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Sample records for dna repair-deficient strains

  1. COMPARISON OF UV INACTIVATION OF SPORES OF THREE ENCEPHALITOZOON SPECIES WITH THAT OF SPORES OF TWO DNA REPAIR-DEFICIENT BACILLUS SUBTILIS BIODOSIMETRY STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of three Encephalitozoon spp. to ultraviolet (UV) inactivation was determined. Encephalitozoon intestinalis is a contaminant listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Also, use of DNA repair deficient strains of Bacillus subtilis were evaluat...

  2. DNA Repair Deficiency and Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Preface Responding to genotoxic stress is a prerequisite for development of the nervous system. Mutations in a variety of DNA repair factors can lead to human diseases that are characterized by pronounced neuropathology. In many of these syndromes the neurological component is amongst the most deleterious aspects of the disease. The nervous system poses a particular challenge in terms of clinical intervention, as the neuropathology often arises during nervous system development, and can be fully penetrant by childhood. Understanding how DNA repair deficiency impacts the nervous system will provide a rationale basis for therapies targeted at ameliorating the neurological problems in these syndromes. PMID:19145234

  3. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  4. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  5. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  6. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  7. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  8. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. ); Libertin, C.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  9. BRCA Mutations, DNA Repair Deficiency, and Ovarian Aging1

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kutluk; Turan, Volkan; Titus, Shiny; Stobezki, Robert; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte aging has a significant impact on reproductive outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the age-related decline in reproductive success have not been fully addressed. BRCA is known to be involved in homologous DNA recombination and plays an essential role in double-strand DNA break repair. Given the growing body of laboratory and clinical evidence, we performed a systematic review on the current understanding of the role of DNA repair in human reproduction. We find that BRCA mutations negatively affect ovarian reserve based on convincing evidence from in vitro and in vivo results and prospective studies. Because decline in the function of the intact gene occurs at an earlier age, women with BRCA1 mutations exhibit accelerated ovarian aging, unlike those with BRCA2 mutations. However, because of the still robust function of the intact allele in younger women and because of the masking of most severe cases by prophylactic oophorectomy or cancer, it is less likely one would see an effect of BRCA mutations on fertility until later in reproductive age. The impact of BRCA2 mutations on reproductive function may be less visible because of the delayed decline in the function of normal BRCA2 allele. BRCA1 function and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA repair may also be important in the pathogenesis of age-induced increase in aneuploidy. BRCA1 is required for meiotic spindle assembly, and cohesion function between sister chromatids is also regulated by ATM family member proteins. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian aging. PMID:26224004

  10. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  11. C. elegans whole-genome sequencing reveals mutational signatures related to carcinogens and DNA repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Cooke, Susanna L.; Weiss, Joerg; Bailly, Aymeric P.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Maddison, Mark; Anderson, Elizabeth; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is associated with developmental and hereditary disorders, aging, and cancer. While we understand some mutational processes operative in human disease, most remain mysterious. We used Caenorhabditis elegans whole-genome sequencing to model mutational signatures, analyzing 183 worm populations across 17 DNA repair-deficient backgrounds propagated for 20 generations or exposed to carcinogens. The baseline mutation rate in C. elegans was approximately one per genome per generation, not overtly altered across several DNA repair deficiencies over 20 generations. Telomere erosion led to complex chromosomal rearrangements initiated by breakage–fusion–bridge cycles and completed by simultaneously acquired, localized clusters of breakpoints. Aflatoxin B1 induced substitutions of guanines in a GpC context, as observed in aflatoxin-induced liver cancers. Mutational burden increased with impaired nucleotide excision repair. Cisplatin and mechlorethamine, DNA crosslinking agents, caused dose- and genotype-dependent signatures among indels, substitutions, and rearrangements. Strikingly, both agents induced clustered rearrangements resembling “chromoanasynthesis,” a replication-based mutational signature seen in constitutional genomic disorders, suggesting that interstrand crosslinks may play a pathogenic role in such events. Cisplatin mutagenicity was most pronounced in xpf-1 mutants, suggesting that this gene critically protects cells against platinum chemotherapy. Thus, experimental model systems combined with genome sequencing can recapture and mechanistically explain mutational signatures associated with human disease. PMID:25030888

  12. Contribution of defective mitophagy to the neurodegeneration in DNA repair-deficient disorders.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fang, Evandro Fei; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-08-01

    DNA repair is a prerequisite for life as we know it, and defects in DNA repair lead to accelerated aging. Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a classic DNA repair-deficient disorder with patients displaying sun sensitivity and cancer susceptibility. XPA patients also exhibit neurodegeneration, leading to cerebellar atrophy, neuropathy, and hearing loss, through a mechanism that has remained elusive. Using in silico, in vitro, and in vivo studies, we discovered defective mitophagy in XPA due to PARP1 hyperactivation and NAD(+) (and thus, SIRT1) depletion. This leads to mitochondrial membrane hyper-polarization, PINK1 cleavage and defective mitophagy. This study underscores the importance of mitophagy in promoting a healthy pool of mitochondria and in preventing neurodegeneration and premature aging.

  13. New areas of focus at workshop on human diseases involving DNA repair deficiency and premature aging.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Kenneth H; Sander, Miriam; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2007-02-01

    Researchers and clinicians interested in human diseases of DNA repair deficiency and premature aging gathered at the National Conference Center in Lansdowne, Virginia on 5-8 September 2006 to attend a workshop co-organized by Vilhelm Bohr (National Institute of Aging) and Kenneth Kraemer (National Cancer Institute). An important feature of this workshop was the participation of representatives from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne Syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD) family support groups. Studies presented at the workshop described important new insights into the phenotypic complexity of XP, CS and TTD, renewed focus on the neurological manifestations of each of these diseases, as well as keen interest in the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes and normal and/or premature aging. This workshop report summarizes some of the presentations and outcomes of the workshop.

  14. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N.; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P.; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the U.S. Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in 7 isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis. PMID:21538559

  15. Reconstruction of DNA repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum skin in vitro: a model to study hypersensitivity to UV light.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, Françoise; Asselineau, Daniel; Frechet, Mathilde; Sarasin, Alain; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, recessive, photosensitive and cancer-prone syndrome, the biochemical hallmark of which is a defect in nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced mutagenic lesions. After isolation and amplification of several strains of XP-C keratinocytes and fibroblasts, a three-dimensional skin model in vitro comprising both epidermis and a dermal equivalent could be obtained. XP dermal tissues and XP epidermis displayed specific morphological and biochemical characteristics compared with tissues obtained with normal cells. One of the major features was the formation of epidermal invaginations into the dermal equivalent. After UV-B exposure, and contrary to repair of DNA lesions in normal cells, the XP model displayed repair deficiency with long-lasting persistence of UV-induced DNA damage and p53 positive nuclei. Recent data obtained after genetic correction leading to functional XPC gene in keratinocytes and fibroblasts revealed that several abnormal features could be normalized. In conclusion, reconstruction of XP skin in vitro provides a very promising system to study genetic hyperphotosensitivity and opens a rational perspective to XP tissue therapy. PMID:15369409

  16. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients. PMID:26255934

  17. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  18. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  19. Resistance of CD-1 and ogg1 DNA repair-deficient mice to thalidomide and hydrolysis product embryopathies in embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Crystal J J; Gonçalves, Luisa L; Wells, Peter G

    2011-07-01

    Thalidomide (TD) displays remarkable species specificity, causing birth defects (teratogenesis) in humans and rabbits, but not rats or mice; yet, few determinants of species susceptibility have been identified. Also, certain mouse strains are susceptible to the embryopathic effects of some teratogens in embryo culture despite their resistance in vivo. Herein we show that CD-1 mouse embryos in culture are resistant to limb embryopathies caused by TD and two of its hydrolysis products, 2-phthalimidoglutaramic acid and 2-phthalimidoglutaric acid, although all three compounds cause these embryopathies in rabbit embryo culture. These results show that the resistance of CD-1 mice to TD teratogenesis is inherent to the embryo and is not dependent upon maternal factors, including differential in vivo exposure to the many hydrolysis products of TD. In utero TD exposure of rabbit but not mouse embryos elevates levels of the teratogenic oxidative DNA lesion 8-oxoguanine, which is repaired by oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1). However, DNA repair-deficient ogg1 knockout mice proved resistant to TD-initiated embryopathies in culture and teratogenesis in vivo, indicating that the resistance of mice is not due to a higher level of DNA repair.

  20. Why Cockayne syndrome patients do not get cancer despite their DNA repair deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reid-Bayliss, Kate S; Arron, Sarah T; Loeb, Lawrence A; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Cleaver, James E

    2016-09-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are human photosensitive diseases with mutations in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which repairs DNA damage from UV exposure. CS is mutated in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) branch of the NER pathway and exhibits developmental and neurological pathologies. The XP-C group of XP patients have mutations in the global genome repair (GGR) branch of the NER pathway and have a very high incidence of UV-induced skin cancer. Cultured cells from both diseases have similar sensitivity to UV-induced cytotoxicity, but CS patients have never been reported to develop cancer, although they often exhibit photosensitivity. Because cancers are associated with increased mutations, especially when initiated by DNA damage, we examined UV-induced mutagenesis in both XP-C and CS cells, using duplex sequencing for high-sensitivity mutation detection. Duplex sequencing detects rare mutagenic events, independent of selection and in multiple loci, enabling examination of all mutations rather than just those that confer major changes to a specific protein. We found telomerase-positive normal and CS-B cells had increased background mutation frequencies that decreased upon irradiation, purging the population of subclonal variants. Primary XP-C cells had increased UV-induced mutation frequencies compared with normal cells, consistent with their GGR deficiency. CS cells, in contrast, had normal levels of mutagenesis despite their TCR deficiency. The lack of elevated UV-induced mutagenesis in CS cells reveals that their TCR deficiency, although increasing cytotoxicity, is not mutagenic. Therefore the absence of cancer in CS patients results from the absence of UV-induced mutagenesis rather than from enhanced lethality. PMID:27543334

  1. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined “Lynch-like syndrome” if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or “familial colorectal cancer type X” if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies. PMID:25716099

  2. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shia, Jinru

    2015-09-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined "Lynch-like syndrome" if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or "familial colorectal cancer type X" if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies.

  3. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  4. Immunohistochemistry for hMLH1 and hMSH2: a practical test for DNA mismatch repair-deficient tumors.

    PubMed

    Marcus, V A; Madlensky, L; Gryfe, R; Kim, H; So, K; Millar, A; Temple, L K; Hsieh, E; Hiruki, T; Narod, S; Bapat, B V; Gallinger, S; Redston, M

    1999-10-01

    Inactivation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair genes, most commonly human mutL homologue 1 (hMLH1) or human mutS homologue 2 (hMSH2), is a recently described alternate pathway in cancer development and progression. The resulting genetic instability is characterized by widespread somatic mutations in tumor DNA, and is termed high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Although described in a variety of tumors, mismatch repair deficiency has been studied predominantly in colorectal carcinoma. Most MSI-H colorectal carcinomas are sporadic, but some occur in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), and are associated with germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. Until now, the identification of MSI-H cancers has required molecular testing. To evaluate the role of immunohistochemistry as a new screening tool for mismatch repair-deficient neoplasms, the authors studied the expression of hMLH1 and hMSH2, using commercially available monoclonal antibodies, in 72 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors that had been tested previously for microsatellite instability. They compared immunohistochemical patterns of 38 MSI-H neoplasms, including 16 cases from HNPCC patients with known germline mutations in hMLH1 or hMSH2, with 34 neoplasms that did not show microsatellite instability. Thirty-seven of 38 MSI-H neoplasms were predicted to have a mismatch repair gene defect, as demonstrated by the absence of hMLH1 and/or hMSH2 expression. This included correspondence with all 16 cases with germline mutations. All 34 microsatellite-stable cancers had intact staining with both antibodies. These findings clearly demonstrate that immunohistochemistry can discriminate accurately between MSI-H and microsatellite-stable tumors, providing a practical new technique with important clinical and research applications. PMID:10524526

  5. YU238259 Is a Novel Inhibitor of Homology-dependent DNA Repair that Exhibits Synthetic Lethality and Radiosensitization in Repair-deficient Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stachelek, Gregory C.; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Liu, Yanfeng; Fernandez, Rafael J.; Pike, Luke R. G.; Qian, Jack M.; Abriola, Laura; Hoyer, Denton; Hungerford, William; Merkel, Janie; Glazer, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy and DNA-damaging chemotherapy are frequently utilized in the treatment of solid tumors. Innate or acquired resistance to these therapies remains a major clinical challenge in oncology. The development of small molecules that sensitize cancers to established therapies represents an attractive approach to extending survival and quality of life in patients. Here, we demonstrate that YU238259, a member of a novel class of DNA double-strand break repair inhibitors, exhibits potent synthetic lethality in the setting of DNA damage response and DNA repair defects. YU238259 specifically inhibits homology-dependent DNA repair (HDR), but not non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), in cell-based GFP reporter assays. Treatment with YU238259 is not only synergistic with ionizing radiation (IR), etoposide, and PARP inhibition, but this synergism is heightened by BRCA2-deficiency. Further, growth of BRCA2-deficient human tumor xenografts in nude mice is significantly delayed by YU238259 treatment even in the absence of concomitant DNA-damaging therapy. The cytotoxicity of these small molecules in repair-deficient cells results from an accumulation of unresolved DNA double-strand breaks. These findings suggest that YU238259 or related small molecules may have clinical benefit to patients with advanced BRCA2-negative tumors, either as a monotherapy or as an adjuvant to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapies. PMID:26116172

  6. Repair-deficient 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase homozygous mutant mouse cells have increased sensitivity to alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cell killing.

    PubMed Central

    Engelward, B P; Dreslin, A; Christensen, J; Huszar, D; Kurahara, C; Samson, L

    1996-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the repair of 3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA lesions prevents alkylation-induced cell death because unrepaired 3MeA blocks DNA replication. Whether this lesion is cytotoxic to mammalian cells has been difficult to establish in the absence of 3MeA repair-deficient cell lines. We previously isolated and characterized a mouse 3MeA DNA glycosylase cDNA (Aag) that provides resistance to killing by alkylating agents in E. coli. To determine the in vivo role of Aag, we cloned a large fragment of the Aag gene and used it to create Aag-deficient mouse cells by targeted homologous recombination. Aag null cells have no detectable Aag transcripts or 3MeA DNA glycosylase activity. The loss of Aag renders cells significantly more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate-induced chromosome damage, and to cell killing induced by two methylating agents, one of which produces almost exclusively 3MeAs. Aag null embryonic stem cells become sensitive to two cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents, namely 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and mitomycin C, indicating that Aag status is an important determinant of cellular resistance to these agents. We conclude that this mammalian 3MeA DNA glycosylase plays a pivotal role in preventing alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cytotoxicity. Images PMID:8631315

  7. UV-induced histone H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage related proteins accumulate and persist in nucleotide excision repair-deficient XP-B cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyu-Seon; Bustin, Michael; Mazur, Sharlyn J; Appella, Ettore; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) may be caused by ionizing radiation. In contrast, UV exposure forms dipyrimidine photoproducts and is not considered an inducer of DSB. We found that uniform or localized UV treatment induced phosphorylation of the DNA damage related (DDR) proteins H2AX, ATM and NBS1 and co-localization of γ-H2AX with the DDR proteins p-ATM, p-NBS1, Rad51 and FANCD2 that persisted for about 6h in normal human fibroblasts. This post-UV phosphorylation was observed in the absence of nucleotide excision repair (NER), since NER deficient XP-B cells (lacking functional XPB DNA repair helicase) and global genome repair-deficient rodent cells also showed phosphorylation and localization of these DDR proteins. Resolution of the DDR proteins was dependent on NER, since they persisted for 24h in the XP-B cells. In the normal and XP-B cells p53 and p21 was detected at 6h and 24h but Mdm2 was not induced in the XP-B cells. Post-UV induction of Wip1 phosphatase was detected in the normal cells but not in the XP-B cells. DNA DSB were detected with a neutral comet assay at 6h and 24h post-UV in the normal and XP-B cells. These results indicate that UV damage can activate the DDR pathway in the absence of NER. However, a later step in DNA damage processing involving induction of Wip1 and resolution of DDR proteins was not observed in the absence of NER.

  8. RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Peter

    2009-05-15

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

  9. Chimeric negative regulation of p14ARF and TBX1 by a t(9;22) translocation associated with melanoma, deafness, and DNA repair deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaohui; Anzick, Sarah L; Khan, Sikandar G; Ueda, Takahiro; Stone, Gary; Digiovanna, John J; Tamura, Deborah; Wattendorf, Daniel; Busch, David; Brewer, Carmen C; Zalewski, Christopher; Butman, John A; Griffith, Andrew J; Meltzer, Paul S; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the most frequent interstitial deletion syndrome. We characterized a novel balanced t(9;22)(p21;q11.2) translocation in a patient with melanoma, DNA repair deficiency, and features of DGS including deafness and malformed inner ears. Using chromosome sorting, we located the 9p21 breakpoint in CDKN2A intron 1. This resulted in underexpression of the tumor suppressor p14 alternate reading frame (p14ARF); the reduced DNA repair was corrected by transfection with p14ARF. Ultraviolet radiation-type p14ARF mutations in his melanoma implicated p14ARF in its pathogenesis. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located in a palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR22). We identified a new gene, FAM230A, that contains PATRR22 within an intron. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located 800 kb centromeric to TBX1, which is required for inner ear development. TBX1 expression was greatly reduced. The translocation resulted in a chimeric transcript encoding portions of p14ARF and FAM230A. Inhibition of chimeric p14ARF-FAM230A expression increased p14ARF and TBX1 expression and improved DNA repair. Expression of the chimera in normal cells produced dominant negative inhibition of p14ARF. Similar chimeric mRNAs may mediate haploinsufficiency in DGS or dominant negative inhibition of other genes such as those involved in melanoma.

  10. Differential behaviors toward ultraviolet A and B radiation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes from normal and DNA-repair-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Otto, A I; Riou, L; Marionnet, C; Mori, T; Sarasin, A; Magnaldo, T

    1999-03-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD) are rare genodermatoses transmitted as recessive and autosomal traits that result in reduced capacity to repair UV-induced DNA lesions. Although XP, but not TTD, patients are prone to basal and squamous cell carcinomas, to date no comparative studies of the XP and TTD phenotypes have included epidermal keratinocytes. We compared the DNA repair capacity (by unscheduled DNA synthesis) and cell survival (by clonal analysis) of epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts grown from normal individuals and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy following UVA and UVB irradiation. The same dose of UVB (1000 J/m2) induced twice as many DNA lesions in normal fibroblasts as in normal keratinocytes. UV survival rates were always higher in keratinocytes than in fibroblasts. Normal and TTD keratinocytes survived better following UVA and UVB irradiation than XP-C and XP-D keratinocytes. XP-C keratinocytes exhibited exacerbated sensitivity toward UVA radiation. Unscheduled DNA synthesis at UV doses leading to 50% cell survival indicated that the ratio of DNA repair capacity to cell survival is higher in keratinocytes than in fibroblasts. In addition, UVA and UVB irradiation induced a transition from proliferative to abortive keratinocyte colonies. This transition varied between donors and was in part correlated with their cancer susceptibility. Altogether these data provide the first evidence of the differential behaviors of normal, XP, and TTD keratinocytes toward UV radiation. PMID:10096550

  11. Relative frequencies of homologous recombination between plasmids introduced into DNA repair-deficient and other mammalian somatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Moore, P D

    1990-07-01

    Twelve mammalian somatic cell lines, some of them DNA damage-sensitive mutants paired with their respective wild-type parental lines, were assayed for their ability to catalyze extrachromosomal, intermolecular homologous recombination between pSV2neo plasmid recombination substrates. All of the somatic cell lines analyzed are capable of catalyzing homologous recombination; however, there is a wide range of efficiencies with which they do so. Five human cell lines display a fourfold range of recombination frequencies, and six hamster cell lines vary almost 20-fold. Linearizing one of the recombination substrates stimulates recombination in all but one of the cell lines. Two of the three paired mutant cell lines display a threefold reduction in their ability to catalyze homologous recombination when compared to their respective parental cell lines, indicating that the mutations that render them sensitive to DNA damaging agents might also play a role in homologous recombination. PMID:2218721

  12. DNA Repair Deficiency as a Susceptibility Marker for Spontaneous Lymphoma in Golden Retriever Dogs: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Thamm, Douglas H.; Grunerud, Kristen K.; Rose, Barbara J.; Vail, David M.; Bailey, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that an individual’s inability to accurately repair DNA damage in a timely fashion may in part dictate a predisposition to cancer. Dogs spontaneously develop lymphoproliferative diseases such as lymphoma, with the golden retriever (GR) breed being at especially high risk. Mechanisms underlying such breed susceptibility are largely unknown; however, studies of heritable cancer predisposition in dogs may be much more straightforward than similar studies in humans, owing to a high degree of inbreeding and more limited genetic heterogeneity. Here, we conducted a pilot study with 21 GR with lymphoma, 20 age-matched healthy GR and 20 age-matched healthy mixed-breed dogs (MBD) to evaluate DNA repair capability following exposure to either ionizing radiation (IR) or the chemical mutagen bleomycin. Inter-individual variation in DNA repair capacity was evaluated in stimulated canine lymphoctyes exposed in vitro utilizing the G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay to quantify clastogen-induced chromatid-type aberrations (gaps and breaks). Golden retrievers with lymphoma demonstrated elevated sensitivity to induction of chromosome damage following either challenge compared to either healthy GR or MBD at multiple doses and time points. Using the 75th percentile of chromatid breaks per 1,000 chromosomes in the MBD population at 4 hours post 1.0 Gy IR exposure as a benchmark to compare cases and controls, GR with lymphoma were more likely than healthy GR to be classified as “sensitive” (odds ratio = 21.2, 95% confidence interval 2.3-195.8). Furthermore, our preliminary findings imply individual (rather than breed) susceptibility, and suggest that deficiencies in heritable factors related to DNA repair capabilities may be involved in the development of canine lymphoma. These studies set the stage for larger confirmatory studies, as well as candidate-based approaches to probe specific genetic susceptibility factors. PMID:23935952

  13. Mutation Rate, Spectrum, Topology, and Context-Dependency in the DNA Mismatch Repair-Deficient Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC948

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F.; Ackerman, Matthew S.; Doak, Thomas G.; Lynch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    High levels of genetic diversity exist among natural isolates of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens, and are especially elevated around the replication terminus of the genome, where strain-specific genes are found. In an effort to understand the role of genetic variation in the evolution of Pseudomonas, we analyzed 31,106 base substitutions from 45 mutation accumulation lines of P. fluorescens ATCC948, naturally deficient for mismatch repair, yielding a base-substitution mutation rate of 2.34 × 10−8 per site per generation (SE: 0.01 × 10−8) and a small-insertion-deletion mutation rate of 1.65 × 10−9 per site per generation (SE: 0.03 × 10−9). We find that the spectrum of mutations in prophage regions, which often contain virulence factors and antibiotic resistance, is highly similar to that in the intergenic regions of the host genome. Our results show that the mutation rate varies around the chromosome, with the lowest mutation rate found near the origin of replication. Consistent with observations from other studies, we find that site-specific mutation rates are heavily influenced by the immediately flanking nucleotides, indicating that mutations are context dependent. PMID:25539726

  14. Subnormal albumin gene expression is associated with weight loss in immunodeficient/DNA-repair-deficient wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Woloschak, G.E. |; Mobarhan, S.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wst express a disease syndrome of immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction, and increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. The mice were originally characterized as ``wasted`` because of their dramatic weight loss that begins at 21 days of age and progresses until death at 28-32 days of age. Because of the reported association between abnormal liver status and weight loss, we examined expression of a variety of liver-specific genes in wst/wst 10 mice relative to littermate (wst/{center_dot}) and parental strain (BCF{sub 1}) controls. Interestingly, the results revealed a greater than 67% reduction in albumin mRNA expression in livers derived from wst/wst mice relative to both controls. Expression of alpha-fetoprotein as well as a variety of other liver-specific genes (secretory component, metallothionein, cytochrome P{sub 1}450, transferrin receptor, tumor necrosis factor, and Ia antigen) was unaffected. These results suggest a relationship between low albumin expression and wasting syndromes in mice. In addition, we believe that our data suggest the wasted mouse as a unique model for subnormal albumin expression in humans.

  15. Mechanisms of ultraviolet-induced mutation. Mutational spectra in the Escherichia coli lacI gene for a wild-type and an excision-repair-deficient strain.

    PubMed

    Schaaper, R M; Dunn, R L; Glickman, B W

    1987-11-20

    We have analyzed the DNA sequence changes in a total of 409 ultraviolet light-induced mutations in the lacI gene of Escherichia coli: 227 in a Uvr+ and 182 in a UvrB- strain. Both differences and similarities were observed. In both strains the mutations were predominantly (60 to 75%) base substitutions, followed by smaller contributions of single-base frameshifts, deletions and frameshift hotspot mutations. The base substitutions proved largely similar in the two strains but differences were observed among the single-base frameshifts, the deletions and the hotspot mutations. Among the base substitutions, both transitions (72.5%) and transversions (27.5%) were observed. The largest single group was G.C----A.T (60% of all base substitutions). The sites where G.C----A.T changes occurred were strongly correlated (97.5%) with sequences of adjacent pyrimidines, indicating mutation targeted ultraviolet photoproducts. Comparable amounts of mutation occurred at cytosine/cytosine and (mixed) cytosine/thymine sites. From an analysis of the prevalence of mutation at either the 5' or 3' side of a dipyrimidine, we conclude that both cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) lesions may contribute to mutation. Despite the general similarity of the base-substitution spectra between the wild-type and excision-defective strains, a number of sites were uniquely mutable in the UvrB- strain. Analysis of their surrounding DNA sequences suggested that, in addition to damage directly at the site of mutation, the potential for nearby opposite-strand damage may be important in determining the mutability of a site. The ultraviolet light-induced frameshift mutations were largely single-base losses. Inspection of the DNA sequences at which the frameshifts occurred suggested that they resulted from targeted mutagenesis, probably at cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. The prevalence of frameshift mutations at homodimers (TT or CC) suggests that their formation involves local misalignment (slippage) and that base

  16. Mechanism of action studies of lomaiviticin A and the monomeric lomaiviticin aglycon. Selective and potent activity toward DNA double-strand break repair-deficient cell lines.

    PubMed

    Colis, Laureen C; Hegan, Denise C; Kaneko, Miho; Glazer, Peter M; Herzon, Seth B

    2015-05-01

    (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) and the monomeric lomaiviticin aglycon [aka: (-)-MK7-206, (3)] are cytotoxic agents that induce double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA. Here we elucidate the cellular responses to these agents and identify synthetic lethal interactions with specific DNA repair factors. Toward this end, we first characterized the kinetics of DNA damage by 1 and 3 in human chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) cells. DSBs are rapidly induced by 3, reaching a maximum at 15 min post addition and are resolved within 4 h. By comparison, DSB production by 1 requires 2-4 h to achieve maximal values and >8 h to achieve resolution. As evidenced by an alkaline comet unwinding assay, 3 induces extensive DNA damage, suggesting that the observed DSBs arise from closely spaced single-strand breaks (SSBs). Both 1 and 3 induce ataxia telangiectasia mutated- (ATM-) and DNA-dependent protein kinase- (DNA-PK-) dependent production of phospho-SER139-histone H2AX (γH2AX) and generation of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) foci in K562 cells within 1 h of exposure, which is indicative of activation of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) repair. Both compounds also lead to ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related- (ATR-) dependent production of γH2AX at later time points (6 h post addition), which is indicative of replication stress. 3 is also shown to induce apoptosis. In accord with these data, 1 and 3 were found to be synthetic lethal with certain mutations in DNA DSB repair. 1 potently inhibits the growth of breast cancer type 2, early onset- (BRCA2-) deficient V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line derivative (VC8), and phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten- (PTEN-) deficient human glioblastoma (U251) cell lines, with LC50 values of 1.5 ± 0.5 and 2.0 ± 0.6 pM, respectively, and selectivities of >11.6 versus the isogenic cell lines transfected with and expressing functional BRCA2 and PTEN genes. 3 inhibits the growth of the same

  17. E7449: A dual inhibitor of PARP1/2 and tankyrase1/2 inhibits growth of DNA repair deficient tumors and antagonizes Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiayi; Chang, Paul; Kolber-Simonds, Donna; Ackermann, Karen; Twine, Natalie C.; Shie, Jue-Lon; Miu, Jingzang Tao; Huang, Kuan-Chun; Moniz, George A.; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase1 (PARP1) impairs DNA damage repair, and early generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (olaparib, niraparib, etc.) have demonstrated clinical proof of concept for cancer treatment. Here, we describe the development of the novel PARP inhibitor E7449, a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor that also inhibits PARP5a/5b, otherwise known as tankyrase1 and 2 (TNKS1 and 2), important regulators of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. E7449 inhibits PARP enzymatic activity and additionally traps PARP1 onto damaged DNA; a mechanism previously shown to augment cytotoxicity. Cells deficient in DNA repair pathways beyond homologous recombination were sensitive to E7449 treatment. Chemotherapy was potentiated by E7449 and single agent had significant antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient xenografts. Additionally, E7449 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon cancer cell lines, likely through TNKS inhibition. Consistent with this possibility, E7449 stabilized axin and TNKS proteins resulting in β-catenin de-stabilization and significantly altered expression of Wnt target genes. Notably, hair growth mediated by Wnt signaling was inhibited by E7449. A pharmacodynamic effect of E7449 on Wnt target genes was observed in tumors, although E7449 lacked single agent antitumor activity in vivo, a finding typical for selective TNKS inhibitors. E7449 antitumor activity was increased through combination with MEK inhibition. Particularly noteworthy was the lack of toxicity, most significantly the lack of intestinal toxicity reported for other TNKS inhibitors. E7449 represents a novel dual PARP1/2 and TNKS1/2 inhibitor which has the advantage of targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling addicted tumors. E7449 is currently in early clinical development. PMID:26513298

  18. Relationship between UV-induced mutant p53 patches and skin tumours, analysed by mutation spectra and by induction kinetics in various DNA-repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rebel, Heggert; Kram, Nicolien; Westerman, Anja; Banus, Sander; van Kranen, Henk J; de Gruijl, Frank R

    2005-12-01

    Clusters of p53 immunopositive epidermal keratinocytes (so-called p53 patches, clones or foci) are found in sun or ultraviolet (UV) light-exposed skin. We investigated to what extent these p53 patches are genuine precursors of skin carcinomas in chronically irradiated hairless (SKH1) mice. The mutation spectra of exons 5-8 of the p53 gene of laser-micro-dissected mutant p53 patches and carcinomas were therefore compared. The mutations we found were mainly UV-signature mutations (C-->T and CC-->TT at dipyrimidine sites) located at known hotspots. No significant differences were found between both spectra, indicating that all p53 patches harbour mutations with which they could progress to carcinomas. To examine whether these p53 patches can be used as tumour risk indicators, we made an extensive comparison of the induction kinetics of these patches and carcinomas in genetically modified mice with various defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER), i.e. xeroderma pigmentosum A (Xpa), Xpc and Cockayne syndrome B (Csb) and wild-type mice. In this aforementioned order, the mouse strains developed both p53 patches and carcinomas in the course of daily exposure to 40 J/m(2) UV. Hence, the order in which the NER-deficient mice developed patches was predictive of the order in which they developed tumours. The induction kinetics of the patches in Xpc-deficient mice differed notably from the others: there was a stationary phase (days 13-41) where the numbers were limited to 5-10 patches per mouse before an explosive increase which ran parallel to the other groups. The chance that a p53 patch progresses to carcinoma is relatively small (estimated at 1 out of 8300-40,000/individual when the first tumour appears), but our results are strongly indicative of a causal relationship between p53 patches and carcinomas. PMID:16051635

  19. Relationship between UV-induced mutant p53 patches and skin tumours, analysed by mutation spectra and by induction kinetics in various DNA-repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rebel, Heggert; Kram, Nicolien; Westerman, Anja; Banus, Sander; van Kranen, Henk J; de Gruijl, Frank R

    2005-12-01

    Clusters of p53 immunopositive epidermal keratinocytes (so-called p53 patches, clones or foci) are found in sun or ultraviolet (UV) light-exposed skin. We investigated to what extent these p53 patches are genuine precursors of skin carcinomas in chronically irradiated hairless (SKH1) mice. The mutation spectra of exons 5-8 of the p53 gene of laser-micro-dissected mutant p53 patches and carcinomas were therefore compared. The mutations we found were mainly UV-signature mutations (C-->T and CC-->TT at dipyrimidine sites) located at known hotspots. No significant differences were found between both spectra, indicating that all p53 patches harbour mutations with which they could progress to carcinomas. To examine whether these p53 patches can be used as tumour risk indicators, we made an extensive comparison of the induction kinetics of these patches and carcinomas in genetically modified mice with various defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER), i.e. xeroderma pigmentosum A (Xpa), Xpc and Cockayne syndrome B (Csb) and wild-type mice. In this aforementioned order, the mouse strains developed both p53 patches and carcinomas in the course of daily exposure to 40 J/m(2) UV. Hence, the order in which the NER-deficient mice developed patches was predictive of the order in which they developed tumours. The induction kinetics of the patches in Xpc-deficient mice differed notably from the others: there was a stationary phase (days 13-41) where the numbers were limited to 5-10 patches per mouse before an explosive increase which ran parallel to the other groups. The chance that a p53 patch progresses to carcinoma is relatively small (estimated at 1 out of 8300-40,000/individual when the first tumour appears), but our results are strongly indicative of a causal relationship between p53 patches and carcinomas.

  20. Production of truncated MBD4 protein by frameshift mutation in DNA mismatch repair-deficient cells enhances 5-fluorouracil sensitivity that is independent of hMLH1 status.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie; Hamaya, Yasushi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Sugimoto, Ken; Carethers, John M

    2016-07-01

    Methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) is a DNA glycosylase that can remove 5-fluorodeoxyuracil from DNA as well as repair T:G or U:G mismatches. MBD4 is a target for frameshift mutation with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, creating a truncated MBD4 protein (TruMBD4) that lacks its glycosylase domain. Here we show that TruMBD4 plays an important role for enhancing 5-fluorouracil (5FU) sensitivity in MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cells. We found biochemically that TruMBD4 binds to 5FU incorporated into DNA with higher affinity than MBD4. TruMBD4 reduced the 5FU affinity of the MMR recognition complexes that determined 5FU sensitivity by previous reports, suggesting other mechanisms might be operative to trigger cytotoxicity. To analyze overall 5FU sensitivity with TruMBD4, we established TruMBD4 overexpression in hMLH1-proficient or -deficient colorectal cancer cells followed by treatment with 5FU. 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells demonstrated diminished growth characteristics compared to controls, independently of hMLH1 status. Flow cytometry revealed more 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells in S phase than controls. We conclude that patients with MMR-deficient cancers, which show characteristic resistance to 5FU therapy, may be increased for 5FU sensitivity via secondary frameshift mutation of the base excision repair gene MBD4.

  1. Integration of Principles of Systems Biology and Radiation Biology: Toward Development of in silico Models to Optimize IUdR-Mediated Radiosensitization of DNA Mismatch Repair Deficient (Damage Tolerant) Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Timothy J.; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Du, Weinan; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) and ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR). These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP), brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR-induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR deficient (MMR−) “damage tolerant” human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular) and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice) models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR− damage tolerant cancers. PMID:22649757

  2. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors. PMID:25711864

  3. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  4. Management of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia in a Child With Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Elhasid, Ronit; Dvir, Rina; Rosenfeld Keidar, Hila; Ben Shachar, Shay; Bitan, Menachem; Solar, Irit; Durno, Carol; Aronson, Melyssa; Malkin, David; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri

    2015-11-01

    Germline biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) results in a unique cancer predisposition syndrome in which the affected children are susceptible to the development of malignancies, especially brain, gastrointestinal, and lymphoid cancers. Acute myeloblastic leukemia is rarely reported in this syndrome. Here we report the decision-making challenges in a bMMRD child with acute myeloblastic leukemia. Our experience should alert physicians to include bMMRD in the differential diagnosis of a child with hyper/hypopigmented spots and leukemia. Furthermore, the presence of the above and consanguinity emphasizes the need to rule out bMMRD when an allogeneic bone marrow transplant is considered and to enable the surveillance of other family members for earlier detection of cancers in these children.

  5. Management of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia in a Child With Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Elhasid, Ronit; Dvir, Rina; Rosenfeld Keidar, Hila; Ben Shachar, Shay; Bitan, Menachem; Solar, Irit; Durno, Carol; Aronson, Melyssa; Malkin, David; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri

    2015-11-01

    Germline biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) results in a unique cancer predisposition syndrome in which the affected children are susceptible to the development of malignancies, especially brain, gastrointestinal, and lymphoid cancers. Acute myeloblastic leukemia is rarely reported in this syndrome. Here we report the decision-making challenges in a bMMRD child with acute myeloblastic leukemia. Our experience should alert physicians to include bMMRD in the differential diagnosis of a child with hyper/hypopigmented spots and leukemia. Furthermore, the presence of the above and consanguinity emphasizes the need to rule out bMMRD when an allogeneic bone marrow transplant is considered and to enable the surveillance of other family members for earlier detection of cancers in these children. PMID:26274037

  6. Mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations: insights from studies with DNA repair-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Palitti, F

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations, studies performed on human syndromes with genomic instability can be fruitful. In this report, the results from studies in our laboratory on the importance of the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway on the induction of chromosomal damage and apoptosis by ultraviolet light (UV) are discussed. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome group B) deficient in TCR showed a dramatic increase in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis following UV treatment. At relatively low UV doses, the induction of chromosomal aberrations preceded the apoptotic process. Chromosomal aberrations probably lead to apoptosis and most of the cells had gone through an S phase after the UV treatment before entering apoptosis. At higher doses of UV, the cells could go into apoptosis already in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in the parental cell line AA8 also resulted in the induction of elevated chromosomal damage and apoptotic response similar to the one observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is responsible for the increased frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in UV61 cells. Hypersensitivity to the induction of chromosomal damage by inhibitors of antitopoisomerases I and II in Werner's syndrome cells is also discussed in relation to the compromised G2 phase processes involving the Werner protein. PMID:15162020

  7. Predictive genetic testing in children: constitutional mismatch repair deficiency cancer predisposing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruwer, Zandrè; Algar, Ursula; Vorster, Alvera; Fieggen, Karen; Davidson, Alan; Goldberg, Paul; Wainwright, Helen; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Biallelic germline mutations in mismatch repair genes predispose to constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D). The condition is characterized by a broad spectrum of early-onset tumors, including hematological, brain and bowel and is frequently associated with features of Neurofibromatosis type 1. Few definitive screening recommendations have been suggested and no published reports have described predictive testing. We report on the first case of predictive testing for CMMR-D following the identification of two non-consanguineous parents, with the same heterozygous mutation in MLH1: c.1528C > T. The genetic counseling offered to the family, for their two at-risk daughters, is discussed with a focus on the ethical considerations of testing children for known cancer-causing variants. The challenges that are encountered when reporting on heterozygosity in a child younger than 18 years (disclosure of carrier status and risk for Lynch syndrome), when discovered during testing for homozygosity, are addressed. In addition, the identification of CMMR-D in a three year old, and the recommended clinical surveillance that was proposed for this individual is discussed. Despite predictive testing and presymptomatic screening, the sudden death of the child with CMMR-D syndrome occurred 6 months after her last surveillance MRI. This report further highlights the difficulty of developing guidelines, as a result of the rarity of cases and diversity of presentation.

  8. Mutation rates, spectra, and genome-wide distribution of spontaneous mutations in mismatch repair deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gregory I; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E

    2013-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  9. Bacterial mutagenicity studies of DNA-intercalating aniline mustards: an insight into the mode of action of a novel class of anti-tumour drugs.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Gourdie, T A; Valu, K K; Denny, W A

    1989-10-01

    Bifunctional alkylating agents are reactive compounds which work by crosslinking DNA, but which have no special affinity for it. A series of acridine-linked aniline mustards of widely-varying alkylator reactivity (5-11), designed as DNA-directed alkylating agents, have been evaluated in various strains of Salmonella typhimurium with differing DNA repair capabilities to obtain information about their mechanism of action. The compounds showed greatly increased potency (determined as D37 values) compared with the corresponding untargeted mustards, in the repair-proficient strain TA1978+. All but the most unreactive mustards were considerably more potent (greater than 10-fold) in the corresponding repair-deficient strain TA98, indicating that DNA-crosslinking is the major cytotoxic mechanism. However, the mutagenic profile of the compounds in four Salmonella strains, particularly in the excision repair-deficient strains TA98 and TA100, suggest the compounds also form substantial levels of mutagenic monoadducts. The possibility that intercalative binding by the acridine chromophore provides an additional geometrical restraint on cross-linking by the mustard is an important facet of design which needs further study.

  10. High frequency of mismatch repair deficiency among pediatric high grade gliomas in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Amayiri, Nisreen; Tabori, Uri; Campbell, Brittany; Bakry, Doua; Aronson, Melyssa; Durno, Carol; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Malkin, David; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Musharbash, Awni; Swaidan, Maisa; Bouffet, Eric; Hawkins, Cynthia; Al-Hussaini, Maysa

    2016-01-15

    Biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) is a cancer predisposition syndrome affecting primarily individuals from consanguinous families resulting in multiple childhood cancers including high grade gliomas (HGG). This is the first study to assess the prevalence of bMMRD among patients with HGG in countries where consanguinity is high. We collected molecular and clinical information on all children diagnosed with HGG and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) between 2003 and 2013 at King Hussein Cancer Center, Jordan. Comparison was made to a similar cohort from Toronto. Clinical data regarding presence of café au lait macules(CAL), family history of cancer, consanguinity, pathology and treatment were collected. Tumors were centrally reviewed and tested for MMRD by immunohistochemistry of the corresponding proteins. Forty-two patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including 36 with HGG. MMRD was observed in 39% of HGG of whom 79% also lost MMR staining in the corresponding normal cells suggestive of bMMRD. P53 dysfunction was highly enriched in MMR deficient tumors (p = 0.0003).The frequency of MMRD was significantly lower in Toronto cohort (23%, p = 0.03). Both evidence of CAL and consanguinity correlated with bMMRD (p = 0.005 and 0.05,respectively) but family history of cancer didn't. HGG with all three bMMRD risk factors had evidence of MMRD and all children affected by multiple bMMRD related cancers had identical gene loss by immunohistochemical staining. In Jordan, the frequency of clinical and immunohistochemical alterations suggestive of bMMRD in pediatric HGG is high. Genetic testing will enable appropriate counseling and cancer screening to improve survival of these patients.

  11. The Significance of Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Young Patients With Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mandy Man-Yee; Liu, Stephanie Si; Tam, Kar-Fai; Ip, Philip Pun-Ching; Cheung, Annie Nga-Yin; Ngan, Hextan Yuen-Sheung

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the tumor characteristics associated with mismatch repair deficiency in young patients with endometrial carcinoma. Young patients (45 yr old or younger) with endometrial carcinoma treated by hysterectomy in our institution between July 2001 and June 2009 were identified. The clinical and pathologic data were obtained by review of clinical records. Among the 122 cases identified, paraffin sections were available in 67 cases for immunohistochemical staining and frozen tissue available in 62 cases for microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis. Both paraffin sections and frozen tissue were available in 36 cases. Among the 67 cases with immunohistochemical staining, 22 (32.8%) showed loss of expression of at least 1 mismatch repair protein. Defective MLH1 or MSH2 expression was associated with poor prognostic factors, including a higher incidence of pelvic lymph nodes metastasis (P=0.018) and higher stage (P=0.022) for MLH1, and an increased risk of lymphovascular permeation (P=0.015) for MSH2. On the contrary, defective MSH6 protein expression was associated with a lower incidence of high-grade tumors (P=0.04). Among the 62 cases with MSI analysis, 12 (19.4%) tumors were classified as microsatellite-high (MSI-H), whereas 2 (3.2%) were classified as microsatellite-low (MSI-L). There was no difference in the pathologic characteristics between MSI-stable and MSI-H tumor. We concluded that defective mismatch repair expression is important in young patients with endometrial carcinoma, with MSH6 protein being most commonly affected. The phenotype resulting from defective MSH6 expression was different from that caused by MLH1 or MSH2 loss.

  12. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amie L; Joyce, Kellie; Xie, Hong; Falank, Carolyne; Hinz, John M; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation. PMID:24561002

  13. Loss of ARID1A Expression in Gastric Cancer: Correlation with Mismatch Repair Deficiency and Clinicopathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Ju; Jung, Hae Yoen; Oh, Mee-Hye; Cho, Hyundeuk; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jang, Si-Hyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) gene encodes BRG1-associated factor 250a, a component of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable chromatin remodeling complex, which is considered a tumor suppressor in many tumors. We aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of ARID1A expression in gastric cancers and explore its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters such as mismatch repair protein expression. Materials and Methods Four tissue microarrays were constructed from 191 resected specimens obtained at Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital from 2006 to 2008. Nuclear expression of ARID1A was semiquantitatively assessed and binarized into retained and lost expression. Results Loss of ARID1A expression was observed in 62 cases (32.5%). This was associated with more frequent vascular invasion (P=0.019) and location in the upper third of the stomach (P=0.001), and trended toward more poorly differentiated subtypes (P=0.054). ARID1A loss was significantly associated with the mismatch repair-deficient phenotype (P=0.003). ARID1A loss showed a statistically significant correlation with loss of MLH1 (P=0.001) but not MSH2 expression (P=1.000). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no statistically significant difference in overall survival; however, patients with retained ARID1A expression tended to have better overall survival than those with loss of ARID1A expression (P=0.053). In both mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient groups, survival analysis showed no differences related to ARID1A expression status. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that loss of ARID1A expression is closely associated with the mismatch repair-deficient phenotype, especially in sporadic microsatellite instability-high gastric cancers. PMID:26468418

  14. Head and neck cancer cell lines exhibit differential mitochondrial repair deficiency in response to 4NQO.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael M; Glazer, Chad A; Mambo, Elizabeth; Chatterjee, Aditi; Zhao, Ming; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph A

    2006-02-01

    Constituents of tobacco can cause DNA adduct formation and are implicated in head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSC) development. We investigated the capacity of HNSC cell lines to repair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage induced by a DNA adduct-forming agent. HNSC cell lines underwent 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) exposure with subsequent rescue with normal media. Real-time quantitative PCR for nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mtDNA was performed. mtDNA to nDNA ratios were calculated and standardized to mock-treated cells to assess mtDNA repair ability. Two of three tested cancer cell lines exposed to 4NQO exhibited consistent decreases in mtDNA/nDNA ratios throughout the different repair timepoints. At 24 h mtDNA/nDNA ratios of JHU-O19 and JHU-O22 decreased to 63% and 60% of controls, respectively. Conversely, a control keratinocyte cell line exhibited overall increases in mtDNA/nDNA ratios compared to baseline suggesting intact DNA repair mechanisms. By using a DNA adduct formation and repair model featuring 4NQO and HNSC cell lines, we have implicated faulty mtDNA repair as having a potential role in HNSC.

  15. Metachronous T-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma in a Child With Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Thomas B; McGee, Rose B; Kaye, Erica C; McCarville, Mary Beth; Choi, John K; Cavender, Cary P; Nichols, Kim E; Sandlund, John T

    2016-08-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) is a cancer predisposition syndrome associated with a high risk of developing early-onset malignancies of the blood, brain, and intestinal tract. We present the case of a patient with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma at the age of 3 years, followed by Burkitt lymphoma 10 years later. This patient also exhibited numerous nonmalignant findings including café au lait spots, lipomas, bilateral renal nodules, a nonossifying fibroma, multiple colonic adenomas, and a rapidly enlarging pilomatrixoma. The spectrum of malignant and nonmalignant neoplasms in this patient highlights the remarkable diversity, and early onset, of lesions seen in children with CMMRD. PMID:27037742

  16. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  17. Use of Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA as a Means of Developing Genus- and Strain-Specific Streptomyces DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark A.; Crawford, Don L.

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers against 36 Streptomyces strains, including 17 taxonomically undefined strains, 25 nonstreptomycete actinomycetes, and 12 outgroups consisting of gram-positive and -negative species. Most of the primers were useful in identifying unique DNA polymorphisms of all strains tested. We have used RAPD techniques to develop a genus-specific probe, one not necessarily targeting the ribosomal gene, for Streptomyces, and a strain-specific probe for the biological control agent Streptomyces lydicus WYEC108. In the course of these investigations, small-scale DNA isolations were also developed for efficiently isolating actinomycete DNA. Various modifications of isolation procedures for soil DNA were compared, and the reliability and specificity of the RAPD methodology were tested by specifically detecting the S. lydicus WYEC108 in DNA isolated from soil. PMID:10831438

  18. Isolation of a Variant Strain of Pleurotus eryngii and the Development of Specific DNA Markers to Identify the Variant Strain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ryu, Jae-San; Lee, Chang-Yun; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2014-03-01

    A degenerated strain of Pleurotus eryngii KNR2312 was isolated from a commercial farm. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis performed on the genomic DNA of the normal and degenerated strains of this species revealed differences in the DNA banding pattern. A unique DNA fragment (1.7 kbp), which appeared only in the degenerated strain, was isolated and sequenced. Comparing this sequence with the KNR2312 genomic sequence showed that the sequence of the degenerated strain comprised three DNA regions that originated from nine distinct scaffolds of the genomic sequence, suggesting that chromosome-level changes had occurred in the degenerated strain. Using the unique sequence, three sets of PCR primers were designed that targeted the full length, the 5' half, and the 3' half of the DNA. The primer sets P2-1 and P2-2 yielded 1.76 and 0.97 kbp PCR products, respectively, only in the case of the degenerated strain, whereas P2-3 generated a 0.8 kbp product in both the normal and the degenerated strains because its target region was intact in the normal strain as well. In the case of the P2-1 and P2-2 sets, the priming regions of the forward and reverse primers were located at distinct genomic scaffolds in the normal strain. These two primer sets specifically detected the degenerate strain of KNR2312 isolated from various mushrooms including 10 different strains of P. eryngii, four strains of P. ostreatus, and 11 other wild mushrooms. PMID:24808734

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  20. Isolation of Rhizobium loti Strain-Specific DNA Sequences by Subtraction Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Bjourson, A. J.; Cooper, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Mixed-phase (heterogeneous) and single-phase (homogeneous) DNA subtraction-hybridization methods were used to isolate specific DNA probes for closely related Rhizobium loti strains. In the heterogeneous method, DNA from the prospective probe strain was repeatedly hybridized to a mixture of DNA from cross-hybridizing strains (subtracter DNA) which was immobilized on an epoxy-activated cellulose matrix. Probe strain sequences which shared homology with the matrix-bound subtracter DNA hybridized to it, leaving unique probe strain sequences in the mobile phase. In the homogeneous method, probe strain sequences were hybridized in solution to biotinylated, mercurated subtracter DNA. Biotinylated, mercurated subtracer DNA and probe strain sequences hybridized to it were removed by two-step affinity chromatography on streptavidin-agarose and thiol-Sepharose. The specificity of the sequences remaining after subtraction hybridization by both methods was assessed and compared by colony hybridization with R. loti strains. Both methods allowed the rapid isolation of strain-specific DNA fragments which were suitable for use as probes. Images PMID:16347782

  1. The endoperoxide ascaridol shows strong differential cytotoxicity in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Rashda; Efferth, Thomas; Kuhmann, Christine; Opatz, Till; Hao, Xiaojiang; Popanda, Odilia; Schmezer, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Targeting synthetic lethality in DNA repair pathways has become a promising anti-cancer strategy. However little is known about such interactions with regard to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Therefore, cell lines with a defect in the NER genes ERCC6 or XPC and their normal counterparts were screened with 53 chemically defined phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine for differential cytotoxic effects. The screening revealed 12 drugs that killed NER-deficient cells more efficiently than proficient cells. Five drugs were further analyzed for IC{sub 50} values, effects on cell cycle distribution, and induction of DNA damage. Ascaridol was the most effective compound with a difference of > 1000-fold in resistance between normal and NER-deficient cells (IC{sub 50} values for cells with deficiency in ERCC6: 0.15 μM, XPC: 0.18 μM, and normal cells: > 180 μM). NER-deficiency combined with ascaridol treatment led to G2/M-phase arrest, an increased percentage of subG1 cells, and a substantially higher DNA damage induction. These results were confirmed in a second set of NER-deficient and -proficient cell lines with isogenic background. Finally, ascaridol was characterized for its ability to generate oxidative DNA damage. The drug led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species at cytotoxic concentrations, but only NER-deficient cells showed a strongly induced amount of 8-oxodG sites. In summary, ascaridol is a cytotoxic and DNA-damaging compound which generates intracellular reactive oxidative intermediates and which selectively affects NER-deficient cells. This could provide a new therapeutic option to treat cancer cells with mutations in NER genes. -- Highlights: ► Thousand-fold higher Ascaridol activity in NER-deficient versus proficient cells. ► Impaired repair of Ascaridol-induced oxidative DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. ► Selective activity of Ascaridol opens new therapy

  2. Germline variants in POLE are associated with early onset mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Fadwa A; Kets, C Marleen; Ruano, Dina; van den Akker, Brendy; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Schrumpf, Melanie; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Vasen, Hans FA; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Germline variants affecting the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 predispose to multiple colorectal adenomas and/or colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of previously described heterozygous germline variants POLE c.1270C>G, p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 c.1433G>A, p.(Ser478Asn) in a Dutch series of unexplained familial, early onset CRC and polyposis index cases. We examined 1188 familial CRC and polyposis index patients for POLE p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variants using competitive allele-specific PCR. In addition, protein expression of the POLE and DNA mismatch repair genes was studied by immunohistochemistry in tumours from POLE carriers. Somatic mutations were screened using semiconductor sequencing. We detected three index patients (0.25%) with a POLE p.(Leu424Val) variant. In one patient, the variant was found to be de-novo. Tumours from three patients from two families were microsatellite instable, and immunohistochemistry showed MSH6/MSH2 deficiency suggestive of Lynch syndrome. Somatic mutations but no germline MSH6 and MSH2 variants were subsequently found, and one tumour displayed a hypermutator phenotype. None of the 1188 patients carried the POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variant. POLE germline variant carriers are also associated with a microsatellite instable CRC. POLE DNA analysis now seems warranted in microsatellite instable CRC, especially in the absence of a causative DNA mismatch repair gene germline variant. PMID:25370038

  3. Identification of DNA Sequences Specific for Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2 Strains by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Te; Amaro, Carmen; Sanjuán, Eva; Hor, Lien-I

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus can be divided into three biotypes, and only biotype 2, which is further divided into serovars, contains eel-virulent strains. We compared the genomic DNA of a biotype 2 serovar E isolate (tester) with the genomic DNAs of three biotype 1 strains by suppression subtractive hybridization and then tested the distribution of the tester-specific DNA sequences in a wide collection of bacterial strains. In this way we identified three plasmid-borne DNA sequences that were specific for biotype 2 strains irrespective of the serovar and three chromosomal DNA sequences that were specific for serovar E biotype 2 strains. These sequences have potential for use in the diagnosis of eel vibriosis caused by V. vulnificus and in the detection of biotype 2 serovar E strains. PMID:16151155

  4. Involvement of MBD4 inactivation in mismatch repair-deficient tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Rossella; Cortellino, Salvatore; Riccio, Antonio; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie; van der Klift, Heleen; Wijnen, Juul; Turner, David; Ventura, Andrea; Rovella, Valentina; Percesepe, Antonio; Lucci-Cordisco, Emanuela; Radice, Paolo; Bertario, Lucio; Pedroni, Monica; de Leon, Maurizio Ponz; Mancuso, Pietro; Devarajan, Karthik; Cai, Kathy Q.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Neri, Giovanni; Møller, Pål; Viel, Alessandra; Genuardi, Maurizio; Fodde, Riccardo; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The DNA glycosylase gene MBD4 safeguards genomic stability at CpG sites and is frequently mutated at coding poly-A tracks in mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colorectal tumors (CRC). Mbd4 biallelic inactivation in mice provided conflicting results as to its role in tumorigenesis. Thus, it is unclear whether MBD4 alterations are only secondary to MMR defects without functional consequences or can contribute to the mutator phenotype. We investigated MBD4 variants in a large series of hereditary/familial and sporadic CRC cases. Whereas MBD4 frameshifts were only detected in tumors, missense variants were found in both normal and tumor DNA. In CRC with double-MBD4/MMR and single-MBD4 variants, transition mutation frequency was increased, indicating that MBD4 defects may affect the mutational landscape independently of MMR defect. Mbd4-deficient mice showed reduced survival when combined with Mlh1−/− genotype. Taken together, these data suggest that MBD4 inactivation may contribute to tumorigenesis, acting as a modifier of MMR-deficient cancer phenotype. PMID:26503472

  5. Development of a mutant strain of Escherichia coli for molecular cloning of highly methylated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Bishr, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A mutant strain of Escherichia coli designated as GR219 that allows efficient molecular cloning of highly methylated bean DNA has been developed by UV light mutation of the parent LE392 str[sup r] strain. This mutant strain, like the parent, is streptomycin resistant and is biologically contained, because it requires thymidine for growth. Both the wild type and the mutant strain have lambda phage receptors so both can be utilized for construction of genomic libraries using the phase as a vector. The efficiency of transformation of the parent and the mutant strain with a recombinant plasmid containing bean DNA was compared to the efficiency of transformation of the PLK-F[prime] strain, which has a deletion of mcrA and mcrB genes and, therefore, allows transformation with methylated bean DNA. It has been found that the GR219 strain has the highest efficiency of transformation, while the PLK-F[prime] strain shows less, and the parent LE392 str[sup r] strain the least efficiency of transformation. These results indicate that strains of E. coli with mcrA and mcrB genes can recognize and degrade highly methylated DNA. However, other undefined factors affected by the altered gene(s) in the GR219 strain are also involved in the recognition and degradation of any cloned foreign DNA.

  6. Biomarkers for immune therapy in colorectal cancer: mismatch-repair deficiency and others

    PubMed Central

    Bupathi, Manojkumar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease for which the treatment backbone has primarily been cytotoxic chemotherapy. With better understanding of the involved molecular mechanisms, it is now known that there are a number of epigenetic and genetic events, which are involved in CRC pathogenesis. Specific biomarkers have been identified which can be used to determine the clinical outcome of patients beyond tumor staging and predict for treatment efficacy. Molecular testing is now routinely performed to select for patients that will benefit the most from targeted agents and immunotherapy. In addition to KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutation (MT), analysis of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and checkpoint protein expression may be helpful to determine whether patients are eligible for certain therapies. The focus of this article is to discuss present and upcoming biomarkers for immunotherapy in CRC. PMID:27747085

  7. Improvement of ENU Mutagenesis Efficiency Using Serial Injection and Mismatch Repair Deficiency Mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Llamas, Jabier; Timms, Andrew E; Pitstick, Rose; Peters, Janet; Carlson, George A; Beier, David R

    2016-01-01

    ENU mutagenesis is a powerful method for generating novel lines of mice that are informative with respect to both fundamental biological processes and human disease. Rapid developments in genomic technology have made the task of identifying causal mutations by positional cloning remarkably efficient. One limitation of this approach remains the mutation frequency achievable using standard treatment protocols, which currently generate approximately 1-2 sequence changes per megabase when optimized. In this study we used two strategies to attempt to increase the number of mutations induced by ENU treatment. One approach employed mice carrying a mutation in the DNA repair enzyme Msh6. The second strategy involved injection of ENU to successive generations of mice. To evaluate the number of ENU-induced mutations, single mice or pooled samples were analyzed using whole exome sequencing. The results showed that there is considerable variability in the induced mutation frequency using these approaches, but an overall increase in ENU-induced variants from one generation to another was observed. The analysis of the mice deficient for Msh6 also showed an increase in the ENU-induced variants compared to the wild-type ENU-treated mice. However, in both cases the increase in ENU-induced mutation frequency was modest. PMID:27441645

  8. Improvement of ENU Mutagenesis Efficiency Using Serial Injection and Mismatch Repair Deficiency Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pitstick, Rose; Peters, Janet; Carlson, George A.

    2016-01-01

    ENU mutagenesis is a powerful method for generating novel lines of mice that are informative with respect to both fundamental biological processes and human disease. Rapid developments in genomic technology have made the task of identifying causal mutations by positional cloning remarkably efficient. One limitation of this approach remains the mutation frequency achievable using standard treatment protocols, which currently generate approximately 1–2 sequence changes per megabase when optimized. In this study we used two strategies to attempt to increase the number of mutations induced by ENU treatment. One approach employed mice carrying a mutation in the DNA repair enzyme Msh6. The second strategy involved injection of ENU to successive generations of mice. To evaluate the number of ENU-induced mutations, single mice or pooled samples were analyzed using whole exome sequencing. The results showed that there is considerable variability in the induced mutation frequency using these approaches, but an overall increase in ENU-induced variants from one generation to another was observed. The analysis of the mice deficient for Msh6 also showed an increase in the ENU-induced variants compared to the wild-type ENU-treated mice. However, in both cases the increase in ENU-induced mutation frequency was modest. PMID:27441645

  9. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... increase of turbidity of the paired cultures. (3) Number of cultures. When using a plate diffusion.... Bacteria should be exposed to the test substance both in the presence and absence of an appropriate... substance for tests including a metabolic activation system should be selected on the basis of......

  10. Relationship between DNA double-strand break rejoining and cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation in human fibroblast strains with differing ATM/p53 status: Implications for evaluation of clinical radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Severin, Diane; Murray, David . E-mail: davem@cancerboard.ab.ca

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To better understand the impact of defects in the DNA damage-surveillance network on the various cell-based assays used for the prediction of patient radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We examined noncancerous human fibroblast strains from individuals with ataxia telangiectasia (ataxia telangiectasia mutated [ATM] deficient) or Li-Fraumeni syndrome (p53 deficient) using the neutral comet, H2AX phosphorylation, and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Using the comet assay, we found that, compared with normal fibroblasts, cells lacking either ATM or p53 function exhibited a reduced rate of double-strand break (DSB) rejoining early ({<=}4 h) after exposure to 8 Gy of {gamma}-radiation and also exhibited high levels of unrejoined DSBs later after irradiation. ATM-deficient and p53-deficient fibroblasts also exhibited abnormally increased levels of phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) at later intervals after irradiation. In the clonogenic assay, ATM-deficient cells exhibited marked radiosensitivity and p53-deficient cells had varying degrees of radioresistance compared with normal fibroblasts. Conclusion: Regardless of whether ataxia telangiectasia and Li-Fraumeni syndrome fibroblasts are DSB-repair deficient per se, it is apparent that p53 and ATM defects greatly influence the cellular phenotype as evidenced by the neutral comet and {gamma}-H2AX assays. Our data suggest that the {gamma}-H2AX levels observed at later intervals after irradiation may represent a reliable measure of the overall DSB rejoining capabilities of human fibroblasts. However, it appears that using this parameter as a predictor of radiosensitivity without knowledge of the cells' p53 status could lead to incorrect conclusions.

  11. Kinetoplast DNA signatures of Trypanosoma cruzi strains obtained directly from infected tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Vago, A. R.; Macedo, A. M.; Oliveira, R. P.; Andrade, L. O.; Chiari, E.; Galvão, L. M.; Reis, D.; Pereira, M. E.; Simpson, A. J.; Tostes, S.; Pena, S. D.

    1996-01-01

    We report here a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based DNA profiling technique that permits Trypanosoma cruzi strain characterization by direct study of infected tissues. This is based on application of a recently developed method of DNA fragment identification, called low-stringency single specific primer PCR (LSSP-PCR), to the study of the variable region of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles from T. cruzi Thus, we can translate the intraspecific polymorphism in the nucleotide sequence of kDNA minicircles into a specific and highly reproducible kDNA signature. Comparison with the phenogram obtained by DNA fingerprinting analysis of a set of T. cruzi strains showed good qualitative correlation between the degree of divergence of the LSSP-PCR profiles and the genetic distance between the strains. kDNA signatures of heart tissue from acutely or chronically infected animals revealed perfect concordance with the patterns obtained from cultured parasites for the CL and Colombiana strains but not for the Y strain, which is known to be multiclonal. However, the match was perfect for studies with two clones of the Y strain. We take this as evidence that in some multiclonal strains there is heterogeneity among the clones in the degree of tropism for the heart tissue. Finally, we showed that it is possible to obtain a T. cruzi kDNA signature from the heart of a human patient with chronic Chagasic myocardiopathy. kDNA signatures obtained by LSSP-PCR of sequences amplified from infected tissues constitute a new tool to study the molecular epidemiology of Chagas' disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8952547

  12. Use of Ti Plasmid DNA Probes for Determining Tumorigenicity of Agrobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Thomas J.; Norelli, John L.; Katz, Barbara H.; Bishop, Andrew L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 106 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains. Images PMID:16348218

  13. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two {sup 32}P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10{sup 6} CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains.

  14. Polymorphism of Paramecium pentaurelia (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) strains revealed by rDNA and mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Surmacz, Marta

    2011-05-01

    Paramecium pentaurelia is one of 15 known sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex. It is recognized as a species showing no intra-specific differentiation on the basis of molecular fingerprint analyses, whereas the majority of other species are polymorphic. This study aimed at assessing genetic polymorphism within P. pentaurelia including new strains recently found in Poland (originating from two water bodies, different years, seasons, and clones of one strain) as well as strains collected from distant habitats (USA, Europe, Asia), and strains representing other species of the complex. We compared two DNA fragments: partial sequences (349 bp) of the LSU rDNA and partial sequences (618 bp) of cytochrome B gene. A correlation between the geographical origin of the strains and the genetic characteristics of their genotypes was not observed. Different genotypes were found in Kraków in two types of water bodies (Opatkowice-natural pond; Jordan's Park-artificial pond). Haplotype diversity within a single water body was not recorded. Likewise, seasonal haplotype differences between the strains within the artificial water body, as well as differences between clones originating from one strain, were not detected. The clustering of some strains belonging to different species was observed in the phylogenies.

  15. Relationship between biological behaviour and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, R A; Escario, J A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Gómez-Barrio, A

    2001-02-01

    Once known some biological characteristics of six Trypanosoma cruzi strains, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was made. Cluster analysis by UPGMA (unweighted pair group method analysis) was then applied both to biological parameters and RAPD profiles. Inspection of the UPGMA phenograms indicates identical clusters, so supporting that usefulness of biological parameters to characterization of T. cruzi strains still remains. PMID:11285506

  16. ARID1A loss correlates with mismatch repair deficiency and intact p53 expression in high-grade endometrial carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Allo, Ghassan; Bernardini, Marcus Q; Wu, Ren-Chin; Shih, Ie-Ming; Kalloger, Steve; Pollett, Aaron; Gilks, C Blake; Clarke, Blaise A

    2015-01-01

    -grade endometrioid carcinomas than in other high-grade endometrial cancers and is associated with mismatch repair deficiency and normal p53 expression. PMID:23887303

  17. Effect of growth rate on plasmid DNA production and metabolic performance of engineered Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Martin; Taymaz-Nikerel, Hilal; Gosset, Guillermo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-03-01

    Two engineered Escherichia coli strains, designated VH33 and VH34, were compared to their parent strain W3110 in chemostat mode during plasmid DNA (pDNA) production. In strain VH33 the glucose uptake system was modified with the aim of reducing overflow metabolism. The strain VH34 has an additional deletion of the pyruvate kinase A gene (pykA) to increase pDNA formation. pDNA formation rates as well as kinetic and stoichiometric parameters were investigated in dependence of the growth rate within a range from 0.02 to 0.25 h(-1). Differences between strains were found in terms of the biomass yields on nitrogen and oxygen, as well as on the cell maintenance coefficients. The deletion of pykA led to a significantly increased pDNA yield and productivity. At an optimal growth rate of 0.20 h(-1) it was nearly 60% higher than that of W3110 and VH33. Metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balance analysis showed differences mainly in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The obtained data are useful for the design of cultivation schemes for pDNA production by E. coli. PMID:24012107

  18. Selection of species-specific DNA probes which detect strain restriction polymorphism in four Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Mangin, I; Bourget, N; Simonet, J M; Decaris, B

    1995-01-01

    Randomly cloned fragments (in a size range 1 to 2.5 kb) of DNA from Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707, B. adolescentis CIP 64.59T, B. bifidum CIP 64.65 and B. animalis ATCC 25527 were used as hybridization probes to characterize strains of these species and distinguish them from closely related Bifidobacterium species. The fragments were screened for hybridization with native DNA from 41 different Bifidobacterium strains. For each species, a fragment hybridizing specifically with DNA from strains of the same species was isolated. Each fragment was then hybridized with restriction digests in order to study the genome polymorphism. In some of the tested B. longum strains including strain ATCC 15707, the species-specific fragment L6/45 hybridized with 2 fragments instead of one as expected. Sequence of the fragment revealed the presence of an ORF which had an amino acid sequence similar to the site-specific recombinases of lambda integrase family. Moreover, Southern analysis demonstrated that at least 3 copies of this fragment are present in the chromosome of B. longum ATCC 15707 and in some other B. longum strains. The species-specific fragment A6/17 of B. adolescentis hybridized with the same restriction fragment on the eight strains of this species tested. The B. bifidum-specific fragment hybridized with different DNA restriction fragments according to the strain. The restriction fragment an1 from B. animalis ATCC 25527 hybridized with the same restriction fragment from strain B. animalis ATCC 27536. However, these two strains could be differentiated by another restriction pattern. Thus, hybridization results highlight the genetic polymorphism which exists among Bifidobacterium strains of the same species.

  19. Characterization of unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi by using ribosomal DNA fingerprinting, DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Grattard, F; Etienne, J; Pozzetto, B; Tardy, F; Gaudin, O G; Fleurette, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of 31 unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi isolated from 13 hospitals between 1973 and 1991 were determined by ribosomal DNA fingerprinting by using a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe, genomic DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles. Only six strains harbored one or two plasmids. DNA restriction analysis, which was carried out with five endonucleases (EcoRI, HindIII, PstI, PvuII, and ClaI), did not allow us to discriminate between isolates. Ribotyping with HindIII, ClaI, or EcoRI enzymes generated six, seven, and nine distinct patterns, respectively. With the combination ClaI-EcoRI, 13 ribotypes were obtained among the 31 strains, suggesting a relative heterogeneity within the species. Moreover, all strains shared two or three common bands, according to the endonuclease used, which were relatively specific for S. schleiferi in comparison with the ribosomal banding patterns described for other coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results illustrate that ribotyping can be used for the epidemiological investigation of S. schleiferi isolates and possibly for taxonomic analysis in this species. Images PMID:8385149

  20. Sex and strain differences in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, C.A.; Way, B.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The hepatocyte primary culture (HPC)/DNA repair test was developed using hepatocytes isolated from male F-344 rats. A number of genetic polymorphisms have been shown to occur in inbred strains of rats, which may lead to variation in biotransformation of xenobiotics resulting in differences in susceptibility to genotoxins. The effect of the strain utilized as a source of hepatocytes was investigated with female Lewis, F-344, and DA rats. Variation was observed when hepatocytes from the three strains were exposed to aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). No clearcut strain differences were seen when cells were exposed to diethylnitrosamine (DEN) or 2-acetylaminofluorene. These results demonstrate that both the strain and the sex of the animal used as a source of hepatocytes can affect the HPC/DNA repair test.

  1. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis.

    We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  2. Infectious cDNA clones of the DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R P; Stein, S; Ohara, Y; Fu, J L; Semler, B L

    1989-01-01

    The DA strain and other members of the TO subgroup of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses cause a persistent demyelinating infection, whereas the GDVII strain and other GDVII subgroup strains cause an acute lethal polioencephalomyelitis. We generated an infectious DA cDNA clone inserted into a transcription vector. Virus derived from transfection of transcripts produced a demyelinating disease indistinguishable from that of wild-type virus. The infectious clone provides a critical reagent for the production of interstrain recombinant viruses to help identify genetic loci responsible for the biological activities of the strains. Images PMID:2555569

  3. Evolutionary relationships among Magnetospirillum strains inferred from phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J G; Kawaguchi, R; Sakaguchi, T; Thornhill, R H; Matsunaga, T

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the evolutionary relationships between two facultatively anaerobic Magnetospirillum strains (AMB-1 and MGT-1) and fastidious, obligately microaerophilic species, such as Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, using a molecular phylogenetic approach. Genomic DNA from strains MGT-1 and AMB-1 was used as a template for amplification of the genes coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) by the polymerase chain reaction. Amplified DNA fragments were sequenced (1,424 bp) and compared with sequences for M. magnetotacticum MS-1 and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Phylogenetic analysis of the aligned 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the two new magnetic spirilla, AMB-1 and MGT-1, lie within the alpha subdivision (alpha-1) of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria and are closely related to Rhodospirillum fulvum and to several endosymbiotic bacteria. Strains AMB-1, MGT-1, and MS-1 formed a cluster, termed group I, in which they were more closely related to each other than to group II, which contained M. gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Group I strains were also physiologically distinct from strain MSR-1. Sequence alignment studies allowed elucidation of genus-specific regions of the 16S rDNA, and oligonucleotide primers complementary to two of these regions were used to develop a specific polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of magnetic spirilla in natural samples. Images PMID:7691800

  4. Geographic discrimination of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strains by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, A M; Niño-Vega, G; San-Blas, F; San-Blas, G

    1998-06-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of 33 Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strains from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela produced reproducible amplification products which were sufficiently polymorphic to allow differentiation of the strains. Types generated with five primers (OPG 03, OPG 05, OPG 14, OPG 16, and OPG 18) resulted in a high discriminatory index (0.956). The discriminatory index was slightly reduced (0.940) when only two primers (OPG 3 and OPG 14) were used. A dendrogram based on these results showed a high degree of similarity among the strains, and genetic differences were expressed in clusters related to geographical regions but not to pathological features of the disease. With a few exceptions, strains were sorted into five groups by geographical origin as follows: group I, Venezuelan strains; group II, Brazilian strains; group III, Peruvian strains; group IV, Colombian strains; and group V, Argentinian strains. The group containing the most disparate strains was group V (discriminatory index, 0.633); the discriminatory index for the other four groups was 0.824. The use of primer OPG 18 by itself was sufficient to discriminate species specificity, and the use of primer OPG 14 by itself was sufficient to discriminate among the geographical locations of the strains in the sample. This method may be helpful for epidemiological studies of P. brasiliensis. PMID:9620409

  5. Geographic Discrimination of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Strains by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Ana María; Niño-Vega, Gustavo; San-Blas, Felipe; San-Blas, Gioconda

    1998-01-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of 33 Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strains from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela produced reproducible amplification products which were sufficiently polymorphic to allow differentiation of the strains. Types generated with five primers (OPG 03, OPG 05, OPG 14, OPG 16, and OPG 18) resulted in a high discriminatory index (0.956). The discriminatory index was slightly reduced (0.940) when only two primers (OPG 3 and OPG 14) were used. A dendrogram based on these results showed a high degree of similarity among the strains, and genetic differences were expressed in clusters related to geographical regions but not to pathological features of the disease. With a few exceptions, strains were sorted into five groups by geographical origin as follows: group I, Venezuelan strains; group II, Brazilian strains; group III, Peruvian strains; group IV, Colombian strains; and group V, Argentinian strains. The group containing the most disparate strains was group V (discriminatory index, 0.633); the discriminatory index for the other four groups was 0.824. The use of primer OPG 18 by itself was sufficient to discriminate species specificity, and the use of primer OPG 14 by itself was sufficient to discriminate among the geographical locations of the strains in the sample. This method may be helpful for epidemiological studies of P. brasiliensis. PMID:9620409

  6. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  7. Tandemly repeated nonribosomal DNA sequences in the chloroplast genome of an Acetabularia mediterranea strain.

    PubMed

    Tymms, M J; Schweiger, H G

    1985-03-01

    A purified chloroplast fraction was prepared from caps of the giant unicellular green alga Acetabularia mediterranea (strain 17). High molecular weight DNA obtained from these chloroplasts contains at least five copies of a 10-kilobase-pair (kbp) sequence tandemly arranged. This unique sequence is present in DNA from chloroplasts of all stages of the life cycle examined. A chloroplast rDNA clone from mustard hybridized with some restriction fragments from Acetabularia chloroplast DNA but not with the repeated sequence. An 8-kbp EcoRI-Pst I fragment of the repeated sequence was cloned into pBR322 and used as a hybridization probe. No homology was found between the cloned 8-kbp sequence and chloroplast DNA from related species Acetabularia crenulata or chloroplast DNA from spinach.

  8. DNA relatedness among strains of the sweet potato pathogen Streptomyces ipomoea (Person and Martin 1940) Waksman and Henrici 1948.

    PubMed

    Labeda, D P; Lyons, A J

    1992-02-01

    DNA relatedness among 28 putative strains of Streptomyces ipomoea from geographically diverse locations and the type strain, NRRL B-12321, was determined spectrophotometrically. The data confirm that these 28 strains are not closely related genetically to the plant-pathogenic species Streptomyces scabies (39% DNA relatedness) or Streptomyces acidiscabies (17% DNA relatedness) or any other major blue-spored Streptomyces species (less than 30% DNA relatedness). Of the 29 strains examined, 4 could be clearly distinguished from S. ipomoea on the basis of morphological criteria, i.e., they had gray rather than blue spores and produced melanin pigment, and their low DNA relatedness to authentic S. ipomoea strains confirmed their original misidentification. The remaining 25 S. ipomoea strains exhibited high DNA relatedness among themselves (76 to 100% homology), even though they had been isolated in different locations throughout the United States and Japan. The avirulent type strain, NRRL B-12321, exhibited slightly lower DNA relatedness with the virulent strains of S. ipomoea (85% average DNA relatedness) than was observed among the virulent strains (average of 96% DNA relatedness).

  9. Diversities in virulence, antifungal activity, pigmentation and DNA fingerprint among strains of Burkholderia glumae.

    PubMed

    Karki, Hari S; Shrestha, Bishnu K; Han, Jae Woo; Groth, Donald E; Barphagha, Inderjit K; Rush, Milton C; Melanson, Rebecca A; Kim, Beom Seok; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG) agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX) or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR.

  10. DNA microarray analysis of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium strains causing different symptoms of disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the leading food-borne pathogens in the USA and European countries. Outcome of human Salmonella serotype Typhimurium infections ranges from mild self-limiting diarrhoea to severe diarrhoea that requires hospitalization. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms that are responsible for causing infection and especially the severity of infection is of high interest. Results Strains were selected from patients with mild infections (n = 9) and patients with severe infections (n = 9) and clinical data allowed us to correct for known underlying diseases. Additionally, outbreak isolates (n = 3) were selected. Strains were analyzed on a DNA-DNA microarray for presence or absence of 281 genes covering marker groups of genes related to pathogenicity, phages, antimicrobial resistance, fimbriae, mobility, serotype and metabolism. Strains showed highly similar profiles when comparing virulence associated genes, but differences between strains were detected in the prophage marker group. The Salmonella virulence plasmid was present in 72% of the strains, but presence or absence of the virulence plasmid did not correspond to disease symptoms. A dendrogram clustered strains into four groups. Clustering confirmed DT104 as being a clonal phagetype. Clustering of the remaining strains was mainly correlated to presence or absence of the virulence plasmid and mobile elements such as transposons. Each of the four clusters in the tree represented an almost equal amount of strains causing severe or mild symptoms of infection. Conclusions We investigated clinical significance of known virulence factors of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium strains causing different disease symptoms, and conclude that the few detected differences in Salmonella serotype Typhimurium do not affect outcome of human disease. PMID:20356366

  11. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) for differentiation between Thai and Myanmar strains of Wuchereria bancrofti

    PubMed Central

    Nuchprayoon, Surang; Junpee, Alisa; Poovorawan, Yong

    2007-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a mosquito-borne disease caused by mosquito-transmitted filarial nematodes, including Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. The Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Program in Thailand has reduced the prevalence of nocturnally subperiodic W. bancrofti (Thai strain), mainly transmitted by the Ochlerotatus (Aedes) niveus group in Thailand to 0.57/100,000 population. However, it is estimated that more than one million Myanmar migrants with high prevalence of bancroftian filariasis have settled in the large urban cities of Thailand. These infected migrants carry the nocturnally periodic W. bancrofti (Myanmar strain) which has Culex quinquefasciatus as the main mosquito vector. Although transmissions of the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti by the Thai Cx. quinquefasciatus has never been reported, previous study showed that Cx. quinquefasciatus could nurture the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti to the infective stage. Thus, the potential now exists for a re-emergence of bancroftian filariasis in Thailand. The present study was undertaken in an attempt to differentiate between the Thai and Myanmar strains of W. bancrofti. Methods The microfilarial periodicity of Thai and the Myanmar strains of W. bancrofti were determined. Comparative morphology and morphometry of microfilariae and a study of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was performed. The Nei's genetic distance was calculated, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic mean (UPGMA). Results The Thai strain of W. bancrofti was nocturnally subperiodic, and the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti was nocturnally periodic. The body length, cephalic space length, and cephalic space width of the Thai strain of W. bancrofti were significantly larger than those of the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti (p < 0.05). However, an overlapping mean of these parameters made it impractical for field application. RAPD-PCR profiles showed specific

  12. Strain dependent UV degradation of Escherichia coli DNA monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Cristina M; Lapusan, Alexandra; Mihaiu, Liora; Stefan, Razvan

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a method for detection of DNA isolated from nonpathogenic Escherichia coli strains, respectively. Untreated and UV irradiated bacterial DNAs were analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopy, to investigate their screening characteristic features and their structural radiotolerance at 253.7nm. FT-IR spectra, providing a high molecular structural information, have been analyzed in the wavenumber range 800-1800cm(-1). FT-IR signatures, spectroscopic band assignments and structural interpretations of these DNAs are reported. Also, UV damage at the DNA molecular level is of interest. Strain dependent UV degradation of DNA from E. coli has been observed. Particularly, alterations in nucleic acid bases, base pairing and base stacking have been found. Also changes in the DNA conformation and deoxyribose were detected. Based on this work, specific E. coli DNA-ligand interactions, drug development and vaccine design for a better understanding of the infection mechanism caused by an interference between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and for a better control of disease, respectively, might be further investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Besides, understanding the pathways for UV damaged DNA response, like nucleic acids repair mechanisms is appreciated.

  13. Random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting as a marker for Paramecium jenningsi strains.

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, Bogumiła; Przyboś, Ewa; Wodecka, Beata; Maciejewska, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to establish a common RAPD marker for P. jenningsi using a series of Ro primers and to investigate if strains originating from distant and isolated localities (Japan, China, India, Saudi Arabia) have isolated gene pools and represent distinct species. An analysis of dendrograms constructed on the basis of RAPD-PCR fingerprints with four primers (Ro 460-04, 460-06, 460-07, and 460-10) from the first part of this project (SKOTARCZAK et al. 2004), assigns the strains to two groups consisting of the continental strains (India, Saudi Arabia, China) and Japanese strains that have been considered as a separate sibling species within P. jenningsi. The genetic similarity of the Indian and Arabian strains was ascertained, whereas the Chinese strain formed an independent branch in this sibling species. The primers Ro (460-01,460-02, 460-03, 460-05, 460-08) also distinguish between two groups of strains, although they divide the Japanese strains into two subgroups that are not reproductively isolated. This probably indicates genetic variation within this sibling species. However, it comprises one common gene pool (successful inter-strain crosses) and is reproductively isolated from the other sibling species. The results presented in these papers confirm that the construction of ten band patterns having marker attributes is possible on the basis of DNA amplification from 9 strains of P. jenningsi with the RAPD-PCR fingerprinting method using five primers from the Ro series. The patterns can be assigned to three marker-groups: a general species group, a group differentiating between sibling species, and accessory strain markers. PMID:15521659

  14. Induction of strain-transcending immunity against Plasmodium chabaudi adami malaria with a multiepitope DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Scorza, T; Grubb, K; Smooker, P; Rainczuk, A; Proll, D; Spithill, T W

    2005-05-01

    A major goal of current malaria vaccine programs is to develop multivalent vaccines that will protect humans against the many heterologous malaria strains that circulate in endemic areas. We describe a multiepitope DNA vaccine, derived from a genomic Plasmodium chabaudi adami DS DNA expression library of 30,000 plasmids, which induces strain-transcending immunity in mice against challenge with P. c. adami DK. Segregation of this library and DNA sequence analysis identified vaccine subpools encoding open reading frames (ORFs)/peptides of >9 amino acids [aa] (the V9+ pool, 303 plasmids) and >50 aa (V50+ pool, 56 plasmids), respectively. The V9+ and V50+ plasmid vaccine subpools significantly cross-protected mice against heterologous P. c. adami DK challenge, and protection correlated with the induction of both specific gamma interferon production by splenic cells and opsonizing antibodies. Bioinformatic analysis showed that 22 of the V50+ ORFs were polypeptides conserved among three or more Plasmodium spp., 13 of which are predicted hypothetical proteins. Twenty-nine of these ORFs are orthologues of predicted Plasmodium falciparum sequences known to be expressed in the blood stage, suggesting that this vaccine pool encodes multiple blood-stage antigens. The results have implications for malaria vaccine design by providing proof-of-principle that significant strain-transcending immunity can be induced using multiepitope blood-stage DNA vaccines and suggest that both cellular responses and opsonizing antibodies are necessary for optimal protection against P. c. adami.

  15. Holliday Triangle Hunter (HolT Hunter): Efficient Software for Identifying Low Strain DNA Triangular Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, W.B.

    2012-04-16

    Synthetic DNA nanostructures are typically held together primarily by Holliday junctions. One of the most basic types of structures possible to assemble with only DNA and Holliday junctions is the triangle. To date, however, only equilateral triangles have been assembled in this manner - primarily because it is difficult to figure out what configurations of Holliday triangles have low strain. Early attempts at identifying such configurations relied upon calculations that followed the strained helical paths of DNA. Those methods, however, were computationally expensive, and failed to find many of the possible solutions. I have developed a new approach to identifying Holliday triangles that is computationally faster, and finds well over 95% of the possible solutions. The new approach is based on splitting the problem into two parts. The first part involves figuring out all the different ways that three featureless rods of the appropriate length and diameter can weave over and under one another to form a triangle. The second part of the computation entails seeing whether double helical DNA backbones can fit into the shape dictated by the rods in such a manner that the strands can cross over from one domain to the other at the appropriate spots. Structures with low strain (that is, good fit between the rods and the helices) on all three edges are recorded as promising for assembly.

  16. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  17. Comparison of Mycoplasma arthritidis strains by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, and DNA restriction analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Voelker, L L; Ehle, L J; Hirsch, S; Dutenhofer, C; Olson, K; Beck, B

    1995-01-01

    Twenty Mycoplasma arthritidis strains or isolates were compared by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by an antiserum adsorption technique, Western immunoblotting, and restriction analysis of chromosomal DNA. Antigenic markers that defined strains related to strains 158p10p9, PG6, and H606 were identified. In addition, restriction analysis allowed all 20 strains to be divided into six groups. Results of restriction analysis corresponded generally with antigenic similarities, although the former did not allow grouping with as fine a precision as the latter. However, intrastrain antigenic variability, which is common among many Mycoplasma species, including M. arthritidis, introduced a complicating factor into our attempts at antigenic analysis. While serologic and antigenic analyses remain useful, we recommend that they be used with caution and in combination with other techniques for identifying and characterizing new isolates and newly acquired strains. Combinations of these techniques have proven to be useful in our laboratory for quality control and for uncovering interesting relationships among strains subjected to animal passage and their less virulent antecedents and among strains originally classified as the same but obtained from different sources and maintained, sometimes for decades, in different laboratories. PMID:7494014

  18. A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zaisheng; Chang, Dingran; Zhang, Wenqing; Tram, Kha; Lee, Christine; Kim, Peter; Salena, Bruno J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pathogenic strains of bacteria are known to cause various infectious diseases and there is a growing demand for molecular probes that can selectively recognize them. Here we report a special DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD‐CD1, that shows exquisite specificity for a pathogenic strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). RFD‐CD1 was derived by an in vitro selection approach where a random‐sequence DNA library was allowed to react with an unpurified molecular mixture derived from this strain of C. difficle, coupled with a subtractive selection strategy to eliminate cross‐reactivities to unintended C. difficile strains and other bacteria species. RFD‐CD1 is activated by a truncated version of TcdC, a transcription factor, that is unique to the targeted strain of C. difficle. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in vitro selection offers an effective approach for deriving functional nucleic acid probes that are capable of achieving strain‐specific recognition of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26676768

  19. Comparative DNA sequence analysis of the host shutoff genes of different strains of herpes simplex virus: type 2 strain HG52 encodes a truncated UL41 product.

    PubMed

    Everett, R D; Fenwick, M L

    1990-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles contain a factor which can shut off host protein synthesis during the earliest stages of infection. The efficiency of shutoff varies between different strains of virus, type 2 strains being generally more active than type 1 strains. However, HSV-2 strain HG52 is deficient in host cell shutoff. We have investigated the basis of the different shutoff phenotypes of a strong shutoff strain (HSV-2 strain G), a weak shutoff virus (HSV-1 strain 17 syn+) and HG52 by comparative DNA sequence analysis of gene UL41, which encodes the virion-associated host shutoff factor. The results show that the UL41 genes of strains G and 17 are 86% homologous and that the lack of shutoff by HG52 is likely to be explained by a frameshift mutation within its UL41 coding sequence.

  20. Mismatch repair deficiency: a temozolomide resistance factor in medulloblastoma cell lines that is uncommon in primary medulloblastoma tumours

    PubMed Central

    von Bueren, A O; Bacolod, M D; Hagel, C; Heinimann, K; Fedier, A; Kordes, U; Pietsch, T; Koster, J; Grotzer, M A; Friedman, H S; Marra, G; Kool, M; Rutkowski, S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tumours are responsive to temozolomide (TMZ) if they are deficient in O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mismatch repair (MMR) proficient. Methods: The effect of TMZ on medulloblastoma (MB) cell killing was analysed with clonogenic survival assays. Expression of DNA repair genes and enzymes was investigated using microarrays, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. DNA sequencing and promoter methylation analysis were employed to investigate the cause of loss of the expression of MMR gene MLH1. Results: Temozolomide exhibited potent cytotoxic activity in D425Med (MGMT deficient, MLH1 proficient; IC50=1.7 μℳ), moderate activity against D341Med (MGMT proficient, MLH1 deficient), and DAOY MB cells (MGMT proficient, MLH1 proficient). MGMT inhibitor O6-benzylguanine sensitised DAOY, but not D341Med cells to TMZ. Of 12 MB cell lines, D341Med, D283Med, and 1580WÜ cells exhibited MMR deficiency due to MLH1 promoter hypermethylation. DNA sequencing of these cells provided no evidence for somatic genetic alterations in MLH1. Expression analyses of MMR and MGMT in MB revealed that all patient specimens (n=74; expression array, n=61; immunostaining, n=13) are most likely MMR proficient, whereas some tumours had low MGMT expression levels (according to expression array) or were totally MGMT deficient (3 out of 13 according to immunohistochemistry). Conclusion: A subset of MB may respond to TMZ as some patient specimens are MGMT deficient, and tumours appear to be MMR proficient. PMID:22976800

  1. Divergent genes in potential inoculant Sinorhizobium strains are related to DNA replication, recombination, and repair.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Petri; Greco, Dario; Muntyan, Victoria; Terefework, Zewdu; De Lajudie, Philippe; Roumiantseva, Marina; Becker, Anke; Auvinen, Petri; Lindström, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    To serve as inoculants of legumes, nitrogen-fixing rhizobium strains should be competitive and tolerant of diverse environments. We hybridized the genomes of symbiotically efficient and salt tolerant Sinorhizobium inoculant strains onto the Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 microarray. The number of variable genes, that is, divergent or putatively multiplied genes, ranged from 503 to 1556 for S. meliloti AK23, S. meliloti STM 1064 and S. arboris HAMBI 1552. The numbers of divergent genes affiliated with the symbiosis plasmid pSymA and related to DNA replication, recombination and repair were significantly higher than expected. The variation was mainly in the accessory genome, implying that it was important in shaping the adaptability of the strains.

  2. DNA characterization of simian Entamoeba histolytica-like strains to differentiate them from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Takano, Jun-ichiro; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Kato, Miyoko; Narita, Toyoko; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Koji

    2009-10-01

    Two simian Entamoeba histolytica-like strains, EHMfas1 and P19-061405, have been suggested to represent a new species based on genetic characterization. Sequence analyses of the hexokinase, glucose phosphate isomerase, and phosphoglucomutase genes supported the previous findings of isoenzyme analyses demonstrating a new zymodeme pattern. Phylogenetic studies of 18S rDNA, 5.8S rDNA, the chaperonin 60 gene, and the pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase gene showed original clusters of simian E. histolytica-like strains below or near E. histolytica, respectively. Comparative studies of the chitinase and the serine-rich E. histolytica protein genes and locus 1-2 region revealed that most mutated units were shared among the simian E. histolytica-like strains. The similarities of each of the repeating units within the simian E. histolytica-like strains or E. histolytica and the differences of those between the both might be generated by concerted evolution. Our results indicate that EHMfas1 and P19-061405 should be considered to be the same species, despite that they were isolated from different monkey species and different habitats. Simian E. histolytica-like amebas may be endemic to macaque monkeys, as a counterpart to E. histolytica in humans, and should be differentiated from E. histolytica by the revival name Entamoeba nuttalli, as proposed for P19-061405.

  3. Comparison of DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms of Nostoc strains in and from cycads.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, P; Haselkorn, R; Bergman, B; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1989-01-01

    DNA was prepared from cyanobacteria freshly isolated from coralloid roots of natural populations of five cycad species: Ceratozamia mexicana mexicana (Mexico), C. mexicana robusta (Mexico), Dioon spinulosum (Mexico), Zamia furfuraceae (Mexico) and Z. skinneri (Costa Rica). Using the Southern blot technique and cloned Anabaena PCC 7120 nifK and glnA genes as probes, restriction fragment length polymorphisms of these cyanobacterial symbionts were compared. The five cyanobacterial preparations showed differences in the sizes of their DNA fragments hybridizing with both probes, indicating that different cyanobacterial species and/or strains were in the symbiotic associations. On the other hand, a similar comparison of cyanobacteria freshly collected from a single Encephalartos altensteinii coralloid root and from three independently subcultured isolates from the same coralloid root revealed that these were likely to be one and the same organism. Moreover, the complexity of restriction patterns shows that a mixture of Nostoc strains can associate with a single cycad species although a single cyanobacterial strain can predominate in the root of a single cycad plant. Thus, a wide range of Nostoc strains appear to associate with the coralloid roots of cycads.

  4. Premethylation of Foreign DNA Improves Integrative Transformation Efficiency in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Yu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Restriction digestion of foreign DNA is one of the key biological barriers against genetic transformation in microorganisms. To establish a high-efficiency transformation protocol in the model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (Synechocystis 6803), we investigated the effects of premethylation of foreign DNA on the integrative transformation of this strain. In this study, two type II methyltransferase-encoding genes, i.e., sll0729 (gene M) and slr0214 (gene C), were cloned from the chromosome of Synechocystis 6803 and expressed in Escherichia coli harboring an integration plasmid. After premethylation treatment in E. coli, the integration plasmid was extracted and used for transformation of Synechocystis 6803. The results showed that although expression of methyltransferase M had little impact on the transformation of Synechocystis 6803, expression of methyltransferase C resulted in 11- to 161-fold-higher efficiency in the subsequent integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. Effective expression of methyltransferase C, which could be achieved by optimizing the 5′ untranslated region, was critical to efficient premethylation of the donor DNA and thus high transformation efficiency in Synechocystis 6803. Since premethylating foreign DNA prior to transforming Synechocystis avoids changing the host genetic background, the study thus provides an improved method for high-efficiency integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. PMID:26452551

  5. Simple sequence repeats together with mismatch repair deficiency can bias mutagenic pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Alejandro J; Feliziani, Sofía; Di Rienzo, Julio A; Smania, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and undergoes a process of genetic adaptation based on mutagenesis. We evaluated the role of mononucleotide G:C and A:T simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in this adaptive process. An in silico survey of the genome sequences of 7 P. aeruginosa strains showed that mononucleotide G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were greatly under-represented in coding regions, suggesting a strong counterselection process for G:C SSRs with lengths >5 bp but not for A:T SSRs. A meta-analysis of published whole genome sequence data for a P. aeruginosa strain from a CF patient with chronic airway infection showed that G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were frequently mutated during the infection process through the insertion or deletion of one or more SSR subunits. The mutation tendency of G:C SSRs was length-dependent and increased exponentially as a function of SSR length. When this strain naturally became a stable Mismatch Repair System (MRS)-deficient mutator, the degree of increase of G:C SSRs mutations (5-fold) was much higher than that of other types of mutation (2.2-fold or less). Sequence analysis of several mutated genes reported for two different collections, both containing mutator and non-mutator strains of P. aeruginosa from CF chronic infections, showed that the proportion of G:C SSR mutations was significantly higher in mutators than in non-mutators, whereas no such difference was observed for A:T SSR mutations. Our findings, taken together, provide genome-scale evidences that under a MRS-deficient background, long G:C SSRs are able to stochastically bias mutagenic pathways by making the genes in which they are harbored more prone to mutation. The combination of MRS deficiency and virulence-related genes that contain long G:C SSRs is therefore a matter of concern in P. aeruginosa CF chronic infection.

  6. Fate of DNA encoding hygromycin resistance after meiosis in transformed strains of Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium moniliforme).

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, J F; Dickman, M B

    1991-01-01

    Stability of foreign DNA transformed into a novel host is an important parameter in decisions to permit the release of genetically engineered microorganisms into the environment. Meiotic instability of transformed DNA has been reported in fungi such as Ascobolus, Aspergillus, and Neurospora. We used strains of Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium moniliforme) transformed with the hygr gene from Escherichia coli to study meiotic stability of foreign DNA in this plant pathogenic fungus. Crosses with single-copy transformants segregated hygr:hygs in a 1:1 manner consistent with that expected for a Mendelian locus in a haploid organism. Multicopy transformants, however, segregated hygr:hygs in a 1:2 manner that was not consistent with Mendelian expectations for a chromosomal marker, even though two unrelated auxotrophic nuclear genes were segregating normally. Segregation ratios in crosses in which hygr was introduced via the male parent did not differ significantly from crosses in which the transformed strain served as the female parent. Some of the sensitive progeny from the crosses with the multicopy transformants carried hygr sequences. When these phenotypically sensitive progeny were crossed with a wild-type strain that carried no hygr sequences, some of the progeny were phenotypically hygr. Some progeny from some crosses were more resistant to hygromycin than were their sibs or the transformant strains that served as their parents. Transformants passaged through a maize plant only rarely segregated progeny with the high levels of resistance. The mechanism underlying these genetic instabilities is not clear but may involve unequal crossing over or methylation or both. Further work with cloned genes with homology to sequences already present in the Fusarium genome is warranted. Images PMID:1854200

  7. Genotyping by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alli, John Adeolu; Iwalokun, Bamidele A; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Okonko, Iheanyi Omezuruike

    2015-01-01

    Yogurt and starter culture producers are still searching strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus to produce healthier yogurt with a longer shelf life and better texture, taste, and quality. This study determined the genotyping of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains recovered from Nigerian yogurts. Yogurt samples were collected from four different states of South West regions of Nigeria. Isolates were obtained from MRS Medium and biochemically characterized. This was further confirmed by API50CH. The bacteriocin positivity and activity was determined. Genomic characterization of our Lactobacillus acidophilus strains was done with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR. All yogurt samples containing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains meet the probiotic requirement of ≥10(6) cfu/mL. The gel picture revealed 6 RAPD clonal types of Lactobacillus acidophilus strains with RAPD type C observed to be more common. Significant differences existed in the mean growth inhibition zone (t = -7.32, P < 0.05 for E. coli ATCC; t = -6.19, P < 0.05 for E. coli clinical isolates; t = -6.16, P < 0.05 for Enterobacter sp; t = -11.92, P < 0.05 for Salmonella typhi, t = -1.10, P > 0.05 Staphylococcus aureus). No correlation between the bacteriocin production, activity, and their RAPD clonal division (X(2) = 7.49, P = 0.1610, df = 5). In conclusion, L. acidophilus isolated in Nigeria samples met the probiotic requirements of ≥10(6) cfu/mL and produce bacteriocins with good spectrum of activity.

  8. Molecular characterization of Saudi local chicken strains using mitochondrial DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, H A; Ramadan, H A I; Baeshen, Nabih A; Sadek, Mahmoud Abdel; Abou Alsoud, M E

    2015-08-01

    The current study was carried out to investigate and estimate the genetic diversity of native breeds based on cytochrome b (cyt-b) gene of mitochondrial DNA information. The obtained sequences of cyt-b gene segment have TAA as a stop codon at 488 position with no insertions or deletion in all individuals of both native chicken strains. The blast results showed that no variation was found among individuals within both native chicken strains, but when a comparison was established among them and other species of genus Gallus the variation is exploring, additionally many mutant sites were detected as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different sites. The phylogenetic trees exhibited three different groups. The results revealed that the native chicken strains were closely related to the cluster of Gallus gallus and subspecies of Gallus, suggesting that they may be separated from the same origin. According to this result and previously studies, the native chicken strains are genetically closer to Gallus gallus and it could be successfully distinguished from the other wild types of Gallus chicken based on cyt-b gene information. We recommended that the governmental concerns for native chicken strain should be enhanced to screen its genetic structure for large scale in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

  9. DNA-directed aniline mustards with high selectivity for adenine or guanine bases: mutagenesis in a variety of Salmonella typhimurium strains differing in DNA-repair capability.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Denny, W A; Boritzki, T J

    1994-04-01

    Two closely-related aniline monomustards (1 and 2), linked to a DNA-targeting acridine chromophore by a linker chain of different length, show high selectivity for alkylation of polymer DNA. The shorter-chain derivative (2) alkylates mainly at guanine N7 sites, while the longer-chain analogue (1) reacts almost exclusively at adenine N1. The biological effects of these compounds have been studied in standard Ames Salmonella typhimurium strains in order to determine the mutagenic consequences of such well-defined DNA lesions, and the effect of DNA-repair systems on them. Both compounds caused detectable mutations in strains TA1537, TA98 or TA100 and some related strains. Mutation rates were greatly enhanced in strains carrying either a uvrB deletion or the plasmid pKM101. Frameshift mutagenesis by both compounds was completely eliminated by recA deletion, in both the presence or absence of the plasmid. The adenine-selective compound (1) appeared more sensitive to the DNA-repair defects than the guanine-selective derivative (2). Additionally, only the adenine-selective compound (1) caused statistically significant levels of detectable mutation in the repair-proficient strains TA102, TA4001 or TA4006. The bacterial mutagenesis evidence suggests that a bulky, major groove-residing adenine lesion may be more readily recognised by DNA-repair systems, and more likely to lead to a wider range of mutagenic events, than a similar guanine lesion.

  10. Evaluation of Protein A Gene Polymorphic Region DNA Sequencing for Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shopsin, B.; Gomez, M.; Montgomery, S. O.; Smith, D. H.; Waddington, M.; Dodge, D. E.; Bost, D. A.; Riehman, M.; Naidich, S.; Kreiswirth, B. N.

    1999-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were typed by DNA sequence analysis of the X region of the protein A gene (spa). spa typing was compared to both phenotypic and molecular techniques for the ability to differentiate and categorize S. aureus strains into groups that correlate with epidemiological information. Two previously characterized study populations were examined. A collection of 59 isolates (F. C. Tenover, R. Arbeit, G. Archer, J. Biddle, S. Byrne, R. Goering, G. Hancock, G. A. Hébert, B. Hill, R. Hollis, W. R. Jarvis, B. Kreiswirth, W. Eisner, J. Maslow, L. K. McDougal, J. M. Miller, M. Mulligan, and M. A. Pfaller, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:407–415, 1994) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was used to test for the ability to discriminate outbreak from epidemiologically unrelated strains. A separate collection of 261 isolates form a multicenter study (R. B. Roberts, A. de Lencastre, W. Eisner, E. P. Severina, B. Shopsin, B. N. Kreiswirth, and A. Tomasz, J. Infect. Dis. 178:164–171, 1998) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in New York City (NYC) was used to compare the ability of spa typing to group strains along clonal lines to that of the combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization. In the 320 isolates studied, spa typing identified 24 distinct repeat types and 33 different strain types. spa typing distinguished 27 of 29 related strains and did not provide a unique fingerprint for 4 unrelated strains from the four outbreaks of the CDC collection. In the NYC collection, spa typing provided a clonal assignment for 185 of 195 strains within the five major groups previously described. spa sequencing appears to be a highly effective rapid typing tool for S. aureus that, despite some expense of specificity, has significant advantages in terms of speed, ease of use, ease of interpretation, and standardization among laboratories. PMID:10523551

  11. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Prados, Julien; Stenz, Ludwig; Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  12. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  13. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae strains using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) - fragment length analysis (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ronald W; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-07-15

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year. The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites). Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China, Malawi, the Philippines, and Brazil. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS). The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions. The PCR products may be subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis to verify the

  14. DNA Fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae Strains Using Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) - Fragment Length Analysis (FLA)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ronald W.; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO1, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year.2 The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped3,4 and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites).5 Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci.5,6,7 Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)5 analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing7,8,9, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA)10 has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China11,12, Malawi8, the Philippines10,13, and Brazil14. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS).10 The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions.10 The PCR products may be subjected to agarose

  15. Frequency and organization of papA homologous DNA sequences among uropathogenic digalactoside-binding Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Denich, K; Craiu, A; Rugo, H; Muralidhar, G; O'Hanley, P

    1991-06-01

    The frequency of selected papA DNA sequences among 89 digalactoside-binding, uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains was evaluated with 12 different synthetic 15-base probes corresponding to papA genes from four digalactoside-binding piliated recombinant strains (HU849, 201B, and 200A). The papA probes encode amino acids which are common at the carboxy terminus of all strains, adjacent to the proximal portion of the intramolecular disulfide loop of strain 210B, or predicted to constitute the type-specific epitope for each of the four recombinant strains or other epitopes of strain HU849. The presence among the strains of DNA sequence homology to the papA probes was determined by in situ colony hybridization. Hybridization data suggest that there is a high frequency of homologous papA DNA sequences corresponding to selected regions of the papA gene from strain HU849 among the clinical strains. The following nucleotide locations which encode portions of the mature HU849 PapA are detected in a high percentage (42 to 70%) of clinical isolates: 208 to 222, 310 to 324, 478 to 492, 517 to 531, 553 to 567, and 679 to 693. These sequences encode portions of the predicted protective, immunogenic, and/or antigenic epitopes of this PapA. The data also indicate considerable heterogeneity of papA sequences among the strains, especially in the region of nucleotide bases corresponding to positions 391 to 418. These oligonucleotides encode the predicted PapA type-specific immunogenic dominant epitope. Determination of the extent of genetic variability in the papA gene among digalactoside-binding strains will require more extensive DNA sequencing of prototypic papA genes, additional hybridization studies employing other papA gene oligonucleotide probes, and assessment of the different pap operons and their copy number in each strain.

  16. Improved reporter strain for monitoring Cre recombinase-mediated DNA excisions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiaohong; Fujiwara, Yuko; Orkin, Stuart H.

    1999-01-01

    Effective use of conditional Cre recombinase-loxP gene modification requires Cre-expressing mouse strains with defined patterns of expression. To assess the in vivo functionality of Cre-expressing mice, we have engineered an improved reporter strain for monitoring Cre-mediated excisions. The β-galactosidase-neomycin phosphotransferase fusion gene (βgeo)-trapped ROSA26 locus was modified by gene targeting such that βgeo is expressed only after Cre-mediated excision of loxP-flanked DNA sequences. βgeo from the excised ROSA26 allele is expressed ubiquitously in embryos and adult mice. By mating the reporter strain with Cre-expressing transgenic mice, we have shown that the loxP-flanked ROSA26 allele is accessible to Cre during early embryogenesis, as well as in a specific hematopoietic lineage (T lymphocytes). This improved reporter strain should facilitate monitoring in vivo Cre-mediated excision events in a variety of experimental contexts. PMID:10220414

  17. Ribosomal DNA analysis of tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted Ethiopian Trypanosoma vivax strains in view of improved molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fikru, Regassa; Matetovici, Irina; Rogé, Stijn; Merga, Bekana; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Büscher, Philippe; Van Reet, Nick

    2016-04-15

    Animal trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma vivax (T. vivax) is a devastating disease causing serious economic losses. Most molecular diagnostics for T. vivax infection target the ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA) but are challenged by the heterogeneity among T. vivax strains. In this study, we investigated the rDNA heterogeneity of Ethiopian T. vivax strains in relation to their presence in tsetse-infested and tsetse-free areas and its effect on molecular diagnosis. We sequenced the rDNA loci of six Ethiopian (three from tsetse-infested and three from tsetse-free areas) and one Nigerian T. vivax strain. We analysed the obtained sequences in silico for primer-mismatches of some commonly used diagnostic PCR assays and for GC content. With these data, we selected some rDNA diagnostic PCR assays for evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore we constructed two phylogenetic networks based on sequences within the smaller subunit (SSU) of 18S and within the 5.8S and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) to assess the relatedness of Ethiopian T. vivax strains to strains from other African countries and from South America. In silico analysis of the rDNA sequence showed important mismatches of some published diagnostic PCR primers and high GC content of T. vivax rDNA. The evaluation of selected diagnostic PCR assays with specimens from cattle under natural T. vivax challenge showed that this high GC content interferes with the diagnostic accuracy of PCR, especially in cases of mixed infections with T. congolense. Adding betain to the PCR reaction mixture can enhance the amplification of T. vivax rDNA but decreases the sensitivity for T. congolense and Trypanozoon. The networks illustrated that Ethiopian T. vivax strains are considerably heterogeneous and two strains (one from tsetse-infested and one from tsetse-free area) are more related to the West African and South American strains than to the East African strains. The rDNA locus sequence of six Ethiopian T. vivax

  18. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  19. Comparison of Haemophilus parasuis reference strains and field isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and protein profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease and is a pathogen of swine in high-health status herds. Reports on serotyping of field strains from outbreaks describe that approximately 30% of them are nontypeable and therefore cannot be traced. Molecular typing methods have been used as alternatives to serotyping. This study was done to compare random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles and whole cell protein (WCP) lysate profiles as methods for distinguishing H. parasuis reference strains and field isolates. Results The DNA and WCP lysate profiles of 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of H. parasuis were analyzed using the Dice and neighbor joining algorithms. The results revealed unique and reproducible DNA and protein profiles among the reference strains and field isolates studied. Simpson’s index of diversity showed significant discrimination between isolates when three 10mer primers were combined for the RAPD method and also when both the RAPD and WCP lysate typing methods were combined. Conclusions The RAPD profiles seen among the reference strains and field isolates did not appear to change over time which may reflect a lack of DNA mutations in the genes of the samples. The recent field isolates had different WCP lysate profiles than the reference strains, possibly because the number of passages of the type strains may affect their protein expression. PMID:22703293

  20. Evaluation of three methods for DNA fingerprinting of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from goats in Poland.

    PubMed

    Stefańska, Ilona; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Binek, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic approaches based on metabolic and biological characteristics of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis have been limited due to insufficient discrimination between closely related isolates. In this paper we present performance and convenience of three molecular typing methods: BOX-PCR, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction site (ADSRRS-fingerprinting) in genome analysis of these bacteria. Among examined 61 strains there were distinguished four, eight and 10 different genotypes by BOX-PCR, RAPD and ADSRRS-fingerprinting, respectively. The value of discrimination index was the lowest for BOX-PCR (D = 0.265), much bigger for RAPD (D = 0.539) and the highest for ADSRRS-fingerprinting (D = 0.604). The good discriminatory ability and reproducibility of RAPD and ADSRRS-fingerprinting indicates that those techniques may be particularly applied for epidemiological studies of C. pseudotuberculosis isolates. We found that ADSRRS-fingerprinting is a rapid method offering good discrimination power, excellent reproducibility and may be applied for epidemiological studies of intraspecific genetic relatedness of C. pseudotuberculosis strains.

  1. Cloning and Analysis of a DNA Fragment Stimulating Avermectin Production in Various Streptomyces avermitilis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yong-Soon; Kim, Eung-Soo; Biró, Sándor; Choi, Cha-Yong

    2003-01-01

    To isolate a gene for stimulating avermectin production, a genomic library of Streptomyces avermitilis ATCC 31267 was constructed in Streptomyces lividans TK21 as the host strain. An 8.0-kb DNA fragment that significantly stimulated actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production was isolated. When wild-type S. avermitilis was transformed with the cloned fragment, avermectin production increased approximately 3.5-fold. The introduction of this fragment into high-producer (ATCC 31780) and semi-industrial (L-9) strains also resulted in an increase of avermectin production by more than 2.0- and 1.4-fold, respectively. Subclones were studied to locate the minimal region involved in stimulation of pigmented-antibiotic and avermectin production. An analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the entire DNA fragment identified eight complete and one incomplete open reading frame. All but one of the deduced proteins exhibited strong homology (68 to 84% identity) to the hypothetical proteins of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The orfX gene product showed no significant similarity to any other protein in the databases, and an analysis of its sequence suggested that it was a putative membrane protein. Although the nature of the stimulatory effect is still unclear, the disruption of orfX revealed that this gene was intrinsically involved in the stimulation of avermectin production in S. avermitilis. PMID:12571055

  2. Cloning and analysis of a DNA fragment stimulating avermectin production in various Streptomyces avermitilis strains.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong-Soon; Kim, Eung-Soo; Biró, Sándor; Choi, Cha-Yong

    2003-02-01

    To isolate a gene for stimulating avermectin production, a genomic library of Streptomyces avermitilis ATCC 31267 was constructed in Streptomyces lividans TK21 as the host strain. An 8.0-kb DNA fragment that significantly stimulated actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production was isolated. When wild-type S. avermitilis was transformed with the cloned fragment, avermectin production increased approximately 3.5-fold. The introduction of this fragment into high-producer (ATCC 31780) and semi-industrial (L-9) strains also resulted in an increase of avermectin production by more than 2.0- and 1.4-fold, respectively. Subclones were studied to locate the minimal region involved in stimulation of pigmented-antibiotic and avermectin production. An analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the entire DNA fragment identified eight complete and one incomplete open reading frame. All but one of the deduced proteins exhibited strong homology (68 to 84% identity) to the hypothetical proteins of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The orfX gene product showed no significant similarity to any other protein in the databases, and an analysis of its sequence suggested that it was a putative membrane protein. Although the nature of the stimulatory effect is still unclear, the disruption of orfX revealed that this gene was intrinsically involved in the stimulation of avermectin production in S. avermitilis. PMID:12571055

  3. UV-induced skin carcinogenesis in xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) gene-knockout mice with nucleotide excision repair-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Kamiuchi, S; Ren, Y; Yonemasu, R; Ichikawa, M; Murai, H; Yoshino, M; Takeuchi, S; Saijo, M; Nakatsu, Y; Miyauchi-Hashimoto, H; Horio, T

    2001-06-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes a wide variety of lesions from the genome and is deficient in the genetic disorder, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). In this paper, an in vitro analysis of the XP group A gene product (XPA protein) is reported. Results of an analysis on the pathogenesis of ultraviolet (UV)-B-induced skin cancer in the XPA gene-knockout mouse are also described: (1) contrary to wild type mice, significant bias of p53 mutations to the transcribed strand and no evident p53 mutational hot spots were detected in the skin tumors of XPA-knockout mice. (2) Skin cancer cell lines from UVB-irradiated XPA-knockout mice had a decreased mismatch repair activity and an abnormal cell cycle checkpoint, suggesting that the downregulation of mismatch repair helps cells escape killing by UVB and that mismatch repair-deficient clones are selected for during the tumorigenic transformation of XPA (-/-) cells. (3) The XPA-knockout mice showed a higher frequency of UVB-induced mutation in the rpsL transgene at a low dose of UVB-irradiation than the wild type mice. CC-->TT tandem transition, a hallmark of UV-induced mutation, was detected at higher frequency in the rpsL transgene in the XPA-knockout mice than the wild type mice. This rpsL/XPA mouse system will be useful for further analysing the role of NER in the mutagenesis induced by various carcinogens. (4) The UVB-induced immunosuppression was greatly enhanced in the XPA-knockout mice. It is possible that an enhanced impairment of the immune system by UVB irradiation is involved in the high incidence of skin cancer in XP. PMID:11376684

  4. 129-Derived Mouse Strains Express an Unstable but Catalytically Active DNA Polymerase Iota Variant.

    PubMed

    Aoufouchi, Said; De Smet, Annie; Delbos, Frédéric; Gelot, Camille; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-09-01

    Mice derived from the 129 strain have a nonsense codon mutation in exon 2 of the polymerase iota (Polι) gene and are therefore considered Polι deficient. When we amplified Polι mRNA from 129/SvJ or 129/Ola testes, only a small fraction of the full-length cDNA contained the nonsense mutation; the major fraction corresponded to a variant Polι isoform lacking exon 2. Polι mRNA lacking exon 2 contains an open reading frame, and the corresponding protein was detected using a polyclonal antibody raised against the C terminus of the murine Polι protein. The identity of the corresponding protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. Although the variant protein was expressed at only 5 to 10% of the level of wild-type Polι, it retained de novo DNA synthesis activity, the capacity to form replication foci following UV irradiation, and the ability to rescue UV light sensitivity in Polι(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts derived from a new, fully deficient Polι knockout (KO) mouse line. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of 129-derived male mice with Velcade, a drug that inhibits proteasome function, stabilized and restored a substantial amount of the variant Polι in these animals, indicating that its turnover is controlled by the proteasome. An analysis of two xeroderma pigmentosum-variant (XPV) cases corresponding to missense mutants of Polη, a related translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase in the same family, similarly showed a destabilization of the catalytically active mutant protein by the proteasome. Collectively, these data challenge the prevailing hypothesis that 129-derived strains of mice are completely deficient in Polι activity. The data also document, both for 129-derived mouse strains and for some XPV patients, new cases of genetic defects corresponding to the destabilization of an otherwise functional protein, the phenotype of which is reversible by proteasome inhibition.

  5. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  6. DNA sequence analysis of the Hind III M fragment from Chinese vaccine strain of vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, V J; Jin, Q; Jin, D Y; Hou, Y D

    1989-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Hind III M fragment of vaccinia virus (VV) Tian Tan strain genome was determined by the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. Three open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the complementary strand of the sequence, comprised of 2218bp. Among them, ORF K1 initiates its transcription at -45 of the Hind III K fragment. The deduced peptide encoded by K1 contains 284 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 32.48 KDa. Its sequence is homologous to the host range protein of VV Copenhagen strain; the variation is only 2.46% at the amino acid level. ORF M2 could encode a peptide of 21.94 KDa with 196 amino acids. This gene was shown to be homologous to that of the 23 KDa peptide of herpes simplex virus type I. A non-coding region of 204bp located between K1 and M2 is rich in palindromic structures. ORF M1 extends its 3' terminus into the Hind III N fragment. Within the M fragment, M1 can only encode 212 amino acids. The major part of ORF M1 is very similar to the M portion of a possible alpha-amanitin resistance gene isolated from VV-WR strain. This work provides a molecular foundation in the construction of a new insertion vector for the preparation of a recombinant vaccinia virus to be used as a polyvalent live vaccine.

  7. [The development of reagents set in the format of DNA-chip for genetic typing of strains of Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Pudova, E A; Markelov, M L; Dedkov, V G; Tchekanova, T A; Sadjin, A I; Kirdiyashkina, N P; Bekova, M V; Deviyatkin, A A

    2014-05-01

    The necessity of development of methods of genic diagnostic of cholera is conditioned by continuation of the Seventh pandemic of cholera, taxonomic variability of strains of Vibrio cholerae involved into pandemic and also permanent danger of delivery of disease to the territory of the Russian Federation. The methods of genic diagnostic of cholera make it possible in a comparatively short time to maximally minutely characterize strains isolated from patients or their environment. The article presents information about working out reagents set for genetic typing of agents of cholera using DNA-chip. The makeup of DNA-chip included oligonucleotide probes making possible to differentiate strains of V. cholerae on serogroups and biovars and to determine their pathogenicity. The single DNA-chip makes it possible to genetically type up to 12 samples concurrently. At that, duration of analysis without accounting stage of DNA separation makes up to 5 hours. In the progress of work, 23 cholera and non-cholera strains were analyzed. The full compliance of DNA-chip typing results to previously known characteristics of strains. Hence, there is a reason to consider availability of further development of reagents set and possibility of its further application in laboratories of regional level and reference centers. PMID:25338464

  8. DNAaseI-hypersensitive minichromosomes of SV40 possess an elastic torsional strain in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Luchnik, A N; Bakayev, V V; Yugai, A A; Zbarsky, I B; Georgiev, G P

    1985-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that DNA in a small fraction (2-5%) of SV40 minichromosomes was torsionally strained and could be relaxed by treating minichromosomes with topoisomerase I. This fraction was enriched with endogeneous RNA polymerase II (Luchnik et al., 1982, EMBO J., 1, 1353). Here we show that one and the same fraction of SV40 minichromosomes is hypersensitive to DNAase I and is relaxable by topoisomerase I. Moreover, this fraction completely loses its hypersensitivity to DNAase I upon relaxation. The possibility that this fraction of minichromosomes can be represented by naked DNA is ruled out by the results of studying the kinetics of minichromosome digestion by DNAase I in comparison to digestion of pure SV40 DNA and by measuring the buoyant density of SV40 chromatin in equilibrium CsCl gradient. Our data obtained with SV40 minichromosomes may be relevant to the mechanism responsible for DNAase I hypersensitivity in the loops or domains of cellular chromatin. Images PMID:2987817

  9. Replication Fidelity of Escherichia Coli DNA Polymerase III Holoenzyme in Vitro and Repair of Heteroduplex DNA with Multibase Loops in Vivo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraway, Margaretha Bernardina Maria

    The genetic integrity of an organism is maintained by accurate replication and correction of asymmetry in the DNA. To study replication fidelity, single-stranded plasmid DNA containing the mnt gene, was replicated in vitro with DNA polymerase III holoenzyme by extension of a complimentary annealed primer. On this plasmid the mnt region is fused to a promoterless tet gene. Accurate replication of mnt generates a tetracycline sensitive phenotype, errors in replication are identified by mutation to tetracycline resistance. Mismatch repair deficient mutH cells were transformed to ampicillin-resistance by replicated circles. The mutations in mnt were identified by replica plating and selecting for tetracycline resistant cells. The mutation rate was 1 in 100,000. DNA sequence analysis of 65 isolates identified 33 single base changes, 20 deletions and 12 concurrent deletions and insertions. Except for the deletions and substitutions, identical mutations were isolated in vivo in mismatch repair deficient cells. Therefore, in vitro replication errors resemble those isolated in vivo. Heteroduplexes with loops occur as a result of replication or recombination. To examine if E. coli converts these molecules to a homoduplex via DNA repair, plasmid heteroduplexes with loops of 5, 7, 9, 192, 410 or 514 bases in mnt were constructed. Conversion was examined by tranforming the plasmid heteroduplexes into E. coli lysogens which had a non-functional mnt gene fused to a promoterless lac gene. Repair of the heteroduplex to wild type yields white/tetracycline sensitive colonies; repair to the mutant yields red/tetracycline resistant colonies and no repair results in red-white (mixed)/tetracycline resistant colonies. No significant change in colony color distribution was observed when the heteroduplexes were transformed into wild type and the following mutant strains: pcnB, mutS, recA, recD, recBC sbcBC, recF, recJ, recR, recN, recO, recG ruvC, ruvB, lexA3, lexA51, uvrA, recBC sbcBC rec

  10. Molecular characterization of dichloromethane-degrading Hyphomicrobium strains using 16S rDNA and DCM dehalogenase gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Nikolausz, Marcell; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Ziller, Katja; Kästner, Matthias

    2005-09-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 6 strains of dichloromethane (DCM) utilizing bacteria was performed. Based on the almost complete 16S rDNA sequence determination, all strains clustered together and showed high sequence similarity to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans, except for the strain MC8b, which is only moderately related to them and probably represents a distinct species. The 16S rDNA-based phylogenetic tree was compared to the one obtained from the DNA sequence data of the dcmA gene coding DCM dehalogenase, the key enzyme of DCM utilization. The topology of the two trees is in good agreement and may suggest an ancient origin of DCM dehalogenase, but also raises questions about the original role of the enzyme. PMID:16156115

  11. Geographic divergence of "Sulfolobus islandicus" strains assessed by genomic analyses including electronic DNA hybridization confirms they are geovars.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guanghong; Hao, Bailin; Staley, James T

    2014-02-01

    Ten well-annotated genomes of "Sulfolobus islandicus" strains from different geographic locations have been released at the NCBI database. Whole genome based composition vector trees indicate that these strains show the same branching patterns as originally reported by multi-locus sequence analysis. To determine whether the ten strains meet the criteria for separate species, DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) was performed in silico. DDH values of strains from the same geographic location, i.e., Iceland, Kamchatka and North America, ranged from 82.4 to 95.4 %, clearly qualifying them as members of the same species. The lowest DDH values found between locations ranged from 75.5 to 76.6 %, which exceed the 70 % DDH threshold for a species thereby indicating they are all members of the same species based on the currently accepted definition. The clear divergences of strains from the different geographic locations are sufficiently great to consider them as separate geovars. "S. islandicus" has not yet been validly named and a type strain has not been deposited in culture collections. We urgently recommend that those who study the organism fulfill the criteria of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria in order to designate a type strain and to identify and deposit related strains of this species to make them available to the broader scientific community.

  12. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. PMID:27151293

  13. Escherichia Coli Mutator Mutd5 Is Defective in the Muthls Pathway of DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Schaaper, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    We have previously reported that the Escherichia coli mutator strain mutD5 was defective in the correction of bacteriophage M13mp2 heteroduplex DNA containing a T·G mismatch. Here, this defect was further investigated with regard to its interaction with the mutHLS pathway of mismatch repair. A set of 15 different M13mp2 heteroduplexes was used to measure the mismatch-repair capability of wild-type, mutL and mutD5 cells. Throughout the series, the mutD5 strain proved as deficient in mismatch repair as the mutL strain, indicating that the repair defect is similar in the two strains in both extent and specificity. [One exception was noted in the case of a T·G mispair that was subject to VSP (Very Short Patch) repair. VSP repair was abolished by mutL but not by mutD.] Variation in the dam-methylation state of the heteroduplex molecules clearly affected repair in the wild-type strain but had no effect on either the mutD or mutL strain. Finally, mutDmutL or mutDmutS double-mutator strains were no more deficient in mismatch repair as were the single mutator strains. The combined results strongly argue that the mismatch-repair deficiency of mutD5 cells resides in the mutH,L,S-dependent pathway of mismatch repair and that the high mutation rate of mutD strains derives in part from this defect. PMID:2659431

  14. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  15. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range.

    PubMed

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  16. Characterization of eDNA from the clinical strain Acinetobacter baumannii AIIMS 7 and its role in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Praveen K; Iyer, Pavithra S; Oak, Amrita M; Pardesi, Karishma R; Chopade, Balu A

    2012-01-01

    Release of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was observed during in vitro growth of a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii. Membrane vesicles (MV) of varying diameter (20-200 nm) containing DNA were found to be released by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). An assessment of the characteristics of the eDNA with respect to size, digestion pattern by DNase I/restriction enzymes, and PCR-sequencing, indicates a high similarity with genomic DNA. Role of eDNA in static biofilm formed on polystyrene surface was evaluated by biofilm augmentation assay using eDNA available in different preparations, for example, whole cell lysate, cell-free supernatant, MV suspension, and purified eDNA. Biofilm augmentation was seen up to 224.64%, whereas biofilm inhibition was 59.41% after DNase I treatment: confirming that eDNA facilitates biofilm formation in A. baumannii. This is the first paper elucidating the characteristics and role of eDNA in A. baumannii biofilm, which may provide new insights into its pathogenesis. PMID:22593716

  17. Characterization of strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides by analysis of soluble whole-cell protein pattern, DNA fingerprinting and restriction of ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Coppola, S

    1997-05-01

    Of 215 leuconostocs isolated from field grass, natural whey cultures and water-buffalo milk, 178 were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides while 37 strains could not be identified. Biochemical characterization allowed seven groups to be defined. Representative strains of each group and different habitat and nine reference strains were selected for further analyses. Protein profiles appeared suitable for species discrimination, but did not differentiate between the three subspecies of Leuc. mesenteroides. The technique also showed some differences among equivocal strains. DNA fingerprinting for most strains of Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides examined showed a different restriction pattern from that of the type strain. Ribotyping was not useful for discriminating species and subspecies of the genus Leuconostoc: Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides and ssp. dextranicum showed the same ribopattern as Leuc. lactis while Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. cremoris exhibited a pattern distinct from all the other species examined. On the basis of ARDRA-PCR, two main groups could be distinguished: the larger group included Leuc. mesenteroides, Leuc. lactis, Leuc. pseudomesenteroides and some unidentifiable strains; the second one included Leuc. citreum, Leuc. fallax, Weissella paramesenteroides and some unidentified strains.

  18. 129-Derived Mouse Strains Express an Unstable but Catalytically Active DNA Polymerase Iota Variant

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Annie; Delbos, Frédéric; Gelot, Camille; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Mice derived from the 129 strain have a nonsense codon mutation in exon 2 of the polymerase iota (Polι) gene and are therefore considered Polι deficient. When we amplified Polι mRNA from 129/SvJ or 129/Ola testes, only a small fraction of the full-length cDNA contained the nonsense mutation; the major fraction corresponded to a variant Polι isoform lacking exon 2. Polι mRNA lacking exon 2 contains an open reading frame, and the corresponding protein was detected using a polyclonal antibody raised against the C terminus of the murine Polι protein. The identity of the corresponding protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. Although the variant protein was expressed at only 5 to 10% of the level of wild-type Polι, it retained de novo DNA synthesis activity, the capacity to form replication foci following UV irradiation, and the ability to rescue UV light sensitivity in Polι−/− embryonic fibroblasts derived from a new, fully deficient Polι knockout (KO) mouse line. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of 129-derived male mice with Velcade, a drug that inhibits proteasome function, stabilized and restored a substantial amount of the variant Polι in these animals, indicating that its turnover is controlled by the proteasome. An analysis of two xeroderma pigmentosum-variant (XPV) cases corresponding to missense mutants of Polη, a related translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase in the same family, similarly showed a destabilization of the catalytically active mutant protein by the proteasome. Collectively, these data challenge the prevailing hypothesis that 129-derived strains of mice are completely deficient in Polι activity. The data also document, both for 129-derived mouse strains and for some XPV patients, new cases of genetic defects corresponding to the destabilization of an otherwise functional protein, the phenotype of which is reversible by proteasome inhibition. PMID:26124279

  19. 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in determining proportions of coexisting Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Ihalin, Riikka; Asikainen, Sirkka

    2006-06-01

    Certain serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans seem to prefer coexistence in vivo. The 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was tested for its capability to distinguish coexisting A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of different serotypes or genetic lineages and to determine their proportions in vitro. The migration pattern of the PCR amplicon from serotype c differed from those of the other serotypes. Contrary to the strains of serotypes c, d, and e, strains of serotypes a, b, and f consistently demonstrated intra-serotype migration patterns similar to each other. Since the migration patterns differed between serotype c and b strains a strain of each was used to determine their proportional representation in a strain mixture. The strains were distinguishable from each other above the 5% PCR-DGGE detection level (12.5 ng DNA/1.5 x 10(6) cells). DGGE provides a promising tool for in vitro studies on the coexistence of different genetic lineages of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  20. Differentiation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans strains based on 16S-23S rDNA spacer polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Rogério F; Novo, Maria Teresa M; Veríssimo, Ricardo V; Paulino, Luciana C; Stoppe, Nancy C; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Manfio, Gilson P; Prado, Paulo Inácio; Garcia, Oswaldo; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2004-09-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) were used for differentiating Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains from other related acidithiobacilli, including A. ferrooxidans and A. caldus. RFLP fingerprints obtained with AluI, DdeI, HaeIII, HinfI and MspI enabled the differentiation of all Acidithiobacillus reference strains into species groups. The A. thiooxidans strains investigated (metal mine isolates) yielded identical RFLP patterns to the A. thiooxidans type strain (ATCC 19377(T)), except for strain DAMS, which had a distinct pattern for all enzymes tested. Fourteen A. ferrooxidans mine strains were assigned to 3 RFLP groups, the majority of which were grouped with A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T). The spacer region of one representative strain from each of the RFLP groups obtained was subjected to sequence analysis, in addition to eleven additional A. thiooxidans strains isolated from sediment and water samples, and A. caldus DSM 8584(T). The tRNA(IIe) and tRNA(Ala) genes, present in all strains analyzed, showed high sequence similarity. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences differentiated all three Acidithiobacillus species. Inter- and infraspecific genetic variations detected were mainly due to the size and sequence polymorphism of the ITS3 region. Mantel tests showed no significant correlation between ITS sequence similarity and the geographical origin of strains. The results showed that the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region is a useful target for the development of molecular-based methods aimed at the detection, rapid differentiation and identification of acidithiobacilli.

  1. Using a DNA Microarray To Investigate the Distribution of Insect Virulence Factors in Strains of Photorhabdus Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marokhazi, Judit; Waterfield, Nicholas; LeGoff, Gaelle; Feil, Edward; Stabler, Richard; Hinds, Jason; Fodor, Andras; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    Photorhabdus is an insect-pathogenic bacterium in which oral toxicity to insects is found in two distinct taxonomic groups. Using a DNA microarray and comparative genomics, we show that oral toxicity is associated with toxin complex genes tcaABC and that this locus can be mobilized or deleted within different strains.   PMID:12867479

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Rheinheimera sp. F8, a Biofilm-Forming Strain Which Produces Large Amounts of Extracellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Rheinheimera sp. strain F8 is a biofilm-forming gammaproteobacterium that has been found to produce large amounts of filamentous extracellular DNA. Here, we announce the de novo assembly of its genome. It is estimated to be 4,464,511 bp in length, with 3,970 protein-coding sequences and 92 RNA-coding sequences. PMID:26966195

  3. Recombination between homologous chromosomes induced by unrepaired UV-generated DNA damage requires Mus81p and is suppressed by Mms2p.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi; Petes, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    DNA lesions caused by UV radiation are highly recombinogenic. In wild-type cells, the recombinogenic effect of UV partially reflects the processing of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers into DNA gaps or breaks by the enzymes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. In this study, we show that unprocessed pyrimidine dimers also potently induce recombination between homologs. In NER-deficient rad14 diploid strains, we demonstrate that unexcised pyrimidine dimers stimulate crossovers, noncrossovers, and break-induced replication events. The same dose of UV is about six-fold more recombinogenic in a repair-deficient strain than in a repair-proficient strain. We also examined the roles of several genes involved in the processing of UV-induced damage in NER-deficient cells. We found that the resolvase Mus81p is required for most of the UV-induced inter-homolog recombination events. This requirement likely reflects the Mus81p-associated cleavage of dimer-blocked replication forks. The error-free post-replication repair pathway mediated by Mms2p suppresses dimer-induced recombination between homologs, possibly by channeling replication-blocking lesions into recombination between sister chromatids.

  4. Induction of chromosomal damage in CHO-K1 cells and their repair-deficient mutant XRS5 by x-ray and particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasonova, E.; Ritter, S.; Fomenkova, T.; Kraft, G.

    The cytogenetic effects of X-rays and Au ions were investigated in repair-proficient CHO-K1 cells and their radiosensitive mutant strain xrs5, which shows a defect in the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. Both cell lines were synchronized by mitotic shake off, irradiated in G_1-phase with either 250 kV X-rays or 780 MeV/u Au ions (LET: 1150 keV/mum) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed in first post-irradiation metaphases. Isoeffective doses of X-rays for the induction of aberrant cells and aberrations per cell were about 14 times lower for xrs5 than for CHO-K1 cells. After high LET radiation the difference in the cytogenetic response of both cell lines was drastically diminished. Furthermore, the analysis of the aberration types induced by sparsely and densely ionizing radiation showed for both cell lines specific changes in the spectrum of aberration types as LET increases. The experimental results are discussed with respect to the different types of lesions induced by sparsely and densely ionizing radiation.

  5. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, August 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. More specifically, mutant strains will be selected which are deficient in various DNA repair pathways. These strains will be studied with regard to (1) the nature of the defect in repair, and (2) the mutability and transformability of the defective cells by various agents as compared to the wild type parental cells. The results to date include progress in the following areas: (1) determination of optimum conditions for growth and maintenance of cells and for quantitative measurement of various cellular parameters; (2) investigation of the effect of holding mutagenized cells for various periods in a density inhibited state on survival and on mutation and transformation frequencies; (3) examination of the repair capabilities of BHK cells, as compared to repair-proficient and repair-deficient human cells and excision-deficient mouse cells, as measured by the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) treated with radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS); (4) initiation of host cell reactivation viral sucide enrichment and screening of survivors of the enrichment for sensitivity to ionizing radiation; and (5) investigation of the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of various metabolites of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). (ERB)

  6. Synthesis and Assessment of DNA/Silver Nanoclusters Probes for Optimal and Selective Detection of Tristeza Virus Mild Strains.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Ehsan; Hosseini, Morteza; Faridbod, Farnoush; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2016-09-01

    Citrus Tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most destructive pathogens worldwide that exist as a mixture of malicious (Sever) and tolerable (Mild) strains. Mild strains of CTV can be used to immunize healthy plants from more Severe strains damage. Recently, innovative methods based on the fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters have been developed for molecular detection purposes. In this study, a simple procedure was followed to create more active DNA/AgNCs probe for accurate and selective detection of Tristeza Mild-RNA. To this end, four distinct DNA emitter scaffolds (C12, Red, Green, Yellow) were tethered to the Mild capture sequence and investigated in various buffers in order to find highly emissive combinations. Then, to achieve specific and reliable results, several chemical additives, including organic solvents, PEG and organo-soluble salts were used to enhance control fluorescence signals and optimize the hybridization solution. The data showed that, under adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity is enhanced by a factor of five and the high discrimination between Mild and Severe RNAs were obtained. The emission ratio of the DNA/AgNCs was dropped in the presence of target RNAs and I0/I intensity linearly ranged from 1.5 × 10(-8) M to 1.8 × 10(-6) M with the detection limit of 4.3 × 10(-9) M. PMID:27349801

  7. Protective effect of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) against oxidative DNA damage and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Berić, Tanja; Nikolić, Biljana; Stanojević, Jasna; Vuković-Gacić, Branka; Knezević-Vukcević, Jelena

    2008-02-01

    Mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of essential oil (EO) of basil and its major constituent Linalool, reported to possess antioxidative properties, were examined in microbial tests. In Salmonella/microsome and Escherichia. coli WP2 reversion assays both derivatives (0.25-2.0 microl/plate) showed no mutagenic effect. Salmonella. typhimurium TA98, TA100 and TA102 strains displayed similar sensitivity to both basil derivatives as non-permeable E. coli WP2 strains IC185 and IC202 oxyR. Moreover, the toxicity of basil derivatives to WP2 strains did not depend on OxyR function. The reduction of t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis by EO and Linalool (30-60%) was obtained in repair proficient strains of the E. coli K12 assay (Nikolić, B., Stanojević, J., Mitić, D., Vuković-Gacić, B., Knezević-Vukcević, J., Simić, D., 2004. Comparative study of the antimutagenic potential of vitamin E in different E. coli strains. Mutat. Res. 564, 31-38), as well as in E. coli WP2 IC202 strain. EO and Linalool reduced spontaneous mutagenesis in mismatch repair deficient E. coli K12 strains (27-44%). In all tests, antimutagenic effect of basil derivatives was comparable with that obtained with model antioxidant vitamin E. Linalool and vitamin E induced DNA strand breaks in Comet assay on S. cerevisiae 3A cells, but at non-genotoxic concentrations (0.075 and 0.025 microg/ml, respectively) they reduced the number of H(2)O(2)-induced comets (45-70% Linalool and 80-93% vitamin E). Obtained results indicate that antigenotoxic potential of basil derivatives could be attributed to their antioxidative properties.

  8. [Construction of cDNA infectious clones of EV71 highly-pathogenic and cell-culture-adapted strains].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-xin; Li, Xiao-yu; Huang, Yu-ming; Zhou, Yong-dong; Bi, Sheng-li; Cen, Shan

    2014-11-01

    The highly-pathogenic EV71 strain is the primary cause of mortality in hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) associated with neurological symptoms, for which no clinically effective drugs or vaccines exist. This study aimed to construct infectious cDNA clones of the EV71 highly-pathogenic strain and the cell-culture adapted strain using a reverse genetics approach. The genomic RNAs of EV71 parent strains were used as the templates for RT-PCR amplification, and then the PCR products that overlapped the full-length genome were connected into the pBR322 vector to produce infectious clones of pEV71 (HP) and pEV71 (CCA), respectively. The results showed that the HP strain propagated much more quickly than the CCA strain. The rescued viruses derived from the infectious clones not only maintained their consistency with their parent strains in terms of genomic sequences, but also retained their respective biological phenotypes. This research will contribute to our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis and the development of novel vaccines against HFMD.

  9. Intraspecific differentiation of Paramecium novaurelia strains (Ciliophora, Protozoa) inferred from phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Paramecium novaurelia Beale and Schneller, 1954, was first found in Scotland and is known to occur mainly in Europe, where it is the most common species of the P. aurelia complex. In recent years, two non-European localities have been described: Turkey and the United States of America. This article presents the analysis of intraspecific variability among 25 strains of P. novaurelia with the application of ribosomal and mitochondrial loci (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 5' large subunit rDNA (5'LSU rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) mtDNA). The mean distance observed for all of the studied P. novaurelia sequence pairs was p=0.008/0.016/0.092 (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2/5'LSU rDNA/COI). Phylogenetic trees (NJ/MP/BI) based on a comparison of all of the analysed sequences show that the studied strains of P. novaurelia form a distinct clade, separate from the P. caudatum outgroup, and are divided into two clusters (A and B) and two branches (C and D). The occurrence of substantial genetic differentiation within P. novaurelia, confirmed by the analysed DNA fragments, indicates a rapid evolution of particular species within the Paramecium genus.

  10. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  11. Characterization of DNA fragment from Chlamydia psittaci avian strain which shows high homology with hypB gene of Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Sato, C; Katumata, A; Takashima, I; Hashimoto, N

    1991-12-01

    A study was performed to characterize DNA fragment No. 17 of C. psittaci strain P-1041 which encoded 42 KD beta-galactosidase fusion protein with type-specific antigenicity. Sequence determination identified a partial open reading frame that spanned about 1,200b. p. nucleotides. Screening the literatures for the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences revealed extensive similarity between the DNA fragment of P-1041 and two chlamydial hypB genes. This DNA showed 91.5% homology with C. psittaci GPIC hypB gene in nucleotide sequence and 96.4% homology in deduced amino acid sequence. The hypB gene of C. trachomatis serovar A and the P-1041 DNA fragment showed 81.2% and 91.3% homology in nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. Dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for the products of deleted DNA fragments defined the coding region for type-specific antigenic polypeptide. In addition, the P-1041 DNA fragment carried a sequence highly homologous (greater than 49%) with other bacterial and plant genes called chaperonin which responds to various stress in cells. From these results, the P-1041 DNA fragment was found to be a part of hypB gene and to encode the region critical for type-specific antigenicity.

  12. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  13. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  14. Cd hyperfine interactions in DNA bases and DNA of mouse strains infected with Trypanosoma cruzi investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Philippe A D; Silva, Andreia S; Gonçalves, Marcos B; Lapolli, André L; Ferreira, Ana Maria C; Carbonari, Artur W; Petrilli, Helena M

    2014-06-01

    In this work, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy is used to study differences in the nuclear quadrupole interactions of Cd probes in DNA molecules of mice infected with the Y-strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The possibility of investigating the local genetic alterations in DNA, which occur along generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, using hyperfine interactions obtained from PAC measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations in DNA bases is discussed. A comparison of DFT calculations with PAC measurements could determine the type of Cd coordination in the studied molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use DFT calculations and PAC measurements to investigate the local environment of Cd ions bound to DNA bases in mice infected with Chagas disease. The obtained results also allowed the detection of local changes occurring in the DNA molecules of different generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, opening the possibility of using this technique as a complementary tool in the characterization of complicated biological systems.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of ER2796, a DNA Methyltransferase-Deficient Strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Anton, Brian P; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Agrawal, Sonia; Fomenkov, Alexey; Byrd, Devon R; Roberts, Richard J; Raleigh, Elisabeth A

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially co-linear relationship with no major rearrangements despite many generations of laboratory manipulation. The comparison revealed a total of 41 insertions and deletions, and 228 single base pair substitutions. In addition, the long-read approach facilitated the surprising discovery of four gene conversion events, three involving rRNA operons and one between two cryptic prophages. Such events thus contribute both to genomic homogenization and to bacteriophage diversification. As one of relatively few laboratory strains of E. coli to be sequenced, the genome also reveals the sequence changes underlying a number of classical mutant alleles including those affecting the various native DNA methylation systems.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of ER2796, a DNA Methyltransferase-Deficient Strain of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Brian P.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Agrawal, Sonia; Fomenkov, Alexey; Byrd, Devon R.; Roberts, Richard J.; Raleigh, Elisabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially co-linear relationship with no major rearrangements despite many generations of laboratory manipulation. The comparison revealed a total of 41 insertions and deletions, and 228 single base pair substitutions. In addition, the long-read approach facilitated the surprising discovery of four gene conversion events, three involving rRNA operons and one between two cryptic prophages. Such events thus contribute both to genomic homogenization and to bacteriophage diversification. As one of relatively few laboratory strains of E. coli to be sequenced, the genome also reveals the sequence changes underlying a number of classical mutant alleles including those affecting the various native DNA methylation systems. PMID:26010885

  17. Modulation of recombination and DNA repair by the RecG and PriA helicases of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Deib, A A; Mahdi, A A; Lloyd, R G

    1996-01-01

    The RecG protein of Escherichia coli is a structure-specific DNA helicase that targets strand exchange intermediates in genetic recombination and drives their branch migration along the DNA. Strains carrying null mutations in recG show reduced recombination and DNA repair. Suppressors of this phenotype, called srgA, were located close to metB and shown to be alleles of priA. Suppression depends on the RecA, RecBCD, RecF, RuvAB, and RuvC recombination proteins. Nine srgA mutations were sequenced and shown to specify mutant PriA proteins with single amino acid substitutions located in or close to one of the conserved helicase motifs. The mutant proteins retain the ability to catalyze primosome assembly, as judged by the viability of recG srgA and srgA strains and their ability to support replication of plasmids based on the ColE1 replicon. Multicopy priA+ plasmids increase substantially the recombination- and repair-deficient phenotype of recG strains and confer similar phenotypes on recG srgA double mutants but not on ruvAB or wild-type strains. The multicopy effect is eliminated by K230R, C446G, and C477G substitutions in PriA. It is concluded that the 3'-5' DNA helicase/translocase activity of PriA inhibits recombination and that this effect is normally countered by RecG. PMID:8955297

  18. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  19. Paths of Heritable Mitochondrial DNA Mutation and Heteroplasmy in Reference and gas-1 Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wernick, Riana I.; Estes, Suzanne; Howe, Dana K.; Denver, Dee R.

    2016-01-01

    Heteroplasmy—the presence of more than one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence type in a cell, tissue, or individual—impacts human mitochondrial disease and numerous aging-related syndromes. Understanding the trans-generational dynamics of mtDNA is critical to understanding the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial disease and evolution. We investigated mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmy using a set of wild-type (N2 strain) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) mutant (gas-1) mutant Caenorhabditis elegans mutation-accumulation (MA) lines. The N2 MA lines, derived from a previous experiment, were bottlenecked for 250 generations. The gas-1 MA lines were created for this study, and bottlenecked in the laboratory for up to 50 generations. We applied Illumina-MiSeq DNA sequencing to L1 larvae from five gas-1 MA lines and five N2 MA lines to detect and characterize mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmic inheritance patterns evolving under extreme drift. mtDNA copy number increased in both sets of MA lines: three-fold on average among the gas-1 MA lines and five-fold on average among N2 MA lines. Eight heteroplasmic single base substitution polymorphisms were detected in the gas-1 MA lines; only one was observed in the N2 MA lines. Heteroplasmy frequencies ranged broadly in the gas-1 MA lines, from as low as 2.3% to complete fixation (homoplasmy). An initially low-frequency (<5%) heteroplasmy discovered in the gas-1 progenitor was observed to fix in one gas-1 MA line, achieve higher frequency (37.4%) in another, and be lost in the other three lines. A similar low-frequency heteroplasmy was detected in the N2 progenitor, but was lost in all five N2 MA lines. We identified three insertion-deletion (indel) heteroplasmies in gas-1 MA lines and six indel variants in the N2 MA lines, most occurring at homopolymeric nucleotide runs. The observed bias toward accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gas-1 MA lines is consistent with the idea that impaired

  20. Paths of Heritable Mitochondrial DNA Mutation and Heteroplasmy in Reference and gas-1 Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wernick, Riana I; Estes, Suzanne; Howe, Dana K; Denver, Dee R

    2016-01-01

    Heteroplasmy-the presence of more than one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence type in a cell, tissue, or individual-impacts human mitochondrial disease and numerous aging-related syndromes. Understanding the trans-generational dynamics of mtDNA is critical to understanding the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial disease and evolution. We investigated mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmy using a set of wild-type (N2 strain) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) mutant (gas-1) mutant Caenorhabditis elegans mutation-accumulation (MA) lines. The N2 MA lines, derived from a previous experiment, were bottlenecked for 250 generations. The gas-1 MA lines were created for this study, and bottlenecked in the laboratory for up to 50 generations. We applied Illumina-MiSeq DNA sequencing to L1 larvae from five gas-1 MA lines and five N2 MA lines to detect and characterize mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmic inheritance patterns evolving under extreme drift. mtDNA copy number increased in both sets of MA lines: three-fold on average among the gas-1 MA lines and five-fold on average among N2 MA lines. Eight heteroplasmic single base substitution polymorphisms were detected in the gas-1 MA lines; only one was observed in the N2 MA lines. Heteroplasmy frequencies ranged broadly in the gas-1 MA lines, from as low as 2.3% to complete fixation (homoplasmy). An initially low-frequency (<5%) heteroplasmy discovered in the gas-1 progenitor was observed to fix in one gas-1 MA line, achieve higher frequency (37.4%) in another, and be lost in the other three lines. A similar low-frequency heteroplasmy was detected in the N2 progenitor, but was lost in all five N2 MA lines. We identified three insertion-deletion (indel) heteroplasmies in gas-1 MA lines and six indel variants in the N2 MA lines, most occurring at homopolymeric nucleotide runs. The observed bias toward accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gas-1 MA lines is consistent with the idea that impaired

  1. Construction and use of an ipb DNA module to generate Pseudomonas strains with constitutive trichloroethene and isopropylbenzene oxidation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Berendes, F.; Sabarth, N.; Averhoff, B.; Gottschalk, G.

    1998-07-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JR1 exhibits trichloroethene (TCE) oxidation activity with isopropylbenzene (IPB) as the inducer substrate. The authors previously reported the genes encoding the first three enzymes of the IPB-deg-radiative pathway (ipbAl, ipbA2, ipbA3, ipbA4, ipbB, and ipbC) an identified the initial IPB dioxygenase (IpbAlA2A3A4) as responsible for TCE cooxidation. Primer extension analyses revealed multiple transcriptional start points located upstream of the translational initiation codon of ipbA1. The transcription from these start sites was found to be IPB dependent. Thirty-one base pairs upstream of the first transcriptional start point tandemly repeated DNA sequences overlapping the {minus}35 region of a putative {sigma}{sup 70} promoter were found. These repeats exhibit significant sequence3 similarity to the operator-promoter region of the xyl meta operon in Pseudomonas putida, which is required for the binding of XylS, a regulatory protein of the XylS (also called AraC) family. These similarities suggest that the transcription of the IPB dioxygenase genes is modulated by a regulatory protein of the XylS/AraC family. The construction of an ipb DNA module devoid of this ipb operator-promoter region and the stable insertion of this DNA module into the genomes of different Pseudomonas strains resulted in pseudomonads with constitutive IPB and TCE oxidation activities. Constitutive TCE oxidation of two such Pseudomonas hybrid strains, JR1A::ipb and CBS-3::ipb, was found to be stable for more than 120 generations in antibiotic-free medium. Evaluation of constitutive TCE degradation rates revealed that continuous cultivation of strain JR1A::ipb resulted in a significant increase in rates of TCE degradation.

  2. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  3. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. ); Chen, D.S. . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  4. Phenotypic characterization and genomic DNA polymorphisms of Escherichia coli strains isolated as the sole micro-organism from vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Lobos, Olga; Padilla, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Vaginal infections such as vulvovaginal candiadiasis, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis are common worldwide. Accurate diagnosis and prescription of appropriate treatments are important since these infections are linked to adverse outcomes for women during pregnancy and for newborns. Several aetiological agents are responsible for these infectious diseases; however, the presence of Escherichia coli in these infections is controversial. Thus, it is important to identify some phenotypic and genotypic properties of E. coli strains isolated from vaginal infections. Forty-six E. coli strains isolated from vaginal fluid as the sole micro-organism, and 20 other E. coli strains isolated from other samples (urinary tract infections, otitis and septicaemia) were analysed by several phenotypic tests. In addition, genotypic features were studied by RAPD-PCR techniques. Biochemical tests showed that the E. coli strains isolated from vaginal fluid could be grouped into a single cluster which is subdivided into two phenogroups. Analysis of the dendrogram based on fragment length polymorphisms of genomic DNA indicated that E. coli isolates from vaginal infections form a single cluster with two subdivisions. Further studies are needed to analyse the molecular structure and virulence characteristics of these E. coli strains in order to determine their potential role in vaginal infections.

  5. Characterization of Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) feed and larvae: safety, DNA fingerprinting, and bacteriocinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2016-05-01

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics constitutes an alternative or complementary strategy to chemotherapy and vaccination for disease control in aquaculture. The objectives of this work were (1) the in vitro safety assessment of 8 Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) feed and larvae; (2) the evaluation of their genetic relatedness; (3) the study of their antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens; and (4) the biochemical and genetic characterization of the bacteriocin produced by the strain displaying the greatest antimicrobial activity. Concerning the safety assessment, none of the pediococci showed antibiotic resistance nor produced hemolysin or gelatinase, degraded gastric mucin, or deconjugated bile salts. Four strains (50%) produced tyramine or putrescine, but the corresponding genes were not amplified by PCR. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR) fingerprinting allowed clustering of the pediococci into 2 well-defined groups (68% similarity). From the 8 pediococci displaying direct antimicrobial activity against at least 3 out of 9 fish pathogens, 6 strains (75%) were identified as bacteriocin producers. The bacteriocin produced by P. acidilactici L-14 was purified, and mass spectrometry and DNA sequencing revealed its identity to pediocin PA-1 (PedPA-1). Altogether, our results allowed the identification of 4 (50%) putatively safe pediococci, including 2 bacteriocinogenic strains. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting was a valuable tool for genetic profiling of P. acidilactici strains. This work reports for the first time the characterization of a PedPA-1-producing P. acidilactici strain isolated from an aquatic environment (rainbow trout larvae), which shows interesting properties related to its potential use as a probiotic in aquaculture.

  6. Characterization of Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) feed and larvae: safety, DNA fingerprinting, and bacteriocinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2016-05-01

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics constitutes an alternative or complementary strategy to chemotherapy and vaccination for disease control in aquaculture. The objectives of this work were (1) the in vitro safety assessment of 8 Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) feed and larvae; (2) the evaluation of their genetic relatedness; (3) the study of their antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens; and (4) the biochemical and genetic characterization of the bacteriocin produced by the strain displaying the greatest antimicrobial activity. Concerning the safety assessment, none of the pediococci showed antibiotic resistance nor produced hemolysin or gelatinase, degraded gastric mucin, or deconjugated bile salts. Four strains (50%) produced tyramine or putrescine, but the corresponding genes were not amplified by PCR. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR) fingerprinting allowed clustering of the pediococci into 2 well-defined groups (68% similarity). From the 8 pediococci displaying direct antimicrobial activity against at least 3 out of 9 fish pathogens, 6 strains (75%) were identified as bacteriocin producers. The bacteriocin produced by P. acidilactici L-14 was purified, and mass spectrometry and DNA sequencing revealed its identity to pediocin PA-1 (PedPA-1). Altogether, our results allowed the identification of 4 (50%) putatively safe pediococci, including 2 bacteriocinogenic strains. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting was a valuable tool for genetic profiling of P. acidilactici strains. This work reports for the first time the characterization of a PedPA-1-producing P. acidilactici strain isolated from an aquatic environment (rainbow trout larvae), which shows interesting properties related to its potential use as a probiotic in aquaculture. PMID:27137071

  7. Clinical implications of the basic defects in Cockayne Syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum and the DNA lesions responsible for cancer, neurodegeneration and aging

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, J.E.; Revet, I.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer, aging, and neurodegeneration are all associated with DNA damage and repair in complex fashions. Aging appears to be a cell and tissue-wide process linked to the insulin-dependent pathway in several DNA repair deficient disorders, especially in mice. Cancer and neurodegeneration appear to have complementary relationships to DNA damage and repair. Cancer arises from surviving cells, or even stem cells, that have down-regulated many pathways, including apoptosis, that regulate genomic stability in a multi-step process. Neurodegeneration however occurs in nondividing neurones in which the persistence of apoptosis in response to reactive oxygen species is, itself, pathological. Questions that remain open concern: sources and chemical nature of naturally occurring DNA damaging agents, especially whether mitochondria are the true source; the target tissues for DNA damage and repair; do the human DNA repair deficient diseases delineate specific pathways of DNA damage relevant to clinical outcomes; if naturally occurring reactive oxygen species are pathological in human repair deficient disease, would anti-oxidants or anti-apoptotic agents be feasible therapeutic agent? PMID:18336867

  8. DNA Fingerprinting of Lactobacillus crispatus Strain CTV-05 by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR Analysis in a Pilot Study of Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, May A. D.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2003-01-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the predominant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing species found in the vagina and is under development as a probiotic for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. In this study, we assessed whether DNA fingerprinting by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) can be used to distinguish the capsule strain of L. crispatus (CTV-05) from other endogenous strains as well as other species of vaginal lactobacilli. Vaginal and rectal lactobacilli were identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probe DNA hybridization. The DNAs from L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. gasseri, and an as-yet-unnamed H2O2-negative Lactobacillus species designated 1086V were subjected to rep-PCR. The results of gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining of the DNA fingerprints obtained were compared. L. crispatus CTV-05 had a unique DNA fingerprint compared to all other lactobacilli. DNA fingerprints for 27 production lots of L. crispatus sampled from 1994 through 2001 were identical to that of the original strain isolated in 1993, suggesting strain stability. In a pilot study of nine women, this DNA fingerprinting method distinguished CTV-05 from other endogenous vaginal lactobacilli prior to and after vaginal capsule use. rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting is useful for strain typing and for evaluating longitudinal loss or acquisition of vaginal lactobacilli used as probiotics. PMID:12734221

  9. DNA fingerprinting of Lactobacillus crispatus strain CTV-05 by repetitive element sequence-based PCR analysis in a pilot study of vaginal colonization.

    PubMed

    Antonio, May A D; Hillier, Sharon L

    2003-05-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the predominant hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-producing species found in the vagina and is under development as a probiotic for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. In this study, we assessed whether DNA fingerprinting by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) can be used to distinguish the capsule strain of L. crispatus (CTV-05) from other endogenous strains as well as other species of vaginal lactobacilli. Vaginal and rectal lactobacilli were identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probe DNA hybridization. The DNAs from L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. gasseri, and an as-yet-unnamed H(2)O(2)-negative Lactobacillus species designated 1086V were subjected to rep-PCR. The results of gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining of the DNA fingerprints obtained were compared. L. crispatus CTV-05 had a unique DNA fingerprint compared to all other lactobacilli. DNA fingerprints for 27 production lots of L. crispatus sampled from 1994 through 2001 were identical to that of the original strain isolated in 1993, suggesting strain stability. In a pilot study of nine women, this DNA fingerprinting method distinguished CTV-05 from other endogenous vaginal lactobacilli prior to and after vaginal capsule use. rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting is useful for strain typing and for evaluating longitudinal loss or acquisition of vaginal lactobacilli used as probiotics. PMID:12734221

  10. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal

  11. INDUCTION OF DNA ADDUCTS, TUMORS, AND KI-RAS ONCOGENE MUTATIONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG BY IP. ADMINISTRATION OF DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of DNA adducts, tumors, and Ki-ras oncogene mutations in strain AlJ mouse lung by ip. administration of dibenz[a,h]anthracene

    Previous studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) induced lung tumors in the strain NJ mouse model system have demonstrated qua...

  12. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  13. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22.

    PubMed

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-10-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2'-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H](+) > [M + H - 116](+) transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  14. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2′-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H]+ > [M + H − 116]+ transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2′-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  15. Approach to molecular characterization of different strains of Fasciola hepatica using random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Scarcella, S; Miranda-Miranda, E; Solana, M V; Solana, H

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically characterize Fasciola hepatica strains from diverse ecogeographical regions (America and Europe), susceptible and resistant to Triclabendazole, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA fragments (RAPDs-PCR) technique to elucidate genetic variability between the different isolates. Ten different oligonucleotide primers of 10 bases with GC content varying from 50-70% were used. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out in 25 μl of total volume. Duplicate PCR reactions on each individual template DNA were performed to test the reproducibility of the individual DNA bands. The size of the RAPD-PCR fragments was determined by the reciprocal plot between the delay factors (Rf) versus the logarithm of molecular weight ladder. The phenogram obtained showed three main clusters, the major of which contained European Strains (Cullompton and Sligo) showing a genetic distance of 27.2 between them. The American strains (Cedive and Cajamarca) on the other hand formed each their distinctive group but clearly maintaining a closer genetic relationship among them than that to their European counterparts, with which showed a distance of 33.8 and 37.8, respectively. This polymorphism would give this species enhanced adaptability against the host, as well as the environment. The existence of genetically different populations of F. hepatica could allow, against any selection pressure, natural or artificial (for use fasciolicides products and/or control measures), one or more populations of F. hepatica to be able to survive and create resistance or adaptability to such selective pressure. PMID:25595655

  16. Approach to molecular characterization of different strains of Fasciola hepatica using random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Scarcella, S; Miranda-Miranda, E; Solana, M V; Solana, H

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically characterize Fasciola hepatica strains from diverse ecogeographical regions (America and Europe), susceptible and resistant to Triclabendazole, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA fragments (RAPDs-PCR) technique to elucidate genetic variability between the different isolates. Ten different oligonucleotide primers of 10 bases with GC content varying from 50-70% were used. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out in 25 μl of total volume. Duplicate PCR reactions on each individual template DNA were performed to test the reproducibility of the individual DNA bands. The size of the RAPD-PCR fragments was determined by the reciprocal plot between the delay factors (Rf) versus the logarithm of molecular weight ladder. The phenogram obtained showed three main clusters, the major of which contained European Strains (Cullompton and Sligo) showing a genetic distance of 27.2 between them. The American strains (Cedive and Cajamarca) on the other hand formed each their distinctive group but clearly maintaining a closer genetic relationship among them than that to their European counterparts, with which showed a distance of 33.8 and 37.8, respectively. This polymorphism would give this species enhanced adaptability against the host, as well as the environment. The existence of genetically different populations of F. hepatica could allow, against any selection pressure, natural or artificial (for use fasciolicides products and/or control measures), one or more populations of F. hepatica to be able to survive and create resistance or adaptability to such selective pressure.

  17. Construction of Agrobacterium strains by electroporation of genomic DNA and its utility in analysis of chromosomal virulence mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, T C; Doty, S L; Nester, E W

    1994-01-01

    We have extended the technique of electroporation as a genetic tool for manipulating the Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosome. We used this technique to introduce chromosomal DNA into recipient A. tumefaciens strains by electroporation and constructed isogenic chvE mutants that share the same chromosomal background but differ in their types of pTi (octopine or nopaline). Both nopaline and octopine pTi-carrying chvE mutants were deficient in vir regulon induction and exhibited similar reductions in host range. PMID:7993100

  18. Minute virus of mice: antibody response, viral shedding, and persistence of viral DNA in multiple strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Mähler, Michael; Köhl, Wiebke; Smoczek, Anna; Hedrich, Hans J; Bleich, Andre

    2008-08-01

    Minute virus of mice (MVM) is a major concern for laboratory animal facilities because it remains with considerably high prevalence despite strict barrier systems. The aim of this study was to elucidate potential risks associated with MVM infection by investigating the role of the genetic background on antibody production and persistence as well as viral shedding. Mice of various strains and stocks were inoculated oronasally with the immunosuppressive strain MVMi; in addition, natural infection was modeled through contact exposure. As determined by serology, seroconversion and serum levels of IgG differed considerably among strains and stocks, especially in the contact-exposed group. For example, C57BL/6J mice responded well to exposure in contrast to FVB/N, NMRI, ICR, and C3H/HeN mice. Titration studies indicated that the viral dose necessary to induce seroconversion was strain-dependent. Experiments to dissect the role of the major histocompatibility complex haplotype in the response to MVMi gave inconclusive results. To detect viral persistence, spleens and feces were analyzed by PCR at 16 wk after exposure, and the infectivity of PCR-positive spleens was investigated by IP and oronasal inoculation of naive mice. Although DNA was detected in the spleens of some mice, feces remained negative, and naive mice were not infected by inoculation. In addition, viral shedding declined rapidly after day 20 postinoculation. In summary, the data show that seroconversion and antibody response to MVMi infection depend on the genetic background of mice, with the infective dose being a critical factor. The role of viral DNA in chronically infected mice will require further elucidation.

  19. DNA-Damage Foci to Detect and Characterize DNA Repair Alterations in Children Treated for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mareike; Betten, Dominik; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Rübe, Christian; Graf, Norbert; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA) suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. Methods and Materials In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. Results Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. Conclusions Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies. PMID:24637877

  20. Extrachromosomal DNA isolated from tomato big bud and Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense phytoplasma strains.

    PubMed

    Tran-Nguyen, L T T; Gibb, K S

    2006-11-01

    The nucleotide sequences of two extrachromosomal elements from tomato big bud (TBB) and one extrachromosomal element from Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense (Ca. P. australiense) phytoplasmas were determined. Both TBB plasmids (3319 and 4092 bp) contained an open reading frame ( approximately 570 bp) with homology to the rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep). This gene was shorter than the rep genes identified from other phytoplasma plasmids, geminiviruses and bacterial plasmids. Both TBB extrachromosomal DNAs (eDNAs) encoded a putative DNA primase (dnaG) gene, a chromosomal gene required for DNA replication and which contains the conserved topoisomerase/primase domain. We speculate that the replication mechanism for the TBB phytoplasma eDNA involves the dnaG gene instead of the rep gene. The Ca. P. australiense eDNA (3773 bp) was shown to be circular and contained four open reading frames. The rep gene was encoded on ORF 1 and had homology to both plasmid (pLS1) and geminivirus-like domains.

  1. Detection and identification of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas strains by amplification of DNA sequences related to the hrp genes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed Central

    Leite, R P; Minsavage, G V; Bonas, U; Stall, R E

    1994-01-01

    Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers specific for different regions of the hrp gene (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) cluster of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria were designed and tested for amplification of DNA isolated from a large number of different bacteria. DNA sequences related to the hrp genes were successfully amplified from X. fragariae and from 28 pathovars of X. campestris. No DNA amplification occurred with genomic DNA from phytopathogenic strains of X. campestris pv. secalis, X. campestris pv. translucens, and X. albilineans or from nonpathogenic opportunistic xanthomonads and phytopathogenic strains of the genera Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Clavibacter, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, and Xylella. The DNA from those bacteria also failed to hybridize to hrp-specific fragments in Southern blot analysis. DNA fragments amplified with a particular primer pair were of identical size from each of the different phytopathogenic xanthomonads. However, restriction analysis of these fragments by using frequently cutting endonucleases revealed variation in the pattern for these hrp-related fragments amplified from the different Xanthomonas strains. The restriction patterns generated for the different fragments allowed distinction of the strains representing a pathovar or species of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. We believe that DNA amplification with hrp-specific oligonucleotide primers is a highly sensitive and specific method that can be applied for detection and identification of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. Images PMID:8017904

  2. Assessment of inbreeding by DNA fingerprinting: development of a calibration curve using defined strains of chickens.

    PubMed

    Kuhnlein, U; Zadworny, D; Dawe, Y; Fairfull, R W; Gavora, J S

    1990-05-01

    By analyzing DNA fingerprints of chickens from seven well-defined genetic groups, a calibration curve was established relating the degree of inbreeding with the average band frequency, allelic frequency and band sharing. The probe used was bacteriophage M13 DNA and digestion of the genomic DNA was carried out with the MspI restriction enzyme. The analysis also provided an estimate of the average allelic frequency at a hypervariable locus and the average mutation frequency per locus and generation. The values of 0.24 and 1.7 X 10(-3), respectively, are similar to the estimates for humans using other probes and hybridization protocols. It is suggested that the calibration curve established can be used for determining inbreeding not only in chickens, but also in other species.

  3. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis to differentiate strains of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, A W; Usera, M A; Barrett, T J; Goldsby, R A

    1996-01-01

    A random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting method has been developed to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis isolates. A total of 65 arbitrary primers were screened with S. enteritidis isolates of different phage types. This allowed selection of a panel of primers capable of detecting DNA polymorphisms among S. enteritidis isolates. This panel was used to examine a panel of 29 isolates of S. enteritidis which had been previously characterized by other subtyping methods, including phage typing (PT) (n = 7), ribotyping (RT) (n = 13), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Applied collectively, these three methods resolved the collection into 20 different subtypes. However, by the RAPD fingerprinting method alone, 14 RAPD subtypes were revealed. Eight isolates of S. enteritidis phage type 8 that failed to be discriminated by other typing methods (PT, RT, and PFGE) were resolved into three different subtypes by RAPD analysis. In contrast, isolates that were derived from the same sources were not differentiated by any of the subtyping methods employed, including PT, RT, PFGE, and RAPD analysis. This RAPD approach to S. enteritidis subtyping provided more discriminatory power than did any of several other subtyping methods applied individually. Once the challenging step of primer identification was accomplished, determinations of the appropriate concentrations of arbitrary primer, DNA template, and MG2+ ion were also necessary for optimal discriminatory power. The bacterial DNA used in this RAPD protocol was obtained by boiling the bacterial sample. This simple procedure yielded DNA that produced fingerprint patterns as consistent as those obtained from phenol-chloroform-extracted DNA. Clearly, when appropriately constituted primer sets are identified and employed, RAPD analysis provides a simple, rapid, and powerful subtyping method for S. enteritidis. PMID:8815099

  4. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras.

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Garcia, L; Ferrera, A; Hoffner, S E

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 84 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras were characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Seventy-three different IS6110 patterns were found; 63 of these were unique and 10 were shared by two to three strains each. Thus, no ongoing spread of any specific clone of bacteria could be demonstrated. PMID:9276422

  5. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes. PMID:25186244

  6. Stable high-copy-number integration of Aspergillus oryzae alpha-AMYLASE cDNA in an industrial baker's yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Nieto, A; Prieto, J A; Sanz, P

    1999-01-01

    The Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase cDNA was placed under the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin promoter (pACT1) and introduced into the ribosomal DNA locus of an industrial baker's yeast strain. To obtain a strain eligible for commercial use, we constructed an integrative cassette lacking bacterial DNA sequences but containing the alpha-amylase cDNA and ribosomal DNA sequences to target the integration to this locus. High-copy-number integrants were obtained including a defective TRP1d promoter in the integrative cassette. We selected one transformant, Rib-AMY (CECT10872), in which the multi-integrated sequences were stable even after 200 generations of growth in nonselective medium. This transformant also expressed and secreted high levels of alpha-amylase. Bread made with this strain had a higher volume, lower density, and softer crumbs than bread made with a control strain. The Rib-AMY transformant also was useful in retarding bread firming. This new strain fulfills all the requirements for commercial utilization and should reduce or eliminate the requirement for addition of exogenous alpha-amylase to the flour, reducing allergenic work-related symptoms due to this enzyme.

  7. Prevention of heterocyclic amine-induced DNA damage in colon and liver of rats by different lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Zsivkovits, Markus; Fekadu, Kassie; Sontag, Gerhard; Nabinger, Ursula; Huber, Wolfgang W; Kundi, Michael; Chakraborty, Asima; Foissy, Helmuth; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2003-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of four different lactobacillus (LB) strains, namely Lactobacillus bulgaricus 291, Streptococcus thermophilus F4, S.thermophilus V3 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536, which are used for the production of yogurt, on the DNA-damaging effects of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs). Male F344 rats were treated orally with HCA mixtures containing 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole and 2-amino-3-methyl-3H- imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, which were representative of the HCA contents found in fried beef ('beef mix') and chicken ('chicken mix'). Suspensions of LB were given by gavage to the animals simultaneously with and at different time periods before administration of the HCAs. Subsequently, the extent of DNA migration was measured in colon and liver cells in single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assays. All four strains caused complete inhibition of DNA damage induced with beef mix after administration of 1 x 1010 LB cells/animal, whereas with chicken mix only marginal (non-significant) effects were seen. The inhibition of beef-induced DNA damage was dose dependent and was still significant when 1 x 107 cells/animal were administered. Kinetics studies showed that the protective effects were still significant when LB was given 12 h before the beef mix. A comparison of the present results with chemical analytical data from in vitro experiments suggests that the strong reduction in DNA migration seen in the animals can be only partly explained by direct binding effects. The results of the present study show that LB are highly protective against the genotoxic effects of HCAs under conditions which are relevant for humans and provide a possible explanation for the reduced colon cancer rates observed in some studies in individuals with either high LB counts in their feces or with

  8. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1-5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus DNA sequenci...

  9. Signal strains that can detect certain DNA replication and membrane mutants of Escherichia coli: Isolation of a new ssb allele, ssb-3

    SciTech Connect

    Schmellik-Sandage, C.S.; Tessman, E.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Mutations in several dna genes of Escherichia coli, when introduced into a strain with a lac fusion in the SOS gene sulA, resulted in formation of blue colonies on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (X-Gal). Unexpectedly, several lines of evidence indicated that the blue colony color was not primarily due to induction of the SOS system but rather was due to a membrane defect, along with the replication defect, making the cell X-Gal extrasensitive (phenotypically Xgx), possibly because of enhanced permeability to X-Gal or leakage of beta-galactosidase. (i) In most cases, beta-galactosidase specific activity increased only two- to threefold. (ii) Mutations conferring tolerance to colicin E1 resulted in blue colony color with no increase in beta-galactosidase specific activity. (iii) Mutations in either the dnaA, dnaB, dnaC, dnaE, dnaG, or ssb gene, when introduced into a strain containing a bioA::lac fusion, produced a blue colony color without an increase in beta-galactosidase synthesis. These lac fusion strains can serve as signal strains to detect dna mutations as well as membrane mutations. By localized mutagenesis of the 92-min region of the chromosome of the sulA::lac signal strain and picking blue colonies, we isolated a novel ssb allele that confers the same extreme UV sensitivity as a delta recA allele, which is a considerably greater sensitivity than that conferred by the two well-studied ssb alleles, ssb-1 and ssb-113. The technique also yielded dnaB mutants; fortuitously, uvrA mutants were also found.

  10. Signal strains that can detect certain DNA replication and membrane mutants of Escherichia coli: isolation of a new ssb allele, ssb-3.

    PubMed Central

    Schmellik-Sandage, C S; Tessman, E S

    1990-01-01

    Mutations in several dna genes of Escherichia coli, when introduced into a strain with a lac fusion in the SOS gene sulA, resulted in formation of blue colonies on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (X-Gal). Unexpectedly, several lines of evidence indicated that the blue colony color was not primarily due to induction of the SOS system but rather was due to a membrane defect, along with the replication defect, making the cell X-Gal extrasensitive (phenotypically Xgx), possibly because of enhanced permeability to X-Gal or leakage of beta-galactosidase. (i) In most cases, beta-galactosidase specific activity increased only two- to threefold. (ii) Mutations conferring tolerance to colicin E1 resulted in blue colony color with no increase in beta-galactosidase specific activity. (iii) Mutations in either the dnaA, dnaB, dnaC, dnaE, dnaG, or ssb gene, when introduced into a strain containing a bioA::lac fusion, produced a blue colony color without an increase in beta-galactosidase synthesis. These lac fusion strains can serve as signal strains to detect dna mutations as well as membrane mutations. By localized mutagenesis of the 92-min region of the chromosome of the sulA::lac signal strain and picking blue colonies, we isolated a novel ssb allele that confers the same extreme UV sensitivity as a delta recA allele, which is a considerably greater sensitivity than that conferred by the two well-studied ssb alleles, ssb-1 and ssb-113. The technique also yielded dnaB mutants; fortuitously, uvrA mutants were also found. PMID:2142938

  11. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  12. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Use of the host-cell reactivation viral suicide enrichment procedure was initiated in the isolation of repair-deficient mutants. Lightly mutagenized BHK cells were infected with irradiated Herpes simplex virus (HSV); several radiation-sensitive strains were isolated among the survivors of the infection. The characterization of these strains is progressing and the enrichments are continuing. That alterations in the frequency of mutation of C3H/10T 1/2 cells, occurring as a result of holding the cells in a confluent state following treatment with ethylmethane sulfonate, parallel the alterations in the frequency of neoplastic transformation was found. The repair capabilities of BHK cells were found to be intermediate in comparison to repair-proficient and -deficient human cells with regard to the reactivation of HSV treated with various inactivating agents. The effect of confluency and of low serum levels on DNA synthesis, as well as the response to the cytotoxic effects of MNNG and acriflavin were determined in BHK cells in preparation for the investigation of the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and transformation. It was also found that C3H/10T 1/2 cells partially recover from the toxic effects of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide if they are held in a confluent state for 6 to 22 hrs following treatment. Addition of catalase did not alleviate the toxic effects of 4-NQO. The cells contain a relatively high endogenous level of this enzyme. (ERB)

  13. DNA stress and strain, in silico, in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, David; Benham, Craig J.

    2011-06-01

    A vast literature has explored the genetic interactions among the cellular components regulating gene expression in many organisms. Early on, in the absence of any biochemical definition, regulatory modules were conceived using the strict formalism of genetics to designate the modifiers of phenotype as either cis- or trans-acting depending on whether the relevant genes were embedded in the same or separate DNA molecules. This formalism distilled gene regulation down to its essence in much the same way that consideration of an ideal gas reveals essential thermodynamic and kinetic principles. Yet just as the anomalous behavior of materials may thwart an engineer who ignores their non-ideal properties, schemes to control and manipulate the genetic and epigenetic programs of cells may falter without a fuller and more quantitative elucidation of the physical and chemical characteristics of DNA and chromatin in vivo.

  14. Recent progress with the DNA repair mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Salazar, E.P.; Brookman, K.W.; Collins, C.C.; Stewart, S.A.; Busch, D.B.; Weber, C.A.

    1986-04-02

    Repair deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are being used to identify human genes that correct the repair defects and to study mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Five independent tertiary DNA transformants were obtained from the EM9 mutant. In these clones a human DNA sequence was identified that correlated with the resistance of the cells to CldUrd. After Eco RI digestion, Southern transfer, and hybridization of transformant DNAs with the BLUR-8 Alu family sequence, a common fragment of 25 to 30 kb was present. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Transcription coupled repair deficiency results in increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in the UV61 cell line, the Chinese hamster homologue of Cockayne's syndrome B.

    PubMed

    Proietti De Santis, L; Garcia, C L; Balajee, A S; Brea Calvo, G T; Bassi, L; Palitti, F

    2001-03-01

    Transcription coupled repair (TCR), a special sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER), removes transcription blocking lesions rapidly from the transcribing strand of active genes. In this study, we have evaluated the importance of the TCR pathway in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in isogenic Chinese hamster cell lines, which differ in TCR efficiency. AA8 is the parental cell line, which is proficient in the genome overall repair of UV-C radiation induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4 PP) and the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) from the transcribing strand of active genes. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome (CS) group B cells) originally isolated from AA8, exhibit proficient repair of 6-4 PP but are deficient in CPD removal by the TCR pathway. Upon UV-C irradiation of cells in G1-phase, UV61 showed a dramatic increase in apoptotic response as compared to AA8 cells. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in AA8 cells also resulted in an elevated apoptotic response like that observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is largely responsible for increased apoptotic response in UV61 cells. Furthermore, the chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced by UV were also found to be higher in UV61 cells than in TCR proficient AA8 cells. This study shows that the increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in UV61 cells is due to their inability to remove CPD from the transcribing strand of active genes and suggests a protective role for TCR in the prevention of both chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and time-course appearance of apoptotic cells suggest that the conversion of UV-DNA damage into chromosomal aberrations precedes and determines the apoptotic process. PMID:11182543

  16. Molecular typing of Salmonella typhi strains from Dhaka (Bangladesh) and development of DNA probes identifying plasmid-encoded multidrug-resistant isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, P W; Saha, S K; van Leeuwen, W J; Verbrugh, H A; van Belkum, A; Goessens, W H

    1996-01-01

    Seventy-eight Salmonella typhi strains isolated in 1994 and 1995 from patients living in Dhaka, Bangladesh, were subjected to phage typing, ribotyping, IS200 fingerprinting, and PCR fingerprinting. The collection displayed a high degree of genetic homogeneity, because restricted numbers of phage types and DNA fingerprints were observed. A significant number of the S. typhi strains (67%) were demonstrated to be multiple drug resistant (MDR). The vast majority of the MDR strains were resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, trimethoprim, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (R type CATmSSuT), a resistance phenotype that has also frequently been observed in India. Only two strains displayed a distinct MDR phenotype, R type AT-mSSuT. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of large plasmids exclusively in the MDR strains of both R types. The plasmids present in the S. typhi strains of R type CATmSSuT could be conjugated to Escherichia coli and resulted in the complete transfer of the MDR phenotype. PCR fingerprinting allowed discrimination of MDR and susceptible strains. The DNA fragments enabling discrimination of MDR and susceptible S. typhi strains by PCR were useful genetic markers for identifying MDR encoded by large plasmids of the H1 incompatibility group. PMID:8735083

  17. An immunostimulatory DNA sequence from a probiotic strain of Bifidobacterium longum inhibits IgE production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shimosato, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Kokubo, Sadayuki; Saito, Tadao

    2006-04-01

    The immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) BL07 (5'-GCGTCGGTTTCGGTGCTCAC-3') was identified from the genomic DNA of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum BB536. ODN BL07 stimulated B-lymphocyte proliferation and induced interleukin-12 (IL-12) production in macrophage-like J774.1 cells. ODNs BL07 and BL07S (modified with phosphorothioate backbone) significantly inhibited immunoglobulin E (IgE) production and stimulated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-12 production, but did not affect IL-4 secretion in murine splenic cells of ovalbumin-primed BALB/c mice. These ODNs also significantly inhibited production of IgE in purified murine B cells in the presence of IL-4 and anti-CD40. The results suggest the potential of ODNs BL07 and BL07S in preventing IgE-related immune responses and the possible involvement of ODN BL07 in the antiallergic efficacy of B. longum BB536.

  18. Increase in Ty1 cDNA Recombination in Yeast sir4 Mutant Strains at High Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Sarah J.; Boyle, Meredith L.; Sheely, Catherine J.; Graham, Joel; Haeusser, Daniel P.; Zimmerman, Leigh; Keeney, Jill B.

    2004-01-01

    Transposition of the Ty1 element of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is temperature sensitive. We have identified a null allele of the silent information regulator gene SIR4 as a host mutant that allows for transposition at high temperature. We show that the apparent increase in transposition activity in sir4 mutant strains at high temperature is dependent on the RAD52 gene and is thus likely resulting from an increase in Ty1 cDNA recombination, rather than in IN-mediated integration. General cellular recombination is not increased at high temperature, suggesting that the increase in recombination at high temperature in sir4 mutants is specific for Ty1 cDNA. Additionally, this high-temperature Ty1 recombination was found to be dependent on functional Sir2p and Sir3p. We speculate that the increase in recombination seen in sir4 mutants at high temperature may be due to changes in chromatin structure or Ty1 interactions with chromosomal structures resulting in higher recombination rates. PMID:15454529

  19. Spontaneous and UV-induced mutations in Escherichia coli K-12 strains with altered or absent DNA polymerase I

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, H.; Randall, S.K.; Rayssiguier, C.; Bridges, B.A.; Goodman, M.F.; Radman, M.

    1989-05-01

    The induction of mutations to valine resistance and to rifampin resistance occurs after UV irradiation in bacteria carrying a deletion through the polA gene (delta polA), showing that DNA polymerase I (PolI) is not an essential enzyme for this process. The PolI deletion strain showed a 7- to 10-fold-higher spontaneous mutation frequency than the wild type. The presence in the deletion strain of the 5'----3' exonuclease fragment on an F' episome caused an additional 10-fold increase in spontaneous mutation frequency, resulting in mutation frequencies on the order of 50- to 100-fold greater than wild type. The mutator effect associated with the 5'----3' exonuclease gene fragment together with much of the effect attributable to the polA deletion was blocked in bacteria carrying a umuC mutation. The mutator activity therefore appears to reflect constitutive SOS induction. Excision-proficient polA deletion strains exhibited increased sensitivity to the lethal effect of UV light which was only partially ameliorated by the presence of polA+ on an F' episome. The UV-induced mutation rate to rifampin resistance was marginally lower in delta polA bacteria than in bacteria carrying the polA+ allele. This effect is unlikely to be caused by the existence of a PolI-dependent mutagenic pathway and is probably an indirect effect caused by an alteration in the pattern of excision repair, since it did not occur in excision-deficient (uvrA) bacteria.

  20. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting {gamma}H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  1. Role of OGG1 and NTG2 in the repair of oxidative DNA damage and mutagenesis induced by hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: relationships with transition metals iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Melo, R G M; Leitão, A C; Pádula, M

    2004-09-01

    The base excision repair pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses three DNA N-glycosylases, viz. Ogg1p, Ngt1p and Ntg2p, involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. It was previously reported that inactivation of any of these activities, in most cases, did not generate a sensitive mutant phenotype to a variety of oxidative agents. Only the ntg1 mutant appeared to be more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than a wild-type (WT) strain. In the present study we evaluated the role of S. cerevisiae OGG1 and NTG2 genes in the repair of oxidative lesions induced by high H2O2 concentrations (5-100 mM for 20 min), followed by catalase treatment (500 IU/ml). In these conditions, the ogg1 mutant was more sensitive than the WT strain to H2O2 (concentration 40-60 mM). Unexpectedly, the inactivation of NTG2 in an ogg1 background was able to suppress both sensitivity and mutagenesis induced by H2O2. Indeed, even the ntg2 single mutant was more resistant than the WT (60-100 mM H2O2). The use of metal ion chelators dipyridyl and neocuproine allowed us to evaluate the participation of iron and copper ions in the production of lethal and mutagenic lesions during H2O2 treatment in different DNA repair-deficient S. cerevisiae strains. The roles of OGG1 and NTG2 genes in the repair of lethal and mutagenic oxidative lesions induced by H2O2 and their relationships with iron and copper ions are discussed.

  2. Unscheduled DNA Synthesis: The Clinical and Functional Assay for Global Genomic DNA Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Jean J.; Kelly, Crystal M.

    2016-01-01

    The unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay measures the ability of a cell to perform global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER). This chapter provides instructions for the application of this technique by creating 6-4 photoproducts and pyrimidine dimers using UV-C irradiation. This procedure is designed specifically for quantification of the 6-4 photoproducts. Repair is quantified by the amount of radioactive thymidine incorporated during repair synthesis after this insult, and radioactivity is evaluated by grain counting after autoradiography. The results are used to clinically diagnose human DNA repair deficiency disorders and provide a basis for investigation of repair deficiency in human tissues or tumors. No other functional assay is available that directly measures the capacity to perform NER on the entire genome without the use of specific antibodies. Since live cells are required for this assay, explant culture techniques must be previously established. Host cell reactivation (HCR), as discussed in Chapter 37, is not an equivalent technique, as it measures only transcription-coupled repair (TCR) at active genes, a small subset of total NER. PMID:24623250

  3. Plasmid DNA production with Escherichia coli GALG20, a pgi-gene knockout strain: fermentation strategies and impact on downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Geisa A L; Prather, Kristala L J; Monteiro, Gabriel A; Carnes, Aaron E; Prazeres, Duarte M F

    2014-09-30

    The market development of plasmid biopharmaceuticals for gene therapy and DNA vaccination applications is critically dependent on the availability of cost-effective manufacturing processes capable of delivering large amounts of high-quality plasmid DNA (pDNA) for clinical trials and commercialization. The producer host strain used in these processes must be designed to meet the upstream and downstream processing challenges characteristic of large scale pDNA production. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of different glucose feeding strategies (batch and fed-batch) on the pDNA productivity of GALG20, a pgi Escherichia coli strain potentially useful in industrial fermentations, which uses the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as the main route for glucose metabolism. The parental strain, MG1655ΔendAΔrecA, and the common laboratory strain, DH5α, were used for comparison purposes and pVAX1GFP, a ColE1-type plasmid, was tested as a model. GALG20 produced 3-fold more pDNA (∼141 mg/L) than MG1655ΔendAΔrecA (∼48 mg/L) and DH5α (∼40 mg/L) in glucose-based fed-batch fermentations. The amount of pDNA in lysates obtained from these cells was also larger for GALG20 (41%) when compared with MG1655ΔendAΔrecA (31%) and DH5α (26%). However, the final quality of pDNA preparations obtained with a process that explores precipitation, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and size exclusion was not significantly affected by strain genotype. Finally, high cell density fed-batch cultures were performed with GALG20, this time using another ColE1-type plasmid, NTC7482-41H-HA, in pre-industrial facilities using glucose and glycerol. These experiments demonstrated the ability of GALG20 to produce high pDNA yields of the order of 2100-2200 mg/L.

  4. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  5. Prevention of UV radiation-induced immunosuppression by IL-12 is dependent on DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Agatha; Maeda, Akira; Kernebeck, Kerstin; van Steeg, Harry; Beissert, Stefan; Schwarz, Thomas

    2005-01-17

    The immunostimulatory cytokine IL-12 is able to antagonize immunosuppression induced by solar/ultraviolet (UV) radiation via yet unknown mechanisms. IL-12 was recently found to induce deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair. UV-induced DNA damage is an important molecular trigger for UV-mediated immunosuppression. Thus, we initiated studies into immune restoration by IL-12 to discern whether its effects are linked to DNA repair. IL-12 prevented both UV-induced suppression of the induction of contact hypersensitivity and the depletion of Langerhans cells, the primary APC of the skin, in wild-type but not in DNA repair-deficient mice. IL-12 did not prevent the development of UV-induced regulatory T cells in DNA repair-deficient mice. In contrast, IL-12 was able to break established UV-induced tolerance and inhibited the activity of regulatory T cells independent of DNA repair. These data identify a new mechanism by which IL-12 can restore immune responses and also demonstrate a link between DNA repair and the prevention of UV-induced immunosuppression by IL-12.

  6. Mutagenicity in Escherichia coli of the major DNA adduct derived from the endogenous mutagen malondialdehyde

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Stephen P.; Reddy, G. Ramachandra; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-01

    The spectrum of mutations induced by the naturally occurring DNA adduct pyrimido[1,2-α]purin-10(3H)-one (M1G) was determined by site-specific approaches using M13 vectors replicated in Escherichia coli. M1G was placed at position 6256 in the (−)-strand of M13MB102 by ligating the oligodeoxynucleotide 5′-GGT(M1G)TCCG-3′ into a gapped-duplex derivative of the vector. Unmodified and M1G-modified genomes containing either a cytosine or thymine at position 6256 of the (+)-strand were transformed into repair-proficient and repair-deficient E. coli strains, and base pair substitutions were quantitated by hybridization analysis. Modified genomes containing a cytosine opposite M1G resulted in roughly equal numbers of M1G→A and M1G→T mutations with few M1G→C mutations. The total mutation frequency was ≈1%, which represents a 500-fold increase in mutations compared with unmodified M13MB102. Transformation of modified genomes containing a thymine opposite M1G allowed an estimate to be made of the ability of M1G to block replication. The (−)-strand was replicated >80% of the time in the unadducted genome but only 20% of the time when M1G was present. Correction of the mutation frequency for the strand bias of replication indicated that the actual frequency of mutations induced by M1G was 18%. Experiments using E. coli with different genetic backgrounds indicated that the SOS response enhances the mutagenicity of M1G and that M1G is a substrate for repair by the nucleotide excision repair complex. These studies indicate that M1G, which is present endogenously in DNA of healthy human beings, is a strong block to replication and an efficient premutagenic lesion. PMID:9238032

  7. Development of a Custom-Designed, Pan Genomic DNA Microarray to Characterize Strain-Level Diversity among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Ben Davies; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Yan, Qiongqiong; Chase, Hannah R.; Lee, Boram; Hwang, Seongeun; Trach, Larisa; Park, Eunbi; Yoo, YeonJoo; Chung, TaeJung; Jackson, Scott A.; Patel, Isha R.; Sathyamoorthy, Venugopal; Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Kotewicz, Michael L.; Carter, Laurenda; Iversen, Carol; Pagotto, Franco; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika; Fanning, Séamus; Grim, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter species cause infections in all age groups; however neonates are at highest risk and remain the most susceptible age group for life-threatening invasive disease. The genus contains seven species:Cronobacter sakazakii, Cronobacter malonaticus, Cronobacter turicensis, Cronobacter muytjensii, Cronobacter dublinensis, Cronobacter universalis, and Cronobacter condimenti. Despite an abundance of published genomes of these species, genomics-based epidemiology of the genus is not well established. The gene content of a diverse group of 126 unique Cronobacter and taxonomically related isolates was determined using a pan genomic-based DNA microarray as a genotyping tool and as a means to identify outbreak isolates for food safety, environmental, and clinical surveillance purposes. The microarray constitutes 19,287 independent genes representing 15 Cronobacter genomes and 18 plasmids and 2,371 virulence factor genes of phylogenetically related Gram-negative bacteria. The Cronobacter microarray was able to distinguish the seven Cronobacter species from one another and from non-Cronobacter species; and within each species, strains grouped into distinct clusters based on their genomic diversity. These results also support the phylogenic divergence of the genus and clearly highlight the genomic diversity among each member of the genus. The current study establishes a powerful platform for further genomics research of this diverse genus, an important prerequisite toward the development of future countermeasures against this foodborne pathogen in the food safety and clinical arenas. PMID:25984509

  8. Extremophilic Acinetobacter strains from high-altitude lakes in Argentinean Puna: remarkable UV-B resistance and efficient DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli. PMID:22644565

  9. Extremophilic Acinetobacter Strains from High-Altitude Lakes in Argentinean Puna: Remarkable UV-B Resistance and Efficient DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P.; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli.

  10. Extremophilic Acinetobacter strains from high-altitude lakes in Argentinean Puna: remarkable UV-B resistance and efficient DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli.

  11. Alterations of nuclear DNA synthesis after irradiation of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum: studies performed in a mutant strain displaying enhanced thymidine uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The auxotrophic Dictyostelium discoideum strain HPS 401 was studied. Thymidine at 8 ..mu..g/ml or thymidylate at 50 ..mu..g/ml supported growth to maximal cell densities. Thin layer chromatography of cell extracts showed rapid intracellular accumulation of thymidine in HPS 401 vs slightly detectable accumulation in wild-type cells. Measurements showed that methionine and thymidylate were taken into all strains at a low rate, but HPS 401 had enhanced uptake of thymidine and uridine compared to wild-type. The HPS 401 phenotype is due to the efficient utilization of thymidine as a result of increased nucleoside uptake. Rapid nuclear purification removed mitochondrial DNA without decreasing the single-strand molecular weight of the nuclear DNA. The nuclear DNA peaks on alkaline sucrose gradients were identified using filter hybridization to cloned probes. As measured by pulse-chase labelling, production of full-sized main band DNA required 45-50 minutes. Pulse labelling of the cells immediately after ultraviolet irradiation caused the single-strand molecular weight of the DNA synthesized to decrease from 8 x 10/sup 6/ daltons at O J/m/sup 2/ to 3.9 x 10/sup 6/ daltons at 50 J/m/sup 2/ to 2.6 x 10/sup 6/ daltons at 200 J/m/sup 2/. The time required for maturation into full-sized DNA increased from 1 hour at O J/m/sup 2/ to 4 hours at 20 J/m/sup 2/ and to 21 hours at 200 J/m/sup 2/. Measured amounts of DNA synthesis at times after ultraviolet irradiation showed a period of reduced incorporation, followed by the resumption of control levels. The lag period ended at the same time as the production of full-sized DNA resumed.

  12. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua by 16S rRNA genes and intraspecies discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, J; Bsat, N; Piani, M; Russ, W; Sultana, K; Wiedmann, M; Whitaker, R; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    Differences in the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) which can be used to discriminate Listeria monocytogenes from Listeria innocua have been detected. The 16S rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with a set of oligonucleotide primers which flank a 1.5-kb fragment. Sequence differences were observed in the V2 region of the 16S rDNA both between L. monocytogenes Scott A and L. innocua and between different L. monocytogenes serotypes. Although L. monocytogenes SLCC2371 had the same V2 region sequence as L. innocua, the two species were different within the V9 region at nucleotides 1259 and 1292, in agreement with previous studies (R.-F. Wang, W.-W. Cao, and M.G. Johnson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:3666-3670, 1991). Intraspecies discrimination of L. monocytogenes strains was achieved by using the patterns generated by random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. Although some distinction can be made within the L. monocytogenes species by their 16S rDNA sequence, a far greater discrimination within species could be made by generating random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns from chromosomal DNA. By using a number of 10-bp primers, unique patterns for each isolate which in all cases examined differentiate between various L. monocytogenes serotypes, even though they may have the same 16S rRNA sequences, could be generated. Images PMID:8439157

  13. Antigenic properties and virulence of foot-and-mouth disease virus rescued from full-length cDNA clone of serotype O, typical vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rae-Hyung; Chu, Jia-Qi; Park, Jeong-Nam; Lee, Seo-Yong; Lee, Yeo-Joo; Ko, Mi-Kyeong; Hwang, Ji-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Ko, Young-Joon; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Min-Eun; Kim, Byounghan; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    We cloned the full-length cDNA of O Manisa, the virus for vaccinating against foot-and-mouth disease. The antigenic properties of the virus recovered from the cDNA were similar to those of the parental virus. Pathogenesis did not appear in the pigs, dairy goats or suckling mice, but neutralizing antibodies were raised 5-6 days after the virus challenge. The utilization of O Manisa as a safe vaccine strain will increase if recombinant viruses can be manipulated by inserting or removing a marker gene for differential serology or replacing the protective gene from another serotype.

  14. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  15. Ethanol-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated under selective conditions by over-expression of a proofreading-deficient DNA polymerase delta.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroko; Fujita, Yasuko; Takaoka, Yuki; Kurita, Eri; Yano, Shuntaro; Tanaka, Naotaka; Nakayama, Ken-ichi

    2009-09-01

    Ethanol damages the cell membrane and functional proteins, gradually reducing cell viability, and leading to cell death during fermentation which impairs effective bioethanol production by budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To obtain more suitable strains for bioethanol production and to gain a better understanding of ethanol tolerance, ethanol-tolerant mutants were isolated using the novel mutagenesis technique based on the disparity theory of evolution. According to this theory evolution can be accelerated by affecting the lagging-strand synthesis in which DNA polymerase delta is involved. Expression of the pol3-01 gene, a proofreading-deficient of DNA polymerase delta, in S. cerevisiae W303-1A grown under conditions of increasing ethanol concentration resulted in three ethanol-tolerant mutants (YFY1, YFY2 and YFY3), which could grow in medium containing 13% ethanol. Ethanol productivity also increased in YFY strains compared to the wild-type strain in medium containing 25% glucose. Cell morphology of YFY strain cells was normal even in the presence of 8% ethanol, whereas W303-1A cells were expanded by a big vacuole. Furthermore, two of these mutants were also resistant to high-temperature, Calcofluor white and NaCl. Expression levels of TPS1 and TSL1, which are responsible for trehalose biosynthesis, were higher in YFY strains relative to W303-1A, resulting in high levels of intracellular trehalose in YFY strains. This contributed to the multiple-stress tolerance that makes YFY strains suitable for the production of bioethanol.

  16. VNTR fingerprinting of Kluyveromyces marxianus strains WT, 7-1, and 8-1 by using different primer types to give best results in PCR and on electrophorese gel in order to find differentiation of the DNA of the yeast strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (WT, 7-1, 8-1) we wish to find out the variable numbered tandem repeats (VNTR) of each of the DNA strains from the different mutagenized K. marxianus strains. To do this we used Phusion HF Buffer Pack to try and give a clear picture of the VNTR by u...

  17. Virus nomenclature below the species level: a standardized nomenclature for filovirus strains and variants rescued from cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Jens H.; Bào, Yīmíng; Bavari, Sina; Becker, Stephan; Bradfute, Steven; Brauburger, Kristina; Brister, J. Rodney; Bukreyev, Alexander A.; Caì, Yíngyún; Chandran, Kartik; Davey, Robert A.; Dolnik, Olga; Dye, John M.; Enterlein, Sven; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Formenty, Pierre; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Hoenen, Thomas; Honko, Anna N.; Ignatyev, Georgy M.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Johnson, Karl M.; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Kobinger, Gary; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Leroy, Eric M.; Lever, Mark S.; Mühlberger, Elke; Netesov, Sergey V.; Olinger, Gene G.; Palacios, Gustavo; Patterson, Jean L.; Paweska, Janusz T.; Pitt, Louise; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Ryabchikova, Elena I.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Shestopalov, Aleksandr M.; Smither, Sophie J.; Sullivan, Nancy J.; Swanepoel, Robert; Takada, Ayato; Towner, Jonathan S.; van der Groen, Guido; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Volchkova, Valentina A.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Warren, Travis K.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Weidmann, Manfred; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2013-01-01

    Specific alterations (mutations, deletions, insertions) of virus genomes are crucial for the functional characterization of their regulatory elements and their expression products, as well as a prerequisite for the creation of attenuated viruses that could serve as vaccine candidates. Virus genome tailoring can be performed either by using traditionally cloned genomes as starting materials, followed by site-directed mutagenesis, or by de novo synthesis of modified virus genomes or parts thereof. A systematic nomenclature for such recombinant viruses is necessary to set them apart from wild-type and laboratory-adapted viruses, and to improve communication and collaborations among researchers who may want to use recombinant viruses or create novel viruses based on them. A large group of filovirus experts has recently proposed nomenclatures for natural and laboratory animal-adapted filoviruses that aim to simplify the retrieval of sequence data from electronic databases. Here, this work is extended to include nomenclature for filoviruses obtained in the laboratory via reverse genetics systems. The previously developed template for natural filovirus genetic variant naming, (<strain>/)///-, is retained, but we propose to adapt the type of information added to each field for cDNA clone-derived filoviruses. For instance, the full-length designation of an Ebola virus Kikwit variant rescued from a plasmid developed at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could be akin to “Ebola virus H.sapiens-rec/COD/1995/Kikwit-abc1” (with the suffix “rec” identifying the recombinant nature of the virus and “abc1” being a placeholder for any meaningful isolate designator). Such a full-length designation should be used in databases and the methods section of publications. Shortened designations (such as “EBOVH.sap/COD/95/Kik-abc1”) and

  18. Rapid identification and differentiation of the vaccine strain Rac H from EHV 1 field isolates using a non-radioactive DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H; Hübert, P; Schwend, C; Eichhorn, W

    1992-01-01

    A method for rapid differentiation between the EHV 1 live vaccine strain Rac H and field isolates is described. Total DNA was isolated from virus-infected small scale cell cultures. DNA fragments digested with restriction endonuclease BamHI were separated, transferred and immobilized on filter membranes. A Digoxigenin-labeled probe derived from EHV 1 was used for hybridization. This probe hybridized specifically to sequences of the inverted terminal repeat region which in case of Rac H include a deletion of 0.8 kb. By comparing the different migration patterns after blot hybridization it could be shown that in 65 isolates from cases of abortion the live vaccine strain Rac H was not involved.

  19. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  20. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates. PMID:24484478

  1. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates.

  2. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  3. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26426354

  4. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regionsmore » of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.« less

  5. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  6. Photoprotection by topical DNA repair enzymes: molecular correlates of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, D B; O'Connor, A; Alas, L; Potten, C; Wolf, P

    1999-02-01

    A new approach to photoprotection is to repair DNA damage after UV exposure. This can be accomplished by delivery of a DNA repair enzyme with specificity to UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers into skin by means of specially engineered liposomes. Treatment of DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients or skin cancer patients with T4N5 liposome lotion containing such DNA repair liposomes increases the removal of DNA damage in the first few hours after treatment. In these studies, a DNA repair effect was observed in some patients treated with heat-inactivated enzyme. Unexpectedly, it was discovered that the heat-inactivated T4 endonuclease V enzyme refolds and recovers enzymatic activity. These studies demonstrate that measurements of molecular changes induced by biological drugs are useful adjuvants to clinical studies.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Pythium insidiosum Thai strains using cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) DNA coding sequences and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS).

    PubMed

    Kammarnjesadakul, Patcharee; Palaga, Tanapat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Mendoza, Leonel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Tongchusak, Songsak; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the phylogenetic relationship among Pythium insidiosum isolates in Thailand, we investigated the genomic DNA of 31 P. insidiosum strains isolated from humans and environmental sources from Thailand, and two from North and Central America. We used PCR to amplify the partial COX II DNA coding sequences and the ITS regions of these isolates. The nucleotide sequences of both amplicons were analyzed by the Bioedit program. Phylogenetic analysis using genetic distance method with Neighbor Joining (NJ) approach was performed using the MEGA4 software. Additional sequences of three other Pythium species, Phytophthora sojae and Lagenidium giganteum were employed as outgroups. The sizes of the COX II amplicons varied from 558-564 bp, whereas the ITS products varied from approximately 871-898 bp. Corrected sequence divergences with Kimura 2-parameter model calculated for the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences ranged between 0.0000-0.0608 and 0.0000-0.2832, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using both the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences showed similar trees, where we found three sister groups (A(TH), B(TH), and C(TH)) among P. insidiosum strains. All Thai isolates from clinical cases and environmental sources were placed in two separated sister groups (B(TH) and C(TH)), whereas the Americas isolates were grouped into A(TH.) Although the phylogenetic tree based on both regions showed similar distribution, the COX II phylogenetic tree showed higher resolution than the one using the ITS sequences. Our study indicates that COX II gene is the better of the two alternatives to study the phylogenetic relationships among P. insidiosum strains. PMID:20818919

  8. The protective effect of a Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain 23 kDa plasmid DNA vaccine in pigs is enhanced with IL-12.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinchang; Ren, Jiangong; Da'dara, Akram; Harn, Donald; Xu, Ming; Si, Jin; Yu, Chuanxin; Liang, Yousheng; Ye, Ping; Yin, Xuren; He, Wei; Xu, Yongliang; Cao, Guoqun; Hua, Wanquan

    2004-11-15

    The schistosome integral membrane protein Sm/Sj23 was initially shown to induce protection in mice as a synthetic peptide vaccine and further, as a plasmid DNA vaccine to induce protection in mice, sheep and water buffalo. In this study we asked if we could induce protection against challenge infection in pigs against Schistosoma japonicum by vaccinating them with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the S. japonicum Chinese strain 23 kDa membrane protein. Further, we asked if we could enhance protective efficacy of this vaccine by the addition of IL-12. We compared vaccination with SjC23 plasmid DNA alone or with IL-12 plasmid DNA in pigs. Pigs were immunized three times at three weekly intervals. Thirty Chinese Songjang native pigs were divided into three groups. In group A, each pig was immunized with 500 microg of SjC23 plasmid DNA by intramuscular (i.m.) injection in both buttocks. In group B each pig was immunized with 500 microg of SjC23 plasmid DNA, and 500 microg of each of pcDNA3.1-p35 and 500 microg of pcDNA3.1-p40 DNA by i.m. injection. In group C each pig was immunized with 500 microg of pcDNA3.1 as the control. Thirty days post-vaccination, pigs were challenged with S. japonicum cercariae and adult and egg burdens and granuloma size determined 45 days post-challenge. The results showed that worm reduction rates in SjC23 group compared with control group were 29.2% and in the SjC23 + IL-12 group reduced 58.6%. Similarly the female worm reduction rates were 50.8 and 58.8%, the hepatic egg reduction rates were 48.2 and 56.4%, and the mean square measure reduction rates of hepatic egg granulomas were 48.6 and 44.4%, the mean diameter reduction rates of granulomas were 27.6 and 22.8% in pigs vaccinated with SjC23 or SjC23 + IL-12 compared to plasmid vaccinated pigs, respectively. Analysis of sera from pigs vaccinated with SjC23 showed that 4 of 10 pigs had anti-Sj23 antibody responses; with 5 of 10 pigs positive for anti-Sj23 in the SjC23+IL-12 group. These

  9. Interpretation of band differences to distinguish strains of Serratia marcescens by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI DNA digests.

    PubMed Central

    Aucken, H. M.; Boquete, T.; Kaufmann, M. E.; Pitt, T. L.

    2000-01-01

    The number of band differences in DNA macrorestriction profiles required to distinguish unrelated strains from an index strain varies in an outbreak with the species and restriction enzyme used. In order to define this difference for epidemiological studies of Serratia marcescens, we produced DNA fingerprints from 57 isolates of the organism using the restriction enzyme XbaI and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The isolates were selected on the basis of their epidemiology, serotype and phage-typing patterns to include 28 unrelated strains and 29 representatives from 2 distinct outbreaks. One of the outbreaks was prolonged. lasting for several years. Electrophoretic profiles consisting of 20 or more clearly resolved bands were obtained for all isolates. Twenty-six of the unrelated strains had unique profiles with over 10 band differences from all other strains, while 27 of the outbreak representatives could be assigned to the appropriate outbreak with confidence. The majority of the outbreak isolates had none or 2 band differences from the index profile, although 3 isolates differed by 5-7 bands. The 2 exceptions among the unrelated strains differed by 4 bands, and 3 phage typing reactions, and were isolated from London and Berlin 3 years apart, while the 2 exceptions among the outbreak collection had clearly unique profiles with over 20 band differences from each other and the outbreak profiles. Cluster analysis using Dice coefficient and UPGMA gave cut-off values of 75-78% similarity overall for related isolates, while the closest similarity for unrelated strains was 70%. The results of this study together with those of the 6 previous reports of PFGE for S. marcescens (which used either enzymes XbaI or SpeI) confirm that this technique is of value for this species and that with XbaI at least, most epidemiologically related strains will only differ by 3-4 bands. However, on occasion up to 7 band differences can be found within an apparent outbreak, which

  10. Regenerative capacity of old muscle stem cells declines without significant accumulation of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Wendy; Ho, Michelle Liane; Desai, Rajiv; Tham, Andrea; Chen, Robert Yuzen; Kung, Sunny; Elabd, Christian; Conboy, Irina M

    2013-01-01

    The performance of adult stem cells is crucial for tissue homeostasis but their regenerative capacity declines with age, leading to failure of multiple organs. In skeletal muscle this failure is manifested by the loss of functional tissue, the accumulation of fibrosis, and reduced satellite cell-mediated myogenesis in response to injury. While recent studies have shown that changes in the composition of the satellite cell niche are at least in part responsible for the impaired function observed with aging, little is known about the effects of aging on the intrinsic properties of satellite cells. For instance, their ability to repair DNA damage and the effects of a potential accumulation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) on their regenerative performance remain unclear. This work demonstrates that old muscle stem cells display no significant accumulation of DNA DSBs when compared to those of young, as assayed after cell isolation and in tissue sections, either in uninjured muscle or at multiple time points after injury. Additionally, there is no significant difference in the expression of DNA DSB repair proteins or globally assayed DNA damage response genes, suggesting that not only DNA DSBs, but also other types of DNA damage, do not significantly mark aged muscle stem cells. Satellite cells from DNA DSB-repair-deficient SCID mice do have an unsurprisingly higher level of innate DNA DSBs and a weakened recovery from gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage. Interestingly, they are as myogenic in vitro and in vivo as satellite cells from young wild type mice, suggesting that the inefficiency in DNA DSB repair does not directly correlate with the ability to regenerate muscle after injury. Overall, our findings suggest that a DNA DSB-repair deficiency is unlikely to be a key factor in the decline in muscle regeneration observed upon aging.

  11. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Heteroplasmy in a Mouse Model with Mitochondrial DNA of C57BL/6 and NZB/BINJ Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sangalli, Juliano Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Thiago Bittencourt; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are widely employed to study mitochondrial inheritance, which have implications to several human diseases caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). These mouse models take advantage of polymorphisms between the mtDNA of the NZB/BINJ and the mtDNA of common inbred laboratory (i.e., C57BL/6) strains to generate mice with two mtDNA haplotypes (heteroplasmy). Based on PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), these studies determine the level of heteroplasmy across generations and in different cell types aiming to understand the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial inheritance. However, PCR-RFLP is a time-consuming method of low sensitivity and accuracy that dependents on the use of restriction enzyme digestions. A more robust method to measure heteroplasmy has been provided by the use of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on allelic refractory mutation detection system (ARMS-qPCR). Herein, we report an ARMS-qPCR assay for quantification of heteroplasmy using heteroplasmic mice with mtDNA of NZB/BINJ and C57BL/6 origin. Heteroplasmy and mtDNA copy number were estimated in germline and somatic tissues, providing evidence of the reliability of the approach. Furthermore, it enabled single-step quantification of heteroplasmy, with sensitivity to detect as low as 0.1% of either NZB/BINJ or C57BL/6 mtDNA. These findings are relevant as the ARMS-qPCR assay reported here is fully compatible with similar heteroplasmic mouse models used to study mitochondrial inheritance in mammals. PMID:26274500

  12. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  13. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) from the Sava River basin: New insights into strain formation, mtDNA-like sequences and dynamics of infection.

    PubMed

    Vardić Smrzlić, Irena; Valić, Damir; Kapetanović, Damir; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Gjurčević, Emil; Teskeredžić, Emin

    2015-10-01

    Here we report the genetic variability and presence of mtDNA-like sequences of Pomphorhynchus laevis from the chub, Squalius cephalus, caught at the sampling sites along the Sava River and its tributary the Sutla River in Croatia. Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene of the recovered P. laevis specimens were used for haplotype network construction and phylogenetic analysis. These analyses showed that some specimens contained mitochondrial-like sequences, and they uncovered the existence of a Sava River basin strain different from known strains of P. laevis. This is the first time that P. laevis has been shown to contain mtDNA-like sequences, suggesting the need to exercise caution during COI analyses of P. laevis using universal primers. Highly conserved sequences of two nuclear markers, the ITS region and 18S rRNA, were not helpful for understanding genetic variability or differentiating strains. Furthermore, analysis of the dynamics of P. laevis infections in S. cephalus from the Sava and Sutla Rivers showed decreased prevalence and abundance at sites with inferior water quality, positive association of parasite abundance with fish size, and no clear association of parasite abundance with fish condition index or sex. PMID:25728305

  14. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) from the Sava River basin: New insights into strain formation, mtDNA-like sequences and dynamics of infection.

    PubMed

    Vardić Smrzlić, Irena; Valić, Damir; Kapetanović, Damir; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Gjurčević, Emil; Teskeredžić, Emin

    2015-10-01

    Here we report the genetic variability and presence of mtDNA-like sequences of Pomphorhynchus laevis from the chub, Squalius cephalus, caught at the sampling sites along the Sava River and its tributary the Sutla River in Croatia. Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene of the recovered P. laevis specimens were used for haplotype network construction and phylogenetic analysis. These analyses showed that some specimens contained mitochondrial-like sequences, and they uncovered the existence of a Sava River basin strain different from known strains of P. laevis. This is the first time that P. laevis has been shown to contain mtDNA-like sequences, suggesting the need to exercise caution during COI analyses of P. laevis using universal primers. Highly conserved sequences of two nuclear markers, the ITS region and 18S rRNA, were not helpful for understanding genetic variability or differentiating strains. Furthermore, analysis of the dynamics of P. laevis infections in S. cephalus from the Sava and Sutla Rivers showed decreased prevalence and abundance at sites with inferior water quality, positive association of parasite abundance with fish size, and no clear association of parasite abundance with fish condition index or sex.

  15. Site-specific frame-shift mutagenesis by the 1-nitropyrene-DNA adduct N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-1-aminopyrene located in the (CG)3 sequence: effects of SOS, proofreading, and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Malia, S A; Vyas, R R; Basu, A K

    1996-04-01

    1-Nitropyrene (1-NP), the predominant nitropolycyclic hydrocarbon found in diesel exhaust, is a mutagen and tumorigen. Nitroreduction is a major pathway by which 1-NP is metabolized. Reductively activated 1-NP forms a major DNA adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-1-aminopyrene (dGAP), both in vitro and in vivo. In Salmonella typhimurium 1-NP induces a CpG deletion in a CGCGCGCG sequence. In Escherichia coli, however, mostly -1 and +1 frame-shifts are observed, which occur predominantly in 5'-CG, 5'-GC, and 5'-GG sequences. In order to determine the mechanism of mutagenesis by dGAP in a CpG repetitive sequence, we constructed a single-stranded M13 genome containing the adduct at the underscored deoxyguanosine of an inserted CGCGCG sequence. In E. coli strains with normal repair capability the adduct induced approximately 2% CpG deletions, which was 20-fold that of the control. With SOS, the frequency of frame-shift mutations increased to 2.6%, even though the frequency of CpG deletion accompanied 50% reduction. The enhancement in mutagenesis was due to a +1 frame-shift that occurred at a high frequency. In strains with a defect in methyl-directed mismatch repair, 50-70% increase in mutation frequency was observed. When these strains were SOS induced, frame-shift mutagenesis increased by approximately 100%. When transfections were carried out in dnaQ strains that are impaired in 3'-->5'exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase III, frame-shift mutagenesis increased 5-7-fold. dGAP-induced frame-shifts in the (CG)3 sequence, therefore, varied from 2% to 17% depending on the state of repair of the host cells. We conclude that dGAP induces both -2 and +1 frame-shifts in a CpG repetitive sequence and that these two mutagenic events are competing pathways. The CpG deletion does not require SOS functions, whereas the +1 frame-shifts are SOS-dependent. On the basis of the data in repair-deficient strains, it appears that both types of frame-shifts occurred as a result of

  16. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  17. Genome-wide Transcriptome Profiling of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Mo, Wei; Dai, Hui; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Soo-Mi; Peng, Yang; Mo, Qianxing; Siwko, Stefan; Hu, Ruozhen; Lee, Ju-Seog; Hennessy, Bryan; Hanash, Samir; Mills, Gordon B.; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair deficiency predisposes to cancer development, but also sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damage-inducing therapeutics. Here we identify an HR-defect (HRD) gene signature, which can be used to functionally assess HR repair status without interrogating individual genetic alterations in cells. By using this HRD gene signature as a functional network analysis tool, we discover that simultaneous loss of two major tumor suppressors BRCA1 and PTEN extensively rewire the HR repair-deficient phenotype, which is found in cells with defects in either BRCA1 or PTEN alone. Moreover, the HRD gene signature serves as an effective drug discovery platform to identify agents targeting HR repair as potential chemo/radio-sensitizers. More importantly, this HRD gene signature is able to predict clinical outcomes across multiple cancer lineages. Our findings, therefore, provide a molecular profile of HR repair to assess its status at a functional network level, which can provide both biological insights and have clinical implications in cancer. PMID:24553445

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of hctB encoding a strain-variant chlamydial histone-like protein with DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, T J; Barry, C E; Hackstadt, T

    1993-01-01

    Two DNA-binding proteins with similarity to eukaryotic histone H1 have been described in Chlamydia trachomatis. In addition to the 18-kDa histone H1 homolog Hc1, elementary bodies of C. trachomatis possess an antigenically related histone H1 homolog, which we have termed Hc2, that varies in apparent molecular mass among strains. We report the molecular cloning, expression, and nucleotide sequence of the hctB gene encoding Hc2 and present evidence for in vivo DNA-binding activity of the expressed product. Expression of Hc2 in Escherichia coli induces a compaction of bacterial chromatin that is distinct from that observed upon Hc1 expression. Moreover, isolated nucleoids from Hc2-expressing E. coli exhibit markedly reduced sensitivity to DNase I. These properties of Hc2 are consistent with a postulated role in establishing the nucleoid structure of elementary bodies. Images PMID:7687246

  19. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterizedmore » as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).« less

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Assembled Using Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Brown; Sagar M. Utturkar; Timothy S. Magnuson; Allison E. Ray; Farris L. Poole; W. Andrew Lancaster; Michael P. Thorgersen; Michael W. W. Adams; Dwayne A. Elias

    2014-09-01

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  1. Detection of K-ras oncogene mutations & DNA adducts in the lungs of strain A/J mice exposed to benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F)

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shakra, A.; Roop, B.C.; Nelson, G.

    1995-11-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F) has been shown in our laboratories to induce adenomas in strain A/J mouse lungs using i.p. doses above 50 mg/kg body weight. B[b]F appears to be less potent than benzo[a]pyrene on a mg/kg basis in this tumor model. We measured the formation of B[b]F-DNA adducts in mice exposed to B[b]F after 1-21 days and analyzed B[b]F-induced tumors for K-ras oncogene mutations approximately 8 months later. The major B[b]F-DNA adduct comigrated with an adduct seen after application of 5-hydroxy-B[b]F-9,10-dihydrodiol-11,12-oxide to mouse skin. Tumor DNA was extracted and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers flanking the 111 bp region of exon 1. Samples were sequenced using the dideoxy method; those samples that failed to show a clear sequence after repetitive sequencing were subjected to single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP). B[b]F-induced tumors with K-ras mutations in codon 12, had the following distribution: GGT {yields}GTT, 50%; GGT{yields}TGT, 40%; GGT{yields} 10%. Further characterization of these mutations and their relationship to B[b]F-DNA adducts is in progress

  2. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  3. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  4. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  5. Evaluation of four DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus detection by PCR in tissues from experimentally infected cows with the 2308 strain.

    PubMed

    Vejarano, M P; Matrone, M; Keid, L B; Rocha, V C M; Ikuta, C Y; Rodriguez, C A R; Salgado, V R; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Telles, E O; Ferreira Neto, J S

    2013-04-01

    This study compared 4 protocols for DNA extraction from homogenates of 6 different organs of cows infected with the Brucella abortus 2308 strain. The extraction protocols compared were as follows: GT (guanidine isothiocyanate lysis), Boom (GT lysis with the carrying suspension diatomaceous earth), PK (proteinase K lysis), and Santos (lysis by boiling and freezing with liquid nitrogen). Positive and negative gold standard reference groups were generated by classical bacteriological methods. All samples were processed with the 4 DNA extraction protocols and amplified with the B4 and B5 primers. The number of positive samples in the placental cotyledons was higher than that in the other organs. The cumulated results showed that the Santos protocol was more sensitive than the Boom (p=0.003) and GT (p=0.0506) methods and was similar to the PK method (p=0.2969). All of the DNA extraction protocols resulted in false-negative results for PCR. In conclusion, despite the disadvantages of classical bacteriological methods, the best approach for direct diagnosis of B. abortus in organs of infected cows includes the isolation associated with PCR of DNA extracted from the cotyledon by the Santos or PK methods.

  6. DNA-based methodologies for rapid detection, quantification, and species- or strain-level identification of respiratory pathogens (Mycobacteria and Pseudomonads) in metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jagjit S; Khan, Izhar U H; Fakhari, Farnaz; Soellner, Mathew B

    2003-11-01

    Mycobacteria and pseudomonads occurring in modern metalworking fluids (MWF) have been implicated in occupational health hazards as causal agents for hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) and other respiratory illnesses in machine workers exposed to these fluids and their aerosols. Unlike the conventional cultural and biochemical methods, which are often slow and ambiguous and detect only culturable cells, DNA-based methods offer a time-saving alternative for reliable detection and identification of both culturable and nonculturable bacteria in MWF and for selective quantification of individual genera of pathogens of interest in these fluids. This is the first report on DNA-based direct detection of mycobacteria and pseudomonads in MWF without culturing. Genus-specific PCR approach was successfully applied for screening of field MWF samples originating from different industrial users for detection of mycobacteria or pseudomonads including both culturable and nonculturable cells. PCR in combination with amplicon DNA sequencing led to the identification of Mycobacterium chelonae, Pseudomonas nitroreducens, and an undefined Pseudomonas species from these fluids. Genome fingerprinting by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) on Mycobacterium isolates further showed that the isolates represented three strains of M. chelonae although the possibility of one of the strains being clonal with M. immunogenum cannot be excluded. In parallel efforts, a quantitative competitive PCR method developed based on the Pseudomonas-specific PCR was applied to quantify total P. fluorescens cells in contaminated metalworking fluid and MWF aerosol without culturing. The DNA-based protocols developed in this study will allow rapid screening of field MWF samples for the presence of both culturable and nonculturable cells and thus facilitate effective fluid management and timely exposure assessment. PMID:14555451

  7. Cloning and sequence analysis of novel DNA polymerases from thermophilic Geobacillus species isolated from hot springs in Turkey: characterization of a DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus kaue strain NB.

    PubMed

    Çağlayan, Melike; Bilgin, Neş'e

    2011-11-01

    The complete coding sequences of the polA genes from seven thermophilic Geobacillus species, isolated from hot springs of Gönen and Hisaralan in Turkey, were cloned and sequenced. The polA genes of these Geobacillus species contain a long open reading frame of 2,637 bp encoding DNA polymerase I with a calculated molecular mass of 99 kDa. Amino acid sequences of these Geobacillus DNA polymerases are closely related. The multiple sequence alignments show all include the conserved amino acids in the polymerase and 5'-3' exonuclease domains, but the catalytic residues varied in 3'-5' exonuclease domain of these Geobacillus DNA polymerases. One of them, DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus kaue strain NB (Gkaue polI) is purified to homogeneity and biochemically characterized in vitro. The optimum temperature for enzymatic activity of Gkaue polI is 70 °C at pH 7.5-8.5 in the presence of 8 mM Mg(2+) and 80-100 mM of monovalent ions. The addition of polyamines stimulates the polymerization activity of the enzyme. Three-dimensional structure of Gkaue polI predicted using homology modeling confirmed the conservation of all the functionally important regions in the polymerase active site.

  8. Cellular HIV type 1 DNA levels are equivalent among drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral naive patients.

    PubMed

    Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Hezka, Johana; Kousiappa, Ioanna; Mamais, Ioannis; Skoura, Lemonia; Pilalas, Dimitris; Metallidis, Simeon; Nicolaidis, Pavlos; Malisiovas, Nicolaos; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of resistance against current antiretroviral drugs to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an increasingly important concern to the continuous success of antiretroviral therapy to HIV-1-infected patients. In the past decade, a number of studies reported that the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed patients has reached an overall 9% prevalence worldwide. Also, a number of studies using longitudinal HIV-1 patient study cohorts demonstrated that the cellular HIV-1 DNA level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has a prognostic value for the progression of HIV-1 disease independently of plasma HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 count. Using a previously established molecular-beacon-based real-time PCR methodology, cellular HIV-1 DNA levels were quantified in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral-naive patients in Northern Greece recruited between 2009 and 2010 using a predefined enrolling strategy, in an effort to investigate whether there is any relationship between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. As part of the same study, DNA sequences encoding the env (C2-C5 region of gp120) were also amplified from PBMC-extracted DNA in order to determine the genotypic coreceptor tropism and genetic subtype. Cellular HIV-1 DNA levels had a median of 3.309 log10 HIV-1 copies per 10(6) PBMCs and demonstrated no correlation between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. An absence of association between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels with plasma viral HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 levels was also found reconfirming the previously published study. Genotypic analysis of coreceptor tropism indicated that 96% of samples, independently of the presence or not of genotypic drug resistance, were CCR5-tropic. Overall, the findings reconfirmed the previously proposed proposition that transmitted drug resistance does not have an impact on disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals. Also, CCR5

  9. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey. PMID:26597137

  10. Foreign DNA sequences are received by a wild-type strain of Aspergillus niger after co-culture with transgenic higher plants.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, T; Golz, C; Schieder, O

    1994-12-01

    Different transgenic plants of Brassica napus, Brassica nigra, Datura innoxia and Vicia narbonensis expressing the hph gene under the control of the 35s promoter were co-cultivated with mycelial material of Aspergillus niger in microcosms under sterile conditions. A significantly higher number of hygromycin B-resistant colonies of re-isolated fungi was obtained if compared with co-cultures with non-transgenic plants. The hph gene and other foreign sequences could be detected in some of the resistant strains only for a short time after selection, indicating a rapid loss of foreign DNA. A more stable transgenic strain was obtained after co-culture with transgenic plants of D. innoxia including a high number of hph copies in their genome. DNA with detected pUC sequences was prepared to transform E. coli DH5 alpha. One of the recovered plasmids is shown to include pieces of the plant-transforming vector and a foreign sequence. The 35s-regulated expression of genes is studied in A. niger.

  11. Restriction site detection in repetitive nuclear DNA sequences of Trypanosoma evansi for strain differentiation among different isolates.

    PubMed

    Shyma, K P; Gupta, S K; Gupta, J P; Singh, Ajit; Chaudhari, S S; Singh, Veer

    2016-09-01

    The differences or similarities among different isolates of Trypanosoma evansi through endonuclease profile was identified in the present study. The repetitive nuclear DNA of T. evansi isolated from infected cattle, buffalo and equine blood was initially amplified by PCR using specific primers. A panel of restriction enzymes, EcoRI, Eco91l, HindIII and PstI were for complete digestion of PCR products. Agarose gel electrophoresis of digested product did not show cleavage fragments and only single DNA band of the original size was visible in the ethidium bromide stained agarose gel. This indicated that the 227 bp PCR product from repetitive sequence had no site-specific cleavage sites for the REs used in this study. No heterogeneity in the repetitive nuclear DNA restriction endonuclease profile among the different isolates was recorded. PMID:27605842

  12. Biomphalaria glabrata transcriptome: cDNA microarray profiling identifies resistant- and susceptible-specific gene expression in haemocytes from snail strains exposed to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Lockyer, Anne E; Spinks, Jenny; Kane, Richard A; Hoffmann, Karl F; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer M; Rollinson, David; Noble, Leslie R; Jones, Catherine S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biomphalaria glabrata is an intermediate snail host for Schistosoma mansoni, one of the important schistosomes infecting man. B. glabrata/S. mansoni provides a useful model system for investigating the intimate interactions between host and parasite. Examining differential gene expression between S. mansoni-exposed schistosome-resistant and susceptible snail lines will identify genes and pathways that may be involved in snail defences. Results We have developed a 2053 element cDNA microarray for B. glabrata containing clones from ORESTES (Open Reading frame ESTs) libraries, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries and clones identified in previous expression studies. Snail haemocyte RNA, extracted from parasite-challenged resistant and susceptible snails, 2 to 24 h post-exposure to S. mansoni, was hybridized to the custom made cDNA microarray and 98 differentially expressed genes or gene clusters were identified, 94 resistant-associated and 4 susceptible-associated. Quantitative PCR analysis verified the cDNA microarray results for representative transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were annotated and clustered using gene ontology (GO) terminology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. 61% of the identified differentially expressed genes have no known function including the 4 susceptible strain-specific transcripts. Resistant strain-specific expression of genes implicated in innate immunity of invertebrates was identified, including hydrolytic enzymes such as cathepsin L, a cysteine proteinase involved in lysis of phagocytosed particles; metabolic enzymes such as ornithine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of polyamines, important in inflammation and infection processes, as well as scavenging damaging free radicals produced during production of reactive oxygen species; stress response genes such as HSP70; proteins involved in signalling, such as importin 7 and copine 1

  13. The induction of lysis in lysogenic strains of Escherichia coli by a new antitumor transplatin derivative and its DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Viktor; Pracharova, Jitka; Novakova, Olga; Gibson, Dan; Kasparkova, Jana

    2015-02-28

    The toxicity of the new derivative of transplatin, namely trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] (DEA = diethylamine), in which only one NH3 group was replaced by a small, non-bulky DEA ligand, in the cisplatin sensitive and resistant tumor cell lines was examined. The results indicate that this very small modification of the transplatin molecule results in a considerable enhancement of toxicity in the cancer cells. Thus, this finding is consistent with the thesis that the trans geometry in Pt(II)-dichlorido compounds can also be effectively activated by the replacement of only one NH3 ligand in transplatin by the non-bulky ligand, such as the short aliphatic amine, (C2H5)2NH. We also demonstrate that trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)], in contrast to transplatin, can be grouped with the coordination compounds exhibiting antitumor activity and capable of inducing lysis in lysogenic bacteria. Thus, these results afford, for the first time, experimental support for the view that DNA is the potential cellular target also for antitumor derivatives of transplatin. DNA binding mode of trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] in cell-free media was examined as well. The results show that the small aliphatic DEA ligand has significant consequences for the DNA conformational changes. Unlike 'classical' transplatin, modification of DNA with trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] leads to mainly bifunctional cross-links. The extent and destabilization of the double-helical structure of DNA by this new trans-platinum complex are similar to those induced by cisplatin. As a consequence the lesions effectively inhibit transcription of template DNA similarly to the lesions of cisplatin, but markedly more than the lesions of transplatin. The stronger inhibition of DNA transcription by the adducts of trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] in comparison with the adducts of transplatin adds a new dimension to the impact of the activated trans geometry in platinum compounds on biological processes, possibly including DNA transcription.

  14. DNA-Level Diversity and Relatedness of Helicobacter pylori Strains in Shantytown Families in Peru and Transmission in a Developing-Country Setting▿

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Phabiola M.; Mendez, Melissa; Velapatiõ, Billie; Santivaẽz, Livia; Balqui, Jacqueline; Finger, S. Alison; Sherman, Jonathan; Zimic, Mirko; Cabrera, Lilia; Watanabe, Jose; Rodríguez, Carlos; Gilman, Robert H.; Berg, Douglas E.

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of transmission of a pathogen within families compared with that between unrelated persons can affect both the strategies needed to control or eradicate infection and how the pathogen evolves. In industrialized countries, most cases of transmission of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori seems to be from mother to child. An alternative model, potentially applicable among the very poor in developing countries, where infection is more common and the sanitary infrastructure is often deficient, invokes frequent transmission among unrelated persons, often via environmental sources. In the present study, we compared the genotypes of H. pylori from members of shantytown households in Peru to better understand the transmission of H. pylori in developing-country settings. H. pylori cultures and/or DNAs were obtained with informed consent by the string test (a minimally invasive alternative to endoscopy) from at least one child and one parent from each of 62 families. The random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints of 57 of 81 (70%) child-mother strain pairs did not match, nor did the diagnostic gene sequences (>1% DNA sequence difference), independent of the child's age (range, 1 to 39 years). Most strains from siblings or other paired family members were also unrelated. These results suggest that H. pylori infections are often community acquired in the society studied. Transmission between unrelated persons should facilitate the formation of novel recombinant genotypes by interstrain DNA transfer and selection for genotypes that are well suited for individual hosts. It also implies that the effective prevention of H. pylori infection and associated gastroduodenal disease will require anti-H. pylori measures to be applied communitywide. PMID:18842944

  15. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  16. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  17. Aniline mustard analogues of the DNA-intercalating agent amsacrine: DNA interaction and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, J Y; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Baguley, B C; Denny, W A

    1997-04-01

    Two series of analogues of the clinical antileukemic drug and DNA-intercalating ligand amsacrine have been prepared, containing aniline mustard sidechains of varying reactivity, linked either at the 4-position of the intercalating acridine chromophore (type A) or at the 1'-position of the 9-anilino group (type B). DNase I footprinting assays showed that compounds of type B had stronger reversible binding to DNA than did compounds of type A. Compounds of each type showed similar patterns of alkylation-induced cleavage of DNA, and alkylate at the N7 of guanines in runs of guanines (similar to the pattern for untargeted mustards) as well as some adenines. Both classes of compounds crosslinked DNA, although those bearing relatively inactive mustards did so only at high drug/base pair ratios. However, while the patterns of DNA alkylation were broadly similar, the compounds were considerably more cytotoxic than analogous untargeted mustards. Comparison of their cytotoxicities in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient lines indicated this toxicity was due to DNA crosslinks (except for the least reactive SO2-linked mustards). The 4-linked analogues showed slightly higher in vivo antileukemic activity than the corresponding 1'-linked analogues.

  18. Rescue of the 1947 Zika Virus Prototype Strain with a Cytomegalovirus Promoter-Driven cDNA Clone

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Megan C.; Sourisseau, Marion; Espino, Michael M.; Gray, Essanna S.; Chambers, Matthew T.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has been linked to severe pathogenesis. Here, we report the construction of a plasmid carrying a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-expressed prototype 1947 Uganda MR766 ZIKV cDNA that can initiate infection following direct plasmid DNA transfection of mammalian cells. Incorporation of a synthetic intron in the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) region of the ZIKV polyprotein reduced viral cDNA-associated toxicity in bacteria. High levels of infectious virus were produced following transfection of the plasmid bearing the wild-type MR766 ZIKV genome, but not one with a disruption to the viral nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) polymerase active site. Multicycle growth curve and plaque assay experiments indicated that the MR766 virus resulting from plasmid transfection exhibited growth characteristics that were more similar to its parental isolate than previously published 2010 Cambodia and 2015 Brazil cDNA-rescued ZIKV. This ZIKV infectious clone will be useful for investigating the genetic determinants of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis and should be amenable to construction of diverse infectious clones expressing reporter proteins and representing a range of ZIKV isolates. IMPORTANCE The study of ZIKV, which has become increasingly important with the recent association of this virus with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, would benefit from an efficient strategy to genetically manipulate the virus. This work describes a model system to produce infectious virus in cell culture. We created a plasmid carrying the prototype 1947 Uganda MR766 ZIKV genome that both was stable in bacteria and could produce high levels of infectious virus in mammalian cells through direct delivery of this DNA. Furthermore, growth properties of this rescued virus closely resembled those of the viral isolate from which it was derived. This model system will provide a simple and effective means to study how ZIKV genetics impact viral replication and

  19. Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus pcr detection in aborted fetuses or calves born from cows experimentally infected with strain 2308

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, M.; Keid, L.B.; Rocha, V.C.M.; Vejarano, M.P.; Ikuta, C.Y.; Rodriguez, C.A.R.; Ferreira, F.; Dias, R.A.; Ferreira Neto, J.S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the detection of B. abortus by PCR in organs of aborted fetuses from infected cows, an important mechanism to find infected herds on the eradication phase of the program. So, different DNA extraction protocols were compared, focusing the PCR detection of B. abortus in clinical samples collected from aborted fetuses or calves born from cows challenged with the 2308 B. abortus strain. Therefore, two gold standard groups were built based on classical bacteriology, formed from: 32 lungs (17 positives), 26 spleens (11 positives), 23 livers (8 positives) and 22 bronchial lymph nodes (7 positives). All samples were submitted to three DNA extraction protocols, followed by the same amplification process with the primers B4 and B5. From the accumulated results for organ, the proportion of positives for the lungs was higher than the livers (p=0.04) or bronchial lymph nodes (p=0.004) and equal to the spleens (p=0.18). From the accumulated results for DNA extraction protocol, the proportion of positives for the Boom protocol was bigger than the PK (p< 0.0001) and GT (p=0.0004). There was no difference between the PK and GT protocols (p=0.5). Some positive samples from the classical bacteriology were negative to the PCR and vice-versa. Therefore, the best strategy for B. abortus detection in the organs of aborted fetuses or calves born from infected cows is the use, in parallel, of isolation by classical bacteriology and the PCR, with the DNA extraction performed by the Boom protocol. PMID:24031391

  20. Polymorphisms in the ITS rDNA regions for differentiating strains of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex in Sfax-Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Drira, I; Neji, S; Hadrich, I; Trabelsi, H; Sellami, H; Cheikhrouhou, F; Guidara, R; Makni, F; Ayadi, A

    2014-08-01

    The Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex is the main cause of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Molecular research has provided useful insights into the taxonomy of this complex to overcome the challenges with conventional diagnostics. The aim of this study was to identify, type and differentiate anthropophilic and zoophilic species of the T. mentagrophytes complex. Sixty clinical samples identified as T. mentagrophytes by morphological characteristics were isolated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The identification of our strains by conventional methods was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing in 93.34% of the cases. The strains under investigation were recategorised as T. rubrum (Tr2711). In addition, PCR products were independently digested with the restriction endonucleases, MvaI and HinfI, to produce a single dominant profile for T. interdigitale. ITS sequence analysis revealed a polymorphism in the ITS1 and 5.8S regions. Analysis of the consensus sequences distinguished four types of genotypes among our T. interdigitale species. Moreover, ITS type I was the dominant genotype characterising the anthropophilic variant of T. interdigitale. The phylogenetic study showed that only 5% of our strains were zoophilic. PCR sequencing was useful for distinguishing anthropophilic and zoophilic species of T. interdigitale, in which the differentiation is relevant because it helps to prescribe the correct treatment and to identify the surrounding source of infection. PMID:24621449

  1. DNA sequence and genetic characterization of plasmid pFQ11 from Frankia alni strain CpI1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xudong; Kong, Renqiu; de Bruijn, Frans J; He, Sheng Yang; Murry, Marcia A; Newman, Thomas; Wolk, C Peter

    2002-01-22

    An 8551-bp plasmid, pFQ11, from Frankia alni strain CpI1 was sequenced. Its sequence was found to be very similar to that presented for pFQ31 from strain ArI3. Six potential protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, and transcriptional activity was shown within four of those regions of the plasmid by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. An earlier study reported that ORF E(F) of pFQ31, which is nearly identical to the 3' 45% of ORF1 of pFQ11, is significantly similar to RepF. We found no such similarity. ORF2 and ORF3 predict products that are similar to a repressor protein and a partition protein, respectively. We found inverted repeats within and covering the start codon of ORF3; palindromic sequences and direct repeats between ORF3 and ORF4; and 3' from ORF3, an AT-rich sequence that extensively overlaps the promoter region of a uvrB homolog in strain ArI3. PMID:11886759

  2. DNA damage induced by the anticodon nuclease from a Pichia acaciae killer strain is linked to ribonucleotide reductase depletion.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-02-01

    Virus like element (VLE) encoded killer toxins of Pichia acaciae and Kluyveromyces lactis kill target cells through anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activity directed against tRNA(Gln) and tRNA(Glu) respectively. Not only does tRNA cleavage disable translation, it also affects DNA integrity as well. Consistent with DNA damage, which is involved in toxicity, target cells' mutation frequencies are elevated upon ACNase exposure, suggesting a link between translational integrity and genome surveillance. Here, we analysed whether ACNase action impedes the periodically and highly expressed S-phase specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and proved that RNR expression is severely affected by PaT. Because RNR catalyses the rate-limiting step in dNTP synthesis, mutants affected in dNTP synthesis were scrutinized with respect to ACNase action. Mutations elevating cellular dNTPs antagonized the action of both the above ACNases, whereas mutations lowering dNTPs aggravated toxicity. Consistently, prevention of tRNA cleavage in elp3 or trm9 mutants, which both affect the wobble uridine modification of the target tRNA, suppressed the toxin hypersensitivity of a dNTP synthesis mutant. Moreover, dNTP synthesis defects exacerbated the PaT ACNase sensitivity of cells defective in homologous recombination, proving that dNTP depletion is responsible for subsequent DNA damage. PMID:26247322

  3. DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

  4. Further evidence from SSCP and ITS DNA sequencing support Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum as subspecies or even strains of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan-Zi; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Hide, Geoff; Lai, De-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The subgenus Trypanozoon includes three species Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum, which are morphologically identical and indistinguishable even using some molecular methods. In this study, PCR-based single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to analyze the ribosomal DNA of the Trypanozoon species. Data indicate different patterns of ITS2 fragments between T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum by SSCP. Furthermore, analysis of total ITS sequences within these three members of the subgenus Trypanozoon showed a high degree of homology using phylogenetic analysis but were polyphyletic in haplotype networks. These data provide novel nuclear evidence to further support the notion that T. evansi and T. equiperdum should be subspecies or even strains of T. brucei. PMID:27016375

  5. [Construction of a full-length cDNA clone of a live attenuated vaccine strain against Japanese encephalitis virus and preliminary study of expressing exogenous gene].

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Yang, Shuang; Fang, Zhi-zheng

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to construct full-length cDNA clones of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). SA14-14-2 strain and discuss the feasibility of constructing chimeric viruses for exogenous gene expression based on the JEV genetic skeleton. Long-fragment RT-PCR techniques were applied to amplify JEV cD-NAs, and two amplified fragments with corresponding restriction endonuclease sites at both ends were cloned into the pACYC184 vector sequentially. Using standard molecular techniques, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was inserted into the 3' non-coding region of JEV as a reporter gene. After in vitro transcription and transfection procedures, wild-type JEV and chimeric JEV that expressed the EGFP as the reporter gene were successfully rescued. The recovered viruses were characterized by RT-PCR, plaque assays, and direct fluorescence microscopy. After six serial passage generations, the stability of the recovered viruses were studied in terms of virus growth characteristics and structural gene expression. The results showed that cDNA clones of rJEV and rJEV-EGFP were successfully constructed and rescued in BHK-21 cells after in vitro transcription and transfection. Each generation of the recovered viruses was stable and the chimeric virus rJEV-EGFP could stably express EGFP. The findings of this study indicate that both rJEV and rJEV-EGFP could be constructed and rescued in BHK-21 cells, and the JEV SA14-14-2 strain could be obtained as a viral vector to express foreign genes.

  6. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-02-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP.

  7. Development and characterization of a synthetic infectious cDNA clone of the virulent Bucyrus strain of equine arteritis virus expressing mCherry (red fluorescent protein).

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shankar P; Cook, R Frank; Chelvarajan, R Lakshman; Henney, Pamela J; Timoney, Peter J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Strains of equine arteritis virus (EAV) differ in their virulence phenotypes, causing anywhere from subclinical infections to severe disease in horses. Here, we describe the in silico design and de novo synthesis of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of the horse-adapted virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS) of EAV encoding mCherry along with in vitro characterization of the progeny virions (EAV sVBSmCherry) in terms of host-cell tropism, replicative capacity and stability of the mCherry coding sequences following sequential passage in cell culture. The relative stability of the mCherry sequence during sequential cell culture passage coupled with a comparable host-cell range phenotype (equine endothelial cells, CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) monocytes) to parental EAV VBS suggest that EAV-sVBSmCherry-derived virus could become a valuable research tool for identification of host-cell tropism determinants and for characterization of the viral proteins involved in virus attachment and entry into different subpopulations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that advances in nucleic acid synthesis technology permit synthesis of complex viral genomes with overlapping genes like those of arteriviruses, thereby circumventing the need for complicated molecular cloning techniques. In summary, de novo nucleic acid synthesis technology facilitates innovative viral vector design without the tedium and risks posed by more-conventional laboratory techniques. PMID:26711457

  8. [Expression of cDNA of the Gene for the Capsid Protein VP2 of German Cockroach Densovirus in the Transgenic Strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, E N; Martynova, E U; Roshina, N V; Karakozova, M V; Mukha, D V

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster capable of expressing a cDNA fragment corresponding to open reading frame (ORF) of the gene for the German cockroach densonucleosis virus capsid protein VP2 (ORF VP2) in specific tissues and at a certain stage of development depending on the type of chosen driver strains (GAL-UAS system) were obtained. The ORF VP2 transcription was examined at the imago stage after crossing the obtained transgenic Drosophila with the driver line expressing the inducer protein (GAL4) under control of actin promoter (the ORF VP2 expression is induced in all tissues of the first-generation Drosophila). It was demonstrated that the greater part of transcribed foreign RNA was represented by three spliced variants in which RNA fragments either between nucleotides 137 and 353 or between nucleotides 609 and 1925 were excised; the third spliced variant was represented by RNA lacking both introns. Using the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique, the proportion of unspliced form relative to spliced variants of the analyzed RNA was assessed. It was shown that the ratio of unspliced form to the identified spliced variants of the analyzed RNA was approximately 1:6. It is suggested that splicing of viral RNA foreign to Drosophila can be a sort of defense mechanism preventing the large-scale production of the capsid protein, potentially hazardous to the host organism.

  9. [Expression of cDNA of the Gene for the Capsid Protein VP2 of German Cockroach Densovirus in the Transgenic Strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, E N; Martynova, E U; Roshina, N V; Karakozova, M V; Mukha, D V

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster capable of expressing a cDNA fragment corresponding to open reading frame (ORF) of the gene for the German cockroach densonucleosis virus capsid protein VP2 (ORF VP2) in specific tissues and at a certain stage of development depending on the type of chosen driver strains (GAL-UAS system) were obtained. The ORF VP2 transcription was examined at the imago stage after crossing the obtained transgenic Drosophila with the driver line expressing the inducer protein (GAL4) under control of actin promoter (the ORF VP2 expression is induced in all tissues of the first-generation Drosophila). It was demonstrated that the greater part of transcribed foreign RNA was represented by three spliced variants in which RNA fragments either between nucleotides 137 and 353 or between nucleotides 609 and 1925 were excised; the third spliced variant was represented by RNA lacking both introns. Using the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique, the proportion of unspliced form relative to spliced variants of the analyzed RNA was assessed. It was shown that the ratio of unspliced form to the identified spliced variants of the analyzed RNA was approximately 1:6. It is suggested that splicing of viral RNA foreign to Drosophila can be a sort of defense mechanism preventing the large-scale production of the capsid protein, potentially hazardous to the host organism. PMID:27529987

  10. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates.

  11. Cleavage maps for human cytomegalovirus DNA strain AD169 for restriction endonucleases EcoRI, BglII, and HindIII.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, D H; Hock, L; Tamashiro, J C

    1982-01-01

    We have used cloned EcoRI fragments of the human CMV (HCMV) genome, strain AD169, to prepare restriction endonuclease maps of the DNA. Individual 32P-labeled cloned fragments were hybridized to Southern blots of HCMV DNA cleaved to completion with the restriction endonucleases BglII and HindIII and cleaved partially with EcoRI. By determining which EcoRI fragments hybridized to the same band on a Southern blot, we were able to establish linkage groups. This information coupled with the data derived from digestion of the cloned fragments with the enzymes BglII and HindIII (Tamashiro et al., J. Virol. 42:547-557, 1982) provided the basis for the construction of detailed maps for the enzymes EcoRI, BglII, and HindIII. We also identified the EcoRI fragments derived from the termini of this genome and mapped them with respect to the BglII and HindIII terminal fragments. From our mapping data, we conclude that the genome of HCMV is approximately 240 kilobases in length and is divided into long (198 kilobases) and short (42 kilobases) regions. Both regions consist of a unique sequence bounded by inverted repeats (11 to 12 kilobases for the long region and 2 to 3 kilobases for the short region). Furthermore, the long and short regions can invert relative to each other. Images PMID:6283173

  12. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates. PMID:24299459

  13. Multiplexed detection and differentiation of the DNA strains for influenza A (H1N1 2009) using a silicon-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Kao, Linus Tzu-Hsiang; Shankar, Lakshmi; Kang, Tae Goo; Zhang, Guojun; Tay, Guang Kai Ignatius; Rafei, Siti Rafeah Mohamed; Lee, Charlie Wah Heng

    2011-01-15

    Pandemic influenza by the swine-origin influenza virus (H1N1 2009) has attracted considerable concern worldwide. A convenient and accurate diagnostic approach that can be deployed at the point of care, such as in a doctor's office or at an airport, is critical for disease control. Here we report the development of a silicon-based microfluidic system for subtype differentiation of the novel H1N1 2009 strain vs. the seasonal influenza A (FluA) strain. The proposed system included two functional modules: a multiplexed PCR module for amplification of nucleic acid targets and a multiplexed silicon nanowire (SiNW) module for sequence determination. The PCR module consisted of a microfluidic PCR chamber and an electrical controller to perform a multiplexed protocol that simultaneously enriched specific segments of both H1N1 and FluA strains (if present), with 10(4)-10(5) amplification efficiency. The PCR amplicon was subsequently denatured and transferred to the SiNW sensing module for a label-free, multiplexed detection. A control SiNW was implemented, for the first time, in order to eliminate background interference. The detection module demonstrated a 10× change in the magnitude of differential current when the target DNA was injected. Overall, the system achieved a sensitivity of 20-30 fg/μl for H1N1 and seasonal FluA nucleic acids in a 10 μl sample. The low sample consumption, high sensitivity and high specificity render it a potential point-of-care (POC) platform to help doctors reach a yes/no decision for infectious diseases.

  14. PhyloFlu, a DNA microarray for determining the phylogenetic origin of influenza A virus gene segments and the genomic fingerprint of viral strains.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Luis F; de los D Soto-Del Río, María; Sánchez, Iván; Hernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa M; López-Martínez, Irma; Wong-Chew, Rosa M; Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Isa, P; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2014-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that most influenza A virus gene segments can contribute to the pathogenicity of the virus. In this regard, the hemagglutinin (HA) subtype of the circulating strains has been closely surveyed, but the reassortment of internal gene segments is usually not monitored as a potential source of an increased pathogenicity. In this work, an oligonucleotide DNA microarray (PhyloFlu) designed to determine the phylogenetic origins of the eight segments of the influenza virus genome was constructed and validated. Clades were defined for each segment and also for the 16 HA and 9 neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. Viral genetic material was amplified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with primers specific to the conserved 5' and 3' ends of the influenza A virus genes, followed by PCR amplification with random primers and Cy3 labeling. The microarray unambiguously determined the clades for all eight influenza virus genes in 74% (28/38) of the samples. The microarray was validated with reference strains from different animal origins, as well as from human, swine, and avian viruses from field or clinical samples. In most cases, the phylogenetic clade of each segment defined its animal host of origin. The genomic fingerprint deduced by the combined information of the individual clades allowed for the determination of the time and place that strains with the same genomic pattern were previously reported. PhyloFlu is useful for characterizing and surveying the genetic diversity and variation of animal viruses circulating in different environmental niches and for obtaining a more detailed surveillance and follow up of reassortant events that can potentially modify virus pathogenicity.

  15. DNA Repair in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Distinct from That in Non-Pluripotent Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li Z.; Park, Sang-Won; Bates, Steven E.; Zeng, Xianmin; Iverson, Linda E.; O'Connor, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for human disease treatment using human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), also carries the risk of added genomic instability. Genomic instability is most often linked to DNA repair deficiencies, which indicates that screening/characterization of possible repair deficiencies in pluripotent human stem cells should be a necessary step prior to their clinical and research use. In this study, a comparison of DNA repair pathways in pluripotent cells, as compared to those in non-pluripotent cells, demonstrated that DNA repair capacities of pluripotent cell lines were more heterogeneous than those of differentiated lines examined and were generally greater. Although pluripotent cells had high DNA repair capacities for nucleotide excision repair, we show that ultraviolet radiation at low fluxes induced an apoptotic response in these cells, while differentiated cells lacked response to this stimulus, and note that pluripotent cells had a similar apoptotic response to alkylating agent damage. This sensitivity of pluripotent cells to damage is notable since viable pluripotent cells exhibit less ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage than do differentiated cells that receive the same flux. In addition, the importance of screening pluripotent cells for DNA repair defects was highlighted by an iPSC line that demonstrated a normal spectral karyotype, but showed both microsatellite instability and reduced DNA repair capacities in three out of four DNA repair pathways examined. Together, these results demonstrate a need to evaluate DNA repair capacities in pluripotent cell lines, in order to characterize their genomic stability, prior to their pre-clinical and clinical use. PMID:22412831

  16. A Monofunctional Platinum Complex Coordinated to a Rhodium Metalloinsertor Selectively Binds Mismatched DNA in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh—O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA non-classically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors. PMID:26397309

  17. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  18. The RdgC protein of Escherichia coli binds DNA and counters a toxic effect of RecFOR in strains lacking the replication restart protein PriA.

    PubMed

    Moore, Timothy; McGlynn, Peter; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Sharples, Gary J; Lloyd, Robert G

    2003-02-01

    PriA protein provides a means to load the DnaB replicative helicase at DNA replication fork and D loop structures, and is therefore a key factor in the rescue of stalled or broken forks and subsequent replication restart. We show that the nucleoid-associated RdgC protein binds non-specifically to single-stranded (ss) DNA and double-stranded DNA. It is also essential for growth of a strain lacking PriA, indicating that it might affect replication fork progression or fork rescue. dnaC suppressors of priA overcome this inviability, especially when RecF, RecO or RecR is inactivated, indicating that RdgC avoids or counters a toxic effect of these proteins. Mutations modifying ssDNA-binding (SSB) protein also negate this toxic effect, suggesting that the toxicity reflects inappropriate loading of RecA on SSB-coated ssDNA, leading to excessive or untimely RecA activity. We suggest that binding of RdgC to DNA limits RecA loading, avoiding problems at replication forks that would otherwise require PriA to promote replication restart. Mutations in RNA polymerase also reduce the toxic effect of RecFOR, providing a further link between DNA replication, transcription and repair. PMID:12554673

  19. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene from strain PAO1 and quinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kureishi, A; Diver, J M; Beckthold, B; Schollaardt, T; Bryan, L E

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene was cloned and sequenced from strain PAO1. An open reading frame of 2,769 bp was found; it coded for a protein of 923 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 103 kDa. The derived amino acid sequence shared 67% identity with Escherichia coli GyrA and 54% identity with Bacillus subtilis GyrA, although conserved regions were present throughout the sequences, particularly toward the N terminus. Complementation of an E. coli mutant with a temperature-sensitive gyrA gene with the PAO1 gyrA gene showed that the gene is expressed in E. coli and is able to functionally complement the E. coli DNA gyrase B subunit. Expression of PAO1 gyrA in E. coli or P. aeruginosa with mutationally altered gyrA genes caused a reversion to wild-type quinolone susceptibility, indicating that the intrinsic susceptibility of the PAO1 GyrA to quinolones is comparable to that of the E. coli enzyme. PCR was used to amplify 360 bp of P. aeruginosa gyrA encompassing the so-called quinolone resistance-determining region from ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis. Mutations were found in three of nine isolates tested; these mutations caused the following alterations in the sequence of GyrA: Asp at position 87 (Asp-87) to Asn, Asp-87 to Tyr, and Thr-83 to Ile. The resistance mechanisms in the other six isolates are unknown. The results of the study suggested that mechanisms other than a mutational alteration in gyrA are the most common mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in P. aeruginosa from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7811002

  20. Pre-UV-treatment of cells results in enhanced host cell reactivation of a UV damaged reporter gene in CHO-AA8 chinese hamster ovary cells but not in transcription-coupled repair deficient CHO-UV61 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Rainbow, Andrew J

    2004-12-01

    We have used a non-replicating recombinant adenovirus, Ad5MCMVlacZ, which expresses the beta-galactosidase reporter gene, to examine both constitutive and inducible repair of UV-damaged DNA in repair proficient CHO-AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells and in mutant CHO-UV61 cells which are deficient in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway of nucleotide excision repair. Host cell reactivation (HCR) of beta-galactosidase activity for UV-irradiated Ad5MCMVlacZ was significantly reduced in non-irradiated CHO-UV61 cells compared to that in non-irradiated CHO-AA8 cells suggesting that repair in the transcribed strand of the UV-damaged reporter gene in untreated cells utilizes TCR. Prior UV-irradiation of cells with low UV fluences resulted in a transient enhancement of HCR for expression of the UV-damaged reporter gene in CHO-AA8 cells but not in TCR deficient CHO-UV61 cells. These results suggest the presence of an inducible DNA pathway in CHO cells that results from an enhancement of TCR or a mechanism that involves the TCR pathway. PMID:16158195

  1. Isolation and characterization of the gene encoding single-stranded-DNA-binding protein (SSB) from four marine Shewanella strains that differ in their temperature and pressure optima for growth.

    PubMed

    Chilukuri, L N; Bartlett, D H

    1997-04-01

    The ssb gene, coding for single-stranded-DNA-binding protein (SSB), was cloned from four marine Shewanella strains that differed in their temperature and pressure optima and ranges of growth. All four Shewanella ssb genes complemented Escherichia coli ssb point and deletion mutants, with efficiencies that varied with temperature and ssb gene source. The Shewanella SSBs are the largest bacterial SSBs identified to date (24.9-26.3 kDa) and may be divided into conserved amino- and carboy-terminal regions and a highly variable central region. Greater amino acid sequence homology was observed between the Shewanella SSBs as a group (72-87%) than with other bacterial SSBs (52-69%). Analysis of the amino acid composition of the Shewanella SSBs revealed several features that could correlate with pressure or temperature adaptation. SSBs from the three low-temperature-adapted Shewanella strains were an order of magnitude more hydrophilic than that from the mesophilic strain, and differences in the distribution of eight amino acids were identified which could contribute to either the temperature or pressure adaptation of the proteins. The SSBs from all four Shewanella strains were overproduced and partially purified based upon their ability to bind single-stranded DNA. The differences found among the Shewanella SSBs suggest that these proteins will provide a useful system for exploring the adaptation of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions at low temperature and high pressure. PMID:9141679

  2. Development and validation of DNA markers linked to Sdvy-1, a common bean gene conferring resistance to the yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Takeuchi, Toru; Okuyama, Masataka; Sasaki, Jun; Onodera, Kakumasa; Sato, Mikako; Souma, Chihiro; Ebe, Shigehiko

    2014-12-01

    The yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV-YS) causes yellowing and yield loss in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). The most effective control is achieved through breeding for resistance. An indeterminate climbing cultivar with a white seed coat, 'Oofuku', is resistant to SbDV-YS in inoculation tests. We crossed 'Oofuku' with an elite cultivar, 'Taisho-Kintoki', which is SbDV-YS-susceptible, determinate dwarf with a red-purple seed coat, and performed amplified-fragment-length polymorphism analysis of F3 lines. From nucleotide sequences of the resistant-specific fragments and their flanking regions, we developed five DNA markers, of which DV86, DV386, and DV398 were closely linked to Sdvy-1, a resistance gene. Using the markers, we developed 'Toiku-B79' and 'Toiku-B80', the near-isogenic lines (NILs) incorporating Sdvy-1 in the background of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs had similar growth habit, maturity date and seed shape to those of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The quality of boiled beans was also similar, except that the NILs had more seed coat cracking than 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs showed no SbDV-YS infection in inoculation tests. We suggest that Sdvy-1 is a useful source of SbDV-YS resistance in common bean. PMID:25914596

  3. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations.

  4. Correlation between CYP1A1 transcript, protein level, enzyme activity and DNA adduct formation in normal human mammary epithelial cell strains exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Divi, Rao L.; Einem Lindeman, Tracey L.; Shockley, Marie E.; Keshava, Channa; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo(a)pyrene (BP) is thought to bind covalently to DNA, through metabolism by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1, and other enzymes, to form r7, t8, t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N 2-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]-pyrene (BPdG). Evaluation of RNA expression data, to understand the contribution of different metabolic enzymes to BPdG formation, is typically presented as fold-change observed upon BP exposure, leaving the actual number of RNA transcripts unknown. Here, we have quantified RNA copies/ng cDNA (RNA cpn) for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, as well as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), which may reduce formation of BPdG adducts, using primary normal human mammary epithelial cell (NHMEC) strains, and the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In unexposed NHMECs, basal RNA cpn values were 58–836 for CYP1A1, 336–5587 for CYP1B1 and 5943–40112 for NQO1. In cells exposed to 4.0 µM BP for 12h, RNA cpn values were 251–13234 for CYP1A1, 4133–57078 for CYP1B1 and 4456–55887 for NQO1. There were 3.5 (mean, range 0.2–15.8) BPdG adducts/108 nucleotides in the NHMECs (n = 16), and 790 in the MCF-7s. In the NHMECs, BP-induced CYP1A1 RNA cpn was highly associated with BPdG (P = 0.002), but CYP1B1 and NQO1 were not. Western blots of four NHMEC strains, chosen for different levels of BPdG adducts, showed a linear correlation between BPdG and CYP1A1, but not CYP1B1 or NQO1. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, which measures CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 together, correlated with BPdG, but NQO1 activity did not. Despite more numerous levels of CYP1B1 and NQO1 RNA cpn in unexposed and BP-exposed NHMECs and MCF-7cells, BPdG formation was only correlated with induction of CYP1A1 RNA cpn. The higher level of BPdG in MCF-7 cells, compared to NHMECs, may have been due to a much increased induction of CYP1A1 and EROD. Overall, BPdG correlation was observed with CYP1A1 protein and CYP1A1/1B1 enzyme activity, but not with CYP1B1 or NQO

  5. Selective amplification of cDNA sequence from total RNA by cassette-ligation mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR): application to sequencing 6.5 kb genome segment of hantavirus strain B-1.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Y; Sheng, J; Sokawa, Y; Yamanishi, K; Nakagomi, O; Ueda, S

    1992-12-01

    A method, referred to as cassette-ligation mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR), has been developed to permit selective and specific amplification of cDNA sequence from total cellular RNA. This technique comprises (i) digestion of cDNA with multiple restriction enzymes, (ii) ligation of cleavage products to double-stranded DNA cassettes possessing a corresponding restriction site and (iii) amplification of cassette-ligated restriction fragments containing a short, known sequence (but not all the other ligation products) by PCR using the specific and cassette primers; the specific primer is designed to prime synthesis from the known sequence of the cDNA whereas the cassette primer anneals to one strand of the cassette. Sequencing from the cassette primer provides information to design a new primer for the next walking step. The amplified cDNA fragments are often larger than the maximum DNA fragments (500-600 bp) that can be sequenced without the need of synthesizing internal sequencing primer. Each of such large cDNA fragments is dissected into smaller DNA fragments by repeating cassette-ligation mediated PCR exploiting different restriction sites and different sets of cassette primers. This dissection process reduces the number of specific primers to a minimum, thereby increasing the speed of sequencing and minimizing the overall cost. We have successfully applied this cDNA walking and sequencing by the cassette-ligation mediated PCR to the sequencing of an entire 6.5 kb genome segment of hantavirus strain B-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Structural basis for DNA cleavage by the potent antiproliferative agent (–)-lomaiviticin A

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Christina M.; Li, Zhenwu; Herzon, Seth B.

    2016-01-01

    (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) is a complex antiproliferative metabolite that inhibits the growth of many cultured cancer cell lines at low nanomolar–picomolar concentrations. (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) possesses a C2-symmetric structure that contains two unusual diazotetrahydrobenzo[b]fluorene (diazofluorene) functional groups. Nucleophilic activation of each diazofluorene within 1 produces vinyl radical intermediates that affect hydrogen atom abstraction from DNA, leading to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Certain DNA DSB repair-deficient cell lines are sensitized toward 1, and 1 is under evaluation in preclinical models of these tumor types. However, the mode of binding of 1 to DNA had not been determined. Here we elucidate the structure of a 1:1 complex between 1 and the duplex d(GCTATAGC)2 by NMR spectroscopy and computational modeling. Unexpectedly, we show that both diazofluorene residues of 1 penetrate the duplex. This binding disrupts base pairing leading to ejection of the central AT bases, while placing the proreactive centers of 1 in close proximity to each strand. DNA binding may also enhance the reactivity of 1 toward nucleophilic activation through steric compression and conformational restriction (an example of shape-dependent catalysis). This study provides a structural basis for the DNA cleavage activity of 1, will guide the design of synthetic DNA-activated DNA cleavage agents, and underscores the utility of natural products to reveal novel modes of small molecule–DNA association. PMID:26929332

  7. Development of a screening system for DNA damage and repair of potential carcinogens based on dual luciferase assay in human HepG2 cell.

    PubMed

    Fan, Longgang; Niu, Yujie; Zhang, Shaohui; Shi, Lei; Guo, Huicai; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    At present, different methods are used for the detection of early biological effects of DNA-damaging agents in environment. Some sensitive testing methods employing DNA damage-inducing genes RNR3, RAD51, RAD54 or growth-arrested and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (Gadd 153) are used to detect the DNA damage. The host cell reactivation (HCR) assay is a functional assay that is based on the independent transfection of cells with either damaged or undamaged plasmid DNA and allows the identification of the genes responsible for DNA repair-deficient syndromes. In this study, we combined the gadd153-luc test system and HCR assay to measure the DNA damage and DNA repair by dual luciferase assay. We used 16 DNA-damaging agents all of which were detected by a positive dual luciferase reporter test system. The sensitivity of the dual luciferase assay system to detect DNA damage/repair was same as the gadd153-luc test system and/or the HCR assay. Since DNA repair is important to maintain genetic stability, DNA damage and repair have been good biomarkers of early biological effects of DNA-damaging agents. Accordingly, the measurement of DNA repair capacity should be a valued tool in molecular epidemiology studies. The dual luciferase assay described in this study is rapid, convenient, stable and standard.

  8. A critical re-assessment of DNA repair gene promoter methylation in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Do, Hongdo; Wong, Nicholas C.; Murone, Carmel; John, Thomas; Solomon, Benjamin; Mitchell, Paul L.; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair genes that have been inactivated by promoter methylation offer potential therapeutic targets either by targeting the specific repair deficiency, or by synthetic lethal approaches. This study evaluated promoter methylation status for eight selected DNA repair genes (ATM, BRCA1, ERCC1, MGMT, MLH1, NEIL1, RAD23B and XPC) in 56 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumours and 11 lung cell lines using the methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) methodology. Frequent methylation in NEIL1 (42%) and infrequent methylation in ERCC1 (2%) and RAD23B (2%) are reported for the first time in NSCLC. MGMT methylation was detected in 13% of the NSCLCs. Contrary to previous studies, methylation was not detected in ATM, BRCA1, MLH1 and XPC. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) was consistent with these findings. The study emphasises the importance of using appropriate methodology for accurate assessment of promoter methylation. PMID:24569633

  9. Neurotoxin-induced DNA damage is persistentin SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Musich, Phillip R.; Cui, Kui; Zou, Yue; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons has been reported in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, their pathologic characteristics during the neurodegenerative course and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used the neurotoxincamptothecin (CPT)to induce the DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, normal fibroblast cells, and primarily cultured LC and raphe neurons to examine cellular responses and repair capabilities after neurotoxin exposure. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and deficientin DNA repair, as compared to fibroblast cells. Furthermore, similar to SH-SY5Y cells, primarily cultured LC neurons are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and show a deficiency in repairing this damage. Moreover, while N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) exposure also results in DNA damage in cultured LC neurons, neither CPT nor DSP4 induce DNA damage in neuronal cultures from the raphe nuclei. Taken together, noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons are sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and exhibit a repair deficiency, providing a mechanistic explanation for the pathologic characteristics of LC degeneration when facing endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging insultsin vivo. PMID:25724887

  10. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  11. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    SciTech Connect

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  12. DNA-DNA hybridization study of strains of Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia and Empedobacter and of other usually indole-producing non-fermenters of CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi, mostly from human clinical sources, and proposals of Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov., Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Holmes, B; Steigerwalt, A G; Nicholson, A C

    2013-12-01

    The taxonomic classification of 182 phenotypically similar isolates was evaluated using DNA-DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These bacterial isolates were mainly derived from clinical sources; all were Gram-negative non-fermenters and most were indole-producing. Phenotypically, they resembled species from the genera Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia or Empedobacter or belonged to CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi. Based on these analyses, four novel species are described: Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13530(T) = CCUG 60564(T) = CDC G229(T)), Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13525(T) = CCUG 60559(T) = CDC G81(T)), Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 11390(T) = CCUG 60566(T) = CDC KC1864(T)) and Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13529(T) = CCUG 60563(T) = CDC G41(T)). The new combination Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov. (type strain NCTC 13490(T) = X-65(T) = CCTCC AB 208154(T) = NRRL B-51322(T)) is also proposed to accommodate the reclassified Planobacterium taklimakanense.

  13. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains have the ability to cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of the potential risk they pose to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated...

  14. Insight into the routes of Wolbachia invasion: high levels of horizontal transfer in the spider genus Agelenopsis revealed by Wolbachia strain and mitochondrial DNA diversity.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Laura; Ayoub, Nadia A; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Russell, Jacob A; Stahlhut, Julie K; Werren, John H

    2008-01-01

    The pandemic distribution of Wolbachia (alpha-proteobacteria) across arthropods is largely due to the ability of these maternally inherited endosymbionts to successfully shift hosts across species boundaries. Yet it remains unclear whether Wolbachia has preferential routes of transfer among species. Here, we examined populations of eight species of the North American funnel-web spider genus Agelenopsis to evaluate whether Wolbachia show evidence for host specificity and the relative contribution of horizontal vs. vertical transmission of strains within and among related host species. Wolbachia strains were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and Wolbachia surface protein (WSP) sequences, and analysed in relation to host phylogeny, mitochondrial diversity and geographical range. Results indicate that at least three sets of divergent Wolbachia strains invaded the genus Agelenopsis. After each invasion, the Wolbachia strains preferentially shuffled across species of this host genus by horizontal transfer rather than cospeciation. Decoupling of Wolbachia and host mitochondrial haplotype (mitotypes) evolutionary histories within single species reveals an extensive contribution of horizontal transfer also in the rapid dispersal of Wolbachia among conspecific host populations. These findings provide some of the strongest evidence to support the association of related Wolbachia strains with related hosts by means of both vertical and horizontal strain transmission. Similar analyses across a broader range of invertebrate taxa are needed, using sensitive methods for strain typing such as MLST, to determine if this pattern of Wolbachia dispersal is peculiar to Agelenopsis (or spiders), or is in fact a general pattern in arthropods.

  15. Genotype Directed Therapy in Murine Mismatch Repair Deficient Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kucherlapati, Melanie H.; Esfahani, Shadi; Habibollahi, Peiman; Wang, Junning; Still, Eric R.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Mahmood, Umar; Kucherlapati, Raju S.

    2013-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has frequently been found activated in human tumors. We show that in addition to Wnt signaling dysfunction, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is often upregulated in mouse Msh2−/− initiated intestinal tumors. NVP-BEZ235 is a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor toxic to many cancer cell lines and currently involved in clinical trials. We have treated two mouse models involving Msh2 that develop small intestinal and/or colonic tumors with NVP-BEZ235, and a subset of animals with NVP-BEZ235 and MEK inhibitor ADZ4266. The disease phenotype has been followed with pathology, 18F FDG PET imaging, and endoscopy. Intestinal adenocarcinomas are significantly decreased in multiplicity by both drug regimens. The majority of tumors treated with combined therapy regress significantly, while a small number of highly progressed tumors persist. We have examined PTEN, AKT, MEK 1&2, MAPK, S6K, mTOR, PDPK1, and Cyclin D1 and find variable alterations that include downregulation of PTEN, upregulation of AKT and changes in its phosphorylated forms, upregulation of pMEK 1&2, p42p44MAPK, pS6K, and Cyclin D1. Apoptosis has been found intact in some tumors and not in others. Our data indicate that NVP-BEZ235 alone and in combination with ADZ4266 are effective in treating a proportion of colorectal cancers, but that highly progressed resistant tumors grow in the presence of the drugs. Pathways upregulated in some resistant tumors also include PDPK1, suggesting that metabolic inhibitors may also be useful in treating these tumors. PMID:23935891

  16. Purification of bacterial genomic DNA in less than 20 min using chelex-100 microwave: examples from strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Escogido, Lourdes; Balam-Chi, Mario; Rodríguez-Buenfil, Ingrid; Valdés, Jesús; Kameyama, Luis; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco

    2010-11-01

    We established a Chelex 100-Microwave method for the purification of bacterial genomic DNA (gDNA) in less than 20 min with high yield and good quality, useful for multiple purposes. It combines Chelex 100, proteinase K, RNase A and heating in a microwave oven. The resulting gDNA was used directly to identify bacterial species of the Order Lactobacillales by means of PCR amplification of their 16S rDNA gene, isolated from sediments on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. This method produced gDNA free of phenolic and protein residual contaminants from 100 of these isolated bacteria. 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing showed Pediococcus acidilactici to prevail in inland lagoons, and Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sp., and Lactobacillus fermentum to be most abundant in the soils of livestock farms. The combination of Chelex 100, enzymes and microwave heating used in the Chelex 100-Microwave method produced large amounts of highly pure gDNA from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, in less than 20 min.

  17. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons to monitor changes in fecal bacterial populations of weaning pigs after introduction of Lactobacillus reuteri strain MM53.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J M; McCracken, V J; Gaskins, H R; Mackie, R I

    2000-11-01

    The diversity and stability of the fecal bacterial microbiota in weaning pigs was studied after introduction of an exogenous Lactobacillus reuteri strain, MM53, using a combination of cultivation and techniques based on genes encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA). Piglets (n = 9) were assigned to three treatment groups (control, daily dosed, and 4th-day dosed), and fresh fecal samples were collected daily. Dosed animals received 2.5 x 10(10) CFU of antibiotic-resistant L. reuteri MM53 daily or every 4th day. Mean Lactobacillus counts for the three groups ranged from 1 x 10(9) to 4 x 10(9) CFU/g of feces. Enumeration of strain L. reuteri MM53 on MRS agar (Difco) plates containing streptomycin and rifampin showed that the introduced strain fluctuated between 8 x 10(3) and 5 x 10(6) CFU/g of feces in the two dosed groups. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments, with primers specific for variable regions 1 and 3 (V1 and V3), was used to profile complexity of fecal bacterial populations. Analysis of DGGE banding profiles indicated that each individual maintained a unique fecal bacterial population that was stable over time, suggesting a strong host influence. In addition, individual DGGE patterns could be separated into distinct time-dependent clusters. Primers designed specifically to restrict DGGE analysis to a select group of lactobacilli allowed examination of interspecies relationships and abundance. Based on relative band migration distance and sequence determination, L. reuteri was distinguishable within the V1 region 16S rDNA gene patterns. Daily fluctuations in specific bands within these profiles were observed, which revealed an antagonistic relationship between L. reuteri MM53 (band V1-3) and another indigenous Lactobacillus assemblage (band V1-6).

  18. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  19. Monitoring of an Alkaline 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol-Degrading Enrichment Culture by DNA Fingerprinting Methods and Isolation of the Responsible Organism, Haloalkaliphilic Nocardioides sp. Strain M6

    PubMed Central

    Maltseva, O.; Oriel, P.

    1997-01-01

    A site situated near Alkali Lake (Oregon) and highly contaminated by chloroaromatic compounds was chosen for isolation of alkaliphilic chlorophenol-degrading bacteria. Prolonged cultivation of an enrichment culture followed by successive transfers resulted in a strong increase in the 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) degradation rate. Repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis were applied to distinguish members of the enrichment culture and monitor them during the enrichment procedure. Comparison of the fingerprints of the isolates obtained from the enrichment culture and its total DNA fingerprint indicated the presence of an unidentified bacterium in the enrichment culture, assisting in its isolation. The 2,4,6-TCP-degrading isolate, M6, was tentatively identified as a Nocardioides sp. strain based on its partial 16S RNA sequence and fatty acid profile. Strain M6 was capable of utilizing up to 1.6 g of 2,4,6-TCP per liter as a sole carbon and energy source and could also grow on 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. A high-cell-density suspension of this strain degraded a wide range of chlorinated phenols from di- to pentachlorophenol while showing a clear preference for phenols containing chlorine substituents in positions 2 plus 4. Based on its optimal pH (9.0 to 9.4) and sodium ion concentration (0.2 to 0.4 M) for growth, Nocardioides sp. strain M6 is a slightly halophilic alkaliphile. PMID:16535723

  20. Suppression of capsule expression in Δlon strains of Escherichia coli by two novel rpoB mutations in concert with HNS: possible role for DNA bending at rcsA promoter

    PubMed Central

    Meenakshi, Shanmugaraja; Munavar, M Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of mutations in genes coding for subunits of RNA polymerase always throw more light on the intricate events that regulate the expression of gene(s). Lon protease of Escherichia coli is implicated in the turnover of RcsA (positive regulator of genes involved in capsular polysaccharide synthesis) and SulA (cell division inhibitor induced upon DNA damage). Failure to degrade RcsA and SulA makes lon mutant cells to overproduce capsular polysaccharides and to become sensitive to DNA damaging agents. Earlier reports on suppressors for these characteristic lon phenotypes related the role of cochaperon DnaJ and tmRNA. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two novel mutations in rpoB gene capable of modulating the expression of cps genes in Δlon strains of E. coli in concert with HNS. clpA, clpB, clpY, and clpQ mutations do not affect this capsule expression suppressor (Ces) phenotype. These mutant RNA polymerases affect rcsA transcription, but per se are not defective either at rcsA or at cps promoters. The results combined with bioinformatics analyses indicate that the weaker interaction between the enzyme and DNA::RNA hybrid during transcription might play a vital role in the lower level expression of rcsA. These results might have relevance to pathogenesis in related bacteria. PMID:26403574

  1. Structural defect linked to nonrandom mutations in the matrix gene of Biden strain subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus defined by cDNA cloning and expression of chimeric genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayata, M.; Hirano, A.; Wong, T.C.

    1989-03-01

    Biken strain, a nonproductive measles viruslike agent isolated from a subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patient, contains a posttranscriptional defect affecting matrix (M) protein. A putative M protein was translated in vitro with RNA from Biken strain-infected cells. A similar protein was detected in vivo by an antiserum against a peptide synthesized from the cloned M gene of Edmonston strain measles virus. By using a novel method, full-length cDNAs of the Biken M gene were selectively cloned. The cloned Biken M gene contained an open reading frame which encoded 8 extra carboxy-terminal amino acid residues and 20 amino acid substitutions predicted to affect both the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of the gene product. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and in vivo into a 37,500 M/sub r/ protein electrophoretically and antigenically distinct from the M protein of Edmonston strain but identical to the M protein in Biken strain-infected cells. Chimeric M proteins synthesized in vitro and in vivo showed that the mutations in the carboxy-proximal region altered the local antigenicity and those in the amino region affected the overall protein conformation. The protein expressed from the Biken M gene was unstable in vivo. Instability was attributed to multiple mutations. These results offer insights into the basis of the defect in Biken strain and pose intriguing questions about the evolutionary origins of SSPE viruses in general.

  2. Characterization of Postreplication Repair in Mutagen-Sensitive Strains of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, J. B.; Setlow, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Mutants of Drosophila melanogaster, with suspected repair deficiencies, were analyzed for their capacity to repair damage induced by X-rays and UV radiation. Analysis was performed on cell cultures derived from embryos of homozygous mutant stocks. Postreplication repair following UV radiation has been analyzed in mutant stocks derived from a total of ten complementation groups. Cultures were irradiated, pulse-labeled, and incubated in the dark prior to analysis by alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. Kinetics of the molecular weight increase in newly synthesized DNA were assayed after cells had been incubated in the presence or absence of caffeine. Two separate pathways of postreplication repair have been tentatively identified by mutants derived from four complementation groups. The proposed caffeine sensitive pathway (CAS) is defined by mutants which also disrupt meiosis. The second pathway (CIS) is caffeine insensitive and is not yet associated with meiotic functions. All mutants deficient in postreplication repair are also sensitive to nitrogen mustard. The mutants investigated display a normal capacity to repair single-strand breaks induced in DNA by X-rays, although two may possess a reduced capacity to repair damage caused by localized incorporation of high specific activity thymidine-3H. The data have been employed to construct a model for repair of UV-induced damage in Drosophila DNA. Implications of the model for DNA repair in mammals are discussed. PMID:826451

  3. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  4. Neurotoxin-induced DNA damage is persistent in SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Musich, Phillip R; Cui, Kui; Zou, Yue; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-05-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons has been reported in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, their pathological characteristics during the neurodegenerative course and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used the neurotoxin camptothecin (CPT) to induce the DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, normal fibroblast cells, and primarily cultured locus coeruleus (LC) and raphe neurons to examine cellular responses and repair capabilities after neurotoxin exposure. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and deficient in DNA repair, as compared to fibroblast cells. Furthermore, similar to SH-SY5Y cells, primarily cultured LC neurons are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and show a deficiency in repairing this damage. Moreover, while N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) exposure also results in DNA damage in cultured LC neurons, neither CPT nor DSP4 induce DNA damage in neuronal cultures from the raphe nuclei. Taken together, noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons are sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and exhibit a repair deficiency, providing a mechanistic explanation for the pathological characteristics of LC degeneration when facing endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging insults in vivo.

  5. A p53-mediated DNA damage response limits reprogramming to ensure iPS cell genomic integrity

    PubMed Central

    Marión, Rosa M.; Strati, Katerina; Li, Han; Murga, Matilde; Blanco, Raquel; Ortega, Sagrario; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    The reprogramming of differentiated cells to pluripotent cells (induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells) is known to be an inefficient process. We recently reported that cells with short telomeres cannot be reprogrammed to iPS cells despite their normal proliferation rates1, 2, probably reflecting the existence of ‘reprogramming barriers’ that abort the reprogramming of cells with uncapped telomeres. Here we show that p53 (also known as Trp53 in mice and TP53 in humans) is critically involved in preventing the reprogramming of cells carrying various types of DNA damage, including short telomeres, DNA repair deficiencies, or exogenously inflicted DNA damage. Reprogramming in the presence of pre-existing, but tolerated, DNA damage is aborted by the activation of a DNA damage response and p53-dependent apoptosis. Abrogation of p53 allows efficient reprogramming in the face of DNA damage and the generation of iPS cells carrying persistent DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. These observations indicate that during reprogramming cells increase their intolerance to different types of DNA damage and that p53 is critical in preventing the generation of human and mouse pluripotent cells from suboptimal parental cells. PMID:19668189

  6. Fossil DNA Stratigraphy revealed Multiple Sources of Alkenones in the Holocene Black Sea at the Strain Level: Implications for UK37 Paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, M. J.; Saenz, J. P.; Trowbridge, N.; Eglinton, T.

    2007-12-01

    The fossil distribution of long-chain alkenones is now a widely accepted tool to reconstruct past sea surface temperatures (SST) (i.e. UK37-index). In most studies, the UK37 index is calibrated for the main source of alkenones, the coccolithophorid haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi. Besides temperature, additional factors such as salinity, growth conditions, or different or multiple biological sources seem to influence the level of unsaturation of alkenones and the reliability of the UK37-inferred SST. The Black Sea is an interesting setting to study such factors since unreliable SST were reconstructed from the Holocene sapropel with high concentrations of an unusual "Black Sea" alkenone (C36:2 ethyl ketone) whereas calcium-bearing microfossils (coccoliths) of haptophytes are lacking. To identify Holocene sources for alkenones in the Black Sea at the unprecedented strain-level and to refine paleoenvironmental conditions, we searched for multiple fossil genetic signatures of haptophytes. This revealed that the slow increase in salinity as a result of post-glacial introduction of Mediterranean waters in the paleo lacustrine Black Sea, caused a succession between alkenone-biosynthesizing haptophytes from Isochrysis spp. (which do not produce coccoliths), to a mixture of Isochrysis and E huxleyi strains, then only E. huxleyi strains, and when the salinity reached a threshold of 18 per mille at 3000 years BP, the fossilized calcium-bearing E. huxleyi strain was introduced. At least 11 E. huxleyi strains were identified and the first non-fossilizing strains already colonized the Black Sea 4000 years before the fossilized calcium-bearing strain appeared. Most E. huxleyi strains were likely sources of C36:2 eK but the presence of one fossil "phylotype" coincided with the highest levels of this unusual alkenone ( more than 80 percent of the total alkenone content) and unreliable past SST (varying between 5 and 30 degrees C; 7500-5500 years BP). C36:2 eK was not biosynthesized by

  7. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  8. Escherichia coli responses to a single DNA adduct.

    PubMed

    Pandya, G A; Yang, I Y; Grollman, A P; Moriya, M

    2000-12-01

    To study the mechanisms by which Escherichia coli modulates the genotoxic effects of DNA damage, a novel system has been developed which permits quantitative measurements of various E. coli pathways involved in mutagenesis and DNA repair. Events measured include fidelity and efficiency of translesion DNA synthesis, excision repair, and recombination repair. Our strategy involves heteroduplex plasmid DNA bearing a single site-specific DNA adduct and several mismatched regions. The plasmid replicates in a mismatch repair-deficient host with the mismatches serving as strand-specific markers. Analysis of progeny plasmid DNA for linkage of the strand-specific markers identifies the pathway from which the plasmid is derived. Using this approach, a single 1, N(6)-ethenodeoxyadenosine adduct was shown to be repaired inefficiently by excision repair, to inhibit DNA synthesis by approximately 80 to 90%, and to direct the incorporation of correct dTMP opposite this adduct. This approach is especially useful in analyzing the damage avoidance-tolerance mechanisms. Our results also show that (i) progeny derived from the damage avoidance-tolerance pathway(s) accounts for more than 15% of all progeny; (ii) this pathway(s) requires functional recA, recF, recO, and recR genes, suggesting the mechanism to be daughter strand gap repair; (iii) the ruvABC genes or the recG gene is also required; and (iv) the RecG pathway appears to be more active than the RuvABC pathway. Based on these results, the mechanism of the damage avoidance-tolerance pathway is discussed. PMID:11073901

  9. Genetic relationships among strains of Xanthomonas fragariae based on random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR data and generation of multiplexed PCR primers useful for the identification of this phytopathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Pooler, M R; Ritchie, D F; Hartung, J S

    1996-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 25 isolates of Xanthomonas fragariae from diverse geographic regions were determined by three PCR methods that rely on different amplification priming strategies: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR. The results of these assays are mutually consistent and indicate that pathogenic strains are very closely related to each other. RAPD, ERIC, and REP PCR assays identified nine, four, and two genotypes, respectively, within X. fragariae isolates. A single nonpathogenic isolate of X. fragariae was not distinguishable by these methods. The results of the PCR assays were also fully confirmed by physiological tests. There was no correlation between DNA amplification product patterns and geographic sites of isolation, suggesting that this bacterium has spread largely through exchange of infected plant germ plasm. Sequences identified through the RAPD assays were used to develop three primer pairs for standard PCR assays to identify X. fragariae. In addition, we developed a stringent multiplexed PCR assay to identify X. fragariae by simultaneously using the three independently derived sets of primers specific for pathogenic strains of the bacteria. PMID:8795198

  10. Application of the reuseable, KanMX selectable marker to industrial yeast: construction and evaluation of heterothallic wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, possessing minimal foreign DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michelle E; Gardner, Jennie M; Vystavelova, Andrea; McBryde, Colin; de Barros Lopes, Miguel; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2003-12-01

    The characterisation of wine yeasts and the complex metabolic processes influencing wine fermentation and the quality of wine might best be achieved by exploiting the standard classical and recombinant genetic techniques which have been successfully used with laboratory strains. However, application of these techniques to industrial strains has been restricted because such strains are typically prototrophic and often polyploid. To overcome this problem, we have identified commercial wine strains with good mating and sporulation properties from which heterothallic derivatives were constructed by disruption of the HO gene. Consequently, these haploids are amenable to genetic analysis, whilst retaining desirable wine-making properties. The approach used was an adaptation of a previously published gene disruption procedure for laboratory yeast and is based on the acquisition of geneticin resistance from a removable KanMX marker. The present work is the first report of the application of a construct of this type to the disruption of the HO gene in wine yeasts that are in common commercial use. Most of the 4.9-kb disruption construct was successfully removed from the genome of the haploid derivative strains by loop-out of the KanMX marker through meiotic recombination. Sequencing of the HO region confirmed the reduction of foreign sequences to a 582-bp fragment comprised largely of a single direct repeat at the target gene. The removal of the active foreign gene (conferring antibiotic resistance) allows the application of other constructs based on the KanMX module without the need to resort to other selectable marker systems. Laboratory-scale fermentation trials typically showed minimal differences between the HO disruptants and the parental wine strains in terms of fermentation kinetics and formation of key metabolites.

  11. A Single Electroporation Delivery of a DNA Vaccine Containing the Hemagglutinin Gene of Asian H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Generated a Protective Antibody Response in Chickens against a North American Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pasick, John; Kobinger, Gary P.; Hannaman, Drew; Berhane, Yohannes; Clavijo, Alfonso; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Protection against the avian influenza (AI) H5N1 virus is suspected to be mainly conferred by the presence of antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the virus. A single electroporation delivery of 100 or 250 μg of a DNA vaccine construct, pCAG-HA, carrying the HA gene of strain A/Hanoi/30408/2005 (H5N1), in chickens led to the development of anti-HA antibody response in 16 of 17 immunized birds, as measured by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), and an indirect ELISA. Birds vaccinated by electroporation (n = 11) were protected from experimental AI challenge with strain A/chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/1/1983 (H5N2) as judged by low viral load, absence of clinical symptoms, and absence of mortality (n = 11). In contrast, only two out of 10 birds vaccinated with the same vaccine dose (100 or 250 μg) but without electroporation developed antibodies. These birds showed high viral loads and significant morbidity and mortality after the challenge. Seroconversion was reduced in birds electroporated with a low vaccine dose (10 μg), but the antibody-positive birds were protected against virus challenge. Nonelectroporation delivery of a low-dose vaccine did not result in seroconversion, and the birds were as susceptible as those in the control groups that received the control pCAG vector. Electroporation delivery of the DNA vaccine led to enhanced antibody responses and to protection against the AI virus challenge. The HI test, cELISA, or indirect ELISA for anti-H5 antibodies might serve as a good predictor of the potency and efficacy of a DNA immunization strategy against AI in chickens. PMID:23365205

  12. Induction of pathogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies is controlled on the level of B cells in a non-lupus prone mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Langnickel, Dirk; Enghard, Philipp; Klein, Claudia; Undeutsch, Reinmar; Hocher, Berthold; Manz, R; Burmester, G R; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    The SmD1(83-119) peptide is a main target of autoantibodies and T cells in human and murine lupus, but its role in autoimmunity induction remains elusive. Therefore, female Balb/c mice and (NZW x Balb/c)F1 [CWF1] mice with identical MHC haplotype as lupus prone NZB/W mice were immunized with SmD1(83-119). Immunizations of CWF1 mice with SmD1(83-119), but not with the controls (irrelevant peptide, HEL peptide, or saline), induced anti-SmD1(83-119) and anti-dsDNA antibodies and proteinuria not present in Balb/c mice. DsDNA-specific plasma cell induction after SmD1(83-119) immunizations was confirmed by ELISPOT assays showing that the generation of dsDNA-specific antibody forming cells (AFC) was mainly driven by increased T-cell help. T-cell help for the generation of dsDNA-specific AFC was also present in saline-treated CWF1 mice but was controlled on the levels of B cells preventing autoimmunity.

  13. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep) and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR) led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in the non-coding region of

  14. Translesion synthesis mechanisms depend on the nature of DNA damage in UV-irradiated human cells

    PubMed Central

    Quinet, Annabel; Martins, Davi Jardim; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Stary, Anne; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet-induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) can be tolerated by translesion DNA polymerases (TLS Pols) at stalled replication forks or by gap-filling. Here, we investigated the involvement of Polη, Rev1 and Rev3L (Polζ catalytic subunit) in the specific bypass of 6-4PP and CPD in repair-deficient XP-C human cells. We combined DNA fiber assay and novel methodologies for detection and quantification of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gaps on ongoing replication forks and postreplication repair (PRR) tracts in the human genome. We demonstrated that Rev3L, but not Rev1, is required for postreplicative gap-filling, while Polη and Rev1 are responsible for TLS at stalled replication forks. Moreover, specific photolyases were employed to show that in XP-C cells, CPD arrest replication forks, while 6-4PP are responsible for the generation of ssDNA gaps and PRR tracts. On the other hand, in the absence of Polη or Rev1, both types of lesion block replication forks progression. Altogether, the data directly show that, in the human genome, Polη and Rev1 bypass CPD and 6-4PP at replication forks, while only 6-4PP are also tolerated by a Polζ-dependent gap-filling mechanism, independent of S phase. PMID:27095204

  15. Nitroxides block DNA scission and protect cells from oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, A.; Godinger, D.; Aronovitch, J. ); Russo, A.; Mitchell, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The protective effect of cyclic stable nitroxide free radicals, having SOD-like activity, against oxidative damage was studied by using Escherichia coli xthA DNA repair-deficient mutant hypersensitive to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Oxidative damage induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was assayed by monitoring cell survival. The metal chelator 1,10-phenanthroline (OP), which readily intercalates into DNA, potentiated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced damage. The extent of in vivo DNA scission and degradation was studied and compared with the loss of cell viability. The extent of DNA breakage correlated with cell killing, supporting previous suggestions that DNA is the crucial cellular target of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cytotoxicity. The xthA cells were protected by catalase but not by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Both five- and six-membered ring nitroxides, having SOD-like activity, protected growing and resting cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2} toxicity, without lowering H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration. To check whether nitroxides protect against O{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}}-independent injury also, experiments were repeated under hypoxia. These nitroxides also protected hypoxic cells against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, suggesting alternative modes of protection. Since nitroxides were found to reoxidize DNA-bound iron(II), the present results suggest that nitroxides protect by oxidizing reduced transition metals, thus interfering with the Fenton reaction.

  16. Genealogies of mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Beck, J A; Lloyd, S; Hafezparast, M; Lennon-Pierce, M; Eppig, J T; Festing, M F; Fisher, E M

    2000-01-01

    The mouse is a prime organism of choice for modelling human disease. Over 450 inbred strains of mice have been described, providing a wealth of different genotypes and phenotypes for genetic and other studies. As new strains are generated and others become extinct, it is useful to review periodically what strains are available and how they are related to each other, particularly in the light of available DNA polymorphism data from microsatellite and other markers. We describe the origins and relationships of inbred mouse strains, 90 years after the generation of the first inbred strain. Given the large collection of inbred strains available, and that published information on these strains is incomplete, we propose that all genealogical and genetic data on inbred strains be submitted to a common electronic database to ensure this valuable information resource is preserved and used efficiently.

  17. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  18. A double-stranded RNA element from a hypovirulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani occurs in DNA form and is genetically related to the pentafunctional AROM protein of the shikimate pathway.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, D K; Jian, J; Tavantzis, S M

    1998-05-26

    M2 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) element occurring in the hypovirulent isolate Rhs 1A1 of the plant pathogenic basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani. Rhs 1A1 originated as a sector of the virulent field isolate Rhs 1AP, which contains no detectable amount of the M2 dsRNA. The complete sequence (3,570 bp) of the M2 dsRNA has been determined. A 6.9-kbp segment of total DNA from either Rhs 1A1 or Rhs 1AP hybridizes with an M2-specific cDNA probe. The sequences of M2 dsRNA and of PCR products generated from Rhs 1A1 total DNA were found to be identical. Thus this report describes a fungal host containing full-length DNA copies of a dsRNA element. A major portion of the M2 dsRNA is located in the cytoplasm, whereas a smaller amount is found in mitochondria. Based on either the universal or the mitochondrial genetic code of filamentous fungi, one strand of M2 encodes a putative protein of 754 amino acids. The resulting polypeptide has all four motifs of a dsRNA viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) and is phylogenetically related to the RDRP of a mitochondrial dsRNA associated with hypovirulence in strain NB631 of Cryphonectria parasitica, incitant of chestnut blight. This polypeptide also has significant sequence similarity with two domains of a pentafunctional polypeptide, which catalyzes the five central steps of the shikimate pathway in yeast and filamentous fungi.

  19. Diversity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from the Aquatic Environment as Determined by Serotyping and Amplification of the Ribosomal DNA Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baudart, Julia; Lemarchand, Karine; Brisabois, Anne; Lebaron, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186–194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates. PMID:10742240

  20. Diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from the aquatic environment as determined by serotyping and amplification of the ribosomal DNA spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Baudart, J; Lemarchand, K; Brisabois, A; Lebaron, P

    2000-04-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186-194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates.

  1. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  2. An easy, rapid, and cost-effective method for DNA extraction from various lichen taxa and specimens suitable for analysis of fungal and algal strains.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook-Young; Jang, Seol-Hwa; Oh, Soon-Ok; Kim, Jung A; Hur, Jae-Seoun

    2014-12-01

    Lichen studies, including biodiversity, phylogenetic relationships, and conservation concerns require definitive species identification, however many lichens can be challenging to identify at the species level. Molecular techniques have shown efficacy in discriminating among lichen taxa, however, obtaining genomic DNA from herbarium and fresh lichen thalli by conventional methods has been difficult, because lichens contain high proteins, polysaccharides, and other complex compounds in their cell walls. Here we report a rapid, easy, and inexpensive protocol for extracting PCR-quality DNA from various lichen species. This method involves the following two steps: first, cell breakage using a beadbeater; and second, extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The procedure requires approximately 10 mg of lichen thalli and can be completed within 20 min. The obtained DNAs were of sufficient quality and quantity to amplify the internal transcribed spacer region from the fungal and algal lichen components, as well as to sequence the amplified products. In addition, 26 different lichen taxa were tested, resulting in successful PCR products. The results of this study validated the experimental protocols, and clearly demonstrated the efficacy and value of our KCl extraction method applied in the fungal and algal samples.

  3. A modified host-cell reactivation assay to quantify DNA repair capacity in cryopreserved peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Pedro; Taron, Miquel; Moran, Teresa; Fernandez, Marco A; Requena, Gerard; Rosell, Rafael

    2011-06-10

    The host-cell reactivation assay (HCRA) is a functional assay that allows the identification of the genes responsible for DNA repair-deficient syndromes, such as Xeroderma pigmentosum, by cross-complementation experiments. It has also been used in molecular epidemiology studies to correlate the low nucleotide excision repair pathway function in peripheral blood lymphocytes with an increased risk of bladder, head and neck, skin and lung cancers. Herein, we present the technical validation of a newly modified HCRA, where nucleofection is used for the transfection of the pmaxGFP plasmid into cryopreserved peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) or lymphoblastoid cell lines. In each sample, 20-24h after transfection, the relative DNA repair capacity (DRC) was quantified by flow cytometry, comparing the transfection efficiency of nucleoporated cells with undamaged plasmid to those transfected with UV-light damaged plasmid in the seven cell lines that were characterized by different DNA repair phenotypes. Dead cells were excluded from the analysis. We observed a high reproducibility of the relative DRC, transfection efficiency and cell viability. The inter-experimental normalization of the flow cytometry resulted in an increased data accuracy and reproducibility. The amount of cells required for each transfection reaction was reduced fourfold, without affecting the final relative DRC. Furthermore, our HCRA demonstrated strong discrimination power in the UV-light dose-response, both in lymphoblastoid cell lines and cryopreserved PBLs. We also observed a strong correlation of the relative DRC data, when samples were measured against two independent batches of both damaged and undamaged plasmid DNA. The relative DRC variable shows a normal distribution when analyzed in the cryopreserved PBLs from a cohort of 35 lung cancer patients and a 5.59-fold variation in the relative DRC is identified among our patients. The mitotic dynamic was discarded as a confounding factor for the

  4. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  5. Trapping DNA replication origins from the human genome.

    PubMed

    Eki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2013-04-17

    Synthesis of chromosomal DNA is initiated from multiple origins of replication in higher eukaryotes; however, little is known about these origins' structures. We isolated the origin-derived nascent DNAs from a human repair-deficient cell line by blocking the replication forks near the origins using two different origin-trapping methods (i.e., UV- or chemical crosslinker-treatment and cell synchronization in early S phase using DNA replication inhibitors). Single-stranded DNAs (of 0.5-3 kb) that accumulated after such treatments were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was immunopurified after fractionation by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cloned by complementary-strand synthesis and PCR amplification. Competitive PCR revealed an increased abundance of DNA derived from known replication origins (c-myc and lamin B2 genes) in the nascent DNA fractions from the UV-treated or crosslinked cells. Nucleotide sequences of 85 and 208 kb were obtained from the two libraries (I and II) prepared from the UV-treated log-phase cells and early S phase arrested cells, respectively. The libraries differed from each other in their G+C composition and replication-related motif contents, suggesting that differences existed between the origin fragments isolated by the two different origin-trapping methods. The replication activities for seven out of 12 putative origin loci from the early-S phase cells were shown by competitive PCR. We mapped 117 (library I) and 172 (library II) putative origin loci to the human genome; approximately 60% and 50% of these loci were assigned to the G-band and intragenic regions, respectively. Analyses of the flanking sequences of the mapped loci suggested that the putative origin loci tended to associate with genes (including conserved sites) and DNase I hypersensitive sites; however, poor correlations were found between such loci and the CpG islands, transcription start sites, and K27-acetylated histone H3 peaks.

  6. DNA damage is a late event in resveratrol-mediated inhibition of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Mahesh; Soundar, Swetha; Mangoli, Suhas

    2016-07-01

    Resveratrol is an important phytoalexin notable for a wide variety of beneficial activities. Resveratrol has been reported to be active against various pathogenic bacteria. However, it is not clear at the molecular level how this important activity is manifested. Resveratrol has been reported to bind to cupric ions and reduce it. In the process, it generates copper-peroxide complex and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to this ability, resveratrol has been shown to cleave plasmid DNA in several studies. To this end, we envisaged DNA damage to play a role in resveratrol mediated inhibition in Escherichia coli. We employed DNA damage repair deficient mutants from keio collection to demonstrate the hypersensitive phenotype upon resveratrol treatment. Analysis of integrity and PCR efficiency of plasmid DNA from resveratrol-treated cells revealed significant DNA damage after 6 h or more compared to DNA from vehicle-treated cells. RAPD-PCR was performed to demonstrate the damage in genomic DNA from resveratrol-treated cells. In addition, in situ DNA damage was observed under fluorescence microscopy after resveratrol treatment. Further resveratrol treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest of significant fraction of population revealed by flow cytometry. However, a robust induction was not observed in phage induction assay and induction of DNA damage response genes quantified by promoter fused fluorescent tracker protein. These observations along with our previous observation that resveratrol induces membrane damage in E. coli at early time point reveal, DNA damage is a late event, occurring after a few hours of treatment. PMID:27021971

  7. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  8. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M

    2015-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures.

  9. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus strain O/JPN/2010 isolated in Japan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Onozato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Seiichi; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manabu; Morioka, Kazuki; Kanno, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genome of a foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from the 2010 epidemic in Japan was constructed and designated pSVL-f02. Transfection of Cos-7 or IBRS-2 cells with this clone allowed the recovery of infectious virus. The recovered virus had the same in vitro characterization as the parental virus with regard to antigenicity in neutralization and indirect immunofluorescence tests, plaque size and one-step growth. Pigs were experimentally infected with the parental virus or the recombinant virus recovered from pSVL-f02 transfected cells. There were no significant differences in clinical signs or antibody responses between the two groups, and virus isolation and viral RNA detection from clinical samples were similar. Virus recovered from transfected cells therefore retained the in vitro characteristics and the in vivo pathogenicity of their parental strain. This cDNA clone should be a valuable tool to analyze determinants of pathogenicity and mechanisms of virus replication, and to develop genetically engineered vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus. PMID:27234555

  10. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus strain O/JPN/2010 isolated in Japan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Onozato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Seiichi; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manabu; Morioka, Kazuki; Kanno, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genome of a foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from the 2010 epidemic in Japan was constructed and designated pSVL-f02. Transfection of Cos-7 or IBRS-2 cells with this clone allowed the recovery of infectious virus. The recovered virus had the same in vitro characterization as the parental virus with regard to antigenicity in neutralization and indirect immunofluorescence tests, plaque size and one-step growth. Pigs were experimentally infected with the parental virus or the recombinant virus recovered from pSVL-f02 transfected cells. There were no significant differences in clinical signs or antibody responses between the two groups, and virus isolation and viral RNA detection from clinical samples were similar. Virus recovered from transfected cells therefore retained the in vitro characteristics and the in vivo pathogenicity of their parental strain. This cDNA clone should be a valuable tool to analyze determinants of pathogenicity and mechanisms of virus replication, and to develop genetically engineered vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  11. Characterization of a Pathogenic Full-Length cDNA Clone and Transmission Model for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC22A

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Anne; Yount, Boyd; Lin, Chun-Ming; Hou, Yixuan; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly pathogenic alphacoronavirus. In the United States, highly virulent PEDV strains cause between 80 and 100% mortality in suckling piglets and are rapidly transmitted between animals and farms. To study the genetic factors that regulate pathogenesis and transmission, we developed a molecular clone of PEDV strain PC22A. The infectious-clone-derived PEDV (icPEDV) replicated as efficiently as the parental virus in cell culture and in pigs, resulting in lethal disease in vivo. Importantly, recombinant PEDV was rapidly transmitted to uninoculated pigs via indirect contact, demonstrating virulence and efficient transmission while replicating phenotypes seen in the wild-type virus. Using reverse genetics, we removed open reading frame 3 (ORF3) and replaced this region with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene to generate icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP. icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo, was efficiently transmitted among pigs, and produced lethal disease outcomes. However, the diarrheic scores in icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP-infected pigs were lower than those in wild-type-virus- or icPEDV-infected pigs, and the virus formed smaller plaques than those of PC22A. Together, these data describe the development of a robust reverse-genetics platform for identifying genetic factors that regulate pathogenic outcomes and transmission efficiency in vivo, providing key infrastructural developments for developing and evaluating the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines and therapeutics in a clinical setting. PMID:26733065

  12. Transcription Profiling of the Model Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 by Next-Gen (SOLiD™) Sequencing of cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 encodes about 3200 proteins. Transcripts were detected for nearly all annotated open reading frames by a global transcriptomic analysis by Next-Generation (SOLiD™) sequencing of cDNA. In the cDNA samples sequenced, ∼90% of the mapped sequences were derived from the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs and ∼10% of the sequences were derived from mRNAs. In cells grown photoautotrophically under standard conditions [38°C, 1% (v/v) CO2 in air, 250 μmol photons m−2 s−1], the highest transcript levels (up to 2% of the total mRNA for the most abundantly transcribed genes; e.g., cpcAB, psbA, psaA) were generally derived from genes encoding structural components of the photosynthetic apparatus. High-light exposure for 1 h caused changes in transcript levels for genes encoding proteins of the photosynthetic apparatus, Type-1 NADH dehydrogenase complex and ATP synthase, whereas dark incubation for 1 h resulted in a global decrease in transcript levels for photosynthesis-related genes and an increase in transcript levels for genes involved in carbohydrate degradation. Transcript levels for pyruvate kinase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex decreased sharply in cells incubated in the dark. Under dark anoxic (fermentative) conditions, transcript changes indicated a global decrease in transcripts for respiratory proteins and suggested that cells employ an alternative phosphoenolpyruvate degradation pathway via phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (ppsA) and the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (nifJ). Finally, the data suggested that an apparent operon involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and fatty acid desaturation, acsF2–ho2–hemN2–desF, may be regulated by oxygen concentration. PMID:21779275

  13. Replication of simian virus 40 DNA after UV irradiation: evidence of growing fork blockage and single-stranded gaps in daughter strands

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, M.; Menck, C.F.M.; Courtin, P.; Sarasin, A.

    1988-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms of in vivo inhibition of mammalian DNA replication by exposure to UV light (at 254 nm) was studied in monkey and human cells infected with simian virus 40. Analysis of viral DNA by electron microscopy and sucrose gradients confirmed that the presence of UV-induced lesions severely blocks DNA synthesis, and thus the conversion of replicative intermediates (RIs) into fully replicated form I DNA is inhibited by UV irradiation. These blocked RI molecules present several special features when visualized by electron microscopy. In excision repair-proficient monkey and human cells they are composed of a double-stranded circular DNA with a double-stranded tail whose size corresponds to the average interpyrimidine dimer distance, as determined by the dimer-specific T4 endonuclease V. In excision repair-deficient human cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, UV-irradiated RIs present a Carins-like structure similar to that observed for replicating molecules obtained from unirradiated infected cells. Single-stranded gaps are visualized in the replicated portions of UV-irradiated RI molecules; such regions are detected and clearly distinguishable from double-stranded DNA when probed by a specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein such as the bacteriophage T4 gene 32 product. Consistent with the presence of gaps in UV-irradiated RI molecules, single-strand-specific S1 nuclease digestion causes a shift in their sedimentation properties when analyzed in neutral sucrose gradients compared with undamaged molecules.

  14. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer corrects DNA repair defect of xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation groups A, B and C.

    PubMed

    Zeng, L; Quilliet, X; Chevallier-Lagente, O; Eveno, E; Sarasin, A; Mezzina, M

    1997-10-01

    With the aim to devise a long-term gene therapy protocol for skin cancers in individuals affected by the inherited autosomal recessive xeroderma pigmentosum we transferred the human DNA repair XPA, XPB/ERCC3 and XPC cDNAs, by using the recombinant retroviral vector LXSN, into primary and immortalized fibroblasts obtained from two XP-A, one XP-B (associated with Cockayne's syndrome) and two XP-C patients. After transduction, the complete correction of DNA repair deficiency and functional expression of the transgenes were monitored by UV survival, unscheduled DNA synthesis and recovery of RNA synthesis, and Western blots. The results show that the recombinant retroviruses are highly efficient vectors to transfer and stably express the human DNA repair genes in XP cells and correct the defect of DNA repair of group A, B and C. With our previous results with XPD/ERCC2, the present work extends further promising issues for the gene therapy strategy for most patients suffering from this cancer-prone syndrome. PMID:9415314

  15. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  17. Induction of UV photoproducts and DNA damage by solar simulator UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfreys, A.; Henderson, L.; Clingen, P.

    1997-10-01

    The recent increased incidence of skin cancer and the depletion of the ozone layer has increased interest in the ultraviolet (UV) component of natural sunlight and its role in the induction of skin cancer. Previous research on UV radiation has concentrated on UVC (254nm) but, as only UVB and UVA are present in natural sunlight, its relevance is unknown. We have investigated the induction of two forms of direct DNA damage - the pyrimidine dimer and the (6-4) photoproduct - in human DNA repair deficient XP-G (Xeroderma pigmentosum group G) lymphoblastoid cells following exposure to simulated sunlight. As exposure to natural sunlight is highly variable, a solar simulator lamp was used which is known to mimic natural sunlight at midday in Central Europe. Cells were irradiated on ice to minimise DNA repair and the relative induction of pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts was measured using specific monoclonal antibodies and a computer assisted image analysis system. A time dependent increase in both cyclobutane dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites was seen. The increases in pyrimidine dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites differed to that reported with natural sunlight in the UK but was similar to that seen with a similar solar simulator lamp.

  18. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  19. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  20. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  1. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    SciTech Connect

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. )

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  2. Defining the Contribution of MC1R Physiological Ligands to ATR Phosphorylation at Ser435, a Predictor of DNA Repair in Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Stuart G; Wolf Horrell, Erin M; Boulanger, Mary C; D'Orazio, John A

    2015-12-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS-coupled receptor that signals through cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA), regulates pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and melanoma resistance. MC1R-cAMP signaling promotes PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) at Ser435 (ATR-pS435), a modification that enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER) by facilitating recruitment of the XPA protein to sites of UV-induced DNA damage. High-throughput methods were developed to quantify ATR-pS435, measure XPA-photodamage interactions, and assess NER function. We report that melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or ACTH induce ATR-pS435, enhance XPA's association with UV-damaged DNA and optimize melanocytic NER. In contrast, MC1R antagonists agouti signaling protein (ASIP) or human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) interfere with ATR-pS435 generation, impair the XPA-DNA interaction, and reduce DNA repair. Although ASIP and HBD3 each blocked α-MSH-mediated induction of the signaling pathway, only ASIP depleted basal ATR-pS435. Our findings confirm that ASIP diminishes agonist-independent MC1R basal signaling whereas HBD3 is a neutral MC1R antagonist that blocks activation by melanocortins. Furthermore, our data suggest that ATR-pS435 may be a useful biomarker for the DNA repair-deficient MC1R phenotype. PMID:26168232

  3. Defining the contribution of MC1R physiological ligands to ATR phosphorylation at Ser435, a predictor of DNA repair in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Stuart G.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS-coupled receptor that signals through cAMP and PKA, regulates pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and melanoma resistance. MC1R-cAMP signaling promotes PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) at Ser435 (ATR-pS435), a modification that enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER) by facilitating recruitment of the XPA protein to sites of UV-induced DNA damage. High-throughput methods were developed to quantify ATR-pS435, measure XPA-photodamage interactions and assess NER function. We report that melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) induce ATR-pS435, enhance XPA’s association with UV-damaged DNA and optimize melanocytic NER. In contrast, MC1R antagonists agouti signaling protein (ASIP) or human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) interfere with ATR-pS435 generation, impair the XPA-DNA interaction and reduce DNA repair. Although ASIP and HBD3 each blocked α-MSH-mediated induction of the signaling pathway, only ASIP depleted basal ATR-pS435. Our findings confirm that ASIP diminishes agonist-independent MC1R basal signaling whereas HBD3 is a neutral MC1R antagonist that blocks activation by melanocortins. Furthermore, our data suggest that ATR-pS435 may be a useful biomarker for the DNA repair-deficient MC1R phenotype. PMID:26168232

  4. The role of DNA repair on cell killing by charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Kanai, T.; Furusawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Ohara, H.; Yatagai, F.

    It can be noted that it is not simple double strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks that are associated with high biological effectiveness in the cell killing effect for high LET radiation. Here, we have examined the effectiveness of fast neutrons and low (initial energy = 12 MeV/u) or high (135 MeV/u) energy charged particles on cell death in 19 mammalian cell lines including radiosensitive mutants. Some of the radiosensitive lines were deficient in DNA dsb repair such as LX830, M10, V3, and L5178Y-S cells and showed lower values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for fast neutrons if compared with their parent cell lines. The other lines of human ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts, irs 1, irs 2, irs 3 and irs1SF cells, which were also radiosensitive but known as proficient in dsb repair, showed moderate RBEs. Dsb repair deficient mutants showed low RBE values for heavy ions. These experimental findings suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role against the attack of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Therefore, we hypothesize that a main cause of cell death induced by high LET radiations is due to non-reparable dsb, which are produced at a higher rate compared to low LET radiations.

  5. Mutational analysis of ERCC3, which is involved in DNA repair and transcription initiation: identification of domains essential for the DNA repair function.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Westbroek, A; Jochemsen, A G; Weeda, G; Bosch, A; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H; van der Eb, A J

    1994-06-01

    The human ERCC3 gene, which corrects specifically the nucleotide excision repair defect in human xeroderma pigmentosum group B and cross-complements the repair deficiency in rodent UV-sensitive mutants of group 3, encodes a presumed DNA helicase that is identical to the p89 subunit of the general transcription factor TFIIH/BTF2. To examine the significance of the postulated functional domains in ERCC3, we have introduced mutations in the ERCC3 cDNA by means of site-specific mutagenesis and have determined the repair capacity of each mutant to complement the UV-sensitive phenotype of rodent group 3 cells. A conservative substitution of arginine for the invariant lysine residue in the ATPase motif (helicase domain I), six deletion mutations in the other helicase domains, and a deletion in the potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif fail to complement the ERCC3 excision repair defect of rodent group 3 mutants, which implies that the helicase domains as well as the potential DNA-binding motif are required for the repair function of ERCC3. Analysis of carboxy-terminal deletions suggests that the carboxy-terminal exon may comprise a distinct determinant for the DNA repair function. In addition, we show that a functional epitope-tagged version of ERCC3 accumulates in the nucleus. Deletion of the putative nuclear location signal impairs neither the nuclear location nor the repair function, indicating that other sequences may (also) be involved in translocation of ERCC3 to the nucleus. PMID:8196650

  6. Host cell reactivation of sunlamp-exposed adenovirus in fibroblasts from patients with Bloom's syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, and Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rainbow, A.J. )

    1991-01-01

    In this study, a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique was used to examine the repair capacity for DNA damaged by sunlamp exposure in fibroblast strains derived from 5 normal individuals and 8 patients representing three different diseases associated with DNA repair deficiencies. Adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was exposed to radiation from a GE 275 W sunlamp and subsequently used to infect fibroblast monolayers. At 48 hr after infection, cells were scored for the presence of viral structural antigens (Vag) using indirect immunofluorescent staining. Previous reports using this technique showed a substantial reduction in the HCR of sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 for infection of excision repair deficient fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In contrast, the HCR of Vag synthesis for sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 was in the normal range for the three ataxia telangiectasia, three Bloom's syndrome, and two Huntington's disease fibroblasts strains.

  7. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, James E.; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M.; Swanson, Raymond A.; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human DNA repair-deficient disease that involves transcription coupled repair (TCR), in which three gene products, Cockayne syndrome A (CSA), Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), and ultraviolet stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) cooperate in relieving RNA polymerase II arrest at damaged sites to permit repair of the template strand. Mutation of any of these three genes results in cells with increased sensitivity to UV light and defective TCR. Mutations in CSA or CSB are associated with severe neurological disease but mutations in UVSSA are for the most part only associated with increased photosensitivity. This difference raises questions about the relevance of TCR to neurological disease in CS. We find that CSB-mutated cells, but not UVSSA-deficient cells, have increased levels of intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially when mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by rotenone. Increased ROS would result in oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. CSB appears to behave as an electron scavenger in the mitochondria whose absence leads to increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial ROS, however, did not cause detectable nuclear DNA damage even when base excision repair was blocked by an inhibitor of polyADP ribose polymerase. Neurodegeneration in Cockayne syndrome may therefore be associated with ROS-induced damage in the mitochondria, independent of nuclear TCR. An implication of our present results is that mitochondrial dysfunction involving ROS has a major impact on CS-B pathology, whereas nuclear TCR may have a minimal role. PMID:25136123

  8. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, James E; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Swanson, Raymond A; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-09-16

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human DNA repair-deficient disease that involves transcription coupled repair (TCR), in which three gene products, Cockayne syndrome A (CSA), Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), and ultraviolet stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) cooperate in relieving RNA polymerase II arrest at damaged sites to permit repair of the template strand. Mutation of any of these three genes results in cells with increased sensitivity to UV light and defective TCR. Mutations in CSA or CSB are associated with severe neurological disease but mutations in UVSSA are for the most part only associated with increased photosensitivity. This difference raises questions about the relevance of TCR to neurological disease in CS. We find that CSB-mutated cells, but not UVSSA-deficient cells, have increased levels of intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially when mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by rotenone. Increased ROS would result in oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. CSB appears to behave as an electron scavenger in the mitochondria whose absence leads to increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial ROS, however, did not cause detectable nuclear DNA damage even when base excision repair was blocked by an inhibitor of polyADP ribose polymerase. Neurodegeneration in Cockayne syndrome may therefore be associated with ROS-induced damage in the mitochondria, independent of nuclear TCR. An implication of our present results is that mitochondrial dysfunction involving ROS has a major impact on CS-B pathology, whereas nuclear TCR may have a minimal role. PMID:25136123

  9. Complementary Methodologies To Identify Specific Agrobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Hacene; Moore, Larry W.

    1987-01-01

    Serological techniques and restriction enzyme cleavage patterns of total DNA were used to differentiate strains of Agrobacterium spp. Forty-five wild-type and plasmid-cured Agrobacterium strains were tested by immunodiffusion and immunofluorescence against polyclonal antisera to a crude ribosome preparation from Agrobacterium strains K84, U11, B6, A323, NT1, and C58. In immunodiffusion gels, these antisera reacted only with water-phenol extracts of the homologous strain, producing a single, strain-specific precipitin line. In contrast, when the same antisera were used in immunofluorescence staining, cross-reactions occurred with a limited number of heterologous Agrobacterium strains. However, the cross-reacting heterologous cells fluoresced generally less brightly than the homologous cells. When the EcoRI-digested DNA profiles from the same Agrobacterium strains were compared, 34 distinct cleavage patterns were observed. The DNA profiles were the same for all strains sharing a common chromosomal background and correlated with the strain-specific serological reaction. The presence or absence of plasmid DNA did not alter the strain-specific serological reaction or the DNA cleavage patterns. Both the serological reaction and the restriction enzyme digestion of total DNA were complementary to each other. These methods were used successfully to identify A. radiobacter K84 strains which were recovered 6 months after being inoculated to young trees in the field. Images PMID:16347485

  10. Surfactin production by strains of Bacillus mojavensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus mojavensis, RRC101 is an endophytic bacterium patented for control of fungal diseases in maize and other plants. DNA fingerprint analysis of the rep-PCR fragments of 35 B. mojavensis and 4 B. subtilis strains using the Diversilab genotyping system revealed genotypic distinctive strains alon...

  11. Oxidative DNA damage in the in utero initiation of postnatal neurodevelopmental deficits by normal fetal and ethanol-enhanced oxidative stress in oxoguanine glycosylase 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Pinto, Daniel J; Wells, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Studies in mice with deficient antioxidative enzymes have shown that physiological levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can adversely affect the developing embryo and fetus. Herein, DNA repair-deficient progeny of oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (ogg1)-knockout mice lacking repair of the oxidative DNA lesion 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) exhibited enhanced postnatal neurodevelopmental deficits, revealing the pathogenic potential of 8-oxodGuo initiated by physiological ROS production in fetal brain and providing the first evidence of a pathological phenotype for ogg1-knockout mice. Moreover, when exposed in utero to ethanol (EtOH), ogg1-knockout progeny exhibited higher levels of 8-oxodGuo in fetal brain and more severe postnatal neurodevelopmental deficits than wild-type littermates, both of which were blocked by pretreatment with the free radical trapping agent phenylbutylnitrone. These results suggest that ROS-initiated DNA oxidation, as distinct from altered signal transduction, contributes to neurodevelopmental deficits caused by in utero EtOH exposure, and fetal DNA repair is a determinant of risk. PMID:25311828

  12. Benzo(a)pyrene induces similar gene expression changes in testis of DNA repair proficient and deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Benzo [a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure induces DNA adducts at all stages of spermatogenesis and in testis, and removal of these lesions is less efficient in nucleotide excision repair deficient Xpc-/- mice than in wild type mice. In this study, we investigated by using microarray technology whether compromised DNA repair in Xpc-/- mice may lead to a transcriptional reaction of the testis to cope with increased levels of B[a]P induced DNA damage. Results Two-Way ANOVA revealed only 4 genes differentially expressed between wild type and Xpc-/- mice, and 984 genes between testes of B[a]P treated and untreated mice irrespective of the mouse genotype. However, the level in which these B[a]P regulated genes are expressed differs between Wt and Xpc-/- mice (p = 0.000000141), and were predominantly involved in the regulation of cell cycle, translation, chromatin structure and spermatogenesis, indicating a general stress response. In addition, analysis of cell cycle phase dependent gene expression revealed that expression of genes involved in G1-S and G2-M phase arrest was increased after B[a]P exposure in both genotypes. A slightly higher induction of average gene expression was observed at the G2-M checkpoint in Xpc-/- mice, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.086). Other processes that were expected to have changed by exposure, like apoptosis and DNA repair, were not found to be modulated at the level of gene expression. Conclusion Gene expression in testis of untreated Xpc-/- and wild type mice were very similar, with only 4 genes differentially expressed. Exposure to benzo(a)pyrene affected the expression of genes that are involved in cell cycle regulation in both genotypes, indicating that the presence of unrepaired DNA damage in testis blocks cell proliferation to protect DNA integrity in both DNA repair proficient and deficient animals. PMID:20504355

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Aeromonas diversa Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Maribel; Spataro, Nino; Sanglas, Ariadna; Albarral, Vicenta; Lorén, J Gaspar; Bosch, Elena; Fusté, M Carmen

    2013-06-27

    We present here the first genome sequence of the Aeromonas diversa type strain (CECT 4254(T)). This strain was isolated from the leg wound of a patient in New Orleans (Louisiana) and was originally described as enteric group 501 and distinguished from A. schubertii by DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypical characterization.

  14. Random mutagenesis strategies for construction of large and diverse clone libraries of mutated DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2004-01-01

    The first important step toward a successful preparation of large and diverse DNA libraries with desired complexity is to select a suitable mutagenesis strategy. This chapter describes three different methods for random mutagenesis, the use of XL1-red cells, error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and degenerate oligonucleotides-Pfu (DOP). These mutagenesis strategies possess different benefits and pitfalls; thus, they are differentially useful for production of DNA libraries with different density and complexity. The use of XL1-red, an engineered Escherichia coli with DNA repair deficiency, is one of the simplest mutagenesis and requires no subcloning step. After plasmid encoding DNA of inter-est is transformed into the cells, the mutations are simply generated during each round of DNA replication. The mutation frequency of this method is reported to be 1 base change per 2000 nucleotides; however, it can be slightly increased by extending the culture period to allow the accumulation of more mutations. This strategy is suitable for generation of random mutations with low frequency in a large target DNA. Error-prone PCR is one of the most widely used random mutagenesis. During DNA amplification, misincorporation of nucleotides can be promoted by altering the nucleotide ratio and the concentration of divalent cations in the reaction. We discovered that, by adjusting template concentration, frequency of mutation could be controlled easily and a library with desired mutation rate could be obtained. Additionally, efficiency of subsequent cloning steps to insert the PCR product into plasmid DNA is also a key factor determining size and complexity of the libraries. DOP mutagenesis is a rapid and effective method for random mutagenesis of small DNA and peptides. This strategy uses two chemically synthesized degenerate oligonucleotides as primers. By controlling the positions and ratios of degenerate nucleotides used during oligonucleotide synthesis, it is possible to

  15. DNA, a possible site of action of aluminum in Rhizobium spp

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.C.; Wood, M. )

    1990-12-01

    Al was found to penetrate the cell envelopes of both sensitive and tolerant Rhizobium strains and bind to DNA in vivo. Despite causing a reduction viability, Al stimulated DNA synthesis in the sensitive strain, which suggested that an excision repair mechanism was operating. The Al-stimulated DNA synthesis was reduced by the simultaneous addition of chloramphenicol. In contrast to the sensitive strain, DNA synthesis was unaffected by Al binding to DNA in the tolerant strain. It is proposed that Al enters the cell and binds to the DNA helix, increasing stabilization and preventing successful replication. Different repair mechanisms appear to operate in response to Al in tolerant and sensitive strains.

  16. Streptomyces avermectinius sp. nov., an avermectin-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoko; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Seino, Akio; Ueno, Junji; Iwai, Yuzuru; Omura, Satoshi

    2002-11-01

    We propose the establishment of a new species, Streptomyces avermectinius, based on characterization of strain MA-4680(T) and morphological and phylogenetic comparisons with closely related members of the genus Streptomyces. The 16S rDNA sequence was obtained from this strain and used to place it among Streptomyces species using the variable alpha region and the nearly complete 16S rDNA sequence. Four Streptomyces species were selected as related species from phenotypic data, three species from phylogenetic databases on alpha region sequences and two species from phylogenetic data using nearly complete 16S rDNA sequences. Analysis of DNA-DNA hybridization tests distinguished strain MA-4680(T) from these eight Streptomyces species. The type strain is strain MA-4680(T) (= ATCC 31267(T) = NRRL 8165(T)). PMID:12508884

  17. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Chimileski, Scott; Dolas, Kunal; Naor, Adit; Gophna, Uri; Papke, R. Thane

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the microbial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA concentrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration, and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent, and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy showed that labeled DNA co-localized with H. volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created a strain deficient in the ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life. PMID:24600440

  18. Genetic diversity of Rhodopirellula strains.

    PubMed

    Frank, Carsten S; Klockow, Christine; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Harder, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica SH1(T) is a marine planctomycete with 7,325 genes in its genome. Ten strains of the genus Rhodopirellula were studied in whole genome microarray experiments to assess the extent of their genetic relatedness to R. baltica SH1(T). DNA of strains which were previously affiliated with the species R. baltica (OTU A) hybridized with 3,645-5,728 genes of the type strain on the microarray. Strains SH398 and 6C (OTU B), representing a closely related species with an average nucleotide identity of 88 %, showed less hybridization signals: 1,816 and 3,302 genes gave a hybridization signal, respectively. Comparative genomics of eight permanent draft genomes revealed the presence of over 4,000 proteins common in R. baltica SH1(T) and strains of OTU A or B. The genus Rhodopirellula is characterized by large genomes, with over 7,000 genes per genome and a core genome of around 3000 genes. Individual Rhodopirellula strains have a large portion of strain-specific genes. PMID:23975513

  19. Variability among Rhizobium Strains Originating from Nodules of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, P; Beyene, D; Vera, F T; Keyser, H H

    1995-07-01

    Rhizobium strains from nodules of Vicia faba were diverse in plasmid content and serology. Results of multilocus gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated several deep chromosomal lineages among the strains. Linkage disequilibrium among the chromosomal types was detected and may have reflected variation of Rhizobium strains in the different geographical locations from which the strains originated. An investigation of pea strains with antibodies prepared against fava bean strains and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, targeting DNA regions coding for rRNA and nodulation, indicated that Rhizobium strains from V. faba nodules were distinguishable from those from Pisum sativum, V. villosa, and Trifolium spp. PMID:16535075

  20. Virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281 on legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, E.E.; Fraley, R.T.; Chilton, M.D.

    1987-03-01

    This study addresses the basis of host range on legumes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281, an L,L-succinamopine strain. The authors tested virulence of T-DNA and vir region constructs from this tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid with complementary Ti plasmid regions from heterologous nopaline and octopine strains.

  1. Recent research in DNA repair, mutation and recombination: a report of the DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on 18 December 1995.

    PubMed

    Jones, N J; Strike, P

    1996-09-01

    The now traditional one day Christmas DNA Repair meeting was held at City University, London for the third year in succession. With over 130 participants and a programme consisting of a total of 24 pre-offered presentations the meeting reached record dimensions. Attendees were from 24 institutions throughout the United Kingdom, and with several distinct research groups contained within the large contingents from the ICRF Clare Hall Laboratories and the MRC Cell Mutation Unit in Brighton, this indicates the increasing interest and depth of UK research in DNA repair. One slight disappointment of the meeting was the fall in the numbers of non-UK participants. Although the meeting in 1994 (Strike, 1995) saw an increase in presentations from Continental Europe (six countries including France, Germany. The Netherlands and Switzerland), the trend did not continue this year, with only Denmark being represented. The 24 contributors consisted of approximately equal numbers of postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers and more "established' scientists reflecting the continuing policy of encouraging younger members of the repair community to present their work. The mix of presenters was particularly well illustrated by two excellent and consecutive talks by Professor Bryn Bridges (MRC Cell Mutation Unit) and Alison Mitchell, a postgraduate student in Stephen West's laboratory (ICRF, Clare Hall). The organisms under study were as equally disparate and included Archaebacteria, Escherichia coli. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus, mice and men. The range of topics was also varied and included bacterial mutagenesis, NMR studies of Ada protein, preferential DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint genes, reconstitution of nucleotide excision repair and V(D)J recombination in vitro, creation of repair deficient transgenic mice and mismatch defects in human cells. The result was a very successful meeting which was characterized by the consistently high

  2. Bone marrow failure in Fanconi anemia is triggered by an exacerbated p53/p21 DNA damage response that impairs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Raphael; Parmar, Kalindi; Mouly, Enguerran; Delord, Marc; Kim, Jung Min; Regairaz, Marie; Pla, Marika; Vasquez, Nadia; Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Pondarre, Corinne; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Gluckman, Eliane; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Leblanc, Thierry; Larghero, Jérôme; Grompe, Markus; Socié, Gérard; D'Andrea, Alan D; Soulier, Jean

    2012-07-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair deficiency syndrome. FA patients undergo progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) during childhood, which frequently requires allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The pathogenesis of this BMF has been elusive to date. Here we found that FA patients exhibit a profound defect in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that is present before the onset of clinical BMF. In response to replicative stress and unresolved DNA damage, p53 is hyperactivated in FA cells and triggers a late p21(Cdkn1a)-dependent G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest. Knockdown of p53 rescued the HSPC defects observed in several in vitro and in vivo models, including human FA or FA-like cells. Taken together, our results identify an exacerbated p53/p21 "physiological" response to cellular stress and DNA damage accumulation as a central mechanism for progressive HSPC elimination in FA patients, and have implications for clinical care.

  3. Genetic transformation assays for identification of strains of Moraxella urethralis.

    PubMed Central

    Juni, E

    1977-01-01

    Studies of 31 strains of Moraxella urethralis have shown that 20 of them are competent for genetic transformation. This finding has led to the development of transformation assays for identification of newly isolated strains of this organism. Crude deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples from all strains of M. urethralis readily transform auxotrophic mutants of competent strains to prototrophy, whereas DNA samples from unrelated bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Moraxella, and Neisseria species uniformly fail to elicit positive transformation of mutant tester strains. One of the competent strains of M. urethralis investigated is a naturally occurring mutant defective in its ability to utilize citrate as a carbon and energy source. DNA samples from 29 of the 30 remaining strains of utilization; the one nonreacting strain is citrate negative and probably possesses the same genetic lesion as the citrate-negative mutant. Three organisms originally identified as strains of M. urethralis, because of their phenotypic properties, are probably incorrectly designated, since DNA samples from these strains failed to transform any of the tester mutant strains used in the present study. The transformation assay for M. urethralis is very simple and can be performed readily in a clinical laboratory. The entire procedure can be carried out in less than 24 h. Images PMID:845247

  4. Methanol exposure does not produce oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, liver or kidney of adult mice, rabbits or primates

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Gordon P.; Siu, Michelle; Sweeting, J. Nicole; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-15

    In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests indicate methanol (MeOH) is not mutagenic, but carcinogenic potential has been claimed in one controversial long-term rodent cancer bioassay that has not been replicated. To determine whether MeOH could indirectly damage DNA via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanisms, we treated male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) and 6 h later assessed oxidative damage to DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. We found no MeOH-dependent increases in 8-oxodG in lung, liver or kidney of any species. Chronic treatment of CD-1 mice with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) daily for 15 days also did not increase 8-oxodG levels in these organs. These results were corroborated in DNA repair-deficient oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) knockout (KO) mice, which accumulated 8-oxodG in lung, kidney and liver with age, but exhibited no increase following MeOH, despite a 2-fold increase in renal 8-oxodG in Ogg1 KO mice following treatment with a ROS-initiating positive control, the renal carcinogen potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}; 100 mg/kg ip). These observations suggest that MeOH exposure does not promote the accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, kidney or liver, and that environmental exposure to MeOH is unlikely to initiate carcinogenesis in these organs by DNA oxidation.

  5. A modified host-cell reactivation assay to measure repair of alkylating DNA damage for assessing risk of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luo; Wei, Qingyi; Shi, Qiuling; Guo, Zhaosheng; Qiao, Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R

    2007-07-01

    The nicotine-derived nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces lung adenocarcinoma through formation of DNA adducts. Our previous research on susceptibility to tobacco-induced carcinogenesis focused on benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) as the in vitro mutagen for phenotype measurements of DNA repair capacity (DRC) in mammalian cells. Here, we present a modified host-cell reactivation (HCR) assay to measure lymphocytic DRC for alkylating DNA damage as is induced by the tobacco-specific nitrosamine, NNK. We substituted dimethyl sulfate (DMS) to create alkylating damage in pCMVluc plasmid DNA and established the damage-repair dose-response curves in both normal and nucleotide excision repair-deficient lymphoblastoid cell lines and in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated primary lymphocytes. We then successfully measured the DRC in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes from 48 patients with lung adenocarcinoma and 45 cancer-free controls and tested our hypothesis that lower DRC for alkylating damage is associated with an increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma. The cases exhibited a lower mean DRC than did the controls. A >3-fold increased risk (odds ratio = 3.21; 95% confidence interval = 1.25-8.21) was found for those with DRC levels below the control median. There was no correlation between the DRC measured with this DMS-HCR assay and that from the parallel BPDE-HCR assay. Interestingly, risk increased to >10-fold for those with sub-optimal DRC measured by both DMS- and BPDE-HCR assays. We conclude that variability in DRC is a risk factor for lung cancer and our results provide proof of principle for a new assay that can assess DRC for NNK-induced DNA damage. PMID:17341660

  6. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Weeda, G.; Donker, I.; Vermeulen, W.

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in {approximately}50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TM have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly support the concept of {open_quotes}transcription syndromes.{close_quotes} 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Validation of 64Cu-ATSM damaging DNA via high-LET Auger electron emission.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Dayton D; Maeda, Junko; Bell, Justin J; Genet, Matthew D; Phoonswadi, Garrett; Mann, Kelly A; Kraft, Susan L; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2015-09-01

    Radioactive copper (II) (diacetyl-bis N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) isotopes were originally developed for the imaging of hypoxia in tumors. Because the decay of a (64)Cu atom is emitting not only positrons but also Auger electrons, this radionuclide has great potential as a theranostic agent. However, the success of (64)Cu-ATSM internal radiation therapy would depend on the contribution of Auger electrons to tumor cell killing. Therefore, we designed a cell culture system to define the contributions to cell death from Auger electrons to support or refute our hypothesis that the majority of cell death from (64)Cu-ATSM is a result of high-LET Auger electrons and not positrons or other low-LET radiation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) wild type and DNA repair-deficient xrs5 cells were exposed to (64)Cu-ATSM during hypoxic conditions. Surviving fractions were compared with those surviving gamma-radiation, low-LET hadron radiation, and high-LET heavy ion exposure. The ratio of the D(10) values (doses required to achieve 10% cell survival) between CHO wild type and xrs5 cells suggested that (64)Cu-ATSM toxicity is similar to that of high-LET Carbon ion radiation (70 keV/μm). γH2AX foci assays confirmed DNA double-strand breaks and cluster damage by high-LET Auger electrons from (64)Cu decay, and complex types of chromosomal aberrations typical of high-LET radiation were observed after (64)Cu-ATSM exposure. The majority of cell death was caused by high-LET radiation. This work provides strong evidence that (64)Cu-ATSM damages DNA via high-LET Auger electrons, supporting further study and consideration of (64)Cu-ATSM as a cancer treatment modality for hypoxic tumors.

  8. Validation of 64Cu-ATSM damaging DNA via high-LET Auger electron emission.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Dayton D; Maeda, Junko; Bell, Justin J; Genet, Matthew D; Phoonswadi, Garrett; Mann, Kelly A; Kraft, Susan L; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2015-09-01

    Radioactive copper (II) (diacetyl-bis N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) isotopes were originally developed for the imaging of hypoxia in tumors. Because the decay of a (64)Cu atom is emitting not only positrons but also Auger electrons, this radionuclide has great potential as a theranostic agent. However, the success of (64)Cu-ATSM internal radiation therapy would depend on the contribution of Auger electrons to tumor cell killing. Therefore, we designed a cell culture system to define the contributions to cell death from Auger electrons to support or refute our hypothesis that the majority of cell death from (64)Cu-ATSM is a result of high-LET Auger electrons and not positrons or other low-LET radiation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) wild type and DNA repair-deficient xrs5 cells were exposed to (64)Cu-ATSM during hypoxic conditions. Surviving fractions were compared with those surviving gamma-radiation, low-LET hadron radiation, and high-LET heavy ion exposure. The ratio of the D(10) values (doses required to achieve 10% cell survival) between CHO wild type and xrs5 cells suggested that (64)Cu-ATSM toxicity is similar to that of high-LET Carbon ion radiation (70 keV/μm). γH2AX foci assays confirmed DNA double-strand breaks and cluster damage by high-LET Auger electrons from (64)Cu decay, and complex types of chromosomal aberrations typical of high-LET radiation were observed after (64)Cu-ATSM exposure. The majority of cell death was caused by high-LET radiation. This work provides strong evidence that (64)Cu-ATSM damages DNA via high-LET Auger electrons, supporting further study and consideration of (64)Cu-ATSM as a cancer treatment modality for hypoxic tumors. PMID:26251463

  9. Targeting the Parasite's DNA with Methyltriazenyl Purine Analogs Is a Safe, Selective, and Efficacious Antitrypanosomal Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Martin J.; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A. M.; Ebiloma, Godwin U.; Barnes, Rebecca L.; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2−/−) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  10. DNA characterization of Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, G. P.; Steigerwalt, A. G.; Johnson, S.; Barbour, A. G.; Steere, A. C.; Robinson, I. M.; Brenner, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes (LDS) have phenotypic characteristics of both treponemes and borreliae. To ascertain whether one or more species of LDS exist, as well as their taxonomic status, we determined the DNA base (G + C) content for three strains of LDS, the DNA relatedness of ten strains isolated in the United States or Europe, and the DNA relatedness of LDS to other spirochetes. The G + C content of the three LDS strains was 28.1-29.0 mol%, most similar to those of Borellia hermsii (30.6 mol %) and Treponema hyodysenteriae (25.6 mol %) among the other spirochetes tested. DNA hybridization studies of nine LDS strains to a reference strain isolated from human blood revealed divergence (unpaired bases) within related nucleotide sequences of only 0.0-1.0 percent, indicating the strains were one species. Similarly, relatedness values of seven strains to the reference strain were high: 58-98 percent (mean, 71 percent) in 50 degrees C reactions and 50-93 percent (mean, 69 percent) in 65 degrees C reactions. Labeled DNA from B. hermsii was 30-40 percent related to three Lyme disease spirochete strains in 50 degrees C reactions and 8-10 percent related in 65 degrees C reactions. In contrast, DNA from the reference LDS strain showed relatedness of only 1 percent to DNAs of two leptospires and only 16 percent to DNA from T. hyodysenteriae. We conclude that LDS are a single species, genetically unlike treponemes or leptospires, which belong in the genus Borrelia. PMID:6516455

  11. DNA Polymorphisms in Lentinula edodes, the Shiitake Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Rajiv K.

    1991-01-01

    DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were examined in Lentinula edodes strains. Genomic DNA from strain 70 was cloned in plasmid vector pUC19, and 18 random clones containing low-copy DNA sequences were used to probe seven strains in Southern DNA-DNA hybridizations. Each cloned fragment revealed DNA polymorphism. An RFLP genotype was determined for each strain and the genetic relatedness was assessed. The coefficients of genetic similarity among the seven strains ranged from 0.43 to 0.90. The inheritance of RFLP markers was examined in single spore isolates. Homokaryons displayed a loss of polymorphic bands compared with the parent dikaryon. Hybrids constructed by crossing compatible homokaryons displayed the inheritance of RFLP markers from each parent homokaryon. Images PMID:16348509

  12. Rapid DNA extraction methods and new primers for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Deng, M Q; Cliver, D O

    1999-08-01

    A randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) procedure using simple genomic DNA preparation methods and newly designed primers was optimized for analyzing Giardia duodenalis strains. Genomic DNA was extracted from in vitro cultivated trophozoites by five freezing-thawing cycles or by sonic treatment. Compared to a conventional method involving proteinase K digestion and phenol extraction, both freezing-thawing and sonication were equally efficient, yet with the advantage of being much less time- and labor-intensive. Five of the 10 tested RAPD primers produced reproducible polymorphisms among five human origin G. duodenalis strains, and grouping of these strains based on RAPD profiles was in agreement among these primers. The consistent classification of two standard laboratory reference strains, Portland-1 and WB, in the same group confirmed previous results using other fingerprinting methods, indicating that the reported simple DNA extraction methods and the selected primers are useful in RAPD for molecular characterization of G. duodenalis strains.

  13. A Mouse Strain Defective in Both T Cells and NK Cells Has Enhanced Sensitivity to Tumor Induction by Plasmid DNA Expressing Both Activated H-Ras and c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Sheng-Fowler, Li; Tu, Wei; Fu, Haiqing; Murata, Haruhiko; Lanning, Lynda; Foseh, Gideon; Macauley, Juliete; Blair, Donald; Hughes, Stephen H.; Coffin, John M.; Lewis, Andrew M.; Peden, Keith

    2014-01-01

    As part of safety studies to evaluate the risk of residual cellular DNA in vaccines manufactured in tumorigenic cells, we have been developing in vivo assays to detect and quantify the oncogenic activity of DNA. We generated a plasmid expressing both an activated human H-ras gene and murine c-myc gene and showed that 1 µg of this plasmid, pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc, was capable of inducing tumors in newborn NIH Swiss mice. However, to be able to detect the oncogenicity of dominant activated oncogenes in cellular DNA, a more sensitive system was needed. In this paper, we demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon transgenic mouse, which is defective in both T-cell and NK-cell functions, can detect the oncogenic activity of 25 ng of the circular form of pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc. When this plasmid was inoculated as linear DNA, amounts of DNA as low as 800 pg were capable of inducing tumors. Animals were found that had multiple tumors, and these tumors were independent and likely clonal. These results demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon mouse is highly sensitive for the detection of oncogenic activity of DNA. To determine whether it can detect the oncogenic activity of cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-cell lines (HeLa, A549, HT-1080, and CEM), DNA (100 µg) was inoculated into newborn CD3 epsilon mice both in the presence of 1 µg of linear pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc as positive control and in its absence. While tumors were induced in 100% of mice with the positive-control plasmid, no tumors were induced in mice receiving any of the tumor DNAs alone. These results demonstrate that detection of oncogenes in cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-derived cell lines in this mouse system was not possible; the results also show the importance of including a positive-control plasmid to detect inhibitory effects of the cellular DNA. PMID:25302710

  14. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  15. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  16. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  17. Alkali-sensitive sites in DNA from human cells treated with ultraviolet light, 1'-acetoxysafrole or 1'-acetoxyestragole

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.H.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The formation and repair of alkali-labile sites in the DNA of human cells treated with 254 nm u.v. light, 1'-acetoxyestragole (1'-AcO-E) or 1'-acetoxysafrole (1'-AcO-S) have been studied. DNA was analysed by sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients after the cells had been layered on the gradients in lysis solution for 15 h (long lysis) or for only 0.75 h (short lysis). With the long lysis technique, a dose of 20 J/m2 resulted in 0.2-0.4 strand breaks/10(8) daltons while treatment of cells with 0.5 mM 1'-AcO-E or 1'-AcO-S caused 0.1-0.3 strand breaks/10(8) daltons. In excision repair proficient T98G cells, one third to two thirds of these strand breaks disappeared upon 4 h incubation after exposure to each of the three agents. In excision repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts (XPA), the alkali-labile sites produced by 1'-AcO-E or 1'-AcO-S were still repaired, although those resulting from u.v.-irradiation were not. Similar characteristics were observed after the short lysis period. The sedimentation velocities of nucleoids, prepared from treated XPA cells, in neutral sucrose gradients containing ethidium bromide, did not reveal the presence of overt strand breaks in the DNA, suggesting that the lesions were of a type in which the sugar-phosphate backbone was intact but sensitive to hydrolysis by alkali. The contribution of this type of damage to the total DNA damage produced by the agents was estimated to be less than 1% for u.v., and less than 2.5% for 1'-AcO-E and 1'-AcO-S.

  18. Interaction of Ddc1 and RPA with single-stranded/double-stranded DNA junctions in yeast whole cell extracts: Proteolytic degradation of the large subunit of replication protein A in ddc1Δ strains.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; D'Herin, Claudine; Boiteux, Serge; Lavrik, Olga I

    2014-10-01

    To characterize proteins that interact with single-stranded/double-stranded (ss/ds) DNA junctions in whole cell free extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we used [(32)P]-labeled photoreactive partial DNA duplexes containing a 3'-ss/ds-junction (3'-junction) or a 5'-ss/ds-junction (5'-junction). Identification of labeled proteins was achieved by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting and genetic analysis. In wild-type extract, one of the components of the Ddc1-Rad17-Mec3 complex, Ddc1, was found to be preferentially photocrosslinked at a 3'-junction. On the other hand, RPAp70, the large subunit of the replication protein A (RPA), was the predominant crosslinking product at a 5'-junction. Interestingly, ddc1Δ extracts did not display photocrosslinking of RPAp70 at a 5'-junction. The results show that RPAp70 crosslinked to DNA with a 5'-junction is subject to limited proteolysis in ddc1Δ extracts, whereas it is stable in WT, rad17Δ, mec3Δ and mec1Δ extracts. The degradation of the RPAp70-DNA adduct in ddc1Δ extract is strongly reduced in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG 132. We also addressed the question of the stability of free RPA, using anti-RPA antibodies. The results show that RPAp70 is also subject to proteolysis without photocrosslinking to DNA upon incubation in ddc1Δ extract. The data point to a novel property of Ddc1, modulating the turnover of DNA binding proteins such as RPAp70 by the proteasome.

  19. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  20. Involvement of DNA gyrase in replication and transcription of bacteriophage T7 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Wyngaert, M; Hinkle, D C

    1979-01-01

    Growth of bacteriophage T7 is inhibited by the antibiotic coumermycin A1, an inhibitor of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase. Since growth of the phage is insensitive to the antibiotic in strains containing a coumermycin-resistant DNA gyrase, this enzyme appears to be required for phage growth. We have investigated the effect of coumermycin on the kinetics of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis during T7 infection. DNA synthesis is completely inhibited by the antibiotic. In addition, coumermycin significantly inhibits transcription of late but not early genes. Thus, E. coli DNA gyrase may play an important role in transcription as well as in replication of T7 DNA. Images PMID:372560

  1. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  2. Multiscale modelling of DNA mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical properties of DNA are important not only in a wide range of biological processes but also in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology. We review some of the recent developments in modeling these properties, emphasizing the multiscale nature of the problem. Modern atomic resolution, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations have contributed to our understanding of DNA fine structure and conformational polymorphism. These simulations may serve as data sources to parameterize rigid base models which themselves have undergone major development. A consistent buildup of larger entities involving multiple rigid bases enables us to describe DNA at more global scales. Free energy methods to impose large strains on DNA, as well as bead models and other approaches, are also briefly discussed.

  3. BENZO[A]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE FORMS COVALENT-DNA ADDUCTS IN VITRO BUT NONE WERE DETECTED IN THE LUNGS OR LIVERS OF STRAIN A/J MICE IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a potent human and rodent lung carcinogen. This activity has been ascribed in part to the formation of B[a]P-7,8-dio1-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts. Other carcinogenic mechanisms have been proposed: 1.] The induction of apurinic sites from radical cati...

  4. BENZO[ A ]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE FORMS COVALENT-DNA ADDUCTS IN VITRO BUT NONE WERE DETECTED IN THE LUNGS OR LIVERS OF STRAIN A/J MICE IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a potent human and rodent lung carcinogen. This activity has been ascribed in part to the formation of B[a]P-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts. Other carcinogenic mechanisms have been proposed: 1.] The induction of apurinic si...

  5. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  6. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  7. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Valdes, E.; Cozar, E.; Rotger, R. Lalucat, J. ); Ursing, J. )

    1988-10-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridizations demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons.

  8. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  9. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  10. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  11. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M; Morais e Silva Tavares, Patrícia; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros

    2005-09-01

    This study establishes the genetic relatedness among Brazilian Histoplasma capsulatum samples obtained from different sources. A PCR-based random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay was used to delineate polymorphisms among isolates in geographically diverse regions in Brazil. RAPD fingerprints revealed distinct DNA profiles and provided a high level of discrimination among H. capsulatum strains from different locations. Cluster I was composed of H. capsulatum isolates from the northeast region. The majority of strains from southeast and south were categorized as major cluster II. The strain 84564 from Rio de Janeiro State showed no genetic correlation to any of the isolates from the same state. The RAPD patterns of H. capsulatum isolates from Goias (Cluster III) were unrelated to DNA fingerprints observed among the other H. capsulatum strains (48% similarity). This study is the first report that stratifies the clusters of H. capsulatum strains from Brazil by molecular typing and associates them with the geographical origin. PMID:16055317

  12. Diversity among Streptomyces Strains Causing Potato Scab.

    PubMed

    Doering-Saad, C; Kämpfer, P; Manulis, S; Kritzman, G; Schneider, J; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, J; Schrempf, H; Barash, I

    1992-12-01

    Eighty Streptomyces isolates, including 35 potato scab-inducing strains and 12 reference strains of Streptomyces scabies, were physiologically characterized by a total of 329 miniaturized tests. Overall similarities of all strains were determined by numerical taxonomy, with the unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) algorithm and simple matching (S(sm)) and Jaccard (S(j)) coefficients used as measures for similarity. Three cluster groups (A to C) were defined at a similarity level of 80.1% (S(sm)); these groups contained 14 clusters and 24 unclustered strains defined at a similarity level of 86.5% (S(sm)). Cluster group A contained strains phenotypically related to S. griseus or S. exfoliatus, whereas cluster group B contained strains which were phenotypically related to S. violaceus or S. rochei. The majority of the pathogenic isolates and reference strains were assigned to S. violaceus (57%) and S. griseus (22%). A DNA probe derived from the rRNA operon of S. coelicolor IMET 40271 was used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RELPs) among 40 pathogenic and nonpathogenic Streptomyces isolates. Southern blots revealed a high degree of diversity among the pathogenic strains tested. No significant correlation between numerical classification and RFLP grouping of Streptomyces strains could be revealed. The results obtained suggest that RFLP data are of minor importance in classification of Streptomyces species and that genes for pathogenicity determinants are spread among different Streptomyces species by mobilizable elements. PMID:16348823

  13. Diversity among Streptomyces Strains Causing Potato Scab

    PubMed Central

    Doering-Saad, Christiane; Kämpfer, Peter; Manulis, Shulamit; Kritzman, Giora; Schneider, Jörg; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta; Schrempf, Hildgund; Barash, Isaac

    1992-01-01

    Eighty Streptomyces isolates, including 35 potato scab-inducing strains and 12 reference strains of Streptomyces scabies, were physiologically characterized by a total of 329 miniaturized tests. Overall similarities of all strains were determined by numerical taxonomy, with the unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) algorithm and simple matching (Ssm) and Jaccard (Sj) coefficients used as measures for similarity. Three cluster groups (A to C) were defined at a similarity level of 80.1% (Ssm); these groups contained 14 clusters and 24 unclustered strains defined at a similarity level of 86.5% (Ssm). Cluster group A contained strains phenotypically related to S. griseus or S. exfoliatus, whereas cluster group B contained strains which were phenotypically related to S. violaceus or S. rochei. The majority of the pathogenic isolates and reference strains were assigned to S. violaceus (57%) and S. griseus (22%). A DNA probe derived from the rRNA operon of S. coelicolor IMET 40271 was used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RELPs) among 40 pathogenic and nonpathogenic Streptomyces isolates. Southern blots revealed a high degree of diversity among the pathogenic strains tested. No significant correlation between numerical classification and RFLP grouping of Streptomyces strains could be revealed. The results obtained suggest that RFLP data are of minor importance in classification of Streptomyces species and that genes for pathogenicity determinants are spread among different Streptomyces species by mobilizable elements. Images PMID:16348823

  14. Identification, mapping and linkage analysis of randomly amplified DNA polymorphisms in Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Brickner, J.H.; Lynch, T.J.; Zeilinger, D.; Orias, E.

    1996-06-01

    Using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique and exploiting the unique genetics of Tetrahymena thermophila, we have identified and characterized 40 DNA polymorphisms occurring between two inbred strains (B and C3) of this ciliated protozoan. These RAPD markers permit the PCR amplification of a DNA species using template DNA from SB1969 (B strain) but fail to do so using DNA from C3-368-5 (C3 strain). Polymorphisms were mapped to chromosomes using a panel of monosomic strains constructed by crossing B strain-derived nullisomic strains to inbred strain C3. They map to all five chromosomes and appear to be evenly distributed throughout the genome. Chromosomal groups were then analyzed for linkage using meiotic segregants; four linkage groups were identified in chromosomes 1R, 2L, 3 and 5. The RAPD method appears useful for the construction of a genetic map of the Tetrahymena genome based on DNA polymorphisms. 37 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. [Phenotypic features of Ferroplasma acidiphilum strains Yt and Y-2].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, T A; Kondrat'eva, T F; Batrakov, S G; Esipov, S E; Sheĭchenko, V I; Bykova, S A; Lysenko, A M; Karavaĭko, G I

    2002-01-01

    Earlier, we described a new family of mesophilic, strictly autotrophic Fe(2+)-oxidizing archaebacteria, Ferroplasmaceae, which belongs to the order Thermoplasmales and includes the genus Ferroplasma and species F. acidiphilum (strain YT) [1]. The present work is concerned with a comparative study of phenotypic characteristics of the type strain YT and a new strain, F. acidiphilum Y-2, isolated from dense pulps produced during oxidation of arsenogold concentrates from the Bakyrchikskoe (Kazakhstan) and Olimpiadinskoe (Krasnoyarsk Krai) ore deposits, respectively. The G + C content of DNA from strains YT and Y-2 comprised 35.1 and 35.2 mol%, respectively; the level of DNA-DNA homology between the strains was 84%. Restriction profiles of chromosomal DNA from both strains exhibited a similarity coefficient of 0.87. Genotypic characteristics of these strains indicate their affiliation to the same species. The cells of both strains are polymorphic and lack cell walls. Strains of F. acidiphilum oxidized ferrous oxide and pyrite as the sole source of energy and fixed carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source. Strains required yeast extract as a growth factor. Optimum pH for cell growth ranged from 1.7 to 1.8; the temperature optima for the growth of strains YT and Y-2 were 34-36 and 40-42 degrees C, respectively. Comparative analysis of total lipids revealed their close similarity in the strains; two glycophospholipids comprised 90% of total lipids: lipid I, beta-D-glucopyranosylcaldarchaetidylglycerol (about 55%), and lipid II, trihexosylcaldarchaetidylglycerol (26%), whose isopranyl chains contained no cyclopentane rings. The carbohydrate fraction of lipid I hydrolysate contained only D-glucose, whereas hydrolysate of lipid II contained both D-glucose and D-galactose in a molar ratio of 2:1. Thus, it was established that the intraspecific phylogenetic divergence within F. acidiphilum is manifested in two the strains by different temperature optima against the background

  16. Identification of Iron-reducing Thermus strains as Thermus scotoductus

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, David L.; Kieft, T L.; Tsukuda, Toyoko; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Onstott, T C.; Macnaughton, S.; Bownas, J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2004-02-01

    Thermus strain SA-01, previously isolated from a deep (3.2) South African gold mine, is closely related to Thermus strains NMX2 A.1 and VI-7 (previously isolated from thermal springs in New Mexico USA and Portugal, respectively). Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 have also been shown previously to grow using nitrate, Fe(III), , Mn(IV) or So as terminal electron acceptors and to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), U(VI), Co(III), and the quinine-containing compound anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The objectives of this study were to determine the phylogenetic positions of the three known metal-reducing Thermus strains and to determine the phylogenetic significance of metal reduction within the genus Thermus. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences, BOX PCR genomic fingerprinting, and DNA-DNA reassociation analyses indicated that these strains belong to the previously described genospecies T. scotoductus. The morphologies and lipid fatty acid profiles of these metal-reducing strains are consistent with their identification as T. scotoductus; however, the T. scotoductus strains tested in this study evinced a wide intraspecies variability in some other phenotypic traits, e.g., carbon substrate utilization and pigmentation. Iron reduction occurred in all strains of T. scotoductus tested except the mixotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing strain IT-7254. Thermus strains belonging to other species did not reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) or reduced it only poorly.

  17. SEQUENCE SIMILARITIES IN THE GENES ENCODING POLY- CHLORINATED BIPHENYL DEGRADATION BY PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400 AND ALCALIGENES EUTROPHUS H850

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-DNA hybridization was used to compare the Pseudomonas strain LB400 genes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation with those from seven other PCB-degrading strains. Significant hybridization was detected to the genome of Alcaligenes eutrophus H850, a strain similar to L...

  18. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  19. Molecular characterization of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans strains isolated from mine wastes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paulino, L C; Bergamo, R F; Garcia, O; de Mello, M P; Manfio, G P; Ottoboni, L M

    2001-10-01

    Nineteen strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, including 12 strains isolated from coal, copper, gold and uranium mines in Brazil, strains isolated from similar sources in other countries and the type strains of the two species were characterized together with the type strain of A. caldus by using a combination of molecular systematic methods, namely ribotyping, BOX- and ERIC-PCR and DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Data derived from the molecular fingerprinting analyses showed that the tested strains encompassed a high degree of genetic variability. Two of the Brazilian A. ferrooxidans organisms (strains SSP and PCE) isolated from acid coal mine waste and uranium mine effluent, respectively, and A. thiooxidans strain DAMS, isolated from uranium mine effluent, were the most genetically divergent organisms. The DNA-DNA hybridization data did not support the allocation of Acidithiobacillus strain SSP to the A. ferrooxidans genomic species, as it shared only just over 40% DNA relatedness with the type strain of the species. Acidithiobacillus strain SSP was not clearly related to A. ferrooxidans in the 16S rDNA tree.

  20. Whole Genome Analysis of a Wine Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Fellenberg, Kurt; Gil, Rosario; Bastuck, Sonja; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains frequently exhibit rather specific phenotypic features needed for adaptation to a special environment. Wine yeast strains are able to ferment musts, for example, while other industrial or laboratory strains fail to do so. The genetic differences that characterize wine yeast strains are poorly understood, however. As a first search of genetic differences between wine and laboratory strains, we performed DNA-array analyses on the typical wine yeast strain T73 and the standard laboratory background in S288c. Our analysis shows that even under normal conditions, logarithmic growth in YPD medium, the two strains have expression patterns that differ significantly in more than 40 genes. Subsequent studies indicated that these differences correlate with small changes in promoter regions or variations in gene copy number. Blotting copy numbers vs. transcript levels produced patterns, which were specific for the individual strains and could be used for a characterization of unknown samples. PMID:18628902

  1. DNA nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2007-05-01

    We are learning to build synthetic molecular machinery from DNA. This research is inspired by biological systems in which individual molecules act, singly and in concert, as specialized machines: our ambition is to create new technologies to perform tasks that are currently beyond our reach. DNA nanomachines are made by self-assembly, using techniques that rely on the sequence-specific interactions that bind complementary oligonucleotides together in a double helix. They can be activated by interactions with specific signalling molecules or by changes in their environment. Devices that change state in response to an external trigger might be used for molecular sensing, intelligent drug delivery or programmable chemical synthesis. Biological molecular motors that carry cargoes within cells have inspired the construction of rudimentary DNA walkers that run along self-assembled tracks. It has even proved possible to create DNA motors that move autonomously, obtaining energy by catalysing the reaction of DNA or RNA fuels.

  2. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.

  3. Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and t...

  4. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  5. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  6. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    PubMed

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  7. DNA polymerases delta and epsilon are required for chromosomal replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Budd, M E; Campbell, J L

    1993-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases, alpha, delta, and epsilon are required for viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have investigated whether DNA polymerases epsilon and delta are required for DNA replication. Two temperature-sensitive mutations in the POL2 gene, encoding DNA polymerase epsilon, have been identified by using the plasmid shuffle technique. Alkaline sucrose gradient analysis of DNA synthesis products in the mutant strains shows that no chromosomal-size DNA is formed after shift of an asynchronous culture to the nonpermissive temperature. The only DNA synthesis observed is a reduced quantity of short DNA fragments. The DNA profiles of replication intermediates from these mutants are similar to those observed with DNA synthesized in mutants deficient in DNA polymerase alpha under the same conditions. The finding that DNA replication stops upon shift to the nonpermissive temperature in both DNA polymerase alpha- and DNA polymerase epsilon- deficient strains shows that both DNA polymerases are involved in elongation. By contrast, previous studies on pol3 mutants, deficient in DNA polymerase delta, suggested that there was considerable residual DNA synthesis at the nonpermissive temperature. We have reinvestigated the nature of DNA synthesis in pol3 mutants. We find that pol3 strains are defective in the synthesis of chromosomal-size DNA at the restrictive temperature after release from a hydroxyurea block. These results demonstrate that yeast DNA polymerase delta is also required at the replication fork. PMID:8417347

  8. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black-pigment-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Christopher A; Saunders, Lauren P; Schisler, David A; Leathers, Timothy D; Naeem, Naveed; Cohan, Frederick M; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2016-08-01

    Two isolates of a Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a dark pigment on tryptic soy agar. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that these strains were related most closely to Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum (99.7 % similarity) and Bacillus axarquiensis (99.7 %). In phenotypic characterization, the novel strains were found to grow between 17 and 50 °C and can tolerate up to 9 % (w/v) NaCl. Furthermore, the strains grew in media of pH 5.5-10 (optimal growth at pH 7.0-8.0). The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 (34.8 %) and iso-C15 : 0 (21.9 %). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. A draft genome of both strains was completed. The DNA G+C content was 43.8 mol%. A phylogenomic analysis on the core genome of these two new strains and all members of the Bacillus subtilis group revealed these two strains formed a distinct monophyletic clade with the nearest neighbour Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. DNA-DNA relatedness studies using in silico DNA-DNA hybridizations showed the two strains were conspecific (93.8 %), while values with all other species (<31.5 %) were well below the species threshold of 70 %. Based on the consensus of phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses, these strains are considered to represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain NRRL B-41091T (=CCUG 68786T). PMID:27150918

  9. Caffeine-enhanced survival of radiation-sensitive, repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-11-01

    A clone of V79 Chinese hamster cells (V79-AL162/S-10) with unique properties has been isolated after a challenge of parental cells (V79-AL162) with 1 mM ouabain. Compared with parental cells, or with other clones isolated after the ouabain challenge, these cells form smaller colonies, are more sensitive to both x rays and fission-spectrum neutrons, and respond atypically to a postirradiation treatment with caffeine. Their enhanced response to x rays results mainly from a large reduction in the shoulder of their survival curve, probably because in late S phase, the most resistant phase in the cell cycle, the survival curve of these cells has a reduced shoulder width. Caffeine, and to a lesser extent theophylline, added to the colony-forming medium immediately after exposure appreciably increases the width of the shoulder of these sensitive cells, whereas caffeine has the opposite effect on the response of normal V79 cells. Thus the unique response of the V79-AL162/S-10 cells to a radiation posttreatment with caffeine (increased survival) results from a net increase in their ability to repair damage that is otherwise lethal; caffeine treatment ordinarly prevents normal V79 cells from repairing damage that is only potentially lethal.

  10. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in nucleotide excision repair-deficient XPA knock out mice.

    PubMed

    van Steeg, H; Mullenders, L H; Vijg, J

    2000-05-30

    Mice with a defect in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) gene have a complete deficiency in nucleotide excision repair (NER). As such, these mice mimic the human XP phenotype in that they have a >1000-fold higher risk of developing UV-induced skin cancer. Besides being UV-sensitive, XPA(-/-) mice also develop internal tumors when they are exposed to chemical carcinogens. To investigate the effect of a total NER deficiency on the induction of gene mutations and tumor development, we crossed XPA(-/-) mice with transgenic lacZ/pUR288 mutation-indicator mice. The mice were treated with various agents and chemicals like UV-B, benzo[a]pyrene and 2-aceto-amino-fluorene. Gene mutation induction in several tumor target- and non-target tissues was determined in both the bacterial lacZ reporter gene and in the endogenous Hprt gene. Furthermore, alterations in the p53- and ras genes were determined in UV-induced skin tumors of XPA(-/-) mice. In this work, we review these results and discuss the applicability and reliability of enhanced gene mutant frequencies as early indicators of tumorigenesis. PMID:10838141

  11. Genomic Relatedness of Xanthomonas campestris Strains Causing Diseases of Citrus †

    PubMed Central

    Egel, D. S.; Graham, J. H.; Stall, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris strains that cause disease in citrus were compared by restriction endonuclease analysis of DNA fragments separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and by DNA reassociation. Strains of X. campestris pv. citrumelo, which cause citrus bacterial spot, were, on average, 88% related to each other by DNA reassociation, although these strains exhibited diverse restriction digest patterns. In contrast, strains of X. campestris pv. citri groups A and B, which cause canker A and canker B, respectively, had relatively homogeneous restriction digest patterns. The groups of strains causing these three different citrus diseases were examined by DNA reassociation and were found to be from 55 to 63% related to one another. Several pathovars of X. campestris, previously shown to cause weakly aggressive symptoms on citrus, ranged from 83 to 90% similar to X. campestris pv. citrumelo by DNA reassociation. The type strain of X. campestris pv. campestris ranged from 30 to 40% similar in DNA reassociation experiments to strains of X. campestris pv. citrumelo and X. campestris pv. citri groups A and B. Whereas DNA reassociation quantified the difference between relatively unrelated groups of bacterial strains, restriction endonuclease analysis distinguished between closely related strains. Images PMID:16348555

  12. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  13. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus–like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Results Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non–conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra–specific comparison are sharp markers of inter–specific evolution: indeed, many events of non–conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. Conclusions The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to

  14. Enhanced Deletion Formation by Aberrant DNA Replication in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Saveson, C. J.; Lovett, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated genes and sequences are prone to genetic rearrangements including deletions. We have investigated deletion formation in Escherichia coli strains mutant for various replication functions. Deletion was selected between 787 base pair tandem repeats carried either on a ColE1-derived plasmid or on the E. coli chromosome. Only mutations in functions associated with DNA Polymerase III elevated deletion rates in our assays. Especially large increases were observed in strains mutant in dnaQ, the ε editing subunit of Pol III, and dnaB, the replication fork helicase. Mutations in several other functions also altered deletion formation: the α polymerase (dnaE), the γ clamp loader complex (holC, dnaX), and the β clamp (dnaN) subunits of Pol III and the primosomal proteins, dnaC and priA. Aberrant replication stimulated deletions through several pathways. Whereas the elevation in dnaB strains was mostly recA- and lexA-dependent, that in dnaQ strains was mostly recA- and lexA-independent. Deletion product analysis suggested that slipped mispairing, producing monomeric replicon products, may be preferentially increased in a dnaQ mutant and sister-strand exchange, producing dimeric replicon products, may be elevated in dnaE mutants. We conclude that aberrant Polymerase III replication can stimulate deletion events through several mechanisms of deletion and via both recA-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:9177997

  15. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  16. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-08-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  17. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study.

  18. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study. PMID:27402481

  19. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  20. DNA Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Explains a method to enable students to understand DNA and protein synthesis using model-building and role-playing. Acquaints students with the triplet code and transcription. Includes copies of the charts used in this technique. (DDR)

  1. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  2. Genetic profiling of yeast industrial strains using in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Wnuk, Maciej; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Magda, Michal; Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Lewinska, Anna

    2015-09-20

    The genetic differences and changes in genomic stability may affect fermentation processes involving baker's, brewer's and wine yeast strains. Thus, it seems worthwhile to monitor the changes in genomic DNA copy number of industrial strains. In the present study, we developed an in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate the ploidy and genetic differences between selected industrial yeast strains. The CGH-based system was validated using the laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (haploid BY4741 and diploid BY4743). DNA isolated from BY4743 cells was considered a reference DNA. The ploidy and DNA gains and losses of baker's, brewer's and wine strains were revealed. Taken together, the in situ CGH was shown a helpful molecular tool to identify genomic differences between yeast industrial strains. Moreover, the in situ CGH-based system may be used at the single-cell level of analysis to supplement array-based techniques and high-throughput analyses at the population scale. PMID:26116136

  3. Fimbriation, capsulation, and iron-scavenging systems of Klebsiella strains associated with human urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Tarkkanen, A M; Allen, B L; Williams, P H; Kauppi, M; Haahtela, K; Siitonen, A; Orskov, I; Orskov, F; Clegg, S; Korhonen, T K

    1992-03-01

    Thirty-two strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae and seven strains of Klebsiella oxytoca isolated from urinary tract infections in elderly adults were analyzed for capsular antigens, iron-scavenging systems, and fimbriation. All strains were capsulated. Twenty-seven different K antigens were identified among the strains, with no particular antigen dominating. All strains produced the iron-scavenging system enterochelin as analyzed by bioassay and DNA hybridization. In contrast, the aerobactin iron-sequestering system was not detected in any of the strains. All strains caused hemagglutination of tannin-treated human erythrocytes and reacted with an anti-type 3 fimbriae antiserum as well as in DNA hybridization with a type 3 fimbria-specific probe, indicating that the Klebsiella strains possessed this fimbrial type. Possession of type 1 fimbriae was analyzed by agglutination tests and by hybridization with DNA probes from two distinct Klebsiella type 1 fimbria gene clusters. Phenotypic expression of the type 1 fimbriae was found in 29 of 32 K. pneumoniae strains, whereas 30 strains reacted with either of the two type 1 fimbrial cluster DNA probes. In K. oxytoca, however, only three of seven strains expressed type 1 fimbriae and reacted with the DNA probes. The type 3 fimbriae were found to bind to a fraction of epithelial cells exfoliated in normal human urine, whereas the type 1 fimbriae bound strongly to urinary slime. No inhibitors of type 3 fimbrial binding were detected in human urine.

  4. DNA Adductomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the 32P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC–MSn), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC–MSn instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology. PMID:24437709

  5. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  6. Revision of the taxonomic status of type strains of Mesorhizobium loti and reclassification of strain USDA 3471T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumerdmanii sp. nov. and ATCC 33669T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumjarvisii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Rivas, Raúl; Igual, José M; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Álvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-06-01

    The species Mesorhizobim loti was isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus and its type strain deposited in several collections. Some of these type strains, such as those deposited in the USDA and ATCC collections before 1990, are not coincident with the original strain, NZP 2213T, deposited in the NZP culture collection. The analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T formed independent branches from that occupied by Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T and related to those occupied by Mesorhizobium opportunistum WSM2075T and Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243T, respectively, with 99.9 % similarity in both cases. However, the analysis of concatenated recA, atpD and glnII genes with similarities lower than 96, 98 and 94 %, respectively, between strains USDA 3471T and M. opportunistum WSM2075T and between strains ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii IFO 15243T, indicated that the strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T represent different species of the genus Mesorhizobium. These results were confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic characterization. Therefore, the two strains were reclassified as representatives of the two species Mesorhizobium erdmanii sp. nov. (type strain USDA 3471T = CECT 8631T = LMG 17826t2T) and Mesorhizobium jarvisii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 33669T = CECT 8632T = LMG 28313T).

  7. Expression of mammalian O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in a cell line sensitive to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M E; Norbeck, L; Clyde, C; Hora, N K; Erickson, L C; Pegg, A E

    1989-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were co-transfected with pSV2neo and sheared DNA from either a human cell line (HT29) expressing high levels of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) or from a cell line (BE) deficient in this activity. Cells expressing the selectable marker were obtained by exposure to G418 and colonies resistant to alkylation damage isolated by growth in the presence of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). The number of colonies of cells expressing AGT activity arising after transfection with DNA from BE cells was similar to the number arising from cells exposed to HT29 DNA. Although the amount of AGT repair protein expressed in the transfectant colonies from this experiment was relatively low, these results indicate that repair of alkylation damage can be restored in AGT-deficient cells by transfection of human DNA from both repair-deficient and proficient cells. A separate transfection of CHOMG cells [a mutant of CHO cells resistant to the drug, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG)] with HT29 DNA and pSV2neo followed by selection of G418 and 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) resulted in three colonies with high AGT levels. These transfectants had different growth rates and expressed levels of the AGT protein between 230 and 300 fmol/mg protein. The transfectants were as resistant to the cytotoxic effects of BCNU, Clomesone, methylnitrosourea (MNU) and 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) as HT29 cells which were much more resistant than the parental CHOMG cells. Pretreatment of transfectant cells with 0.4 mM O6-methylguanine for 24 h reduced AGT activity to 14% basal levels, which upon removal of the base increased to approximately 74% basal level within 8 h. The sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of both the chloroethylating and methylating agents was enhanced by treatment with O6-methylguanine. In the same manner, the number of BCNU-induced DNA interstrand cross-links increased in transfectant

  8. Glucosyltransferase gene polymorphism among Streptococcus mutans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Chia, J S; Hsu, T Y; Teng, L J; Chen, J Y; Hahn, L J; Yang, C S

    1991-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases were detected among Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains by Southern blot analysis with DNA probes located within the gtfB gene (H. Aoki, T. Shiroza, M. Hayakawa, S. Sato, and H. K. Kuramitsu, Infect. Immun. 53:587-594, 1986). Restriction endonucleases were used to examine genomic DNAs isolated from serotype a to h strains. The variations were readily detected among 33 strains of serotype c by EcoRI and PstI restriction enzyme digestions. Serotypes e and f, which are genetically similar to serotype c, also had comparable polymorphism; however, serotypes a, b, d, g, and h did not hybridize to the same DNA probes in parallel experiments. Further analysis of enzymatic activities for glucan synthesis and sucrose-dependent adherence revealed no significant differences among the serotype c strains. Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms existing in S. mutans serotype c strains may reflect a complexity in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases, which are produced ubiquitously in members of the S. mutans group. Images PMID:1826894

  9. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA Segment in Wine Yeast Genomes by Extrachromosomal Circular DNA Formation

    PubMed Central

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations. PMID:21423766

  10. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  11. Inducible error-prone repair in Bacillus subtilis. Progress report, May 1, 1985-April 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Yasbin, R.E.

    1986-06-01

    DNA damage-inducible star operon fusions were generated in B. subtilis by transpositional mutagenesis. These fusion isolates produce increased beta-galactosidase when exposed to mitomycin C, uv radiation, or ethyl methanesulfonate, indicating that the lacZ structural gene had inserted into host transcriptional units that are induced by a variety of DNA damaging agents. One of the fusion strains was DNA-repair deficient and phenotypically resembled a uv-sensitive excision-repair deficient mutant of B. subtilis. Induction of beta-galactosidase also occurred in the competent subpopulation of each of the din fusion strains, independent of exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Both the DNA-damage-inducible and competence-inducible components of beta-galactosidase expression were abolished by the recE4 mutation, which inhibits SOS-like (SOB) induction but does not interfere with the development of the competent state. The results indicate that gene expression is stimulated at specific loci within the B. subtilis chromosome both by DNA-damaging agents and by the development of competence and this response is under the control of the SOB regulon. Furthermore, they demonstrated that at the molecular level SOB induction and the development of competence are interrelated cellular events.

  12. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  13. Existence of lysogenic bacteriophages in Bacillus thuringiensis type strains.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong Yul; Park, Jong Bin; Liu, Qin; Kim, Song Eun; Tao, Xueying; Choi, Tae Woong; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Woo Jin; Jin, Byung Rae; Je, Yeon Ho

    2013-07-01

    We screened the existence of bacteriophages in 67 Bacillus thuringiensis type strains by phage DNA extraction and PCR using phage terminase small subunit (TerS)-specific primers to the supernatants and the precipitated pellets of Bt cultures, and by transmission electron microscopy. The various bacteriophages were observed from the supernatants of 22 type strains. Ten type strains showed the extracted phage DNAs and the amplified fragment by TerS PCR but 12 type strains showed only the phage DNAs. Their morphological characteristic suggests that they belong to Family Siphoviridae which had a long tail and symmetrical head. PMID:23632013

  14. Ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2005-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets.

  15. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  16. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  17. DNA topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    The various problems of disentangling DNA strands or duplexes in a cell are all rooted in the double-helical structure of DNA. Three distinct subfamilies of enzymes, known as the DNA topoisomerases, have evolved to solve these problems. This review focuses on work in the past decade on the mechanisms and cellular functions of these enzymes. Newly discovered members and recent biochemical and structural results are reviewed, and mechanistic implications of these results are summarized. The primary cellular functions of these enzymes, including their roles in replication, transcription, chromosome condensation, and the maintenance of genome stability, are then discussed. The review ends with a summary of the regulation of the cellular levels of these enzymes and a discussion of their association with other cellular proteins.

  18. Cytotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects of energy-related agents in diploid human cells which differ in DNA repair capacity. Progress report, 1980-1983

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.; Maher, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanisms of action of a series of energy-related chemical carcinogens to bring about cell killing, the induction of mutations, and the transformation of diploid human fibroblasts in culture were examined. Some of these studies have employed direct-acting compounds (reactive derivatives or metabolites of parent compounds) such as (+-)-7..beta..,8..cap alpha..-dihydroxy9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene (anti BPDE), the 4,5-epoxide of benzo(a)pyrene(B(a)P 4,5-oxide), and aflatoxin B/sub 1/-dichloride (AFB/sub 1/-Cl/sub 2/). In other studies, human epithelial cell lines have served as source of the various metabolizing enzymes needed to convert parent compounds into reactive intermediates. We screened a series of 15 epithelial cell lines with unlimited lifespan (derived from various human carcinomas) for the ability to activate representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amides, nitrogen heterocyclics, nitro samines, and/or aflatoxins. Candidate metabolizing cells were then combined with diploid human fibroblasts as target cells in a cell-mediated assay of the mutagenic and/or cytotoxic effect of particular energy-related chemical carcinogens, such as B(a)P, benzofluoranthenes, and dibenzo(c,g)carbazole. The number and kind of major DNA adducts formed in human cells by these chemicals were determined. Comparative studies of anti BPDE and B(a)P 4,5-oxide showed that in diploid human fibroblasts, both normal and DNA repair deficient, these agents do not differ significantly in mutagenic efficiency (per mean lethal event) or mutagenic effectiveness (per DNA adduct). In diploid Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts anti BPDE had approx. 4-fold higher mutagenic efficiency than B(a)P 4,5-oxide in the latter cells. FA cells were significantly more sensitive than normal to killing by anti BPDE.

  19. Xenorhabdus luminescens (DNA hybridization group 5) from human clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, J J; Jorgensen, J H; Grimont, P A; Akhurst, R J; Poinar, G O; Ageron, E; Pierce, G V; Smith, J A; Carter, G P; Wilson, K L

    1989-01-01

    An unusual isolate from a human leg wound was identified as Xenorhabdus luminescens. This finding led to the discovery or isolation of four additional strains, two from blood and two from wounds. Three of the five strains were from patients in San Antonio, Tex. Three strains were studied by DNA-DNA hybridization (S1 nuclease-trichloroacetic acid method) and were 77 to 100% related to each other, 34% related to the type strain of X. luminescens, 35 to 40% related to three of Grimont's other DNA hybridization groups of X. luminescens, and 9% related to the type strain of Xenorhabdus nematophilus. The new group of five strains was designated X. luminescens DNA hybridization group 5. All five strains were very inactive biochemically and fermented only D-glucose and D-mannose. The key reactions for recognizing this new organism are yellow pigment production, negative test for nitrate reduction to nitrite, weak bioluminescence (10 to 15 min of dark adaptation is required to see the weak light produced), and a unique hemolytic reaction on sheep blood agar plates incubated at 25 degrees C. Two case histories of strains from wounds are given; these suggest that X. luminescens DNA hybridization group 5 may be a new bacterial agent that causes wound infections. The two cases of wound infection, along with the two blood isolates, suggest that the new organism is clinically significant. Images PMID:2768446

  20. Radiosensitization by PARP Inhibition in DNA Repair Proficient and Deficient Tumor Cells: Proliferative Recovery in Senescent Cells.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Moureq; Sharma, Khushboo; Saleh, Tareq; Povirk, Lawrence F; Hendrickson, Eric A; Gewirtz, David A

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy continues to be a primary modality in the treatment of cancer. In addition to promoting apoptosis, radiation-induced DNA damage can promote autophagy and senescence, both of which can theoretically function to prolong tumor survival. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that autophagy and/or senescence could be permissive for DNA repair, thereby facilitating tumor cell recovery from radiation-induced growth arrest and/or cell death. In addition, studies were designed to elucidate the involvement of autophagy and senescence in radiosensitization by PARP inhibitors and the re-emergence of a proliferating tumor cell population. In the context of this work, the relationship between radiation-induced autophagy and senescence was also determined. Studies were performed using DNA repair-proficient HCT116 colon carcinoma cells and a repair-deficient ligase IV(-/-) isogenic cell line. Exposure to radiation promoted a parallel induction of autophagy and senescence that was strongly correlated with the extent of persistent H2AX phosphorylation in both cell lines, however, inhibition of autophagy failed to suppress senescence, indicating that the two responses were dissociable. Exposure to radiation resulted in a transient arrest in the HCT116 cells while arrest was prolonged in the ligase IV(-/-) cells, however, both cell lines ultimately recovered proliferative function, which may reflect maintenance of DNA repair capacity. The PARP inhibitors, olaparib and niraparib, increased the extent of persistent DNA damage induced by radiation exposure as well as the extent of both autophagy and senescence. Neither cell line underwent significant apoptosis by radiation exposure alone or in the presence of the PARP inhibitors. Inhibition of autophagy failed to attenuate radiosensitization, indicating that autophagy was not involved in the action of the PARP inhibitors. As with radiation alone, despite sensitization by PARP inhibition, proliferative recovery was evident

  1. Different distribution patterns of ten virulence genes in Legionella reference strains and strains isolated from environmental water and patients.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Virulence genes are distinct regions of DNA which are present in the genome of pathogenic bacteria and absent in nonpathogenic strains of the same or related species. Virulence genes are frequently associated with bacterial pathogenicity in genus Legionella. In the present study, an assay was performed to detect ten virulence genes, including iraA, iraB, lvrA, lvrB, lvhD, cpxR, cpxA, dotA, icmC and icmD in different pathogenicity islands of 47 Legionella reference strains, 235 environmental strains isolated from water, and 4 clinical strains isolated from the lung tissue of pneumonia patients. The distribution frequencies of these genes in reference or/and environmental L. pneumophila strains were much higher than those in reference non-L. pneumophila or/and environmental non-L. pneumophila strains, respectively. L. pneumophila clinical strains also maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to four other types of Legionella strains. Distribution frequencies of these genes in reference L. pneumophila strains were similar to those in environmental L. pneumophila strains. In contrast, environmental non-L. pneumophila maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to those found in reference non-L. pneumophila strains. This study illustrates the association of virulence genes with Legionella pathogenicity and reveals the possible virulence evolution of non-L. pneumophia strains isolated from environmental water.

  2. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Riggsby, W S; Torres-Bauza, L J; Wills, J W; Townes, T M

    1982-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. We used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; we obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. We concluded that these strains are diploid. PMID:6765567

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Vagococcus fluvialis, including strains isolated from human sources.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, L M; Carvalho, M G; Merquior, V L; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Facklam, R R

    1997-01-01

    This study presents phenotypic and genotypic data for seven isolates of Vagococcus fluvialis, including four strains recovered from human clinical sources, one strain isolated from an environmental source, and two strains isolated from pigs. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, most isolates were initially classified as "unidentified enterococci," because they resembled atypical arginine-negative enterococcal species. All seven strains as well as the type strain of V. fluvialis reacted with the AccuProbe Enterococcus genetic probe. The seven isolates had virtually indistinguishable whole-cell protein profiles that were similar to that of the V. fluvialis type strain and distinct from those of Enterococcus and Lactococcus species. DNA-DNA reassociation experiments confirmed that the strains were V. fluvialis. They were 71% or more related to the V. fluvialis type strain under optimum and stringent conditions, with 2.5% or less divergence within related sequences. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin and were resistant to clindamycin, lomefloxacin, and ofloxacin. Strain-to-strain variation was observed in relation to susceptibilities to 18 other antimicrobial agents. Chromosomal DNA was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digestion with SmaI. Distinctive PFGE patterns were generated, suggesting the nonclonal nature of V. fluvialis strains. Although the number of strains was small, this report provides molecular characterization of V. fluvialis and the first evidence of a possible connection of this species with human infections. PMID:9350732

  4. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  5. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  6. Strain typing of acetic acid bacteria responsible for vinegar production by the submerged elaboration method.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Rocío; Torres, Carmen; Sanz, Susana; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2010-12-01

    Strain typing of 103 acetic acid bacteria isolates from vinegars elaborated by the submerged method from ciders, wines and spirit ethanol, was carried on in this study. Two different molecular methods were utilised: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of total DNA digests with a number of restriction enzymes, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. The comparative study of both methods showed that restriction fragment PFGE of SpeI digests of total DNA was a suitable method for strain typing and for determining which strains were present in vinegar fermentations. Results showed that strains of the species Gluconacetobacter europaeus were the most frequent leader strains of fermentations by the submerged method in the studied vinegars, and among them strain R1 was the predominant one. Results showed as well that mixed populations (at least two different strains) occurred in vinegars from cider and wine, whereas unique strains were found in spirit vinegars, which offered the most stressing conditions for bacterial growth.

  7. Genetic analyses of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains reveal distinct phylogenetic groups.

    PubMed

    Donahoo, R S; Jones, J B; Lacy, G H; Stromberg, V K; Norman, D J

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 175 Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains isolated from 10 Araceae hosts was done to identify pathogen variation. The strains were subjected to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction and four major phylogenetic clusters were generated. A subset of 40 strains isolated from Anthurium, Dieffenbachia, and Syngonium was further defined by amplified fragment length polymorphism and fatty acid methyl ester analysis and the same four phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of representative strains in the first three clusters using DNA-DNA hybridization and multilocus sequence analysis supports the previous reclassification of strains in cluster I, including the X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae pathovar reference strain (LMG695), to X. citri. Our research findings indicate that strains in cluster I, isolated primarily from anthurium, probably represent an undescribed pathovar. Other phylogenetic subclusters consisting primarily of strains isolated from xanthosoma and philodendron in clusters III and IV, respectively, may yet represent other undescribed species or pathovars of Xanthomonas. PMID:23134337

  8. A closer look at prion strains

    PubMed Central

    Solforosi, Laura; Milani, Michela; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins that are responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and consist primarily of scrapie prion protein (PrPSc), a pathogenic isoform of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC). The absence of nucleic acids as essential components of the infectious prions is the most striking feature associated to these diseases. Additionally, different prion strains have been isolated from animal diseases despite the lack of DNA or RNA molecules. Mounting evidence suggests that prion-strain-specific features segregate with different PrPSc conformational and aggregation states. Strains are of practical relevance in prion diseases as they can drastically differ in many aspects, such as incubation period, PrPSc biochemical profile (e.g., electrophoretic mobility and glycoform ratio) and distribution of brain lesions. Importantly, such different features are maintained after inoculation of a prion strain into genetically identical hosts and are relatively stable across serial passages. This review focuses on the characterization of prion strains and on the wide range of important implications that the study of prion strains involves. PMID:23357828

  9. A Mechanism for the Inhibition of DNA-PK-Mediated DNA Sensing by a Virus

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nicholas E.; Ferguson, Brian J.; Mazzon, Michela; Fahy, Aodhnait S.; Krysztofinska, Ewelina; Arribas-Bosacoma, Raquel; Pearl, Laurence H.; Ren, Hongwei; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system is critical in the response to infection by pathogens and it is activated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) binding to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). During viral infection, the direct recognition of the viral nucleic acids, such as the genomes of DNA viruses, is very important for activation of innate immunity. Recently, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a heterotrimeric complex consisting of the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs was identified as a cytoplasmic PRR for DNA that is important for the innate immune response to intracellular DNA and DNA virus infection. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV) has evolved to inhibit this function of DNA-PK by expression of a highly conserved protein called C16, which was known to contribute to virulence but by an unknown mechanism. Data presented show that C16 binds directly to the Ku heterodimer and thereby inhibits the innate immune response to DNA in fibroblasts, characterised by the decreased production of cytokines and chemokines. Mechanistically, C16 acts by blocking DNA-PK binding to DNA, which correlates with reduced DNA-PK-dependent DNA sensing. The C-terminal region of C16 is sufficient for binding Ku and this activity is conserved in the variola virus (VARV) orthologue of C16. In contrast, deletion of 5 amino acids in this domain is enough to knockout this function from the attenuated vaccine strain modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). In vivo a VACV mutant lacking C16 induced higher levels of cytokines and chemokines early after infection compared to control viruses, confirming the role of this virulence factor in attenuating the innate immune response. Overall this study describes the inhibition of DNA-PK-dependent DNA sensing by a poxvirus protein, adding to the evidence that DNA-PK is a critical component of innate immunity to DNA viruses. PMID:24098118

  10. Genome sequence of Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present the whole genome sequence and annotation of the Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia. This strain was isolated from an aborting goat in 1991 in Windhoek, Namibia. The plasmid type QpRS was confirmed in our work. Further genomic typing placed the strain into a unique genomic group. The genome sequence is 2,101,438 bp long and contains 1,979 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including one rRNA operon. To overcome the poor yield from cell culture systems, an additional DNA enrichment with whole genome amplification (WGA) methods was applied. We describe a bioinformatics pipeline for improved genome assembly including several filters with a special focus on WGA characteristics. PMID:25593636

  11. Genomic diversity of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus strains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Peng; Cheng, Ruo-Lin; Xi, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2013-07-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a baculovirus that selectively infects the domestic silkworm. In this study, six BmNPV strains were compared at the whole genome level. We found that the number of bro genes and the composition of the homologous regions (hrs) are the two primary areas of divergence within these genomes. When we compared the ORFs of these BmNPV variants, we noticed a high degree of sequence divergence in the ORFs that are not baculovirus core genes. This result is consistent with the results derived from phylogenetic trees and evolutionary pressure analyses of these ORFs, indicating that ORFs that are not core genes likely play important roles in the evolution of BmNPV strains. The evolutionary relationships of these BmNPV strains might be explained by their geographic origins or those of their hosts. In addition, the total number of hr palindromes seems to affect viral DNA replication in Bm5 cells. PMID:23639478

  12. Ultrafast spectroscopy of UV-induced DNA-lesions — on the search for strategies which keep DNA alive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinth, W.; Fingerhut, B. P.; Herzog, T. T.; Ryseck, G. R.; Haiser, K.; Graupner, F. F.; Heil, K.; Gilch, P.; Schreier, W. J.; Carell, T.; de Vivie-Riedle, R.

    2013-03-01

    UV-induced photolesions are studied in the visible and IR. While structural distortions of the DNA-backbone at the moment of light absorption are prerequisite for CPD-formation, strain from the backbone guides Dewar-formation.

  13. Molecular Identification of Two Strains of Phellinus sp. by Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two species of cultivated Phellinus sp. were identified as P. baumii by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. The fruit bodies of the examined strains were similar to those of naturally occurring strains, having a bracket-like form, yellow-to-orange color, and poroid hymenial surfaces. The DNA sequences of ITS region of both strains showed a homology of 99% with ITS1 to ITS2 sequences of P. (Inonotus) baumii strain PB0806. PMID:22783119

  14. Biological and molecular characterisation of potential biocontrol strains of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Turóczi, G; Fekete, C; Kerényi, Z; Nagy, R; Pomázi, A; Hornok, L

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-four strains of seven species of Trichoderma isolated from various fungal sources were compared for direct mycoparasitic activity (MPA), chitinase production and antibiotic activity (ANA) in order to choose the most appropriate partners for a strain-breeding programme. Within species genetic differences were also assesses in T. hamatum, T. harzianum and T. viride by means of random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Endochitinase activities of the Trichoderma strains ranged between 20.4 and 1264.5 units/g dry weight of mycelium. The correlation between MPA and chitinase activity was not unambiguous and no correlation existed between MPA and ANA. The RAPD patterns of T. viride strains were highly variable, while isolates of T. harzianum proved to be more uniform; T. hamatum revealed remarkable intraspecific divergence. All these three comprised certain pairs of strains that are promising participants of a strain-improving programme, since their strong genetic affinities offer good changes for combining their contrasted biocontrol traits.

  15. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weeda, G; Eveno, E; Donker, I; Vermeulen, W; Chevallier-Lagente, O; Taïeb, A; Stary, A; Hoeijmakers, J H; Mezzina, M; Sarasin, A

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in approximately 50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. Besides XPD and TTDA, the XPB gene product is also part of TFIIH. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TTD have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and man. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly

  16. Can strain magnetize light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Strain in photonic structures can induce pseudomagnetic fields and Landau levels. Nature Photonics spoke to Mordechai Segev, Mikael Rechtsman, Alexander Szameit and Julia Zeuner about their unique approach.

  17. Salt-Dependent DNA-DNA Spacings in Intact Bacteriophage lambda Reflect Relative Importance of DNA Self-Repulsion and Bending Energies

    SciTech Connect

    X Qiu; D Rau; V Parsegian; L Fang; C Knobler; W Gelbart

    2011-12-31

    Using solution synchrotron x-ray scattering, we measure the variation of DNA-DNA d spacings in bacteriophage {lambda} with mono-, di-, and polyvalent salt concentrations, for wild-type [48.5 x 10{sup 3} base pairs (bp)] and short-genome-mutant (37.8 kbp) strains. From the decrease in d spacings with increasing salt, we deduce the relative contributions of DNA self-repulsion and bending to the energetics of packaged phage genomes. We quantify the DNA-DNA interaction energies within the intact phage by combining the measured d spacings in the capsid with measurements of osmotic pressure in DNA assemblies under the same salt conditions in bulk solution. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, the DNA-DNA interaction energies inside the phage capsids are shown to be about 1 kT/bp, an order of magnitude larger than the bending energies.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Biodegradation of Tetralin by a Sphingomonas Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, María José; Reineke, Walter; Santero, Eduardo

    1999-01-01

    A strain designated TFA which very efficiently utilizes tetralin has been isolated from the Rhine river. The strain has been identified as Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus, based on 16S rDNA sequence similarity. Genetic analysis of tetralin biodegradation has been performed by insertion mutagenesis and by physical analysis and analysis of complementation between the mutants. The genes involved in tetralin utilization are clustered in a region of 9 kb, comprising at least five genes grouped in two divergently transcribed operons. PMID:10103288

  19. A new type of DNA "light-switch": a dual photochemical sensor and metalating agent for duplex and G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Erin; Howerton, Brock S; Hall, Emily C; Parkin, Sean; Glazer, Edith C

    2014-01-11

    Ru(bpy)2dppz, a well studied "light-switch" metal complex, transforms into a photochemical "light-switch" and DNA damaging agent by incorporating structural strain. This distorted compound is photoreactive and ejects a ligand upon binding duplex and G-quadruplex DNA, producing a reactive metal center that metalates the DNA.

  20. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  1. Macronuclear DNA molecules of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, R K; Brunk, C F

    1986-01-01

    The physical organization of the DNA in the macronuclei of Tetrahymena thermophila was investigated by using alternating-orthogonal-field gel electrophoresis. The genome consisted of a spectrum of molecules with lengths ranging from less than 100 to in excess of 1,500 kilobase pairs. There were about 270 different macronuclear DNA molecules, with an average size of about 800 kilobase pairs. Specific genes were mapped and were generally found on macronuclear DNA molecules of the same size in different strains of T. thermophila. This indicates that the molecular mechanisms giving rise to the macronuclear DNA molecules were precise. The fragmentation process that gave rise to macronuclear DNA molecules occurred between 11 and 19 h after the initiation of conjugation. Images PMID:3773895

  2. Clonal relationship among Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated in Somalia.

    PubMed

    Scrascia, Maria; Pugliese, Nicola; Maimone, Francesco; Mohamud, Kadigia A; Grimont, Patrick A D; Materu, Sadiki F; Pazzani, Carlo

    2009-03-01

    One hundred and three Vibrio cholerae O1 strains, selected to represent the cholera outbreaks which occurred in Somalia in 1998-1999, were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns, ribotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility. All strains showed a unique amplified DNA pattern and 2 closely related ribotypes (B5a and B8a), among which B5a was the more frequently identified. Ninety-one strains were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim, conferred, except for spectinomycin, by a conjugative plasmid IncC. These findings indicated that the group of strains active in Somalia in the late 1990s had a clonal origin.

  3. The involvement of cell cycle checkpoint-mutations in the mutagenesis induced in Drosophila by a longer wavelength light band of solar UV.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Megumi; Takinami, Syogo; Hieda, Kotaro; Fursawa, Yoshiya; Negishi, Tomoe

    2002-03-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is considered to be injurious rather than necessary for most organisms living on the earth. It is reported that the risk of skin cancer in humans increases by the depletion of the ozone layer. We have examined the genotoxicity of solar ultraviolet, especially the longer wavelength light, using Drosophila. Recently, we have demonstrated that light of wavelength up to 340 nm is mutagenic on Drosophila larvae. Using an excision repair-deficient Drosophila strain (mus201), we have obtained results suggesting that the lesion caused in larvae by the 320 nm-light irradiation may be similar to the damage induced by irradiation at 310 nm, and that light of 330 and 340 nm may induce damage different from that induced by 310 and 320 nm-light. To examine the difference in DNA damage induced by light of a particular wavelength, we performed monochromatic irradiation on larvae of two Drosophila strains; one excision repair-deficient (mei-9) and another postreplication repair-deficient (mei-41). 310 and 320 nm-light was more mutagenic in the mei-9 strain than in mei-41, whereas 330 and 340 nm-light was more mutagenic in mei-41 than in mei-9. It is demonstrated that the mei-41 gene is a homologue of the human atm gene which is responsible for a cell cycle checkpoint. This result suggests that 310-320 nm-light induces DNA damage that is subject to nucleotide excision repair (NER) and that 330-360 nm-light causes damage to be recognized by the cell cycle checkpoint but it is not repairable by NER.

  4. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 contains N6-methyladenine in its genome

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Bhaskar Jyoti; Sabnis, Ketaki; Deobagkar, Deepti D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.; E-mail: dndeo@unipune.ernet.in

    2005-09-23

    Methylation of DNA is known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in bacteria. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 on exposure to high radiation undergoes significant DNA damage, which is repaired without mutations. However, the presence of modified nucleotides has not been reported in its genome. We report here the detection of N6-methyladenine in the genome of D. radiodurans strain R1 using immunochemical techniques. This N6-methyladenine is not a part of GATC restriction-modification system. D. radiodurans cell extract also exhibited a DNA adenine methyltransferase activity which was reduced in the early post-irradiation recovery phase.

  5. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-11-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. PMID:2513480

  6. Detection of maltose fermentation genes in the baking yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Tonomura, K

    1996-10-01

    The presence of any one of the five unlinked MAL loci (MAL1, MAL2, MAL3, MAL4 and MAL6) confers the ability to ferment maltose on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each locus is composed of three genes encoding maltose permease, alpha-glucosidase and MAL activator. Chromosomal DNA of seven representative baking strains has been separated by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and probed with three genes in MAL6 locus. The DNA bands to which all of the three MAL-derived probes simultaneously hybridized were chromosome VII carrying MAL1 in all of the strains tested, chromosome XI carrying MAL4 in six strains, chromosome III carrying MAL2 in three strains and chromosomes II and VIII carrying MAL3 and MAL6, respectively, in the one strain. The number of MAL loci in baking strains was comparable to those of brewing strains.

  7. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  8. DNA curvature and flexibility in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Justin P.; Maher, L. James

    2014-01-01

    It has been more than 50 years since the elucidation of the structure of double-helical DNA. Despite active research and progress in DNA biology and biochemistry, much remains to be learned in the field of DNA biophysics. Predicting the sequence-dependent curvature and flexibility of DNA is difficult. Applicability of the conventional worm-like chain polymer model of DNA has been challenged. The fundamental forces responsible for the remarkable resistance of DNA to bending and twisting remain controversial. The apparent “softening” of DNA measured in vivo in the presence of kinking proteins and superhelical strain is incompletely understood. New methods and insights are being applied to these problems. This review places current work on DNA biophysics in historical context and illustrates the ongoing interplay between theory and experiment in this exciting field. PMID:20478077

  9. Magnetic torque tweezers: measuring torsional stiffness in DNA and RecA-DNA filaments.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Jager, Tessa; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-12-01

    We introduce magnetic torque tweezers, which enable direct single-molecule measurements of torque. Our measurements of the effective torsional stiffness C of dsDNA indicated a substantial force dependence, with C = approximately 40 nm at low forces up to C = approximately 100 nm at high forces. The initial torsional stiffness of RecA filaments was nearly twofold larger than that for dsDNA, yet at moderate torques further build-up of torsional strain was prevented. PMID:20953173

  10. DNA characterization of the spirochete that causes Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, G P; Steigerwalt, A G; Johnson, S E; Barbour, A G; Steere, A C; Robinson, I M; Brenner, D J

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease long recognized in Europe but only recently recognized in the United States, was shown in 1982-1983 to be caused by a spirochete, the Lyme disease spirochete. Whether one or more species of the spirochete exists is unknown, as is its taxonomic status. To answer these questions, we determined (i) the DNA base (guanidine-plus-cytosine) content for five strains; (ii) the DNA relatedness of 10 strains from Europe or the United States (isolated from ticks, humans, and a mouse) by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite assay at 50 and 65 degrees C); and (iii) the DNA relatedness to other pathogenic spirochetes. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of the Lyme disease spirochete strains was 27.5 to 29.0 mol%, most similar to those of Borrelia hermsii (30.6 mol%) and Treponema hyodysenteriae (25.6 mol%) among the other spirochetes tested. DNA hybridization studies with 32P-labeled DNA from Lyme disease spirochete strain TLO-005, a human blood isolate, revealed divergence (unpaired bases) within related nucleotide sequences of only 0.0 to 1.0% for all nine Lyme disease spirochete strains tested for relatedness to TLO-005. Relatedness values of seven strains to TLO-005 were 58 to 98% (mean, 71%) in 50 degrees C reactions and 50 to 93% (mean, 69%) in 65 degrees C reactions. Two other strains, from which very low yields of DNA were obtained, showed less relatedness (36 to 50 degrees C, 38 to 47% at 65 degrees C). These were nonetheless considered to belong to the same species because of the low amount of divergence in the sequences related to TLO-005 and the absence of decreased relatedness in reactions done at 65 degrees Celsius compared with those done at 50 degrees Celsius. DNA from strain TLO-005 showed relatedness of 1% to DNAs of two leptospires and 16% relatedness to DNA from T. hyodysenteriae. B. hermsii DNA was 30 to 40% related to three Lyme disease spirochete strains in 50 degrees Celsius reactions. Divergence in these reactions was 16

  11. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be