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Sample records for dna repair-deficient strains

  1. COMPARISON OF UV INACTIVATION OF SPORES OF THREE ENCEPHALITOZOON SPECIES WITH THAT OF SPORES OF TWO DNA REPAIR-DEFICIENT BACILLUS SUBTILIS BIODOSIMETRY STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of three Encephalitozoon spp. to ultraviolet (UV) inactivation was determined. Encephalitozoon intestinalis is a contaminant listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Also, use of DNA repair deficient strains of Bacillus subtilis were evaluat...

  2. Characterization of DNA repair deficient strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii generated by insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Plecenikova, Andrea; Slaninova, Miroslava; Riha, Karel

    2014-01-01

    While the mechanisms governing DNA damage response and repair are fundamentally conserved, cross-kingdom comparisons indicate that they differ in many aspects due to differences in life-styles and developmental strategies. In photosynthetic organisms these differences have not been fully explored because gene-discovery approaches are mainly based on homology searches with known DDR/DNA repair proteins. Here we performed a forward genetic screen in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to identify genes deficient in DDR/DNA repair. We isolated five insertional mutants that were sensitive to various genotoxic insults and two of them exhibited altered efficiency of transgene integration. To identify genomic regions disrupted in these mutants, we established a novel adaptor-ligation strategy for the efficient recovery of the insertion flanking sites. Four mutants harbored deletions that involved known DNA repair factors, DNA Pol zeta, DNA Pol theta, SAE2/COM1, and two neighbouring genes encoding ERCC1 and RAD17. Deletion in the last mutant spanned two Chlamydomonas-specific genes with unknown function, demonstrating the utility of this approach for discovering novel factors involved in genome maintenance.

  3. Measurement of DNA repair deficiency in workers exposed to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.M.; Au, W.W.; El Zein, R.; Grossman, L.

    1996-05-01

    We hypothesize that chronic exposure to environmental toxicants can induce genetic damage causing DNA repair deficiencies and leading to the postulated mutator phenotype of carcinogenesis. To test our hypothesis, a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was used in which pCMVcat plasmids were damaged with UV light (175, 350 J/m{sup 2} UV light), inactivating the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and then transfected into lymphocytes. Transfected lymphocytes were therefore challenged to repair the damaged plasmids, reactivating the reporter gene. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Gaucher cell lines were used as positive and negative controls for the HCR assay. The Gaucher cell line repaired normally but XP cell lines demonstrated lower repair activity. Additionally, the repair activity of the XP heterozygous cell line showed intermediate repair compared to the homozygous XP and Gaucher cells. We used HCR to measure the effects of benzene exposure on 12 exposed and 8 nonexposed workers from a local benzene plant. Plasmids 175 J/m{sup 2} and 350 J/m{sup 2} were repaired with a mean frequency of 66% and 58%, respectively, in control workers compared to 71% and 62% in exposed workers. Conversely, more of the exposed workers were grouped into the reduced repair category than controls. These differences in repair capacity between exposed and control workers were, however, not statistically significant. The lack of significant differences between the exposed and control groups may be due to extremely low exposure to benzene (<0.3 ppm), small population size, or a lack of benzene genotoxicity at these concentrations. These results are consistent with a parallel hprt gene mutation assay. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA damage which is expressed as differential...

  5. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA damage which is expressed as differential...

  6. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA damage which is expressed as differential...

  7. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  8. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. ); Libertin, C.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  9. BRCA Mutations, DNA Repair Deficiency, and Ovarian Aging.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Kutluk; Turan, Volkan; Titus, Shiny; Stobezki, Robert; Liu, Lin

    2015-09-01

    Oocyte aging has a significant impact on reproductive outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the age-related decline in reproductive success have not been fully addressed. BRCA is known to be involved in homologous DNA recombination and plays an essential role in double-strand DNA break repair. Given the growing body of laboratory and clinical evidence, we performed a systematic review on the current understanding of the role of DNA repair in human reproduction. We find that BRCA mutations negatively affect ovarian reserve based on convincing evidence from in vitro and in vivo results and prospective studies. Because decline in the function of the intact gene occurs at an earlier age, women with BRCA1 mutations exhibit accelerated ovarian aging, unlike those with BRCA2 mutations. However, because of the still robust function of the intact allele in younger women and because of the masking of most severe cases by prophylactic oophorectomy or cancer, it is less likely one would see an effect of BRCA mutations on fertility until later in reproductive age. The impact of BRCA2 mutations on reproductive function may be less visible because of the delayed decline in the function of normal BRCA2 allele. BRCA1 function and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA repair may also be important in the pathogenesis of age-induced increase in aneuploidy. BRCA1 is required for meiotic spindle assembly, and cohesion function between sister chromatids is also regulated by ATM family member proteins. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian aging.

  10. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  11. Diet restriction delays accelerated aging and genomic stress in DNA repair deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, W.P.; Dollé, M.E.T.; Reiling, E.; Jaarsma, D.; Payan-Gomez, C.; Bombardieri, C.R.; Wu, H.; Roks, A.J.M.; Botter, S.M.; van der Eerden, B.C.; Youssef, S.A.; Kuiper, R.V.; Nagarajah, B.; van Oostrom, C.T.; Brandt, R.M.C.; Barnhoorn, S.; Imholz, S.; Pennings, J.L.A.; de Bruin, A.; Gyenis, Á.; Pothof, J.; Vijg, J.; van Steeg, H.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair-deficient Ercc1Δ/− mice show numerous accelerated aging features limiting lifespan to 4–6 month1–4. Simultaneously they exhibit a ‘survival response’, which suppresses growth and enhances maintenance, resembling the anti-aging response induced by dietary restriction (DR)1,5. Here we report that subjecting these progeroid, dwarf mutants to 30% DR tripled median and maximal remaining lifespan, and drastically retarded numerous aspects of accelerated aging, e.g. DR animals retained 50% more neurons and maintained full motoric function, even far beyond the lifespan of ad libitum (AL) animals. Repair-deficient, progeroid Xpg−/− mice, a Cockayne syndrome model6, responded similarly, extending this observation to other repair mutants. The DR response in Ercc1Δ/− mice closely resembled DR in wild type animals. Interestingly, AL Ercc1Δ/− liver showed preferential extinction of expression of long genes, a phenomenon we also observe in several normal aging tissues. This is consistent with accumulation of stochastic, transcription-blocking lesions, affecting long genes more than short ones. DR largely prevented declining transcriptional output and reduced γH2AX DNA damage foci, indicating that DR preserves genome function by alleviating DNA damage. Our findings establish Ercc1Δ/− mice as powerful model for interventions sustaining health, reveal untapped potential for reducing endogenous damage, provide new venues for understanding the molecular mechanism of DR, and suggest a counterintuitive DR-like therapy for human progeroid genome instability syndromes and possibly neurodegeneration in general. PMID:27556946

  12. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R

    2011-08-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the US Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in seven isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis.

  13. Restricted diet delays accelerated ageing and genomic stress in DNA-repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, W P; Dollé, M E T; Reiling, E; Jaarsma, D; Payan-Gomez, C; Bombardieri, C R; Wu, H; Roks, A J M; Botter, S M; van der Eerden, B C; Youssef, S A; Kuiper, R V; Nagarajah, B; van Oostrom, C T; Brandt, R M C; Barnhoorn, S; Imholz, S; Pennings, J L A; de Bruin, A; Gyenis, Á; Pothof, J; Vijg, J; van Steeg, H; Hoeijmakers, J H J

    2016-09-15

    Mice deficient in the DNA excision-repair gene Ercc1 (Ercc1(∆/-)) show numerous accelerated ageing features that limit their lifespan to 4-6 months. They also exhibit a 'survival response', which suppresses growth and enhances cellular maintenance. Such a response resembles the anti-ageing response induced by dietary restriction (also known as caloric restriction). Here we report that a dietary restriction of 30% tripled the median and maximal remaining lifespans of these progeroid mice, strongly retarding numerous aspects of accelerated ageing. Mice undergoing dietary restriction retained 50% more neurons and maintained full motor function far beyond the lifespan of mice fed ad libitum. Other DNA-repair-deficient, progeroid Xpg(-/-) (also known as Ercc5(-/-)) mice, a model of Cockayne syndrome, responded similarly. The dietary restriction response in Ercc1(∆/-) mice closely resembled the effects of dietary restriction in wild-type animals. Notably, liver tissue from Ercc1(∆/-) mice fed ad libitum showed preferential extinction of the expression of long genes, a phenomenon we also observed in several tissues ageing normally. This is consistent with the accumulation of stochastic, transcription-blocking lesions that affect long genes more than short ones. Dietary restriction largely prevented this declining transcriptional output and reduced the number of γH2AX DNA damage foci, indicating that dietary restriction preserves genome function by alleviating DNA damage. Our findings establish the Ercc1(∆/-) mouse as a powerful model organism for health-sustaining interventions, reveal potential for reducing endogenous DNA damage, facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of dietary restriction and suggest a role for counterintuitive dietary-restriction-like therapy for human progeroid genome instability syndromes and possibly neurodegeneration in general.

  14. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Raj, Divya D A; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M; de Waard, Monique C; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L; Laman, Jon D; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P H; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of microglia is enhanced sensitivity to inflammatory stimuli, referred to as priming. It is unclear if priming is due to intrinsic microglia ageing or induced by the ageing neural environment. We have studied this in Ercc1 mutant mice, a DNA repair-deficient mouse model that displays features of accelerated aging in multiple tissues including the CNS. In Ercc1 mutant mice, microglia showed hallmark features of priming such as an exaggerated response to peripheral lipopolysaccharide exposure in terms of cytokine expression and phagocytosis. Specific targeting of the Ercc1 deletion to forebrain neurons resulted in a progressive priming response in microglia exemplified by phenotypic alterations. Summarizing, these data show that neuronal genotoxic stress is sufficient to switch microglia from a resting to a primed state.

  15. Age-related dystrophic changes in corneal endothelium from DNA repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Roh, Danny S; Du, Yiqin; Gabriele, Michelle L; Robinson, Andria R; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Funderburgh, James L

    2013-12-01

    The corneal endothelium (CE) is a single layer of cells lining the posterior face of the cornea providing metabolic functions essential for maintenance of corneal transparency. Adult CE cells lack regenerative potential, and the number of CE cells decreases throughout life. To determine whether endogenous DNA damage contributes to the age-related spontaneous loss of CE, we characterized CE in Ercc1(-/Δ) mice, which have impaired capacity to repair DNA damage and age prematurely. Eyes from 4.5- to 6-month-old Ercc1(-/Δ) mice, age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates, and old WT mice (24- to 34-month-old) were compared by spectral domain optical coherence tomography and corneal confocal microscopy. Histopathological changes in CE were further identified in paraffin tissue sections, whole-mount immunostaining, and scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The CE of old WT mice displayed polymorphism and polymegathism, polyploidy, decreased cell density, increased cell size, increases in Descemet's thickness, and the presence of posterior projections originating from the CE toward the anterior chamber, similar to changes documented for aging human corneas. Similar changes were observed in young adult Ercc1(-/Δ) mice CE, demonstrating spontaneous premature aging of the CE of these DNA repair-deficient mice. CD45(+) immune cells were associated with the posterior surface of CE from Ercc1(-/Δ) mice and the tissue expressed increased IL-1α, Cxcl2, and TNFα, pro-inflammatory proteins associated with senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These data provide strong experimental evidence that DNA damage can promote aging of the CE and that Ercc1(-/Δ) mice offer a rapid and accurate model to study CE pathogenesis and therapy.

  16. Identification of genotoxic compounds using isogenic DNA repair deficient DT40 cell lines on a quantitative high throughput screening platform

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Kana; Huang, Ruili; Zhao, Jinghua; Shahane, Sampada A.; Witt, Kristine L.; Smith-Roe, Stephanie L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Takeda, Shunichi; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair pathways play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by repairing DNA damage induced by endogenous processes and xenobiotics, including environmental chemicals. Induction of DNA damage may lead to genomic instability, disruption of cellular homeostasis and potentially tumours. Isogenic chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways can be used to identify genotoxic compounds and aid in characterising the nature of the induced DNA damage. As part of the US Tox21 program, we previously optimised several different DT40 isogenic clones on a high-throughput screening platform and confirmed the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxicants by measuring differential cytotoxicity in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient clones following chemical exposure. In the study reported here, we screened the Tox21 10K compound library against two isogenic DNA repair-deficient DT40 cell lines (KU70 −/−/RAD54 −/− and REV3 −/−) and the wild-type cell line using a cell viability assay that measures intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels. KU70 and RAD54 are genes associated with DNA double-strand break repair processes, and REV3 is associated with translesion DNA synthesis pathways. Active compounds identified in the primary screening included many well-known genotoxicants (e.g. adriamycin, melphalan) and several compounds previously untested for genotoxicity. A subset of compounds was further evaluated by assessing their ability to induce micronuclei and phosphorylated H2AX. Using this comprehensive approach, three compounds with previously undefined genotoxicity—2-oxiranemethanamine, AD-67 and tetraphenylolethane glycidyl ether—were identified as genotoxic. These results demonstrate the utility of this approach for identifying and prioritising compounds that may damage DNA. PMID:26243743

  17. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  18. Germline mutation rates at tandem repeat loci in DNA-repair deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Barber, Ruth C; Miccoli, Laurent; van Buul, Paul P W; Burr, Karen L-A; van Duyn-Goedhart, Annemarie; Angulo, Jaime F; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2004-10-04

    Mutation rates at two expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci were studied in the germline of non-exposed and irradiated severe combined immunodeficient (scid) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1-/-) deficient male mice. Non-exposed scid and PARP-/- male mice showed considerably elevated ESTR mutation rates, far higher than those in wild-type isogenic mice and other inbred strains. The irradiated scid and PARP-1-/- male mice did not show any detectable increases in their mutation rate, whereas significant ESTR mutation induction was observed in the irradiated wild-type isogenic males. ESTR mutation spectra in the scid and PARP-1-/- strains did not differ from those in the isogenic wild-type strains. Considering these data and the results of previous studies, we propose that a delay in repair of DNA damage in scid and PARP-1-/- mice could result in replication fork pausing which, in turn, may affect ESTR mutation rate in the non-irradiated males. The lack of mutation induction in irradiated scid and PARP-1-/- can be explained by the high cell killing effects of irradiation on the germline of deficient mice.

  19. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  20. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  1. Molecular analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans recA locus and identification of a mutation site in a DNA repair-deficient mutant, rec30.

    PubMed

    Narumi, I; Satoh, K; Kikuchi, M; Funayama, T; Kitayama, S; Yanagisawa, T; Watanabe, H; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-07

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain rec30, which is a DNA damage repair-deficient mutant, has been estimated to be defective in the deinococcal recA gene. To identify the mutation site of strain rec30 and obtain information about the region flanking the gene, a 4.4-kb fragment carrying the wild-type recA gene was sequenced. It was revealed that the recA locus forms a polycistronic operon with the preceding cistrons (orf105a and orf105b). Predicted amino acid sequences of orf105a and orf105b showed substantial similarity to the competence-damage inducible protein (cinA gene product) from Streptococcus pneumoniae and the 2'-5' RNA ligase from Escherichia coli, respectively. By analyzing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments derived from the genomic DNA of strain rec30, the mutation site in the strain was identified as a single G:C to A:T transition which causes an amino acid substitution at position 224 (Gly to Ser) of the deinococcal RecA protein. Furthermore, we succeeded in expressing both the wild-type and mutant recA genes of D. radiodurans in E. coli without any obvious toxicity or death. The gamma-ray resistance of an E. coli recA1 strain was fully restored by the expression of the wild-type recA gene of D. radiodurans that was cloned in an E. coli vector plasmid. This result is consistent with evidence that RecA proteins from many bacterial species can functionally complement E. coli recA mutants. In contrast with the wild-type gene, the mutant recA gene derived from strain rec30 did not complement E. coli recA1, suggesting that the mutant RecA protein lacks functional activity for recombinational repair.

  2. Repair of DNA-protein cross-links in an excision repair-deficient human cell line and its simian virus 40-transformed derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, R.; Taylor, W.G.; Camalier, R.F.; Stephens, E.V.

    1984-05-01

    DNA-protein cross-links are induced in mammalian cells by X-rays, ultraviolet light, fluorescent light, and numerous chemical carcinogens. Others have shown that these cross-links are repaired by normal cells but that excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) Group A cells, XP12BE, are deficient in repair of these bulky adducts. This paper compares the DNA-protein cross-link repair competency of another XP Group A strain, XP20S, with its more rapidly proliferating simian virus 40-transformed derivative line and with normal human skin fibroblasts. DNA-protein cross-links were induced with 20 microM transplatinum(II)diamminedichloride and assayed by the membrane alkaline elution procedure of Kohn. Treated and untreated cells are lysed on a polycarbonate membrane filter, and the coelution rates of the DNA at pH 12.2 are compared; DNA-protein cross-links retard elution of DNA. The repair competency of XP20S cells for trans-platinum(II)diamminedichloride-induced DNA-protein cross-links was similar to that of XP12BE cells, but the competency of the simian virus 40-transformed XP20S cells was nearly equal to that of normal human skin fibroblasts. These results suggest that either cell cycling compensates for the genetic deficiency present in the nucleotide excision process of XP Group A cells or that a process other than nucleotide excision can repair these lesions; this process requires cell cycling or activation by the virus.

  3. Enhanced Genotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in DNA Repair Deficient Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Asharani, P. V.; Hande, M. Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) have been used in medicine and commercially due to their anti-microbial properties. Therapeutic potentials of these nanoparticles are being explored extensively despite the lack of information on their mechanism of action at molecular and cellular level. Here, we have investigated the DNA damage response and repair following Ag-np treatment in mammalian cells. Studies have shown that Ag-np exerts genotoxicity through double-strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs, the catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase, is an important caretaker of the genome which is known to be the main player mediating Non-homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs is responsible for the repair of Ag-np induced DNA damage. In vitro studies have been carried out to investigate both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by Ag-np in normal human cells, DNA-PKcs proficient, and deficient mammalian cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity with NU7026, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, has been performed to further validate the role of DNA-PKcs in this model. Our results suggest that Ag-np induced more prominent dose-dependent decrease in cell viability in DNA-PKcs deficient or inhibited cells. The deficiency or inhibition of DNA-PKcs renders the cells with higher susceptibility to DNA damage and genome instability which in turn contributed to greater cell cycle arrest/cell death. These findings support the fact that DNA-PKcs is involved in the repair of Ag-np induced genotoxicity and NHEJ repair pathway and DNA-PKcs particularly is activated to safeguard the genome upon Ag-np exposure. PMID:22707954

  4. Enhanced genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in DNA repair deficient Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Asharani, P V; Hande, M Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) have been used in medicine and commercially due to their anti-microbial properties. Therapeutic potentials of these nanoparticles are being explored extensively despite the lack of information on their mechanism of action at molecular and cellular level. Here, we have investigated the DNA damage response and repair following Ag-np treatment in mammalian cells. Studies have shown that Ag-np exerts genotoxicity through double-strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs, the catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase, is an important caretaker of the genome which is known to be the main player mediating Non-homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs is responsible for the repair of Ag-np induced DNA damage. In vitro studies have been carried out to investigate both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by Ag-np in normal human cells, DNA-PKcs proficient, and deficient mammalian cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity with NU7026, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, has been performed to further validate the role of DNA-PKcs in this model. Our results suggest that Ag-np induced more prominent dose-dependent decrease in cell viability in DNA-PKcs deficient or inhibited cells. The deficiency or inhibition of DNA-PKcs renders the cells with higher susceptibility to DNA damage and genome instability which in turn contributed to greater cell cycle arrest/cell death. These findings support the fact that DNA-PKcs is involved in the repair of Ag-np induced genotoxicity and NHEJ repair pathway and DNA-PKcs particularly is activated to safeguard the genome upon Ag-np exposure.

  5. Chromium(VI) causes interstrand DNA crosslinking in vitro but shows no hypersensitivity in crosslink repair-deficient human cells

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Jessica L.; Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a human carcinogen activated primarily by direct reduction with cellular ascorbate and to a lesser extent, by glutathione. Cr(III), the final product of Cr(VI) reduction, forms six bonds allowing intermolecular crosslinking. In this work, we investigated the ability of Cr(VI) to cause interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs) whose formation mechanisms and the presence in human cells are currently uncertain. We found that in vitro reduction of Cr(VI) with glutathione showed a sublinear production of ICLs, yield of which was less than 1% of total Cr-DNA adducts at the optimal conditions. Formation of ICLs in fast ascorbate-Cr(VI) reactions occurred during a short reduction interval and displayed a linear dose-dependence with the average yield of 1.3% of total adducts. In vitro production of ICLs was strongly suppressed by increasing buffer molarity, indicating inhibitory effects of ligand-Cr(III) binding on the formation of crosslinking species. The presence of ICLs in human cells was assessed from the impact of ICL repair deficiencies on Cr(VI) responses. We found that ascorbate-restored FANCD2-null and isogenic FANCD2-complemented cells showed similar cell cycle inhibition and toxicity by Cr(VI). XPA-null cells are defective in repair of Cr-DNA monoadducts but stable knockdowns of ERCC1 or XPF in these cells with extended time for the completion of crosslinking reactions did not produce any sensitization to Cr(VI). Our results together with chemical and steric considerations of Cr(III) reactivity suggest that ICL generation by chromate is probably an in vitro phenomenon occurring at conditions permitting formation of Cr(III) polymers. PMID:24059640

  6. Folate and Colorectal Cancer in Rodents: A Model of DNA Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Rita; Ma, Hongzhi; Cabelof, Diane C.

    2012-01-01

    Fortification of grains has resulted in a positive public health outcome vis-a-vis reduced incidence of neural tube defects. Whether folate has a correspondingly beneficial effect on other disease outcomes is less clear. A role for dietary folate in the prevention of colorectal cancer has been established through epidemiological data. Experimental data aiming to further elucidate this relationship has been somewhat equivocal. Studies report that folate depletion increases DNA damage, mutagenesis, and chromosomal instability, all suggesting inhibited DNA repair. While these data connecting folate depletion and inhibition of DNA repair are convincing, we also present data demonstrating that genetic inhibition of DNA repair is protective in the development of preneoplastic colon lesions, both when folate is depleted and when it is not. The purpose of this paper is to (1) give an overview of the data demonstrating a DNA repair defect in response to folate depletion, and (2) critically compare and contrast the experimental designs utilized in folate/colorectal cancer research and the corresponding impact on tissue folate status and critical colorectal cancer endpoints. Our analysis suggests that there is still an important need for a comprehensive evaluation of the impact of differential dietary prescriptions on blood and tissue folate status. PMID:23093960

  7. Why Cockayne syndrome patients do not get cancer despite their DNA repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Reid-Bayliss, Kate S.; Arron, Sarah T.; Loeb, Lawrence A.; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Cleaver, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are human photosensitive diseases with mutations in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which repairs DNA damage from UV exposure. CS is mutated in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) branch of the NER pathway and exhibits developmental and neurological pathologies. The XP-C group of XP patients have mutations in the global genome repair (GGR) branch of the NER pathway and have a very high incidence of UV-induced skin cancer. Cultured cells from both diseases have similar sensitivity to UV-induced cytotoxicity, but CS patients have never been reported to develop cancer, although they often exhibit photosensitivity. Because cancers are associated with increased mutations, especially when initiated by DNA damage, we examined UV-induced mutagenesis in both XP-C and CS cells, using duplex sequencing for high-sensitivity mutation detection. Duplex sequencing detects rare mutagenic events, independent of selection and in multiple loci, enabling examination of all mutations rather than just those that confer major changes to a specific protein. We found telomerase-positive normal and CS-B cells had increased background mutation frequencies that decreased upon irradiation, purging the population of subclonal variants. Primary XP-C cells had increased UV-induced mutation frequencies compared with normal cells, consistent with their GGR deficiency. CS cells, in contrast, had normal levels of mutagenesis despite their TCR deficiency. The lack of elevated UV-induced mutagenesis in CS cells reveals that their TCR deficiency, although increasing cytotoxicity, is not mutagenic. Therefore the absence of cancer in CS patients results from the absence of UV-induced mutagenesis rather than from enhanced lethality. PMID:27543334

  8. Bone fragility and decline in stem cells in prematurely aging DNA repair deficient trichothiodystrophy mice.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Karin E M; Nicolaije, Claudia; Priemel, Matthias; Waarsing, Jan H; Day, Judd S; Brandt, Renata M C; Schilling, Arndt F; Botter, Sander M; Weinans, Harrie; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2012-08-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder caused by mutations in components of the dual functional NER/basal transcription factor TFIIH. TTD mice, carrying a patient-based point mutation in the Xpd gene, strikingly resemble many features of the human syndrome and exhibit signs of premature aging. To examine to which extent TTD mice resemble the normal process of aging, we thoroughly investigated the bone phenotype. Here, we show that female TTD mice exhibit accelerated bone aging from 39 weeks onwards as well as lack of periosteal apposition leading to reduced bone strength. Before 39 weeks have passed, bones of wild-type and TTD mice are identical excluding a developmental defect. Albeit that bone formation is decreased, osteoblasts in TTD mice retain bone-forming capacity as in vivo PTH treatment leads to increased cortical thickness. In vitro bone marrow cell cultures showed that TTD osteoprogenitors retain the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts. However, after 13 weeks of age TTD females show decreased bone nodule formation. No increase in bone resorption or the number of osteoclasts was detected. In conclusion, TTD mice show premature bone aging, which is preceded by a decrease in mesenchymal stem cells/osteoprogenitors and a change in systemic factors, identifying DNA damage and repair as key determinants for bone fragility by influencing osteogenesis and bone metabolism.

  9. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined “Lynch-like syndrome” if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or “familial colorectal cancer type X” if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies. PMID:25716099

  10. RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Peter

    2009-05-15

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

  11. Chimeric negative regulation of p14ARF and TBX1 by a t(9;22) translocation associated with melanoma, deafness, and DNA repair deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaohui; Anzick, Sarah L; Khan, Sikandar G; Ueda, Takahiro; Stone, Gary; Digiovanna, John J; Tamura, Deborah; Wattendorf, Daniel; Busch, David; Brewer, Carmen C; Zalewski, Christopher; Butman, John A; Griffith, Andrew J; Meltzer, Paul S; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the most frequent interstitial deletion syndrome. We characterized a novel balanced t(9;22)(p21;q11.2) translocation in a patient with melanoma, DNA repair deficiency, and features of DGS including deafness and malformed inner ears. Using chromosome sorting, we located the 9p21 breakpoint in CDKN2A intron 1. This resulted in underexpression of the tumor suppressor p14 alternate reading frame (p14ARF); the reduced DNA repair was corrected by transfection with p14ARF. Ultraviolet radiation-type p14ARF mutations in his melanoma implicated p14ARF in its pathogenesis. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located in a palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR22). We identified a new gene, FAM230A, that contains PATRR22 within an intron. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located 800 kb centromeric to TBX1, which is required for inner ear development. TBX1 expression was greatly reduced. The translocation resulted in a chimeric transcript encoding portions of p14ARF and FAM230A. Inhibition of chimeric p14ARF-FAM230A expression increased p14ARF and TBX1 expression and improved DNA repair. Expression of the chimera in normal cells produced dominant negative inhibition of p14ARF. Similar chimeric mRNAs may mediate haploinsufficiency in DGS or dominant negative inhibition of other genes such as those involved in melanoma.

  12. Age-related skeletal dynamics and decrease in bone strength in DNA repair deficient male trichothiodystrophy mice.

    PubMed

    Nicolaije, Claudia; Diderich, Karin E M; Botter, S M; Priemel, Matthias; Waarsing, Jan H; Day, Judd S; Brandt, Renata M C; Schilling, Arndt F; Weinans, Harrie; Van der Eerden, Bram C; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of DNA damage caused by oxidative stress is thought to be one of the main contributors of human tissue aging. Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) mice have a mutation in the Ercc2 DNA repair gene, resulting in accumulation of DNA damage and several features of segmental accelerated aging. We used male TTD mice to study the impact of DNA repair on bone metabolism with age. Analysis of bone parameters, measured by micro-computed tomography, displayed an earlier decrease in trabecular and cortical bone as well as a loss of periosteal apposition and a reduction in bone strength in TTD mice with age compared to wild type mice. Ex vivo analysis of bone marrow differentiation potential showed an accelerated reduction in the number of osteogenic and osteoprogenitor cells with unaltered differentiation capacity. Adipocyte differentiation was normal. Early in life, osteoclast number tended to be increased while at 78 weeks it was significantly lower in TTD mice. Our findings reveal the importance of genome stability and proper DNA repair for skeletal homeostasis with age and support the idea that accumulation of damage interferes with normal skeletal maintenance, causing reduction in the number of osteoblast precursors that are required for normal bone remodeling leading to a loss of bone structure and strength.

  13. Subnormal albumin gene expression is associated with weight loss in immunodeficient/DNA-repair-deficient wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Woloschak, G.E. |; Mobarhan, S.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wst express a disease syndrome of immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction, and increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. The mice were originally characterized as ``wasted`` because of their dramatic weight loss that begins at 21 days of age and progresses until death at 28-32 days of age. Because of the reported association between abnormal liver status and weight loss, we examined expression of a variety of liver-specific genes in wst/wst 10 mice relative to littermate (wst/{center_dot}) and parental strain (BCF{sub 1}) controls. Interestingly, the results revealed a greater than 67% reduction in albumin mRNA expression in livers derived from wst/wst mice relative to both controls. Expression of alpha-fetoprotein as well as a variety of other liver-specific genes (secretory component, metallothionein, cytochrome P{sub 1}450, transferrin receptor, tumor necrosis factor, and Ia antigen) was unaffected. These results suggest a relationship between low albumin expression and wasting syndromes in mice. In addition, we believe that our data suggest the wasted mouse as a unique model for subnormal albumin expression in humans.

  14. Escherichia coli strains (ndk) lacking nucleoside diphosphate kinase are powerful mutators for base substitutions and frameshifts in mismatch-repair-deficient strains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeffrey H; Funchain, Pauline; Clendenin, Wendy; Huang, Tiffany; Nguyen, Anh; Wolff, Erika; Yeung, Annie; Chiang, Ju-Huei; Garibyan, Lilit; Slupska, Malgorzata M; Yang, Hanjing

    2002-09-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is one of the enzymes that maintains triphosphate pools. Escherichia coli strains (ndk) lacking this enzyme have been shown to be modest base substitution mutators, and two members of the human family of NDP kinases act as tumor suppressors. We show here that in E. coli strains lacking NDP kinase high levels of mispairs are generated, but most of these are corrected by the mismatch-repair system. Double mutants that are ndk mutS, lacking both the NDP kinase and mismatch repair, have levels of base substitutions 15-fold higher and levels of certain frameshifts up to 10-fold higher than those of the respective mutations in mutS strains that are NDP kinase proficient. A sequence analysis of the specificity of base substitution mutations generated in ndk and ndk mutS backgrounds as well as other experiments suggests that NDP kinase deficiency stimulates polymerase errors that lead to A:T --> G:C transitions and that the editing capacity of cells may be affected, leading to additional uncorrected mispairs and to A:T --> T:A transversions.

  15. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors

    PubMed Central

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysed ex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20–67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation. PMID:25678531

  16. Cytotoxic and genotoxic profiles of benzo[a]pyrene and N-nitrosodimethylamine demonstrated using DNA repair deficient DT40 cells with metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Masato; Takazawa, Hironori; Takeda, Shunichi; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-02-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene and N-nitrosodimethylamine are major genotoxic compounds present in cigarette smoke, food and oil. To examine the type(s) of DNA damage induced by these compounds, we used a panel of DNA-repair-pathway-deficient mutants generated from chicken DT40 cells and achieved metabolic activation of the test compounds by including rat liver S9 mix. Consistent with expections, benzo[a]pyrene and N-nitrosodimethylamine require metabolicactivation to become genotoxic. The REV3(-/-) mutant cell line exhibited the highest sensitivity, in terms of increased cytotoxicity, to the both compounds after metabolic activation consistent with the known ability of these two compounds to induce DNA adducts. Strikingly, we found that the RAD54(-/-)/KU70(-/-) cell line, a mutant defective in the repair of double-strand breaks, is sensitive to benzo[a]pyrene, suggesting that this compound also induces strand breaks in these cells. In this study we combined a previously employed method, metabolic activation by S9 mix, with the use of a DNA-repair mutant panel, thereby broadening the range of compounds that can be screened for potential genotoxicity.

  17. E7449: A dual inhibitor of PARP1/2 and tankyrase1/2 inhibits growth of DNA repair deficient tumors and antagonizes Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiayi; Chang, Paul; Kolber-Simonds, Donna; Ackermann, Karen; Twine, Natalie C.; Shie, Jue-Lon; Miu, Jingzang Tao; Huang, Kuan-Chun; Moniz, George A.; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase1 (PARP1) impairs DNA damage repair, and early generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (olaparib, niraparib, etc.) have demonstrated clinical proof of concept for cancer treatment. Here, we describe the development of the novel PARP inhibitor E7449, a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor that also inhibits PARP5a/5b, otherwise known as tankyrase1 and 2 (TNKS1 and 2), important regulators of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. E7449 inhibits PARP enzymatic activity and additionally traps PARP1 onto damaged DNA; a mechanism previously shown to augment cytotoxicity. Cells deficient in DNA repair pathways beyond homologous recombination were sensitive to E7449 treatment. Chemotherapy was potentiated by E7449 and single agent had significant antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient xenografts. Additionally, E7449 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon cancer cell lines, likely through TNKS inhibition. Consistent with this possibility, E7449 stabilized axin and TNKS proteins resulting in β-catenin de-stabilization and significantly altered expression of Wnt target genes. Notably, hair growth mediated by Wnt signaling was inhibited by E7449. A pharmacodynamic effect of E7449 on Wnt target genes was observed in tumors, although E7449 lacked single agent antitumor activity in vivo, a finding typical for selective TNKS inhibitors. E7449 antitumor activity was increased through combination with MEK inhibition. Particularly noteworthy was the lack of toxicity, most significantly the lack of intestinal toxicity reported for other TNKS inhibitors. E7449 represents a novel dual PARP1/2 and TNKS1/2 inhibitor which has the advantage of targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling addicted tumors. E7449 is currently in early clinical development. PMID:26513298

  18. Specific UV-induced mutation spectrum in the p53 gene of skin tumors from DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dumaz, N.; Drougard, C.; Sarasin, A.; Daya-Grosjean, L. )

    1993-11-15

    The UV component of sunlight is the major carcinogen involved in the etiology of skin cancers. The authors have studied the rare, hereditary syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is characterized by a very high incidence of cutaneous tumors on exposed skin at an early age, probably due to a deficiency in excision repair of UV-induced lesions. It is interesting to determine the UV mutation spectrum in XP skin tumors in order to correlate the absence of repair of specific DNA lesions and the initiation of skin tumors. The p53 gene is frequently mutated in human cancers and represents a good target for studying mutation spectra since there are >100 potential sites for phenotypic mutations. Using reverse transcription-PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism to analyze >40 XP skin tumors (mainly basal and squamous cell carcinomas), the authors have found that 40% (17 out of 43) contained at least one point mutation on the p53 gene. All the mutations were located at dipyrimidine sites, essentially at CC sequences, which are hot spots for UV-induced DNA lesions. Sixty-one percent of these mutations were tandem CC [yields] TT mutations considered to be unique to UV-induced lesions; these mutations are not observed in internal human tumors. All the mutations, except two, must be due to translesion synthesis of unrepaired dipyrimidine lesions left on the nontranscribed strand. These results show the existence of preferential repair of UV lesions [either pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts] on the transcribed strand in human tissues.

  19. Specific UV-induced mutation spectrum in the p53 gene of skin tumors from DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dumaz, N; Drougard, C; Sarasin, A; Daya-Grosjean, L

    1993-01-01

    The UV component of sunlight is the major carcinogen involved in the etiology of skin cancers. We have studied the rare, hereditary syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is characterized by a very high incidence of cutaneous tumors on exposed skin at an early age, probably due to a deficiency in excision repair of UV-induced lesions. It is interesting to determine the UV mutation spectrum in XP skin tumors in order to correlate the absence of repair of specific DNA lesions and the initiation of skin tumors. The p53 gene is frequently mutated in human cancers and represents a good target for studying mutation spectra since there are > 100 potential sites for phenotypic mutations. Using reverse transcription-PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism to analyze > 40 XP skin tumors (mainly basal and squamous cell carcinomas), we have found that 40% (17 out of 43) contained at least one point mutation on the p53 gene. All the mutations were located at dipyrimidine sites, essentially at CC sequences, which are hot spots for UV-induced DNA lesions. Sixty-one percent of these mutations were tandem CC-->TT mutations considered to be unique to UV-induced lesions; these mutations are not observed in internal human tumors. All the mutations, except two, must be due to translesion synthesis of unrepaired dipyrimidine lesions left on the nontranscribed strand. These results show the existence of preferential repair of UV lesions [either pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts] on the transcribed strand in human tissues. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8248141

  20. Frequency of intrachromosomal homologous recombination induced by UV radiation in normally repairing and excision repair-deficient human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimura, T.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J. ); Godwin, A.R.; Liskay, R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    To investigate the role of DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair in intrachromosomal homologous recombination, a plasmid containing duplicated copies of the gene coding for hygromycin resistance was introduced into the genome of a repair-proficient human cell line, KMST-6, and two repair-deficient lines, XP2OS(SV) from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A and XP2YO(SV) from complementation group F. Neither hygromycin-resistance gene codes for a functional enzyme because each contains an insertion/deletion mutation at a unique site, but recombination between the two defective genes can yield hygromycin-resistant cells. The rates of spontaneous recombination in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains containing the recombination substrate were found to be similar. The frequency of UV-induced recombination was determined for three of these cell strains. At low doses, the group A cell strain and the group F cell strain showed a significant increase in frequency of recombinants. The repair-proficient cell strain required 10-to 20-fold higher doses of UV to exhibit comparable increases in frequency of recombinants. These results suggest that unexcised DNA damage, rather than the excision repair process per se, stimulates such recombination.

  1. Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) DNA adduct formation in DNA repair-deficient p53 haploinsufficient [Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-)] and wild-type mice fed BP and BP plus chlorophyllin for 28 days.

    PubMed

    John, Kaarthik; Pratt, M Margaret; Beland, Frederick A; Churchwell, Mona I; McMullen, Gail; Olivero, Ofelia A; Pogribny, Igor P; Poirier, Miriam C

    2012-11-01

    We have evaluated DNA damage (DNA adduct formation) after feeding benzo[a]pyrene (BP) to wild-type (WT) and cancer-susceptible Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice deficient in nucleotide excision repair and haploinsufficient for the tumor suppressor p53. DNA damage was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ES-MS/MS), which measures r7,t8,t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N (2)-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPdG), and a chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA), using anti-r7,t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE)-DNA antiserum, which measures both BPdG and the other stable BP-DNA adducts. When mice were fed 100 ppm BP for 28 days, BP-induced DNA damage measured in esophagus, liver and lung was typically higher in Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice, compared with WT mice. This result is consistent with the previously observed tumor susceptibility of Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice. BPdG, the major DNA adduct associated with tumorigenicity, was the primary DNA adduct formed in esophagus (a target tissue in the mouse), whereas total BP-DNA adducts predominated in higher levels in the liver (a non-target tissue in the mouse). In an attempt to lower BP-induced DNA damage, we fed the WT and Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice 0.3% chlorophyllin (CHL) in the BP-containing diet for 28 days. The addition of CHL resulted in an increase of BP-DNA adducts in esophagus, liver and lung of WT mice, a lowering of BPdG in esophagi of WT mice and livers of Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice and an increase of BPdG in livers of WT mice. Therefore, the addition of CHL to a BP-containing diet showed a lack of consistent chemoprotective effect, indicating that oral CHL administration may not reduce PAH-DNA adduct levels consistently in human organs.

  2. Strain softening in stretched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Binquan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic mechanics of DNA stretching was characterized using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By employing an anisotropic pressure control method, realistic force-extension dependences of effectively infinite DNA molecules were obtained. A coexistence of B- and S-DNA domains was observed during the overstretching transition. The simulations revealed that strain softening may occur in the process of stretching torsionally constrained DNA. The latter observation was qualitatively reconciled with available experimental data using a random-field Ising model. PMID:18851334

  3. PD-1 Blockade in Tumors with Mismatch-Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Le, D.T.; Uram, J.N.; Wang, H.; Bartlett, B.R.; Kemberling, H.; Eyring, A.D.; Skora, A.D.; Luber, B.S.; Azad, N.S.; Laheru, D.; Biedrzycki, B.; Donehower, R.C.; Zaheer, A.; Fisher, G.A.; Crocenzi, T.S.; Lee, J.J.; Duffy, S.M.; Goldberg, R.M.; de la Chapelle, A.; Koshiji, M.; Bhaijee, F.; Huebner, T.; Hruban, R.H.; Wood, L.D.; Cuka, N.; Pardoll, D.M.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K.W.; Zhou, S.; Cornish, T.C.; Taube, J.M.; Anders, R.A.; Eshleman, J.R.; Vogelstein, B.; Diaz, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations have the potential to encode “non-self” immunogenic antigens. We hypothesized that tumors with a large number of somatic mutations due to mismatch-repair defects may be susceptible to immune checkpoint blockade. METHODS We conducted a phase 2 study to evaluate the clinical activity of pembrolizumab, an anti–programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, in 41 patients with progressive metastatic carcinoma with or without mismatch-repair deficiency. Pembrolizumab was administered intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 14 days in patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers, patients with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers, and patients with mismatch repair–deficient cancers that were not colorectal. The coprimary end points were the immune-related objective response rate and the 20-week immune-related progression-free survival rate. RESULTS The immune-related objective response rate and immune-related progression-free survival rate were 40% (4 of 10 patients) and 78% (7 of 9 patients), respectively, for mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers and 0% (0 of 18 patients) and 11% (2 of 18 patients) for mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were not reached in the cohort with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer but were 2.2 and 5.0 months, respectively, in the cohort with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancer (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.10 [P<0.001], and hazard ratio for death, 0.22 [P = 0.05]). Patients with mismatch repair–deficient noncolorectal cancer had responses similar to those of patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer (immune-related objective response rate, 71% [5 of 7 patients]; immune-related progression-free survival rate, 67% [4 of 6 patients]). Whole-exome sequencing revealed a mean of 1782 somatic mutations per tumor in

  4. Engineering Clostridium Strain to Accept Unmethylated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Dai, Zongjie; Li, Yin

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM) systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level. PMID:20161730

  5. Tissue-specific accelerated aging in nucleotide excision repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multi-step DNA repair mechanism that removes helix-distorting modified nucleotides from the genome. NER is divided into two subpathways depending on the location of DNA damage in the genome and how it is first detected. Global genome NER identifies and repairs DNA lesions throughout the genome. This subpathway of NER primarily protects against the accumulation of mutations in the genome. Transcription-coupled (TC) NER rapidly repairs lesions in the transcribed strand of DNA that block transcription by RNA polymerase II. TC-NER prevents cell death in response to stalled transcription. Defects in NER cause three distinct human diseases: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Each of these syndromes is characterized by premature onset of pathologies that overlap with those associated with old age in humans. This reveals the contribution of DNA damage to multiple age-related diseases. Tissues affected include the skin, eye, bone marrow, nervous system and endocrine axis. This review emphasizes accelerated aging associated with xeroderma pigmentosum and discusses the cause of these pathologies, either mutation accumulation or cell death as a consequence of failure to repair DNA damage. PMID:18538374

  6. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  7. Some repair-deficient mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum display enhanced susceptibilities to bleomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Deering, R A; Guyer, R B; Stevens, L; Watson-Thais, T E

    1996-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a soil eukaryote, is highly resistant to DNA-damaging agents; repair mutants are more susceptible. Susceptibility to bleomycin, produced by Streptomyces verticillus, is greater for mutants which are susceptible to other agents than for resistant strains. The high potential for DNA repair may result from the need to cope with chemicals produced by other soil microorganisms. PMID:8834899

  8. Identification of Lactobacillus UFV H2B20 (probiotic strain) using DNA-DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, J.T.; Uetanabaro, A.P. T.; de Moraes, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization tests were performed for identification of the species of the probiotic Lactobacillus UFV H2b20 strain. Using these two tests, we concluded that this strain, originally considered Lact. acidophilus, should be classified as Lact. delbrueckii. PMID:24031263

  9. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals

    PubMed Central

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Toonen, Pim W; Verheul, Mark; van Roekel, Henk S; Nijman, Isaac J; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis is currently the most successful method in rats, although it is still very laborious and expensive. Results As ENU-induced DNA damage is normally recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we hypothesized that the effectiveness of the target-selected mutagenesis approach could be improved by using a MMR-deficient genetic background. Indeed, Msh6 knockout rats were found to be more sensitive to ENU treatment and the germ line mutation rate was boosted more than two-fold to 1 mutation per 585 kb. In addition, the molecular mutation spectrum was found to be changed in favor of generating knockout-type alleles by ~20%, resulting in an overall increase in efficiency of ~2.5 fold. The improved effectiveness was demonstrated by high throughput mutation discovery in 70 Mb of sequence in a set of only 310 mutant F1 rats. This resulted in the identification of 89 mutations of which four introduced a premature stopcodon and 64 resulted in amino acid changes. Conclusion Taken together, we show that the use of a MMR-deficient background considerably improves ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis in the rat, thereby reducing animal use as well as screening costs. The use of a mismatch repair-deficient genetic background for improving mutagenesis and target-selected knockout efficiency is in principle applicable to any organism of interest. PMID:18840264

  10. A 30-Year-Old Man with Three Primary Malignancies: A Case of Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rengifo-Cam, William; Jasperson, Kory; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Colman, Howard; Scaife, Courtney; Samowitz, Wade; Samadder, N Jewel

    2017-01-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) is a devastating cancer predisposition syndrome for which clinical manifestations, genetic screening, and cancer prevention strategies are limited. We report a case of CMMRD presenting with metachronous colorectal cancer and brain cancer. Oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of the CMMRD syndrome as a rare cause of very early-onset colorectal cancer.

  11. A 30-Year-Old Man with Three Primary Malignancies: A Case of Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rengifo-Cam, William; Jasperson, Kory; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Colman, Howard; Scaife, Courtney; Samowitz, Wade

    2017-01-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) is a devastating cancer predisposition syndrome for which clinical manifestations, genetic screening, and cancer prevention strategies are limited. We report a case of CMMRD presenting with metachronous colorectal cancer and brain cancer. Oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of the CMMRD syndrome as a rare cause of very early-onset colorectal cancer. PMID:28286799

  12. Screening method for isolating DNA repair-deficient mutants of CHO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Rubin, J.S.; Cleaver, J.E.; Whitmore, G.F.; Brookman, K.

    1980-01-01

    A simple procedure for isolating mutagen-sensitive clones of CHO cells was developed and applied in mutant hunts in which colonies were screened for hypersensitivity to killing by ultraviolet radiation (uv), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), or mitomycin C (MMC). Each of two uv-sensitive clones studied in detail had a D/sub 37/ dose of 1.0 J/m/sup 2/ compared to 7.0 J/m/sup 2/ for the wild-type cells, and each was shown to have no detectable repair replication following exposure to uv doses of up to 26 J/m/sup 2/. Clones having hypersensitivity to alkylating agents, but not uv, were obtained using MMC and EMS. In the latter case the two clones had significantly increased sensitivity to the killing action of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays.

  13. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amie L; Joyce, Kellie; Xie, Hong; Falank, Carolyne; Hinz, John M; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation.

  14. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  15. UV damage-specific DNA-binding protein in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, H.; Fujiwara, Y. )

    1991-03-29

    The gel mobility shift assay method revealed a specifically ultraviolet (UV) damage recognizing, DNA-binding protein in nuclear extracts of normal human cells. The resulted DNA/protein complexes caused the two retarded mobility shifts. Four xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XPE) fibroblast strains derived from unrelated Japanese families were not deficient in such a DNA damage recognition/binding protein because of the normal complex formation and gel mobility shifts, although we confirmed the reported lack of the protein in the European XPE (XP2RO and XP3RO) cells. Thus, the absence of this binding protein is not always commonly observed in all the XPE strains, and the partially repair-deficient and intermediately UV-hypersensitive phenotype of XPE cells are much similar whether or not they lack the protein.

  16. Strain-promoted "click" chemistry for terminal labeling of DNA.

    PubMed

    Marks, Isaac S; Kang, Jun Sung; Jones, Brady T; Landmark, Kevin J; Cleland, Andrew J; Taton, T Andrew

    2011-07-20

    1,3-Dipolar [3 + 2] cycloaddition between azides and alkynes--an archetypal "click" chemistry--has been used increasingly for the functionalization of nucleic acids. Copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions between alkyne-tagged DNA molecules and azides work well, but they require optimization of multiple reagents, and Cu ions are known to mediate DNA cleavage. For many applications, it would be preferable to eliminate the Cu(I) catalyst from these reactions. Here, we describe the solid-phase synthesis and characterization of 5'-dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified oligonucleotides, using a new DIBO phosphoramidite, which react with azides via copper-free, strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC). We found that the DIBO group not only survived the standard acidic and oxidative reactions of solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis (SPOS), but that it also survived the thermal cycling and standard conditions of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). As a result, PCR with DIBO-modified primers yielded "clickable" amplicons that could be tagged with azide-modified fluorophores or immobilized on azide-modified surfaces. Given its simplicity, SPAAC on DNA could streamline the bioconjugate chemistry of nucleic acids in a number of modern biotechnologies.

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  18. The endoperoxide ascaridol shows strong differential cytotoxicity in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Rashda; Efferth, Thomas; Kuhmann, Christine; Opatz, Till; Hao, Xiaojiang; Popanda, Odilia; Schmezer, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Targeting synthetic lethality in DNA repair pathways has become a promising anti-cancer strategy. However little is known about such interactions with regard to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Therefore, cell lines with a defect in the NER genes ERCC6 or XPC and their normal counterparts were screened with 53 chemically defined phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine for differential cytotoxic effects. The screening revealed 12 drugs that killed NER-deficient cells more efficiently than proficient cells. Five drugs were further analyzed for IC{sub 50} values, effects on cell cycle distribution, and induction of DNA damage. Ascaridol was the most effective compound with a difference of > 1000-fold in resistance between normal and NER-deficient cells (IC{sub 50} values for cells with deficiency in ERCC6: 0.15 μM, XPC: 0.18 μM, and normal cells: > 180 μM). NER-deficiency combined with ascaridol treatment led to G2/M-phase arrest, an increased percentage of subG1 cells, and a substantially higher DNA damage induction. These results were confirmed in a second set of NER-deficient and -proficient cell lines with isogenic background. Finally, ascaridol was characterized for its ability to generate oxidative DNA damage. The drug led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species at cytotoxic concentrations, but only NER-deficient cells showed a strongly induced amount of 8-oxodG sites. In summary, ascaridol is a cytotoxic and DNA-damaging compound which generates intracellular reactive oxidative intermediates and which selectively affects NER-deficient cells. This could provide a new therapeutic option to treat cancer cells with mutations in NER genes. -- Highlights: ► Thousand-fold higher Ascaridol activity in NER-deficient versus proficient cells. ► Impaired repair of Ascaridol-induced oxidative DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. ► Selective activity of Ascaridol opens new therapy

  19. Case report: impressive response to pembrolizumab in a patient with mismatch-repair deficient metastasized colorectal cancer and bulky disease

    PubMed Central

    Kieler, Markus; Scheithauer, Werner; Zielinski, Christoph C; Chott, Andreas; Al-Mukhtar, Ali; Prager, Gerald W

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the history of a 42-year-old female patient with sporadic mismatch-repair-deficient metastatic colorectal cancer and abdominal bulky disease, who received pembrolizumab (200 mg every 3 weeks) after the failure of third-line treatment. Restaging 3 months after initiation of treatment revealed a striking response with shrinkage of the bulky peritoneal tumour mass (baseline size 11×11×14 cm) to nearly 25% of the original tumour volume (6.2×7.1×10.4 cm). Restaging 8 months after initiation showed further downsizing of the tumour mass (5.5×7.0×8.0 cm). Tumour markers CEA and CA 19-9 decreased to normal levels, haemoglobin level increased from 8 to 13 mg/dL and her overall clinical performance status increased from ECOG 3 to 1 within 3 months. Therapy with pembrolizumab was continued and is still ongoing. We emphasise the importance of testing for mismatch-repair status in metastatic disease. PMID:28255450

  20. Agenesis of the corpus callosum and gray matter heterotopia in three patients with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baas, Annette F; Gabbett, Michael; Rimac, Milan; Kansikas, Minttu; Raphael, Martine; Nievelstein, Rutger Aj; Nicholls, Wayne; Offerhaus, Johan; Bodmer, Danielle; Wernstedt, Annekatrin; Krabichler, Birgit; Strasser, Ulrich; Nyström, Minna; Zschocke, Johannes; Robertson, Stephen P; van Haelst, Mieke M; Wimmer, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome is a rare inherited childhood cancer predisposition caused by biallelic germline mutations in one of the four mismatch repair (MMR)-genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Owing to a wide tumor spectrum, the lack of specific clinical features and the overlap with other cancer predisposing syndromes, diagnosis of CMMR-D is often delayed in pediatric cancer patients. Here, we report of three new CMMR-D patients all of whom developed more than one malignancy. The common finding in these three patients is agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Gray matter heterotopia is present in two patients. One of the 57 previously reported CMMR-D patients with brain tumors (therefore all likely had cerebral imaging) also had ACC. With the present report the prevalence of cerebral malformations is at least 4/60 (6.6%). This number is well above the population birth prevalence of 0.09-0.36 live births with these cerebral malformations, suggesting that ACC and heterotopia are features of CMMR-D. Therefore, the presence of cerebral malformations in pediatric cancer patients should alert to the possible diagnosis of CMMR-D. ACC and gray matter heterotopia are the first congenital malformations described to occur at higher frequency in CMMR-D patients than in the general population. Further systematic evaluations of CMMR-D patients are needed to identify possible other malformations associated with this syndrome.

  1. Biomarkers for immune therapy in colorectal cancer: mismatch-repair deficiency and others

    PubMed Central

    Bupathi, Manojkumar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease for which the treatment backbone has primarily been cytotoxic chemotherapy. With better understanding of the involved molecular mechanisms, it is now known that there are a number of epigenetic and genetic events, which are involved in CRC pathogenesis. Specific biomarkers have been identified which can be used to determine the clinical outcome of patients beyond tumor staging and predict for treatment efficacy. Molecular testing is now routinely performed to select for patients that will benefit the most from targeted agents and immunotherapy. In addition to KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutation (MT), analysis of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and checkpoint protein expression may be helpful to determine whether patients are eligible for certain therapies. The focus of this article is to discuss present and upcoming biomarkers for immunotherapy in CRC. PMID:27747085

  2. Transformation of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 by transgenic sugar beet DNA.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, F; Smalla, K

    1998-04-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413(pFG4 delta nptII) to take up and integrate transgenic plant DNA based on homologous recombination was studied under optimized laboratory conditions. Restoration of nptII, resulting in kanamycin-resistant transformants, was observed with plasmid DNA, plant DNA, and homogenates carrying the gene nptII. Molecular analysis showed that some transformants not only restored the 317-bp deletion but also obtained additional DNA.

  3. Relationship between DNA double-strand break rejoining and cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation in human fibroblast strains with differing ATM/p53 status: Implications for evaluation of clinical radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Severin, Diane; Murray, David . E-mail: davem@cancerboard.ab.ca

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To better understand the impact of defects in the DNA damage-surveillance network on the various cell-based assays used for the prediction of patient radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We examined noncancerous human fibroblast strains from individuals with ataxia telangiectasia (ataxia telangiectasia mutated [ATM] deficient) or Li-Fraumeni syndrome (p53 deficient) using the neutral comet, H2AX phosphorylation, and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Using the comet assay, we found that, compared with normal fibroblasts, cells lacking either ATM or p53 function exhibited a reduced rate of double-strand break (DSB) rejoining early ({<=}4 h) after exposure to 8 Gy of {gamma}-radiation and also exhibited high levels of unrejoined DSBs later after irradiation. ATM-deficient and p53-deficient fibroblasts also exhibited abnormally increased levels of phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) at later intervals after irradiation. In the clonogenic assay, ATM-deficient cells exhibited marked radiosensitivity and p53-deficient cells had varying degrees of radioresistance compared with normal fibroblasts. Conclusion: Regardless of whether ataxia telangiectasia and Li-Fraumeni syndrome fibroblasts are DSB-repair deficient per se, it is apparent that p53 and ATM defects greatly influence the cellular phenotype as evidenced by the neutral comet and {gamma}-H2AX assays. Our data suggest that the {gamma}-H2AX levels observed at later intervals after irradiation may represent a reliable measure of the overall DSB rejoining capabilities of human fibroblasts. However, it appears that using this parameter as a predictor of radiosensitivity without knowledge of the cells' p53 status could lead to incorrect conclusions.

  4. Engineering of bacterial strains and vectors for the production of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Bower, Diana M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2009-04-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) is anticipated to increase significantly as DNA vaccines and non-viral gene therapies enter phase 3 clinical trials and are approved for use. This increased demand, along with renewed interest in pDNA as a therapeutic vector, has motivated research targeting the design of high-yield, cost-effective manufacturing processes. An important aspect of this research is engineering bacterial strains and plasmids that are specifically suited to the production of plasmid biopharmaceuticals. This review will survey recent innovations in strain and vector engineering that aim to improve plasmid stability, enhance product safety, increase yield, and facilitate downstream purification. While these innovations all seek to enhance pDNA production, they can vary in complexity from subtle alterations of the host genome or vector backbone to the investigation of non-traditional host strains for higher pDNA yields.

  5. Improvement of ENU Mutagenesis Efficiency Using Serial Injection and Mismatch Repair Deficiency Mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Llamas, Jabier; Timms, Andrew E; Pitstick, Rose; Peters, Janet; Carlson, George A; Beier, David R

    2016-01-01

    ENU mutagenesis is a powerful method for generating novel lines of mice that are informative with respect to both fundamental biological processes and human disease. Rapid developments in genomic technology have made the task of identifying causal mutations by positional cloning remarkably efficient. One limitation of this approach remains the mutation frequency achievable using standard treatment protocols, which currently generate approximately 1-2 sequence changes per megabase when optimized. In this study we used two strategies to attempt to increase the number of mutations induced by ENU treatment. One approach employed mice carrying a mutation in the DNA repair enzyme Msh6. The second strategy involved injection of ENU to successive generations of mice. To evaluate the number of ENU-induced mutations, single mice or pooled samples were analyzed using whole exome sequencing. The results showed that there is considerable variability in the induced mutation frequency using these approaches, but an overall increase in ENU-induced variants from one generation to another was observed. The analysis of the mice deficient for Msh6 also showed an increase in the ENU-induced variants compared to the wild-type ENU-treated mice. However, in both cases the increase in ENU-induced mutation frequency was modest.

  6. Disruption of TTDA Results in Complete Nucleotide Excision Repair Deficiency and Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Arjan F.; Nonnekens, Julie; Steurer, Barbara; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; de Wit, Jan; Lemaitre, Charlène; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; Raams, Anja; Maas, Alex; Vermeij, Marcel; Essers, Jeroen; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Vermeulen, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The ten-subunit transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) plays a crucial role in transcription and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Inactivating mutations in the smallest 8-kDa TFB5/TTDA subunit cause the neurodevelopmental progeroid repair syndrome trichothiodystrophy A (TTD-A). Previous studies have shown that TTDA is the only TFIIH subunit that appears not to be essential for NER, transcription, or viability. We studied the consequences of TTDA inactivation by generating a Ttda knock-out (Ttda−/−) mouse-model resembling TTD-A patients. Unexpectedly, Ttda−/− mice were embryonic lethal. However, in contrast to full disruption of all other TFIIH subunits, viability of Ttda−/− cells was not affected. Surprisingly, Ttda−/− cells were completely NER deficient, contrary to the incomplete NER deficiency of TTD-A patient-derived cells. We further showed that TTD-A patient mutations only partially inactivate TTDA function, explaining the relatively mild repair phenotype of TTD-A cells. Moreover, Ttda−/− cells were also highly sensitive to oxidizing agents. These findings reveal an essential role of TTDA for life, nucleotide excision repair, and oxidative DNA damage repair and identify Ttda−/− cells as a unique class of TFIIH mutants. PMID:23637614

  7. Improvement of ENU Mutagenesis Efficiency Using Serial Injection and Mismatch Repair Deficiency Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pitstick, Rose; Peters, Janet; Carlson, George A.

    2016-01-01

    ENU mutagenesis is a powerful method for generating novel lines of mice that are informative with respect to both fundamental biological processes and human disease. Rapid developments in genomic technology have made the task of identifying causal mutations by positional cloning remarkably efficient. One limitation of this approach remains the mutation frequency achievable using standard treatment protocols, which currently generate approximately 1–2 sequence changes per megabase when optimized. In this study we used two strategies to attempt to increase the number of mutations induced by ENU treatment. One approach employed mice carrying a mutation in the DNA repair enzyme Msh6. The second strategy involved injection of ENU to successive generations of mice. To evaluate the number of ENU-induced mutations, single mice or pooled samples were analyzed using whole exome sequencing. The results showed that there is considerable variability in the induced mutation frequency using these approaches, but an overall increase in ENU-induced variants from one generation to another was observed. The analysis of the mice deficient for Msh6 also showed an increase in the ENU-induced variants compared to the wild-type ENU-treated mice. However, in both cases the increase in ENU-induced mutation frequency was modest. PMID:27441645

  8. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... here are: (i) Tests performed on solid medium (diffusion tests). (ii) Tests performed in liquid culture... appropriate. (ii) Preparation and storage. Stock culture preparation and storage, growth requirements, method... microbiological techniques should be used to grow fresh cultures of bacteria. The phase of growth and cell...

  9. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... here are: (i) Tests performed on solid medium (diffusion tests). (ii) Tests performed in liquid culture... appropriate. (ii) Preparation and storage. Stock culture preparation and storage, growth requirements, method... microbiological techniques should be used to grow fresh cultures of bacteria. The phase of growth and cell...

  10. Echinococcus granulosus: DNA extraction from germinal layers allows strain determination in fertile and nonfertile hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Kamenetzky, L; Canova, S G; Guarnera, E A; Rosenzvit, M C

    2000-06-01

    A method for the isolation of Echinococcus granulosus DNA from germinal layers of hydatid cysts is described. The method includes a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide/chloroform extraction and an adsorption to diatomaceous earth suspension. DNA suitable for polymerase chain reaction was obtained and used for parasite strain determination by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequencing. Fertile and nonfertile cyst isolates from sheep, cattle, pigs, and humans were characterized. Hitherto, no direct parasite strain characterization has been made on nonfertile hydatid cysts, whereas here we report that nonfertile hydatid cysts were produced by sheep strain (G1 genotype) in sheep, cattle, and humans and by pig strain (G7 genotype) in pigs.

  11. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis to Differentiate Strains of Vibrio Vulnificus Isolated from Cockles and Shrimps.

    PubMed Central

    Ahbrizal, Tg.; Radu, Son; Latif, Abdul Reezal Abdul; Mutalib, Abdul Rahim; Rusul, Gulam; Elhadi, Nasreldin; Yuherman

    2000-01-01

    A random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting method has been developed to differentiate Vibrio vulnificus strains isolated. Twenty-nine strains isolated from cockles and twenty-one strains isolated from shrimps were analyzed. A total of 10 primers were screened with Vibrio vulnificus strains to identify those capable of generating DNA polymorphisms and two primers were selected. Primer GEN 1-50-01 and GEN 1-50-08 produced polymorphisms in most strains tested, with the band sizes ranging from 10.0 to 0.25 kb pair. Dendrogram analysis showed that primer GEN 1-50-01 produced 10 clusters and 24 single strains at a 40% similarity, whereas primer GEN 1-50-08 produced 11 clusters and 20 single strains at a 40% similarity. This study revealed the potential use of PCR fingerprinting in epidemiological studies. PMID:22844214

  12. Diversity of mitochondrial DNA in three Arabian horse strains.

    PubMed

    Almarzook, S; Reissmann, M; Brockmann, G A

    2016-12-14

    Arabian horse registries classify Arabian horses based on their dam lineages into five main strains. To test the maternal origin of Syrian Arabian horses, 192 horses representing the three major strains Saglawi, Kahlawi, and Hamdani were sequenced for 353 bp of their mitochondrial displacement loop (D-loop) region. Sequencing revealed 28 haplotypes comprising 38 sequence variations. The haplotype diversity values were 0.95, 0.91, and 0.90 in Kahlawi, Hamdani, and Saglawi strains, respectively. The pair-wise population differentiation estimates (Fst) between strains were low, ranging between 0.098 and 0.205. The haplotype diversity and the pair-wise population differentiation estimates (Fst) between strains showed high diversity within individuals of each strain and low variation between the three strains. Mitochondrial haplotypes scattered all over the neighbor-joining tree without clear separation of the three strains. In the median-joining network, the Syrian horses were grouped into seven major haplogroups. These results suggest that more than five ancestors exist that share common maternal haplotypes with other horse breeds.

  13. Herpesvirus saimiri strains from three DNA subgroups have different oncogenic potentials in New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Medveczky, M M; Szomolanyi, E; Hesselton, R; DeGrand, D; Geck, P; Medveczky, P G

    1989-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri is a primate tumor virus that induces acute T-cell lymphomas in New World monkeys. Strains of this virus have been previously classified into three groups on the basis of extreme DNA variability of the rightmost region of unique L-DNA. To compare the oncogenic potentials of various strains, we inoculated New Zealand White rabbits with viruses representing groups A, B, and C of herpesvirus saimiri. The results showed that a group C strain were highly oncogenic in New Zealand White rabbits; however, group A or B viruses were not oncogenic in these rabbits. Analysis of DNAs of tumor tissues and lymphoid cell lines established from tumors showed that the viral genome exists in circular episomal form. To identify which part of the genome of the group C strain is responsible for the highly oncogenic phenotype, group B-C recombinant strains were constructed by an efficient drug selection technique. Two group B recombinant strains in which the right-end 9.2 kilobase pairs of unique DNA is replaced by group C virus DNA were oncogenic in rabbits, indicating that the rightmost sequences contribute to the oncogenic properties of the group C strain. Oncogenicity of herpesvirus saimiri has been traditionally evaluated in New World monkeys; infection of rabbits with group C strain 484-77 offers a much more accessible animal model to study the mechanism of oncogenicity of this virus. Images PMID:2547988

  14. Effect of growth rate on plasmid DNA production and metabolic performance of engineered Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Martin; Taymaz-Nikerel, Hilal; Gosset, Guillermo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-03-01

    Two engineered Escherichia coli strains, designated VH33 and VH34, were compared to their parent strain W3110 in chemostat mode during plasmid DNA (pDNA) production. In strain VH33 the glucose uptake system was modified with the aim of reducing overflow metabolism. The strain VH34 has an additional deletion of the pyruvate kinase A gene (pykA) to increase pDNA formation. pDNA formation rates as well as kinetic and stoichiometric parameters were investigated in dependence of the growth rate within a range from 0.02 to 0.25 h(-1). Differences between strains were found in terms of the biomass yields on nitrogen and oxygen, as well as on the cell maintenance coefficients. The deletion of pykA led to a significantly increased pDNA yield and productivity. At an optimal growth rate of 0.20 h(-1) it was nearly 60% higher than that of W3110 and VH33. Metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balance analysis showed differences mainly in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The obtained data are useful for the design of cultivation schemes for pDNA production by E. coli.

  15. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA somatic mutations in OXYS and Wistar strain rats.

    PubMed

    Rotskaya, U N; Rogozin, I B; Vasyunina, E A; Kolosova, N G; Malyarchuk, B A; Nevinsky, G A; Sinitsyna, O I

    2009-04-01

    Rats of the OXYS strain are sensitive to oxidative stress and serve as a biological model of premature aging. We have compared spectra of somatic mutations in a control region of mtDNA from the liver of the OXYS rat strain and of Wistar rats as a control. The majority of nucleotide substitutions in the mutation spectra were represented by transitions: 94 and 97% in the OXYS and Wistar rats, respectively. It was shown that 40% of somatic mutations in the control region of mtDNA from Wistar rats were significantly consistent with the model of dislocation mutagenesis. No statistical support for this model was found for mutations in the control region of mtDNA from OXYS rats. The mutation frequency in the ETAS section was higher in the OXYS strain rats than in Wistar rats. These results suggest different mechanisms of mutagenesis in the two rat strains under study.

  16. Synthetic exfoliative toxin A and B DNA probes for detection of toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, S; Barbancon, V; Prevost, G; Piemont, Y

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for the detection of exfoliative toxin (ET) from Staphylococcus aureus were compared: (i) a phenotypic assay, electrosyneresis, and (ii) a genotypic assay, staphylococcal DNA hybridization with oligodeoxynucleotide probes. The probes were chosen from the previously determined sequences of serotype A and B of ET, one probe for serotype A and another for serotype B. Strains exhibiting ET production in electrosyneresis always possessed the ET gene(s). Conversely, some strains not exhibiting ET production in electrosyneresis harbored the ET gene(s). The latter strains produced levels of ET. ET-negative phage group 2 strains of S. aureus as well as tested coagulase-negative staphylococci did not possess the ET gene(s). The sensitivity of the DNA hybridization technique was 10(6) bacteria or 100 ng of genomic DNA. Images PMID:2715322

  17. [Comparative restriction analysis of chromosomal DNA of strains of Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Videlets, I Iu; Starodubtseva, L I; Podgornova, G P; Lutskaia, N I; Shenderov, A N

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA in 5 hereditary variants occurring in Photobacterium leiognathi population was subjected to restriction analysis. The variants differed in the levels and regulation of luminescence and colony morphology. Agarose electrophoresis of DNA fragments isolated after exposure to Hind II, Bam HI, Bgl I and Pst I restriction endonucleases revealed respectively 38, 28, 35 and 29 fragments equally distributed by their molecular weights. Electrophoregrams of the 5 strains were absolutely identical. After exposure of DNA of all the strains to PVu II, Xho II, Sal GI and Eco RI restriction endonucleases there were detected no fragments. The pleoiotropic genetic variation in these strains was not associated with large deletions or amplification of chromosomal DNA regions.

  18. Sex and strain differences in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, C.A.; Way, B.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The hepatocyte primary culture (HPC)/DNA repair test was developed using hepatocytes isolated from male F-344 rats. A number of genetic polymorphisms have been shown to occur in inbred strains of rats, which may lead to variation in biotransformation of xenobiotics resulting in differences in susceptibility to genotoxins. The effect of the strain utilized as a source of hepatocytes was investigated with female Lewis, F-344, and DA rats. Variation was observed when hepatocytes from the three strains were exposed to aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). No clearcut strain differences were seen when cells were exposed to diethylnitrosamine (DEN) or 2-acetylaminofluorene. These results demonstrate that both the strain and the sex of the animal used as a source of hepatocytes can affect the HPC/DNA repair test.

  19. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis.

    We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  20. Geographic Discrimination of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Strains by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Ana María; Niño-Vega, Gustavo; San-Blas, Felipe; San-Blas, Gioconda

    1998-01-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of 33 Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strains from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela produced reproducible amplification products which were sufficiently polymorphic to allow differentiation of the strains. Types generated with five primers (OPG 03, OPG 05, OPG 14, OPG 16, and OPG 18) resulted in a high discriminatory index (0.956). The discriminatory index was slightly reduced (0.940) when only two primers (OPG 3 and OPG 14) were used. A dendrogram based on these results showed a high degree of similarity among the strains, and genetic differences were expressed in clusters related to geographical regions but not to pathological features of the disease. With a few exceptions, strains were sorted into five groups by geographical origin as follows: group I, Venezuelan strains; group II, Brazilian strains; group III, Peruvian strains; group IV, Colombian strains; and group V, Argentinian strains. The group containing the most disparate strains was group V (discriminatory index, 0.633); the discriminatory index for the other four groups was 0.824. The use of primer OPG 18 by itself was sufficient to discriminate species specificity, and the use of primer OPG 14 by itself was sufficient to discriminate among the geographical locations of the strains in the sample. This method may be helpful for epidemiological studies of P. brasiliensis. PMID:9620409

  1. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  2. Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of isolated strains of Taylorella equigenitalis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, M; Asami, Y; Miyazawa, T; Samata, T; Isayama, Y; Honda, M; Ide, Y

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of Taylorella equigenitalis NCTC11184, Kentucky 188, and five strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan were carried out. The three restriction enzymes used, ApaI, NaeI and NotI, cleaved the genomic DNAs of five Japanese strains of T. equigenitalis into relatively limited numbers of restriction fragments, which were well resolved on crossed-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE). The respective profiles after CFGE of the restriction fragments from all five strains were essentially identical to each other after digestion by ApaI, NaeI or NotI. Hence it appears that these strains have a common genome type with respect to these three restriction enzymes. It was also shown that the respective profiles from these strains were essentially different from those of T. equigenitalis NCTC11184 and those of Kentucky 188 after digestion with ApaI, NaeI or NotI.

  3. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  4. DNA-damage-inducible (din) loci are transcriptionally activated in competent Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Love, P.E.; Lyle, M.J.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1985-09-01

    DNA damage-inducible (din) operon fusions were generated in Bacillus subtilis by transpositional mutagenesis. These YB886(din::Tn917-lacZ) fusion isolates produced increased ..beta..-galactosidase when exposed to mitomycin C, UV radiation, or ethyl methanesulfonate, indicating that the lacZ structural gene had inserted into host transcriptional units that are induced by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. One of the fusion strains was DNA-repair deficient and phenotypically resembled a UV-sensitive mutant of B. subtilis. Induction of ..beta..-galactosidase also occurred in the competent subpopulation of each of the din fusion strains, independent of exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Both the DNA-damage-inducible and competence-inducible components of ..beta..-galactosidase expression were abolished by the recE4 mutation, which inhibits SOS-like (SOB) induction but does not interfere with the development of the component state. The results indicate that gene expression is stimulated at specific loci within the B. subtilis chromosome both by DNA-damaging agents and by the development of competence and that this response is under the control of the SOB regulatory system. Furthermore, they demonstrate that at the molecular level SOB induction and the development of competence are interrelated cellular events.

  5. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) for differentiation between Thai and Myanmar strains of Wuchereria bancrofti

    PubMed Central

    Nuchprayoon, Surang; Junpee, Alisa; Poovorawan, Yong

    2007-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a mosquito-borne disease caused by mosquito-transmitted filarial nematodes, including Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. The Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Program in Thailand has reduced the prevalence of nocturnally subperiodic W. bancrofti (Thai strain), mainly transmitted by the Ochlerotatus (Aedes) niveus group in Thailand to 0.57/100,000 population. However, it is estimated that more than one million Myanmar migrants with high prevalence of bancroftian filariasis have settled in the large urban cities of Thailand. These infected migrants carry the nocturnally periodic W. bancrofti (Myanmar strain) which has Culex quinquefasciatus as the main mosquito vector. Although transmissions of the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti by the Thai Cx. quinquefasciatus has never been reported, previous study showed that Cx. quinquefasciatus could nurture the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti to the infective stage. Thus, the potential now exists for a re-emergence of bancroftian filariasis in Thailand. The present study was undertaken in an attempt to differentiate between the Thai and Myanmar strains of W. bancrofti. Methods The microfilarial periodicity of Thai and the Myanmar strains of W. bancrofti were determined. Comparative morphology and morphometry of microfilariae and a study of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was performed. The Nei's genetic distance was calculated, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic mean (UPGMA). Results The Thai strain of W. bancrofti was nocturnally subperiodic, and the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti was nocturnally periodic. The body length, cephalic space length, and cephalic space width of the Thai strain of W. bancrofti were significantly larger than those of the Myanmar strain of W. bancrofti (p < 0.05). However, an overlapping mean of these parameters made it impractical for field application. RAPD-PCR profiles showed specific

  6. Strain dependent UV degradation of Escherichia coli DNA monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Cristina M; Lapusan, Alexandra; Mihaiu, Liora; Stefan, Razvan

    2014-01-05

    In this work we present a method for detection of DNA isolated from nonpathogenic Escherichia coli strains, respectively. Untreated and UV irradiated bacterial DNAs were analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopy, to investigate their screening characteristic features and their structural radiotolerance at 253.7nm. FT-IR spectra, providing a high molecular structural information, have been analyzed in the wavenumber range 800-1800cm(-1). FT-IR signatures, spectroscopic band assignments and structural interpretations of these DNAs are reported. Also, UV damage at the DNA molecular level is of interest. Strain dependent UV degradation of DNA from E. coli has been observed. Particularly, alterations in nucleic acid bases, base pairing and base stacking have been found. Also changes in the DNA conformation and deoxyribose were detected. Based on this work, specific E. coli DNA-ligand interactions, drug development and vaccine design for a better understanding of the infection mechanism caused by an interference between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and for a better control of disease, respectively, might be further investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Besides, understanding the pathways for UV damaged DNA response, like nucleic acids repair mechanisms is appreciated.

  7. Holliday Triangle Hunter (HolT Hunter): Efficient Software for Identifying Low Strain DNA Triangular Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, W.B.

    2012-04-16

    Synthetic DNA nanostructures are typically held together primarily by Holliday junctions. One of the most basic types of structures possible to assemble with only DNA and Holliday junctions is the triangle. To date, however, only equilateral triangles have been assembled in this manner - primarily because it is difficult to figure out what configurations of Holliday triangles have low strain. Early attempts at identifying such configurations relied upon calculations that followed the strained helical paths of DNA. Those methods, however, were computationally expensive, and failed to find many of the possible solutions. I have developed a new approach to identifying Holliday triangles that is computationally faster, and finds well over 95% of the possible solutions. The new approach is based on splitting the problem into two parts. The first part involves figuring out all the different ways that three featureless rods of the appropriate length and diameter can weave over and under one another to form a triangle. The second part of the computation entails seeing whether double helical DNA backbones can fit into the shape dictated by the rods in such a manner that the strands can cross over from one domain to the other at the appropriate spots. Structures with low strain (that is, good fit between the rods and the helices) on all three edges are recorded as promising for assembly.

  8. Comparison of Mycoplasma arthritidis strains by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, and DNA restriction analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Voelker, L L; Ehle, L J; Hirsch, S; Dutenhofer, C; Olson, K; Beck, B

    1995-01-01

    Twenty Mycoplasma arthritidis strains or isolates were compared by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by an antiserum adsorption technique, Western immunoblotting, and restriction analysis of chromosomal DNA. Antigenic markers that defined strains related to strains 158p10p9, PG6, and H606 were identified. In addition, restriction analysis allowed all 20 strains to be divided into six groups. Results of restriction analysis corresponded generally with antigenic similarities, although the former did not allow grouping with as fine a precision as the latter. However, intrastrain antigenic variability, which is common among many Mycoplasma species, including M. arthritidis, introduced a complicating factor into our attempts at antigenic analysis. While serologic and antigenic analyses remain useful, we recommend that they be used with caution and in combination with other techniques for identifying and characterizing new isolates and newly acquired strains. Combinations of these techniques have proven to be useful in our laboratory for quality control and for uncovering interesting relationships among strains subjected to animal passage and their less virulent antecedents and among strains originally classified as the same but obtained from different sources and maintained, sometimes for decades, in different laboratories. PMID:7494014

  9. Phylogeny of Flabellulidae (Amoebozoa: Leptomyxida) inferred from SSU rDNA sequences of the type strain of Flabellula citata Schaeffer, 1926 and newly isolated strains of marine amoebae.

    PubMed

    Dyková, Iva; Fiala, Ivan; Pecková, Hana; Dvoráková, Helena

    2008-12-01

    New strains of non-vannellid flattened amoebae isolated from fish, an invertebrate and the marine environment were studied together with Flabellula citata Schaeffer, 1926 selected by morphology as a reference strain. The study revealed a paucity of features distinguishing individual strains at the generic level, but clearly evidenced mutual phylogenetic relationships within the assemblage of strains as well as their affiliation to the Leptomyxida. In this study, the SSU rDNA dataset of leptomyxids was expanded and a new branching pattern was presented within this lineage of Amoebozoa. Sequences of three newly introduced strains clustered in close relationship with the type strain of F. citata, the type species of the genus. Three strains, including one resembling Flamella sp., were positioned within a sister-group containing Paraflabellula spp. Results of phylogenetic analysis confirmed doubts of previous authors regarding generic assignment of several Rhizanmoeba and Ripidomnyxa strains.

  10. A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zaisheng; Chang, Dingran; Zhang, Wenqing; Tram, Kha; Lee, Christine; Kim, Peter; Salena, Bruno J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pathogenic strains of bacteria are known to cause various infectious diseases and there is a growing demand for molecular probes that can selectively recognize them. Here we report a special DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD‐CD1, that shows exquisite specificity for a pathogenic strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). RFD‐CD1 was derived by an in vitro selection approach where a random‐sequence DNA library was allowed to react with an unpurified molecular mixture derived from this strain of C. difficle, coupled with a subtractive selection strategy to eliminate cross‐reactivities to unintended C. difficile strains and other bacteria species. RFD‐CD1 is activated by a truncated version of TcdC, a transcription factor, that is unique to the targeted strain of C. difficle. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in vitro selection offers an effective approach for deriving functional nucleic acid probes that are capable of achieving strain‐specific recognition of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26676768

  11. Repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells made UV light resistant by fusion with X-ray-inactivated Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1986-10-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive human disease, characterized by an extreme sensitivity to sunlight, caused by the inability of cells to repair UV light-induced damage to DNA. Cell fusion was used to transfer fragments of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) chromosomes into XP cells. The hybrid cells exhibited UV resistance and DNA repair characteristics comparable to those expressed by CHO cells, and their DNA had greater homology with CHO DNA than did the DNA from XP cells. Control experiments consisted of fusion of irradiated and unirradiated XP cells and repeated exposure of unfused XP cells to UV doses used for hybrid selection. These treatments did not result in an increase in UV resistance, repair capability, or homology with CHO DNA. The hybrid cell lines do not, therefore, appear to be XP revertants. The establishment of these stable hybrid cell lines is an initial step toward identifying and cloning CHO DNA repair genes that complement the XP defect in human cells. The method should also be applicable to cloning genes for other diseases, such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Fanconi's anemia.

  12. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  13. Establishment of a heteroplasmic mouse strain with interspecific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and improvement of a PCR-RFLP-based measurement system for estimation of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Hiroshi; Cao, Liqin; Yamaguchi, Midori; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Taya, Choji

    2017-02-20

    Mitochondrial DNA segregation is one of the characteristic modes of mitochondrial inheritance in which the heteroplasmic state of mitochondrial DNA is transmitted to the next generation in variable proportions. To analyze mitochondrial DNA segregation, we produced a heteroplasmic mouse strain with interspecific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, which contains two types of mitochondrial DNA derived from C57BL/6J and Mus spretus strains. The strain was produced on a C57BL/6J nuclear genomic background by microinjection of donor cytoplasm into fertilized eggs. The PCR-RFLP semi-quantitative analysis method, which was improved to reduce the effect of heteroduplex formation, was used to measure the proportion of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA in tissues. Founder mice contained up to approximately 14% of exogenous Mus spretus mitochondrial DNA molecules in their tails, and the detected proportions differed among tissues of the same individual. Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA is transmitted to the next generation in varying proportions under the maternal inheritance mode. This mitochondrial heteroplasmic mouse strain and the improved PCR-RFLP measurement system enable analysis of the transmission of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA variants between tissues and generations.

  14. DNA fingerprinting differentiation between β-carotene hyperproducer strains of Dunaliella from around the world

    PubMed Central

    Olmos, Jorge; Ochoa, Leonel; Paniagua-Michel, Jesus; Contreras, Rosalía

    2009-01-01

    Background Dunaliella salina is the most important species of the genus for β-carotene production. Several investigations have demonstrated that D. salina produces more than 10% dry weight of pigment and that the species grows in salt saturated lagoons. High plasticity in the green stage and the almost indistinguishable differences in the red phase make identification and differentiation of species and ecotypes very difficult and time consuming. Results In this work, we applied our intron-sizing method to compare the 18S rDNA fingerprint between D. salina (CCAP 19/18), D. salina/bardawil (UTEX LB2538) and β-carotene hyperproducing strains of Dunaliella isolated from salt saturated lagoons in Baja, Mexico. All hyperproducer strains reached β-carotene levels of about 10 pg/cell. Optical microscopy did not allow to differentiate between these Dunaliella strains; however, 18S rDNA fingerprinting methodology allowed us to differentiate D. salina from D. salina/bardawil. Conclusion In Baja Mexico we found D. salina and D. salina/bardawil species by using intron-sizing-method. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Dunaliella 18S rDNA gene sequences were analyzed with our methodology and extraordinary correlation was found with experimental results. PMID:19563682

  15. Application of DNA markers to estimate genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, Karol; Polok, Kornelia; Zieliński, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The obligatory human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the most important etiological factor of tuberculosis. Unfortunately, there is little information about genetic diversity of this pathogen. The main aim of this research was the estimation of genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis on the basis of various categories of DNA markers. The genome of 32 strains were scanned by DNA markers such RAPD, IS6110 and catalase-peroxidase katG gene. All 162 identified loci were polymorphic. The genetic diversity coefficient (HT) of M. tuberculosis was 0.32 for RAPD and 0.27 for IS 6110. There were 14 alleles in katG gene. All strains were characterised by the individual molecular pattern. Genetic similarity varied from 0.13 to 0.94 (RAPD markers) and from 0 to 1 for (IS6110). M. tuberculosis strains did not represent a clonal structure, single source of transmission and epidemiological relationships as well. The applied DNA markers proved to be highly efficient for analysis of genetic structure of M. tuberculosis.

  16. DNA characterization of simian Entamoeba histolytica-like strains to differentiate them from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Takano, Jun-ichiro; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Kato, Miyoko; Narita, Toyoko; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Koji

    2009-10-01

    Two simian Entamoeba histolytica-like strains, EHMfas1 and P19-061405, have been suggested to represent a new species based on genetic characterization. Sequence analyses of the hexokinase, glucose phosphate isomerase, and phosphoglucomutase genes supported the previous findings of isoenzyme analyses demonstrating a new zymodeme pattern. Phylogenetic studies of 18S rDNA, 5.8S rDNA, the chaperonin 60 gene, and the pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase gene showed original clusters of simian E. histolytica-like strains below or near E. histolytica, respectively. Comparative studies of the chitinase and the serine-rich E. histolytica protein genes and locus 1-2 region revealed that most mutated units were shared among the simian E. histolytica-like strains. The similarities of each of the repeating units within the simian E. histolytica-like strains or E. histolytica and the differences of those between the both might be generated by concerted evolution. Our results indicate that EHMfas1 and P19-061405 should be considered to be the same species, despite that they were isolated from different monkey species and different habitats. Simian E. histolytica-like amebas may be endemic to macaque monkeys, as a counterpart to E. histolytica in humans, and should be differentiated from E. histolytica by the revival name Entamoeba nuttalli, as proposed for P19-061405.

  17. Comparison of DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms of Nostoc strains in and from cycads.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, P; Haselkorn, R; Bergman, B; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1989-01-01

    DNA was prepared from cyanobacteria freshly isolated from coralloid roots of natural populations of five cycad species: Ceratozamia mexicana mexicana (Mexico), C. mexicana robusta (Mexico), Dioon spinulosum (Mexico), Zamia furfuraceae (Mexico) and Z. skinneri (Costa Rica). Using the Southern blot technique and cloned Anabaena PCC 7120 nifK and glnA genes as probes, restriction fragment length polymorphisms of these cyanobacterial symbionts were compared. The five cyanobacterial preparations showed differences in the sizes of their DNA fragments hybridizing with both probes, indicating that different cyanobacterial species and/or strains were in the symbiotic associations. On the other hand, a similar comparison of cyanobacteria freshly collected from a single Encephalartos altensteinii coralloid root and from three independently subcultured isolates from the same coralloid root revealed that these were likely to be one and the same organism. Moreover, the complexity of restriction patterns shows that a mixture of Nostoc strains can associate with a single cycad species although a single cyanobacterial strain can predominate in the root of a single cycad plant. Thus, a wide range of Nostoc strains appear to associate with the coralloid roots of cycads.

  18. Genomic and cDNA actin sequences from a virulent strain of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, U; Meza, I; Agabian, N

    1987-01-01

    Invasiveness of Entamoeba histolytica strains that cause acute amoebiasis is characterized by aggressive behavior associated with cell motility and actin function. Analysis of actin genes from E. histolytica was initiated by devising methods for the isolation of biologically active nucleic acids, which allowed the preparation of cDNA and genomic DNA libraries. E. histolytica actin-encoding cDNAs and genomic clones have been isolated from libraries prepared from the virulent HM1:IMSS strain using a heterologous actin probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis of three independent cDNA clones and one genomic clone reveals a highly unusual codon bias and the absence of intervening sequences in E. histolytica actin. The coding sequence of the genomic clone is identical to that of two of the three cDNA clones. These represent at least two distinct mRNAs differing only by five silent changes in the protein coding sequence. Multiple genomic copies of the actin gene can be detected by Southern hybridization. E. histolytica actin exhibits a higher degree of homology to cytoplasmic than to muscle actin. Although the protein has been shown not to bind DNase I, the inferred amino acid sequence indicates conservation of all residues implied to participate in this binding. Images PMID:2883657

  19. Aflatoxin B1-Induced Developmental and DNA Damage in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei-Hong; Xue, Kathy S.; Tang, Lili; Williams, Phillip L.; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a ubiquitous mycotoxin produced by toxicogenic Aspergillus species. AFB1 has been reported to cause serious adverse health effects, such as cancers and abnormal development and reproduction, in animals and humans. AFB1 is also a potent genotoxic mutagen that causes DNA damage in vitro and in vivo. However, the link between DNA damage and abnormal development and reproduction is unclear. To address this issue, we examined the DNA damage, germline apoptosis, growth, and reproductive toxicity following exposure to AFB1, using Caenorhabditis elegans as a study model. Results found that AFB1 induced DNA damage and germline apoptosis, and significantly inhibited growth and reproduction of the nematodes in a concentration-dependent manner. Exposure to AFB1 inhibited growth or reproduction more potently in the DNA repair-deficient xpa-1 nematodes than the wild-type N2 strain. According to the relative expression level of pathway-related genes measured by real-time PCR, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway was found to be associated with AFB1-induced germline apoptosis, which further played an essential role in the dysfunction of growth and reproduction in C. elegans. PMID:28035971

  20. DnaJ sequences of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from outbreaks of hospital infection are highly similar to Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwei; van Hung, Pham; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Shigeru; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Ezaki, Takayuki

    2011-07-01

    Bacillus cereus is becoming an important nomosomial pathogen because of frequent isolation from blood cultures and from severe systemic infections. To differentiate highly pathogenic outbreak strain of B. cereus from other sources of the Bacillus cereus, we attempted to analyze their dnaJ sequences. Assays indicated that dnaJ sequence similarity of all of 52 blood culture isolates of B. cereus ranged from 92.8% to 100%. The distance between B. anthracis and B. cereus except six outbreak isolates ranged from 3.8% to 6.4%. The dnaJ sequences of six outbreak strains of B. cereus (GTC 02891, GTC 02896, GTC 02916, GTC 02917, GTC 03221, and GTC 03222) were closely related to those of B. anthracis (99.2%-99.5% sequence similarity). Ba813 sequences were only found in the six outbreak strains of B. cereus. The other pathogenic factors of B. anthracis were not found in these six outbreak strains, with the exception of GTC 02891 (cap-positive). The six outbreak strains formed clear β-hemolytic colonies on a sheep blood agar plate. Our findings suggest that outbreak strains of B. cereus isolated from blood cultures are likely to have the risk of causing serious infection, and dnaJ and Ba813 are important markers to identify such strains. Phylogenetic analysis of dnaJ and MLST revealed that the six outbreak strains of B. cereus are closely related to B. anthracis.

  1. Outer Membrane Proteins and DNA Profiles in Strains of Haemophilus parasuis Recovered from Systemic and Respiratory Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Alvaro; Oliveira, Simone; Torremorell, Montserrat; Pijoan, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Polyserositis caused by Haemophilus parasuis is an important disease that affects mostly weaned pigs. Recent studies have shown that virulence can differ among strains recovered from distinct body sites and also that it may be related to the presence of certain outer membrane proteins (OMPs). The objective of this study was to compare the OMP and DNA profiles of H. parasuis strains isolated from systemic and respiratory sites from diseased and healthy pigs. Strains evaluated in this study were processed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and repetitive-PCR techniques. Two experiments were conducted in order to better define the relationship among genotype, phenotype, and site of isolation. Experiment 1 included 53 H. parasuis isolates recovered from healthy and diseased pigs from unrelated herds. Experiment 2 included 31 isolates of H. parasuis obtained from diseased pigs involved in an outbreak in a large, multifarm system. Results showed that strains recovered from systemic sites had more homogeneous OMP and DNA profiles than those isolated from respiratory sites. Evaluation of isolates involved in the multifarm outbreak showed that only two H. parasuis strains were causing disease. These strains had homogeneous OMP and DNA profiles. However, it was noted that these two parameters were unrelated, since strains classified in the same genotype group expressed different OMP profiles. The homogeneity of OMP and DNA profiles of strains isolated from systemic sites strongly suggests the existence of clonal relationships between virulent strains and also suggests that expression of certain OMP profiles may be related to virulence. PMID:11325986

  2. Genotyping by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alli, John Adeolu; Iwalokun, Bamidele A; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Okonko, Iheanyi Omezuruike

    2015-01-01

    Yogurt and starter culture producers are still searching strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus to produce healthier yogurt with a longer shelf life and better texture, taste, and quality. This study determined the genotyping of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains recovered from Nigerian yogurts. Yogurt samples were collected from four different states of South West regions of Nigeria. Isolates were obtained from MRS Medium and biochemically characterized. This was further confirmed by API50CH. The bacteriocin positivity and activity was determined. Genomic characterization of our Lactobacillus acidophilus strains was done with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR. All yogurt samples containing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains meet the probiotic requirement of ≥10(6) cfu/mL. The gel picture revealed 6 RAPD clonal types of Lactobacillus acidophilus strains with RAPD type C observed to be more common. Significant differences existed in the mean growth inhibition zone (t = -7.32, P < 0.05 for E. coli ATCC; t = -6.19, P < 0.05 for E. coli clinical isolates; t = -6.16, P < 0.05 for Enterobacter sp; t = -11.92, P < 0.05 for Salmonella typhi, t = -1.10, P > 0.05 Staphylococcus aureus). No correlation between the bacteriocin production, activity, and their RAPD clonal division (X(2) = 7.49, P = 0.1610, df = 5). In conclusion, L. acidophilus isolated in Nigeria samples met the probiotic requirements of ≥10(6) cfu/mL and produce bacteriocins with good spectrum of activity.

  3. Derivation of DNA probes for enumeration of a specific strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus in piglet digestive tract samples.

    PubMed Central

    Rodtong, S; Dobbinson, S; Thode-Andersen, S; McConnell, M A; Tannock, G W

    1993-01-01

    Four DNA probes were derived that hybridized specifically to DNA from Lactobacillus acidophilus O. The probes were constructed by randomly cloning lactobacillus DNA in plasmid vector pBR322. Two of the probes (pSR1 and pSR2) were composed of vector and plasmid DNA inserts (3.6 and 1.6 kb, respectively); the others (pSR3 and pSR4) were composed of vector and chromosomally derived inserts (6.9 and 1.4 kb, respectively). The probes were used to enumerate, by colony hybridization, strain O in digestive tract samples collected from piglets inoculated 24 hours previously with a culture of the strain. The probes did not hybridize to DNA from lactobacilli inhabiting the digestive tract of uninoculated piglets. Strain O made up about 10% of the total lactobacillus population of the pars esophagea and about 20% of the population in other digestive tract samples. Images PMID:8285690

  4. DNA-directed aniline mustards with high selectivity for adenine or guanine bases: mutagenesis in a variety of Salmonella typhimurium strains differing in DNA-repair capability.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Denny, W A; Boritzki, T J

    1994-04-01

    Two closely-related aniline monomustards (1 and 2), linked to a DNA-targeting acridine chromophore by a linker chain of different length, show high selectivity for alkylation of polymer DNA. The shorter-chain derivative (2) alkylates mainly at guanine N7 sites, while the longer-chain analogue (1) reacts almost exclusively at adenine N1. The biological effects of these compounds have been studied in standard Ames Salmonella typhimurium strains in order to determine the mutagenic consequences of such well-defined DNA lesions, and the effect of DNA-repair systems on them. Both compounds caused detectable mutations in strains TA1537, TA98 or TA100 and some related strains. Mutation rates were greatly enhanced in strains carrying either a uvrB deletion or the plasmid pKM101. Frameshift mutagenesis by both compounds was completely eliminated by recA deletion, in both the presence or absence of the plasmid. The adenine-selective compound (1) appeared more sensitive to the DNA-repair defects than the guanine-selective derivative (2). Additionally, only the adenine-selective compound (1) caused statistically significant levels of detectable mutation in the repair-proficient strains TA102, TA4001 or TA4006. The bacterial mutagenesis evidence suggests that a bulky, major groove-residing adenine lesion may be more readily recognised by DNA-repair systems, and more likely to lead to a wider range of mutagenic events, than a similar guanine lesion.

  5. DNA Fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae Strains Using Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) - Fragment Length Analysis (FLA)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ronald W.; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO1, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year.2 The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped3,4 and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites).5 Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci.5,6,7 Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)5 analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing7,8,9, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA)10 has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China11,12, Malawi8, the Philippines10,13, and Brazil14. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS).10 The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions.10 The PCR products may be subjected to agarose

  6. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae strains using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) - fragment length analysis (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ronald W; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-07-15

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year. The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites). Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China, Malawi, the Philippines, and Brazil. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS). The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions. The PCR products may be subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis to verify the

  7. A method for high-throughput production of sequence-verified DNA libraries and strain collections.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin D; Schlecht, Ulrich; Xu, Weihong; Suresh, Sundari; Horecka, Joe; Proctor, Michael J; Aiyar, Raeka S; Bennett, Richard A O; Chu, Angela; Li, Yong Fuga; Roy, Kevin; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Hyman, Richard W; Levy, Sasha F; St Onge, Robert P

    2017-02-13

    The low costs of array-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries are empowering rapid advances in quantitative and synthetic biology. However, high synthesis error rates, uneven representation, and lack of access to individual oligonucleotides limit the true potential of these libraries. We have developed a cost-effective method called Recombinase Directed Indexing (REDI), which involves integration of a complex library into yeast, site-specific recombination to index library DNA, and next-generation sequencing to identify desired clones. We used REDI to generate a library of ~3,300 DNA probes that exhibited > 96% purity and remarkable uniformity (> 95% of probes within twofold of the median abundance). Additionally, we created a collection of ~9,000 individually accessible CRISPR interference yeast strains for > 99% of genes required for either fermentative or respiratory growth, demonstrating the utility of REDI for rapid and cost-effective creation of strain collections from oligonucleotide pools. Our approach is adaptable to any complex DNA library, and fundamentally changes how these libraries can be parsed, maintained, propagated, and characterized.

  8. Simple Sequence Repeats Together with Mismatch Repair Deficiency Can Bias Mutagenic Pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Chronic Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Alejandro J.; Feliziani, Sofía; Di Rienzo, Julio A.; Smania, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and undergoes a process of genetic adaptation based on mutagenesis. We evaluated the role of mononucleotide G:C and A:T simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in this adaptive process. An in silico survey of the genome sequences of 7 P. aeruginosa strains showed that mononucleotide G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were greatly under-represented in coding regions, suggesting a strong counterselection process for G:C SSRs with lengths >5 bp but not for A:T SSRs. A meta-analysis of published whole genome sequence data for a P. aeruginosa strain from a CF patient with chronic airway infection showed that G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were frequently mutated during the infection process through the insertion or deletion of one or more SSR subunits. The mutation tendency of G:C SSRs was length-dependent and increased exponentially as a function of SSR length. When this strain naturally became a stable Mismatch Repair System (MRS)-deficient mutator, the degree of increase of G:C SSRs mutations (5-fold) was much higher than that of other types of mutation (2.2-fold or less). Sequence analysis of several mutated genes reported for two different collections, both containing mutator and non-mutator strains of P. aeruginosa from CF chronic infections, showed that the proportion of G:C SSR mutations was significantly higher in mutators than in non-mutators, whereas no such difference was observed for A:T SSR mutations. Our findings, taken together, provide genome-scale evidences that under a MRS-deficient background, long G:C SSRs are able to stochastically bias mutagenic pathways by making the genes in which they are harbored more prone to mutation. The combination of MRS deficiency and virulence-related genes that contain long G:C SSRs is therefore a matter of concern in P. aeruginosa CF chronic infection. PMID:24278287

  9. A mononucleotide repeat in PRRT2 is an important, frequent target of mismatch repair deficiency in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Inês Teles; Cano, David; Böttcher, René; van der Korput, Hetty; Dinjens, Winand; Jenster, Guido; Trapman, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system corrects DNA replication mismatches thereby contributing to the maintenance of genomic stability. MMR deficiency has been observed in prostate cancer but its impact on the genomic landscape of these tumours is not known. In order to identify MMR associated mutations in prostate cancer we have performed whole genome sequencing of the MMR deficient PC346C prostate cancer cell line. We detected a total of 1196 mutations in PC346C which was 1.5-fold higher compared to a MMR proficient prostate cancer sample (G089). Of all different mutation classes, frameshifts in mononucleotide repeat (MNR) sequences were significantly enriched in the PC346C sample. As a result, a selection of genes with frameshift mutations in MNR was further assessed regarding its mutational status in a comprehensive panel of prostate, ovarian, endometrial and colorectal cancer cell lines. We identified PRRT2 and DAB2IP to be frequently mutated in MMR deficient cell lines, colorectal and endometrial cancer patient samples. Further characterization of PRRT2 revealed an important role of this gene in cancer biology. Both normal prostate cell lines and a colorectal cancer cell line showed increased proliferation, migration and invasion when expressing the mutated form of PRRT2 (ΔPRRT2). The wild-type PRRT2 (PRRT2wt) had an inhibitory effect in proliferation, consistent with the low expression level of PRRT2 in cancer versus normal prostate samples. PMID:27907910

  10. Ribosomal DNA analysis of tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted Ethiopian Trypanosoma vivax strains in view of improved molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fikru, Regassa; Matetovici, Irina; Rogé, Stijn; Merga, Bekana; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Büscher, Philippe; Van Reet, Nick

    2016-04-15

    Animal trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma vivax (T. vivax) is a devastating disease causing serious economic losses. Most molecular diagnostics for T. vivax infection target the ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA) but are challenged by the heterogeneity among T. vivax strains. In this study, we investigated the rDNA heterogeneity of Ethiopian T. vivax strains in relation to their presence in tsetse-infested and tsetse-free areas and its effect on molecular diagnosis. We sequenced the rDNA loci of six Ethiopian (three from tsetse-infested and three from tsetse-free areas) and one Nigerian T. vivax strain. We analysed the obtained sequences in silico for primer-mismatches of some commonly used diagnostic PCR assays and for GC content. With these data, we selected some rDNA diagnostic PCR assays for evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore we constructed two phylogenetic networks based on sequences within the smaller subunit (SSU) of 18S and within the 5.8S and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) to assess the relatedness of Ethiopian T. vivax strains to strains from other African countries and from South America. In silico analysis of the rDNA sequence showed important mismatches of some published diagnostic PCR primers and high GC content of T. vivax rDNA. The evaluation of selected diagnostic PCR assays with specimens from cattle under natural T. vivax challenge showed that this high GC content interferes with the diagnostic accuracy of PCR, especially in cases of mixed infections with T. congolense. Adding betain to the PCR reaction mixture can enhance the amplification of T. vivax rDNA but decreases the sensitivity for T. congolense and Trypanozoon. The networks illustrated that Ethiopian T. vivax strains are considerably heterogeneous and two strains (one from tsetse-infested and one from tsetse-free area) are more related to the West African and South American strains than to the East African strains. The rDNA locus sequence of six Ethiopian T. vivax

  11. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  12. Selective elimination of potential ring-X as opposed to rod-X in matings of males treated with diepoxybutane (DEB) to repair-deficient st mus302 females of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmering, S.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence is presented demonstrating that diepoxybutane (DEB)-induced ring-X loss in sperm/late spermatids of the Drosophila melanogaster male is substantially lower in matings of ring-X males with repair-deficient st mus302 than ordinary females, but the reverse is obtained when rod-X males are so tested. Taken in conjunction with a higher rate of induced (partial) loss of the rod-Y chromosome of the male with the repair-deficient females suggests the possibility of a greater likelihood that DEB-induced prebreak lesions in ring chromosomes as opposed to rod chromosomes will be eliminated (presumably as a dominant lethals) in the presence of the maternal st mus302 genotype.

  13. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a human cDNA encoding the antimutator enzyme 8-hydroxyguanine-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Wei, Ying-Fei; Carter, Kenneth C.; Klungland, Arne; Anselmino, Catherine; Wang, Rui-Ping; Augustus, Meena; Lindahl, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    The major mutagenic base lesion in DNA caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species is 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine). In bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this damaged base is excised by a DNA glycosylase with an associated lyase activity for chain cleavage. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed a human cDNA with partial sequence homology to the relevant yeast gene. The encoded 47-kDa human enzyme releases free 8-hydroxyguanine from oxidized DNA and introduces a chain break in a double-stranded oligonucleotide specifically at an 8-hydroxyguanine residue base paired with cytosine. Expression of the human protein in a DNA repair-deficient E. coli mutM mutY strain partly suppresses its spontaneous mutator phenotype. The gene encoding the human enzyme maps to chromosome 3p25. These results show that human cells have an enzyme that can initiate base excision repair at mutagenic DNA lesions caused by active oxygen. PMID:9223306

  14. Comparison of Haemophilus parasuis reference strains and field isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and protein profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease and is a pathogen of swine in high-health status herds. Reports on serotyping of field strains from outbreaks describe that approximately 30% of them are nontypeable and therefore cannot be traced. Molecular typing methods have been used as alternatives to serotyping. This study was done to compare random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles and whole cell protein (WCP) lysate profiles as methods for distinguishing H. parasuis reference strains and field isolates. Results The DNA and WCP lysate profiles of 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of H. parasuis were analyzed using the Dice and neighbor joining algorithms. The results revealed unique and reproducible DNA and protein profiles among the reference strains and field isolates studied. Simpson’s index of diversity showed significant discrimination between isolates when three 10mer primers were combined for the RAPD method and also when both the RAPD and WCP lysate typing methods were combined. Conclusions The RAPD profiles seen among the reference strains and field isolates did not appear to change over time which may reflect a lack of DNA mutations in the genes of the samples. The recent field isolates had different WCP lysate profiles than the reference strains, possibly because the number of passages of the type strains may affect their protein expression. PMID:22703293

  15. Cell fusion-mediated improvement in transfection competence for repair-deficient mutant of mouse T cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomi, T.; Hieda-Shiomi, N.; Sato, K.; Yoshizumi, T.; Nakazawa, T.

    1988-03-01

    A multiple mutagen-sensitive mutant (XUM1) of mouse T-cell lymphoma line, L5178Y, is hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet (UV) light, and cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C). The frequency of transfection for XUM1 cells after exposure to calcium phosphate-coprecipitated pSV2neo DNA was more than 10(4)-fold less effective than that for Ltk-aprt- (LTA) cells. Other transfection methods (DEAE-dextran and polybrene-DMSO) were not effective for L5178Y and XUM1 cells. The transfection-proficient trait of LTA cells was demonstrated to be genetically dominant by examining the the transfection frequency in hybrid clones constructed between XUM1 and LTA cells. To circumvent the problem with XUM1, the LTA genes necessary for transformation processes were introduced into XUM1 cells by constructing hybrids between XUM1 and LTA cells irradiated with X-rays which causes directional chromosome elimination for hybrid cells. Four of 194 hybrid clones tested were transfection-proficient and hypersensitive to UV (XL102, XL107, XL215, and XL216). All four clones were not hypersensitive to X-rays or mitomycin C. The frequencies of transfection for XL102 and XL216 were nearly the same level as that for LTA cells. The efficiency of transfection for XL107 and XL215 was 10 to 100-fold lower than that for LTA cells.

  16. Photodynamic inactivation and mutagenesis by angelicin (isopsoralen) or thiopyronin (methylene red) in wild-type and repair-deficient strains of bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    Photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophage T4 particles, mediated by either angelicin or thiopyronin, is enhanced by defects in the T4 uvsW-uvsX-uvsY postreplication repair system but not by a defect in the denV pyrimidine-dimer-excision system. There was no evidence for functional interactions between the two repair systems. As observed previously with 8-methoxypsoralen, photodynamic mutagenesis with angelicin is abolished by defects in the uvsW-uvsX-uvsY system.

  17. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  18. Evaluation of three methods for DNA fingerprinting of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from goats in Poland.

    PubMed

    Stefańska, Ilona; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Binek, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic approaches based on metabolic and biological characteristics of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis have been limited due to insufficient discrimination between closely related isolates. In this paper we present performance and convenience of three molecular typing methods: BOX-PCR, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction site (ADSRRS-fingerprinting) in genome analysis of these bacteria. Among examined 61 strains there were distinguished four, eight and 10 different genotypes by BOX-PCR, RAPD and ADSRRS-fingerprinting, respectively. The value of discrimination index was the lowest for BOX-PCR (D = 0.265), much bigger for RAPD (D = 0.539) and the highest for ADSRRS-fingerprinting (D = 0.604). The good discriminatory ability and reproducibility of RAPD and ADSRRS-fingerprinting indicates that those techniques may be particularly applied for epidemiological studies of C. pseudotuberculosis isolates. We found that ADSRRS-fingerprinting is a rapid method offering good discrimination power, excellent reproducibility and may be applied for epidemiological studies of intraspecific genetic relatedness of C. pseudotuberculosis strains.

  19. Discriminatory power and reproducibility of novel DNA typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Kristin; Arnold, Catherine; Cataldi, Angel; Gutiérrez, M Cristina; Haas, Walter H; Panaiotov, Stefan; Skuce, Robin A; Supply, Philip; van der Zanden, Adri G M; van Soolingen, Dick

    2005-11-01

    In recent years various novel DNA typing methods have been developed which are faster and easier to perform than the current internationally standardized IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing method. However, there has been no overview of the utility of these novel typing methods, and it is largely unknown how they compare to previously published methods. In this study, the discriminative power and reproducibility of nine recently described PCR-based typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were investigated using the strain collection of the interlaboratory study of Kremer et al. This strain collection contains 90 M. tuberculosis complex and 10 non-M. tuberculosis complex mycobacterial strains, as well as 31 duplicated DNA samples to assess reproducibility. The highest reproducibility was found with variable numbers of tandem repeat typing using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU VNTR) and fast ligation-mediated PCR (FLiP), followed by second-generation spoligotyping, ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR), VNTR typing using five repeat loci identified at the Queens University of Belfast (QUB VNTR), and the Amadio speciation PCR. Poor reproducibility was associated with fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism typing, which was performed in three different laboratories. The methods were ordered from highest discrimination to lowest by the Hunter-Gaston discriminative index as follows: QUB VNTR typing, MIRU VNTR typing, FLiP, LM-PCR, and spoligotyping. We conclude that both VNTR typing methods and FLiP typing are rapid, highly reliable, and discriminative epidemiological typing methods for M. tuberculosis and that VNTR typing is the epidemiological typing method of choice for the near future.

  20. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  1. The Mre11 complex: at the crossroads of dna repair and checkpoint signalling.

    PubMed

    D'Amours, Damien; Jackson, Stephen P

    2002-05-01

    The Mre11 complex is a multisubunit nuclease that is composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1/Xrs2. Mutations in the genes that encode components of this complex result in DNA- damage sensitivity, genomic instability, telomere shortening and aberrant meiosis. The molecular defect that underlies these phenotypes has long been thought to be related to a DNA repair deficiency. However, recent studies have uncovered functions for the Mre11 complex in checkpoint signalling and DNA replication.

  2. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-01-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains. PMID:9212417

  3. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-07-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains.

  4. Replication Fidelity of Escherichia Coli DNA Polymerase III Holoenzyme in Vitro and Repair of Heteroduplex DNA with Multibase Loops in Vivo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraway, Margaretha Bernardina Maria

    The genetic integrity of an organism is maintained by accurate replication and correction of asymmetry in the DNA. To study replication fidelity, single-stranded plasmid DNA containing the mnt gene, was replicated in vitro with DNA polymerase III holoenzyme by extension of a complimentary annealed primer. On this plasmid the mnt region is fused to a promoterless tet gene. Accurate replication of mnt generates a tetracycline sensitive phenotype, errors in replication are identified by mutation to tetracycline resistance. Mismatch repair deficient mutH cells were transformed to ampicillin-resistance by replicated circles. The mutations in mnt were identified by replica plating and selecting for tetracycline resistant cells. The mutation rate was 1 in 100,000. DNA sequence analysis of 65 isolates identified 33 single base changes, 20 deletions and 12 concurrent deletions and insertions. Except for the deletions and substitutions, identical mutations were isolated in vivo in mismatch repair deficient cells. Therefore, in vitro replication errors resemble those isolated in vivo. Heteroduplexes with loops occur as a result of replication or recombination. To examine if E. coli converts these molecules to a homoduplex via DNA repair, plasmid heteroduplexes with loops of 5, 7, 9, 192, 410 or 514 bases in mnt were constructed. Conversion was examined by tranforming the plasmid heteroduplexes into E. coli lysogens which had a non-functional mnt gene fused to a promoterless lac gene. Repair of the heteroduplex to wild type yields white/tetracycline sensitive colonies; repair to the mutant yields red/tetracycline resistant colonies and no repair results in red-white (mixed)/tetracycline resistant colonies. No significant change in colony color distribution was observed when the heteroduplexes were transformed into wild type and the following mutant strains: pcnB, mutS, recA, recD, recBC sbcBC, recF, recJ, recR, recN, recO, recG ruvC, ruvB, lexA3, lexA51, uvrA, recBC sbcBC rec

  5. Assessment of oxidative DNA damage in the oxyR-deficient SOS chromotest strain escherichia coli PQ300

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J. ); Janz, S. )

    1992-01-01

    The SOS chromotest is a simple short-term genotoxicity assay measuring the induction of gene sfiA in Escherichia coli K-12. The recent availability of SOS tester strains with additional mutations in DNA repair or protection systems allows testing of DNA damaging compounds for genotoxic specificity. E. coli PQ300 differs from the standard SOS tester strain PQ37 in that it contains an additional mutation in gene oxyR that renders it more sensitive to oxidative genotoxins. The generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by hydroperoxides (H[sub 2]O[sub 2], t-butyl hydroperoxide, cumene hydroperoxide), [gamma]-radiation, glucose oxidase, and xanthine oxidase resulted in a more vigorous SOS response in strain PQ300 compared to strain PQ37. PQ300 was also more sensitive than PQ37 for the detection of reducing agents such as ascorbic acid, cysteine, and glutathione, which also alter the redox status of the bacterial cells. However, intercalating agents (adriamycin, bleomycin, and mitomycin C) and the UV- and radiomimetic compound 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide whose DNA damaging potential are known also to involve ROI did not show significant differences between strains PQ37 and PQ300. It is concluded that the oxyR-deficient strain PQ300 is useful for detecting certain classes of genotoxins that change the oxidative/antioxidative balance of tester bacteria in the SOS chromotest. 70 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries.

  7. Immunological inter-strain crossreactivity correlated to 18S rDNA sequence types in Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed

    Walochnik, J; Obwaller, A; Aspöck, H

    2001-02-01

    Various species of the genus Acanthamoeba have been described as potential pathogens; however, differentiation of acanthamoebae remains problematic. The genus has been divided into 12 18S rDNA sequence types, most keratitis causing strains exhibiting sequence type T4. We recently isolated a keratitis causing Acanthamoeba strain showing sequence type T6, but being morphologically identical to a T4 strain. The aim of our study was to find out, whether the 18S rDNA sequence based identification correlates to immunological differentiation. The protein and antigen profiles of the T6 isolate and three reference Acanthamoeba strains were investigated using two sera from Acanthamoeba keratitis patients and one serum from an asymptomatic individual. It was shown, that the T6 strain produces a distinctly different immunological pattern, while patterns within T4 were identical. Affinity purified antibodies were used to further explore immunological cross-reactivity between sequence types. Altogether, the results of our study support the Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA sequence type classification in the investigated strains.

  8. Growth inhibition and antioxidative status induced by selenium-enriched broccoli extract and selenocompounds in DNA mismatch repair-deficient human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Ou, Bor-Rung; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Yeh, Jan-Ying

    2013-08-15

    The effects of enzymatic-digested Se-enriched broccoli extracts (SeB) and selenocompounds on growth and antioxidative status in human colon cancer cells was investigated in this study. HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cells were treated with selenocompounds (sodium selenite, sodium selenate, Se-Met, MeSeCys) or SeB [high-Se (H-SeB) or low-Se (L-SeB)]. The cytotoxicity induced by selenocompounds in HCT116 cells was not associated with cellular H2O2 level, while the differential cytotoxicity observed by sodium selenite between HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cell lines was related to cellular H2O2 production with the change in antioxidative enzyme activity, and the restoration of chromosome 3. H-SeB was found to reduce the cellular H2O2 content in HCT116+Chr.3 cells. The results in this study indicate that regardless of Se content, the cytotoxicity in HCT116 cells of both SeB forms appeared to be H2O2-independent, whereas the cytotoxicity in HCT116+Chr.3 of either SeB form appeared to be H2O2-dependent with an increase in antioxidative ability for H-SeB.

  9. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  10. DNA typing methods for differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii strains and other yeasts related to surface ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Petersen, K M; Møller, P L; Jespersen, L

    2001-09-19

    The discriminative power of ITS-PCR, ITS-PCR RFLP and mitochondrial (mt)-DNA RFLP were evaluated for differentiation of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. In total 60 isolates were included. Of these, 40 strains of the following species, Debaryomyces hansenii var. hansenii, D. hansenii var. fabryi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida zeylanoides, Kluyveromyces lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica, were obtained from culture collections and 20 isolates of D. hansenii representing six different phenotypes were collected from seven Danish producers of surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR was evaluated for differentiation at species level on the 40 strains obtained from culture collections. Ten strains of each variety of D. hansenii and five strains of each of the above mentioned species were analysed. For each of the investigated species, a specific ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region size was observed. Accordingly ITS-PCR was found valuable for differentiation at species level of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR RFLP was investigated for the purpose of strain typing of D. hansenii. Ten CBS strains of each variety of D. hansenii were analysed. Only one enzyme (TaqI) out of several investigated (BamHI, DpnI, Fnu4HI, HaeIII, HindIII, HpaII, NlaII, Sau3AI, TaqI) demonstrated genetic diversity within the strains. This enzyme divided the 20 strains in three groups. Sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region for the type strains of each variety of D. hansenii showed an identity of 99.84%, corresponding to a difference in one basepair. Based on these results, ITS-PCR RFLP was found ineffective for strain typing of D. hansenii. MtDNA RFLP using HaeIII and HpaII was evaluated for strain typing of D. hansenii on the 20 CBS strains of D. hansenii. The CBS strains were divided into 16 groups according to their restriction profiles, which proved the method useful for typing of D. hansenii at subspecies level. The 20 dairy isolates showed a lower genetic

  11. Using RFLP-mtDNA for the rapid monitoring of the dominant inoculated yeast strain in industrial wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, María Esther; Infante, Juan José; Molina, Montse; Rebordinos, Laureana; Cantoral, Jesús Manuel

    2011-01-31

    The analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-RFLP) has been applied as a test to monitor the abundance of the starter yeast strain during industrial wine fermentations without previous isolation of yeast colonies. For white wine fermentations, we performed a rapid assay consisting in taking a sample of fermenting must, purifying the DNA from harvested cells, and obtaining the restriction patterns by digestion with the endonuclease HinfI. The same protocol, but adding an overnight cultivation step before DNA purification, was also applied to red wine fermentations. The results were compared with those obtained from the subsequent characterisation of strains, for the same samples, by analysis of the electrophoretic karyotype of isolated yeast colonies. In all cases, when the inoculated strain was dominant within the yeast population, the rapid assay anticipated the result by showing the coincidence between the restriction profiles obtained from both total cells and the inoculated strain. The results were obtained at 11 or 23 h after sampling for white- or red-wine fermentations respectively. This method allows a rapid intervention of the wine-producer if the presence of the inoculated yeasts has suffered a sudden decrease in any phase of the fermentation process.

  12. Using a DNA microarray to investigate the distribution of insect virulence factors in strains of photorhabdus bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marokhazi, Judit; Waterfield, Nicholas; LeGoff, Gaelle; Feil, Edward; Stabler, Richard; Hinds, Jason; Fodor, Andras; ffrench-Constant, Richard H

    2003-08-01

    Photorhabdus is an insect-pathogenic bacterium in which oral toxicity to insects is found in two distinct taxonomic groups. Using a DNA microarray and comparative genomics, we show that oral toxicity is associated with toxin complex genes tcaABC and that this locus can be mobilized or deleted within different strains.

  13. Using a DNA Microarray To Investigate the Distribution of Insect Virulence Factors in Strains of Photorhabdus Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marokhazi, Judit; Waterfield, Nicholas; LeGoff, Gaelle; Feil, Edward; Stabler, Richard; Hinds, Jason; Fodor, Andras; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    Photorhabdus is an insect-pathogenic bacterium in which oral toxicity to insects is found in two distinct taxonomic groups. Using a DNA microarray and comparative genomics, we show that oral toxicity is associated with toxin complex genes tcaABC and that this locus can be mobilized or deleted within different strains.   PMID:12867479

  14. Pi30 DNA probe may be useful for the identification of Prevotella intermedia at the species or strain level.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Kook; Jeong, Seung-U; Yoo, So Young; Kim, Mi-Kwang; Kim, Hwa-Sook; Kim, Byung-Ock; Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ho-Keel; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a new method for the rapid screening of bacterial species-or subspecies-specific DNA probes, named the "inverted dot blot hybridization screening method." This method has subsequently been then applied to develop species-or strain-specific DNA probes for Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. In a previous study, the inverted dot blot hybridization data showed that a probe, Pi30, was specific for P. intermedia. In this study, the DNA probe Pi30 was evaluated by Southern blot analysis to determine if it could distinguish P. intermedia from P. nigrescens. The data showed that the probe Pi30 reacted with the genomic DNAs from the reference strains and clinical isolates of both P. intermedia and P. nigrescens, but the size of the signal bands was different. In addition, the probe Pi30 reacted with a 1.4 kbp fragment from the genomic DNAs digested with Pst I of the P. intermedia strains but not with any fragments of P. nigrescens strains. The result indicates that the probe Pi30 could be useful for the identification of P. intermedia by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) at the species or strain level.

  15. Hepatitis B virus DNA splicing in Lebanese blood donors and genotype A to E strains: implications for hepatitis B virus DNA quantification and infectivity.

    PubMed

    El Chaar, Mira; El Jisr, Tamima; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major viruses transmissible by blood that causes chronic infection in immunocompromised individuals. The study of 61 HBV carrier blood donors from Lebanon revealed multiple patterns of spliced HBV DNA. HBV DNA splicing was examined and quantified in samples of five genotypes and in seroconversion panels. The Lebanese sample median viral load was 1.5 ×10(2) IU/ml. All strains were genotype D, serotype ayw; 35 clustered as subgenotype D1 and 7 clustered as subgenotype D2. Three splice variants (SP1, SP1A, and Pol/S) were observed in 12 high-viral-load samples. Twenty samples of each genotype, A to E, were tested for the presence of HBV spliced DNA and SP1-specific splice variant. An unspliced HBV genome was dominant, but 100% of strains with a viral load of ≥10(5) copies/ml contained various proportions of spliced DNA. SP1 was detected in 56/100 (56%) samples in levels that correlated with the overall viral load. HBV DNA quantification with S (unspliced) and X (total DNA) regions provided different levels of viral load, with the difference corresponding to spliced DNA. During the highly infectious window period, the SP1 variant became detectable shortly after the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), suggesting a correlation between the initiation of splicing and the production of detectable levels of HBsAg. The quantification of HBV DNA with primers located outside and inside the spliced region might provide different estimations of viral load and differentiate between infectious and defective viral genomes. The role of splicing neoproteins in HBV replication and interaction with the host remains to be determined.

  16. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, August 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. More specifically, mutant strains will be selected which are deficient in various DNA repair pathways. These strains will be studied with regard to (1) the nature of the defect in repair, and (2) the mutability and transformability of the defective cells by various agents as compared to the wild type parental cells. The results to date include progress in the following areas: (1) determination of optimum conditions for growth and maintenance of cells and for quantitative measurement of various cellular parameters; (2) investigation of the effect of holding mutagenized cells for various periods in a density inhibited state on survival and on mutation and transformation frequencies; (3) examination of the repair capabilities of BHK cells, as compared to repair-proficient and repair-deficient human cells and excision-deficient mouse cells, as measured by the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) treated with radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS); (4) initiation of host cell reactivation viral sucide enrichment and screening of survivors of the enrichment for sensitivity to ionizing radiation; and (5) investigation of the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of various metabolites of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). (ERB)

  17. Induction of chromosomal damage in CHO-K1 cells and their repair-deficient mutant XRS5 by x-ray and particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasonova, E.; Ritter, S.; Fomenkova, T.; Kraft, G.

    The cytogenetic effects of X-rays and Au ions were investigated in repair-proficient CHO-K1 cells and their radiosensitive mutant strain xrs5, which shows a defect in the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. Both cell lines were synchronized by mitotic shake off, irradiated in G_1-phase with either 250 kV X-rays or 780 MeV/u Au ions (LET: 1150 keV/mum) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed in first post-irradiation metaphases. Isoeffective doses of X-rays for the induction of aberrant cells and aberrations per cell were about 14 times lower for xrs5 than for CHO-K1 cells. After high LET radiation the difference in the cytogenetic response of both cell lines was drastically diminished. Furthermore, the analysis of the aberration types induced by sparsely and densely ionizing radiation showed for both cell lines specific changes in the spectrum of aberration types as LET increases. The experimental results are discussed with respect to the different types of lesions induced by sparsely and densely ionizing radiation.

  18. Differentially expressed transcripts in shell glands from low and high egg production strains of chickens using cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kuo-Tai; Lin, Chia-Yu; Liou, Jong-Shian; Fan, Yi-Hsing; Chiou, Shiow-Her; Huang, Chang-Wen; Wu, Chean-Ping; Lin, En-Chung; Chen, Chih-Feng; Lee, Yen-Pai; Lee, Wen-Chuan; Ding, Shih-Torng; Cheng, Winston Teng-Kuei; Huang, Mu-Chiou

    2007-09-01

    We have constructed a tissue-specific in-house cDNA microarray to identify differentially expressed transcripts in shell glands from low (B) and high (L2) egg production strains of Taiwanese country chickens during their egg-laying period. The shell gland cDNA library was constructed from the high egg production strain. cDNA clones (7680) were randomly selected and their 5'-end sequences characterized. After excluding overlapping sequences, an in-house cDNA microarray, representing 2743 non-redundant transcripts, was generated for functional genomic studies. Using our microarray, we have successfully identified 85 differentially expressed transcripts from the two different strains of chicken shell glands. In this study, 34 of these transcripts were associated with signal transduction, protein biosynthesis, cell adhesion, cellular metabolism, skeletal development, cell organization and biogenesis. We selected a number of the differentially expressed transcripts for further validation using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. These included elongation factor 2 (EEF2), ovocalyxin-32 (OCX-32) and annexin A2 (ANXA2) which were expressed at high levels in the chicken shell glands of the B strain and, in contrast, the coactosin-like protein (COTL1), transcription factor SOX18 and MX protein were more highly expressed in the L2 strain. Our results suggest that these differentially expressed transcripts may be suitable to use as molecular markers for high rates of egg production, and now need to be investigated further to assess whether they can be applied for use in breeding selection programs in Taiwanese country chickens.

  19. Impediment of E. coli UvrD by DNA-destabilizing force reveals a strained-inchworm mechanism of DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Wei, Kong-Ji; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing-Hua; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Li, Ming; Xi, Xu Guang

    2008-12-17

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a non-ring-shaped model helicase, displaying a 3'-5' polarity in DNA unwinding. Using a transverse magnetic tweezer and DNA hairpins, we measured the unwinding kinetics of UvrD at various DNA-destabilizing forces. The multiform patterns of unwinding bursts and the distributions of the off-times favour the mechanism that UvrD unwinds DNA as a dimer. The two subunits of the dimer coordinate to unwind DNA processively. They can jointly switch strands and translocate backwards on the other strand to allow slow (approximately 40 bp/s) rewinding, or unbind simultaneously to allow quick rehybridization. Partial dissociation of the dimer results in pauses in the middle of the unwinding or increases the translocation rate from approximately 40 to approximately 150 nt/s in the middle of the rewinding. Moreover, the unwinding rate was surprisingly found to decrease from approximately 45 to approximately 10 bp/s when the force is increased from 2 to 12 pN. The results lead to a strained-inchworm mechanism in which a conformational change that bends and tenses the ssDNA is required to activate the dimer.

  20. Protective effect of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) against oxidative DNA damage and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Berić, Tanja; Nikolić, Biljana; Stanojević, Jasna; Vuković-Gacić, Branka; Knezević-Vukcević, Jelena

    2008-02-01

    Mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of essential oil (EO) of basil and its major constituent Linalool, reported to possess antioxidative properties, were examined in microbial tests. In Salmonella/microsome and Escherichia. coli WP2 reversion assays both derivatives (0.25-2.0 microl/plate) showed no mutagenic effect. Salmonella. typhimurium TA98, TA100 and TA102 strains displayed similar sensitivity to both basil derivatives as non-permeable E. coli WP2 strains IC185 and IC202 oxyR. Moreover, the toxicity of basil derivatives to WP2 strains did not depend on OxyR function. The reduction of t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis by EO and Linalool (30-60%) was obtained in repair proficient strains of the E. coli K12 assay (Nikolić, B., Stanojević, J., Mitić, D., Vuković-Gacić, B., Knezević-Vukcević, J., Simić, D., 2004. Comparative study of the antimutagenic potential of vitamin E in different E. coli strains. Mutat. Res. 564, 31-38), as well as in E. coli WP2 IC202 strain. EO and Linalool reduced spontaneous mutagenesis in mismatch repair deficient E. coli K12 strains (27-44%). In all tests, antimutagenic effect of basil derivatives was comparable with that obtained with model antioxidant vitamin E. Linalool and vitamin E induced DNA strand breaks in Comet assay on S. cerevisiae 3A cells, but at non-genotoxic concentrations (0.075 and 0.025 microg/ml, respectively) they reduced the number of H(2)O(2)-induced comets (45-70% Linalool and 80-93% vitamin E). Obtained results indicate that antigenotoxic potential of basil derivatives could be attributed to their antioxidative properties.

  1. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  2. Excision of ultraviolet damage and the effect of irradiation on DNA synthesis in a strain of Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, P.; Selsky, C.A.; Little, J.B.

    1981-03-01

    Researchers have studied repair of ultraviolet light-induced damage in a strain of Bloom's syndrome cells which we have shown to be defective in host cell reactivation of uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus. Excision repair was monitored by following loss of sensitivity of DNA in permeabilized cells to digestion by the Micrococcus luteus uv endonuclease preparation. The Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts apparently removed endonuclease-sensitive sites from the DNA slightly less efficiently than did normal strains. After 24 h, 38% of the sites remained in the Bloom's syndrome cells in comparison with 16% in normal fibroblasts. DNA newly synthesized in uv-irradiated Bloom's syndrome cells sedimented less far into alkaline sucrose gradients than did DNA from similarly treated normal cells. In other respects, including the effect of caffeine exposure, DNA synthesis in Bloom's syndrome cells was indistinguishable from that in normal cells. We were therefore able to detect only minor defects in the repair of uv-induced damage in Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts. This is consistent with the normal survival exhibited by these cells. The defect in excision repair may, however, be sufficient to allow the cellular repair capacity to become saturated at high infecting multiplicities of uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus.

  3. Evolution and replacement of Candida albicans strains during recurrent vaginitis demonstrated by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Schröppel, K; Rotman, M; Galask, R; Mac, K; Soll, D R

    1994-01-01

    Southern blot hybridization with the Ca3 probe and the C fragment of the Ca3 probe was used to assess the genetic relatedness of Candida albicans strains from one patient with recurrent C. albicans infection in whom the same strain was maintained, one patient in whom the infecting strain was replaced, and their male sexual partners. In the patient in whom the infecting strain was maintained, the infecting strain exhibited a minor genetic change in each successive episode of Candida vaginitis. These genetic changes occurred in the C-fragment bands of the Ca3 hybridization pattern. In the patient in whom the infecting strain was replaced by another infecting strain, a transition infection involved a genetically mixed infecting population, and the replacement strain appeared to have originated from the oral cavity of the male partner. The results demonstrate that the infecting strains of recurrent Candida vaginitis are not genetically stable, that drug treatment can result in the selection of variants of the previously infecting strain or replacement by a genetically unrelated strain, and that the male partner can be the source of a replacement strain. Images PMID:7852550

  4. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  5. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  6. Cd hyperfine interactions in DNA bases and DNA of mouse strains infected with Trypanosoma cruzi investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Philippe A D; Silva, Andreia S; Gonçalves, Marcos B; Lapolli, André L; Ferreira, Ana Maria C; Carbonari, Artur W; Petrilli, Helena M

    2014-06-03

    In this work, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy is used to study differences in the nuclear quadrupole interactions of Cd probes in DNA molecules of mice infected with the Y-strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The possibility of investigating the local genetic alterations in DNA, which occur along generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, using hyperfine interactions obtained from PAC measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations in DNA bases is discussed. A comparison of DFT calculations with PAC measurements could determine the type of Cd coordination in the studied molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use DFT calculations and PAC measurements to investigate the local environment of Cd ions bound to DNA bases in mice infected with Chagas disease. The obtained results also allowed the detection of local changes occurring in the DNA molecules of different generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, opening the possibility of using this technique as a complementary tool in the characterization of complicated biological systems.

  7. Differential mutagenicity of N-methyl-N-nitrosocarbamate insectides in Escherichia coli strains having different DNA repair capacities.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, K; Uchino, H; Kurata, H

    1978-12-01

    Four isogenic strains of Escherichia coli with the same auxotrophic marker (arg Fam--namely wild-type, uvrA-, polA- and recA-) were used for testing the lethalities and mutagenicities of 1-naphthyl N-methyl-N-nitrosocarbamate (nitroso-NAC), 3-methylphenyl N-methyl-N-nitrosocarbamate (nitroso-MTMC), and 3,4-dimethylphenyl N-methyl-N-nitrosocarbamate (nitroso-MPMC). The strains recA- and polA- showed a similarly higher sensitivity to killing than wild-type and uvrA- after treatments with each of the three chemicals, whereas the strains wild-type, uvrA-, and polA- were equally mutable by these compounds at equal doses. The strain recA- was hardly mutable by nitroso-NAC, but significant levels of Arg+ mutations were observed after treatments with nitroso-MTMC and nitroso-MPMC. These and previous results suggest that both nitroso-MTMC and nitroso-MPMC are similar in their mutagenicity pattern to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine whereas nitroso-NAC is similar to methyl methanesulfonate or X-rays, and that the major damage to DNA of the three agents is not excisable by the uvrA+-dependent excision repair, probably methylation in DNA.

  8. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis coupled with microchip electrophoresis for high-resolution identification of Monascus strains.

    PubMed

    Shinzato, Naoya; Namihira, Tomoyuki; Tamaki, Yasutomo; Tsukahara, Masatoshi; Matsui, Toru

    2009-04-01

    Monascus fungi are commonly used for a variety of food products in Asia, and are also known to produce some biologically active compounds. Since the use of Monascus is expected to increase in food industries, strain-level identification and management of Monascus will be needed in the near future. In the present study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis coupled with microchip electrophoresis was applied for this purpose. Evaluations of the analysis stability revealed that reproducible results could be obtained, although template DNA fragmentation could influence the resulting RAPD pattern. RAPD analysis using 15 Monascus strains consisting of four species, M. ruber, M. pilosus, M. purpureus, and M. kaoliang showed that each strain generated a unique RAPD pattern, which allows strain-level identification of Monascus. In addition, the phylogenetic tree constructed from RAPD patterns reflected M. ruber-M. pilosus and M. purpureus-M. kaoliang clusters inferred from both ITS and beta-tubulin gene sequences, which indicated that the RAPD pattern could reflect their phylogenetic traits to a certain extent. On the other hand, RAPD analysis did not support the monophyletic clustering of the four Monascus species used in this study, which suggests the necessity of reexamination of species boundaries in Monascus.

  9. Characterization of Erwinia amylovora strains using random amplified polymorphic DNA fragments (RAPDs).

    PubMed

    Momol, M T; Momol, E A; Lamboy, W F; Norelli, J L; Beer, S V; Aldwinckle, H S

    1997-03-01

    The genetic diversity among 16 strains of Erwinia amylovora, chosen to represent different host plant origins and geographical regions, was investigated by RAPD analysis. One strain of Erwinia herbicola and one of Agrobacterium vitis were used as outgroups. Ninety-eight different RAPD fragments were produced by polymerase chain reaction amplification with six different 10-mer primers. RAPD banding profiles were found that enabled the Erw. amylovora strains to be distinguished from one another. Cluster analysis based on the number of RAPD fragments shared between strains showed that strains of Erw. amylovora isolated from subfamily Pomoideae formed a single group, whereas two strains from Rubus (subfamily Rosoideae) formed a second group. Two strains isolated from Asian pear on Hokkaido, Japan, formed a third group. Sets of RAPD fragments were identified that enabled each of the two host-range groups and one geographical region (Hokkaido) of Erw. amylovora strains to be unambiguously distinguished from one another and from the outgroups. This study shows that strains of Erw. amylovora exhibit genetic diversity detectable by RAPD analysis, and that molecular and statistical analysis of RAPD fragments can be used both to distinguish between strains and to determine relatedness between them.

  10. Paths of Heritable Mitochondrial DNA Mutation and Heteroplasmy in Reference and gas-1 Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wernick, Riana I.; Estes, Suzanne; Howe, Dana K.; Denver, Dee R.

    2016-01-01

    Heteroplasmy—the presence of more than one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence type in a cell, tissue, or individual—impacts human mitochondrial disease and numerous aging-related syndromes. Understanding the trans-generational dynamics of mtDNA is critical to understanding the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial disease and evolution. We investigated mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmy using a set of wild-type (N2 strain) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) mutant (gas-1) mutant Caenorhabditis elegans mutation-accumulation (MA) lines. The N2 MA lines, derived from a previous experiment, were bottlenecked for 250 generations. The gas-1 MA lines were created for this study, and bottlenecked in the laboratory for up to 50 generations. We applied Illumina-MiSeq DNA sequencing to L1 larvae from five gas-1 MA lines and five N2 MA lines to detect and characterize mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmic inheritance patterns evolving under extreme drift. mtDNA copy number increased in both sets of MA lines: three-fold on average among the gas-1 MA lines and five-fold on average among N2 MA lines. Eight heteroplasmic single base substitution polymorphisms were detected in the gas-1 MA lines; only one was observed in the N2 MA lines. Heteroplasmy frequencies ranged broadly in the gas-1 MA lines, from as low as 2.3% to complete fixation (homoplasmy). An initially low-frequency (<5%) heteroplasmy discovered in the gas-1 progenitor was observed to fix in one gas-1 MA line, achieve higher frequency (37.4%) in another, and be lost in the other three lines. A similar low-frequency heteroplasmy was detected in the N2 progenitor, but was lost in all five N2 MA lines. We identified three insertion-deletion (indel) heteroplasmies in gas-1 MA lines and six indel variants in the N2 MA lines, most occurring at homopolymeric nucleotide runs. The observed bias toward accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gas-1 MA lines is consistent with the idea that impaired

  11. Effectiveness of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting for Helicobacter pylori strain differentiation.

    PubMed

    Finger, S Alison; Velapatiño, Billie; Kosek, Margaret; Santivañez, Livia; Dailidiene, Daiva; Quino, Willi; Balqui, Jacqueline; Herrera, Phabiola; Berg, Douglas E; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-07-01

    We compared the robustness and discriminatory power of the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting methods for detecting cases of mixed Helicobacter pylori infection in Peruvian shantytown residents. H. pylori isolates from 63 participants were cultured, and five single colonies and a pool of additional colonies from each participant were analyzed by ERIC-PCR and by RAPD tests with four 10-nucleotide primers (one primer per reaction). There was 94% agreement between the ERIC and RAPD profiles in classifying sets of isolates as uniform versus closely related but not identical versus probably unrelated, indicating a high kappa statistic of 0.8942. Subtle differences in related ERIC or RAPD patterns likely reflect gene transfer between strains, recombination, and/or mutation, whereas markedly different patterns reflect infection by unrelated strains. At least half of infected shantytown residents seemed to carry more than one H. pylori strain, although in 19 of 31 persons, the strains were closely related. Three RAPD tests, each with a different primer, were needed to achieve the sensitivity of one ERIC test. ERIC-PCR constitutes a resource- and time-efficient method for H. pylori strain differentiation.

  12. Phenotypic characterization and genomic DNA polymorphisms of Escherichia coli strains isolated as the sole micro-organism from vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Lobos, Olga; Padilla, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Vaginal infections such as vulvovaginal candiadiasis, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis are common worldwide. Accurate diagnosis and prescription of appropriate treatments are important since these infections are linked to adverse outcomes for women during pregnancy and for newborns. Several aetiological agents are responsible for these infectious diseases; however, the presence of Escherichia coli in these infections is controversial. Thus, it is important to identify some phenotypic and genotypic properties of E. coli strains isolated from vaginal infections. Forty-six E. coli strains isolated from vaginal fluid as the sole micro-organism, and 20 other E. coli strains isolated from other samples (urinary tract infections, otitis and septicaemia) were analysed by several phenotypic tests. In addition, genotypic features were studied by RAPD-PCR techniques. Biochemical tests showed that the E. coli strains isolated from vaginal fluid could be grouped into a single cluster which is subdivided into two phenogroups. Analysis of the dendrogram based on fragment length polymorphisms of genomic DNA indicated that E. coli isolates from vaginal infections form a single cluster with two subdivisions. Further studies are needed to analyse the molecular structure and virulence characteristics of these E. coli strains in order to determine their potential role in vaginal infections.

  13. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  14. Specificities of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad6, rad18, and rad52 mutators exhibit different degrees of dependence on the REV3 gene product, a putative nonessential DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Roche, H; Gietz, R D; Kunz, B A

    1995-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad6, rad18, and rad52 mutants exhibit DNA repair deficiencies and distinct mutator phenotypes. DNA replication past unrepaired spontaneous damage might contribute to the specificities of these mutators. Because REV3 is thought to encode a DNA polymerase that specializes in translesion synthesis, we determined the REV3 dependence of the rad mutator specificities. Spontaneous mutagenesis at a plasmid-borne SUP4-o locus was examined in isogenic strains having combinations of normal or mutant REV3 and RAD6, RAD18, or RAD52 alleles. For the rad6 and rad18 mutators, the mutation rate increase relied largely, but not exclusively, on REV3 whereas the rad52 mutator was entirely REV3 dependent. The influence of REV3 on the specificity of the rad6 mutator differed markedly depending on the mutational class examined. However, the requirement of rev3 for the production of G.C-->T.A transversions by the rad18 mutator, which induces only these substitutions, was similar to that for rad6-mediated G.C-->T.A transversion. This supports a role for the Rad6-Rad18 protein complex in the control of spontaneous mutagenesis. The available data imply that the putative Rev3 polymerase can process a variety of spontaneous DNA lesions that normally are substrates for error-free repair.

  15. Multilocus sequence typing is a reliable alternative method to DNA fingerprinting for discriminating among strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Robles, Juan C; Koreen, Larry; Park, Steven; Perlin, David S

    2004-06-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) has emerged as a powerful new DNA-typing tool for the evaluation of intraspecies genetic relatedness. This method relies on DNA sequence analysis of nucleotide polymorphisms in housekeeping genes and has shown a high degree of intraspecies discriminatory power for bacterial and fungal pathogens. However, the results of the MLST scheme for Candida albicans have heretofore never been formally compared to those of other established typing techniques. To assess the value of MLST relative to those of other DNA fingerprinting tools for discriminating among strains of C. albicans, we applied it to a previously well-characterized set of 29 C. albicans isolates evaluated by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and Ca3 Southern hybridization probe techniques. MLST identified three clusters of genetically related isolates, with 82.3% direct concordance with MLEE, 82.7% with RAPD analysis, and 86.2% with the Ca3 Southern hybridization technique. When MLST was applied to a subset of 22 isolates of unrelated origins, it identified 21 independent diploid sequence types (DSTs), resulting in a discriminatory power of 99.6%. These DSTs were 96.9, 99.6, and 99.6% concordant with the genotypes identified by RAPD analysis, MLEE, and Ca3 Southern hybridization, respectively. These results demonstrate that MLST is a highly effective technique that performs at least comparably to other established DNA fingerprinting techniques.

  16. Characterization of Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) feed and larvae: safety, DNA fingerprinting, and bacteriocinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2016-05-03

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics constitutes an alternative or complementary strategy to chemotherapy and vaccination for disease control in aquaculture. The objectives of this work were (1) the in vitro safety assessment of 8 Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) feed and larvae; (2) the evaluation of their genetic relatedness; (3) the study of their antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens; and (4) the biochemical and genetic characterization of the bacteriocin produced by the strain displaying the greatest antimicrobial activity. Concerning the safety assessment, none of the pediococci showed antibiotic resistance nor produced hemolysin or gelatinase, degraded gastric mucin, or deconjugated bile salts. Four strains (50%) produced tyramine or putrescine, but the corresponding genes were not amplified by PCR. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR) fingerprinting allowed clustering of the pediococci into 2 well-defined groups (68% similarity). From the 8 pediococci displaying direct antimicrobial activity against at least 3 out of 9 fish pathogens, 6 strains (75%) were identified as bacteriocin producers. The bacteriocin produced by P. acidilactici L-14 was purified, and mass spectrometry and DNA sequencing revealed its identity to pediocin PA-1 (PedPA-1). Altogether, our results allowed the identification of 4 (50%) putatively safe pediococci, including 2 bacteriocinogenic strains. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting was a valuable tool for genetic profiling of P. acidilactici strains. This work reports for the first time the characterization of a PedPA-1-producing P. acidilactici strain isolated from an aquatic environment (rainbow trout larvae), which shows interesting properties related to its potential use as a probiotic in aquaculture.

  17. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. ); Chen, D.S. . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  18. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  19. Checkpoint Kinase-Dependent Regulation of DNA Repair and Genome Instability in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    cells reduces radiosensitivity. Cancer J 9:277-85. 15. Lehmann, A. R. 2003. DNA repair-deficient diseases, xeroderma pigmentosum , Cockayne syndrome...in NER give rise to the autosomal recessive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is characterized by ex- treme sun sensitivity, premature aging...mediated ubiquitination and deg- radation. J. Biol. Chem. 276:48175–48182. 14. Chu, G., and E. Chang. 1988. Xeroderma pigmentosum group E cells lack a

  20. INDUCTION OF DNA ADDUCTS, TUMORS, AND KI-RAS ONCOGENE MUTATIONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG BY IP. ADMINISTRATION OF DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of DNA adducts, tumors, and Ki-ras oncogene mutations in strain AlJ mouse lung by ip. administration of dibenz[a,h]anthracene

    Previous studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) induced lung tumors in the strain NJ mouse model system have demonstrated qua...

  1. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal

  2. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2′-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H]+ > [M + H − 116]+ transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2′-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  3. Approach to molecular characterization of different strains of Fasciola hepatica using random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Scarcella, S; Miranda-Miranda, E; Solana, M V; Solana, H

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically characterize Fasciola hepatica strains from diverse ecogeographical regions (America and Europe), susceptible and resistant to Triclabendazole, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA fragments (RAPDs-PCR) technique to elucidate genetic variability between the different isolates. Ten different oligonucleotide primers of 10 bases with GC content varying from 50-70% were used. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out in 25 μl of total volume. Duplicate PCR reactions on each individual template DNA were performed to test the reproducibility of the individual DNA bands. The size of the RAPD-PCR fragments was determined by the reciprocal plot between the delay factors (Rf) versus the logarithm of molecular weight ladder. The phenogram obtained showed three main clusters, the major of which contained European Strains (Cullompton and Sligo) showing a genetic distance of 27.2 between them. The American strains (Cedive and Cajamarca) on the other hand formed each their distinctive group but clearly maintaining a closer genetic relationship among them than that to their European counterparts, with which showed a distance of 33.8 and 37.8, respectively. This polymorphism would give this species enhanced adaptability against the host, as well as the environment. The existence of genetically different populations of F. hepatica could allow, against any selection pressure, natural or artificial (for use fasciolicides products and/or control measures), one or more populations of F. hepatica to be able to survive and create resistance or adaptability to such selective pressure.

  4. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  5. Equilibrium dissociation and unfolding of the dimeric human papillomavirus strain-16 E2 DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Y. K.; de Prat Gay, G.; Butler, P. J.; Bycroft, M.

    1996-01-01

    The equilibrium unfolding reaction of the C-terminal 80-amino-acid dimeric DNA-binding domain of human papillomavirus (HPV) strain 16 E2 protein has been investigated using fluorescence, far-UV CD, and equilibrium sedimentation. The stability of the HPV-16 E2 DNA-binding domain is concentration-dependent, and the unfolding reaction is well described as a two-state transition from folded dimer to unfolded monomer. The conformational stability of the protein, delta GH2O, was found to be 9.8 kcal/mol at pH 5.6, with the corresponding equilibrium unfolding/dissociation constant, Ku, being 6.5 x 10(-8) M. Equilibrium sedimentation experiments give a Kd of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, showing an excellent agreement between the two different techniques. Denaturation by temperature followed by the change in ellipticity also shows a concomitant disappearance of secondary and tertiary structures. The Ku changes dramatically at physiologically relevant pH's: with a change in pH from 6.1 to 7.0, it goes from 5.5 x 10(-8) M to 4.4 x 10(10) M. Our results suggest that, at the very low concentration of protein where DNA binding is normally measured (e.g., 10(-11) M), the protein is predominantly monomeric and unfolded. They also stress the importance of the coupling between folding and DNA binding. PMID:8745409

  6. Alum adjuvanted rabies DNA vaccine confers 80% protection against lethal 50 LD50 rabies challenge virus standard strain.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajni; Kaur, Manpreet; Saxena, Ankur; Prasad, Rajendra; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2017-03-03

    Rabies is a serious concern world-wide. Despite availability of rabies vaccines for long; their efficacy, safety, availability and cost effectiveness has been a tremendous issue. This calls for improvement of rabies vaccination strategies. DNA vaccination has immense potential in this regard. The DNA vaccine pgp.LAMP-1 conferred 60% protection to BALB/c mice against 20 LD50 rabies challenge virus standard (CVS) strain challenge. Upon supplementation with Emulsigen-D, the vaccine formulation conferred complete protection against lethal challenge. To assess the feasibility of this vaccine formulation for human use, it was tested along with other FDA approved adjuvants, namely, Alum, Immuvac, Montanide ISA720 VG. Enhanced immune response correlated with high IgG antibody titer, Th2 biased response with a high level of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNAs) and IgG1/IgG2a ratio >1, observed upon alum supplementation of the rabies DNA vaccine. The total IgG antibody titer was 2IU/ml and total RVNA titer was observed to be 4IU/ml which is eight times higher than the minimum protective titer recommended by WHO. Furthermore, it conferred 80% protection against challenge with 50 LD50 of the rabies CVS strain, conducted in compliance with the potency test for rabies recommended by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA. Previously, we have established pre-clinical safety of this vaccine as per the guidelines of Schedule Y, FDA as well as The European Agency for evaluation of Medicinal Products. The vaccine showed no observable toxicity at the site of injection as well as at systemic level in Wistar rats when administered with 10X recommended dose. Therefore, supplementation of rabies DNA vaccine, pgp.LAMP-1 with alum would lead to development of a non-toxic, efficacious, stable and affordable vaccine that can be used to combat high numbers of fatal rabies infections tormenting developing countries.

  7. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  8. DNA Strand Breaks, Neurodegeneration and Aging in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Defective responses to DNA single- or double-strand breaks can result in neurological disease, underscoring the critical importance of DNA repair for neural homeostasis. Human DNA repair-deficient syndromes are generally congenital, in which brain pathology reflects the consequences of developmentally incurred DNA damage. Although, it is unclear to what degree DNA strand-break repair defects in mature neural cells contributes to disease pathology. However, DNA single-strand breaks are a relatively common lesion which if not repaired can impact cells via interference with transcription. Thus, this lesion, and probably to a lesser extent DNA double strand breaks, may be particularly relevant to aging in the neural cell population. In this review we will examine the consequences of defective DNA strand break repair towards homeostasis in the brain. Further, we also consider the utility of mouse models as reagents to understand the connection between DNA strand breaks and aging in the brain. PMID:18455751

  9. Dme-miR-314-3p modulation in Cr(VI) exposed Drosophila affects DNA damage repair by targeting mus309.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Swati; Khatoon, Rehana; Pandey, Ashutosh; Saini, Sanjay; Vimal, Divya; Singh, Pallavi; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2016-03-05

    microRNAs (miRNAs) as one of the major epigenetic modulators negatively regulate mRNAs at post transcriptional level. It was therefore hypothesized that modulation of miRNAs by hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)], a priority environmental chemical, can affect DNA damage. In a genetically tractable model, Drosophila melanogaster, role of maximally up-regulated miRNA, dme-miR-314-3p, on DNA damage was examined by exposing the third instar larvae to 5.0-20.0 μg/ml Cr(VI) for 24 and 48 h. mus309, a Drosophila homologue of human Bloom's syndrome and predicted as one of the potential targets of this miRNA, was confirmed as its target by 5'RLM-RACE assay. A significant down-regulation of mus309 was observed in dme-miR-314-3p overexpression strain (myo-gal4>UAS-miR-314-3p) as compared with that in parental strains (myo-gal4 and UAS-miR-314-3p) and in w(1118). A significant increase in DNA damage including double strand breaks generation was observed in exposed myo-gal4>UAS-miR-314 and mus309 mutants as compared with that in parental strain and in unexposed control. A significant down-regulation of cell cycle regulation genes (CycA, CycB and cdc2) was observed in these exposed genotypes. Collectively, the study demonstrates that dme-miR-314-3p can mediate the downregulation of repair deficient gene mus309 leading to increased DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in exposed organism which may affect Cr(VI) mediated carcinogenesis.

  10. I-R system of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster: analysis of the mitochondrial DNA in reactive strains exhibiting different potentials for I factor transposition.

    PubMed

    Azou, Y; Bregliano, J C

    2001-01-01

    In the I-R hybrid dysgenesis system, Drosophila melanogaster strains fall into two categories denoted inducer (I) and reactive (R). Among the reactive strains we can distinguish strains with weak, medium or strong reactivity levels. These levels are inherited in a complex way involving both chromosomal and nonchromosomal determinants, the nonchromosomal determinant being mainly maternally inherited. We were interested in determining the molecular basis of this maternal transmission. In this article we analyse the possible implication of the mitochondrial DNA in the determination of the reactivity levels. The mtDNA was analysed in lines with very different reactivity levels with the aim of correlating sequence differences with reactivity levels. The mtDNA was analysed by sequencing and restriction fragment length. No correlation was established between reactivity level and mtDNA sequence. This may favour the hypothesis that epigenetic changes would be responsible for the different reactivity levels and their transgenerational transmission.

  11. Chronic ethanol consumption inhibits repair of dimethylnitrosamine-induced DNA alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mufti, S.I.; Salvagnini, M.; Lieber, C.S.; Garro, A.J.

    1988-04-15

    Chronic ethanol consumption causes a DNA repair deficiency. This was demonstrated in Sprague-Dawley rats injected with /sup 14/C-labeled dimethylnitrosamine after being pair-fed isocaloric, ethanol, or carbohydrate control diets for 4 weeks. Hepatic DNA was isolated from rats killed at intervals over a 36 hour period after administration of the nitrosamine and concentrations of alkylated guanine derivatives were measured. While N7-methylguanine was lost at equivalent rates from the DNA of both diet groups, 06methylguanine, a promutagenic lesion, persisted at higher levels for longer periods of time in the DNA from the alcohol-fed animals.

  12. [Capsular types, virulence factors and DNA types of Klebsiella oxytoca strains isolated from blood and bile].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yuka; Yagi, Tetsuya; Mochizuki, Mariko; Ohta, Michio

    2012-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca is an opportunistic pathogen and is isolated at the second highest frequency among genus Klebsiella from hospitalized patients. According to previous reports, the major virulence factors of K. pneumoniae include capsules and several kinds of pill, whereas the virulence factors of K. oxytoca have not been well investigated. We noticed an increased frequency of K. oxytoca isolates from patients who had undergone a biliary tract operation in a general hospital from May through November, 2009. We then performed a PCR analysis of the virulence factors and an epidemiological analysis with capsular typing (serotyping) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for K. oxytoca of 11 blood isolates and 10 bile isolates. As a result, serotypes of K9, K15, K26, K31, K43, K47, K55, K70, and K79 were identified in these strains, and K1 and K2 which are frequent serotypes in K. pneumoniae strains were not observed. Two blood isolates of the K55 serotype showed almost the same PFGE pattern, suggesting that these isolates were very closely related and caused cross-infection in a hospital ward. Strains of the K43 serotype were three blood isolates and 1 bile isolate, all of which showed different PFGE patterns. There were no common isolates among the blood and bile isolates. A PCR search revealed that fimH and mrkD genes which are relevant to type 1 and type 2 pili, respectively, were present in all strains, whereas kfuBC, an iron uptake gene, and cf29a were detected in only a few strains. Neither of the mucoid phenotype-related genes magA and rmpA was present in any strains. These results strongly suggest that type 1 and/or type 3 pili would have important roles in the pathogenesis of blood infection and bile infection caused by K. oxytoca.

  13. Double-strand break repair deficiency in NONO knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts and compensation by spontaneous upregulation of the PSPC1 paralog.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuyi; Li, Zhentian; Shu, Feng-Jue; Xiong, Hairong; Phillips, Andrew C; Dynan, William S

    2014-09-01

    NONO, SFPQ and PSPC1 make up a family of proteins with diverse roles in transcription, RNA processing and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. To understand long-term effects of loss of NONO, we characterized murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from knockout mice. In the absence of genotoxic stress, wild-type and mutant MEFs showed similar growth rates and cell cycle distributions, and the mutants were only mildly radiosensitive. Further investigation showed that NONO deficiency led to upregulation of PSPC1, which replaced NONO in a stable complex with SFPQ. Knockdown of PSPC1 in a NONO-deficient background led to severe radiosensitivity and delayed resolution of DSB repair foci. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitor, NU7741, sensitized wild-type and singly deficient MEFs, but had no additional effect on doubly deficient cells, suggesting that NONO/PSPC1 and DNA-PK function in the same pathway. We tested whether NONO and PSPC1 might also affect repair indirectly by influencing mRNA levels for other DSB repair genes. Of 12 genes tested, none were downregulated, and several were upregulated. Thus, NONO or related proteins are critical for DSB repair, NONO and PSPC1 are functional homologs with partially interchangeable functions and a compensatory response involving PSPC1 blunts the effect of NONO deficiency.

  14. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology.

    PubMed

    Derkx, Patrick M F; Janzen, Thomas; Sørensen, Kim I; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Johansen, Eric

    2014-08-29

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes.

  15. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes. PMID:25186244

  16. DNA stress and strain, in silico, in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, David; Benham, Craig J.

    2011-06-01

    A vast literature has explored the genetic interactions among the cellular components regulating gene expression in many organisms. Early on, in the absence of any biochemical definition, regulatory modules were conceived using the strict formalism of genetics to designate the modifiers of phenotype as either cis- or trans-acting depending on whether the relevant genes were embedded in the same or separate DNA molecules. This formalism distilled gene regulation down to its essence in much the same way that consideration of an ideal gas reveals essential thermodynamic and kinetic principles. Yet just as the anomalous behavior of materials may thwart an engineer who ignores their non-ideal properties, schemes to control and manipulate the genetic and epigenetic programs of cells may falter without a fuller and more quantitative elucidation of the physical and chemical characteristics of DNA and chromatin in vivo.

  17. DNA stress and strain, in silico, in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Levens, David; Benham, Craig J

    2011-06-01

    A vast literature has explored the genetic interactions among the cellular components regulating gene expression in many organisms. Early on, in the absence of any biochemical definition, regulatory modules were conceived using the strict formalism of genetics to designate the modifiers of phenotype as either cis- or trans-acting depending on whether the relevant genes were embedded in the same or separate DNA molecules. This formalism distilled gene regulation down to its essence in much the same way that consideration of an ideal gas reveals essential thermodynamic and kinetic principles. Yet just as the anomalous behavior of materials may thwart an engineer who ignores their non-ideal properties, schemes to control and manipulate the genetic and epigenetic programs of cells may falter without a fuller and more quantitative elucidation of the physical and chemical characteristics of DNA and chromatin in vivo.

  18. The aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin damages DNA bases in Escherichia coli: caffeine potentiates the DNA-damaging effects of kanamycin while suppressing cell killing by ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tina Manzhu; Yuan, Jessica; Nguyen, Angelyn; Becket, Elinne; Yang, Hanjing; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2012-06-01

    The distribution of mutants in the Keio collection of Escherichia coli gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and neomycin indicates that damaged bases resulting from antibiotic action can lead to cell death. Strains lacking one of a number of glycosylases (e.g., AlkA, YzaB, Ogt, KsgA) or other specific repair proteins (AlkB, PhrB, SmbC) are more sensitive to these antibiotics. Mutants lacking AlkB display the strongest sensitivity among the glycosylase- or direct lesion removal-deficient strains. This perhaps suggests the involvement of ethenoadenine adducts, resulting from reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, since AlkB removes this lesion. Other sensitivities displayed by mutants lacking UvrA, polymerase V (Pol V), or components of double-strand break repair indicate that kanamycin results in damaged base pairs that need to be removed or replicated past in order to avoid double-strand breaks that saturate the cellular repair capacity. Caffeine enhances the sensitivities of these repair-deficient strains to kanamycin and neomycin. The gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to caffeine (dnaQ, holC, holD, and priA knockout mutants) indicate that caffeine blocks DNA replication, ultimately leading to double-strand breaks that require recombinational repair by functions encoded by recA, recB, and recC, among others. Additionally, caffeine partially protects cells of both Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis from killing by the widely used fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin.

  19. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  20. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Use of the host-cell reactivation viral suicide enrichment procedure was initiated in the isolation of repair-deficient mutants. Lightly mutagenized BHK cells were infected with irradiated Herpes simplex virus (HSV); several radiation-sensitive strains were isolated among the survivors of the infection. The characterization of these strains is progressing and the enrichments are continuing. That alterations in the frequency of mutation of C3H/10T 1/2 cells, occurring as a result of holding the cells in a confluent state following treatment with ethylmethane sulfonate, parallel the alterations in the frequency of neoplastic transformation was found. The repair capabilities of BHK cells were found to be intermediate in comparison to repair-proficient and -deficient human cells with regard to the reactivation of HSV treated with various inactivating agents. The effect of confluency and of low serum levels on DNA synthesis, as well as the response to the cytotoxic effects of MNNG and acriflavin were determined in BHK cells in preparation for the investigation of the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and transformation. It was also found that C3H/10T 1/2 cells partially recover from the toxic effects of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide if they are held in a confluent state for 6 to 22 hrs following treatment. Addition of catalase did not alleviate the toxic effects of 4-NQO. The cells contain a relatively high endogenous level of this enzyme. (ERB)

  1. Processing of UV-induced DNA damage in diverse biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    A novel protocol has been developed allowing direct evaluation and accurate quantitation of UV lesions contained with both genomic DNA and the small oligonucleotides excised by a living cell during nucleotide excision repair. Using this methodology, the repair capacity of normal and UV-sensitive cells of human, Chinese hamster, and Escherichia coli origin, has been assessed. Several conclusions have been reached: (1) severage of the interpyrimidine phosphodiester linkage of cyclobutane dimers appears to be an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon; (2) the kinetics of cyclobutane dimer repair differ markedly from both (6-4) photoproduct and TA* lesion removal; (3) the ability to excise cyclobutane dimers is independent of (6-4) photoproduct repair capacity, suggesting that the lesions are not repaired/recognized by identical mechanisms; (4) fibroblast strains representing the eight xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups each show a unique proficiency/deficiency to repair the different photolesions under study, implicating that a defect in a different locus underlies each genetic form of this disease; (5) the repair deficiency in UV-sensitive strains of trichothiodystrophy appears to be completely unrelated to that of non-complementing XP-D cells. To allow direct assessment of an IDP-altered photoproduct, substrates have been constructed which contain, at a defined dithymidine site, no lesion, a conventional cyclobutane dimer, or a cyclobutane dimer modified by severage of the intradimer phosphodiester bond. Bacteriophage T4 UV endonuclease has no activity towards a modified lesion, questioning the interpretation of experiments which utilize the strand-incising activity of this enzyme to monitor repair. Furthermore, although this altered lesion acts as a block to E. coli DNA polymerase I, it allows SP6 RNA polymerase to bypass the otherwise RNA polymerase-blocking lesion.

  2. Recent progress with the DNA repair mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Salazar, E.P.; Brookman, K.W.; Collins, C.C.; Stewart, S.A.; Busch, D.B.; Weber, C.A.

    1986-04-02

    Repair deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are being used to identify human genes that correct the repair defects and to study mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Five independent tertiary DNA transformants were obtained from the EM9 mutant. In these clones a human DNA sequence was identified that correlated with the resistance of the cells to CldUrd. After Eco RI digestion, Southern transfer, and hybridization of transformant DNAs with the BLUR-8 Alu family sequence, a common fragment of 25 to 30 kb was present. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Increased Mutation Frequency Due to Inactivation of the DNA Oxidative Repair System▿

    PubMed Central

    Mandsberg, L. F.; Ciofu, O.; Kirkby, N.; Christiansen, L. E.; Poulsen, H. E.; Høiby, N.

    2009-01-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:19332676

  4. An unusual gene arrangement for the putative chromosome replication origin and circadian expression of dnaN in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Tsinoremas, N F

    1996-06-12

    In eubacteria, the clustering of DnaA boxes around the dnaN (beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) and dnaA genes usually defines the chromosome replication origin (oriC). In this study, the dnaN locus from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was sequenced. The gene order in this region is cbbZp-dnaN-orf288-purL-purF which contrasts with other eubacteria. A cluster of eleven DnaA boxes (consensus sequence: TTTTCCACA) was found in the intergenic region between dnaN and cbbZp. We also found a 41-bp sequence within this region that is 80% identical to the proposed oriC of Streptomyces coelicolor. Therefore, we propose that this intergenic region may serve as an oriC in Synechococcus. Using bacterial luciferase as a reporter, we also showed that dnaN is rhythmically expressed, suggesting that DNA replication could be under circadian control in this organism.

  5. Construction and characterization of infectious cDNA clones of a chicken strain of hepatitis E virus (HEV), avian HEV.

    PubMed

    Huang, F F; Pierson, F W; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2005-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, is an important human pathogen. Increasing evidence indicates that hepatitis E is a zoonosis. Avian HEV was recently discovered in chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in the USA. Like swine HEV from pigs, avian HEV is also genetically and antigenically related to human HEV. The objective of this study was to construct and characterize an infectious cDNA clone of avian HEV for future studies of HEV replication and pathogenesis. Three full-length cDNA clones of avian HEV, pT7-aHEV-5, pT7G-aHEV-10 and pT7G-aHEV-6, were constructed and their infectivity was tested by in vitro transfection of leghorn male hepatoma (LMH) chicken liver cells and by direct intrahepatic inoculation of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens with capped RNA transcripts from the three clones. The results showed that the capped RNA transcripts from each of the three clones were replication competent when transfected into LMH cells as demonstrated by detection of viral antigens with avian HEV-specific antibodies. SPF chickens intrahepatically inoculated with the capped RNA transcripts from each of the three clones developed active avian HEV infections as evidenced by seroconversion to avian HEV antibodies, viraemia and faecal virus shedding. The infectivity was further confirmed by successful infection of naïve chickens with the viruses recovered from chickens inoculated with the RNA transcripts. The results indicated that all three cDNA clones of avian HEV are infectious both in vitro and in vivo. The availability of these infectious clones for a chicken strain of HEV now affords an opportunity to study the mechanisms of HEV cross-species infection and tissue tropism by constructing chimeric viruses among human, swine and avian HEVs.

  6. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting {gamma}H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  7. The placement of South African strains of Beauveria in a phylogeny inferred from rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequences.

    PubMed

    Morar-Bhana, Nainisha; Cron, Glynis Valerie; Gray, Vincent Myles; Straker, Colin John

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to confirm the identity of three strains of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana from South African soils and to investigate their phylogenetic relationship with non-indigenous strains from other geographic regions. Sequences of the rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of 23 strains were compared with the Genbank reference sequences of 20 other cosmopolitan strains. Fitch parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions resolved the strains into two distinct clades and matched them to four species groups/lineages: Beauveria bassiana, B. cf. bassiana (pseudobassiana), B. brongniartii and B. caledonica. Two of the South African strains initially identified as B. bassiana grouped with B. caledonica, whereas the third strain was confirmed as B. bassiana. Because of the paucity of Genbank references for B. caledonica, we have designated the two South African B. caledonica strains as B. sp. aff. caledonica. Other reassignments included two strains from Norway, originally classified as B. bassiana, being grouped with B. brongniartii, and three of the B. brongniartii reference taxa from Brazil which were clearly placed in the B. bassiana clade. The study provides a first report of the presence of the B. caledonica lineage in Africa and confirms current Beauveria phylogenies inferred from molecular data.

  8. Skin-Based DNA Repair Phenotype for Cancer Risk from GCR in Genetically Diverse Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiet, Elodie; Viger, Louise; Snijders, Antoine; Costes, Sylvian V.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting cancer risk associated with cosmic radiation remains a mission-critical challenge for NASA radiation health scientists and mission planners. Epidemiological data are lacking and risk methods do not take individual radiation sensitivity into account. In our approach we hypothesize that genetic factors strongly influence risk of cancer from space radiation and that biomarkers reflecting DNA damage and cell death are ideal tools to predict risk and monitor potential health effects post-flight. At this workshop, we will be reporting the work we have done over the first 9 months of this proposal. Skin cells from 15 different strains of mice already characterized for radiation-induced cancer sensitivity (B6C3F; BALB/cByJ, C57BL/6J, CBA/CaJ, C3H/HeMsNrsf), and 10 strains from the DOE collaborative cross-mouse model were expanded from ear biopsy and cultivated until Passage 3. On average, 3 males and 3 females for each strain were expanded and frozen for further characterization at the NSRL beam line during the NSRL16C run for three LET (350 MeV/n Si, 350 MeV/n Ar and 600 MeV/n Fe) and two ion fluences (1 and 3 particles per cell). The mice work has established new metrics for the usage of Radiation Induced Foci as a marker for various aspect of DNA repair deficiencies. In year 2, we propose to continue characterization of the mouse lines with low LET to identify loci specific to high- versus low- LET and establish genetic linkage for the various DNA repair biomarkers. Correlation with cancer risk from each animals strain and gender will also be investigated. On the human side, we will start characterizing the DNA damage response induced ex-vivo in 200 human's blood donors for radiation sensitivity with a tentative 500 donors by the end of this project. All ex-vivo phenotypic data will be correlated to genetic characterization of each individual human donors using SNP arrays characterization as done for mice. Similarly, ex-vivo phenotypic features from mice will

  9. RecET driven chromosomal gene targeting to generate a RecA deficient Escherichia coli strain for Cre mediated production of minicircle DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Palaszewski, Iwona; Bigger, Brian; Coutelle, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Background Minicircle DNA is the non-replicating product of intramolecular site-specific recombination within a bacterial minicircle producer plasmid. Minicircle DNA can be engineered to contain predominantly human sequences which have a low content of CpG dinucleotides and thus reduced immunotoxicity for humans, whilst the immunogenic bacterial origin and antibiotic resistance marker gene sequences are entirely removed by site-specific recombination. This property makes minicircle DNA an excellent vector for non-viral gene therapy. Large-scale production of minicircle DNA requires a bacterial strain expressing tightly controlled site-specific recombinase, such as Cre recombinase. As recombinant plasmids tend to be more stable in RecA-deficient strains, we aimed to construct a recA- bacterial strain for generation of minicircle vector DNA with less chance of unwanted deletions. Results We describe here the construction of the RecA-deficient minicircle DNA producer Escherichia coli HB101Cre with a chromosomally located Cre recombinase gene under the tight control of the araC regulon. The Cre gene expression cassette was inserted into the chromosomal lacZ gene by creating transient homologous recombination proficiency in the recA- strain HB101 using plasmid-born recET genes and homology-mediated chromosomal "pop-in, pop-out" of the plasmid pBAD75Cre containing the Cre gene and a temperature sensitive replication origin. Favourably for the Cre gene placement, at the "pop-out" step, the observed frequency of RecET-led recombination between the proximal regions of homology was 10 times higher than between the distal regions. Using the minicircle producing plasmid pFIXluc containing mutant loxP66 and loxP71 sites, we isolated pure minicircle DNA from the obtained recA- producer strain HB101Cre. The minicircle DNA preparation consisted of monomeric and, unexpectedly, also multimeric minicircle DNA forms, all containing the hybrid loxP66/71 site 5'-TACCGTTCGT ATAATGTATG

  10. Role of OGG1 and NTG2 in the repair of oxidative DNA damage and mutagenesis induced by hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: relationships with transition metals iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Melo, R G M; Leitão, A C; Pádula, M

    2004-09-01

    The base excision repair pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses three DNA N-glycosylases, viz. Ogg1p, Ngt1p and Ntg2p, involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. It was previously reported that inactivation of any of these activities, in most cases, did not generate a sensitive mutant phenotype to a variety of oxidative agents. Only the ntg1 mutant appeared to be more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than a wild-type (WT) strain. In the present study we evaluated the role of S. cerevisiae OGG1 and NTG2 genes in the repair of oxidative lesions induced by high H2O2 concentrations (5-100 mM for 20 min), followed by catalase treatment (500 IU/ml). In these conditions, the ogg1 mutant was more sensitive than the WT strain to H2O2 (concentration 40-60 mM). Unexpectedly, the inactivation of NTG2 in an ogg1 background was able to suppress both sensitivity and mutagenesis induced by H2O2. Indeed, even the ntg2 single mutant was more resistant than the WT (60-100 mM H2O2). The use of metal ion chelators dipyridyl and neocuproine allowed us to evaluate the participation of iron and copper ions in the production of lethal and mutagenic lesions during H2O2 treatment in different DNA repair-deficient S. cerevisiae strains. The roles of OGG1 and NTG2 genes in the repair of lethal and mutagenic oxidative lesions induced by H2O2 and their relationships with iron and copper ions are discussed.

  11. An infectious cDNA clone of the poliovirus Sabin strain could be used as a stable repository and inoculum for the oral polio live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kohara, M; Abe, S; Kuge, S; Semler, B L; Komatsu, T; Arita, M; Itoh, H; Nomoto, A

    1986-05-01

    Viruses were recovered from HeLa S3 cells and African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells transfected with an infectious cDNA clone of poliovirus vaccine Sabin 1 strain. The viruses recovered from the different DNA-transfected cells were tested for the biological characteristics of temperature sensitivity (rct marker), plaque size, and bicarbonate concentration dependency (d marker). The results revealed that the above properties were similar to those obtained from tests on the Sabin 1 vaccine reference strain. The recovered viruses and the vaccine reference virus were passaged in AGMK cells at an elevated temperature of 37.5 degrees, and the passaged isolates were tested for the rct marker. The virus recovered from AGMK cells had the most stable rct phenotype while the virus from HeLa S3 cells had a similar stability to that of the reference virus, suggesting that the virus from AGMK cells would be more suitable as a vaccine strain than the other two viruses. Furthermore, an infectious cDNA clone of high specific infectivity, constructed by introducing SV40 large T antigen into the plasmid, was used for production of high titers of virus after transfection. The results of in vitro biological tests on the recovered virus suggested that virus produced in the transfected AGMK cells also had the high quality that is desirable in vaccine stocks. Monkey neurovirulence tests performed with these recovered viruses revealed that the recovered viruses were weakly neurovirulent, similar to the vaccine reference virus. The infectious cDNA clone of the poliovirus vaccine strain could therefore be used to generate a possible inoculum of the oral polio live vaccine. Our findings strongly suggest that an infectious cDNA clone of poliovirus RNA may be used to preserve the constancy and quality of the present seed viruses of the Sabin 1 vaccine strain.

  12. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  13. DNA-based diagnostic tests for Salmonella strains targeting hilA, agfA, spvC and sef genes.

    PubMed

    Crăciunaş, Cornelia; Keul, Anca-Livia; Flonta, Mirela; Cristea, Mariana

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the suitability of the hilA, agfA, spvC and sef genes amplification by PCR as a method for detection of Salmonella strains. Twenty nine isolates of Salmonella spp. including 6 different serotypes were analyzed in this study. The bacteria were isolated between 2005 and 2007 and serotyped at the Clinical Hospital of Infectious Disease, Cluj-Napoca. Ten non-Salmonella strains were also tested by the same procedure. We used a direct PCR technique, DNA extraction had been skipped and the bacterial cell wall denaturated in the first step of the reaction. All Salmonella strains gave positive results by the PCR amplification of hilA gene. The utilization of the sef, and spvC genes or spvC and agfA genes in a multiplex PCR provides a valuable diagnostic tool for Salmonella enteritidis strains.

  14. DNA strand breaks: the DNA template alterations that trigger p53-dependent DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W G; Kastan, M B

    1994-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 serves as a critical regulator of a G1 cell cycle checkpoint and of apoptosis following exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The mechanism by which DNA-damaging agents elevate p53 protein levels to trigger G1/S arrest or cell death remains to be elucidated. In fact, whether damage to the DNA template itself participates in transducing the signal leading to p53 induction has not yet been demonstrated. We exposed human cell lines containing wild-type p53 alleles to several different DNA-damaging agents and found that agents which rapidly induce DNA strand breaks, such as ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and DNA topoisomerase-targeted drugs, rapidly triggered p53 protein elevations. In addition, we determined that camptothecin-stimulated trapping of topoisomerase I-DNA complexes was not sufficient to elevate p53 protein levels; rather, replication-associated DNA strand breaks were required. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the antimetabolite N(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) did not cause rapid p53 protein increases but resulted in delayed increases in p53 protein levels temporally correlated with the appearance of DNA strand breaks. Finally, we concluded that DNA strand breaks were sufficient for initiating p53-dependent signal transduction after finding that introduction of nucleases into cells by electroporation stimulated rapid p53 protein elevations. While DNA strand breaks appeared to be capable of triggering p53 induction, DNA lesions other than strand breaks did not. Exposure of normal cells and excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells to low doses of UV light, under conditions in which thymine dimers appear but DNA replication-associated strand breaks were prevented, resulted in p53 induction attributable to DNA strand breaks associated with excision repair. Our data indicate that DNA strand breaks are sufficient and probably necessary for p53 induction in cells with wild-type p53 alleles exposed to DNA

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF STEREOCHEMICAL CONFIGURATIONS OF CYCLOPENTA[CD]PYRENE-DNA ADDUCTS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG AND C3H10T1/2CL8 CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of Sterochemical Configurations of Cyclopent A[cd]Pyrene DNA Adducts in Strain A/J Mouse Lung and C3H10T1/2CL8 Cells.

    Four major and several minor DNA adducts were resolved by 32P-postlabeling analysis of DNA from strain A/J mouse lung and C3H10T1/2CL8 (C3H...

  16. Co-administration of attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 168 strain with bacterial DNA enhances the local and systemic immune response after intranasal vaccination in pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Li, Pengcheng; Wang, Xueping; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2012-03-09

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. M. hyopneumoniae infects pigs at mucosal surfaces of respiratory tract. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the protection rate against M. hyopneumoniae infection following intranasal immunization with attenuated M. hyopneumoniae 168 strain is improved by administration of bacterial DNA containing CpG motifs. Thirty pigs were immunized intranasally or intramuscularly and the levels of local respiratory tract and systemic immune responses were detected. The results showed that the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes in the tracheal fork, the levels of cytokine IL-6, and M. hyopneumoniae specific SIgA in local nasal cavity increased respectively after intranasal vaccination with the attenuated M. hyopneumoniae 168 strain alone. However, the levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ in local nasal cavity, the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes in trachea, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the lung and hilar lymph nodes, the specific IgG antibody level in serum on 35 day post immunization were all increased significantly after intranasal vaccination of the attenuated M. hyopneumoniae 168 strain adjuvanted with bacterial DNA. We concluded that intranasal administration of attenuated M. hyopneumoniae 168 strain adjuvanted with bacterial DNA may be effective in evoking the local cellular and humoral immune response in the respiratory tract and the systemic immune response. Intranasal vaccination will be effective in prevention of the transmission and prevalence of MPS.

  17. Extremophilic Acinetobacter Strains from High-Altitude Lakes in Argentinean Puna: Remarkable UV-B Resistance and Efficient DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P.; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli.

  18. Extremophilic Acinetobacter strains from high-altitude lakes in Argentinean Puna: remarkable UV-B resistance and efficient DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli.

  19. Canonical DNA Repair Pathways Influence R-Loop-Driven Genome Instability.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2016-07-22

    DNA repair defects create cancer predisposition in humans by fostering a higher rate of mutations. While DNA repair is quite well characterized, recent studies have identified previously unrecognized relationships between DNA repair and R-loop-mediated genome instability. R-loops are three-stranded nucleic acid structures in which RNA binds to genomic DNA to displace a loop of single-stranded DNA. Mutations in homologous recombination, nucleotide excision repair, crosslink repair, and DNA damage checkpoints have all now been linked to formation and function of transcription-coupled R-loops. This perspective will summarize recent literature linking DNA repair to R-loop-mediated genomic instability and discuss how R-loops may contribute to mutagenesis in DNA-repair-deficient cancers.

  20. Most frequent scenario for recurrent Candida vaginitis is strain maintenance with "substrain shuffling": demonstration by sequential DNA fingerprinting with probes Ca3, C1, and CARE2.

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, S R; Reed, B D; Pierson, C L; Soll, D R

    1996-01-01

    The following three basic scenarios have emerged for the genetic relatedness of strains in recurrent vaginal candidiasis: strain maintenance without genetic variation, strain maintenance with minor genetic variation, and strain replacement. To test the frequency of each of the three scenarios, the genetic relatedness of Candida albicans isolates from each of 18 patients with recurrent infections was assessed by sequential DNA fingerprinting with the following three probes: the Ca3 probe; the C1 probe, a subfragment of the Ca3 probe which hybridizes to hypervariable genomic fragments; and the unrelated CARE2 probe. In each of the 18 patients with recurrent infections, the same strain was responsible for sequential infections, suggesting that the predominant scenario is strain maintenance. However, in 56% of these patients, the strain exhibited minor genetic variations in sequential infections. These changes were not found to be progressive. Rather, the changes suggest that substrains of an established infecting strain are shuffled in sequential infections. Results are also presented that in 45% of patients with recurrent infections, oral and vulvovaginal isolates were identical, in 35% they were highly related but not identical, and in 20% they were unrelated. These results differ markedly from those for commensal isolates simultaneously cultured from the oral cavity and vulvovaginal region of healthy individuals. Finally, it is demonstrated that in all eight cases in which C. albicans was isolated from both the male sexual partner of the patient with a recurrent infection and the patient, an isolate from the male partner was identical or highly related to the vulvovaginal strain. These results demonstrate that in patients with recurrent vulvovaginitis, a single strain usually dominates both in the different body locations of the patient and in the male partner and that it is maintained through sequential infections. However, in patients with recurrent infections

  1. The probability of the Acinetobacter baumannii strain clonal spreading in donor-recipient systems, as confirmed by the molecular analysis of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA.

    PubMed

    Sikora, M; Netsvyetayeva, I; Golas, M; Swoboda-Kopec, E; de Walthoffen, S Walter; Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Pacholczyk, M; Chmura, A; Mlynarczyk, G

    2011-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important pathogen widely distributed in the hospital environment and responsible for a variety of nosocomial infections. This micro-organism especially affects patients with impaired host defenses in the intensive care unit. It has been implicated in severe nosocomial infections including bloodstream infections, pneumonia, and meningitides. Those infections are often outbreaks caused by a single clone spreading. The aim of our study was an epidemiological analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from hospitalized liver/kidney transplant donors and recipients. The analyzed material for epidemiological test included 13 A. baumannii strains isolated in 2010 from eight liver/kidney donors and 5 organ recipients. The epidemiological analysis of the isolates was performed by the use of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-polymerase chain reaction method to determine their genetic relatedness. We isolated 9 A. baumannii strains from 8 organ donors. Among this group of isolates, four strains showed the same fingerprints that were classified as one RAPD type 1. The remaining donor isolates revealed differentiated patterns. All strains isolated from recipients formed distinct RAPD types, one of which was identical to the group of four donor strains (RAPD type 1). The clonal spreading of A. baumannii strains was not observed among recipients but we noted a single case of probable transmission of the pathogen from the donor to the recipient.

  2. Production of infectious RNA transcripts from full-length cDNA clones representing two subgroups of peanut stunt virus strains: mapping satellite RNA support to RNA1.

    PubMed

    Hu, C C; Sanger, M; Ghabrial, S A

    1998-08-01

    Full-length cDNA clones from which infectious transcripts could be generated were constructed from the genomic RNAs of two distinct strains of peanut stunt cucumovirus (PSV), PSV-ER and PSV-W. PSV-ER, a subgroup I strain, is known to support efficient replication of satellite RNA (satRNA) in infected plants, whereas PSV-W, a subgroup II strain, does not support satRNA replication. Although artificial reassortants (pseudorecombinants) of all possible combinations of infectious transcripts representing RNA1, RNA2 and RNA3 were infectious, only those having RNA1 from PSV-ER supported the replication of satRNA. These results demonstrate conclusively that support of PSV satRNA replication maps to RNA1. Comparisons of secondary structure predictions of the C-terminal helicase-like domain of the 1a proteins of four PSV strains belonging to two subgroups did not reveal any obvious differences between strains that differ in satRNA support. The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA1 from strains PSV-ER and PSV-W were determined and found to be 79% identical. Sequence comparison analysis of RNA1 sequences of cucumoviruses confirmed the placement of the PSV strains into two distinct subgroups.

  3. Telomere Dysfunction and DNA-PKcs Deficiency: characterization and consequence

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Eli S.; Klingler, Rebekah; Ponnaiya, Brian; Hardt, Tanja; Schrock, Evelin; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Meek, Katheryn; Ullrich, Robert L.; Bailey, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cells accurately distinguish between DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends and telomeric DNA ends remain poorly defined. Recent investigations have revealed intriguing interactions between DNA repair and telomeres. We were the first to report a requirement for the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) protein DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in the effective end-capping of mammalian telomeres. Here, we report our continued characterization of uncapped (as opposed to shortened) dysfunctional telomeres in cells deficient for the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) and shed light on their consequence. We present evidence in support of our model that uncapped telomeres in this repair-deficient background are inappropriately detected and processed as DSBs, and so participate not only in spontaneous telomere-telomere fusion, but importantly, also in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced telomere-DSB fusion events. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs itself (Thr-2609 cluster) is a critical event for proper telomere end-processing and that ligase IV (NHEJ) is required for uncapped telomere fusion. We also find uncapped telomeres in cells from the BALB/c mouse, which harbors two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that result in reduced DNA-PKcs abundance and activity, most markedly in mammary tissue, and is both radiosensitive and susceptible to radiogenic mammary cancer. Our results suggest mechanistic links between uncapped/dysfunctional telomeres in DNA-PKcs repair-deficient backgrounds, radiation-induced instability and breast cancer. These studies provide the first direct evidence of genetic susceptibility and environmental insult interactions leading to a unique and on-going form of genomic instability capable of driving carcinogenesis. PMID:19244120

  4. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua by 16S rRNA genes and intraspecies discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, J; Bsat, N; Piani, M; Russ, W; Sultana, K; Wiedmann, M; Whitaker, R; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    Differences in the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) which can be used to discriminate Listeria monocytogenes from Listeria innocua have been detected. The 16S rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with a set of oligonucleotide primers which flank a 1.5-kb fragment. Sequence differences were observed in the V2 region of the 16S rDNA both between L. monocytogenes Scott A and L. innocua and between different L. monocytogenes serotypes. Although L. monocytogenes SLCC2371 had the same V2 region sequence as L. innocua, the two species were different within the V9 region at nucleotides 1259 and 1292, in agreement with previous studies (R.-F. Wang, W.-W. Cao, and M.G. Johnson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:3666-3670, 1991). Intraspecies discrimination of L. monocytogenes strains was achieved by using the patterns generated by random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. Although some distinction can be made within the L. monocytogenes species by their 16S rDNA sequence, a far greater discrimination within species could be made by generating random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns from chromosomal DNA. By using a number of 10-bp primers, unique patterns for each isolate which in all cases examined differentiate between various L. monocytogenes serotypes, even though they may have the same 16S rRNA sequences, could be generated. Images PMID:8439157

  5. VNTR fingerprinting of Kluyveromyces marxianus strains WT, 7-1, and 8-1 by using different primer types to give best results in PCR and on electrophorese gel in order to find differentiation of the DNA of the yeast strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (WT, 7-1, 8-1) we wish to find out the variable numbered tandem repeats (VNTR) of each of the DNA strains from the different mutagenized K. marxianus strains. To do this we used Phusion HF Buffer Pack to try and give a clear picture of the VNTR by u...

  6. Detection of pap-, sfa- and afa-specific DNA sequences in Escherichia coli strains isolated from extraintestinal material.

    PubMed

    Bogyiová, E; Kmetová, M; Biros, E; Siegfried, L

    2002-01-01

    P-fimbriae, S-fimbriae and AFA-adhesins are virulence factors responsible for adherence of Escherichia coli strains to extraintestinal host-cell surface. Detection of pap-, sfa- and afa-specific sequences performed by PCR revealed 74% pap+, 65% sfa+, and 8.3% afa+ strains in a group of 84 extraintestinal E. coli isolates. Detection in a group of fecal strains showed 29% pap+, 21% sfa+ and 4% afa+ strains. pap together with sfa were found as the most frequent combination (56%) among extraintestinal isolates probably due to localization of pap- and sfa-operons on a common pathogenicity island. The occurrence of afa-specific sequence among 56 urine strains was 11%, although no afa+ strain was detected among 28 gynecological isolates. No strains with detected adhesin operons were found among twenty (24%) extraintestinal E. coli strains.

  7. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  8. Differentiation of strains in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by DNA sequence polymorphisms, including rapid identification of M. bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Frothingham, R

    1995-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. microti, and M. africanum. Seven strains of the M. tuberculosis complex were sequenced in a region of about 300 bp which contains multiple 15-bp tandem repeats and which is part of a 1,551-bp open reading frame. Four distinct sequences were obtained, each defining a sequevar. A sequevar includes the strain or strains with a given sequence. The type strain M. tuberculosis TMC 102 (H37Rv) was designated sequevar MED-G. When compared to MED-G, sequevar LONG had an insertion of one 15-bp tandem repeat and sequevar SHORT had a deletion of one tandem repeat. Sequevar MED-C had a G-->C substitution, coding for the conservative change Ser-->Thr. BanI cuts only sequevar MED-C at the site of the substitution. PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was used to determine the sequevars of 92 M. tuberculosis complex strains. All 23 M. bovis BCG strains belonged to sequevar MED-C. The M. africanum type strain was sequevar SHORT. The remaining 68 strains of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis (not BCG), and M. microti were sequevars LONG (3 strains) or MED-G (65 strains). PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was applied to reference strains and clinical isolates with a worldwide distribution. This method provides rapid, sensitive, and specific identification of the important vaccine strain M. bovis BCG. PMID:7790448

  9. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Competence Gene, comC, Required for DNA Binding and Uptake in Acinetobacter sp. Strain BD413

    PubMed Central

    Link, Caroline; Eickernjäger, Sandra; Porstendörfer, Dirk; Averhoff, Beate

    1998-01-01

    A gene (comC) essential for natural transformation was identified in Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413. ComC has a typical leader sequence and is similar to different type IV pilus assembly factors. A comC mutant (T308) is not able to bind or take up DNA but exhibits a piliation phenotype indistinguishable from the transformation wild type as revealed by electron microscopy. PMID:9515934

  10. Independent regulation of nifHDK operon transcription and DNA rearrangement during heterocyst differentiation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, J W; Whorff, L L; Wiest, D R

    1991-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 expresses the genes required for nitrogen fixation in terminally differentiated cells called heterocysts. The nifHDK operon encodes the nitrogenase polypeptides and is expressed at high levels in heterocysts. During heterocyst differentiation, an 11-kb DNA element is excised from the nifD gene by site-specific recombination. The xisA gene, located on the 11-kb element, is required for the excision of the element. Transcription and DNA rearrangement of the nifHDK operon both occur late during heterocyst differentiation, about 18 to 24 h after induction, suggesting that the regulation of these events might be coupled. We show that heterocyst-specific transcription and DNA rearrangement of the nifHDK operon are independent of one another. Northern (RNA) analysis of the xisA mutant strain DW12-2.2, which cannot excise the nifD 11-kb element or fix nitrogen, showed that the nifH and nifD genes are transcribed on unrearranged chromosomes. The nifK gene was not transcribed in DW12-2.2, indicating that its expression is dependent on the nifH promoter and excision of the 11-kb element from the operon. A 1.68-kb DNA fragment containing the nifH promoter was deleted from the chromosome to produce the mutant strain LW1. LW1 formed heterocysts but did not grow on nitrogen-free medium and showed no transcription through nifD. Southern analysis of LW1 showed normal excision of the 11-kb element from the nifHDK operon, indicating that transcription from the nifH promoter is not required for the developmentally regulated DNA rearrangement. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:1938911

  11. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  12. Indistinguishable Landscapes of Meiotic DNA Breaks in rad50+ and rad50S Strains of Fission Yeast Revealed by a Novel rad50+ Recombination Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2008-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rec12 protein, the homolog of Spo11 in other organisms, initiates meiotic recombination by creating DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and becoming covalently linked to the DNA ends of the break. This protein–DNA linkage has previously been detected only in mutants such as rad50S in which break repair is impeded and DSBs accumulate. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DSB distribution in a rad50S mutant is markedly different from that in wild-type (RAD50) meiosis, and it was suggested that this might also be true for other organisms. Here, we show that we can detect Rec12-DNA linkages in Sc. pombe rad50+ cells, which are proficient for DSB repair. In contrast to the results from Sa. cerevisiae, genome-wide microarray analysis of Rec12-DNA reveals indistinguishable meiotic DSB distributions in rad50+ and rad50S strains of Sc. pombe. These results confirm our earlier findings describing the occurrence of widely spaced DSBs primarily in large intergenic regions of DNA and demonstrate the relevance and usefulness of fission yeast studies employing rad50S. We propose that the differential behavior of rad50S strains reflects a major difference in DSB regulation between the two species—specifically, the requirement for the Rad50-containing complex for DSB formation in budding yeast but not in fission yeast. Use of rad50S and related mutations may be a useful method for DSB analysis in other species. PMID:19023408

  13. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  14. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26426354

  15. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    DOE PAGES

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regionsmore » of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.« less

  16. Arbitrarily primed PCR DNA fingerprinting of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains by using templates from boiled cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Madico, G; Akopyants, N S; Berg, D E

    1995-01-01

    Arbitrarily primed PCR allows genetically different bacterial strains to be distinguished with great sensitivity and efficiency. We report that informative, reproducible arbitrarily primed PCR profiles can be obtained from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains by using boiled stationary-phase cultures, without the need for time-consuming phenol extraction. This simple template preparation procedure should be especially useful in large epidemiologic studies when many strains must be typed. PMID:7650181

  17. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  18. Induction of a novel damage-specific DNA binding protein correlates with enhanced DNA repair in primate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.; Hirschfeld, S.; Tsang, A.P.; Wagner, M.; Dixon, K.; Levine, A.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Pretreatment of mammalian cell with DNA-damaging agents, such as UV light or mitomycin C, but not the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), results in the enhanced repair of subsequently transfected UV-damaged expression vectors. To determine the cellular factors that are responsible for this enhancement, the authors have used a modified gel retardation assay to detect the proteins that interact with damaged DNA. They have identified a constitutive DNA binding protein in extracts from primate cells that has a high affinity for UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin, but not TPA or serum starvation, have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA binding (DDB) protein. These results suggest that the signal for induction of DDB protein can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. The induction of DDB protein varies among primate cells with different phenotypes: (1) virus-transformed repair-proficient cells have partially or fully lost the ability to induce DDB protein above constitutive levels; (2) primary cells from repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group C, and transformed XP groups A and D, show constitutive DDB protein, but do not show induced levels of this protein 48 h after UV; and (3) primary and transformed repair-deficient cells from one XP E patient are lacking both the constitutive and the induced DDB activity. The correlation between the induction of the DDB protein and the enhanced repair of UV-damaged expression vectors implies the involvement of the DDB protein in this inducible cellular response.

  19. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Heteroplasmy in a Mouse Model with Mitochondrial DNA of C57BL/6 and NZB/BINJ Strains.

    PubMed

    Machado, Thiago Simões; Macabelli, Carolina Habermann; Sangalli, Juliano Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Thiago Bittencourt; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are widely employed to study mitochondrial inheritance, which have implications to several human diseases caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). These mouse models take advantage of polymorphisms between the mtDNA of the NZB/BINJ and the mtDNA of common inbred laboratory (i.e., C57BL/6) strains to generate mice with two mtDNA haplotypes (heteroplasmy). Based on PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), these studies determine the level of heteroplasmy across generations and in different cell types aiming to understand the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial inheritance. However, PCR-RFLP is a time-consuming method of low sensitivity and accuracy that dependents on the use of restriction enzyme digestions. A more robust method to measure heteroplasmy has been provided by the use of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on allelic refractory mutation detection system (ARMS-qPCR). Herein, we report an ARMS-qPCR assay for quantification of heteroplasmy using heteroplasmic mice with mtDNA of NZB/BINJ and C57BL/6 origin. Heteroplasmy and mtDNA copy number were estimated in germline and somatic tissues, providing evidence of the reliability of the approach. Furthermore, it enabled single-step quantification of heteroplasmy, with sensitivity to detect as low as 0.1% of either NZB/BINJ or C57BL/6 mtDNA. These findings are relevant as the ARMS-qPCR assay reported here is fully compatible with similar heteroplasmic mouse models used to study mitochondrial inheritance in mammals.

  20. Benzo[b]fluoranthene: tumorigenicity in strain A/J mouse lungs, DNA adducts and mutations in the Ki-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Mass, M J; Abu-Shakra, A; Roop, B C; Nelson, G; Galati, A J; Stoner, G D; Nesnow, S; Ross, J A

    1996-08-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F) is a pervasive constituent of environmental combustion products. We sought to examine the lung tumorigenic activity of B[b]F in strain A/J mice, to study the relationship between formation and decay of B[b]F-DNA adducts and to examine mutations in the Ki-ras proto-oncogene in DNA from B[b]F-induced tumors. Mice were given i.p. injections of 0, 10, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg body wt and lung adenomas were scored after 8 months. B[b]F induced significant numbers of mouse lung adenomas in a dose-related fashion, with the highest dose (200 mg/kg) yielding 6.95 adenomas/ mouse, with 100% of the mice exhibiting an adenoma. In mice given tricaprylin, the vehicle control, there were 0.60 adenomas/mouse, with 55% of the mice exhibiting an adenoma. Based on dose, B[b]F was less active than benzo[a]pyrene. DNA adducts were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by 32P-post-labeling in lungs of strain A/J mice 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days after i.p. injection. Maximal levels of adduction occurred 5 days after treatment with the 200 mg/kg dose group, producing 1230 amol B[b]F-DNA adducts/microgram DNA. The major B[b]F-DNA adduct was identified by co-chromatography as trans-9, 10-dihydroxy-anti-11, 12-epoxy-5-hydroxy-9, 10, 11, 12-tetra-hydro-B[b]F-deoxyguanosine. Approximately 86% of the tumors had a mutation in codon 12 of the Ki-ras oncogene, as determined by direct DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified exon 1 and single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. Analysis of the Ki-ras mutation spectrum in 25 of 29 B[b]F-induced tumors revealed the predominant mutation to be a G-->T transversion in the first or second base of codon 12, congruous with the DNA adduct data. Our data are consistent with previous reports in mouse skin implicating a phenolic diol epoxide as the proximate carcinogenic form of B[b]F that binds to guanine.

  1. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) from the Sava River basin: New insights into strain formation, mtDNA-like sequences and dynamics of infection.

    PubMed

    Vardić Smrzlić, Irena; Valić, Damir; Kapetanović, Damir; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Gjurčević, Emil; Teskeredžić, Emin

    2015-10-01

    Here we report the genetic variability and presence of mtDNA-like sequences of Pomphorhynchus laevis from the chub, Squalius cephalus, caught at the sampling sites along the Sava River and its tributary the Sutla River in Croatia. Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene of the recovered P. laevis specimens were used for haplotype network construction and phylogenetic analysis. These analyses showed that some specimens contained mitochondrial-like sequences, and they uncovered the existence of a Sava River basin strain different from known strains of P. laevis. This is the first time that P. laevis has been shown to contain mtDNA-like sequences, suggesting the need to exercise caution during COI analyses of P. laevis using universal primers. Highly conserved sequences of two nuclear markers, the ITS region and 18S rRNA, were not helpful for understanding genetic variability or differentiating strains. Furthermore, analysis of the dynamics of P. laevis infections in S. cephalus from the Sava and Sutla Rivers showed decreased prevalence and abundance at sites with inferior water quality, positive association of parasite abundance with fish size, and no clear association of parasite abundance with fish condition index or sex.

  2. Immunogenicity of a Candidate DNA Vaccine Based on the prM/E Genes of a Dengue Type 2 Virus Cosmopolitan Genotype Strain.

    PubMed

    Putri, Dwi Hilda; Sudiro, Tjahjani Mirawati; Yunita, Rina; Jaya, Ungke Anton; Dewi, Beti Ernawati; Sjatha, Fithriyah; Konishi, Eiji; Hotta, Hak; Sudarmono, Pratiwi

    2015-01-01

    The development of a dengue virus vaccine is a major priority in efforts to control the diseases. Several researchers are currently using the Asian 1 and Asian 2 genotypes as vaccine candidates for dengue type 2 virus (DENV-2). However, in this study, we constructed a recombinant plasmid-based prM/E gene, from a DENV-2 Cosmopolitan genotype strain as a dengue DNA vaccine candidate. The protein expression of the recombinant plasmid in CHO cells was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting, and sucrose gradient sedimentation. After being used to immunize ddY mice three times at doses of 25 or 100 μg, the DNA vaccine induced humoral immune responses. There was no difference in the neutralizing antibody titer (focus reduction neutralization test 50% value) of mice immunized with 25 and 100 μg DNA vaccine doses. When challenged with 3 × 10(5) FFU DENV-2, immunized mice could raise anamnestic neutralizing antibody responses, which were observed at day 4 and day 8 post-challenge. Analysis of immunogenicity using BALB/c mice showed that their antibody neutralization titers were lower than those of ddY mice. In addition, the antibodies produced after immunization and challenge could also neutralize a DENV-2 Asian 2 genotype (New Guinea C) strain. Therefore, the DENV-2 Cosmopolitan genotype may be a DENV-2 vaccine candidate.

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF STEROCHEMICAL CONFIGERATION OF CYCLOPENTA[CD]PYRENE-DNA ADDUCTS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG AND C3H10T1/2CL8

    EPA Science Inventory

    The definitive identification of stereochemical configurations of DNA adducts detected by 32P-postlabeling requires co-chromatography of adducts with synthetic chromatographic standards. Four major and several minor DNA adducts are formed by cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) in strain A...

  4. Immunological evaluation of a DNA cocktail vaccine with co-delivery of calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaPNs) against the Toxoplasma gondii RH strain in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Sharif, Mahdi; Abediankenari, Saeid; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Valadan, Reza; Ramandie, Mahdi Fasihi-; Hosseini, Seyed-Abdollah; Daryani, Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    Many recent studies have been conducted to evaluate protective immunity mediated by DNA vaccines against toxoplasmosis. Cocktail DNA vaccines showed better immune responses compared to single vaccines. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the protective efficacy of rhomboid 4 (ROM4) and cocktail DNA vaccines (ROM4 + GRA14) of the Toxoplasma gondii RH strain with or without coated calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaPNs) as the adjuvant to improve the immunogenicity against the T. gondii RH strain in BALB/c mice. Cocktail DNA vaccines of pcROM4 + pcGRA14 of the T. gondii RH strain were constructed. CaPNs were synthesized and the cocktail DNA vaccine was coated with the adjuvant of CaPNs. Immunogenicity and the protective effects of cocktail DNA vaccines with or without CaPNs against lethal challenge were evaluated in BALB/c mice. pcROM4 and cocktail DNA vaccine coated with CaPNs significantly enhanced cellular and humoral immune responses against Toxoplasma compared to pcROM4 and cocktail DNA vaccine without CaPNs (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that the survival time of immunized mice after challenge with the RH strain of T. gondii was increased compared to that of controls and the DNA vaccine provided significant protection in mice (p < 0.05). The CaPN-based cocktail DNA vaccine of pcROM4 + pcGRA14 showed the longest survival time compared to the other groups. Co-immunization with CaPN-based cocktail DNA vaccine (pcROM4 + pcGRA14) boosted immune responses and increased the protective efficacy against acute toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice compared to both single gene and bivalent DNA vaccine without nano-adjuvants.

  5. Development and characterization of an infectious cDNA clone of the modified live virus vaccine strain of equine arteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Go, Yun Young; Huang, Chengjin M; Meade, Barry J; Lu, Zhengchun; Snijder, Eric J; Timoney, Peter J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2012-08-01

    A stable full-length cDNA clone of the modified live virus (MLV) vaccine strain of equine arteritis virus (EAV) was developed. RNA transcripts generated from this plasmid (pEAVrMLV) were infectious upon transfection into mammalian cells, and the resultant recombinant virus (rMLV) had 100% nucleotide identity to the parental MLV vaccine strain of EAV. A single silent nucleotide substitution was introduced into the nucleocapsid gene (pEAVrMLVB), enabling the cloned vaccine virus (rMLVB) to be distinguished from parental MLV vaccine as well as other field and laboratory strains of EAV by using an allelic discrimination real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay. In vitro studies revealed that the cloned vaccine virus rMLVB and the parental MLV vaccine virus had identical growth kinetics and plaque morphologies in equine endothelial cells. In vivo studies confirmed that the cloned vaccine virus was very safe and induced high titers of neutralizing antibodies against EAV in experimentally immunized horses. When challenged with the heterologous EAV KY84 strain, the rMLVB vaccine virus protected immunized horses in regard to reducing the magnitude and duration of viremia and virus shedding but did not suppress the development of signs of EVA, although these were reduced in clinical severity. The vaccine clone pEAVrMLVB could be further manipulated to improve the vaccine efficacy as well as to develop a marker vaccine for serological differentiation of EAV naturally infected from vaccinated animals.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Assembled Using Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Brown; Sagar M. Utturkar; Timothy S. Magnuson; Allison E. Ray; Farris L. Poole; W. Andrew Lancaster; Michael P. Thorgersen; Michael W. W. Adams; Dwayne A. Elias

    2014-09-01

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  7. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; ...

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterizedmore » as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).« less

  8. Evaluation of a high-throughput repetitive-sequence-based PCR system for DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex strains.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Gerard A; Freeman, Robert J; Lewis, Kaeryn N; Livingston-Rosanoff, Devon; Shah, Ketan S; Milan, Sparrow Joy; Goldberg, Stefan V

    2004-06-01

    Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) is useful for generating DNA fingerprints of diverse bacterial and fungal species. Rep-PCR amplicon fingerprints represent genomic segments lying between repetitive sequences. A commercial system that electrophoretically separates rep-PCR amplicons on microfluidic chips, and provides computer-generated readouts of results has been adapted for use with Mycobacterium species. The ability of this system to type M. tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) isolates was evaluated. M. tuberculosis strains (n = 56) were typed by spoligotyping with rep-PCR as a high-resolution adjunct. Results were compared with those generated by a standard approach of spoligotyping with IS6110-targeted restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) as the high-resolution adjunct. The sample included 11 epidemiologically and genotypically linked outbreak isolates and a population-based sample of 45 isolates from recent immigrants to Seattle, Wash., from the African Horn countries of Somalia, Eritrea, and Ethiopia. Twenty isolates exhibited unique spoligotypes and were not analyzed further. Of the 36 outbreak and African Horn isolates with nonunique spoligotypes, 23 fell into four clusters identified by IS6110-RFLP and rep-PCR, with 97% concordance observed between the two methods. Both approaches revealed extensive strain heterogeneity within the African Horn sample, consistent with a predominant pattern of reactivation of latent infections in this immigrant population. Rep-PCR exhibited 89% concordance with IS1245-RFLP typing of 28 M. avium subspecies avium strains. For M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium subspecies avium, the discriminative power of rep-PCR equaled or exceeded that of RFLP. Rep-PCR also generated DNA fingerprints from M. intracellulare (n = 8) and MAC(x) (n = 2) strains. It shows promise as a fast, unified method for high-throughput genotypic fingerprinting of multiple Mycobacterium species.

  9. An Improved Method for TAL Effectors DNA-Binding Sites Prediction Reveals Functional Convergence in TAL Repertoires of Xanthomonas oryzae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Dereeper, Alexis; López, Camilo; Koebnik, Ralf; Szurek, Boris; Cunnac, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Transcription Activators-Like Effectors (TALEs) belong to a family of virulence proteins from the Xanthomonas genus of bacterial plant pathogens that are translocated into the plant cell. In the nucleus, TALEs act as transcription factors inducing the expression of susceptibility genes. A code for TALE-DNA binding specificity and high-resolution three-dimensional structures of TALE-DNA complexes were recently reported. Accurate prediction of TAL Effector Binding Elements (EBEs) is essential to elucidate the biological functions of the many sequenced TALEs as well as for robust design of artificial TALE DNA-binding domains in biotechnological applications. In this work a program with improved EBE prediction performances was developed using an updated specificity matrix and a position weight correction function to account for the matching pattern observed in a validation set of TALE-DNA interactions. To gain a systems perspective on the large TALE repertoires from X. oryzae strains, this program was used to predict rice gene targets for 99 sequenced family members. Integrating predictions and available expression data in a TALE-gene network revealed multiple candidate transcriptional targets for many TALEs as well as several possible instances of functional convergence among TALEs. PMID:23869221

  10. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  11. Analysis of differentially expressed genes in the precocious line of Eimeria maxima and its parent strain using suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Lin, Jiaojiao; Han, Hongyu; Jiang, Lianlian; Zhao, Qiping; Zhu, Shunhai; Huang, Bing

    2011-04-01

    The precocious line of Eimeria spp., obtained by repeated passages of oocysts initially collected from feces of previously infected chickens, has unique phenotypes and plays an important role in immunizing chickens against coccidiosis. However, the genetic basis of precocious phenotype in Eimeria is still poorly understood. To investigate gene expression changes in sporulated oocysts between the precocious line of E. maxima and its parent strain, subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). A total of 3,164 cDNA fragments were selected from the SSH cDNA libraries to fabricate cDNA microarrays and further identify the differentially expressed genes. The credibility of the microarray data was verified by real-time PCR. A total of 360 valid expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained, which represented 32 unique sequences. Twenty-one genes were validated as downregulated and 11 genes as upregulated in the precocious line. Homology searching of the public sequence database showed that six genes encoded proteins homologous with previously reported proteins, including rhomboid-like protein and transhydrogenase of E. tenella, serpin, and cation-transporting ATPase of E. acervulina, a heat-shock protein of E. maxima, and a conserved hypothetical protein of Toxoplasma gondii. Thus, the remaining 26 ESTs have not been previously reported. Further characterization of these differentially expressed genes will be useful in understanding the genetic basis for the precocious phenotype in Eimeria spp.

  12. Molecular Characterization of a Brucella Species Large DNA Fragment Deleted in Brucella abortus Strains: Evidence for a Locus Involved in the Synthesis of a Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Vizcaíno, Nieves; Cloeckaert, Axel; Zygmunt, Michel S.; Fernández-Lago, Luis

    1999-01-01

    A Brucella melitensis 16M DNA fragment of 17,119 bp, which contains a large region deleted in B. abortus strains and DNA flanking one side of the deletion, has been characterized. In addition to the previously identified omp31 gene, 14 hypothetical genes have been identified in the B. melitensis fragment, most of them showing homology to genes involved in the synthesis of a polysaccharide. Considering that 10 of the 15 genes are missing in B. abortus and that all the polysaccharides described in the Brucella genus (lipopolysaccharide, native hapten, and polysaccharide B) have been detected in all the species, it seems likely that the genes described here might be part of a cluster for the synthesis of a novel Brucella polysaccharide. Several polysaccharides have been identified as important virulence factors, and the discovery of a novel polysaccharide in the brucellae which is probably not synthesized in B. abortus might be interesting for a better understanding of the pathogenicity and host preference differences observed between the Brucella species. However, the possibility that the genes described in this paper no longer encode the synthesis of a polysaccharide cannot be excluded. Brucellae belong to the alpha-2 subdivision of the class Proteobacteria, which includes other microorganisms living in association with eucaryotic cells, some of them synthesizing extracellular polysaccharides involved in the interaction with the host cell. The genes described in this paper might be a remnant of the common ancestor of the alpha-2 subdivision of the class Proteobacteria, and the brucellae might have lost such extracellular polysaccharide during evolution if it was not necessary for survival or for establishment of the infectious process. Nevertheless, further studies are necessary to identify the entire DNA fragment missing in B. abortus strains and to elucidate the mechanism responsible for such deletion, since only 9,948 bp of the deletion was present in the

  13. DNA Ligase III is critical for mtDNA integrity but not Xrcc1-mediated nuclear DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yankun; Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Zhao, Jingfeng; Rehg, Jerold E.; Russell, Helen R.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication and repair in mammalian cells involves three distinct DNA ligases; ligase I (Lig1), ligase III (Lig3) and ligase IV (Lig4)1. Lig3 is considered a key ligase during base excision repair because its stability depends upon its nuclear binding partner Xrcc1, a critical factor for this DNA repair pathway2,3. Lig3 is also present in the mitochondria where its role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is independent of Xrcc14. However, the biological role of Lig3 is unclear as inactivation of murine Lig3 results in early embryonic lethality5. Here we report that Lig3 is essential for mtDNA integrity but dispensable for nuclear DNA repair. Inactivation of Lig3 in the mouse nervous system resulted in mtDNA loss leading to profound mitochondrial dysfunction, disruption of cellular homeostasis and incapacitating ataxia. Similarly, inactivation of Lig3 in cardiac muscle resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and defective heart pump function leading to heart failure. However, Lig3 inactivation did not result in nuclear DNA repair deficiency, indicating essential DNA repair functions of Xrcc1 can occur in the absence of Lig3. Instead, we found that Lig1 was critical for DNA repair, but in a cooperative manner with Lig3. Additionally, Lig3 deficiency did not recapitulate the hallmark features of neural Xrcc1 inactivation such as DNA damage-induced cerebellar interneuron loss6, further underscoring functional separation of these DNA repair factors. Therefore, our data reveal that the critical biological role of Lig3 is to maintain mtDNA integrity and not Xrcc1-dependent DNA repair. PMID:21390131

  14. The production and repair of aflatoxin B sub 1 -induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A.

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the influence of function or activity of a DNA sequence on its repair, we have studied excision repair of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-induced damage in the nontranscribed, heterochromatic alpha DNA of monkey cells and in the metallothionein genes of human cells. In confluent cells, AFB{sub 1} adducts are produced in similar frequencies in alpha and in the rest of the DNA, but removal from alpha DNA is severely deficient, however, removal of AFB{sub 1} adducts from alpha DNA is enhanced by small doses of UV. The repair deficiencies are not observed in actively growing cells. We have also shown that there is preferential repair of AFB{sub 1} damage in active genes. AFB{sub 1} damage is efficiently repaired in the active human metallothionein (hMT) genes, but deficiently repaired in inactive hMT genes. 51 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey.

  16. Comparison of Haemophilus parasuis reference strains and field isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and protein profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease and is a pathogen of swine in high-health status herds. Reports on serotyping of field strains from outbreaks describe that approximately 30% of them are nontypable and therefore cannot be traced. Molecular typing methods have been use...

  17. Rescue of the 1947 Zika Virus Prototype Strain with a Cytomegalovirus Promoter-Driven cDNA Clone

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Megan C.; Sourisseau, Marion; Espino, Michael M.; Gray, Essanna S.; Chambers, Matthew T.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has been linked to severe pathogenesis. Here, we report the construction of a plasmid carrying a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-expressed prototype 1947 Uganda MR766 ZIKV cDNA that can initiate infection following direct plasmid DNA transfection of mammalian cells. Incorporation of a synthetic intron in the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) region of the ZIKV polyprotein reduced viral cDNA-associated toxicity in bacteria. High levels of infectious virus were produced following transfection of the plasmid bearing the wild-type MR766 ZIKV genome, but not one with a disruption to the viral nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) polymerase active site. Multicycle growth curve and plaque assay experiments indicated that the MR766 virus resulting from plasmid transfection exhibited growth characteristics that were more similar to its parental isolate than previously published 2010 Cambodia and 2015 Brazil cDNA-rescued ZIKV. This ZIKV infectious clone will be useful for investigating the genetic determinants of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis and should be amenable to construction of diverse infectious clones expressing reporter proteins and representing a range of ZIKV isolates. IMPORTANCE The study of ZIKV, which has become increasingly important with the recent association of this virus with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, would benefit from an efficient strategy to genetically manipulate the virus. This work describes a model system to produce infectious virus in cell culture. We created a plasmid carrying the prototype 1947 Uganda MR766 ZIKV genome that both was stable in bacteria and could produce high levels of infectious virus in mammalian cells through direct delivery of this DNA. Furthermore, growth properties of this rescued virus closely resembled those of the viral isolate from which it was derived. This model system will provide a simple and effective means to study how ZIKV genetics impact viral replication and

  18. Aniline mustard analogues of the DNA-intercalating agent amsacrine: DNA interaction and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, J Y; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Baguley, B C; Denny, W A

    1997-04-01

    Two series of analogues of the clinical antileukemic drug and DNA-intercalating ligand amsacrine have been prepared, containing aniline mustard sidechains of varying reactivity, linked either at the 4-position of the intercalating acridine chromophore (type A) or at the 1'-position of the 9-anilino group (type B). DNase I footprinting assays showed that compounds of type B had stronger reversible binding to DNA than did compounds of type A. Compounds of each type showed similar patterns of alkylation-induced cleavage of DNA, and alkylate at the N7 of guanines in runs of guanines (similar to the pattern for untargeted mustards) as well as some adenines. Both classes of compounds crosslinked DNA, although those bearing relatively inactive mustards did so only at high drug/base pair ratios. However, while the patterns of DNA alkylation were broadly similar, the compounds were considerably more cytotoxic than analogous untargeted mustards. Comparison of their cytotoxicities in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient lines indicated this toxicity was due to DNA crosslinks (except for the least reactive SO2-linked mustards). The 4-linked analogues showed slightly higher in vivo antileukemic activity than the corresponding 1'-linked analogues.

  19. Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus pcr detection in aborted fetuses or calves born from cows experimentally infected with strain 2308

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, M.; Keid, L.B.; Rocha, V.C.M.; Vejarano, M.P.; Ikuta, C.Y.; Rodriguez, C.A.R.; Ferreira, F.; Dias, R.A.; Ferreira Neto, J.S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the detection of B. abortus by PCR in organs of aborted fetuses from infected cows, an important mechanism to find infected herds on the eradication phase of the program. So, different DNA extraction protocols were compared, focusing the PCR detection of B. abortus in clinical samples collected from aborted fetuses or calves born from cows challenged with the 2308 B. abortus strain. Therefore, two gold standard groups were built based on classical bacteriology, formed from: 32 lungs (17 positives), 26 spleens (11 positives), 23 livers (8 positives) and 22 bronchial lymph nodes (7 positives). All samples were submitted to three DNA extraction protocols, followed by the same amplification process with the primers B4 and B5. From the accumulated results for organ, the proportion of positives for the lungs was higher than the livers (p=0.04) or bronchial lymph nodes (p=0.004) and equal to the spleens (p=0.18). From the accumulated results for DNA extraction protocol, the proportion of positives for the Boom protocol was bigger than the PK (p< 0.0001) and GT (p=0.0004). There was no difference between the PK and GT protocols (p=0.5). Some positive samples from the classical bacteriology were negative to the PCR and vice-versa. Therefore, the best strategy for B. abortus detection in the organs of aborted fetuses or calves born from infected cows is the use, in parallel, of isolation by classical bacteriology and the PCR, with the DNA extraction performed by the Boom protocol. PMID:24031391

  20. Enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated human skin explants treated with T4N5 liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Kibitel, J.T.; Green, L.A.; Spinowitz, A. )

    1991-07-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes cultured from explants of skin cancer patients, including biopsies from xeroderma pigmentosum patients, were ultraviolet light-irradiated and DNA repair synthesis was measured. Repair capacity was much lower in xeroderma pigmentosum patients than in normal patients. The extent of DNA repair replication did not decline with the age of the normal patient. Treatment with T4N5 liposomes containing a DNA repair enzyme enhanced repair synthesis in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum keratinocytes in an irradiation- and liposome-dose dependent manner. These results provide no evidence that aging people or skin cancer patients are predisposed to cutaneous malignancy by a DNA repair deficiency, but do demonstrate that T4N5 liposomes enhance DNA repair in the keratinocytes of the susceptible xeroderma pigmentosum and skin cancer population.

  1. DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

  2. Identification of Mutations in a Candidate Dengue 4 Vaccine Strain 341750 PDK20 and Construction of a Full-Length eDNA Clone of the PDK20 Vaccine Candidate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Identification of mutations in a candidate dengue 4 vaccine strain 341750 PDIង and construction of a full-length eDNA clone of the PDIង vaccine...history: Received 19 May 2009 Received in revised form 2 October 2009 Accepted IS October 2009 Available online 27 October 2009 Keywords: Dengue ...virus Vaccine virus mutat ion analysis Infectious clone Dengue 4 virus strain 34 1750 serially passaged 20 t imes in primary dog kidney ( PDK) cells

  3. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-02-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP.

  4. DNA prime and virus-like particle boost from a single H5N1 strain elicits broadly neutralizing antibody responses against head region of H5 hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiqin; Zhou, Fan; Buchy, Philippe; Zuo, Teng; Hu, Hongxing; Liu, Jingjing; Song, Yufeng; Ding, Heng; Tsai, Cheguo; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Linqi; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Since 1996, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has presented a persistent threat to public health. Its high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous challenges in developing effective vaccines. To search for vaccine regimens that could elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses against diverse HPAI H5N1 strains, in the present study we tested H5 hemagglutinin (HA) from an A/Thailand/1(KAN)-1/2004 strain in a heterologous prime-boost vaccination. We demonstrated that priming mice with DNA and boosting with virus-like particle induced antibody responses that cross-neutralize all reported clades and subclades of HPAI H5N1 viruses and protect mice from high lethal dose HPAI H5N1 challenge in both active and passive immunizations. Unexpectedly, cross-divergent H5 neutralizing antibodies are directed to the HA head and block both attachment and postattachment of virus entry. Thus, we conclude that as a promising pan-H5 vaccine candidate this prime-boost regimen could be further developed in ferrets and in humans.

  5. Rescue of the highly virulent classical swine fever virus strain "Koslov" from cloned cDNA and first insights into genome variations relevant for virulence.

    PubMed

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Risager, Peter Christian; Nielsen, Jens; Belsham, Graham J; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2014-11-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain "Koslov" is highly virulent with a mortality rate of up to 100% in pigs. In this study, we modified non-functional cDNAs generated from the blood of Koslov virus infected pigs by site-directed mutagenesis, removing non-synonymous mutations step-by-step, thereby producing genomes encoding the consensus amino acid sequence. Viruses rescued from the construct corresponding to the inferred parental form were highly virulent, when tested in pigs, with infected animals displaying pronounced clinical symptoms leading to high mortality. The reconstruction therefore gave rise to a functional cDNA corresponding to the highly virulent Koslov strain of CSFV. It could be demonstrated that two single amino acid changes (S763L and P968H) in the surface structural protein E2 resulted in attenuation in the porcine infection system while another single amino acid change within the nonstructural protein NS3 (D2183G) reduced virus growth within cells in vitro.

  6. 3-O-Methylfunicone, a Selective Inhibitor of Mammalian Y-Family DNA Polymerases from an Australian Sea Salt Fungal Strain

    PubMed Central

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Motoshima, Hirohisa; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Hirano, Ken; Sugawara, Fumio; Yoshida, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    We isolated a pol inhibitor from the cultured mycelia extract of a fungal strain isolated from natural salt from a sea salt pan in Australia, which was identified as 3-O-methylfunicone by spectroscopic analyses. This compound selectively inhibited the activities of mammalian Y-family DNA polymerases (pols) (i.e., pols η, ι and κ). Among these pols, human pol κ activity was most strongly inhibited, with an IC50 value of 12.5 μM. On the other hand, the compound barely influenced the activities of the other families of mammalian pols, such as A-family (i.e., pol γ), B-family (i.e., pols α, δ and ɛ) or X-family (i.e., pols β, λ and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase), and showed no effect on the activities of fish pol δ, plant pols, prokaryotic pols and other DNA metabolic enzymes, such as calf primase of pol α, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase, human telomerase, T7 RNA polymerase, mouse IMP dehydrogenase (type II), human topoisomerases I and II, T4 polynucleotide kinase or bovine deoxyribonuclease I. This compound also suppressed the growth of two cultured human cancer cell lines, HCT116 (colon carcinoma cells) and HeLa (cervix carcinoma cells), and UV-treated HeLa cells exhibited lower clonogenic survival in the presence of inhibitor. PMID:20098603

  7. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates.

  8. PhyloFlu, a DNA Microarray for Determining the Phylogenetic Origin of Influenza A Virus Gene Segments and the Genomic Fingerprint of Viral Strains

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Luis F.; Soto-Del Río, María de los D.; Sánchez, Iván; Hernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa M.; López-Martínez, Irma; Wong-Chew, Rosa M.; Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Isa, P.; López, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that most influenza A virus gene segments can contribute to the pathogenicity of the virus. In this regard, the hemagglutinin (HA) subtype of the circulating strains has been closely surveyed, but the reassortment of internal gene segments is usually not monitored as a potential source of an increased pathogenicity. In this work, an oligonucleotide DNA microarray (PhyloFlu) designed to determine the phylogenetic origins of the eight segments of the influenza virus genome was constructed and validated. Clades were defined for each segment and also for the 16 HA and 9 neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. Viral genetic material was amplified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with primers specific to the conserved 5′ and 3′ ends of the influenza A virus genes, followed by PCR amplification with random primers and Cy3 labeling. The microarray unambiguously determined the clades for all eight influenza virus genes in 74% (28/38) of the samples. The microarray was validated with reference strains from different animal origins, as well as from human, swine, and avian viruses from field or clinical samples. In most cases, the phylogenetic clade of each segment defined its animal host of origin. The genomic fingerprint deduced by the combined information of the individual clades allowed for the determination of the time and place that strains with the same genomic pattern were previously reported. PhyloFlu is useful for characterizing and surveying the genetic diversity and variation of animal viruses circulating in different environmental niches and for obtaining a more detailed surveillance and follow up of reassortant events that can potentially modify virus pathogenicity. PMID:24353006

  9. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-05

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  10. A Monofunctional Platinum Complex Coordinated to a Rhodium Metalloinsertor Selectively Binds Mismatched DNA in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh—O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA non-classically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors. PMID:26397309

  11. Personalised pathway analysis reveals association between DNA repair pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability in sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Srihari, Sriganesh; Lal, Samir; Gautier, Benoît; Simpson, Peter T; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ragan, Mark A; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    The Homologous Recombination (HR) pathway is crucial for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated during DNA replication. Defects in HR repair have been linked to the initiation and development of a wide variety of human malignancies, and exploited in chemical, radiological and targeted therapies. In this study, we performed a personalised pathway analysis independently for four large sporadic breast cancer cohorts to investigate the status of HR pathway dysregulation in individual sporadic breast tumours, its association with HR repair deficiency and its impact on tumour characteristics. Specifically, we first manually curated a list of HR genes according to our recent review on this pathway (Liu et al., 2014), and then applied a personalised pathway analysis method named Pathifier (Drier et al., 2013) on the expression levels of the curated genes to obtain an HR score quantifying HR pathway dysregulation in individual tumours. Based on the score, we observed a great diversity in HR dysregulation between and within gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes, and by using two published HR-defect signatures, we found HR pathway dysregulation reflects HR repair deficiency. Furthermore, we identified a novel association between HR pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability (CIN) in sporadic breast cancer. Although CIN has long been considered as a hallmark of most solid tumours, with recent extensive studies highlighting its importance in tumour evolution and drug resistance, the molecular basis of CIN in sporadic cancers remains poorly understood. Our results imply that HR pathway dysregulation might contribute to CIN in sporadic breast cancer.

  12. Comparative analysis by polymerase chain reaction amplified minicircles of kinetoplast DNA of a stable strain of Trypanosoma cruzi from São Felipe, Bahia, its clones and subclones: possibility of predominance of a principal clone in this area.

    PubMed

    Campos, R F; Gonçalves, M S; dos Reis, E A; dos Reis, M G; Andrade, S G

    1999-01-01

    Molecular characterization of one stable strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, the 21 SF, representative of the pattern of strains isolated from the endemic area of São Felipe, State of Bahia, Brazil, maintained for 15 years in laboratory by serial passages in mice and classified as biodeme Type II and zymodeme 2 has been investigated. The kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) of parental strain, 5 clones and 14 subclones were analyzed. Schizodeme was established by comparative study of the fragments obtained from digestion of the 330-bp fragments amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the variable regions of the minicircles, and digested by restriction endonucleases Rsa I and Hinf I. Our results show a high percentual of similarity between the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the parental strain and its clones and among these individual clones and their subclones at a level of 80 to 100%. This homology indicates a predominance of the same "principal clone" in the 21SF strain and confirms the homogeneity previously observed at biological and isozymic analysis. These results suggest the possibility that the T. cruzi strains with similar biological and isoenzymic patterns, circulating in this endemic area, are representative of one dominant clone. The presence of "principal clones" could be responsible for a predominant tropism of the parasites for specific organs and tissues and this could contribute to the pattern of clinico-pathological manifestations of Chagas's disease in one geographical area.

  13. DNA repair genes of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Fuscoe, J.C.; Weber, C.A.

    1985-09-27

    In the CHO cell line various mutations affecting DNA repair have been obtained. Mutants that belong to five genetic complementation groups for UV sensitivity and resemble the cells from individuals having the cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum were previously identified. Each mutant is defective in the incision step of nucleotide excision repair and hypersensitive to bulky DNA lesions. A sixth genetic complementation group for UV sensitivity has now been identified with UV27-1. These UV mutants can be divided into two subgroups; only Groups 2 and 4 are extremely sensitive to mitomycin C and other DNA cross-linking agents. The clear-cut phenotypes of the CHO mutants have allowed us to construct hybrid cells by fusion with human lymphocytes and thereby identify which human chromosomes carry genes that correct the CHO mutations. The first two mutants analyzed, UV20 (excision-repair deficient; UV Group 2) and EM9, which has very high SCE, are both corrected by chromosome 19. 46 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Development and validation of DNA markers linked to Sdvy-1, a common bean gene conferring resistance to the yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Takeuchi, Toru; Okuyama, Masataka; Sasaki, Jun; Onodera, Kakumasa; Sato, Mikako; Souma, Chihiro; Ebe, Shigehiko

    2014-12-01

    The yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV-YS) causes yellowing and yield loss in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). The most effective control is achieved through breeding for resistance. An indeterminate climbing cultivar with a white seed coat, 'Oofuku', is resistant to SbDV-YS in inoculation tests. We crossed 'Oofuku' with an elite cultivar, 'Taisho-Kintoki', which is SbDV-YS-susceptible, determinate dwarf with a red-purple seed coat, and performed amplified-fragment-length polymorphism analysis of F3 lines. From nucleotide sequences of the resistant-specific fragments and their flanking regions, we developed five DNA markers, of which DV86, DV386, and DV398 were closely linked to Sdvy-1, a resistance gene. Using the markers, we developed 'Toiku-B79' and 'Toiku-B80', the near-isogenic lines (NILs) incorporating Sdvy-1 in the background of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs had similar growth habit, maturity date and seed shape to those of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The quality of boiled beans was also similar, except that the NILs had more seed coat cracking than 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs showed no SbDV-YS infection in inoculation tests. We suggest that Sdvy-1 is a useful source of SbDV-YS resistance in common bean.

  15. Recovery of active beta-lactamases from Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 hybrid by random mutagenesis by using a dnaQ strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Mazinani, S M; Nakajima, E; Ihara, Y; Kameyama, K Z; Sugimoto, K

    1996-01-01

    Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 beta-lactamases that belong to molecular class A with 37% amino acid similarity were examined to find the relationship between amino acid residues and activity of enzymes. MICs of ampicillin were > 2,000 micrograms/ml for Escherichia coli cells producing these enzymes. We have made 18 hybrid genes by substituting the coding region of the P. vulgaris beta-lactamase gene with the equivalent portions from the RTEM-1 gene. Most of these hybrids produced inactive proteins, but a few hybrid enzymes had partial or trace activity. From one of the hybrid genes (MIC of ampicillin, 100 micrograms/ml), we recovered three kinds of active mutants which provided ampicillin MICs of 1,000 micrograms/ml by the selection of spontaneous mutations in a dnaQ strain of E. coli. In these mutants, Leu-148, Met-182, and Tyr-274 were replaced with Val, Thr, and His, respectively. These amino acids have not been identified as residues with functional roles in substrate hydrolysis. Furthermore, from these hybrid mutants, we obtained a second set of mutants which conferred ampicillin MICs of 1,500 micrograms/ml. Interestingly, the second mutations were limited to these three amino acid substitutions. These amino acid residues which do not directly interact with substrates have an effect on enzyme activity. These mutant enzymes exhibited lower K(m) values for cephaloridine than both parental enzymes. PMID:8878598

  16. "Curing" of plasmid DNA in acetogen using microwave or applying an electric pulse improves cell growth and metabolite production as compared to the plasmid-harboring strain.

    PubMed

    Berzin, Vel; Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Plasmid-free acetogen Clostridium sp. MT962 electrotransformed with a small cryptic plasmid pMT351 was used to develop time- and cost-effective methods for plasmid elimination. Elimination of pMT351 restored production of acetate and ethanol to the levels of the plasmid-free strain with no dry cell weight changes. Destabilizing cell membrane via microwave at 2.45 GHz, or exposure to a single 12 ms square electric pulse at 35 kV cm⁻¹, eliminated pMT351 in 42-47 % of cells. Plasmid elimination with a single square electric pulse required 10 versus 0.1 J needed to introduce the same 3,202-bp plasmid into the cells as calculated per cell sample of Clostridium sp. MT962. Microwave caused visible changes in repPCR pattern and increased ethanol production at the expense of acetate. This is the first report on microwave of microwave ovens, wireless routers, and mobile devices causing chromosomal DNA aberrations in microbes along with carbon flux change.

  17. Recovery of active beta-lactamases from Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 hybrid by random mutagenesis by using a dnaQ strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Mazinani, S M; Nakajima, E; Ihara, Y; Kameyama, K Z; Sugimoto, K

    1996-09-01

    Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 beta-lactamases that belong to molecular class A with 37% amino acid similarity were examined to find the relationship between amino acid residues and activity of enzymes. MICs of ampicillin were > 2,000 micrograms/ml for Escherichia coli cells producing these enzymes. We have made 18 hybrid genes by substituting the coding region of the P. vulgaris beta-lactamase gene with the equivalent portions from the RTEM-1 gene. Most of these hybrids produced inactive proteins, but a few hybrid enzymes had partial or trace activity. From one of the hybrid genes (MIC of ampicillin, 100 micrograms/ml), we recovered three kinds of active mutants which provided ampicillin MICs of 1,000 micrograms/ml by the selection of spontaneous mutations in a dnaQ strain of E. coli. In these mutants, Leu-148, Met-182, and Tyr-274 were replaced with Val, Thr, and His, respectively. These amino acids have not been identified as residues with functional roles in substrate hydrolysis. Furthermore, from these hybrid mutants, we obtained a second set of mutants which conferred ampicillin MICs of 1,500 micrograms/ml. Interestingly, the second mutations were limited to these three amino acid substitutions. These amino acid residues which do not directly interact with substrates have an effect on enzyme activity. These mutant enzymes exhibited lower K(m) values for cephaloridine than both parental enzymes.

  18. BamI, KpnI, and SalI restriction enzyme maps of the DNAs of herpes simplex virus strains Justin and F: occurrence of heterogeneities in defined regions of the viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Locker, H; Frenkel, N

    1979-01-01

    We present the locations of the cleavage sites for the BamI, KpnI, and SalI restriction endonucleases within the DNA molecules of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strains Justin and F. These restriction enzymes cleave the HSV-1 DNA at many sites, producing relatively small fragments which should prove useful in future studies of HSV-1 gene structure and function. The mapping data revealed the occurrence of heterogeneity within three regions of the viral genome including (i) the region spanning map coordinates 0.74--0.76, (ii) the ends of the large (L) DNA component, and (iii) the junction between the large (L) and the small (S) components. The heterogeneity in the ends of L and the S-L junctions of HSV-1 (Justin) and HSV-1 (F) DNAs was grossly similar to that previously reported to occur in the ends of L and the S-L junctions of the HSV-1 (KOS) DNA (M. J. Wagner and W. C. Summers, J. Virol. 27:374--387, 1978). Thus, cleavage of these regions with restriction endonucleases yielded sets of minor fragments differing in size by constant increments. However, the various strains of HSV-1 differed with respect to the numbers, size increments, and relative molarities of the various minor fragments, suggesting that the parameters of the heterogeneity are inherited in the structural makeup of the HSV-1 genome. The strain dependence of the pattern of heterogeneity can be most easily explained in terms of variable sizes of the terminally reiterated a sequence, contained in the DNA molecules of these three strains of HSV-1. Images PMID:228068

  19. [Numerical taxonomy and 16S rDNA PCR-rFLP analysis of rhizobial strains isolated from root nodules of cowpea and mung bean grown in different regions of China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-fa; Wang, Feng-qin; Chen, Wen-xin

    2006-12-01

    Seventy-nine rhizobial strains, isolated from root nodules of cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata ) and mung bean (Vigna radiata ) grown in different regions of China, were studied by a fuzzy cluster analysis of 128 phenotypic characteristics. The phenotypic characterization of these strains showed that most of these strains had high stress resistance. For instance, most of them could grow from pH 5.0 to pH 11.0. Over 85% of these strains could grow well on YMA plate at 37 degrees C and several of them even could grow after a 45 minutes hot shock at 60 degrees C. Some strains had a tolerance to high concentration of Bacitracin (400 microg/mL) . The result of the fuzzy cluster analysis showed that all the strains were clustered into 2 groups, slow growers and fast growers, at the similarity level of 63.5% . At the similarity level of 79 %, there were 7 subgroups further separated. Based upon the result of the numerical taxonomy, these strains together with 22 reference stains were analyzed by the 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Thirty-four genotype profiles were obtained from the fingerprinting of the 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP. These strains were analyzed by GelCompare II software and clustered into 7 groups at the similarity level of 91% , which were consonant with the 7 subgroups clustered at the similarity level of 79% in numerical taxonomy. The results of numerical taxonomy and 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP analysis showed that all of the seventy-nine rhizobial Bradyrhizobium, strains isolated from root nodules of cowpea and mung bean were clustered into four genera: Agrobacterium, Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium, respectively. An individual clade without any reference stains, which was composed of CCBAU 45071, CCBAU 45111-1 and CCBAU 45248, might be a new species of Rhizobium. Overall, the study results demonstrated a high phenotypic and phylogenetic diversity of rhizobial strains nodulating cowpea and mung bean grown in different geographic regions of China.

  20. Construction and Application of a Rh–Pt DNA Metalloinsertor Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic conjugate (RhPt) in which an oxaliplatin derivative is tethered to a rhodium metalloinsertor through an aminomalonate leaving group ligand. The complex interacts with DNA through metalloinsertion at a base pair mismatch followed by formation of a covalent Pt–DNA adduct. Characterization of RhPt in mismatch repair-deficient HCT116O cells reveals increased cytotoxicity compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin as well as relative to the unconjugated rhodium and platinum counterparts. Caspase and poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibition assays indicate that RhPt induces apoptotic cell death. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) experiments reveal that RhPt exhibits enhanced cellular uptake properties that contribute to its increased efficacy. PMID:25032512

  1. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations.

  2. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Karen L.; Dashner, Erica J.; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye

    2015-01-01

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  3. Correlation between CYP1A1 transcript, protein level, enzyme activity and DNA adduct formation in normal human mammary epithelial cell strains exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Divi, Rao L.; Einem Lindeman, Tracey L.; Shockley, Marie E.; Keshava, Channa; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo(a)pyrene (BP) is thought to bind covalently to DNA, through metabolism by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1, and other enzymes, to form r7, t8, t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N 2-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]-pyrene (BPdG). Evaluation of RNA expression data, to understand the contribution of different metabolic enzymes to BPdG formation, is typically presented as fold-change observed upon BP exposure, leaving the actual number of RNA transcripts unknown. Here, we have quantified RNA copies/ng cDNA (RNA cpn) for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, as well as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), which may reduce formation of BPdG adducts, using primary normal human mammary epithelial cell (NHMEC) strains, and the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In unexposed NHMECs, basal RNA cpn values were 58–836 for CYP1A1, 336–5587 for CYP1B1 and 5943–40112 for NQO1. In cells exposed to 4.0 µM BP for 12h, RNA cpn values were 251–13234 for CYP1A1, 4133–57078 for CYP1B1 and 4456–55887 for NQO1. There were 3.5 (mean, range 0.2–15.8) BPdG adducts/108 nucleotides in the NHMECs (n = 16), and 790 in the MCF-7s. In the NHMECs, BP-induced CYP1A1 RNA cpn was highly associated with BPdG (P = 0.002), but CYP1B1 and NQO1 were not. Western blots of four NHMEC strains, chosen for different levels of BPdG adducts, showed a linear correlation between BPdG and CYP1A1, but not CYP1B1 or NQO1. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, which measures CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 together, correlated with BPdG, but NQO1 activity did not. Despite more numerous levels of CYP1B1 and NQO1 RNA cpn in unexposed and BP-exposed NHMECs and MCF-7cells, BPdG formation was only correlated with induction of CYP1A1 RNA cpn. The higher level of BPdG in MCF-7 cells, compared to NHMECs, may have been due to a much increased induction of CYP1A1 and EROD. Overall, BPdG correlation was observed with CYP1A1 protein and CYP1A1/1B1 enzyme activity, but not with CYP1B1 or NQO

  4. Cell cycle-dependent strand bias for UV-induced mutations in the transcribed strand of excision repair-proficient human fibroblasts but not in repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, W.G.; Chen, Ruey-Hwa; Lukash, L.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J. )

    1991-04-01

    To study the effect of nucleotide excision repair on the spectrum of mutations induced in diploid human fibroblasts by UV light (wavelength, 254 nm), the authors synchronized repair-proficient cells and irradiated them when the HPRT gene was about to be replicated (early S phase) so that there would be no time for repair in that gene before replication, or in G, phase 6 h prior to S, and determined the kinds and location of mutations in that gene. As a control, they also compared the spectra of mutations induced in synchronized populations of xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP12BE cells, which are unable to excise UV-induced DNA damage). Among the 84 mutants sequenced, base substitutions predominated. Of the XP mutants from S or G[sub 1] and the repair-proficient mutants from S, [approximately]62% were G [center dot] C[r arrow]A [center dot] T. In the repair-proficient mutants from G[sub 1], 47% were. In mutants from the repair-proficient cells irradiated in S, 71% (10 of 14) of the premutagenic lesions were located in the transcribed strand; with mutants from such cells irradiated in G[sub 1], only 20% (3 of 15) were. The switch in strand bias supports preferential nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced damage in the transcribed strand of the HPRT gene.

  5. Structural basis for DNA cleavage by the potent antiproliferative agent (–)-lomaiviticin A

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Christina M.; Li, Zhenwu; Herzon, Seth B.

    2016-01-01

    (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) is a complex antiproliferative metabolite that inhibits the growth of many cultured cancer cell lines at low nanomolar–picomolar concentrations. (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) possesses a C2-symmetric structure that contains two unusual diazotetrahydrobenzo[b]fluorene (diazofluorene) functional groups. Nucleophilic activation of each diazofluorene within 1 produces vinyl radical intermediates that affect hydrogen atom abstraction from DNA, leading to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Certain DNA DSB repair-deficient cell lines are sensitized toward 1, and 1 is under evaluation in preclinical models of these tumor types. However, the mode of binding of 1 to DNA had not been determined. Here we elucidate the structure of a 1:1 complex between 1 and the duplex d(GCTATAGC)2 by NMR spectroscopy and computational modeling. Unexpectedly, we show that both diazofluorene residues of 1 penetrate the duplex. This binding disrupts base pairing leading to ejection of the central AT bases, while placing the proreactive centers of 1 in close proximity to each strand. DNA binding may also enhance the reactivity of 1 toward nucleophilic activation through steric compression and conformational restriction (an example of shape-dependent catalysis). This study provides a structural basis for the DNA cleavage activity of 1, will guide the design of synthetic DNA-activated DNA cleavage agents, and underscores the utility of natural products to reveal novel modes of small molecule–DNA association. PMID:26929332

  6. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein.

  7. Cell cycle-dependent strand bias for UV-induced mutations in the transcribed strand of excision repair-proficient human fibroblasts but not in repair-deficient cells.

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, W G; Chen, R H; Lukash, L; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1991-01-01

    To study the effect of nucleotide excision repair on the spectrum of mutations induced in diploid human fibroblasts by UV light (wavelength, 254 nm), we synchronized repair-proficient cells and irradiated them when the HPRT gene was about to be replicated (early S phase) so that there would be no time for repair in that gene before replication, or in G1 phase 6 h prior to S, and determined the kinds and location of mutations in that gene. As a control, we also compared the spectra of mutations induced in synchronized populations of xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP12BE cells, which are unable to excise UV-induced DNA damage). Among the 84 mutants sequenced, base substitutions predominated. Of the XP mutants from S or G1 and the repair-proficient mutants from S, approximately 62% were G.C----A.T. In the repair-proficient mutants from G1, 47% were. In mutants from the repair-proficient cells irradiated in S, 71% (10 of 14) of the premutagenic lesions were located in the transcribed strand; with mutants from such cells irradiated in G1, only 20% (3 of 15) were. In contrast, there was no statistically significant difference in the fraction of premutagenic lesions located in the transcribed strand of the XP12BE cells; approximately 75% (24 of 32) of the premutagenic lesions were located in that strand, i.e., 15 of 19 (79%) in the S-phase cells and 9 of 13 (69%) in the G1-phase cells. The switch in strand bias supports preferential nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced damage in the transcribed strand of the HPRT gene. PMID:2005888

  8. Small polydispersed circular DNA contains strains of mobile genetic elements and occurs more frequently in permanent cell lines of malignant tumors than in normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hannelore; Taubert, Helge; Lange, Heidemarie; Kriese, Karen; Schmitt, Wolfgang Daniel; Hoffmann, Steve; Bartel, Frank; Hauptmann, Steffen

    2009-08-01

    Small polydispersed circular DNA (spcDNA) belongs to the extrachromosomal pool of DNA and is composed of heterogeneous DNA circles. Whether spcDNA has a special function is currently unclear but their occurrence was suggested to be linked to genetic instability. In this study we investigated as to whether human lymphocytes from healthy volunteers also harbour spcDNA and whether spcDNA is present in all permanent cell lines from human normal and malignant tissues. Moreover, we were interested to see whether spcDNA contains sequences of mobile genetic elements. Our results show that spcDNA is present in all samples investigated yet the amount is lower in normal lymphocytes when compared to cancer cell lines (5.4 vs. 17.8%). Alu sequences were present in 12/16 cancer cell lines whereas LINE-1 (L1) sequences were present in 15 of them. Six tumor cell lines also contained telomeric sequences. In contrast to that, spcDNA of normal lymphocytes contains Alu and L1 sequences only in 3/16 cases and no telomeric sequences at all. Our findings suggest a direct dependency of the amount of Alu and L1 sequences on that of spcDNA. Beside these repetitive sequences, sequencing of spcDNA revealed in most cases chromosomal sequences of almost all chromosomes without an increased frequency of single regions. We suggest that the whole spcDNA including retrotranspositional elements and telomeric sequences may play a role for chromosomal rearrangements and genomic instability.

  9. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    SciTech Connect

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  10. DNA-DNA hybridization study of strains of Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia and Empedobacter and of other usually indole-producing non-fermenters of CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi, mostly from human clinical sources, and proposals of Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov., Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Holmes, B; Steigerwalt, A G; Nicholson, A C

    2013-12-01

    The taxonomic classification of 182 phenotypically similar isolates was evaluated using DNA-DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These bacterial isolates were mainly derived from clinical sources; all were Gram-negative non-fermenters and most were indole-producing. Phenotypically, they resembled species from the genera Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia or Empedobacter or belonged to CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi. Based on these analyses, four novel species are described: Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13530(T) = CCUG 60564(T) = CDC G229(T)), Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13525(T) = CCUG 60559(T) = CDC G81(T)), Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 11390(T) = CCUG 60566(T) = CDC KC1864(T)) and Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13529(T) = CCUG 60563(T) = CDC G41(T)). The new combination Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov. (type strain NCTC 13490(T) = X-65(T) = CCTCC AB 208154(T) = NRRL B-51322(T)) is also proposed to accommodate the reclassified Planobacterium taklimakanense.

  11. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes may predict neoadjuvant therapy response in triple negative breast patients.

    PubMed

    Spugnesi, Laura; Gabriele, Michele; Scarpitta, Rosa; Tancredi, Mariella; Maresca, Luisa; Gambino, Gaetana; Collavoli, Anita; Aretini, Paolo; Bertolini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Barbara; Landucci, Elisabetta; Fontana, Andrea; Rossetti, Elena; Roncella, Manuela; Naccarato, Giuseppe Antonio; Caligo, Maria Adelaide

    2016-12-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent about 15-20% of all breast cancer cases and are characterized by a complex molecular heterogeneity. Some TNBCs exhibit clinical and pathological properties similar to BRCA-mutated tumors, without actually bearing a mutation in BRCA genes. This "BRCAness" phenotype may be explained by germline mutations in other genes involved in DNA repair. Although respond to chemotherapy with alkylating agents, they have a high risk of recurrence and progression. Some studies have shown the efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy in TNBC patients with DNA repair defects, but proper biomarkers of DNA repair deficiency are still needed. Here, we investigated if mutations in DNA repair genes may be correlated with anthracyclines/taxanes neoadjuvant therapy response. DNA from 19 TNBC patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy were subjected to next generation sequencing of a panel of 24 genes in DNA repair and breast cancer predisposition. In this study, 5 of 19 patients (26%) carried a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1, PALB2, RAD51C and two patients carried a probable pathogenic missense variant. Moreover, VUS (Variants of Unknown Significance) in other genes, predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, were detected in five patients. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes were found to be associated with the group of TNBC patients who responded to therapy. We conclude that a subgroup of TNBC patients have defects in DNA repair genes, other than BRCA1, and such patients respond favourably to neoadjuvant anthracyclines/taxanes therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. )

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  13. Having a direct look: analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-11-15

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis.

  14. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  15. Aberrant topoisomerase-1 DNA lesions are pathogenic in neurodegenerative genome instability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Nitiss, Karin C; Downing, Susanna M; Li, Yang; Shimada, Mikio; Zhao, Jingfeng; Russell, Helen R; Petrini, John H J; Nitiss, John L; McKinnon, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    DNA damage is considered to be a prime factor in several spinocerebellar neurodegenerative diseases; however, the DNA lesions underpinning disease etiology are unknown. We observed the endogenous accumulation of pathogenic topoisomerase-1 (Top1)-DNA cleavage complexes (Top1ccs) in murine models of ataxia telangiectasia and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy 1. We found that the defective DNA damage response factors in these two diseases cooperatively modulated Top1cc turnover in a non-epistatic and ATM kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, coincident neural inactivation of ATM and DNA single-strand break repair factors, including tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 or XRCC1, resulted in increased Top1cc formation and excessive DNA damage and neurodevelopmental defects. Notably, direct Top1 poisoning to elevate Top1cc levels phenocopied the neuropathology of the mouse models described above. Our results identify a critical endogenous pathogenic lesion associated with neurodegenerative syndromes arising from DNA repair deficiency, indicating that genome integrity is important for preventing disease in the nervous system.

  16. Aberrant Topoisomerase-1-DNA Lesions are Pathogenic in Neurodegenerative Genome Instability Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Nitiss, Karin C.; Downing, Susanna M.; Li, Yang; Shimada, Mikio; Zhao, Jingfeng; Russell, Helen R.; Petrini, John H. J.; Nitiss, John L.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage is considered a prime factor in multiple spinocerebellar neurodegenerative diseases; however, the DNA lesions underpinning disease etiology are unknown. Here we identify the endogenous accumulation of pathogenic topoisomerase-1-DNA cleavage complexes (Top1cc) in murine models of ataxia telangiectasia and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy 1. We also show that the defective DNA damage response factors in these two diseases cooperatively modulate Top1cc turnover in a non-epistatic and ATM kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, coincident neural inactivation of ATM and DNA single strand break repair factors including tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 or XRCC1 result in increased Top1cc formation and excessive DNA damage and neurodevelopmental defects. Importantly, direct topoisomerase-1 poisoning to elevate Top1cc levels phenocopies the neuropathology of the mouse models above. Our study identifies a critical endogenous pathogenic lesion associated with neurodegenerative syndromes arising from DNA repair deficiency, indicating the essential role that genome integrity plays in preventing disease in the nervous system. PMID:24793032

  17. Genome-Wide DNA Microarray Analysis of Francisella tularensis Strains Demonstrates Extensive Genetic Conservation within the Species but Identifies Regions That Are Unique to the Highly Virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Broekhuijsen, Martien; Larsson, Pär; Johansson, Anders; Byström, Mona; Eriksson, Ulla; Larsson, Eva; Prior, Richard G.; Sjöstedt, Anders; Titball, Richard W.; Forsman, Mats

    2003-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a potent pathogen and a possible bioterrorism agent. Little is known, however, to explain the molecular basis for its virulence and the distinct differences in virulence found between the four recognized subspecies, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, and F. tularensis subsp. novicida. We developed a DNA microarray based on 1,832 clones from a shotgun library used for sequencing of the highly virulent strain F. tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4. This allowed a genome-wide analysis of 27 strains representing all four subspecies. Overall, the microarray analysis confirmed a limited genetic variation within the species F. tularensis, and when the strains were compared, at most 3.7% of the probes showed differential hybridization. Cluster analysis of the hybridization data revealed that the causative agents of type A and type B tularemia, i.e., F. tularensis subsp. tularensis and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, respectively, formed distinct clusters. Despite marked differences in their virulence and geographical origin, a high degree of genomic similarity between strains of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis and F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica was apparent. Strains from Japan clustered separately, as did strains of F. tularensis subsp. novicida. Eight regions of difference (RD) 0.6 to 11.5 kb in size, altogether comprising 21 open reading frames, were identified that distinguished strains of the moderately virulent subspecies F. tularensis subsp. holarctica and the highly virulent subspecies F. tularensis subsp. tularensis. One of these regions, RD1, allowed for the first time the development of an F. tularensis-specific PCR assay that discriminates each of the four subspecies. PMID:12843022

  18. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. )

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  19. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains have the ability to cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of the potential risk they pose to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated...

  20. Conflicting results obtained by RAPD-PCR and large-subunit rDNA sequences in determining and comparing yeast strains isolated from flowers: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Michael; Fischer, Reinhard; Titze, Andreas

    2002-07-01

    Sixty-six yeast strains isolated from the nectar of various plant species in Central Europe were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR) and by sequencing of the variable D1/D2 domain of large-subunit (26S) rDNA. The usefulness of both methods for the determination and comparison of unknown ascomycetous and basidiomycetous yeast strains was compared and evaluated. The reproducibility of RAPD-PCR was shown to be low and the information obtained by this method was clearly not as precise as that obtained from sequence analysis. Numerous imponderables make RAPD-PCR analysis unreliable, at least as a means of identifying yeasts in ecological studies. The lack of standard protocols for RAPD-PCR analysis and the absence of a general database of banding patterns made it impossible to identify unknown yeast strains or to recognize new species. In contrast to RAPD-PCR, sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain was found to be a fast and reliable method for the rapid identification of yeast species and was also shown to be an invaluable tool for the discovery of new species.

  1. A dnaN Plasmid Shuffle Strain for Rapid In Vivo Analysis of Mutant Escherichia coli β Clamps Provides Insight Into the Role of Clamp in umuDC-Mediated Cold Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C. PMID:24896652

  2. A dnaN plasmid shuffle strain for rapid in vivo analysis of mutant Escherichia coli β clamps provides insight into the role of clamp in umuDC-mediated cold sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Babu, Vignesh M P; Sutton, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C.

  3. Purification of bacterial genomic DNA in less than 20 min using chelex-100 microwave: examples from strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Escogido, Lourdes; Balam-Chi, Mario; Rodríguez-Buenfil, Ingrid; Valdés, Jesús; Kameyama, Luis; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco

    2010-11-01

    We established a Chelex 100-Microwave method for the purification of bacterial genomic DNA (gDNA) in less than 20 min with high yield and good quality, useful for multiple purposes. It combines Chelex 100, proteinase K, RNase A and heating in a microwave oven. The resulting gDNA was used directly to identify bacterial species of the Order Lactobacillales by means of PCR amplification of their 16S rDNA gene, isolated from sediments on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. This method produced gDNA free of phenolic and protein residual contaminants from 100 of these isolated bacteria. 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing showed Pediococcus acidilactici to prevail in inland lagoons, and Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sp., and Lactobacillus fermentum to be most abundant in the soils of livestock farms. The combination of Chelex 100, enzymes and microwave heating used in the Chelex 100-Microwave method produced large amounts of highly pure gDNA from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, in less than 20 min.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  5. Structural defect linked to nonrandom mutations in the matrix gene of Biden strain subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus defined by cDNA cloning and expression of chimeric genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayata, M.; Hirano, A.; Wong, T.C.

    1989-03-01

    Biken strain, a nonproductive measles viruslike agent isolated from a subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patient, contains a posttranscriptional defect affecting matrix (M) protein. A putative M protein was translated in vitro with RNA from Biken strain-infected cells. A similar protein was detected in vivo by an antiserum against a peptide synthesized from the cloned M gene of Edmonston strain measles virus. By using a novel method, full-length cDNAs of the Biken M gene were selectively cloned. The cloned Biken M gene contained an open reading frame which encoded 8 extra carboxy-terminal amino acid residues and 20 amino acid substitutions predicted to affect both the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of the gene product. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and in vivo into a 37,500 M/sub r/ protein electrophoretically and antigenically distinct from the M protein of Edmonston strain but identical to the M protein in Biken strain-infected cells. Chimeric M proteins synthesized in vitro and in vivo showed that the mutations in the carboxy-proximal region altered the local antigenicity and those in the amino region affected the overall protein conformation. The protein expressed from the Biken M gene was unstable in vivo. Instability was attributed to multiple mutations. These results offer insights into the basis of the defect in Biken strain and pose intriguing questions about the evolutionary origins of SSPE viruses in general.

  6. Bi-allelic alterations in DNA repair genes underpin homologous recombination DNA repair defects in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Robert W; Riaz, Nadeem; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Delsite, Rob; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Edelweiss, Marcia; Martelotto, Luciano G; Sakr, Rita A; King, Tari A; Giri, Dilip D; Drobnjak, Maria; Brogi, Edi; Bindra, Ranjit; Bernheim, Giana; Lim, Raymond S; Blecua, Pedro; Desrichard, Alexis; Higginson, Dan; Towers, Russell; Jiang, Ruomu; Lee, William; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Powell, Simon N

    2017-03-15

    Homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair deficient (HRD) breast cancers have been shown to be sensitive to DNA repair targeted therapies. Burgeoning evidence suggests that sporadic breast cancers, lacking germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, may also be HRD. We developed a functional ex vivo RAD51-based test to identify HRD primary breast cancers. An integrated approach examining methylation, gene expression and whole-exome sequencing was employed to ascertain the etiology of HRD. Functional HRD breast cancers displayed genomic features of lack of competent HR, including large-scale state transitions and specific mutational signatures. Somatic and/or germline genetic alterations resulting in bi-allelic loss-of-function of HR genes underpinned functional HRD in 89% of cases, and were observed in only one of the 15 HR-proficient samples tested. These findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive genetic assessment of bi-allelic alterations in the HR pathway to deliver a precision medicine-based approach to select patients for therapies targeting tumor-specific DNA repair defects.

  7. Structural defect linked to nonrandom mutations in the matrix gene of biken strain subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus defined by cDNA cloning and expression of chimeric genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ayata, M; Hirano, A; Wong, T C

    1989-01-01

    Biken strain, a nonproductive measles viruslike agent isolated from a subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patient, contains a posttranscriptional defect affecting matrix (M) protein. A putative M protein was translated in vitro with RNA from Biken strain-infected cells. A similar protein was detected in vivo by an antiserum against a peptide synthesized from the cloned M gene of Edmonston strain measles virus. By using a novel method, full-length cDNAs of the Biken M gene were selectively cloned. The cloned Biken M gene contained an open reading frame which encoded 8 extra carboxy-terminal amino acid residues and 20 amino acid substitutions predicted to affect both the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of the gene product. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and in vivo into a 37,500 Mr protein electrophoretically and antigenically distinct from the M protein of Edmonston strain but identical to the M protein in Biken strain-infected cells. Chimeric M proteins synthesized in vitro and in vivo showed that the mutations in the carboxy-proximal region altered the local antigenicity and those in the amino region affected the overall protein conformation. The protein expressed from the Biken M gene was unstable in vivo. Instability was attributed to multiple mutations in both the amino and carboxy regions. A surprising number of mutations in both the coding and noncoding regions of the Biken M gene were identical to those in an independently isolated SSPE virus strain with a similar defect. These results offer insights into the basis of the defect in Biken strain and pose intriguing questions about the evolutionary origins of SSPE viruses in general. Images PMID:2915379

  8. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  9. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  10. Cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of specific carcinogen-DNA adducts in diploid human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.; Maher, V.M.

    1985-10-01

    A comparison of the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of a series of carcinogens in normal diploid human fibroblasts and in cells deficient in one or more DNA repair processes has provided insight into the specific DNA adduct(s) responsible for these biological effects. The carcinogens tested include ultraviolet radiation; reactive derivatives of structurally related aromatic amides; metabolites of benzo(a)pyrene; the simple alkylating agents N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea; and aflatoxin B/sub 1/ dichloride, a model for the reactive 2,3-epoxide of aflatoxin B/sub 1/. Exponentially growing cells were exposed to agents and assayed for mutations and cell killing. Cells deficient in repair of particular DNA adducts or lesions proved more sensitive to the agent causing those lesions than did normally repairing cells. Many of the carcinogens were compared for their mutagenic and/or cytotoxic effect, not only as a function of dose administered, but also as a function of the initial number of adducts or photoproducts induced in DNA and the number remaining at critical times posttreatment. The results demonstrated a high correlation between the number of DNA lesions remaining unexcised at the time the DNA was replicated and frequency of mutations induced. Comparative studies of the frequency of UV-induced transformation of normal and repair-deficient cells showed this also to be true for transformation.

  11. [Construction and rescue of infectious cDNA clone of pigeon-origin Newcastle disease virus strain JS/07/04/Pi].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-Mei; Hu, Zeng-Lei; Song, Qing-Qing; Duan, Zhi-Qiang; Gu, Min; Hu, Shun-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Quan; Liu, Xiu-Fan

    2012-01-01

    Based on the complete genome sequence of pigeon-origin Newcastle disease virus strain JS/07/04/ Pi(genotype VIb), nine overlapped fragments covering its full-length genome were amplified by RT-PCR. The fragments were connected sequentially and then inserted into the transcription vector TVT7/R resulting in the TVT/071204 which contained the full genome of strain JS/07/04/Pi. The TVT/071204 was co-transfected with three helper plasmids pCI-NP, pCI-P and pCI-L into the BSR cells, and the transfected cells and culture supernatant were inoculated into 9-day-old SPF embryonated eggs 60 h post-transfection. The HA and HI tests were conducted following the death of embryonated eggs. The results showed that the allantoic fluids obtained were HA positive and the HA could be inhibited by anti-NDV serum which indicated that the strain JS/07/04/Pi was rescued successfully. The rescued virus rNDV/071204 showed similar growth kinetics to its parental virus in CEF. The successful recovery of this strain would contribute to the understanding of the host-specificity of pigeon-origin NDV and to the development of the novel vaccines against the NDV infection in pigeons.

  12. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep) and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR) led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in the non-coding region of

  13. Metabolic activation of furfuryl alcohol: formation of 2-methylfuranyl DNA adducts in Salmonella typhimurium strains expressing human sulfotransferase 1A1 and in FVB/N mice.

    PubMed

    Monien, Bernhard H; Herrmann, Kristin; Florian, Simone; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2011-10-01

    Furfuryl alcohol, formed by acid- and heat-induced dehydration from pentoses, is found in many foodstuffs. It induced renal tubule neoplasms in male B6C3F1 mice and nasal neoplasms in male F344/N rats in a study of the National Toxicology Program (NTP). However, furfuryl alcohol was negative in the standard Ames test and in a battery of in vivo mutagenicity tests. Here, we show that furfuryl alcohol is mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 engineered for expression of human sulfotransferase (SULT) 1A1. This finding suggests that furfuryl alcohol is converted by intracellular sulfo conjugation to 2-sulfo-oxymethylfuran, an electrophile reacting with DNA. We detected nucleoside adducts of 2'-deoxyadenosine, 2'-deoxyguanosine and 2'-deoxycytidine in porcine liver DNA incubated with freshly prepared 2-sulfo-oxymethylfuran. The main adducts, N(2)-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-MFdG) and N(6)-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine (N(6)-MFdA) were synthesized. Their structures were verified by NMR and mass spectrometry. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for the quantification of both adducts were devised. N(2)-MFdG and N(6)-MFdA were detected in DNA of furfuryl alcohol-exposed S.typhimurium TA100 expressing SULT1A1 and in DNA of liver, lung and kidney of FVB/N mice that had received ∼390 mg furfuryl alcohol/kg body wt/day via the drinking water for 28 days. In summary, furfuryl alcohol is converted by sulfo conjugation to a mutagen. The detection of N(2)-MFdG and N(6)-MFdA in renal DNA of furfuryl alcohol-treated mice suggests that the neoplasms observed in this tissue in the study of the NTP may have been induced by 2-sulfo-oxymethylfuran.

  14. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Dunigan, Brittany B.; Stefanick, Donna F.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1+/+ and Xrcc1−/− mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β- dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  15. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  16. Restoration of ligase activity in E. coli K12 lig ts7 strain by bacteriophage Mu and cloning of a DNA fragment harbouring the Mu 'lig' gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, P; Paolozzi, L; Liebart, J C

    1980-01-01

    Restoration of ligase activity has been observed in E. coli K12 ligts7 strain lysogenic for Mu, in presence as well in absence of lysogenic immunity. This restoration consist in phenotypic reversal of temperature sensitivity of E. coli ligts7 which also regain the ability to sustain the complete growth cycle of T4 lig-phages. It is possible to put under the control of the gal operon the expression of the viral gene responsible for the restoration effect. This new gene of Mu has been named 'lig'. A 5 kb fragment responsible for the reported effects and localized between genes gam and lys of Mu genome has been cloned in pBR322. This recombinant plasmid used for transforming ligts7 strain restores in it normal behaviour for ligation of Okazaki pieces. PMID:6449688

  17. Diversity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from the Aquatic Environment as Determined by Serotyping and Amplification of the Ribosomal DNA Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baudart, Julia; Lemarchand, Karine; Brisabois, Anne; Lebaron, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186–194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates. PMID:10742240

  18. Important role of class I heat shock genes hrcA and dnaK in the heat shock response and the response to pH and NaCl stress of group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Selby, Katja; Lindström, Miia; Somervuo, Panu; Heap, John T; Minton, Nigel P; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    Class I heat shock genes (HSGs) code for molecular chaperones which play a major role in the bacterial response to sudden increases of environmental temperature by assisting protein folding. Quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR gene expression analysis of the food-borne pathogen Clostridium botulinum grown at 37°C showed that the class I HSGs grpE, dnaK, dnaJ, groEL, and groES and their repressor, hrcA, were expressed at constant levels in the exponential and transitional growth phases, whereas strong downregulation of all six genes was observed during stationary phase. After heat shock from 37 to 45°C, all HSGs were transiently upregulated. A mutant with insertionally inactivated hrcA expressed higher levels of class I HSGs during exponential growth than the wild type, followed by upregulation of only groES and groES after heat shock. Inactivation of hrcA or of dnaK encoding a major chaperone resulted in lower maximum growth temperatures than for the wild type and reduced growth rates under optimal conditions compared to the wild type. The dnaK mutant showed growth inhibition under all tested temperature, pH, and NaCl stress conditions. In contrast, the growth of an hrcA mutant was unaffected by mild temperature or acid stress compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that induced class I HSGs support growth under moderately nonoptimal conditions. We show that the expression of class I HSGs plays a major role for survival and growth of C. botulinum under the stressful environmental conditions that may be encountered during food processing or growth in food products, in the mammalian intestine, or in wounds.

  19. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  20. The role of DNA repair in the pluripotency and differentiation of human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro Reily; Lerner, Leticia Koch; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2013-01-01

    All living cells utilize intricate DNA repair mechanisms to address numerous types of DNA lesions and to preserve genomic integrity, and pluripotent stem cells have specific needs due to their remarkable ability of self-renewal and differentiation into different functional cell types. Not surprisingly, human stem cells possess a highly efficient DNA repair network that becomes less efficient upon differentiation. Moreover, these cells also have an anaerobic metabolism, which reduces the mitochondria number and the likelihood of oxidative stress, which is highly related to genomic instability. If DNA lesions are not repaired, human stem cells easily undergo senescence, cell death or differentiation, as part of their DNA damage response, avoiding the propagation of stem cells carrying mutations and genomic alterations. Interestingly, cancer stem cells and typical stem cells share not only the differentiation potential but also their capacity to respond to DNA damage, with important implications for cancer therapy using genotoxic agents. On the other hand, the preservation of the adult stem cell pool, and the ability of cells to deal with DNA damage, is essential for normal development, reducing processes of neurodegeneration and premature aging, as one can observe on clinical phenotypes of many human genetic diseases with defects in DNA repair processes. Finally, several recent findings suggest that DNA repair also plays a fundamental role in maintaining the pluripotency and differentiation potential of embryonic stem cells, as well as that of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. DNA repair processes also seem to be necessary for the reprogramming of human cells when iPS cells are produced. Thus, the understanding of how cultured pluripotent stem cells ensure the genetic stability are highly relevant for their safe therapeutic application, at the same time that cellular therapy is a hope for DNA repair deficient patients.

  1. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  2. Draft genomic DNA sequence of the multi-resistant Sphingomonas sp. strain AntH11 isolated from an Antarctic hypolith.

    PubMed

    Gunnigle, Eoin; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Guerrero, Leandro D; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Cowan, Don A

    2015-04-01

    Hypoliths are microbial communities that live underneath translucent rocks in desert ecosystems and represent a key refuge niche in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. These cryptic microbial assemblages are crucial as they mediate numerous ecosystem processes. Here, we present the first draft genome of a hypolith isolate belonging to the α-proteobacterial class and the genus Sphingomonas. The draft genome of Sphingomonas sp. strain AntH11 shows the capacity of this organism to adapt to the extreme cold and arid conditions encountered in Antarctic desert soils. Our result also suggests that its metabolic versatility and multidrug resistance constitutes an opportunistic advantage in competition with other hypolith-colonizing microorganisms.

  3. Trapping DNA replication origins from the human genome.

    PubMed

    Eki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2013-04-17

    Synthesis of chromosomal DNA is initiated from multiple origins of replication in higher eukaryotes; however, little is known about these origins' structures. We isolated the origin-derived nascent DNAs from a human repair-deficient cell line by blocking the replication forks near the origins using two different origin-trapping methods (i.e., UV- or chemical crosslinker-treatment and cell synchronization in early S phase using DNA replication inhibitors). Single-stranded DNAs (of 0.5-3 kb) that accumulated after such treatments were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was immunopurified after fractionation by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cloned by complementary-strand synthesis and PCR amplification. Competitive PCR revealed an increased abundance of DNA derived from known replication origins (c-myc and lamin B2 genes) in the nascent DNA fractions from the UV-treated or crosslinked cells. Nucleotide sequences of 85 and 208 kb were obtained from the two libraries (I and II) prepared from the UV-treated log-phase cells and early S phase arrested cells, respectively. The libraries differed from each other in their G+C composition and replication-related motif contents, suggesting that differences existed between the origin fragments isolated by the two different origin-trapping methods. The replication activities for seven out of 12 putative origin loci from the early-S phase cells were shown by competitive PCR. We mapped 117 (library I) and 172 (library II) putative origin loci to the human genome; approximately 60% and 50% of these loci were assigned to the G-band and intragenic regions, respectively. Analyses of the flanking sequences of the mapped loci suggested that the putative origin loci tended to associate with genes (including conserved sites) and DNase I hypersensitive sites; however, poor correlations were found between such loci and the CpG islands, transcription start sites, and K27-acetylated histone H3 peaks.

  4. Evaluation of a novel method based on amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS fingerprinting) for typing strains of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Beata; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Bronk, Marek; Samet, Alfred; Myjak, Przemysław; Kur, Józef

    2003-03-01

    In the search for an effective DNA-typing technique for use in hospital epidemiology, the performance and convenience of a novel assay based on the fingerprinting of bacterial genomes by amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS fingerprinting) was tested. A large number of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREM) isolates from haematological ward patients of the Clinical Hospital in Gdańsk were examined. We found that ADSRRS fingerprinting analysis is a rapid method that offers good discriminatory power. The method demonstrated also excellent reproducibility. The usefulness of the ADSRRS fingerprinting method for molecular typing was compared with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method, which is currently considered the gold standard for molecular typing of isolates recovered from patients and the environment in the course of investigation and control of nosocomial outbreaks. Clustering of ADSRRS fingerprinting data matched pulsed field gel electrophoresis data. The features of ADSRRS fingerprinting technique is discussed in comparison with conventional methods. Data presented here demonstrate the complexity of the epidemiological situation concerning VREM that may occur in a single medical ward.

  5. Enhancement of DNA repair capacity of mammalian cells by carcinogen treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.; Roilides, E.; Levine, A.S.; Dixon, K.

    1988-07-01

    To determine whether DNA excision repair is enhanced in mammalian cells in response to DNA damage, as it is in bacteria as part of the SOS response, we used an expression vector-host cell reactivation assay to measure cellular DNA repair capacity. When UV-damaged chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) vector DNA was introduced into monkey cells (CV-1), the level of CAT activity was inversely related to the UV fluence due to inhibition of CAT gene expression by UV photoproducts. When CV-1 cells were treated with either UV radiation or mitomycin C, 24-48 h before transfection, CAT expression from the UV-irradiated plasmid was increased. This increase also occurred in a line of normal human cells, but not in repair-deficient human xeroderma pigmentosum cells. We confirmed that this increase in CAT expression was due to repair, and not to production of damage-free templates by recombination; the frequency of generation of supF+ recombinants after transfection with UV-irradiated pZ189 vectors carrying different point mutations in the supF gene did not significantly increase in carcinogen-treated CV-1 cells. From these results we conclude that carcinogen treatment enhances the excision-repair capacity of normal mammalian cells.

  6. Delayed transfection of DNA after riboflavin mediated photosensitization increases G:C to C:G transversions of supF gene in Escherichia coli mutY strain.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, K; Tano, K; Hashimoto, M; Hori, M; Akasaka, S; Utsumi, H

    1999-09-15

    We have previously reported that the majority of base substitution mutations of the Escherichia coli supF gene induced by riboflavin mediated photosensitization were G:C to C:G changes, in addition to G:C to T:A changes which were probably caused by 8-hydroxyguanine (oh(8)Gua), in wild type and mutM mutator mutant strains. This implies that lesions other than oh(8)Gua are produced by riboflavin-photosensitization. G:C to C:G base substitutions have been found in the mutations induced by ionizing radiation and reactive oxygen species, as well as spontaneous mutation. To characterize the G:C to C:G mutation, riboflavin- photosensitized plasmid DNA carrying the supF gene was left at room temperature for 5 h in the dark before transfection. The delayed transfection gave a mutational spectrum different from that for immediate transfection. G:C to C:G transversions significantly increased in mutY mutator strain, in which the transversion was not detected in the immediate transfection. Lesions causing G:C to C:G changes increased during 5-h holding after photosensitization and MutY protein presumably takes part in this type of base change mutation.

  7. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus strain O/JPN/2010 isolated in Japan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Onozato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Seiichi; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manabu; Morioka, Kazuki; Kanno, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genome of a foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from the 2010 epidemic in Japan was constructed and designated pSVL-f02. Transfection of Cos-7 or IBRS-2 cells with this clone allowed the recovery of infectious virus. The recovered virus had the same in vitro characterization as the parental virus with regard to antigenicity in neutralization and indirect immunofluorescence tests, plaque size and one-step growth. Pigs were experimentally infected with the parental virus or the recombinant virus recovered from pSVL-f02 transfected cells. There were no significant differences in clinical signs or antibody responses between the two groups, and virus isolation and viral RNA detection from clinical samples were similar. Virus recovered from transfected cells therefore retained the in vitro characteristics and the in vivo pathogenicity of their parental strain. This cDNA clone should be a valuable tool to analyze determinants of pathogenicity and mechanisms of virus replication, and to develop genetically engineered vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  8. A sequence-specific DNA-binding factor (VF1) from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cells binds to three adjacent sites in the xisA upstream region.

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, C J; Brusca, J S; Ramasubramanian, T S; Wei, T F; Golden, J W

    1990-01-01

    A DNA-binding factor (VF1) partially purified from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cell extracts by heparin-Sepharose chromatography was found to have affinity for the xisA upstream region. The xisA gene is required for excision of an 11-kilobase element from the nifD gene during heterocyst differentiation. Previous studies of the xisA upstream sequences demonstrated that deletion of this region is required for the expression of xisA from heterologous promoters in vegetative cells. Mobility shift assays with a labeled 250-base-pair fragment containing the binding sites revealed three distinct DNA-protein complexes. Competition experiments showed that VF1 also bound to the upstream sequences of the rbcL and glnA genes, but the rbcL and glnA fragments showed only single complexes in mobility shift assays. The upstream region of the nifH gene formed a weak complex with VF1. DNase footprinting and deletion analysis of the xisA binding site mapped the binding to a 66-base-pair region containing three repeats of the consensus recognition sequence ACATT. Images PMID:2118506

  9. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M

    2015-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures.

  10. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  11. Transcription Profiling of the Model Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 by Next-Gen (SOLiD™) Sequencing of cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 encodes about 3200 proteins. Transcripts were detected for nearly all annotated open reading frames by a global transcriptomic analysis by Next-Generation (SOLiD™) sequencing of cDNA. In the cDNA samples sequenced, ∼90% of the mapped sequences were derived from the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs and ∼10% of the sequences were derived from mRNAs. In cells grown photoautotrophically under standard conditions [38°C, 1% (v/v) CO2 in air, 250 μmol photons m−2 s−1], the highest transcript levels (up to 2% of the total mRNA for the most abundantly transcribed genes; e.g., cpcAB, psbA, psaA) were generally derived from genes encoding structural components of the photosynthetic apparatus. High-light exposure for 1 h caused changes in transcript levels for genes encoding proteins of the photosynthetic apparatus, Type-1 NADH dehydrogenase complex and ATP synthase, whereas dark incubation for 1 h resulted in a global decrease in transcript levels for photosynthesis-related genes and an increase in transcript levels for genes involved in carbohydrate degradation. Transcript levels for pyruvate kinase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex decreased sharply in cells incubated in the dark. Under dark anoxic (fermentative) conditions, transcript changes indicated a global decrease in transcripts for respiratory proteins and suggested that cells employ an alternative phosphoenolpyruvate degradation pathway via phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (ppsA) and the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (nifJ). Finally, the data suggested that an apparent operon involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and fatty acid desaturation, acsF2–ho2–hemN2–desF, may be regulated by oxygen concentration. PMID:21779275

  12. Replication of simian virus 40 DNA after UV irradiation: evidence of growing fork blockage and single-stranded gaps in daughter strands

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, M.; Menck, C.F.M.; Courtin, P.; Sarasin, A.

    1988-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms of in vivo inhibition of mammalian DNA replication by exposure to UV light (at 254 nm) was studied in monkey and human cells infected with simian virus 40. Analysis of viral DNA by electron microscopy and sucrose gradients confirmed that the presence of UV-induced lesions severely blocks DNA synthesis, and thus the conversion of replicative intermediates (RIs) into fully replicated form I DNA is inhibited by UV irradiation. These blocked RI molecules present several special features when visualized by electron microscopy. In excision repair-proficient monkey and human cells they are composed of a double-stranded circular DNA with a double-stranded tail whose size corresponds to the average interpyrimidine dimer distance, as determined by the dimer-specific T4 endonuclease V. In excision repair-deficient human cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, UV-irradiated RIs present a Carins-like structure similar to that observed for replicating molecules obtained from unirradiated infected cells. Single-stranded gaps are visualized in the replicated portions of UV-irradiated RI molecules; such regions are detected and clearly distinguishable from double-stranded DNA when probed by a specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein such as the bacteriophage T4 gene 32 product. Consistent with the presence of gaps in UV-irradiated RI molecules, single-strand-specific S1 nuclease digestion causes a shift in their sedimentation properties when analyzed in neutral sucrose gradients compared with undamaged molecules.

  13. Overexpression of a Rrp1 transgene reduces the somatic mutation and recombination frequency induced by oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Szakmary, A; Huang, S M; Chang, D T; Beachy, P A; Sander, M

    1996-02-20

    Recombination repair protein 1 (Rrp1) includes a C-terminal region homologous to several DNA repair proteins, including Escherichia coli exonuclease III and human APE, that repair oxidative and alkylation damage to DNA. The nuclease activities of Rrp1 include apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, 3'-phosphodiesterase, 3'-phosphatase, and 3'-exonuclease. As shown previously, the C-terminal nuclease region of Rrp1 is sufficient to repair oxidative- and alkylation-induced DNA damage in repair-deficient E. coli mutants. DNA strand-transfer and single-stranded DNA renaturation activities are associated with the unique N-terminal region of Rrp1, which suggests possible additional functions that include recombinational repair or homologous recombination. By using the Drosophila w/w+ mosaic eye system, which detects loss of heterozygosity as changes in eye pigmentation, somatic mutation and recombination frequencies were determined in transgenic flies overexpressing wild-type Rrp1 protein from a heat-shock-inducible transgene. A large decrease in mosaic clone frequency is observed when Rrp1 overexpression precedes treatment with gamma-rays, bleomycin, or paraquat. In contrast, Rrp1 overexpression does not alter the spot frequency after treatment with the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate or methyl nitrosourea. A reduction in mosaic clone frequency depends on the expression of the Rrp1 transgene and on the nature of the induced DNA damage. These data suggest a lesion-specific involvement of Rrp1 in the repair of oxidative DNA damage.

  14. Biomarkers for DNA DSB inhibitors and radiotherapy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stanley K; Olive, Peggy L; Bristow, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    Major technical advances in radiotherapy, including IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy, have allowed for improved physical precision and increased dose delivery to the tumor, with better sparing of surrounding normal tissue. The development of inhibitors of the sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is exciting and could be combined with precise radiotherapy targeting to improve local control following radiotherapy. However, caution must be exercised in order that DSB inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy in such a manner as to preserve the therapeutic ratio by exploiting repair deficiencies in malignant cells over that of normal cells. In this review, we discuss the rationale and current approaches to targeting DSB sensing and repair pathways in combined modality with radiotherapy. We also describe potential biomarkers that could be useful in detecting functional inhibition of DSB repair in a patient's tissues during clinical radiotherapy trials. Finally, we examine a number of issues relating to the use of DSB-inhibiting molecular agents and radiotherapy in the context of the tumor microenvironment, effects on normal tissues and the optimal timing and duration of the agent in relation to fractionated radiotherapy.

  15. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  17. Induction of UV photoproducts and DNA damage by solar simulator UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfreys, A.; Henderson, L.; Clingen, P.

    1997-10-01

    The recent increased incidence of skin cancer and the depletion of the ozone layer has increased interest in the ultraviolet (UV) component of natural sunlight and its role in the induction of skin cancer. Previous research on UV radiation has concentrated on UVC (254nm) but, as only UVB and UVA are present in natural sunlight, its relevance is unknown. We have investigated the induction of two forms of direct DNA damage - the pyrimidine dimer and the (6-4) photoproduct - in human DNA repair deficient XP-G (Xeroderma pigmentosum group G) lymphoblastoid cells following exposure to simulated sunlight. As exposure to natural sunlight is highly variable, a solar simulator lamp was used which is known to mimic natural sunlight at midday in Central Europe. Cells were irradiated on ice to minimise DNA repair and the relative induction of pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts was measured using specific monoclonal antibodies and a computer assisted image analysis system. A time dependent increase in both cyclobutane dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites was seen. The increases in pyrimidine dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites differed to that reported with natural sunlight in the UK but was similar to that seen with a similar solar simulator lamp.

  18. The relative roles of DNA damage induced by UVA irradiation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Cortat, Barbara; Garcia, Camila Carrião Machado; Quinet, Annabel; Schuch, André Passaglia; de Lima-Bessa, Keronninn Moreno; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2013-08-01

    UVA light (320-400 nm) represents approximately 95% of the total solar UV radiation that reaches the Earth's surface. UVA light induces oxidative stress and the formation of DNA photoproducts in skin cells. These photoproducts such as pyrimidine dimers (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, CPDs, and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts, 6-4PPs) are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER). In this repair pathway, the XPA protein is recruited to the damage removal site; therefore, cells deficient in this protein are unable to repair the photoproducts. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of oxidative stress and the formation of DNA photoproducts in UVA-induced cell death. In fact, similar levels of oxidative stress and oxidised bases were detected in XP-A and NER-proficient cells exposed to UVA light. Interestingly, CPDs were detected in both cell lines; however, 6-4PPs were detected only in DNA repair-deficient cells. XP-A cells were also observed to be significantly more sensitive to UVA light compared to NER-proficient cells, with an increased induction of apoptosis, while necrosis was similarly observed in both cell lines. The induction of apoptosis and necrosis in XP-A cells using adenovirus-mediated transduction of specific photolyases was investigated and we confirm that both types of photoproducts are the primary lesions responsible for inducing cell death in XP-A cells and may trigger the skin-damaging effects of UVA light, particularly skin ageing and carcinogenesis.

  19. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  20. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-07-08

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee.

  1. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  2. Recovery of DNA Replication in UV-Irradiated Escherichia coli Requires both Excision Repair and RecF Protein Function†

    PubMed Central

    Courcelle, Justin; Crowley, David J.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    1999-01-01

    After UV doses that disrupt DNA replication, the recovery of replication at replication forks in Escherichia coli requires a functional copy of the recF gene. In recF mutants, replication fails to recover and extensive degradation of the nascent DNA occurs, suggesting that recF function is needed to stabilize the disrupted replication forks and facilitate the process of recovery. We show here that the ability of recF to promote the recovery of replication requires that the disrupting lesions be removed. In the absence of excision repair, recF+ cells protect the nascent DNA at replication forks, but replication does not resume. The classical view is that recombination proteins operate in pathways that are independent from DNA repair, and therefore the functions of Rec proteins have been studied in repair-deficient cells. However, mutations in either uvr or recF result in failure to recover replication at UV doses from which wild-type cells recover efficiently, suggesting that recF and excision repair contribute to a common pathway in the recovery of replication. PMID:9922256

  3. Short-Sequence DNA Repeats in Prokaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, Alex; Scherer, Stewart; van Alphen, Loek; Verbrugh, Henri

    1998-01-01

    Short-sequence DNA repeat (SSR) loci can be identified in all eukaryotic and many prokaryotic genomes. These loci harbor short or long stretches of repeated nucleotide sequence motifs. DNA sequence motifs in a single locus can be identical and/or heterogeneous. SSRs are encountered in many different branches of the prokaryote kingdom. They are found in genes encoding products as diverse as microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules and specific bacterial virulence factors such as lipopolysaccharide-modifying enzymes or adhesins. SSRs enable genetic and consequently phenotypic flexibility. SSRs function at various levels of gene expression regulation. Variations in the number of repeat units per locus or changes in the nature of the individual repeat sequences may result from recombination processes or polymerase inadequacy such as slipped-strand mispairing (SSM), either alone or in combination with DNA repair deficiencies. These rather complex phenomena can occur with relative ease, with SSM approaching a frequency of 10−4 per bacterial cell division and allowing high-frequency genetic switching. Bacteria use this random strategy to adapt their genetic repertoire in response to selective environmental pressure. SSR-mediated variation has important implications for bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary fitness. Molecular analysis of changes in SSRs allows epidemiological studies on the spread of pathogenic bacteria. The occurrence, evolution and function of SSRs, and the molecular methods used to analyze them are discussed in the context of responsiveness to environmental factors, bacterial pathogenicity, epidemiology, and the availability of full-genome sequences for increasing numbers of microorganisms, especially those that are medically relevant. PMID:9618442

  4. Survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells correlates with efficient DNA repair in an essential gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bohr, V.A.; Okumoto, D.S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1986-06-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells is not necessarily correlated with their overall capacity to carry out DNA repair. Human cells typically remove 80% of the pyrimidine dimers produced by a UV dose of 5 J/m2 within 24 hr. In contrast, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line survives UV irradiation equally well while removing only 15% of the dimers. Using a newly developed technique to measure dimer frequencies in single-copy specific sequences, we find that the CHO cells remove 70% of the dimers from the essential dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene but only 20% from sequences located 30 kilobases or more upstream from the 5' end of the gene in a 24-hr period. Repair-deficient human cells from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) are similar to the CHO cells in overall repair levels, but they are extremely sensitive to killing by UV irradiation. In the XPC cells, we find little or no repair in the DHFR gene; in contrast, in normal human fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes, greater than 80% of the dimers induced in the gene by 20 J/m2 are removed in 24 hr. Since the CHO and normal human cells exhibit similar UV resistance, much higher than that of XPC cells, our findings suggest a correlation between efficient repair of essential genes and resistance to DNA-damaging agents such as UV light.

  5. Error-prone translesion replication of damaged DNA suppresses skin carcinogenesis by controlling inflammatory hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Verspuy, Johan W. A.; Jansen, Jacob G.; Rebel, Heggert; Carlée, Leone M.; van der Valk, Martin A.; Jonkers, Jos; de Gruijl, Frank R.; de Wind, Niels

    2009-01-01

    The induction of skin cancer involves both mutagenic and proliferative responses of the epidermis to ultraviolet (UV) light. It is believed that tumor initiation requires the mutagenic replication of damaged DNA by translesion synthesis (TLS) pathways. The mechanistic basis for the induction of proliferation, providing tumor promotion, is poorly understood. Here, we have investigated the role of TLS in the initiation and promotion of skin carcinogenesis, using a sensitive nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model that carries a hypomorphic allele of the error-prone TLS gene Rev1. Despite a defect in UV-induced mutagenesis, skin carcinogenesis was accelerated in these mice. This paradoxical phenotype was caused by the induction of inflammatory hyperplasia of the mutant skin that provides strong tumor promotion. The induction of hyperplasia was associated with mild and transient replicational stress of the UV-damaged genome, triggering DNA damage signaling and senescence. The concomitant expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is in agreement with an executive role for IL-6 and possibly other cytokines in the autocrine induction of senescence and the paracrine induction of inflammatory hyperplasia. In conclusion, error-prone TLS suppresses tumor-promoting activities of UV light, thereby controlling skin carcinogenesis. PMID:20007784

  6. The role of DNA repair on cell killing by charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Kanai, T.; Furusawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Ohara, H.; Yatagai, F.

    It can be noted that it is not simple double strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks that are associated with high biological effectiveness in the cell killing effect for high LET radiation. Here, we have examined the effectiveness of fast neutrons and low (initial energy = 12 MeV/u) or high (135 MeV/u) energy charged particles on cell death in 19 mammalian cell lines including radiosensitive mutants. Some of the radiosensitive lines were deficient in DNA dsb repair such as LX830, M10, V3, and L5178Y-S cells and showed lower values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for fast neutrons if compared with their parent cell lines. The other lines of human ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts, irs 1, irs 2, irs 3 and irs1SF cells, which were also radiosensitive but known as proficient in dsb repair, showed moderate RBEs. Dsb repair deficient mutants showed low RBE values for heavy ions. These experimental findings suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role against the attack of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Therefore, we hypothesize that a main cause of cell death induced by high LET radiations is due to non-reparable dsb, which are produced at a higher rate compared to low LET radiations.

  7. Host cell reactivation of sunlamp-exposed adenovirus in fibroblasts from patients with Bloom's syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, and Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rainbow, A.J. )

    1991-01-01

    In this study, a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique was used to examine the repair capacity for DNA damaged by sunlamp exposure in fibroblast strains derived from 5 normal individuals and 8 patients representing three different diseases associated with DNA repair deficiencies. Adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was exposed to radiation from a GE 275 W sunlamp and subsequently used to infect fibroblast monolayers. At 48 hr after infection, cells were scored for the presence of viral structural antigens (Vag) using indirect immunofluorescent staining. Previous reports using this technique showed a substantial reduction in the HCR of sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 for infection of excision repair deficient fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In contrast, the HCR of Vag synthesis for sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 was in the normal range for the three ataxia telangiectasia, three Bloom's syndrome, and two Huntington's disease fibroblasts strains.

  8. Normal and defective repair of damaged DNA in human cells: a sensitive assay utilizing the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Regan, J D; Setlow, R B; Ley, R D

    1971-04-01

    A new technique has been developed for studying the extent of repair of UV-radiation damage to DNA in human cells. It is easy to use, has excellent sensitivity, and provides rapid quantitative estimates of repair. UV-irradiated cells whose DNA has been previously labeled with a radioisotope are grown after irradiation in non-radioactive bromodeoxyuridine, which is incorporated at the breaks induced by repair enzymes. After a period of growth in the thymidine analog the cells are exposed to a large flux of 313 nm radiation and then lysed on top of an alkaline sucrose gradient. Bromodeoxyuridine-containing sections of the DNA are thus selectively photolysed. Sedimentation in the alkaline gradient reveals the average molecular weight of disrupted segments and gives a measure of the number of breaks induced by repair enzymes over the whole period allowed for repair. The large change in average molecular weight observed upon exposure of normal repairing cells to 313 nm radiation is not observed in the repair-deficient cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. The quantitative aspects of this assay for repair and its sensitivity should make it applicable to the study of repair induced by agents other than UV radiation.

  9. Complementation of DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group C by the transfer of human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, G.P.; Athwal, R.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Complementation of DNA excision repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group C (XP-C) has been achieved by the transfer of human chromosome 5. Individual human chromosomes tagged with a selectable marker were transferred to XP-C cells by microcell fusion from mouse-human hybrid cell lines each bearing a single different human chromosome. Analysis of the chromosome transfer clones revealed that introduction of chromosome 5 into XP-C cells corrected the DNA repair defect as well as UV-sensitive phenotypes, while chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 9, 13, 15, 17, and 21 failed to complement. The introduced chromosome 5 in complemented UV[sup r] clones was distinguished from the parental XP-C chromosomes by polymorphism for dinucleotide (CA)[sub n] repeats at two loci, D5S117 and D5S209. In addition, an intact marked chromosome 5 was rescued into mouse cells from a complemented UV[sup r] clone by microcell fusion. Five subclones of a complemented clone that had lost the marked chromosome 5 exhibited UV-sensitive and repair-deficient phenotypes identical to parental XP-C cells. Concordant loss of the transferred chromosome and reappearance of XP-C phenotype further confirmed the presence of a DNA repair gene on human chromosome 5. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. HEREDITARY, SPORADIC AND METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER ARE COMMONLY DRIVEN BY SPECIFIC SPECTRUMS OF DEFECTIVE DNA MISMATCH REPAIR COMPONENTS

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of several human cell mechanisms utilized to repair mutable mistakes within DNA, particularly after DNA is replicated. MMR function is dependent upon heterodimerization of specific MMR proteins that can recognize base-base mispairs as well as frameshifts at microsatellite sequences, followed by the triggering of other complementary proteins that execute excision and repair or initiate cell demise if repair is futile. MMR function is compromised in specific disease states, all of which can be biochemically recognized by faulty repair of microsatellite sequences, causing microsatellite instability. Germline mutation of an MMR gene causes Lynch syndrome, the most common inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC), and biallelic germline mutations cause the rare constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome. Somatic inactivation of MMR through epigenetic mechanisms is observed in 15% of sporadic CRC, and a smaller portion of CRCs possess biallelic somatic mutations. A novel inflammation-driven nuclear-to-cytoplasmic shift of the specific MMR protein hMSH3 is seen in up to 60% of sporadic CRCs that associates with metastasis and poor patient prognosis, unlike improved outcome when MMR is genetically inactivated. The mechanism for MMR inactication as well as the component affected dictates the clinical spectrum and clinical response for patients. PMID:28066040

  11. Genotypic diversity among Brevibacillus laterosporus strains.

    PubMed

    Zahner, V; Rabinovitch, L; Suffys, P; Momen, H

    1999-11-01

    In comparison with other entomopathogenic Bacillus species, the genome of Brevibacillus laterosporus is poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to examine genetic variability in B. laterosporus by using a range of typing methodologies. Strains of B. laterosporus were examined for variation in 13 chromosomal genes encoding enzymes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Optimal conditions of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA were established that allowed analysis of the genome of B. laterosporus. None of these techniques allowed the identification of a convenient molecular marker for entomopathogenic strains, although one specific primer amplified only DNA from almost all mosquitocidal strains.

  12. Oxidative DNA damage in the in utero initiation of postnatal neurodevelopmental deficits by normal fetal and ethanol-enhanced oxidative stress in oxoguanine glycosylase 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Pinto, Daniel J; Wells, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Studies in mice with deficient antioxidative enzymes have shown that physiological levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can adversely affect the developing embryo and fetus. Herein, DNA repair-deficient progeny of oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (ogg1)-knockout mice lacking repair of the oxidative DNA lesion 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) exhibited enhanced postnatal neurodevelopmental deficits, revealing the pathogenic potential of 8-oxodGuo initiated by physiological ROS production in fetal brain and providing the first evidence of a pathological phenotype for ogg1-knockout mice. Moreover, when exposed in utero to ethanol (EtOH), ogg1-knockout progeny exhibited higher levels of 8-oxodGuo in fetal brain and more severe postnatal neurodevelopmental deficits than wild-type littermates, both of which were blocked by pretreatment with the free radical trapping agent phenylbutylnitrone. These results suggest that ROS-initiated DNA oxidation, as distinct from altered signal transduction, contributes to neurodevelopmental deficits caused by in utero EtOH exposure, and fetal DNA repair is a determinant of risk.

  13. Benzo(a)pyrene induces similar gene expression changes in testis of DNA repair proficient and deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Benzo [a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure induces DNA adducts at all stages of spermatogenesis and in testis, and removal of these lesions is less efficient in nucleotide excision repair deficient Xpc-/- mice than in wild type mice. In this study, we investigated by using microarray technology whether compromised DNA repair in Xpc-/- mice may lead to a transcriptional reaction of the testis to cope with increased levels of B[a]P induced DNA damage. Results Two-Way ANOVA revealed only 4 genes differentially expressed between wild type and Xpc-/- mice, and 984 genes between testes of B[a]P treated and untreated mice irrespective of the mouse genotype. However, the level in which these B[a]P regulated genes are expressed differs between Wt and Xpc-/- mice (p = 0.000000141), and were predominantly involved in the regulation of cell cycle, translation, chromatin structure and spermatogenesis, indicating a general stress response. In addition, analysis of cell cycle phase dependent gene expression revealed that expression of genes involved in G1-S and G2-M phase arrest was increased after B[a]P exposure in both genotypes. A slightly higher induction of average gene expression was observed at the G2-M checkpoint in Xpc-/- mice, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.086). Other processes that were expected to have changed by exposure, like apoptosis and DNA repair, were not found to be modulated at the level of gene expression. Conclusion Gene expression in testis of untreated Xpc-/- and wild type mice were very similar, with only 4 genes differentially expressed. Exposure to benzo(a)pyrene affected the expression of genes that are involved in cell cycle regulation in both genotypes, indicating that the presence of unrepaired DNA damage in testis blocks cell proliferation to protect DNA integrity in both DNA repair proficient and deficient animals. PMID:20504355

  14. Variability among Rhizobium Strains Originating from Nodules of Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, P.; Beyene, D.; Vera, F. T.; Keyser, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    Rhizobium strains from nodules of Vicia faba were diverse in plasmid content and serology. Results of multilocus gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated several deep chromosomal lineages among the strains. Linkage disequilibrium among the chromosomal types was detected and may have reflected variation of Rhizobium strains in the different geographical locations from which the strains originated. An investigation of pea strains with antibodies prepared against fava bean strains and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, targeting DNA regions coding for rRNA and nodulation, indicated that Rhizobium strains from V. faba nodules were distinguishable from those from Pisum sativum, V. villosa, and Trifolium spp. PMID:16535075

  15. Virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281 on legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, E.E.; Fraley, R.T.; Chilton, M.D.

    1987-03-01

    This study addresses the basis of host range on legumes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281, an L,L-succinamopine strain. The authors tested virulence of T-DNA and vir region constructs from this tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid with complementary Ti plasmid regions from heterologous nopaline and octopine strains.

  16. Assignment of the XRCC2 human DNA repair gene to chromosome 7q36 by complementation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.J.; Thompson, L.H.; Zhao, Y.

    1995-04-10

    The V79 hamster cell line irs1 is a repair-deficient mutant hypersensitive to radiation and DNA-reactive chemical agents. Somatic cell hybrids were formed by fusing irs1 cells with human lymphocytes and selecting for complementation in medium containing concentrations of mitomycin C (MMC) that are toxic to irs1. Thirty-eight MMC-resistant hybrids showed extensive segregation of human chromosomes, with 35 of them retaining human chromosome 7, as indicated by molecular marker and cytogenetic analyses. Inter-Alu-PCR products from the DNA of hybrids, when used as a fluorescence in situ hybridization probe onto normal human metaphases, indicated that one resistant hybrid was monochromosomal for chromosome 7 and that the three resistant hybrids shown to be negative for chromosome 7 markers have retained portions of chromosome 7, with region 7q36 being the smallest common region. MMC-sensitive subclones of a resistant hybrid lost human chromosome 7. Therefore, the gene complementing the repair defect, XRCC2 (X-ray repair cross complementing), is assigned to human chromosome 7q36. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. 'Fukusensor:' a genetically engineered plant for reporting DNA damage in response to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanhui; Allen, Sara; Millwood, Reginald J; Stewart, C Neal

    2014-12-01

    Transgenic plants can be designed to be 'phytosensors' for detection of environmental contaminants and pathogens. In this study, we describe the design and testing of a radiation phytosensor in the form of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transgenic Arabidopsis plant utilizing a DNA repair deficiency mutant background as a host. Mutant lines of Arabidopsis AtATM (At3g48190), which are hypersensitive to gamma irradiation, were used to generate stable GFP transgenic plants in which a gfp gene was under the control of a strong constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. Mutant and nonmutant genetic background transgenic plants were treated with 0, 1, 5, 10 and 100 Gy radiation doses, respectively, using a Co-60 source. After 1 week, the GFP expression levels were drastically reduced in young leaves of mutant background plants (treated by 10 and 100 Gy), whereas there were scant visible differences in the fluorescence of the nonmutant background plants. These early results indicate that transgenic plants could serve in a relevant sensor system to report radiation dose and the biological effects to organisms in response to radionuclide contamination.

  18. The MG1363 and IL1403 Laboratory Strains of Lactococcus lactis and Several Dairy Strains Are Diploid▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Albrechtsen, Bjarne; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria are normally haploid, maintaining one copy of their genome in one circular chromosome. We have examined the cell cycle of laboratory strains of Lactococcus lactis, and, to our surprise, we found that some of these strains were born with two complete nonreplicating chromosomes. We determined the cellular content of DNA by flow cytometry and by radioactive labeling of the DNA. These strains thus fulfill the criterion of being diploid. Several dairy strains were also found to be diploid while a nondairy strain and several other dairy strains were haploid in slow-growing culture. The diploid and haploid strains differed in their sensitivity toward UV light, in their cell size, and in their D period, the period between termination of DNA replication and cell division. PMID:20023021

  19. Trapping DNA Replication Origins from the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Eki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of chromosomal DNA is initiated from multiple origins of replication in higher eukaryotes; however, little is known about these origins’ structures. We isolated the origin-derived nascent DNAs from a human repair-deficient cell line by blocking the replication forks near the origins using two different origin-trapping methods (i.e., UV- or chemical crosslinker-treatment and cell synchronization in early S phase using DNA replication inhibitors). Single-stranded DNAs (of 0.5–3 kb) that accumulated after such treatments were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was immunopurified after fractionation by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cloned by complementary-strand synthesis and PCR amplification. Competitive PCR revealed an increased abundance of DNA derived from known replication origins (c-myc and lamin B2 genes) in the nascent DNA fractions from the UV-treated or crosslinked cells. Nucleotide sequences of 85 and 208 kb were obtained from the two libraries (I and II) prepared from the UV-treated log-phase cells and early S phase arrested cells, respectively. The libraries differed from each other in their G+C composition and replication-related motif contents, suggesting that differences existed between the origin fragments isolated by the two different origin-trapping methods. The replication activities for seven out of 12 putative origin loci from the early-S phase cells were shown by competitive PCR. We mapped 117 (library I) and 172 (library II) putative origin loci to the human genome; approximately 60% and 50% of these loci were assigned to the G-band and intragenic regions, respectively. Analyses of the flanking sequences of the mapped loci suggested that the putative origin loci tended to associate with genes (including conserved sites) and DNase I hypersensitive sites; however, poor correlations were found between such loci and the CpG islands, transcription start sites, and K27-acetylated histone H3

  20. DNA polymerase III requirement for repair of DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hagensee, M.E.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The pcbA1 mutation allows DNA replication dependent on DNA polymerase I at the restrictive temperature in polC(Ts) strains. Cells which carry pcbA1, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase III gene were used to study the role of DNA polymerase III in DNA repair. At the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III, these strains were more sensitive to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. The same strains showed no increase in sensitivity to bleomycin, UV light, or psoralen at the restrictive temperature. The sensitivity of these strains to MMS and hydrogen peroxide was not due to the pcbAl allele, and normal sensitivity was restored by the introduction of a chromosomal or cloned DNA polymerase III gene, verifying that the sensitivity was due to loss of DNA polymerase III alpha-subunit activity. A functional DNA polymerase III is required for the reformation of high-molecular-weight DNA after treatment of cells with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, as demonstrated by alkaline sucrose sedimentation results. Thus, it appears that a functional DNA polymerase III is required for the optimal repair of DNA damage by MMS or hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Induction of plasminogen activator by UV light in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miskin, R.; Ben-Ishai, R.

    1981-10-01

    Normal and DNA repair-deficient human fibroblasts have been used to study induction of plasminogen activator (PA) by DNA damage. UV light induced the synthesis of PA in skin fibroblasts of all types of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in XP heterozygotes and in human amniotic cells. Enzyme induction was, however, not observed in fibroblasts of normal adults. In classical XP, which are deficient in excision repair, PA synthesis occurred in a narrow range of low-UV fluences. In such strains, the level of enzyme produced was correlated with the extent of repair deficiency. UV fluences required for PA induction in XP variants and XP heteozygotes were at least 10 times those inducing enzyme synthesis in excision-deficient XP. Maximum enzyme induction occurred 48 hr after irradiation, and the highest levels of enzyme produced were 15-20 times those of PA baseline levels. Electrophoretic analysis showed that UV irradiation enhances the synthesis of the M/sub r/ 60,000 human urokinase-type PA, which is present in low amounts in untreated cells. Our results suggest that PA induction in human cells is caused by unrepaired DNA damage and represents a eukaryotic SOS-like function. In addition, PA induction may provide a sensitive assay for detection of cellular DNA repair deficiencies and identification of XP heterozygotes.

  2. Determination of antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs and their genotypic characterization by method of amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (the ADSRRS-fingerprinting).

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Zięba, Przemysław; Gnat, Sebastian

    2016-11-28

    In this study, we analysed phenotypic resistance profiles and their reflection in the genomic profiles of Enterococcus spp. strains isolated from pigs raised on different farms. Samples were collected from five pig farms (n=90 animals) and tested for Enterococcus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of 12 antimicrobials were determined using the broth microdilution method, and epidemiological molecular analysis of strains belonging to selected species (E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. hirae) was performed using the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method with a few modifications. The highest percentage of strains were resistant to tetracycline (73.4%), erythromycin and tylosin (42.5%), and rifampicin (25.2%) as well as a large number exhibited high-level resistance to both kanamycin (25.2%) and streptomycin (27.6%). The strains of E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. hirae (n=184) revealed varied phenotypic resistance profiles, among which as many as seven met the criteria for multi-drug resistance (30,4% of strains tested). ADSRRS-fingerprinting analysis produced 17 genotypic profiles of individual strains which were correlated with their phenotypic resistance profiles. Only E. hirae strains susceptible to all of the chemotherapeutics tested had two different ADSRRS profiles. Moreover, eight animals were carriers of more than one genotype belonging to the same Enterococcus spp., mainly E. faecalis. Given the possibility of transmission to humans of the high resistance/multi-drug resistance enterococci and the significant role of pigs as food animals in this process, it is necessary to introduce a multi-level control strategy by carrying out research on the resistance and molecular characteristics of indicator bacterial strains isolated from animals on individual farms.

  3. Methanol exposure does not produce oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, liver or kidney of adult mice, rabbits or primates

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Gordon P.; Siu, Michelle; Sweeting, J. Nicole; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-15

    In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests indicate methanol (MeOH) is not mutagenic, but carcinogenic potential has been claimed in one controversial long-term rodent cancer bioassay that has not been replicated. To determine whether MeOH could indirectly damage DNA via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanisms, we treated male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) and 6 h later assessed oxidative damage to DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. We found no MeOH-dependent increases in 8-oxodG in lung, liver or kidney of any species. Chronic treatment of CD-1 mice with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) daily for 15 days also did not increase 8-oxodG levels in these organs. These results were corroborated in DNA repair-deficient oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) knockout (KO) mice, which accumulated 8-oxodG in lung, kidney and liver with age, but exhibited no increase following MeOH, despite a 2-fold increase in renal 8-oxodG in Ogg1 KO mice following treatment with a ROS-initiating positive control, the renal carcinogen potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}; 100 mg/kg ip). These observations suggest that MeOH exposure does not promote the accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, kidney or liver, and that environmental exposure to MeOH is unlikely to initiate carcinogenesis in these organs by DNA oxidation.

  4. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Weeda, G.; Donker, I.; Vermeulen, W.

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in {approximately}50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TM have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly support the concept of {open_quotes}transcription syndromes.{close_quotes} 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Genetic variants involved in oxidative stress, base excision repair, DNA methylation, and folate metabolism pathways influence myeloid neoplasias susceptibility and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Alves, Raquel; Baldeiras, Inês; Cortesão, Emília; Carda, José Pedro; Branco, Claudia C; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Loureiro, Luísa; Pereira, Amélia; Nascimento Costa, José Manuel; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) share common features: elevated oxidative stress, DNA repair deficiency, and aberrant DNA methylation. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association in variants of genes involved in oxidative stress, folate metabolism, DNA repair, and DNA methylation with susceptibility and prognosis of these malignancies. To that end, 16 SNPs (one per gene: CAT, CYBA, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, GPX1, KEAP1, MPO, MTRR, NEIL1, NFE2F2, OGG1, SLC19A1, SOD1, SOD2, and XRCC1) were genotyped in 191 patients (101 MDS and 90 AML) and 261 controls. We also measured oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species/total antioxidant status ratio), DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in 50 subjects (40 MDS and 10 controls). Results showed that five genes (GPX1, NEIL1, NFE2L2, OGG1, and SOD2) were associated with MDS, two (DNMT3B and SLC19A1) with AML, and two (CYBA and DNMT1) with both diseases. We observed a correlation of CYBA TT, GPX1 TT, and SOD2 CC genotypes with increased oxidative stress levels, as well as NEIL1 TT and OGG1 GG genotypes with higher DNA damage. The 5-methylcytosine levels were negatively associated with DNMT1 CC, DNMT3A CC, and MTRR AA genotypes, and positively with DNMT3B CC genotype. Furthermore, DNMT3A, MTRR, NEIL1, and OGG1 variants modulated AML transformation in MDS patients. Additionally, DNMT3A, OGG1, GPX1, and KEAP1 variants influenced survival of MDS and AML patients. Altogether, data suggest that genetic variability influence predisposition and prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well AML transformation rate in MDS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A mouse strain defective in both T cells and NK cells has enhanced sensitivity to tumor induction by plasmid DNA expressing both activated H-Ras and c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Sheng-Fowler, Li; Tu, Wei; Fu, Haiqing; Murata, Haruhiko; Lanning, Lynda; Foseh, Gideon; Macauley, Juliete; Blair, Donald; Hughes, Stephen H; Coffin, John M; Lewis, Andrew M; Peden, Keith

    2014-01-01

    As part of safety studies to evaluate the risk of residual cellular DNA in vaccines manufactured in tumorigenic cells, we have been developing in vivo assays to detect and quantify the oncogenic activity of DNA. We generated a plasmid expressing both an activated human H-ras gene and murine c-myc gene and showed that 1 µg of this plasmid, pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc, was capable of inducing tumors in newborn NIH Swiss mice. However, to be able to detect the oncogenicity of dominant activated oncogenes in cellular DNA, a more sensitive system was needed. In this paper, we demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon transgenic mouse, which is defective in both T-cell and NK-cell functions, can detect the oncogenic activity of 25 ng of the circular form of pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc. When this plasmid was inoculated as linear DNA, amounts of DNA as low as 800 pg were capable of inducing tumors. Animals were found that had multiple tumors, and these tumors were independent and likely clonal. These results demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon mouse is highly sensitive for the detection of oncogenic activity of DNA. To determine whether it can detect the oncogenic activity of cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-cell lines (HeLa, A549, HT-1080, and CEM), DNA (100 µg) was inoculated into newborn CD3 epsilon mice both in the presence of 1 µg of linear pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc as positive control and in its absence. While tumors were induced in 100% of mice with the positive-control plasmid, no tumors were induced in mice receiving any of the tumor DNAs alone. These results demonstrate that detection of oncogenes in cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-derived cell lines in this mouse system was not possible; the results also show the importance of including a positive-control plasmid to detect inhibitory effects of the cellular DNA.

  7. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  8. Actual identity of six micrococcal strains selected as potential starter for dry fermented sausages production.

    PubMed

    Selgas, M D; Sanz, B; Ordóñez, J A

    1989-06-01

    The DNA guanine + cytosine contents of six strains previously selected as potential starters for their use for the dry fermented sausages production have been determined. Five strains were characterized as Micrococcus spp. and the remainder as incertae sedis.

  9. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  10. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  12. Nuclear alpha spectrin: Critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link repair and genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-erythroid alpha spectrin (αIISp) is a structural protein which we have shown is present in the nucleus of human cells. It interacts with a number of nuclear proteins such as actin, lamin, emerin, chromatin remodeling factors, and DNA repair proteins. αIISp’s interaction with DNA repair proteins has been extensively studied. We have demonstrated that nuclear αIISp is critical in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair in S phase, in both genomic (non-telomeric) and telomeric DNA, and in maintenance of genomic stability following ICL damage to DNA. We have proposed that αIISp acts as a scaffold aiding to recruit repair proteins to sites of damage. This involvement of αIISp in ICL repair and telomere maintenance after ICL damage represents new and critical functions for αIISp. These studies have led to development of a model for the role of αIISp in DNA ICL repair. They have been aided by examination of cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), a repair-deficient genetic disorder in which a deficiency in αIISp leads to defective ICL repair in genomic and telomeric DNA, telomere dysfunction, and chromosome instability following DNA ICL damage. We have shown that loss of αIISp in FA cells is due to increased breakdown by the protease, µ-calpain. Importantly, we have demonstrated that this deficiency can be corrected by knockdown of µ-calpain and restoring αIISp levels to normal. This corrects a number of the phenotypic deficiencies in FA after ICL damage. These studies suggest a new and unexplored direction for therapeutically restoring genomic stability in FA cells and for correcting numerous phenotypic deficiencies occurring after ICL damage. Developing a more in-depth understanding of the importance of the interaction of αIISp with other nuclear proteins could significantly enhance our knowledge of the consequences of loss of αIISp on critical nuclear processes. PMID:27480253

  13. Multiple point mutations in a shuttle vector propagated in human cells: evidence for an error-prone DNA polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, M.M.; Bredberg, A.; Seetharam, S.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1987-07-01

    Mutagenesis was studied at the DNA-sequence level in human fibroblast and lymphoid cells by use of a shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, containing a suppressor tRNA marker gene. In a series of experiments, 62 plasmids were recovered that had two to six base substitutions in the 160-base-pair marker gene. Approximately 20-30% of the mutant plasmids that were recovered after passing ultraviolet-treated pZ189 through a repair-proficient human fibroblast line contained these multiple mutations. In contrast, passage of ultraviolet-treated pZ189 through an excision-repair-deficient (xeroderma pigmentosum) line yielded only 2% multiple base substitution mutants. Introducing a single-strand nick in otherwise unmodified pZ189 adjacent to the marker, followed by passage through the xeroderma pigmentosum cells, resulted in about 66% multiple base substitution mutants. The multiple mutations were found in a 160-base-pair region containing the marker gene but were rarely found in an adjacent 170-base-pair region. Passing ultraviolet-treated or nicked pZ189 through a repair-proficient human B-cell line also yielded multiple base substitution mutations in 20-33% of the mutant plasmids. An explanation for these multiple mutations is that they were generated by an error-prone polymerase while filling gaps. These mutations share many of the properties displayed by mutations in the immunoglobulin hypervariable regions.

  14. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  15. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  16. BENZO[A]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE FORMS COVALENT-DNA ADDUCTS IN VITRO BUT NONE WERE DETECTED IN THE LUNGS OR LIVERS OF STRAIN A/J MICE IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a potent human and rodent lung carcinogen. This activity has been ascribed in part to the formation of B[a]P-7,8-dio1-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts. Other carcinogenic mechanisms have been proposed: 1.] The induction of apurinic sites from radical cati...

  17. BENZO[ A ]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE FORMS COVALENT-DNA ADDUCTS IN VITRO BUT NONE WERE DETECTED IN THE LUNGS OR LIVERS OF STRAIN A/J MICE IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a potent human and rodent lung carcinogen. This activity has been ascribed in part to the formation of B[a]P-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts. Other carcinogenic mechanisms have been proposed: 1.] The induction of apurinic si...

  18. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  19. Multiscale modelling of DNA mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical properties of DNA are important not only in a wide range of biological processes but also in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology. We review some of the recent developments in modeling these properties, emphasizing the multiscale nature of the problem. Modern atomic resolution, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations have contributed to our understanding of DNA fine structure and conformational polymorphism. These simulations may serve as data sources to parameterize rigid base models which themselves have undergone major development. A consistent buildup of larger entities involving multiple rigid bases enables us to describe DNA at more global scales. Free energy methods to impose large strains on DNA, as well as bead models and other approaches, are also briefly discussed.

  20. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  1. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  2. Identification of Iron-reducing Thermus strains as Thermus scotoductus

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, David L.; Kieft, T L.; Tsukuda, Toyoko; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Onstott, T C.; Macnaughton, S.; Bownas, J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2004-02-01

    Thermus strain SA-01, previously isolated from a deep (3.2) South African gold mine, is closely related to Thermus strains NMX2 A.1 and VI-7 (previously isolated from thermal springs in New Mexico USA and Portugal, respectively). Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 have also been shown previously to grow using nitrate, Fe(III), , Mn(IV) or So as terminal electron acceptors and to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), U(VI), Co(III), and the quinine-containing compound anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The objectives of this study were to determine the phylogenetic positions of the three known metal-reducing Thermus strains and to determine the phylogenetic significance of metal reduction within the genus Thermus. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences, BOX PCR genomic fingerprinting, and DNA-DNA reassociation analyses indicated that these strains belong to the previously described genospecies T. scotoductus. The morphologies and lipid fatty acid profiles of these metal-reducing strains are consistent with their identification as T. scotoductus; however, the T. scotoductus strains tested in this study evinced a wide intraspecies variability in some other phenotypic traits, e.g., carbon substrate utilization and pigmentation. Iron reduction occurred in all strains of T. scotoductus tested except the mixotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing strain IT-7254. Thermus strains belonging to other species did not reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) or reduced it only poorly.

  3. Identification of iron-reducing Thermus strains as Thermus scotoductus.

    PubMed

    Balkwill, D L; Kieft, T L; Tsukuda, T; Kostandarithes, H M; Onstott, T C; Macnaughton, S; Bownas, J; Fredrickson, J K

    2004-02-01

    Thermus strain SA-01, previously isolated from a deep (3.2 km) South African gold mine, is closely related to Thermus strains NMX2 A.1 and VI-7 (previously isolated from thermal springs in New Mexico, USA, and Portugal, respectively). Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 have also been shown previously to grow using nitrate, Fe(III), Mn(IV) or S(O) as terminal electron acceptors and to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), U(VI), Co(III), and the quinone-containing compound anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The objectives of this study were to determine the phylogenetic positions of the three known metal-reducing Thermus strains and to determine the phylogenetic significance of metal reduction within the genus Thermus. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences, BOX PCR genomic fingerprinting, and DNA-DNA reassociation analyses indicated that these strains belong to the previously described genospecies T. scotoductus. The morphologies and lipid fatty acid profiles of these metal-reducing strains are consistent with their identification as T. scotoductus; however, the T. scotoductus strains tested in this study evinced a wide intraspecies variability in some other phenotypic traits, e.g., carbon substrate utilization and pigmentation. Iron reduction occurred in all strains of T. scotoductus tested except the mixotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing strain IT-7254. Thermus strains belonging to other species did not reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) or reduced it only poorly.

  4. The usefulness of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain typing by Pulse-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA detection as the forensic evidence in child sexual abuse cases: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sathirareuangchai, Sakda; Phuangphung, Peerayuht; Leelaporn, Amornrut; Boon-yasidhi, Vitharon

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of alleged child sexual abuse can be made from history in conjunction with physical examination, psychosocial evaluation, and laboratory investigations. Sexually transmitted infection associated with sexual abuse is found in 5 % of the victims, with Neisseria gonorrhoeae being the most common organism. Identification of sexually transmitted disease, particularly N. gonorrhoeae infection, can be useful for the diagnosis of sexual abuse and thus, the initiation of the child protection process. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a newer diagnostic assay with a higher sensitivity compared with conventional culture method. In addition, N. gonorrhoeae strain typing can also be used to identify the abuser. In this case series, we present the application of N. gonorrhoeae strain typing (PFGE technique) to identify the abuser, and the confirmation of gonococcal vaginitis by PCR technique.

  5. Characterization of group A Streptococcus strains recovered from Mexican children with pharyngitis by automated DNA sequencing of virulence-related genes: unexpectedly large variation in the gene (sic) encoding a complement-inhibiting protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, L M; Stockbauer, K E; Pan, X; Cravioto, A; Musser, J M

    1997-01-01

    Sequence variation was studied in several target genes in 54 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) cultured from children with pharyngitis in Mexico City. Although 16 distinct emm alleles were identified, only 4 had not been previously described. Virtually all bacteria (31 of 33 [94%] with the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene (speA) had emm1-related, emm3, or emm6 alleles. The gene (sic) encoding an extracellular GAS protein that inhibits complement function was unusually variable among isolates with the emm1 family of alleles, with a total of seven variants identified. The data suggest that many GAS strains infecting Mexican children are genetically similar to organisms commonly encountered in the United States and western Europe. Sequence variation in the sic gene is useful for rapid differentiation among GAS isolates with the emm1 family of alleles. PMID:9399523

  6. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  7. SEQUENCE SIMILARITIES IN THE GENES ENCODING POLY- CHLORINATED BIPHENYL DEGRADATION BY PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400 AND ALCALIGENES EUTROPHUS H850

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-DNA hybridization was used to compare the Pseudomonas strain LB400 genes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation with those from seven other PCB-degrading strains. Significant hybridization was detected to the genome of Alcaligenes eutrophus H850, a strain similar to L...

  8. Identification, mapping and linkage analysis of randomly amplified DNA polymorphisms in Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Brickner, J.H.; Lynch, T.J.; Zeilinger, D.; Orias, E.

    1996-06-01

    Using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique and exploiting the unique genetics of Tetrahymena thermophila, we have identified and characterized 40 DNA polymorphisms occurring between two inbred strains (B and C3) of this ciliated protozoan. These RAPD markers permit the PCR amplification of a DNA species using template DNA from SB1969 (B strain) but fail to do so using DNA from C3-368-5 (C3 strain). Polymorphisms were mapped to chromosomes using a panel of monosomic strains constructed by crossing B strain-derived nullisomic strains to inbred strain C3. They map to all five chromosomes and appear to be evenly distributed throughout the genome. Chromosomal groups were then analyzed for linkage using meiotic segregants; four linkage groups were identified in chromosomes 1R, 2L, 3 and 5. The RAPD method appears useful for the construction of a genetic map of the Tetrahymena genome based on DNA polymorphisms. 37 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Rhodococcus jostii: a home for Rhodococcus strain RHA1.

    PubMed

    Jones, Amanda L; Davies, Julian; Fukuda, Masao; Brown, Roselyn; Lim, Jesmine; Goodfellow, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The taxonomic position of Rhodococcus strain RHA1, an effective degrader of polychlorinated biphenyls with a large linear chromosome, was established using a polyphasic approach. The morphological and chemotaxonomic properties of the strain were typical of members of the genus Rhodococcus. The strain shared a high level of 16S rRNA sequence similarity (99.9 %) with the type strain of Rhodococcus jostii, a member of the Rhodococcus erythropolis subclade. The two strains shared a DNA:DNA relatedness value well above the cut-off point recommended for the circumscription of genomic species and had a broad range of phenotypic properties in common. The combination of genomic and phenotypic data show strain RHA1 to be a bona fide member of the species Rhodococcus jostii.

  10. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  11. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  12. Whole Genome Analysis of a Wine Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Fellenberg, Kurt; Gil, Rosario; Bastuck, Sonja; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains frequently exhibit rather specific phenotypic features needed for adaptation to a special environment. Wine yeast strains are able to ferment musts, for example, while other industrial or laboratory strains fail to do so. The genetic differences that characterize wine yeast strains are poorly understood, however. As a first search of genetic differences between wine and laboratory strains, we performed DNA-array analyses on the typical wine yeast strain T73 and the standard laboratory background in S288c. Our analysis shows that even under normal conditions, logarithmic growth in YPD medium, the two strains have expression patterns that differ significantly in more than 40 genes. Subsequent studies indicated that these differences correlate with small changes in promoter regions or variations in gene copy number. Blotting copy numbers vs. transcript levels produced patterns, which were specific for the individual strains and could be used for a characterization of unknown samples. PMID:18628902

  13. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, W.; Kleijer, W.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Weeda, G. ); Scott, R.J.; Rodgers, S.; Mueller, H.J. ); Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F. )

    1994-02-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with the remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here the authors report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt[sup [minus

  14. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, W.; Scott, R. J.; Rodgers, S.; Müller, H. J.; Cole, J.; Arlett, C. F.; Kleijer, W. J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J. H.; Weeda, G.

    1994-01-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with ther remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here we report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of > 40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt- mutant T-lymphocytes in blood samples suggests a relatively low in vivo mutation frequency in these patients. Factors in addition to NER deficiency may be required for the development of cutaneous tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8304337

  15. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  16. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  17. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  18. DNA homology studies on Clostridium botulinum and related clostridial species

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The genetic relationships among toxigenic Clostridium botulinum and nontoxigenic C. subterminale and C. hastiforme were examined. DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method at 50/sup 0/C and 65/sup 0/C) was used to determine genetic relatedness among these organisms. DNA was labeled in vitro with /sup 32/P by the nick translation method. C. botulinum type G had less than 20% DNA relatedness with strains of C. botulinum types A, B and F. All nine strains of C. botulinum type G, two of 10 strains of C. subterminale, and one of three strains of C. hastiforme formed one DNA hybridization group, with DNA relatedness ranging from 76 to 100%. The remaining strains formed six smaller hybridization groups: two groups contained single strains of C. hastiforme, and the other four contained strains of C. subterminale. Thus, DNA hybridization data indicate that all strains of the toxigenic C. botulinum type G and the few strains of nontoxigenic C. subterminale and C. hastiforme form a single new species with toxigenicity as a variable characteristic.

  19. Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and t...

  20. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    PubMed

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  1. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  2. Hydrodynamic properties of DNA and DNA-lipid complex in an elongational flow field.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Naoki; Ashitaka, Hidetomo; Ohtomo, Kenji; Fukui, Akimasa

    2007-03-10

    The aim of this study was to determine the difference between hydrodynamic properties of DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA) complex and those of DNA, which may be related to the difference in fibre-forming ability of DNA-CTA from that of DNA. Responses of DNA and DNA-CTA complex to an elongational flow field were investigated. In both solution systems, results suggesting a coil-stretch transition were obtained. From a critical strain rate value, the radius of gyration of DNA-CTA molecules in ethanol-glycerol solution was revealed to be 0.3-0.5 times of that of DNA in aqueous NaCl solution. Shear viscosity of DNA-CTA solution was much smaller than that of DNA solution, also suggesting a smaller size of DNA-CTA in ethanol-glycerol solution than that of DNA in aqueous NaCl solution. The plateau birefringence value of the DNA-CTA system, a parameter that indicates the local molecular conformation and the molecular arrangement, was only about 1/10 of that of the DNA system. There is an empirically determined molecular model of DNA-CTA complex in which a DNA molecule is sheathed by a cylindrical crust made of CTA chains. This structure reduces the DNA molecular density in a pure elongational flow field region but cannot explain the observed reduction of birefringence intensity. The small plateau birefringence value of DNA-CTA compared with that of DNA was attributed to the reduced molecular polarizability by the particular conformation of DNA molecules and CTA chains in the DNA-CTA system such as that expected by the conformational models.

  3. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  4. Caffeine-enhanced survival of radiation-sensitive, repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-11-01

    A clone of V79 Chinese hamster cells (V79-AL162/S-10) with unique properties has been isolated after a challenge of parental cells (V79-AL162) with 1 mM ouabain. Compared with parental cells, or with other clones isolated after the ouabain challenge, these cells form smaller colonies, are more sensitive to both x rays and fission-spectrum neutrons, and respond atypically to a postirradiation treatment with caffeine. Their enhanced response to x rays results mainly from a large reduction in the shoulder of their survival curve, probably because in late S phase, the most resistant phase in the cell cycle, the survival curve of these cells has a reduced shoulder width. Caffeine, and to a lesser extent theophylline, added to the colony-forming medium immediately after exposure appreciably increases the width of the shoulder of these sensitive cells, whereas caffeine has the opposite effect on the response of normal V79 cells. Thus the unique response of the V79-AL162/S-10 cells to a radiation posttreatment with caffeine (increased survival) results from a net increase in their ability to repair damage that is otherwise lethal; caffeine treatment ordinarly prevents normal V79 cells from repairing damage that is only potentially lethal.

  5. Genome organization of epidemic Acinetobacter baumannii strains

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for hospital-acquired infections. A. baumannii epidemics described world-wide were caused by few genotypic clusters of strains. The occurrence of epidemics caused by multi-drug resistant strains assigned to novel genotypes have been reported over the last few years. Results In the present study, we compared whole genome sequences of three A. baumannii strains assigned to genotypes ST2, ST25 and ST78, representative of the most frequent genotypes responsible for epidemics in several Mediterranean hospitals, and four complete genome sequences of A. baumannii strains assigned to genotypes ST1, ST2 and ST77. Comparative genome analysis showed extensive synteny and identified 3068 coding regions which are conserved, at the same chromosomal position, in all A. baumannii genomes. Genome alignments also identified 63 DNA regions, ranging in size from 4 o 126 kb, all defined as genomic islands, which were present in some genomes, but were either missing or replaced by non-homologous DNA sequences in others. Some islands are involved in resistance to drugs and metals, others carry genes encoding surface proteins or enzymes involved in specific metabolic pathways, and others correspond to prophage-like elements. Accessory DNA regions encode 12 to 19% of the potential gene products of the analyzed strains. The analysis of a collection of epidemic A. baumannii strains showed that some islands were restricted to specific genotypes. Conclusion The definition of the genome components of A. baumannii provides a scaffold to rapidly evaluate the genomic organization of novel clinical A. baumannii isolates. Changes in island profiling will be useful in genomic epidemiology of A. baumannii population. PMID:21985032

  6. Revision of the taxonomic status of type strains of Mesorhizobium loti and reclassification of strain USDA 3471T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumerdmanii sp. nov. and ATCC 33669T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumjarvisii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Rivas, Raúl; Igual, José M; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Álvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-06-01

    The species Mesorhizobim loti was isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus and its type strain deposited in several collections. Some of these type strains, such as those deposited in the USDA and ATCC collections before 1990, are not coincident with the original strain, NZP 2213T, deposited in the NZP culture collection. The analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T formed independent branches from that occupied by Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T and related to those occupied by Mesorhizobium opportunistum WSM2075T and Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243T, respectively, with 99.9 % similarity in both cases. However, the analysis of concatenated recA, atpD and glnII genes with similarities lower than 96, 98 and 94 %, respectively, between strains USDA 3471T and M. opportunistum WSM2075T and between strains ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii IFO 15243T, indicated that the strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T represent different species of the genus Mesorhizobium. These results were confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic characterization. Therefore, the two strains were reclassified as representatives of the two species Mesorhizobium erdmanii sp. nov. (type strain USDA 3471T = CECT 8631T = LMG 17826t2T) and Mesorhizobium jarvisii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 33669T = CECT 8632T = LMG 28313T).

  7. Elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittain, J. O.; Geslin, D.; Lei, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Materials were evaluated that could be used in manufacturing electrical resistance strain gages for static strain measurements at temperatures at or above 1273 K. Strain gage materials must have a characteristic response to strain, temperature and time that is reproducible or that varies in a predictable manner within specified limits. Several metallic alloys were evaluated, as well as a series of transition metal carbides, nitrides and silicides.

  8. Sequence similarities in the genes encoding polychlorinated biphenyl degradation by pseudomonas strain LB400 and alcaligenes eutrophus H850

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, J.R.; Mondello, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    DNA-DNA hybridization was used to compare the Pseudomonas strain LB400 genes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation with those from seven other PCB-degrading strains. Significant hybridization was detected to the genome of Alcaligenes eutrophus H850, a strain similar to LB400 in PCB-degrading capability. These two organisms showed a strong conservation of restriction sites in the region of DNA encoding PCB metabolism. No other sequence similarities were detected in the two genomes. DNA from the other PCB-degrading strains showed no hybridization to the probe, which demonstrated the existence of at least two distinct classes of genes encoding PCB degradation.

  9. Characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei-like strains.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, P. J.; Deshazer, D.; Woods, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Previous reports in the literature suggest that Burkholderia pseudomallei strains can be differentiated on the basis of animal virulence. Twenty environmentally and clinically derived isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei were examined for the production of exoenzymes, morphological and biochemical phenotypes and virulence for Syrian golden hamsters. The partial sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA [rRNA] genes from a number of these strains was also determined. Based upon these observations, it is suggested that highly virulent Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are true Burkholderia pseudomallei strains. The DNA sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of the true Burkholderia pseudomallei strains were identical to the published sequences for Burkholderia pseudomallei while differences were revealed between the published sequences and those of the lowly virulent strains. Thus, these latter strains have been designated as Burkholderia pseudomallei-like organisms since they demonstrate significant differences in exoenzyme production, hamster virulence and 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:9129590

  10. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  11. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  12. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  13. Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic strains and differentiation from the vaccine strain Rev-1.

    PubMed

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study forty-four Greek endemic strains of Br. melitensis and three reference strains were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four strains were discriminated from the vaccine strain Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine strains are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine strain can be discriminated from endemic strains by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic strains. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic strains two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic strains due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic strains of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine strain Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.

  14. Identification of acquired DNA in Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    van Passel, Mark W J; Bart, Aldert; Luyf, Angela C M; van Kampen, Antoine H C; van der Ende, Arie

    2006-09-01

    Anomalous DNA (aDNA) in prokaryotic genomes, identified by its aberrant nucleotide composition, generally represents horizontally acquired DNA. Previous studies showed that frequent DNA transfer occurs between commensal Neisseriae and Neisseria meningitidis. Currently, it is unknown whether aDNA regions are also transferred between these species. The genome of Neisseria lactamica strain 892586 was assessed by a strategy that enables the selective isolation of aDNA, using endonucleases with recognition sites that are overrepresented in aDNA. Of eight regions with aDNA, five displayed similarity to virulence-associated meningococcal sequences. Of three aDNA fragments with limited or no similarity to neisserial sequences, one encodes a novel putative autotransporter/adhesin. The remaining two fragments are adjacent in the N. lactamica genome, and encode a novel putative ATPase/subtilisin-like protease operon. A similar operon is present in the genomes of different respiratory tract pathogens. The identification of aDNA from N. lactamica with similarity to meningococcal aDNA shows that genetic exchange between the Neisseriae is not limited to the neisserial core genome. The discovery of aDNA in N. lactamica similar to a locus in other pathogens substantially expands the neisserial gene pool.

  15. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  16. Perturbation of DNA tertiary structure by physical and chemical carcinogens: effects on DNA repair processes.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, A M; Tornaletti, S; Barabino, S; Menichini, P; Fronza, G; Abbondandolo, A

    1989-01-01

    DNA within the cell is organized into higher-order structures characterized by negative supercoiling. Supercoiling is a property of any DNA molecule lacking ends capable of rotation. Parameters defining the properties of supercoiled DNA are significant for the description of the reactive state of DNA molecules. We have investigated whether physical and chemical DNA modifying agents alter the parameters describing the DNA tertiary structure. The variations in DNA tertiary structure of partially relaxed topoisomers obtained from plasmid DNA have been studied by one dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, a technique allowing the measurement of alterations in the degree of supercoiling equivalent to fractions of superhelical turns. Unwinding angles of 8.5 degrees for pyrimidine dimers and of 8.5 degrees for acetyl-4-hydroxyaminoquinoline-I-oxide (Ac-4-HAQO) adducts have been determined by titrating for each topoisomers the number of damaged sites necessary to reduce the superhelical turns by one. Analogous unwinding was observed for topoisomers obtained from in vivo irradiated plasmid DNA. We have also shown that local alterations in DNA structure caused by UV irradiation inhibit bacterial type I DNA topoisomerases. In addition, we have demonstrated that E. coli mutants lacking DNA topoisomerase I are sensitive to UV light. The pronounced inhibition of DNA synthesis as well as the chromosome instability observed after UV irradiation of this strain, suggest that DNA topoisomerase I might be involved in those cellular responses elicited by the proximity of damaged bases to sites of active replication.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  18. Expression of mammalian O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in a cell line sensitive to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M E; Norbeck, L; Clyde, C; Hora, N K; Erickson, L C; Pegg, A E

    1989-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were co-transfected with pSV2neo and sheared DNA from either a human cell line (HT29) expressing high levels of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) or from a cell line (BE) deficient in this activity. Cells expressing the selectable marker were obtained by exposure to G418 and colonies resistant to alkylation damage isolated by growth in the presence of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). The number of colonies of cells expressing AGT activity arising after transfection with DNA from BE cells was similar to the number arising from cells exposed to HT29 DNA. Although the amount of AGT repair protein expressed in the transfectant colonies from this experiment was relatively low, these results indicate that repair of alkylation damage can be restored in AGT-deficient cells by transfection of human DNA from both repair-deficient and proficient cells. A separate transfection of CHOMG cells [a mutant of CHO cells resistant to the drug, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG)] with HT29 DNA and pSV2neo followed by selection of G418 and 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) resulted in three colonies with high AGT levels. These transfectants had different growth rates and expressed levels of the AGT protein between 230 and 300 fmol/mg protein. The transfectants were as resistant to the cytotoxic effects of BCNU, Clomesone, methylnitrosourea (MNU) and 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) as HT29 cells which were much more resistant than the parental CHOMG cells. Pretreatment of transfectant cells with 0.4 mM O6-methylguanine for 24 h reduced AGT activity to 14% basal levels, which upon removal of the base increased to approximately 74% basal level within 8 h. The sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of both the chloroethylating and methylating agents was enhanced by treatment with O6-methylguanine. In the same manner, the number of BCNU-induced DNA interstrand cross-links increased in transfectant

  19. Survival, Deoxyribonucleic Acid Breakdown, and Synthesis in Salmonella typhimurium as Compared with Escherichia coli B Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hudnik-Plevnik, Tamara A.; Djordjević, Nadežda

    1970-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 was compared with radioresistant (B/r) and radiosensitive (Bs−2) strains of Escherichia coli in respect to the survival, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) breakdown, and DNA synthesis after X irradiation. It is shown that S. typhimurium LT-2 is about four times more sensitive than E. coli B/r but less sensitive than Bs−2. The DNA breakdown is in S. typhimurium LT-2 lower than the postirradiation breakdown of DNA in both E. coli strains and DNA synthesis proceeds in this bacterium in spite of a much lower survival, as in the radioresistant E. coli B/r. PMID:4916313

  20. The nodular microsymbionts of Gymnostoma spp. are Elaeagnus-infective Frankia strains.

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Nalin, R; Gauthier, D; Normand, P

    1997-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Frankia strains infective on Gymnostoma with other Frankia strains was analyzed. Partial sequencing of the 16S rDNA and use of specific primers showed that the Frankia strains present in Gymnostoma are phylogenetically close to Elaeagnus-infective strains. This finding was confirmed by using the sequences of the hypervariable nifDK intergenic spacer. The strains present in Gymnostoma nodules were close to one another. Clustered with Elaeagnus-infective strains, and distantly related to Casuarina and Alnus-infective strains. Morphological observations of strains and cross-inoculation trials showed that Gymnostoma-infective strains are indistinguishable from Elaeagnus-infective strains. Results of both phenotypic and genotypic approaches indicate that Gymnostoma-infective strains are Elaeagnus infective and not Casuarina infective. PMID:9097456

  1. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA segment in wine yeast genomes by extrachromosomal circular DNA formation.

    PubMed

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-03-10

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations.

  2. Strain powered antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, John P.; Carman, Greg P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of strain powered antennas that radiate electromagnetic energy by mechanically vibrating a piezoelectric or piezomagnetic material. A closed form analytic model of electromagnetic radiation from a strain powered electrically small antenna is derived and analyzed. Fundamental scaling laws and the frequency dependence of strain powered antennas are discussed. The radiation efficiency of strain powered electrically small antennas is contrasted with a conventional electric dipole. Analytical results show that operating at the first mechanical resonance produces the most efficient strain powered radiation relative to electric dipole antennas. A resonant analysis is exploited to determine the material property space that produces efficient strain powered antennas. These results show how a properly designed strain powered antenna can radiate more efficiently than an equally sized electric dipole antenna.

  3. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  4. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  5. Development of a duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weifeng; Wu, Chao; Kang, Chao; Cai, Chengzhi; Jin, Meilin

    2017-02-01

    The differentiation of vaccine strains from wild type strains is important for disease control. A duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains was developed based on the DNA polymerase IV gene. This duplex PCR was sensitive and specific. The detection results were coincident with that of a single nucleotide polymorphisms based PCR but the detection process was more rapid. In conclusion, this duplex PCR was a useful tool for Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infections' differential diagnosis in China.

  6. Different distribution patterns of ten virulence genes in Legionella reference strains and strains isolated from environmental water and patients.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Virulence genes are distinct regions of DNA which are present in the genome of pathogenic bacteria and absent in nonpathogenic strains of the same or related species. Virulence genes are frequently associated with bacterial pathogenicity in genus Legionella. In the present study, an assay was performed to detect ten virulence genes, including iraA, iraB, lvrA, lvrB, lvhD, cpxR, cpxA, dotA, icmC and icmD in different pathogenicity islands of 47 Legionella reference strains, 235 environmental strains isolated from water, and 4 clinical strains isolated from the lung tissue of pneumonia patients. The distribution frequencies of these genes in reference or/and environmental L. pneumophila strains were much higher than those in reference non-L. pneumophila or/and environmental non-L. pneumophila strains, respectively. L. pneumophila clinical strains also maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to four other types of Legionella strains. Distribution frequencies of these genes in reference L. pneumophila strains were similar to those in environmental L. pneumophila strains. In contrast, environmental non-L. pneumophila maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to those found in reference non-L. pneumophila strains. This study illustrates the association of virulence genes with Legionella pathogenicity and reveals the possible virulence evolution of non-L. pneumophia strains isolated from environmental water.

  7. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  8. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  9. Strain-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism assays for the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain.

    PubMed

    Van Ert, Matthew N; Easterday, W Ryan; Simonson, Tatum S; U'Ren, Jana M; Pearson, Talima; Kenefic, Leo J; Busch, Joseph D; Huynh, Lynn Y; Dukerich, Megan; Trim, Carla B; Beaudry, Jodi; Welty-Bernard, Amy; Read, Timothy; Fraser, Claire M; Ravel, Jacques; Keim, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Highly precise diagnostics and forensic assays can be developed through a combination of evolutionary analysis and the exhaustive examination of genomic sequences. In Bacillus anthracis, whole-genome sequencing efforts revealed ca. 3,500 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among eight different strains and evolutionary analysis provides the identification of canonical SNPs. We have previously shown that SNPs are highly evolutionarily stable, and the clonal nature of B. anthracis makes them ideal signatures for subtyping this pathogen. Here we identified SNPs that define the lineage of B. anthracis that contains the Ames strain, the strain used in the 2001 bioterrorist attacks in the United States. Sequencing and real-time PCR were used to validate these SNPs across B. anthracis strains, including (i) 88 globally and genetically diverse isolates; (ii) isolates that were shown to be genetic relatives of the Ames strain by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA); and (iii) several different lab stocks of the Ames strain, including a clinical isolate from the 2001 letter attack. Six SNPs were found to be highly specific for the Ames strain; four on the chromosome, one on the pX01 plasmid, and one on the pX02 plasmid. All six SNPs differentiated the B. anthracis Ames strain from the 88 unique B. anthracis strains, while five of the six separated Ames from its close genetic relatives. The use of these SNPs coupled with real-time PCR allows specific and sensitive (<100 fg of template DNA) identification of the Ames strain. This evolutionary and genomics-based approach provides an effective means for the discovery of strain-specific SNPs in B. anthracis.

  10. Cytotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects of energy-related agents in diploid human cells which differ in DNA repair capacity. Progress report, 1980-1983

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.; Maher, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanisms of action of a series of energy-related chemical carcinogens to bring about cell killing, the induction of mutations, and the transformation of diploid human fibroblasts in culture were examined. Some of these studies have employed direct-acting compounds (reactive derivatives or metabolites of parent compounds) such as (+-)-7..beta..,8..cap alpha..-dihydroxy9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene (anti BPDE), the 4,5-epoxide of benzo(a)pyrene(B(a)P 4,5-oxide), and aflatoxin B/sub 1/-dichloride (AFB/sub 1/-Cl/sub 2/). In other studies, human epithelial cell lines have served as source of the various metabolizing enzymes needed to convert parent compounds into reactive intermediates. We screened a series of 15 epithelial cell lines with unlimited lifespan (derived from various human carcinomas) for the ability to activate representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amides, nitrogen heterocyclics, nitro samines, and/or aflatoxins. Candidate metabolizing cells were then combined with diploid human fibroblasts as target cells in a cell-mediated assay of the mutagenic and/or cytotoxic effect of particular energy-related chemical carcinogens, such as B(a)P, benzofluoranthenes, and dibenzo(c,g)carbazole. The number and kind of major DNA adducts formed in human cells by these chemicals were determined. Comparative studies of anti BPDE and B(a)P 4,5-oxide showed that in diploid human fibroblasts, both normal and DNA repair deficient, these agents do not differ significantly in mutagenic efficiency (per mean lethal event) or mutagenic effectiveness (per DNA adduct). In diploid Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts anti BPDE had approx. 4-fold higher mutagenic efficiency than B(a)P 4,5-oxide in the latter cells. FA cells were significantly more sensitive than normal to killing by anti BPDE.

  11. Genetic analyses of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains reveal distinct phylogenetic groups.

    PubMed

    Donahoo, R S; Jones, J B; Lacy, G H; Stromberg, V K; Norman, D J

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 175 Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains isolated from 10 Araceae hosts was done to identify pathogen variation. The strains were subjected to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction and four major phylogenetic clusters were generated. A subset of 40 strains isolated from Anthurium, Dieffenbachia, and Syngonium was further defined by amplified fragment length polymorphism and fatty acid methyl ester analysis and the same four phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of representative strains in the first three clusters using DNA-DNA hybridization and multilocus sequence analysis supports the previous reclassification of strains in cluster I, including the X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae pathovar reference strain (LMG695), to X. citri. Our research findings indicate that strains in cluster I, isolated primarily from anthurium, probably represent an undescribed pathovar. Other phylogenetic subclusters consisting primarily of strains isolated from xanthosoma and philodendron in clusters III and IV, respectively, may yet represent other undescribed species or pathovars of Xanthomonas.

  12. Molecular analysis and biochemical characteristics of degenerated strains of Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Deng, Chang-Huan; Zhang, Liao-Yuan; Hu, Kai-Hui

    2017-03-20

    Cordyceps militaris has commercially been cultivated, but its degenerated subcultures have gradually resulted in the reduced production. In this study, the biological characteristics and DNA change of degenerated strains of C. militaris were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the degenerated strains exhibited the lower growth rate, and the deficiency in fruit body formation and pigment production. The degradation of strains was not attributable to DNA changes identified by RAPD and SRAP. Compared to normal strains, the biochemical indexes of degradation strains and normal strains showed that the carotenoid content of degradation strains was significantly lower, the activities of cellulase and amylase of degradation strains were slight lower, and the EPS content was lower, but the IPS was higher. All these results suggested that the degradation of C. militaris may be caused by the inhibition or in harmony of metabolite synthesis involved in the metabolic regulation, which should be further verified.

  13. Strain typing of acetic acid bacteria responsible for vinegar production by the submerged elaboration method.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Rocío; Torres, Carmen; Sanz, Susana; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2010-12-01

    Strain typing of 103 acetic acid bacteria isolates from vinegars elaborated by the submerged method from ciders, wines and spirit ethanol, was carried on in this study. Two different molecular methods were utilised: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of total DNA digests with a number of restriction enzymes, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. The comparative study of both methods showed that restriction fragment PFGE of SpeI digests of total DNA was a suitable method for strain typing and for determining which strains were present in vinegar fermentations. Results showed that strains of the species Gluconacetobacter europaeus were the most frequent leader strains of fermentations by the submerged method in the studied vinegars, and among them strain R1 was the predominant one. Results showed as well that mixed populations (at least two different strains) occurred in vinegars from cider and wine, whereas unique strains were found in spirit vinegars, which offered the most stressing conditions for bacterial growth.

  14. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Riggsby, W S; Torres-Bauza, L J; Wills, J W; Townes, T M

    1982-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. We used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; we obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. We concluded that these strains are diploid. PMID:6765567

  15. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsby, W.S.; Torres-Bauza, L.J.; Wills, J.W.; Townes, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. The authors used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; they obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. They concluded that these strains are diploid.

  16. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  17. [Deoxyribonuclease activity detection in Clostridium chauvoei strains].

    PubMed

    Carloni, G H; Bentancor, L D; De Torres, R A

    2005-01-01

    Beta toxin of C. chauvoei has desoxiribonuclease (DNase) activity which is regarded as one of its virulence factors. The production of DNase was detected in strains isolated from bovines, using as controls C. chauvoei ATCC 10092, and C. perfringens Type A and C. septicum, both laboratory isolates. The enzyme activity was made evident on a DNA substrate observing the macroscopic degradation. A simple methodology was developed using a commercial medium for DNase test, with the incorporation of sterile horse serum. Each strain was streaked on the surface of the medium, incubated in anaerobic atmosphere at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The plates were revealed with HCI 1 N. The appearance of a clear and transparent zone around and under the microbial growing was considered a positive reaction. Enzyme activity was detected in 10 of 12 strains and also in the controls. The serum addition to the commercial basal medium allows the optimum development of the microorganism showing the enzymatic digestion zone.

  18. Genome sequence of Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present the whole genome sequence and annotation of the Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia. This strain was isolated from an aborting goat in 1991 in Windhoek, Namibia. The plasmid type QpRS was confirmed in our work. Further genomic typing placed the strain into a unique genomic group. The genome sequence is 2,101,438 bp long and contains 1,979 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including one rRNA operon. To overcome the poor yield from cell culture systems, an additional DNA enrichment with whole genome amplification (WGA) methods was applied. We describe a bioinformatics pipeline for improved genome assembly including several filters with a special focus on WGA characteristics. PMID:25593636

  19. [Novel methods and strategies for strain improvement].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenting; Zou, Yi; Hu, Changhua

    2009-06-01

    Improvement of the productivity of industrial strains is an important field in micro-biology, because wild-type strains isolated from nature usually produce only a low level of antibiotics. Although random screening and simple rational screening are still effective without using genomic information, they are always time- and labor-consuming. With the broad application of recombinant DNA technology, protoplast fusion and X-omics, novel methods and strategies such as metabolic engineering, genome shuffling, system biology and system biotechnology, ribosome engineering, epigenetic modification are being exploited for the industry microbiology. In this review, we will focus on the progress of these novel methods and strategies for strain improvement in recent years.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Strain Variation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    What is wild-type Epstein-Barr virus and are there genetic differences in EBV strains that contribute to some of the EBV-associated diseases? Recent progress in DNA sequencing has resulted in many new Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome sequences becoming available. EBV isolates worldwide can be grouped into type 1 and type 2, a classification based on the EBNA2 gene sequence. Type 1 transforms human B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines much more efficiently than type 2 EBV and molecular mechanisms that may account for this difference in cell transformation are now becoming understood. Study of geographic variation of EBV strains independent of the type 1/type 2 classification and systematic investigation of the relationship between viral strains, infection and disease are now becoming possible. So we should consider more directly whether viral sequence variation might play a role in the incidence of some EBV-associated diseases.

  1. Natural transformation of Thermotoga sp. strain RQ7

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thermotoga species are organisms of enormous interest from a biotechnological as well as evolutionary point of view. Genetic modifications of Thermotoga spp. are often desired in order to fully release their multifarious potentials. Effective transformation of recombinant DNA into these bacteria constitutes a critical step of such efforts. This study aims to establish natural competency in Thermotoga spp. and to provide a convenient method to transform these organisms. Results Foreign DNA was found to be relatively stable in the supernatant of a Thermotoga culture for up to 6 hours. Adding donor DNA to T. sp. strain RQ7 at its early exponential growth phase (OD600 0.18 ~ 0.20) resulted in direct acquisition of the DNA by the cells. Both T. neapolitana chromosomal DNA and Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vectors effectively transformed T. sp. strain RQ7, rendering the cells resistance to kanamycin. The kan gene carried by the shuttle vector pDH10 was detected by PCR from the plasmid extract of the transformants, and the amplicons were verified by restriction digestions. A procedure for natural transformation of Thermotoga spp. was established and optimized. With the optimized method, T. sp. strain RQ7 sustained a transformation frequency in the order of 10-7 with both genomic and plasmid DNA. Conclusions T. sp. strain RQ7 cells are naturally transformable during their early exponential phase. They acquire DNA from both closely and distantly related species. Both chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA serve as suitable substrates for transformation. Our findings lend a convenient technical tool for the genetic engineering of Thermotoga spp. PMID:24884561

  2. Strain sensor comprising a strain sensitive, two-mode optical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strain sensor uses an optical fiber including a strain sensitive portion and at least one strain insensitive portion. The strain sensitive portion is mounted on the surface of a structure at a location where a strain is desired to be measured. The strain insensitive portion(s) may be fused to the strain sensitive portion to transmit light therethrough, so that the resulting pattern may be detected to determine the amount of strain by comparison with a similar fiber not subjected to strain, or with the light pattern produced when the fiber is not under strain.

  3. Electrotransformation of Yersinia ruckeri by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Cutrín, J M; Conchas, R F; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1994-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri, a fish pathogenic bacterium in aquaculture, was used to evaluate the electroporation as a new transformation method for this species. DNA used for the electrotransformation were plasmids of molecular mass ranging from 2.3 kb to 33 kb, and diverse replicons. To optimize this method we used Y. ruckeri 11.29 strain (from serotype 02) and pSU2718 DNA. The best transformation efficiency (6.0 x 10(5) transformants/micrograms DNA) was obtained with 12.5 kV/cm, 25 microF, 400 omega and 2 hours of incubation after pulse. When these conditions were applied to other strains belonging to different serotypes and other plasmids, we obtained transformants in all strains assayed, but only when using low molecular weight plasmids. Plasmid vectors and resident plasmid were not modified in host strains after electrotransformation. In studies of conformation we confirmed that only circular DNA was able for transformation. The utilization of this technique for direct cloning in Y. ruckeri makes possible further studies on recombinant DNA.

  4. A Wide Extent of Inter-Strain Diversity in Virulent and Vaccine Strains of Alphaherpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Szpara, Moriah L.; Tafuri, Yolanda R.; Parsons, Lance; Shamim, S. Rafi; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Legendre, Matthieu; Enquist, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    Alphaherpesviruses are widespread in the human population, and include herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and 2, and varicella zoster virus (VZV). These viral pathogens cause epithelial lesions, and then infect the nervous system to cause lifelong latency, reactivation, and spread. A related veterinary herpesvirus, pseudorabies (PRV), causes similar disease in livestock that result in significant economic losses. Vaccines developed for VZV and PRV serve as useful models for the development of an HSV-1 vaccine. We present full genome sequence comparisons of the PRV vaccine strain Bartha, and two virulent PRV isolates, Kaplan and Becker. These genome sequences were determined by high-throughput sequencing and assembly, and present new insights into the attenuation of a mammalian alphaherpesvirus vaccine strain. We find many previously unknown coding differences between PRV Bartha and the virulent strains, including changes to the fusion proteins gH and gB, and over forty other viral proteins. Inter-strain variation in PRV protein sequences is much closer to levels previously observed for HSV-1 than for the highly stable VZV proteome. Almost 20% of the PRV genome contains tandem short sequence repeats (SSRs), a class of nucleic acids motifs whose length-variation has been associated with changes in DNA binding site efficiency, transcriptional regulation, and protein interactions. We find SSRs throughout the herpesvirus family, and provide the first global characterization of SSRs in viruses, both within and between strains. We find SSR length variation between different isolates of PRV and HSV-1, which may provide a new mechanism for phenotypic variation between strains. Finally, we detected a small number of polymorphic bases within each plaque-purified PRV strain, and we characterize the effect of passage and plaque-purification on these polymorphisms. These data add to growing evidence that even plaque-purified stocks of stable DNA viruses exhibit limited sequence

  5. Ribosomal DNA spacer probes for yeast identification: studies in the genus Metschnikowia.

    PubMed

    Henriques, M; Sá-Nogueira, I; Giménez-Jurado, G; van Uden, N

    1991-02-01

    To test whether DNA probes derived from ribosomal DNA spacer sequences are suitable for rapid and species-specific yeast identification, a pilot study was undertaken. A 7.7 kb entire ribosomal DNA unit of the type strain of Metschnikowia reukaufii was isolated, cloned and mapped. A 0.65 kb BamHI-HpaI fragment containing non-transcribed spacer sequences was amplified and selected for testing as a 32P hybridization probe with total DNA from the type strains of M. reukaufii, M. pulcherrima, M. lunata, M. bicuspidata, M. australis, M. zobellii, M. krissii, five other strains identified as M. reukaufii and strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Hansenula canadensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica. The probe hybridized exclusively with DNA from the type strain and four other strains of M. reukaufii. DNA from one strain labelled M. reukaufii did not hybridize with the probe. Subsequent % G + C comparison and DNA-DNA reassociation with the type strain revealed that the non-hybridizing strain does not belong to the species M. reukaufii.

  6. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A strain transducer system and process for making the same is disclosed. A beryllium copper ring having four strain gages is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to the output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with strain on the surface causing bending of a ring which provides an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface strain. A photographic pattern of a one half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium copper for chem-mill etch formation is illustrated.

  7. Molecular Identification of Two Strains of Phellinus sp. by Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two species of cultivated Phellinus sp. were identified as P. baumii by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. The fruit bodies of the examined strains were similar to those of naturally occurring strains, having a bracket-like form, yellow-to-orange color, and poroid hymenial surfaces. The DNA sequences of ITS region of both strains showed a homology of 99% with ITS1 to ITS2 sequences of P. (Inonotus) baumii strain PB0806. PMID:22783119

  8. Extracellular DNA Release by Undomesticated Bacillus subtilis Is Regulated by Early Competence

    PubMed Central

    de Figueras, Carolina González; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) release is a widespread capacity described in many microorganisms. We identified and characterized lysis-independent eDNA production in an undomesticated strain of Bacillus subtilis. DNA fragments are released during a short time in late-exponential phase. The released eDNA corresponds to whole genome DNA, and does not harbour mutations suggesting that is not the result of error prone DNA synthesis. The absence of eDNA was linked to a spread colony morphology, which allowed a visual screening of a transposon library to search for genes involved in its production. Transposon insertions in genes related to quorum sensing and competence (oppA, oppF and comXP) and to DNA metabolism (mfd and topA) were impaired in eDNA release. Mutants in early competence genes such as comA and srfAA were also defective in eDNA while in contrast mutations in late competence genes as those for the DNA uptake machinery had no effect. A subpopulation of cells containing more DNA is present in the eDNA producing strains but absent from the eDNA defective strain. Finally, competent B. subtilis cells can be transformed by eDNA suggesting it could be used in horizontal gene transfer and providing a rationale for the molecular link between eDNA release and early-competence in B. subtilis that we report. PMID:23133654

  9. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  10. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  11. Synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    O’ Driscoll, Aisling; Sleator, Roy D.

    2013-01-01

    With world wide data predicted to exceed 40 trillion gigabytes by 2020, big data storage is a very real and escalating problem. Herein, we discuss the utility of synthetic DNA as a robust and eco-friendly archival data storage solution of the future. PMID:23514938

  12. Murine Prkdc Polymorphisms Impact DNA-PKcs Function

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Kristin M.; Ramaiah, Lila; Dregalla, Ryan C.; Desaintes, Christian; Weil, Michael M.; Bailey, Susan M.; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can increase the carcinogenic potential of exposure to ionizing radiation. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Prkdc, the gene encoding the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), have been identified in BALB/c mice and linked to reduced DNA-PKcs activity and mammary cancer susceptibility. We examined three additional mouse strains to better define the roles of the BALB/c Prkdc SNPs (R2140C and M3844V). One is a congenic strain (C.B6) that has the C57BL/6 Prkdc allele on a BALB/c background, and the other is a congenic strain (B6.C) that has the BALB/c variant Prkdc allele on a C57BL/6 background. We also examined the LEWES mouse strain, which possesses only one of the BALB/c Prkdc SNPs (M3844V). Our results demonstrate that both Prkdc SNPs are responsible for deficient DNA-PKcs protein expression, DNA repair and telomere function, while the LEWES SNP affects only DNA-PKcs expression and repair capacity. These studies provide insight into the separation of function between the two BALB/c SNPs as well as direct evidence that SNPs positioned within Prkdc can significantly influence DNA-PKcs function involving DNA repair capacity, telomere end-capping, and potentially cancer susceptibility. PMID:21265624

  13. Conserved Plasmid Hydrogen-Uptake (hup)-Specific Sequences within Hup+Rhizobium leguminosarum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Leyva, Antonio; Palacios, José M.; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen Rhizobium leguminosarum strains previously reported as H2-uptake hydrogenase positive (Hup+) or negative (Hup−) were analyzed for the presence and conservation of DNA sequences homologous to cloned Bradyrhizobium japonicum hup-specific DNA from cosmid pHU1 (M. A. Cantrell, R. A. Haugland, and H. J. Evans, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80:181-185, 1983). The Hup phenotype of these strains was reexamined by determining hydrogenase activity induced in bacteroids from pea nodules. Five strains, including H2 oxidation-ATP synthesis-coupled and -uncoupled strains, induced significant rates of H2-uptake hydrogenase activity and contained DNA sequences homologous to three probe DNA fragments (5.9-kilobase [kb] HindIII, 2.9-kb EcoRI, and 5.0-kb EcoRI) from pHU1. The pattern of genomic DNA HindIII and EcoRI fragments with significant homology to each of the three probes was identical in all five strains regardless of the H2-dependent ATP generation trait. The restriction fragments containing the homology totalled about 22 kb of DNA common to the five strains. In all instances the putative hup sequences were located on a plasmid that also contained nif genes. The molecular sizes of the identified hup-sym plasmids ranged between 184 and 212 megadaltons. No common DNA sequences homologous to B. japonicum hup DNA were found in genomic DNA from any of the eight remaining strains showing no significant hydrogenase activity in pea bacteroids. These results suggest that the identified DNA region contains genes essential for hydrogenase activity in R. leguminosarum and that its organization is highly conserved within Hup+ strains in this symbiotic species. Images PMID:16347471

  14. Induction of an abortive and futile DNA repair process in E. coli by the antitumor DNA bifunctional intercalator, ditercalinium: role in polA in death induction.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, B; Roques, B P; Le Pecq, J B

    1988-01-01

    Ditercalinium, an antitumor bifunctional intercalator which forms a high affinity reversible complex with DNA, was found to be specifically cytotoxic for polA and lig7 E. coli strains. In the polA strain, the cytotoxic effect of ditercalinium was suppressed by the uvrA mutation. DNA single strand breaks accumulated in presence of ditercalinium at high temperature in lig7 strains but not in polA strains. Ditercalinium caused no DNA synthesis inhibition although it was able to induce SOS functions. It is proposed that the ditercalinium DNA complex because of its non covalent nature acts as a dummy lesion for the UV repair system in E. coli leading to a futile and abortive repair process. Polymerase I appears to be required to prevent the malfunctioning of a DNA repair process triggered by molecules forming non covalent complex with DNA. PMID:2830590

  15. Molecular methods for strain typing of Candida albicans: a review.

    PubMed

    Saghrouni, F; Ben Abdeljelil, J; Boukadida, J; Ben Said, M

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most medically important fungi because of its high frequency as a commensal and pathogenic microorganism causing superficial as well as invasive infections. Strain typing and delineation of the species are essential for understanding its biology, epidemiology and population structure. A wide range of molecular techniques have been used for this purpose including non-DNA-based methods (multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis), conventional DNA-based methods (electrophoretic karyotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism, restriction enzyme analysis with and without hybridization, rep-PCR) and DNA-based methods called exact typing methods because they generate unambiguous and highly reproducible typing data (including microsatellite length polymorphism and multi-locus sequence typing). In this review, the main molecular methods used for C. albicans strain typing are summarized, and their advantages and limitations are discussed with regard to their discriminatory power, reproducibility, cost and ease of performance.

  16. Mechanical strain isolator mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Gordon E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical strain. A mechanical strain isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical strain isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral strain in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the strain by bending in the direction of the strain. An axial strain on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the strain. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.

  17. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  18. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer 1 Based Characterization of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Dae Wook; Oh, Youn-Lee; Hyun, Min Woo; Kong, Won-Sik; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-12-01

    Breeding the button mushroom requires genetic information about its strains. This study was undertaken to genetically characterize four domestically bred button mushroom strains (Saea, Saejung, Saedo, Saeyeon cultivars) and to assess the possibility of using the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA as a genetically variable region in the genetic characterization. For the experiment, 34 strains of Agaricus bisporus, two strains of A. bitorquis, and one strain of A. silvaticus, from 17 countries were used. Nucleotide sequence analysis of IGS1 rDNA in these 37 Agaricus strains confirmed that genetic variations exist, not only among the four domestic strains, but also between the four domestic strains and foreign strains. Crossing two different haploid strains of A. bisporus seems to generate genetic variation in the IGS1 region in their off-spring haploid strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the IGS1 sequence revealed all A. bisporus strains could be differentiated from A. silvaticus and A. bitorquis strains. Five genetic groups were resolved among A. bisporus strains. Saejung and Saeyeon cultivars formed a separate genetic group. Our results suggest that IGS1 could be complementarily applied in the polymorphism analysis of button mushroom.

  19. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer 1 Based Characterization of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Dae Wook; Oh, Youn-Lee; Hyun, Min Woo; Kong, Won-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Breeding the button mushroom requires genetic information about its strains. This study was undertaken to genetically characterize four domestically bred button mushroom strains (Saea, Saejung, Saedo, Saeyeon cultivars) and to assess the possibility of using the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA as a genetically variable region in the genetic characterization. For the experiment, 34 strains of Agaricus bisporus, two strains of A. bitorquis, and one strain of A. silvaticus, from 17 countries were used. Nucleotide sequence analysis of IGS1 rDNA in these 37 Agaricus strains confirmed that genetic variations exist, not only among the four domestic strains, but also between the four domestic strains and foreign strains. Crossing two different haploid strains of A. bisporus seems to generate genetic variation in the IGS1 region in their off-spring haploid strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the IGS1 sequence revealed all A. bisporus strains could be differentiated from A. silvaticus and A. bitorquis strains. Five genetic groups were resolved among A. bisporus strains. Saejung and Saeyeon cultivars formed a separate genetic group. Our results suggest that IGS1 could be complementarily applied in the polymorphism analysis of button mushroom. PMID:28154490

  20. Antimutagenicity of Cinnamaldehyde and Vanillin in Human Cells: Global Gene Expression and Possible Role of DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    King, Audrey A.; Shaughnessy, Daniel T.; Mure, Kanae; Leszczynska, Joanna; Ward, William O.; Umbach, David M.; Xu, Zongli; Ducharme, Danica; Taylor, Jack A.; DeMarini, David M.; Klein, Catherine B.

    2007-01-01

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary flavorings that exhibit antimutagenic activity against mutagen-induced and spontaneous mutations in bacteria. Although these compounds were antimutagenic against chromosomal mutations in mammalian cells, they have not been studied for antimutagenesis against spontaneous gene mutations in mammalian cells. Thus, we initiated studies with VAN and CIN in human mismatch repair-deficient (hMLH1−) HCT116 colon cancer cells, which exhibit high spontaneous mutation rates (mutations/cell/generation) at the HPRT locus, permitting analysis of antimutagenic effects of agents against spontaneous mutation. Long-term (1–3-week) treatments of HCT116 cells with VAN at minimally toxic concentrations (0.5–2.5 mM) reduced the spontaneous HPRT mutant fraction (MF, mutants/106 survivors) in a concentration-related manner by 19% to 73%. A similar treatment with CIN at 2.5–7.5 μM yielded a 13% to 56% reduction of the spontaneous MF. Short-term (4–h) treatments also reduced the spontaneous MF by 64% (VAN) and 31% (CIN). To investigate the mechanisms of antimutagenesis, we evaluated the ability of VAN and CIN to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and to alter global gene expression (Affymetrix GeneChip) after 4-h treatments. Both VAN and CIN induced DNA damage in both mismatch repair-proficient (HCT116 + chr3) and deficient (HCT116) cells at concentrations that were antimutagenic in HCT116 cells. There were 64 genes in common whose expression was changed similarly by both VAN and CIN; these included genes related to DNA damage, stress responses, oxidative damage, apoptosis, and cell growth. RT-PCR results paralleled the Affymetrix results for 4 selected genes (HMOX1, DDIT4, GCLM, and CLK4). Our results show for the first time that VAN and CIN are antimutagenic against spontaneous mutations in mammalian (human) cells. These and other data lead us to propose that VAN and CIN may induce DNA damage that elicits recombinational DNA

  1. Antimutagenicity of cinnamaldehyde and vanillin in human cells: Global gene expression and possible role of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    King, Audrey A; Shaughnessy, Daniel T; Mure, Kanae; Leszczynska, Joanna; Ward, William O; Umbach, David M; Xu, Zongli; Ducharme, Danica; Taylor, Jack A; Demarini, David M; Klein, Catherine B

    2007-03-01

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary flavorings that exhibit antimutagenic activity against mutagen-induced and spontaneous mutations in bacteria. Although these compounds were antimutagenic against chromosomal mutations in mammalian cells, they have not been studied for antimutagenesis against spontaneous gene mutations in mammalian cells. Thus, we initiated studies with VAN and CIN in human mismatch repair-deficient (hMLH1(-)) HCT116 colon cancer cells, which exhibit high spontaneous mutation rates (mutations/cell/generation) at the HPRT locus, permitting analysis of antimutagenic effects of agents against spontaneous mutation. Long-term (1-3 weeks) treatment of HCT116 cells with VAN at minimally toxic concentrations (0.5-2.5mM) reduced the spontaneous HPRT mutant fraction (MF, mutants/10(6) survivors) in a concentration-related manner by 19-73%. A similar treatment with CIN at 2.5-7.5microM yielded a 13-56% reduction of the spontaneous MF. Short-term (4-h) treatments also reduced the spontaneous MF by 64% (VAN) and 31% (CIN). To investigate the mechanisms of antimutagenesis, we evaluated the ability of VAN and CIN to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and to alter global gene expression (Affymetrix GeneChip) after 4-h treatments. Both VAN and CIN induced DNA damage in both mismatch repair-proficient (HCT116+chr3) and deficient (HCT116) cells at concentrations that were antimutagenic in HCT116 cells. There were 64 genes whose expression was changed similarly by both VAN and CIN; these included genes related to DNA damage, stress responses, oxidative damage, apoptosis, and cell growth. RT-PCR results paralleled the Affymetrix results for four selected genes (HMOX1, DDIT4, GCLM, and CLK4). Our results show for the first time that VAN and CIN are antimutagenic against spontaneous mutations in mammalian (human) cells. These and other data lead us to propose that VAN and CIN may induce DNA damage that elicits recombinational DNA repair, which reduces

  2. Extracellular DNA in Single- and Multiple-Species Unsaturated Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger, R. E.; Holden, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of bacterial biofilms form a hydrated barrier between cells and their external environment. Better characterization of EPS could be useful in understanding biofilm physiology. The EPS are chemically complex, changing with both bacterial strain and culture conditions. Previously, we reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa unsaturated biofilm EPS contains large amounts of extracellular DNA (eDNA) (R. E. Steinberger, A. R. Allen, H. G. Hansma, and P. A. Holden, Microb. Ecol. 43:416-423, 2002). Here, we investigated the compositional similarity of eDNA to cellular DNA, the relative quantity of eDNA, and the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) community profile of eDNA in multiple-species biofilms. By randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, cellular DNA and eDNA appear identical for P. aeruginosa biofilms. Significantly more eDNA was produced in P. aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida biofilms than in Rhodococcus erythropolis or Variovorax paradoxus biofilms. While the amount of eDNA in dual-species biofilms was of the same order of magnitude as that of of single-species biofilms, the amounts were not predictable from single-strain measurements. By the Shannon diversity index and principle components analysis of TRFLP profiles generated from 16S rRNA genes, eDNA of four-species biofilms differed significantly from either cellular or total DNA of the same biofilm. However, total DNA- and cellular DNA-based TRFLP analyses of this biofilm community yielded identical results. We conclude that extracellular DNA production in unsaturated biofilms is species dependent and that the phylogenetic information contained in this DNA pool is quantifiable and distinct from either total or cellular DNA. PMID:16151131

  3. Extracellular DNA in single- and multiple-species unsaturated biofilms.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, R E; Holden, P A

    2005-09-01

    The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of bacterial biofilms form a hydrated barrier between cells and their external environment. Better characterization of EPS could be useful in understanding biofilm physiology. The EPS are chemically complex, changing with both bacterial strain and culture conditions. Previously, we reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa unsaturated biofilm EPS contains large amounts of extracellular DNA (eDNA) (R. E. Steinberger, A. R. Allen, H. G. Hansma, and P. A. Holden, Microb. Ecol. 43:416-423, 2002). Here, we investigated the compositional similarity of eDNA to cellular DNA, the relative quantity of eDNA, and the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) community profile of eDNA in multiple-species biofilms. By randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, cellular DNA and eDNA appear identical for P. aeruginosa biofilms. Significantly more eDNA was produced in P. aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida biofilms than in Rhodococcus erythropolis or Variovorax paradoxus biofilms. While the amount of eDNA in dual-species biofilms was of the same order of magnitude as that of of single-species biofilms, the amounts were not predictable from single-strain measurements. By the Shannon diversity index and principle components analysis of TRFLP profiles generated from 16S rRNA genes, eDNA of four-species biofilms differed significantly from either cellular or total DNA of the same biofilm. However, total DNA- and cellular DNA-based TRFLP analyses of this biofilm community yielded identical results. We conclude that extracellular DNA production in unsaturated biofilms is species dependent and that the phylogenetic information contained in this DNA pool is quantifiable and distinct from either total or cellular DNA.

  4. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  5. Salt-Dependent DNA-DNA Spacings in Intact Bacteriophage lambda Reflect Relative Importance of DNA Self-Repulsion and Bending Energies

    SciTech Connect

    X Qiu; D Rau; V Parsegian; L Fang; C Knobler; W Gelbart

    2011-12-31

    Using solution synchrotron x-ray scattering, we measure the variation of DNA-DNA d spacings in bacteriophage {lambda} with mono-, di-, and polyvalent salt concentrations, for wild-type [48.5 x 10{sup 3} base pairs (bp)] and short-genome-mutant (37.8 kbp) strains. From the decrease in d spacings with increasing salt, we deduce the relative contributions of DNA self-repulsion and bending to the energetics of packaged phage genomes. We quantify the DNA-DNA interaction energies within the intact phage by combining the measured d spacings in the capsid with measurements of osmotic pressure in DNA assemblies under the same salt conditions in bulk solution. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, the DNA-DNA interaction energies inside the phage capsids are shown to be about 1 kT/bp, an order of magnitude larger than the bending energies.

  6. Autoregulation of the dnaA-dnaN Operon and Effects of DnaA Protein Levels on Replication Initiation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Imai, Yukiho; Ogasawara, Naotake; Moriya, Shigeki

    2001-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the DnaA protein level appears to play a pivotal role in determining the timing of replication initiation. To examine the effects on replication initiation in B. subtilis, we constructed a strain in which a copy of the dnaA gene was integrated at the purA locus on the chromosome under the control of an isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoter. However, increasing the DnaA level resulted in cell elongation and inhibition of cell growth by induction of the SOS response. Transcription of the native dnaA-dnaN operon was greatly reduced at high DnaA levels, but it was increased in a dnaA-null mutant, indicating autoregulation of the operon by DnaA. When a copy of the dnaN gene was added downstream of the additional dnaA gene at purA, the cells grew at high DnaA levels, suggesting that depletion of DnaN (β subunit of DNA polymerase III) within the cell by repression of the native dnaA-dnaN operon at high DnaA levels was the cause of the SOS induction. Flow cytometry of the cells revealed that the cell mass at initiation of replication increased at a lower DnaA level and decreased at DnaA levels higher than those of the wild type. Proper timing of replication initiation was observed at DnaA levels nearly comparable to the wild-type level. These results suggest that if the DnaA level increases with progression of the replication cycle, it could act as a rate-limiting factor of replication initiation in B. subtilis. PMID:11395445

  7. Autoregulation of the dnaA-dnaN operon and effects of DnaA protein levels on replication initiation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Y; Imai, Y; Ogasawara, N; Moriya, S

    2001-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, the DnaA protein level appears to play a pivotal role in determining the timing of replication initiation. To examine the effects on replication initiation in B. subtilis, we constructed a strain in which a copy of the dnaA gene was integrated at the purA locus on the chromosome under the control of an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoter. However, increasing the DnaA level resulted in cell elongation and inhibition of cell growth by induction of the SOS response. Transcription of the native dnaA-dnaN operon was greatly reduced at high DnaA levels, but it was increased in a dnaA-null mutant, indicating autoregulation of the operon by DnaA. When a copy of the dnaN gene was added downstream of the additional dnaA gene at purA, the cells grew at high DnaA levels, suggesting that depletion of DnaN (beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) within the cell by repression of the native dnaA-dnaN operon at high DnaA levels was the cause of the SOS induction. Flow cytometry of the cells revealed that the cell mass at initiation of replication increased at a lower DnaA level and decreased at DnaA levels higher than those of the wild type. Proper timing of replication initiation was observed at DnaA levels nearly comparable to the wild-type level. These results suggest that if the DnaA level increases with progression of the replication cycle, it could act as a rate-limiting factor of replication initiation in B. subtilis.

  8. PCNA Mono-ubiquitination and Activation of Translesion DNA Polymerases by DNA Polymerase α

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Niimi, Atsuko; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Tomida, Shuta; Miao, Huang Qin; Izuta, Shunji; Usukura, Jiro; Itoh, Yasutomo; Hishida, Takashi; Akashi, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Pavlov, Youri; Murate, Takashi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) involves PCNA mono-ubiquitination and TLS DNA polymerases (pols). Recent evidence has shown that the mono-ubiquitination is induced not only by DNA damage but also by other factors that induce stalling of the DNA replication fork. We studied the effect of spontaneous DNA replication errors on PCNA mono-ubiquitination and TLS induction. In the pol1L868F strain, which expressed an error-prone pol α, PCNA was spontaneously mono-ubiquitinated. Pol α L868F had a rate-limiting step at the extension from mismatched primer termini. Electron microscopic observation showed the accumulation of a single-stranded region at the DNA replication fork in yeast cells. For pol α errors, pol ζ participated in a generation of +1 frameshifts. Furthermore, in the pol1L868F strain, UV-induced mutations were lower than in the wild-type and a pol δ mutant strain (pol3-5DV), and deletion of the RAD30 gene (pol η) suppressed this defect. These data suggest that nucleotide misincorporation by pol α induces exposure of single-stranded DNA, PCNA mono-ubiquitination, and activates TLS pols. PMID:19279190

  9. Vibrio pelagius: differences of the type strain deposited at various culture collections.

    PubMed

    Macián, M C; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Garay, E; Pujalte, M J

    2000-10-01

    A critical evaluation of published and own taxonomic and phylogenetic studies on Vibrio pelagius showed substantial diversity of strains received as type strains from various Culture Collections. The comparison of data based upon 16S rRNA sequence analyses, earlier genomic DNA-DNA similarity studies as well as physiological investigations and the original description indicate that Vibrio pelagius strains CECT 4202T and ATCC 25916T really represent the originally described type species whereas strains NCIMB 1900T and CIP 102762T highly likely are representatives of Vibrio natriegens.

  10. Clonal relationship among Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated in Somalia.

    PubMed

    Scrascia, Maria; Pugliese, Nicola; Maimone, Francesco; Mohamud, Kadigia A; Grimont, Patrick A D; Materu, Sadiki F; Pazzani, Carlo

    2009-03-01

    One hundred and three Vibrio cholerae O1 strains, selected to represent the cholera outbreaks which occurred in Somalia in 1998-1999, were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns, ribotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility. All strains showed a unique amplified DNA pattern and 2 closely related ribotypes (B5a and B8a), among which B5a was the more frequently identified. Ninety-one strains were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim, conferred, except for spectinomycin, by a conjugative plasmid IncC. These findings indicated that the group of strains active in Somalia in the late 1990s had a clonal origin.

  11. DNA ligase and the pyridine nucleotide cycle in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Olivera, B M; Hughes, K T; Roth, J R; Hillyard, D R

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial DNA ligases use NAD as an energy source. In this study we addressed two questions about these enzymes. First, what is the physiological consequence of completely removing the NAD-dependent enzyme and replacing it with an ATP-dependent DNA ligase? We constructed Salmonella typhimurium strains in which the endogenous NAD-dependent DNA ligase activity was inactivated by an insertion mutation and the ATP-dependent enzyme from bacteriophage T4 was provided by a cloned phage gene. Such strains were physiologically indistinguishable from the wild type, even under conditions of UV irradiation or treatment with alkylating agents. These results suggest that specific functional interactions between DNA ligase and other replication and repair enzymes may be unimportant under the conditions tested. Second, the importance of DNA ligation as the initiating event of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle was critically assessed in these mutant strains. Surprisingly, our results indicate that DNA ligation makes a minimal contribution to the pyridine nucleotide cycle; the Salmonella strains with only an ATP-dependent ligase had the same NAD turnover rates as the wild-type strain with an NAD-dependent ligase. However, we found that NAD turnover was significantly decreased under anaerobic conditions. We suggest that most intracellular pyridine nucleotide breakdown occurs in a process that protects the cell against oxygen damage but involves a biochemical mechanism other than DNA ligation. Images PMID:2649488

  12. Duplex PCR for differentiation of the vaccine strain Brucella suis S2 and B. suis biovar 1 from other strains of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Tan, Pengfei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zouliang; Mao, Kairong; Peng, Daxin; Chen, Yiping

    2014-09-01

    Immunisation with attenuated Brucella spp. vaccines prevents brucellosis, but may also interfere with diagnosis. In this study, a duplex PCR was developed to distinguish Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from field strains of B. suis biovar 1 and other Brucella spp. The PCR detected 60 fg genomic DNA of B. suis S2 or biovar 1 field strains and was able to distinguish B. suis S2 and wild-type strains of B. suis biovar 1 among 76 field isolates representing all the common species and biovars, as well as four vaccine strains, of Brucella.

  13. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 contains N6-methyladenine in its genome

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Bhaskar Jyoti; Sabnis, Ketaki; Deobagkar, Deepti D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.; E-mail: dndeo@unipune.ernet.in

    2005-09-23

    Methylation of DNA is known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in bacteria. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 on exposure to high radiation undergoes significant DNA damage, which is repaired without mutations. However, the presence of modified nucleotides has not been reported in its genome. We report here the detection of N6-methyladenine in the genome of D. radiodurans strain R1 using immunochemical techniques. This N6-methyladenine is not a part of GATC restriction-modification system. D. radiodurans cell extract also exhibited a DNA adenine methyltransferase activity which was reduced in the early post-irradiation recovery phase.

  14. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop an appropriate sensor for measuring the stress or strain of high altitude balloons during flight are reviewed as well as the various conditions that must be met by such a device. The design, development and calibration of a transducer which promises to satisfy the necessary design constraints are described. The thin film strain transducer has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the strain that would naturally occur in the balloon. In addition, the transducer has a high sensitivity to longitudinal strain (7.216 mV/V/unit strain) which is constant for all temperature from room temperature to -80 C and all strains from 5 percent compression to 10 percent tensile strain. At the same time, the sensor is relatively insensitive (0.27 percent) to transverse forces. The device has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with available bridge balance, amplification and telemetry instrumentation now available for balloon flight. Recommendations are included for improved coatings to provide passive thermal control as well as model, tethered and full scale flight testing.

  15. Detection of maltose fermentation genes in the baking yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Tonomura, K

    1996-10-01

    The presence of any one of the five unlinked MAL loci (MAL1, MAL2, MAL3, MAL4 and MAL6) confers the ability to ferment maltose on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each locus is composed of three genes encoding maltose permease, alpha-glucosidase and MAL activator. Chromosomal DNA of seven representative baking strains has been separated by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and probed with three genes in MAL6 locus. The DNA bands to which all of the three MAL-derived probes simultaneously hybridized were chromosome VII carrying MAL1 in all of the strains tested, chromosome XI carrying MAL4 in six strains, chromosome III carrying MAL2 in three strains and chromosomes II and VIII carrying MAL3 and MAL6, respectively, in the one strain. The number of MAL loci in baking strains was comparable to those of brewing strains.

  16. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  17. A reduced genome decreases the host carrying capacity for foreign DNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Host-plasmid interactions have been discussed largely in terms of the influences of plasmids, whereas the contributions of variations in host genomes to host interactions with foreign DNA remain unclear. A strain with a so-called “clean genome” (i.e., MDS42) of reduced genome size has recently been generated from the wild-type strain MG1655, a commonly used host strain. A quantitative evaluation of the influence of plasmid burdens in these two Escherichia coli strains can not only provide an understanding of how a reduced genome responds to foreign DNA but also offer insights into the proper application of these strains. Results The decreases in growth caused by the cost of carrying foreign DNA were similar for the wild-type and clean-genome strains. A negative correlation between the growth rate and the total amount of exogenous DNA was observed in both strains, but a better theoretical fit with a higher statistical significance was found for the strain with the clean genome. Compared to the wild-type strain, the clean-genome strain exhibited a reduced carrying capacity for exogenous DNA, which was largely attributed to its ability to restrict the replication of foreign DNA. A tendency to allocate energy and resources toward gene expression, but not DNA replication, was observed in the strain with the clean genome. Conclusions The possession of a clean genome constrained the plasmid copy number to a wild-type-equivalent load. The results indicate that the wild-type strain possesses a greater tolerance for foreign DNA, as in endosymbiosis, and that the use of strains with clean genomes will be favorable in the applications that require precise control and theoretical prediction. PMID:24685185

  18. A new type of DNA "light-switch": a dual photochemical sensor and metalating agent for duplex and G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Erin; Howerton, Brock S; Hall, Emily C; Parkin, Sean; Glazer, Edith C

    2014-01-11

    Ru(bpy)2dppz, a well studied "light-switch" metal complex, transforms into a photochemical "light-switch" and DNA damaging agent by incorporating structural strain. This distorted compound is photoreactive and ejects a ligand upon binding duplex and G-quadruplex DNA, producing a reactive metal center that metalates the DNA.

  19. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOEpatents

    Conard, Lisa Marie

    1998-01-01

    A tool and a method for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool.

  20. The effects of microgravity on induced mutation in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Ohnishi, K; Takahashi, S; Masukawa, M; Sekikawa, K; Amano, T; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Ohnishi, T

    2001-01-01

    We examined whether microgravity influences the induced-mutation frequencies through in vivo experiments during space flight aboard the space shuttle Discovery (STS-91). We prepared dried samples of repair-deficient strains and parental strains of Escherichia (E.) coli and Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae given DNA damage treatment. After culture in space, we measured the induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses under microgravity. The experimental findings indicate that almost the same induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses of space samples were observed in both strains compared with the ground control samples. It is suggested that microgravity might not influence induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses at the stages of DNA replication and/or DNA repair. In addition, we developed a new experimental apparatus for space experiments to culture and freeze stocks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae cells.

  1. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Typically, people with a strain experience pain, limited motion, muscle spasms, and possibly muscle weakness. They also ... program designed to prevent stiffness, improve range of motion, and restore the joint's normal flexibility and strength. ...

  2. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the joint or muscle swelling and bruising warmth and redness of the injured area difficulty moving ... looks "bent" or misshapen signs of infection (increased warmth, redness, streaks, swelling, and pain) a strain or ...

  3. Strain and magnetic remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John

    1993-05-01

    Experimental data may be compatible with the hypothesis that a single direction of magnetic remanence rotates as a rigid marker with strains up to 40% shortening in coaxial, perfect flattening ( X = Y > Z). Detailed agreement with the passive line model is relatively poor for the specimens in which remanance is carried by magnetite. However, for this range of strains the differences with the passive line model (Wettstein's equation) are so slight that the latter model may be more easily employed to de-strain or restore deformed remanance to its original attitude. In the case of hematite-bearing remanences, the differences between the passive line and rigid marker model are even smaller because of the higher aspect ratios of grains of hematite. Therefore it is suggested that Wettstein's equation may be safely used to restore remanence after even higher strains, where the remanence is carried by hematite.

  4. Isolation and characterization of ethanol tolerant yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Tikka, Chiranjeevi; Osuru, Hari Prasad; Atluri, Navya; Raghavulu, Praveen Chakravarthi Veera; yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Mannur, Ismail Shaik; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Aluru, Sudheer; K, Narasimha Varma; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2013-01-01

    Yeast strains are commonly associated with sugar rich environments. Various fruit samples were selected as source for isolating yeast cells. The isolated cultures were identified at Genus level by colony morphology, biochemical characteristics and cell morphological characters. An attempt has been made to check the viability of yeast cells under different concentrations of ethanol. Ethanol tolerance of each strain was studied by allowing the yeast to grow in liquid YEPD (Yeast Extract Peptone Dextrose) medium having different concentrations of ethanol. A total of fifteen yeast strains isolated from different samples were used for the study. Seven strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained from different fruit sources were screened for ethanol tolerance. The results obtained in this study show a range of tolerance levels between 7%-12% in all the stains. Further, the cluster analysis based on 22 RAPD (Random Amplified polymorphic DNA) bands revealed polymorphisms in these seven Saccharomyces strains. PMID:23750092

  5. Unusual events involved in Banana bunchy top virus strain evolution.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui-Chuan; Hu, Jer-Ming; Hung, Ting-Hsuan; Su, Hong-Ji; Yeh, Hsin-Hung

    2009-07-01

    Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) can be transmitted by aphids and consists of at least six integral components (DNA-R, -U3, -S, -M, -C, and -N). Several additional replication-competent components (additional Reps) are associated with some BBTV isolates. A collected BBTV strain (TW3) that causes mild symptoms was selected to study the processes in BBTV evolution. Southern blot hybridization, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR did not detect DNA-N in TW3. Real-time PCR quantification of BBTV components revealed that, except for the copy number of TW3 DNA-U3, each detected integral component of BBTV TW3 was at least two orders lower than that of the severe strains. No infection was observed in plants inoculated with aphids, which were first given acquisition access to the TW3-infected banana leaves. Recombination analysis revealed recombination between the integral component TW3 DNA-U3 and the additional Rep DNA-Y. All BBTV integral components contain a replication initiation region (stem-loop common region) that share high sequence identity. Sequence alignment revealed that TW3 DNA-R, -S, -M, and -C all have a stem-loop common region containing a characteristic 9-nucleotide deletion found only in all reported DNA-N. Our data suggest that the additional Rep DNAs can serve as sources of additional genetic diversity for integral BBTV components.

  6. Molecular characterisation of Xanthomonas strains isolated from aroids in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Khoodoo, M H R; Sahin, F; Donmez, M F; Fakim, Y Jaufeerally

    2005-06-01

    Mauritius is one of the largest world producers of Anthurium cut flowers but outbreaks of bacterial blight have never been reported on the island. This work was about the characterisation and identification of bacterial strains isolated from Anthurium andreanum, Dieffenbachia maculata and Aglaonema simplex in Mauritius. Fifteen strains, that showed the morphological properties of Xanthomonas on conventional media, were tested on two semi-selective media (Esculin-trehalose and cellobiose-starch). ELISA tests using a panel of monoclonal antibodies were carried out and three out of 15 strains reacted with a Xanthomonas-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb XII). Analysis using four sets of ribosomal primers revealed that the same three Mauritius strains shared conserved PCR products with reference xanthomonads including virulent strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae (Xad). BIOLOG tests and the Sherlock Microbial Identification system (MIDI) identified these three new strains at the species level as X. axonopodis. The complementary tests that were carried out clearly confirmed that the three strains are xanthomonads and, moreover, a DNA probe which showed specificity to Xad strains suggested that the three Mauritius strains are non-virulent forms of the pathogen causing Anthurium blight.

  7. Strain-Level Diversity of Secondary Metabolism in Streptomyces albus

    PubMed Central

    Seipke, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces spp. are robust producers of medicinally-, industrially- and agriculturally-important small molecules. Increased resistance to antibacterial agents and the lack of new antibiotics in the pipeline have led to a renaissance in natural product discovery. This endeavor has benefited from inexpensive high quality DNA sequencing technology, which has generated more than 140 genome sequences for taxonomic type strains and environmental Streptomyces spp. isolates. Many of the sequenced streptomycetes belong to the same species. For instance, Streptomyces albus has been isolated from diverse environmental niches and seven strains have been sequenced, consequently this species has been sequenced more than any other streptomycete, allowing valuable analyses of strain-level diversity in secondary metabolism. Bioinformatics analyses identified a total of 48 unique biosynthetic gene clusters harboured by Streptomyces albus strains. Eighteen of these gene clusters specify the core secondary metabolome of the species. Fourteen of the gene clusters are contained by one or more strain and are considered auxiliary, while 16 of the gene clusters encode the production of putative strain-specific secondary metabolites. Analysis of Streptomyces albus strains suggests that each strain of a Streptomyces species likely harbours at least one strain-specific biosynthetic gene cluster. Importantly, this implies that deep sequencing of a species will not exhaust gene cluster diversity and will continue to yield novelty. PMID:25635820

  8. Strain-level diversity of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces albus.

    PubMed

    Seipke, Ryan F

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces spp. are robust producers of medicinally-, industrially- and agriculturally-important small molecules. Increased resistance to antibacterial agents and the lack of new antibiotics in the pipeline have led to a renaissance in natural product discovery. This endeavor has benefited from inexpensive high quality DNA sequencing technology, which has generated more than 140 genome sequences for taxonomic type strains and environmental Streptomyces spp. isolates. Many of the sequenced streptomycetes belong to the same species. For instance, Streptomyces albus has been isolated from diverse environmental niches and seven strains have been sequenced, consequently this species has been sequenced more than any other streptomycete, allowing valuable analyses of strain-level diversity in secondary metabolism. Bioinformatics analyses identified a total of 48 unique biosynthetic gene clusters harboured by Streptomyces albus strains. Eighteen of these gene clusters specify the core secondary metabolome of the species. Fourteen of the gene clusters are contained by one or more strain and are considered auxiliary, while 16 of the gene clusters encode the production of putative strain-specific secondary metabolites. Analysis of Streptomyces albus strains suggests that each strain of a Streptomyces species likely harbours at least one strain-specific biosynthetic gene cluster. Importantly, this implies that deep sequencing of a species will not exhaust gene cluster diversity and will continue to yield novelty.

  9. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-18

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  10. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  11. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3