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Sample records for dna-binding transcription factors

  1. Predicting DNA-Binding Specificities of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Adrian; Eichner, Johannes; Supper, Jochen; Eichner, Jonas; Wanke, Dierk; Henneges, Carsten; Zell, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Today, annotated amino acid sequences of more and more transcription factors (TFs) are readily available. Quantitative information about their DNA-binding specificities, however, are hard to obtain. Position frequency matrices (PFMs), the most widely used models to represent binding specificities, are experimentally characterized only for a small fraction of all TFs. Even for some of the most intensively studied eukaryotic organisms (i.e., human, rat and mouse), roughly one-sixth of all proteins with annotated DNA-binding domain have been characterized experimentally. Here, we present a new method based on support vector regression for predicting quantitative DNA-binding specificities of TFs in different eukaryotic species. This approach estimates a quantitative measure for the PFM similarity of two proteins, based on various features derived from their protein sequences. The method is trained and tested on a dataset containing 1 239 TFs with known DNA-binding specificity, and used to predict specific DNA target motifs for 645 TFs with high accuracy. PMID:21152420

  2. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Luis A.; Rogers, Julia M.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J.; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA-binding activity and used universal protein binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA-binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA-binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA-binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA-binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. PMID:27013732

  3. The role of the DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (DOF) transcription factor family in plants.

    PubMed

    Noguero, Mélanie; Atif, Rana Muhammad; Ochatt, Sergio; Thompson, Richard D

    2013-08-01

    The DOF (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) family of transcription factors is involved in many fundamental processes in higher plants, including responses to light and phytohormones as well as roles in seed maturation and germination. DOF transcription factor genes are restricted in their distribution to plants, where they are in many copies in both gymnosperms and angiosperms and also present in lower plants such as the moss Physcomitrella patens and in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which possesses a single DOF gene. DOF transcription factors bind to their promoter targets at the consensus sequence AAAG. This binding depends upon the presence of the highly conserved DOF domain in the protein. Depending on the target gene, DOF factor binding may activate or repress transcription. DOF factors are expressed in most if not all tissues of higher plants, but frequently appear to be functionally redundant. Recent next-generation sequencing data provide a more comprehensive survey of the distribution of DOF sequence classes among plant species and within tissue types, and clues as to the evolution of functions assumed by this transcription factor family. DOFs do not appear to be implicated in the initial differentiation of the plant body plan into organs via the resolution of meristematic zones, in contrast to MADS-box and homeobox transcription factors, which are found in other non-plant eukaryotes, and this may reflect a more recent evolutionary origin.

  4. Evolution of DNA-Binding Sites of a Floral Master Regulatory Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, Jose M.; de Bruijn, Suzanne; Pajoro, Alice; Geuten, Koen; Vingron, Martin; Angenent, Gerco C.; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Flower development is controlled by the action of key regulatory transcription factors of the MADS-domain family. The function of these factors appears to be highly conserved among species based on mutant phenotypes. However, the conservation of their downstream processes is much less well understood, mostly because the evolutionary turnover and variation of their DNA-binding sites (BSs) among plant species have not yet been experimentally determined. Here, we performed comparative ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-seq experiments of the MADS-domain transcription factor SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) in two closely related Arabidopsis species: Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata which have very similar floral organ morphology. We found that BS conservation is associated with DNA sequence conservation, the presence of the CArG-box BS motif and on the relative position of the BS to its potential target gene. Differences in genome size and structure can explain that SEP3 BSs in A. lyrata can be located more distantly to their potential target genes than their counterparts in A. thaliana. In A. lyrata, we identified transposition as a mechanism to generate novel SEP3 binding locations in the genome. Comparative gene expression analysis shows that the loss/gain of BSs is associated with a change in gene expression. In summary, this study investigates the evolutionary dynamics of DNA BSs of a floral key-regulatory transcription factor and explores factors affecting this phenomenon. PMID:26429922

  5. DNA-binding domains of plant-specific transcription factors: structure, function, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-05-01

    The families of the plant-specific transcription factors (TFs) are defined by their characteristic DNA-binding domains (DBDs), such as AP2/ERF, B3, NAC, SBP, and WRKY. Recently, three-dimensional structures of the DBDs, including those in complexes with DNA, were determined by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. In this review we summarize the functional and evolutionary implications arising from structure analyses. The unexpected structural similarity between B3 and the noncatalytic DBD of the restriction endonuclease EcoRII allowed us to build structural models of the B3/DNA complex. Most of the DBDs of plant-specific TFs are likely to have originated from endonucleases associated with transposable elements. After the DBDs have been established in unicellular eukaryotes, they experienced extensive plant-specific expansion, by acquiring new functions.

  6. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.

    1994-12-31

    Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.

  7. Structural and dynamic studies of the transcription factor ERG reveal DNA binding is allosterically autoinhibited.

    PubMed

    Regan, Michael C; Horanyi, Peter S; Pryor, Edward E; Sarver, Jessica L; Cafiso, David S; Bushweller, John H

    2013-08-13

    The Ets-Related Gene (ERG) belongs to the Ets family of transcription factors and is critically important for maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell population. A chromosomal translocation observed in the majority of human prostate cancers leads to the aberrant overexpression of ERG. We have identified regions flanking the ERG Ets domain responsible for autoinhibition of DNA binding and solved crystal structures of uninhibited, autoinhibited, and DNA-bound ERG. NMR-based measurements of backbone dynamics show that uninhibited ERG undergoes substantial dynamics on the millisecond-to-microsecond timescale but autoinhibited and DNA-bound ERG do not. We propose a mechanism whereby the allosteric basis of ERG autoinhibition is mediated predominantly by the regulation of Ets-domain dynamics with only modest structural changes.

  8. Widespread evidence of cooperative DNA binding by transcription factors in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, Majid; Pham, Hannah; Wolfe, Scot A; Brodsky, Michael H; Sinha, Saurabh

    2013-09-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic gene transcription is often combinatorial in nature, with multiple transcription factors (TFs) regulating common target genes, often through direct or indirect mutual interactions. Many individual examples of cooperative binding by directly interacting TFs have been identified, but it remains unclear how pervasive this mechanism is during animal development. Cooperative TF binding should be manifest in genomic sequences as biased arrangements of TF-binding sites. Here, we explore the extent and diversity of such arrangements related to gene regulation during Drosophila embryogenesis. We used the DNA-binding specificities of 322 TFs along with chromatin accessibility information to identify enriched spacing and orientation patterns of TF-binding site pairs. We developed a new statistical approach for this task, specifically designed to accurately assess inter-site spacing biases while accounting for the phenomenon of homotypic site clustering commonly observed in developmental regulatory regions. We observed a large number of short-range distance preferences between TF-binding site pairs, including examples where the preference depends on the relative orientation of the binding sites. To test whether these binding site patterns reflect physical interactions between the corresponding TFs, we analyzed 27 TF pairs whose binding sites exhibited short distance preferences. In vitro protein-protein binding experiments revealed that >65% of these TF pairs can directly interact with each other. For five pairs, we further demonstrate that they bind cooperatively to DNA if both sites are present with the preferred spacing. This study demonstrates how DNA-binding motifs can be used to produce a comprehensive map of sequence signatures for different mechanisms of combinatorial TF action.

  9. Characterization of the DNA-binding Properties of the Mohawk Homeobox Transcription Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; George, Rajani; Noyes, Marcus B.; Rowton, Megan; Liu, Wenjin; Jiang, Rulang; Wolfe, Scot A.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Rawls, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The homeobox transcription factor Mohawk (Mkx) is a potent transcriptional repressor expressed in the embryonic precursors of skeletal muscle, cartilage, and bone. MKX has recently been shown to be a critical regulator of musculoskeletal tissue differentiation and gene expression; however, the genetic pathways through which MKX functions and its DNA-binding properties are currently unknown. Using a modified bacterial one-hybrid site selection assay, we determined the core DNA-recognition motif of the mouse monomeric Mkx homeodomain to be A-C-A. Using cell-based assays, we have identified a minimal Mkx-responsive element (MRE) located within the Mkx promoter, which is composed of a highly conserved inverted repeat of the core Mkx recognition motif. Using the minimal MRE sequence, we have further identified conserved MREs within the locus of Sox6, a transcription factor that represses slow fiber gene expression during skeletal muscle differentiation. Real-time PCR and immunostaining of in vitro differentiated muscle satellite cells isolated from Mkx-null mice revealed an increase in the expression of Sox6 and down-regulation of slow fiber structural genes. Together, these data identify the unique DNA-recognition properties of MKX and reveal a novel role for Mkx in promoting slow fiber type specification during skeletal muscle differentiation. PMID:22923612

  10. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael K.; de Velde, Jan Van; O'Shea, Charlotte; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Workman, Christopher T.; Vandepoele, Klaas; Skriver, Karen; Masi, Federico De

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together with the workflow associated with functional modules offer a strong resource to unravel the regulatory potential of NAC genes and that this workflow could be used to study other families of transcription factors. PMID:24914054

  11. Conformational stability and DNA binding specificity of the cardiac T-box transcription factor Tbx20.

    PubMed

    Macindoe, Ingrid; Glockner, Laura; Vukasin, Paul; Stennard, Fiona A; Costa, Mauro W; Harvey, Richard P; Mackay, Joel P; Sunde, Margaret

    2009-06-12

    The transcription factor Tbx20 acts within a hierarchy of T-box factors in lineage specification and morphogenesis in the mammalian heart and is mutated in congenital heart disease. T-box family members share a approximately 20-kDa DNA-binding domain termed the T-box. The question of how highly homologous T-box proteins achieve differential transcriptional control in heart development, while apparently binding to the same DNA sequence, remains unresolved. Here we show that the optimal DNA recognition sequence for the T-box of Tbx20 corresponds to a T-half-site. Furthermore, we demonstrate using purified recombinant domains that distinct T-boxes show significant differences in the affinity and kinetics of binding and in conformational stability, with the T-box of Tbx20 displaying molten globule character. Our data highlight unique features of Tbx20 and suggest mechanistic ways in which cardiac T-box factors might interact synergistically and/or competitively within the cardiac regulatory network.

  12. Determinants of the DNA binding specificity of class I and class II TCP transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Viola, Ivana L; Reinheimer, Renata; Ripoll, Rodrigo; Manassero, Nora G Uberti; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2012-01-02

    TCP proteins constitute a family of plant transcription factors with more than 20 members in angiosperms. They can be divided in two classes based on sequence homology and the presence of an insertion within the basic region of the TCP DNA binding and dimerization domain. Here, we describe binding site selection studies with the class I protein TCP16, showing that its DNA binding preferences are similar to those of class II proteins. Through sequence comparison and the analysis of mutants and chimeras of TCP16, TCP20 (class I), and TCP4 (class II), we established that the identity of residue 11 of the class I TCP domain or the equivalent residue 15 of the class II domain, whether it is Gly or Asp, determines a preference for a class I or a class II sequence, respectively. Footprinting analysis indicated that specific DNA contacts related to these preferences are established with one of the strands of DNA. The dimerization motif also influences the selectivity of the proteins toward class I and class II sequences and determines a requirement of an extended basic region in proteins with Asp-15. We postulate that differences in orientation of base-contacting residues brought about by the presence of either Gly or Asp are responsible for the binding site preferences of TCP proteins. Expression of repressor forms of TCP16 with Asp-11 or Gly-11 differently affects leaf development. TCP16-like proteins with Asp-11 in the TCP domain arose in rosids and may be related to developmental characteristics of this lineage of eudicots.

  13. Identification of Specific DNA Binding Residues in the TCP Family of Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Pooja; Das Gupta, Mainak; Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Srinivasan, N.; Nath, Utpal

    2010-01-01

    The TCP transcription factors control multiple developmental traits in diverse plant species. Members of this family share an ∼60-residue-long TCP domain that binds to DNA. The TCP domain is predicted to form a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) structure but shares little sequence similarity with canonical bHLH domain. This classifies the TCP domain as a novel class of DNA binding domain specific to the plant kingdom. Little is known about how the TCP domain interacts with its target DNA. We report biochemical characterization and DNA binding properties of a TCP member in Arabidopsis thaliana, TCP4. We have shown that the 58-residue domain of TCP4 is essential and sufficient for binding to DNA and possesses DNA binding parameters comparable to canonical bHLH proteins. Using a yeast-based random mutagenesis screen and site-directed mutants, we identified the residues important for DNA binding and dimer formation. Mutants defective in binding and dimerization failed to rescue the phenotype of an Arabidopsis line lacking the endogenous TCP4 activity. By combining structure prediction, functional characterization of the mutants, and molecular modeling, we suggest a possible DNA binding mechanism for this class of transcription factors. PMID:20363772

  14. Universal protein binding microarrays for the comprehensive characterization of the DNA binding specificities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology provides a rapid, high-throughput means of characterizing the in vitro DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs). Using high-density, custom-designed microarrays containing all 10-mer sequence variants, one can obtain comprehensive binding site measurements for any TF, regardless of its structural class or species of origin. Here, we present a protocol for the examination and analysis of TF binding specificities at high resolution using such ‘all 10-mer’ universal PBMs. This procedure involves double-stranding a commercially synthesized DNA oligonucleotide array, binding a TF directly to the double-stranded DNA microarray, and labeling the protein-bound microarray with a fluorophore-conjugated antibody. We describe how to computationally extract the relative binding preferences of the examined TF for all possible contiguous and gapped 8-mers over the full range of affinities, from highest affinity sites to nonspecific sites. Multiple proteins can be tested in parallel in separate chambers on a single microarray, enabling the processing of a dozen or more TFs in a single day. PMID:19265799

  15. TATA-box DNA binding activity and subunit composition for RNA polymerase III transcription factor IIIB from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    McBryant, S J; Meier, E; Leresche, A; Sharp, S J; Wolf, V J; Gottesfeld, J M

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB contains the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) and polymerase III-specific TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previous studies have shown that DNA oligonucleotides containing the consensus TATA-box sequence inhibit polymerase III transcription, implying that the DNA binding domain of TBP is exposed in TFIIIB. We have investigated the TATA-box DNA binding activity of Xenopus TFIIIB, using transcription inhibition assays and a gel mobility shift assay. Gel shift competition assays with mutant and nonspecific DNAs demonstrate the specificity of the TFIIIB-TATA box DNA complex. The apparent dissociation constant for this protein-DNA interaction is approximately 0.4 nM, similar to the affinity of yeast TBP for the same sequence. TFIIIB transcriptional activity and TATA-box binding activity cofractionate during a series of four ion-exchange chromatographic steps, and reconstituted transcription reactions demonstrate that the TATA-box DNA-protein complex contains TFIIIB TAF activity. Polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 75 and 92 kDa are associated with TBP in this complex. These polypeptides were renatured after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels and tested individually and in combination for TFIIIB TAF activity. Recombinant TBP along with protein fractions containing the 75- and 92-kDa polypeptides were sufficient to reconstitute TFIIIB transcriptional activity and DNA binding activity, suggesting that Xenopus TFIIIB is composed of TBP along with these polypeptides. PMID:8756620

  16. S-nitrosylation influences the structure and DNA binding activity of AtMYB30 transcription factor from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Carolina Pereira; Vernal, Javier; Delena, Ricardo Alexandre; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Cassia, Raul; Terenzi, Hernán

    2014-04-01

    MYB proteins are a family of transcription factors that play an important role in plant development and regulatory defense processes. Arabidopsis thaliana MYB30 (AtMYB30), a member of this protein family, is involved in cell death processes during the hypersensitive response (HR) of plants. HR is characterized by a vast production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). NO may thus influence the binding of AtMYB30 to DNA. In this work we evaluated the effect of NO on AtMYB30 DNA binding activity, and also in the protein structural properties. A fully active minimal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of AtMYB30 (residues 11-116) containing two cysteine residues (C49 and C53) was overexpressed and purified. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to obtain AtMYB30 DBD mutants C49A and C53A. The DNA binding activity of AtMYB30 DBD, and Cys single mutants is clearly inhibited upon incubation with a NO donor, and S-nitrosylation was confirmed by the biotin switch assay. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of NO effect on AtMYB30 DNA binding activity we performed circular dichroism analysis, to correlate the observed protein function inhibition and a potential structural impairment on AtMYB30 DBD. Indeed, NO modification of C49 and C53 residues promotes a subtle modification on the secondary structure of this transcription factor. We thus demonstrated, using various techniques, the in vitro effect of NO on AtMYB30 DBD, and thus the potential consequences of NO activity on plant metabolism influenced by this transcription factor.

  17. Targeting the DNA-binding activity of the human ERG transcription factor using new heterocyclic dithiophene diamidines

    PubMed Central

    Nhili, Raja; Peixoto, Paul; Depauw, Sabine; Flajollet, Sébastien; Dezitter, Xavier; Munde, Manoj M.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; Kumar, Arvind; Farahat, Abdelbasset A.; Stephens, Chad E.; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; David Wilson, W.; Boykin, David W.; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Direct modulation of gene expression by targeting oncogenic transcription factors is a new area of research for cancer treatment. ERG, an ETS-family transcription factor, is commonly over-expressed or translocated in leukaemia and prostate carcinoma. In this work, we selected the di-(thiophene-phenyl-amidine) compound DB1255 as an ERG/DNA binding inhibitor using a screening test of synthetic inhibitors of the ERG/DNA interaction followed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) validation. Spectrometry, footprint and biosensor-surface plasmon resonance analyses of the DB1255/DNA interaction evidenced sequence selectivity and groove binding as dimer. Additional EMSA evidenced the precise DNA-binding sequence required for optimal DB1255/DNA binding and thus for an efficient ERG/DNA complex inhibition. We further highlighted the structure activity relationships from comparison with derivatives. In cellulo luciferase assay confirmed this modulation both with the constructed optimal sequences and the Osteopontin promoter known to be regulated by ERG and which ERG-binding site was protected from DNaseI digestion on binding of DB1255. These data showed for the first time the ERG/DNA complex modulation, both in vitro and in cells, by a heterocyclic diamidine that specifically targets a portion of the ERG DNA recognition site. PMID:23093599

  18. Effect of DNA Binding on Geminate CO Recombination Kinetics in CO-sensing Transcription Factor CooA*

    PubMed Central

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas L.; Champion, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation activator (CooA) proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding in two CooA homologues, Rhodospirillum rubrum (RrCooA) and Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans (ChCooA). The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA-binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were specifically investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes take place on ultrafast time scales but remain non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the time scale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in the CooA proteins relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Comparison of the CO rebinding kinetics of RrCooA, truncated RrCooA, and DNA-bound RrCooA proteins reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA-binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases, and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted. The kinetic studies also offer insights into how the architecture of the heme environment can tune entropic barriers in order to control the geminate recombination of CO in heme proteins, whereas spin selection rules play a minor or non-existent role. PMID:22544803

  19. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  20. Phosphorylation Affects DNA-Binding of the Senescence-Regulating bZIP Transcription Factor GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Smykowski, Anja; Fischer, Stefan M.; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Massive changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana during onset and progression of leaf senescence imply a central role for transcription factors. While many transcription factors are themselves up- or down-regulated during senescence, the bZIP transcription factor G-box-binding factor 1 (GBF1/bZIP41) is constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis leaf tissue but at the same time triggers the onset of leaf senescence, suggesting posttranscriptional mechanisms for senescence-specific GBF1 activation. Here we show that GBF1 is phosphorylated by the threonine/serine CASEIN KINASE II (CKII) in vitro and that CKII phosphorylation had a negative effect on GBF1 DNA-binding to G-boxes of two direct target genes, CATALASE2 and RBSCS1a. Phosphorylation mimicry at three serine positions in the basic region of GBF1 also had a negative effect on DNA-binding. Kinase assays revealed that CKII phosphorylates at least one serine in the basic domain but has additional phosphorylation sites outside this domain. Two different ckII α subunit1 and one α subunit2 T-DNA insertion lines showed no visible senescence phenotype, but in all lines the expression of the senescence marker gene SAG12 was remarkably diminished. A model is presented suggesting that senescence-specific GBF1 activation might be achieved by lowering the phosphorylation of GBF1 by CKII. PMID:27135347

  1. Probing the kinetic landscape of Hox transcription factor-DNA binding in live cells by massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Krmpot, Aleksandar J; Nikolić, Stanko N; Krautz, Robert; Terenius, Lars; Tomancak, Pavel; Rigler, Rudolf; Gehring, Walter J; Vukojević, Vladana

    2015-11-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that control the formation of body structures, segment-specifically along the anterior-posterior axis of metazoans. Hox transcription factors bind nuclear DNA pervasively and regulate a plethora of target genes, deploying various molecular mechanisms that depend on the developmental and cellular context. To analyze quantitatively the dynamics of their DNA-binding behavior we have used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), single-point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). We show that the Hox transcription factor Sex combs reduced (Scr) forms dimers that strongly associate with its specific fork head binding site (fkh250) in live salivary gland cell nuclei. In contrast, dimers of a constitutively inactive, phospho-mimicking variant of Scr show weak, non-specific DNA-binding. Our studies reveal that nuclear dynamics of Scr is complex, exhibiting a changing landscape of interactions that is difficult to characterize by probing one point at a time. Therefore, we also provide mechanistic evidence using massively parallel FCS (mpFCS). We found that Scr dimers are predominantly formed on the DNA and are equally abundant at the chromosomes and an introduced multimeric fkh250 binding-site, indicating different mobilities, presumably reflecting transient binding with different affinities on the DNA. Our proof-of-principle results emphasize the advantages of mpFCS for quantitative characterization of fast dynamic processes in live cells.

  2. Discovery, optimization and validation of an optimal DNA-binding sequence for the Six1 homeodomain transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yubing; Nandi, Soumyadeep; Martel, André; Antoun, Alen; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Blais, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    The Six1 transcription factor is a homeodomain protein involved in controlling gene expression during embryonic development. Six1 establishes gene expression profiles that enable skeletal myogenesis and nephrogenesis, among others. While several homeodomain factors have been extensively characterized with regards to their DNA-binding properties, relatively little is known of the properties of Six1. We have used the genomic binding profile of Six1 during the myogenic differentiation of myoblasts to obtain a better understanding of its preferences for recognizing certain DNA sequences. DNA sequence analyses on our genomic binding dataset, combined with biochemical characterization using binding assays, reveal that Six1 has a much broader DNA-binding sequence spectrum than had been previously determined. Moreover, using a position weight matrix optimization algorithm, we generated a highly sensitive and specific matrix that can be used to predict novel Six1-binding sites with highest accuracy. Furthermore, our results support the idea of a mode of DNA recognition by this factor where Six1 itself is sufficient for sequence discrimination, and where Six1 domains outside of its homeodomain contribute to binding site selection. Together, our results provide new light on the properties of this important transcription factor, and will enable more accurate modeling of Six1 function in bioinformatic studies.

  3. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    PubMed

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-31

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  4. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  5. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs.

  6. Differential sensitivity to methylated DNA by ETS-family transcription factors is intrinsically encoded in their DNA-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Dominique C; Poon, Gregory M K

    2016-10-14

    Transactivation by the ETS family of transcription factors, whose members share structurally conserved DNA-binding domains, is variably sensitive to methylation of their target genes. The mechanism by which DNA methylation controls ETS proteins remains poorly understood. Uncertainly also pervades the effects of hemi-methylated DNA, which occurs following DNA replication and in response to hypomethylating agents, on site recognition by ETS proteins. To address these questions, we measured the affinities of two sequence-divergent ETS homologs, PU.1 and Ets-1, to DNA sites harboring a hemi- and fully methylated CpG dinucleotide. While the two proteins bound unmethylated DNA with indistinguishable affinity, their affinities to methylated DNA are markedly heterogeneous and exhibit major energetic coupling between the two CpG methylcytosines. Analysis of simulated DNA and existing co-crystal structures revealed that hemi-methylation induced non-local backbone and groove geometries that were not conserved in the fully methylated state. Indirect readout of these perturbations was differentially achieved by the two ETS homologs, with the distinctive interfacial hydration in PU.1/DNA binding moderating the inhibitory effects of DNA methylation on binding. This data established a biophysical basis for the pioneering properties associated with PU.1, which robustly bound fully methylated DNA, but not Ets-1, which was substantially inhibited.

  7. Dual regulation of heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) activation and DNA-binding activity by H2O2: role of thioredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier-Sarlin, M R; Polla, B S

    1996-01-01

    The heat-shock (HS) response is a ubiquitous cellular response to stress, involving the transcriptional activation of HS genes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to regulate the activity of a number of transcription factors. We investigated the redox regulation of the stress response and report here that in the human pre-monocytic line U937 cells, H2O2 induced a concentration-dependent transactivation and DNA-binding activity of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF-1). DNA-binding activity was, however, lower with H2O2 than with HS. We thus hypothesized a dual regulation of HSF by oxidants. We found that oxidizing agents, such as H2O2 and diamide, as well as alkylating agents, such as iodoacetic acid, abolished, in vitro, the HSF-DNA-binding activity induced by HS in vivo. The effects of H2O2 in vitro were reversed by the sulphydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol and the endogenous reductor thioredoxin (TRX), while the effects of iodoacetic acid were irreversible. In addition, TRX also restored the DNA-binding activity of HSF oxidized in vivo, while it was found to be itself induced in vivo by both HS and H2O2. Thus, H2O2 exerts dual effects on the activation and the DNA-binding activity of HSF: on the one hand, H2O2 favours the nuclear translocation of HSF, while on the other, it alters HSF-DNA-binding activity, most likely by oxidizing critical cysteine residues within the DNA-binding domain. HSF thus belongs to the group of ROS-modulated transcription factors. We propose that the time required for TRX induction, which may restore the DNA-binding activity of oxidized HSF, provides an explanation for the delay in heat-shock protein synthesis upon exposure of cells to ROS. PMID:8761470

  8. Induction of the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of heat shock factor 1 is uncoupled in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, S; Hnatov, A; Ali, A; Ovsenek, N

    1998-03-12

    The DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) are repressed under normal conditions and rapidly upregulated by heat stress. Here, we tested for the ability of various stress agents to activate HSF1 in the Xenopus oocyte model system. The HSE-binding activity of HSF1 was induced by a number of chemical stresses including cadmium, aluminum, iron, mercury, arsenite, ethanol, methanol, and salicylate. HSE-binding was not induced by several stresses known to induce the synthesis of hsps in other cell types in different organisms including zinc, copper, cobalt, manganese, recovery from anoxia, UV-irradiation, and increased pH. The inability of several known inducers of the stress response to activate the HSE-binding ability of HSF1 suggests that certain stress activation pathways may be absent or inactive in oocytes. The transcriptional activity of oocyte HSF1 was induced by heat, cadmium, and arsenite, but many of the agents that induced HSE-binding failed to stimulate HSF1-mediated transcription. The apparent uncoupling of inducible HSE-binding and transcriptional activities of HSF1 under a variety of stress regimes indicates that these events are regulated by independent mechanisms in the oocyte.

  9. Systematic mutational analysis of the LytTR DNA binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus virulence gene transcription factor AgrA

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Sophie S.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.; Burchell, Lynn; Escalera-Maurer, Andres; James, Ellen H.; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh

    2014-01-01

    Most DNA-binding bacterial transcription factors contact DNA through a recognition α-helix in their DNA-binding domains. An emerging class of DNA-binding transcription factors, predominantly found in pathogenic bacteria interact with the DNA via a relatively novel type of DNA-binding domain, called the LytTR domain, which mainly comprises β strands. Even though the crystal structure of the LytTR domain of the virulence gene transcription factor AgrA from Staphylococcus aureus bound to its cognate DNA sequence is available, the contribution of specific amino acid residues in the LytTR domain of AgrA to transcription activation remains elusive. Here, for the first time, we have systematically investigated the role of amino acid residues in transcription activation in a LytTR domain-containing transcription factor. Our analysis, which involves in vivo and in vitro analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of S. aureus AgrA identifies a highly conserved tyrosine residue, Y229, as a major amino acid determinant for maximal activation of transcription by AgrA and provides novel insights into structure–function relationships in S. aureus AgrA. PMID:25352558

  10. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain (“BEN-solo” factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  11. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors.

  12. POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, represses transcription of ADH5/FDH by interacting with the zinc finger and interfering with DNA binding activity of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Suh, Dongchul; Edenberg, Howard J; Hur, Man-Wook

    2002-07-26

    The POZ domain is a protein-protein interaction motif that is found in many transcription factors, which are important for development, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription repression. We cloned the POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, that recognizes the cis-element (bp -38 to -22) located just upstream of the core Sp1 binding sites (bp -22 to +22) of the ADH5/FDH minimal promoter (bp -38 to +61) in vitro and in vivo, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The ADH5/FDH minimal promoter is potently repressed by the FBI-1. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down showed that the POZ domains of FBI-1, Plzf, and Bcl-6 directly interact with the zinc finger DNA binding domain of Sp1. DNase I footprinting assays showed that the interaction prevents binding of Sp1 to the GC boxes of the ADH5/FDH promoter. Gal4-POZ domain fusions targeted proximal to the GC boxes repress transcription of the Gal4 upstream activator sequence-Sp1-adenovirus major late promoter. Our data suggest that POZ domain represses transcription by interacting with Sp1 zinc fingers and by interfering with the DNA binding activity of Sp1.

  13. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  14. Genome-wide analysis of the DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in bananas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-12-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. In this study, we report a genome-wide search for Musa acuminata Dof (MaDof) genes and their expression profiles at different developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of the Dof gene family in bananas is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 74 full-length protein-coding MaDof genes unevenly distributed on 11 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that MaDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDof I, II, III, and IV). The detailed genomic information of the MaDof gene homologs in the present study provides opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the exact role of the genes in plant growth and development.

  15. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding.

    PubMed

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-03-14

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations.

  16. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  17. Mga, a dual-specificity transcription factor that interacts with Max and contains a T-domain DNA-binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Hurlin, P J; Steingrìmsson, E; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Eisenman, R N

    1999-01-01

    The basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) proteins Myc, Mad and Mnt are part of a transcription activation/repression system involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. The function of these proteins as transcription factors is mediated by heterodimerization with the small bHLHZip protein Max, which is required for their specific DNA binding to E-box sequences. We have identified a novel Max-interacting protein, Mga, which contains a Myc-like bHLHZip motif, but otherwise shows no relationship with Myc or other Max-interacting proteins. Like Myc, Mad and Mnt proteins, Mga requires heterodimerization with Max for binding to the preferred Myc-Max-binding site CACGTG. In addition to the bHLHZip domain, Mga contains a second DNA-binding domain: the T-box or T-domain. The T-domain is a highly conserved DNA-binding motif originally defined in Brachyury and characteristic of the Tbx family of transcription factors. Mga binds the preferred Brachyury-binding sequence and represses transcription of reporter genes containing promoter-proximal Brachyury-binding sites. Surprisingly, Mga is converted to a transcription activator of both Myc-Max and Brachyury site-containing reporters in a Max-dependent manner. Our results suggest that Mga functions as a dual-specificity transcription factor that regulates the expression of both Max-network and T-box family target genes. PMID:10601024

  18. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  19. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping of DNA binding by a zinc-finger domain from the yeast transcription factor ADR1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedeskamp, M.; Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies have revealed that the minimal DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor ADR1 consists of two Cys2-His2 zinc fingers plus an additional 20 residues proximal and N-terminal to the fingers. We have assigned NMR 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts for the entire minimal DNA-binding domain of ADR1 both free and bound to specific DNA. 1H chemical shift values suggest little structural difference between the zinc fingers in this construct and in single-finger constructs, and 13C alpha chemical shift index analysis indicates little change in finger structure upon DNA binding. 1H chemical shift perturbations upon DNA binding are observed, however, and these are mapped to define the protein-DNA interface. The two zinc fingers appear to bind DNA with different orientations, as the entire helix of finger 1 is perturbed, while only the extreme N-terminus of the finger 2 helix is affected. Furthermore, residues N-terminal to the first finger undergo large chemical shift changes upon DNA binding suggesting a role at the protein-DNA interface. A striking correspondence is observed between the protein-DNA interface mapped by chemical shift changes and that previously mapped by mutagenesis. PMID:9300483

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits p53 sequence-specific DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and association with transcription factor ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X W; Forrester, K; Yeh, H; Feitelson, M A; Gu, J R; Harris, C C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic active hepatitis caused by infection with hepatitis B virus, a DNA virus, is a major risk factor for human hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the oncogenicity of several DNA viruses is dependent on the interaction of their viral oncoproteins with cellular tumor-suppressor gene products, we investigated the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) and human wild-type p53 protein. HBX complexes with the wild-type p53 protein and inhibits its sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro. HBX expression also inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo and the in vitro association of p53 and ERCC3, a general transcription factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. Therefore, HBX may affect a wide range of p53 functions and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:8134379

  1. Dual DNA binding specificity of a petal epidermis-specific MYB transcription factor (MYB.Ph3) from Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, R; Nieto, C; Avila, J; Cañas, L; Diaz, I; Paz-Ares, J

    1995-01-01

    The MYB.Ph3 protein recognized two DNA sequences that resemble the two known types of MYB DNA binding site: consensus I (MBSI), aaaAaaC(G/C)-GTTA, and consensus II (MBSII), aaaAGTTAGTTA. Optimal MBSI was recognized by animal c-MYB and not by Am305 from Antirrhinum, whereas MBSII showed the reverse behaviour. Different constraints on MYB.Ph3 binding to the two classes of sequences were demonstrated. DNA binding studies with mutated MBSI and MBSII and hydroxyl radical footprinting analysis, pointed to the N-terminal MYB repeat (R2) as the most involved in determining the dual DNA binding specificity of MYB.Ph3 and supported the idea that binding to MBSI and MBSII does not involve alternative orientations of the two repeats of MYB.Ph3. Minimal promoters containing either MBSI and MBSII were activated to the same extent by MYB.Ph3 in yeast, indicating that both types of binding site can be functionally equivalent. MYB.Ph3 binding sites are present in the promoter of flavonoid biosynthetic genes, such as the Petunia chsJ gene, which was transcriptionally activated by MYB.Ph3 in tobacco protoplasts. MYB.Ph3 was immunolocalized in the epidermal cell layer of petals, where flavonoid biosynthetic genes are actively expressed. This strongly suggests a role for MYB.Ph3 in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis. Images PMID:7737128

  2. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex

    PubMed Central

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-01-01

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel ‘recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4–Met28–Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity. PMID:22146299

  3. Two residues in the basic region of the yeast transcription factor Yap8 are crucial for its DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Catarina; Pimentel, Catarina; Matos, Rute G; Arraiano, Cecília M; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Yap8 is a key determinant in arsenic stress response. Contrary to Yap1, another basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) yeast regulator, Yap8 has a very restricted DNA-binding specificity and only orchestrates the expression of ACR2 and ACR3 genes. In the DNA-binding basic region, Yap8 has three distinct amino acids residues, Leu26, Ser29 and Asn31, at sites of highly conserved positions in the other Yap family of transcriptional regulators and Pap1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To evaluate whether these residues are relevant to Yap8 specificity, we first built a homology model of the complex Yap8bZIP-DNA based on Pap1-DNA crystal structure. Several Yap8 mutants were then generated in order to confirm the contribution of the residues predicted to interact with DNA. Using bioinformatics analysis together with in vivo and in vitro approaches, we have identified several conserved residues critical for Yap8-DNA binding. Moreover, our data suggest that Leu26 is required for Yap8 binding to DNA and that this residue together with Asn31, hinder Yap1 response element recognition by Yap8, thus narrowing its DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore our results point to a role of these two amino acids in the stability of the Yap8-DNA complex.

  4. Cyclic AMP-responsive expression of the surfactant protein-A gene is mediated by increased DNA binding and transcriptional activity of thyroid transcription factor-1.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Gao, E; Mendelson, C R

    1998-02-20

    Surfactant protein (SP)-A gene transcription is stimulated by factors that increase cyclic AMP. In the present study, we observed that three thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) binding elements (TBEs) located within a 255 base pair region flanking the 5'-end of the baboon SP-A2 (bSP-A2) gene are required for maximal cyclic AMP induction of bSP-A2 promoter activity. We found that TTF-1 DNA binding activity was increased in nuclear extracts of pulmonary type II cells cultured in the presence of cyclic AMP. By contrast, the levels of immunoreactive TTF-1 protein were similar in nuclear extracts of control and cyclic AMP-treated type II cells. The incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate into immunoprecipitated TTF-1 protein also was markedly increased by cyclic AMP treatment. Moreover, exposure of nuclear extracts from cyclic AMP-treated type II cells either to potato acid phosphatase or alkaline phosphatase abolished the cyclic AMP-induced increase in TTF-1 DNA-binding activity. Interestingly, the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to activate protein kinase C, also enhanced incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate into TTF-1 protein; however, the DNA binding activity of TTF-1 was decreased in nuclear extracts of TPA-treated type II cells. Expression vectors encoding TTF-1 and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-cat) were cotransfected into A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells together with an SPA:human growth hormone fusion gene (255 base pairs of 5'-flanking DNA from the baboon SP-A2 gene linked to human growth hormone, as reporter) containing TBEs, or with a reporter gene construct containing three tandem TBEs fused upstream of the bSP-A2 gene TATA box and the transcription initiation site. Coexpression of TTF-1 and PKA-cat increased fusion gene expression 3-4-fold as compared with expression of TTF-1 in the absence of PKA-cat. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of TTF-1 was suppressed by cotransfection of a dominant negative form

  5. Equal impact of diffusion and DNA binding rates on the potential spatial distribution of nuclear factor κB transcription factor inside the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A M; Kel, A; Nikolaev, E N; Moshkovskii, S A

    2014-06-01

    There are two physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of transcription factor molecules entering the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, the binding to genomic DNA and the diffusion throughout the nuclear volume. Comparison of the DNA-protein association rate constant and the protein diffusion constant may determine which one is the limiting factor. If the process is diffusion-limited, transcription factor molecules are captured by DNA before their even distribution in the nuclear volume. Otherwise, if the reaction rate is limiting, these molecules diffuse evenly and then find their binding sites. Using well-studied human NF-κB dimer as an example, we calculated its diffusion constant using the Debye-Smoluchowski equation. The value of diffusion constant was about 10(-15) cm(3)/s, and it was comparable to the NF-κB association rate constant for DNA binding known from previous studies. Thus, both diffusion and DNA binding play an equally important role in NF-κB spatial distribution. The importance of genome 3D-structure in gene expression regulation and possible dependence of gene expression on the local concentration of open chromatin can be hypothesized from our theoretical estimate.

  6. Addition and correction: the NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity observed in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts is due to the GBF transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Traincard, F; Ponte, E; Pun, J; Coukell, B; Veron, M

    2001-10-01

    We have previously reported that a NF-kappa B transduction pathway was likely to be present in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. This conclusion was based on several observations, including the detection of developmentally regulated DNA binding proteins in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts that bound to bona fide kappa B sequences. We have now performed additional experiments which demonstrate that the protein responsible for this NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity is the Dictyostelium GBF (G box regulatory element binding factor) transcription factor. This result, along with the fact that no sequence with significant similarity to components of the mammalian NF-kappa B pathway can be found in Dictyostelium genome, now almost entirely sequenced, led us to reconsider our previous conclusion on the occurrence of a NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway in Dictyostelium.

  7. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of vIRF-1 from the oncogenic KSHV reveals a conserved fold for DNA binding and reinforces its role as a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Venkatachalam, Rajakannan; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Lim, Bee Ting; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes four viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), where the most studied is vIRF-1. Even though vIRF-1 shows sequence homology to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of human IRFs, a specific role for this domain in vIRF-1’s function has remained uncertain. To provide insights into the function of the vIRF-1 DBD, we have determined the crystal structure of it in complex with DNA and in its apo-form. Using a thermal stability shift assay (TSSA), we show that the vIRF-1 DBD binds DNA, whereas full-length vIRF-1 does not, suggesting a cis-acting regulatory mechanism in similarity to human IRFs. The complex structure of vIRF-1 DBD reveals interactions with the DNA backbone and the positioning of two arginines for specific recognition in the major grove. A superimposition with human IRF-3 reveals a similar positioning of the two specificity-determining arginines, and additional TSSAs indicate binding of vIRF-1 to an IRF-3 operator consensus sequence. The results from this study, therefore, provide support that vIRF-1 has evolved to bind DNA and plays a role in DNA binding in the context of transcriptional regulation and might act on some of the many operator sequences controlled by human IRF-3. PMID:23435230

  8. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  9. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Zsolt; Sebastian, Alvaro; Xu, Wenjia; Grain, Damaris; Salsac, Fabien; Avon, Alexandra; Berger, Nathalie; Tran, Joseph; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Lurin, Claire; Lepiniec, Loïc; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Dubos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs). Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments) with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences. PMID:26484765

  10. The MotA transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 contains a novel DNA-binding domain : the 'double wing' motif.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Sickmier, E. A.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; White, S. W.; Biosciences Division; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center; Corixa Inc.

    2002-01-01

    MotA is a transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 that helps adapt the host Escherichia coli transcription apparatus to T4 middle promoters. We have determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of MotA (MotCF) to 1.6 A resolution using multiwavelength, anomalous diffraction methods. The structure reveals a novel DNA-binding alpha/beta motif that contains an exposed beta-sheet surface that mediates interactions with the DNA. Independent biochemical experiments have shown that MotCF binds to one surface of a single turn of DNA through interactions in adjacent major and minor grooves. We present a model of the interaction in which beta-ribbons at opposite corners of the six-stranded beta-sheet penetrate the DNA grooves, and call the motif a 'double wing' to emphasize similarities to the 'winged-helix' motif. The model is consistent with data on how MotA functions at middle promoters, and provides an explanation for why MotA can form non-specific multimers on DNA.

  11. Crystal structure of the DNA binding domain of the transcription factor T-bet suggests simultaneous recognition of distant genome sites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ce Feng; Brandt, Gabriel S.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Naumova, Natalia; Lazarevic, Vanja; Hwang, Eun Sook; Dekker, Job; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor T-bet (Tbox protein expressed in T cells) is one of the master regulators of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. It plays a central role in T-cell lineage commitment, where it controls the TH1 response, and in gene regulation in plasma B-cells and dendritic cells. T-bet is a member of the Tbox family of transcription factors; however, T-bet coordinately regulates the expression of many more genes than other Tbox proteins. A central unresolved question is how T-bet is able to simultaneously recognize distant Tbox binding sites, which may be located thousands of base pairs away. We have determined the crystal structure of the Tbox DNA binding domain (DBD) of T-bet in complex with a palindromic DNA. The structure shows a quaternary structure in which the T-bet dimer has its DNA binding regions splayed far apart, making it impossible for a single dimer to bind both sites of the DNA palindrome. In contrast to most other Tbox proteins, a single T-bet DBD dimer binds simultaneously to identical half-sites on two independent DNA. A fluorescence-based assay confirms that T-bet dimers are able to bring two independent DNA molecules into close juxtaposition. Furthermore, chromosome conformation capture assays confirm that T-bet functions in the direct formation of chromatin loops in vitro and in vivo. The data are consistent with a looping/synapsing model for transcriptional regulation by T-bet in which a single dimer of the transcription factor can recognize and coalesce distinct genetic elements, either a promoter plus a distant regulatory element, or promoters on two different genes. PMID:27791029

  12. Identification of a sequence-specific DNA binding factor required for transcription of the barley chloroplast blue light-responsive psbD-psbC promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M; Mullet, J E

    1995-01-01

    The plastid gene psbD encodes the photosystem II reaction center chlorophyll protein D2. psbD is located in a complex operon that includes psbC, psbK, psbl, orf62, and trnG. The operon is transcribed from at least three different promoters. One of the psbD promoters is differentially activated when plants are exposed to blue light. In this study, the psbD blue light-responsive promoter was accurately transcribed in vitro in high-salt extracts of barley plastids. Transcription required supercoiled templates and was inhibited by tagetitoxin, an inhibitor of plastid transcription. Escherichia coli RNA polymerase did not recognize the psbD light-responsive promoter with the same specificity as plastid RNA polymerase. Deletion analyses demonstrated that sequences between -39 and -68, upstream of the transcription initiation site, were required for transcription of the psbD blue light-responsive promoter. This DNA region is highly conserved among plant species and contains multiple AAG sequences. Gel shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments demonstrated that the AAG-rich DNA sequence interacts with a sequence-specific DNA binding factor termed AGF. Point mutations in the AAG cis element decreased binding of AGF and inhibited transcription from the psbD light-responsive promoter. We concluded that AGF is an essential factor required for transcription of the psbD light-responsive promoter. PMID:8589628

  13. A Novel RNA Polymerase I Transcription Initiation Factor, TIF-IE, Commits rRNA Genes by Interaction with TIF-IB, Not by DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khouri, Anna Maria; Paule, Marvin R.

    2002-01-01

    In the small, free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, rRNA transcription requires, in addition to RNA polymerase I, a single DNA-binding factor, transcription initiation factor IB (TIF-IB). TIF-IB is a multimeric protein that contains TATA-binding protein (TBP) and four TBP-associated factors that are specific for polymerase I transcription. TIF-IB is required for accurate and promoter-specific initiation of rRNA transcription, recruiting and positioning the polymerase on the start site by protein-protein interaction. In A. castellanii, partially purified TIF-IB can form a persistent complex with the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) promoter while homogeneous TIF-IB cannot. An additional factor, TIF-IE, is required along with homogeneous TIF-IB for the formation of a stable complex on the rDNA core promoter. We show that TIF-IE by itself, however, does not bind to the rDNA promoter and thus differs in its mechanism from the upstream binding factor and upstream activating factor, which carry out similar complex-stabilizing functions in vertebrates and yeast, respectively. In addition to its presence in impure TIF-IB, TIF-IE is found in highly purified fractions of polymerase I, with which it associates. Renaturation of polypeptides excised from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels showed that a 141-kDa polypeptide possesses all the known activities of TIF-IE. PMID:11784852

  14. Identification of Position-Specific Correlations between DNA-Binding Domains and Their Binding Sites. Application to the MerR Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Andrey A.; Rakhmaininova, Alexandra B.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    The large and increasing volume of genomic data analyzed by comparative methods provides information about transcription factors and their binding sites that, in turn, enables statistical analysis of correlations between factors and sites, uncovering mechanisms and evolution of specific protein-DNA recognition. Here we present an online tool, Prot-DNA-Korr, designed to identify and analyze crucial protein-DNA pairs of positions in a family of transcription factors. Correlations are identified by analysis of mutual information between columns of protein and DNA alignments. The algorithm reduces the effects of common phylogenetic history and of abundance of closely related proteins and binding sites. We apply it to five closely related subfamilies of the MerR family of bacterial transcription factors that regulate heavy metal resistance systems. We validate the approach using known 3D structures of MerR-family proteins in complexes with their cognate DNA binding sites and demonstrate that a significant fraction of correlated positions indeed form specific side-chain-to-base contacts. The joint distribution of amino acids and nucleotides hence may be used to predict changes of specificity for point mutations in transcription factors. PMID:27690309

  15. Synergy of aromatic residues and phosphoserines within the intrinsically disordered DNA-binding inhibitory elements of the Ets-1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Meeker, Charles A; Bhachech, Niraja; Currie, Simon L; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-07-29

    The E26 transformation-specific (Ets-1) transcription factor is autoinhibited by a conformationally disordered serine-rich region (SRR) that transiently interacts with its DNA-binding ETS domain. In response to calcium signaling, autoinhibition is reinforced by calmodulin-dependent kinase II phosphorylation of serines within the SRR. Using mutagenesis and quantitative DNA-binding measurements, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-enhanced autoinhibition requires the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine (ϕ) residues adjacent to the SRR phosphoacceptor serines. The introduction of additional phosphorylated Ser-ϕ-Asp, but not Ser-Ala-Asp, repeats within the SRR dramatically reinforces autoinhibition. NMR spectroscopic studies of phosphorylated and mutated SRR variants, both within their native context and as separate trans-acting peptides, confirmed that the aromatic residues and phosphoserines contribute to the formation of a dynamic complex with the ETS domain. Complementary NMR studies also identified the SRR-interacting surface of the ETS domain, which encompasses its positively charged DNA-recognition interface and an adjacent region of neutral polar and nonpolar residues. Collectively, these studies highlight the role of aromatic residues and their synergy with phosphoserines in an intrinsically disordered regulatory sequence that integrates cellular signaling and gene expression.

  16. Structure of bacterial transcription factor SpoIIID and evidence for a novel mode of DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Himes, Paul; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yang; Lu, Zhenwei; Liu, Aizhuo; Yan, Honggao; Kroos, Lee

    2014-06-01

    SpoIIID is evolutionarily conserved in endospore-forming bacteria, and it activates or represses many genes during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis. An SpoIIID monomer binds DNA with high affinity and moderate sequence specificity. In addition to a predicted helix-turn-helix motif, SpoIIID has a C-terminal basic region that contributes to DNA binding. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of SpoIIID in complex with DNA revealed that SpoIIID does indeed have a helix-turn-helix domain and that it has a novel C-terminal helical extension. Residues in both of these regions interact with DNA, based on the NMR data and on the effects on DNA binding in vitro of SpoIIID with single-alanine substitutions. These data, as well as sequence conservation in SpoIIID binding sites, were used for information-driven docking to model the SpoIIID-DNA complex. The modeling resulted in a single cluster of models in which the recognition helix of the helix-turn-helix domain interacts with the major groove of DNA, as expected. Interestingly, the C-terminal extension, which includes two helices connected by a kink, interacts with the adjacent minor groove of DNA in the models. This predicted novel mode of binding is proposed to explain how a monomer of SpoIIID achieves high-affinity DNA binding. Since SpoIIID is conserved only in endospore-forming bacteria, which include important pathogenic Bacilli and Clostridia, whose ability to sporulate contributes to their environmental persistence, the interaction of the C-terminal extension of SpoIIID with DNA is a potential target for development of sporulation inhibitors.

  17. Structural Determination of Functional Domains in Early B-cell Factor (EBF) Family of Transcription Factors Reveals Similarities to Rel DNA-binding Proteins and a Novel Dimerization Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Siponen, Marina I.; Wisniewska, Magdalena; Lehtiö, Lari; Johansson, Ida; Svensson, Linda; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Nilsson, Lennart; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Berglund, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The early B-cell factor (EBF) transcription factors are central regulators of development in several organs and tissues. This protein family shows low sequence similarity to other protein families, which is why structural information for the functional domains of these proteins is crucial to understand their biochemical features. We have used a modular approach to determine the crystal structures of the structured domains in the EBF family. The DNA binding domain reveals a striking resemblance to the DNA binding domains of the Rel homology superfamily of transcription factors but contains a unique zinc binding structure, termed zinc knuckle. Further the EBF proteins contain an IPT/TIG domain and an atypical helix-loop-helix domain with a novel type of dimerization motif. The data presented here provide insights into unique structural features of the EBF proteins and open possibilities for detailed molecular investigations of this important transcription factor family. PMID:20592035

  18. Regions outside the DNA-binding domain are critical for proper in vivo specificity of an archetypal zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Burdach, Jon; Funnell, Alister P W; Mak, Ka Sin; Artuz, Crisbel M; Wienert, Beeke; Lim, Wooi F; Tan, Lit Yeen; Pearson, Richard C M; Crossley, Merlin

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are often regarded as being composed of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a functional domain. The two domains are considered separable and autonomous, with the DBD directing the factor to its target genes and the functional domain imparting transcriptional regulation. We examined an archetypal zinc finger (ZF) TF, Krüppel-like factor 3 with an N-terminal domain that binds the corepressor CtBP and a DBD composed of three ZFs at its C-terminus. We established a system to compare the genomic occupancy profile of wild-type Krüppel-like factor 3 with two mutants affecting the N-terminal functional domain: a mutant unable to contact the cofactor CtBP and a mutant lacking the entire N-terminal domain, but retaining the ZFs intact. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing was used to assess binding across the genome in murine embryonic fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observe that mutations in the N-terminal domain generally reduced binding, but there were also instances where binding was retained or even increased. These results provide a clear demonstration that the correct localization of TFs to their target genes is not solely dependent on their DNA-contact domains. This informs our understanding of how TFs operate and is of relevance to the design of artificial ZF proteins.

  19. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  20. N-Termini of Fungal CSL Transcription Factors Are Disordered, Enriched in Regulatory Motifs and Inhibit DNA Binding in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Atkinson, Sophie R.; Ptáčková, Martina; McLean, Janel R.; Gould, Kathleen; Folk, Petr; Půta, František; Bähler, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    Background CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M) can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2), we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Conclusions/Significance This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology. PMID:21858190

  1. Mechanistic heterogeneity in site recognition by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of the ETS family transcription factors Ets-1 and PU.1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D; Wilson, W David; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-08-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a "dry" mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1 · DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages.

  2. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Site Recognition by the Structurally Homologous DNA-binding Domains of the ETS Family Transcription Factors Ets-1 and PU.1*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H.; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D.; Wilson, W. David; Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a “dry” mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1·DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. PMID:24952944

  3. CCAAT box binding protein NF-Y facilitates in vivo recruitment of upstream DNA binding transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K L; Vilen, B J; Itoh-Lindstrom, Y; Moore, T L; Li, G; Criscitiello, M; Cogswell, P; Clarke, J B; Ting, J P

    1994-01-01

    NF-Y binds a CCAAT motif found in many eukaryotic polymerase II-dependent promoters. In the HLA-DRA promoter it has been demonstrated that stereo-specific alignment between this motif and the upstream elements X1 and X2 is required for activation. To study the underlying mechanism for this requirement, a panel of transfected cell lines that maintained integrated, wild-type and mutant promoters were analyzed by in vivo genomic footprinting. Cell lines harboring a mutated CCAAT element exhibited a loss of interactions at the CCAAT site, as expected, and no transcriptional activity. Most importantly, mutation of the CCAAT sequence nearly abolished in vivo binding at the X1 and X2 sites, while mutations of X1 and X2 had little effect on CCAAT box binding. However, X1 and X2 binding was interdependent. In vitro, X1 binding activities are known to be stabilized by NF-Y binding. Interaction between NF-Y and X box binding proteins was demonstrated by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation in the absence of DNA and co-affinity purification in the presence of DNA. Collectively, these studies indicate that occupancy of the CCAAT element represents an early event affecting other protein-DNA interactions and suggest that NF-Y stabilizes and interacts with X box factors to mediate this function. These findings may represent a common theme among promoters containing a CCAAT element. Images PMID:8076600

  4. Distinctive features of Egr transcription factor regulation and DNA binding activity in CA1 of the hippocampus in synaptic plasticity and consolidation and reconsolidation of fear memory.

    PubMed

    Cheval, Hélène; Chagneau, Carine; Levasseur, Grégoire; Veyrac, Alexandra; Faucon-Biguet, Nicole; Laroche, Serge; Davis, Sabrina

    2012-03-01

    Activity-dependent regulation of Egr1/Zif268, a transcription factor (TF) of the Egr family, is essential for stabilization of dentate gyrus synaptic plasticity and consolidation and reconsolidation of several forms of memory. The gene can be rapidly induced in selective brain circuits after certain types of learning or after recall. Here, we focused on area CA1 and examined regulation of Egr1, Egr2, and Egr3 mRNA and protein, and their DNA binding activity to the Egr response element (ERE) at different times after LTP in vivo and after learning and recall of a fear memory. We found LTP in CA1 leads to rapid induction of the three Egrs, however only Egr1 protein was overexpressed without a co-ordinated change in binding activity, indicating a fundamental difference between CA1 and dentate gyrus LTP. Our investigations in fear memory reveal that both learning and retrieval lead to an increase in binding of constitutively expressed Egr1 and Egr3 to the ERE, but not Egr2. Memory recall was also associated with increased Egr1 protein translation. The nature and temporal dynamics of these changes and tests for interactions between TFs suggest that in addition to ERE-mediated transcription, Egr1 in CA1 may interact with the TF c-Fos to regulate genes via other DNA response elements.

  5. Sequence Discrimination by DNA-binding Domain of ETS Family Transcription Factor PU.1 Is Linked to Specific Hydration of Protein-DNA Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2012-01-01

    PU.1 is an essential transcription factor in normal hematopoietic lineage development. It recognizes a large number of promoter sites differing only in bases flanking a core consensus of 5′-GGAA-3′. DNA binding is mediated by its ETS domain, whose sequence selectivity directly corresponds to the transactivational activity and frequency of binding sites for full-length PU.1 in vivo. To better understand the basis of sequence discrimination, we characterized its binding properties to a high affinity and low affinity site. Despite sharing a homologous structural framework as confirmed by DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprinting, the two complexes exhibit striking heterogeneity in terms of hydration properties. High affinity binding is destabilized by osmotic stress, whereas low affinity binding is insensitive. Dimethyl sulfate footprinting showed that the major groove at the core consensus is protected in the high affinity complex but accessible in the low affinity one. Finally, destabilization of low affinity binding by salt is in quantitative agreement with the number of phosphate contacts but is substantially attenuated in high affinity binding. These observations support a mechanism of sequence discrimination wherein specifically bound water molecules couple flanking backbone contacts with base-specific interactions in a sequestered cavity at the core consensus. The implications of this model with respect to other ETS paralogs are discussed. PMID:22474303

  6. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in potato.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. Here, we report a genome-wide search for Solanum tuberosum Dof (StDof) genes and their expression profiles at various developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of Dof gene family in potato is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 35 full-length protein-coding StDof genes, unevenly distributed on 10 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that StDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDofI, II, III, and IV). qPCR expression analysis of StDof gene transcripts showed the distinct expression patterns of StDof genes in various potato organs, and tuber developmental stages analyzed. Many StDof genes were upregulated in response to drought, salinity, and ABA treatments. Overall, the StDof gene expression pattern and the number of over-represented cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the StDof genes indicate that most of the StDof genes have redundant functions. The detailed genomic information and expression profiles of the StDof gene homologs in the present study provide opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the genes' exact role in plant growth and development as well as in abiotic stress tolerance.

  7. ChIP-exo signal associated with DNA-binding motifs provides insight into the genomic binding of the glucocorticoid receptor and cooperating transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Starick, Stephan R.; Ibn-Salem, Jonas; Jurk, Marcel; Hernandez, Céline; Love, Michael I.; Chung, Ho-Ryun; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.

    2015-01-01

    The classical DNA recognition sequence of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) appears to be present at only a fraction of bound genomic regions. To identify sequences responsible for recruitment of this transcription factor (TF) to individual loci, we turned to the high-resolution ChIP-exo approach. We exploited this signal by determining footprint profiles of TF binding at single-base-pair resolution using ExoProfiler, a computational pipeline based on DNA binding motifs. When applied to our GR and the few available public ChIP-exo data sets, we find that ChIP-exo footprints are protein- and recognition sequence-specific signatures of genomic TF association. Furthermore, we show that ChIP-exo captures information about TFs other than the one directly targeted by the antibody in the ChIP procedure. Consequently, the shape of the ChIP-exo footprint can be used to discriminate between direct and indirect (tethering to other DNA-bound proteins) DNA association of GR. Together, our findings indicate that the absence of classical recognition sequences can be explained by direct GR binding to a broader spectrum of sequences than previously known, either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer binding together with a member of the ETS or TEAD families of TFs, or alternatively by indirect recruitment via FOX or STAT proteins. ChIP-exo footprints also bring structural insights and locate DNA:protein cross-link points that are compatible with crystal structures of the studied TFs. Overall, our generically applicable footprint-based approach uncovers new structural and functional insights into the diverse ways of genomic cooperation and association of TFs. PMID:25720775

  8. bZIP Transcription Factors in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans with Novel DNA-Binding Domains Are Involved in Defense against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs. PMID:23975888

  9. bZIP transcription factors in the oomycete phytophthora infestans with novel DNA-binding domains are involved in defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I; Judelson, Howard S

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs.

  10. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacological modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation.

    PubMed

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M K; Wilson, W David

    2013-05-27

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤10(5)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>10(7)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes.

  11. Identification of a Bipartite Jasmonate-Responsive Promoter Element in the Catharanthus roseus ORCA3 Transcription Factor Gene That Interacts Specifically with AT-Hook DNA-Binding Proteins1[W

    PubMed Central

    Vom Endt, Débora; Soares e Silva, Marina; Kijne, Jan W.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Memelink, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant signaling molecules that play key roles in defense against certain pathogens and insects, among others, by controlling the biosynthesis of protective secondary metabolites. In Catharanthus roseus, the APETALA2-domain transcription factor ORCA3 is involved in the jasmonate-responsive activation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic genes. ORCA3 gene expression is itself induced by jasmonate. By loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we located a 74-bp region within the ORCA3 promoter, which contains an autonomous jasmonate-responsive element (JRE). The ORCA3 JRE is composed of two important sequences: a quantitative sequence responsible for a high level of expression and a qualitative sequence that appears to act as an on/off switch in response to methyl jasmonate. We isolated 12 different DNA-binding proteins having one of four different types of DNA-binding domains, using the ORCA3 JRE as bait in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) one-hybrid transcription factor screening. The binding of one class of proteins bearing a single AT-hook DNA-binding motif was affected by mutations in the quantitative sequence within the JRE. Two of the AT-hook proteins tested had a weak activating effect on JRE-mediated reporter gene expression, suggesting that AT-hook family members may be involved in determining the level of expression of ORCA3 in response to jasmonate. PMID:17496112

  12. Alternatively spliced products of the maize P gene encode proteins with homology to the DNA-binding domain of myb-like transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Grotewold, E; Athma, P; Peterson, T

    1991-01-01

    The Zea mays P gene has been postulated to regulate the biosynthetic pathway of a flavonoid-derived pigment in certain floral tissues [Styles, E. D. & Ceska, O. (1977) Can. J. Genet. Cytol. 19, 289-302]. We have characterized two P transcripts that are alternatively spliced at their 3' ends. One message of 1802 nucleotides encodes a 43.7-kDa protein with an N-terminal region showing approximately 40% homology to the DNA-binding domain of several members of the myb family of protooncogene proteins. A second message of 945 nucleotides encodes a 17.3-kDa protein that contains most of the myb-homologous domain but differs from the first protein at the C terminus. The deduced P-encoded proteins show an even higher homology (70%) in the myb-homologous domain to the maize regulatory gene C1. Additionally, the P and C1 genes are structurally similar in the sizes and positions of the first and second exons and first intron. We show that P is required for accumulation in the pericarp of transcripts of two genes (A1 and C2) encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis--genes also regulated by C1 in the aleurone. Images PMID:2052542

  13. Diarctigenin, a lignan constituent from Arctium lappa, down-regulated zymosan-induced transcription of inflammatory genes through suppression of DNA binding ability of nuclear factor-kappaB in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hak; Hong, Seong Su; Kwon, Soon Woo; Lee, Hwa Young; Sung, Hyeran; Lee, In-Jeong; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Chung, Daehyun; Ahn, Byeongwoo; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2008-11-01

    Diarctigenin was previously isolated as an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages from the seeds of Arctium lappa used as an alternative medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the molecular basis of these effects. Here, we demonstrated that diarctigenin inhibited the production of NO, prostaglandin E(2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 with IC(50) values of 6 to 12 miciroM in zymosan- or lipopolysaccharide-(LPS) activated macrophages. Diarctigenin attenuated zymosan-induced mRNA synthesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and also inhibited promoter activities of iNOS and cytokine genes in the cells. Because nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB plays a pivotal role in inflammatory gene transcription, we next investigated the effect of diarctigenin on NF-kappaB activation. Diarctigenin inhibited the transcriptional activity and DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB in zymosan-activated macrophages but did not affect the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitory kappaB (IkappaB) proteins. Moreover, diarctigenin suppressed expression vector NF-kappaB p65-elicited NF-kappaB activation and also iNOS promoter activity, indicating that the compound could directly target an NF-kappa-activating signal cascade downstream of IkappaB degradation and inhibit NF-kappaB-regulated iNOS expression. Diarctigenin also inhibited the in vitro DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB but did not affect the nuclear import of NF-kappaB p65 in the cells. Taken together, diarctigenin down-regulated zymosan- or LPS-induced inflammatory gene transcription in macrophages, which was due to direct inhibition of the DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB. Finally, this study provides a pharmacological potential of diarctigenin in the NF-kappaB-associated inflammatory disorders.

  14. Evaluation of DNA Binding Drugs as Inhibitors of ESX, and ETS Domain Transcription Factor Associated With Breast Cancer: Effects of ESX/DNA Complex Disruption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    the major groove simultaneously narrows. This distortion of the helix may contribute to the agent’s inhibition of TF/ DNA complex formation. Another...class of DNA binding agents is the intercalators, which slide the chromophore between the base pairs of DNA and lengthen the helix . This can adversely...7). This distortion of the helix may contribute to the agent’s inhibition of TF/ DNA complex formation (8-10). Another class of DNA binding agents is

  15. p53 represses Sp1 DNA binding and HIV-LTR directed transcription.

    PubMed

    Bargonetti, J; Chicas, A; White, D; Prives, C

    1997-11-01

    The HIV-LTR region contains binding sites for, and is regulated by, a number of transcription factors including Sp1 and NF-kB. The wild-type p53 tumor suppressor protein represses transcription from the HIV-LTR promoter while oncogenic mutant forms of p53 stimulate expression from the HIV-LTR. We have shown previously that wild-type p53 is a site specific DNA binding protein that binds to a region of the SV40 virus which contains GC-box DNA binding sites for the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor Sp1. In this study using DNase I footprinting, we have shown that purified p53 is able to protect the Sp1 binding sites and the adjacent NF-kB site of the HIV-LTR. Furthermore we have demonstrated that when p53 and Sp1 are mixed together both proteins change each other's interaction with DNA. Interestingly, we noted that oncogenic mutant p53 is also able to change the interaction of Sp1 with DNA. We confirmed p53 dependent repression of HIV-LTR driven transcription by comparing the expression from an HIV-LTR reporter construct in the presence and absence of p53. EMSA of an oligonucleotide sequence derived from the HIV-LTR sequence demonstrated a slight decrease in Sp1 DNA binding activity with nuclear extract derived from the cell line expressing a high level of wild-type p53. These data suggest that the influence of p53 on the transcription of promoters with Sp1 binding sites may be partially due to a change in the DNA binding ability of Sp1.

  16. Targeted expression of the DNA binding domain of DRE-binding factor, a Drosophila transcription factor, attenuates DNA replication of the salivary gland and eye imaginal disc.

    PubMed

    Hirose, F; Yamaguchi, M; Matsukage, A

    1999-09-01

    The promoters of Drosophila genes encoding DNA replication-related proteins contain transcription regulatory elements consisting of an 8-bp palindromic DNA replication-related element (DRE) sequence (5'-TATCGATA). The specific DRE-binding factor (DREF), a homodimer of the polypeptide with 709 amino acid residues, is a positive trans-acting factor for transcription of DRE-containing genes. Both DRE binding and dimer formation are associated with residues 16 to 115 of the N-terminal region. We have established transgenic flies expressing the full-length DREF polypeptide or its N-terminal fragment (amino acid residues 1 to 125) under the control of the heat shock promoter, the salivary gland-specific promoter, or the eye imaginal disc-specific promoter. Heat shock induction of the N-terminal fragment during embryonic, larval, or pupal stages caused greater than 50% lethality. This lethality was overcome by coexpression of the full-length DREF. In salivary glands of the transgenic larvae expressing the N-terminal fragment, this fragment formed a homodimer and a heterodimer with the endogenous DREF. Ectopic expression of the N-terminal fragment in salivary gland cells reduced the contents of mRNAs for the 180-kDa subunit of DNA polymerase alpha and for dE2F and the extent of DNA endoreplication. Ectopic expression of the N-terminal fragment in the eye imaginal discs significantly reduced DNA replication in cells at the second mitotic wave. The lines of evidence suggest that the N-terminal fragment can impede the endogenous DREF function in a dominant negative manner and that DREF is required for normal DNA replication in both mitotic cell cycle and endo cycle.

  17. The NMR solution structure of a mutant of the Max b/HLH/LZ free of DNA: insights into the specific and reversible DNA binding mechanism of dimeric transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Simon; Tremblay, Luc; Lavigne, Pierre

    2004-09-17

    Basic region-helix1-loop-helix2-leucine zipper (b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ) transcription factors bind specific DNA sequence in their target gene promoters as dimers. Max, a b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ transcription factor, is the obligate heterodimeric partner of the related b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ proteins of the Myc and Mad families. These heterodimers specifically bind E-box DNA sequence (CACGTG) to activate (e.g. c-Myc/Max) and repress (e.g. Mad1/Max) transcription. Max can also homodimerize and bind E-box sequences in c-Myc target gene promoters. While the X-ray structure of the Max b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ/DNA complex and that of others have been reported, the precise sequence of events leading to the reversible and specific binding of these important transcription factors is still largely unknown. In order to provide insights into the DNA binding mechanism, we have solved the NMR solution structure of a covalently homodimerized version of a Max b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ protein with two stabilizing mutations in the LZ, and characterized its backbone dynamics from (15)N spin-relaxation measurements in the absence of DNA. Apart from minor differences in the pitch of the LZ, possibly resulting from the mutations in the construct, we observe that the packing of the helices in the H(1)LH(2) domain is almost identical to that of the two crystal structures, indicating that no important conformational change in these helices occurs upon DNA binding. Conversely to the crystal structures of the DNA complexes, the first 14 residues of the basic region are found to be mostly unfolded while the loop is observed to be flexible. This indicates that these domains undergo conformational changes upon DNA binding. On the other hand, we find the last four residues of the basic region form a persistent helical turn contiguous to H(1). In addition, we provide evidence of the existence of internal motions in the backbone of H(1) that are of larger amplitude and longer time-scale (nanoseconds) than the ones in the H(2) and LZ domain

  18. An RNA aptamer that interferes with the DNA binding of the HSF transcription activator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoching; Shi, Hua; Sevilimedu, Aarti; Liachko, Nicole; Nelson, Hillary C M; Lis, John T

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor (HSF) is a conserved and highly potent transcription activator. It is involved in a wide variety of important biological processes including the stress response and specific steps in normal development. Reagents that interfere with HSF function would be useful for both basic studies and practical applications. We selected an RNA aptamer that binds to HSF with high specificity. Deletion analysis defined the minimal binding motif of this aptamer to be two stems and one stem-loop joined by a three-way junction. This RNA aptamer interferes with normal interaction of HSF with its DNA element, which is a key regulatory step for HSF function. The DNA-binding domain plus a flanking linker region on the HSF (DL) is essential for the RNA binding. Additionally, this aptamer inhibits HSF-induced transcription in vitro in the complex milieu of a whole cell extract. In contrast to the previously characterized NF-kappaB aptamer, the HSF aptamer does not simply mimic DNA binding, but rather binds to HSF in a manner distinct from DNA binding to HSF.

  19. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in E-box motifs ACAT|GTG and ACAC|GTG increases DNA-binding of the B-HLH transcription factor TCF4.

    PubMed

    Khund-Sayeed, Syed; He, Ximiao; Holzberg, Timothy; Wang, Jun; Rajagopal, Divya; Upadhyay, Shriyash; Durell, Stewart R; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Weirauch, Matthew T; Rose, Robert; Vinson, Charles

    2016-09-12

    We evaluated DNA binding of the B-HLH family members TCF4 and USF1 using protein binding microarrays (PBMs) containing double-stranded DNA probes with cytosine on both strands or 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) on one DNA strand and cytosine on the second strand. TCF4 preferentially bound the E-box motif (CAN|NTG) with strongest binding to the 8-mer CAG|GTGGT. 5mC uniformly decreases DNA binding of both TCF4 and USF1. The bulkier 5hmC also inhibited USF1 binding to DNA. In contrast, 5hmC dramatically enhanced TCF4 binding to E-box motifs ACAT|GTG and ACAC|GTG, being better bound than any 8-mer containing cytosine. Examination of X-ray structures of the closely related TCF3 and USF1 bound to DNA suggests TCF3 can undergo a conformational shift to preferentially bind to 5hmC while the USF1 basic region is bulkier and rigid precluding a conformation shift to bind 5hmC. These results greatly expand the regulatory DNA sequence landscape bound by TCF4.

  20. In Silico Analysis for Transcription Factors With Zn(II)2C6 Binuclear Cluster DNA-Binding Domains in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Maicas, Sergi; Moreno, Inmaculada; Nieto, Almudena; Gómez, Micaela; Sentandreu, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    A total of 6047 open reading frames in the Candida albicans genome were screened for Zn(II)2C6-type zinc cluster proteins (or binuclear cluster proteins) involved in DNA recognition. These fungal proteins are transcription regulators of genes involved in a wide range of cellular processes, including metabolism of different compounds such as sugars or amino acids, as well as multi-drug resistance, control of meiosis, cell wall architecture, etc. The selection criteria used in the sequence analysis were the presence of the CysX2CysX6CysX5-16CysX2CysX6-8Cys motif and a putative nuclear localization signal. Using this approach, 70 putative Zn(II)2C6 transcription factors have been found in the genome of C. albicans. PMID:18629206

  1. CtBP Levels Control Intergenic Transcripts, PHO/YY1 DNA Binding, and PcG Recruitment to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arindam; Atchison, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is a well-known corepressor of several DNA binding transcription factors in Drosophila as well as in mammals. CtBP is implicated in Polycomb Group (PcG) complex-mediated transcriptional repression because it can bind to some PcG proteins, and mutation of the ctbp gene in flies results in lost PcG protein recruitment to Polycomb Response Elements (PREs) and lost PcG repression. However, the mechanism of reduced PcG DNA binding in CtBP mutant backgrounds is unknown. We show here that in a Drosophila CtBP mutant background, intergenic transcripts are induced across several PRE sequences and this corresponds to reduced DNA binding by PcG proteins Pleiohomeotic (PHO) and Polycomb (Pc), and reduced trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 27, a hallmark of PcG repression. Restoration of CtBP levels by expression of a CtBP transgene results in repression of intergenic transcripts, restored PcG binding, and elevated trimethylation of H3 on lysine 27. Our results support a model in which CtBP regulates expression of intergenic transcripts that controls DNA binding by PcG proteins and subsequent histone modifications and transcriptional activity. PMID:20082324

  2. DNA-binding protects p53 from interactions with cofactors involved in transcription-independent functions

    PubMed Central

    Lambrughi, Matteo; De Gioia, Luca; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Nussinov, Ruth; Urani, Chiara; Bruschi, Maurizio; Papaleo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Binding-induced conformational changes of a protein at regions distant from the binding site may play crucial roles in protein function and regulation. The p53 tumour suppressor is an example of such an allosterically regulated protein. Little is known, however, about how DNA binding can affect distal sites for transcription factors. Furthermore, the molecular details of how a local perturbation is transmitted through a protein structure are generally elusive and occur on timescales hard to explore by simulations. Thus, we employed state-of-the-art enhanced sampling atomistic simulations to unveil DNA-induced effects on p53 structure and dynamics that modulate the recruitment of cofactors and the impact of phosphorylation at Ser215. We show that DNA interaction promotes a conformational change in a region 3 nm away from the DNA binding site. Specifically, binding to DNA increases the population of an occluded minor state at this distal site by more than 4-fold, whereas phosphorylation traps the protein in its major state. In the minor conformation, the interface of p53 that binds biological partners related to p53 transcription-independent functions is not accessible. Significantly, our study reveals a mechanism of DNA-mediated protection of p53 from interactions with partners involved in the p53 transcription-independent signalling. This also suggests that conformational dynamics is tightly related to p53 signalling. PMID:27604871

  3. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  4. [Analysis of protein-on-DNA binding profiles, detected with chIP-seq method, reveals possible interaction of specific transcription factors with RNA polymerase II in the process of transcription elongation].

    PubMed

    Belostotskiĭ, A A

    2012-01-01

    It is thought that in the course of mRNA transcription almost all transcription factors stay on a promoter while RNA polymerase II "clears" the promoter and "proceeds" to elongation. However, analysis of some specific transcription factors and RNA polymerase II binding profiles on DNA, detected with ChIP-seq method, revealed the possibility of interaction between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II in the process of transcription elongation.

  5. The high mobility group protein HMG I(Y) can stimulate or inhibit DNA binding of distinct transcription factor ATF-2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Du, W; Maniatis, T

    1994-11-22

    The high mobility group protein HMG I(Y) stimulates the binding of a specific isoform of the activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2(195)) to the interferon beta (IFN-beta) gene promoter. HMG I(Y) specifically interacts with the basic-leucine zipper region of ATF-2(195), and HMG I(Y) binds to two sites immediately flanking the ATF-2 binding site of the IFN-beta promoter. Here, we show that HMG I(Y) can stimulate the binding of ATF-2(195), at least in part, by promoting ATF-2 dimerization. In addition, we report the characterization of a naturally occurring isoform of ATF-2 (ATF-2(192)) that binds specifically to the IFN-beta promoter but is unable to interact with HMG I(Y). Remarkably, HMG I(Y) inhibits the binding of ATF-2(192) to the IFN-beta promoter. Thus, the ability of HMG I(Y) to specifically interact with ATF-2 correlates with its ability to stimulate ATF-2 binding to the IFN-beta promoter. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of the basic-leucine zipper domains of ATF-2(195) and ATF-2(192) suggest that HMG I(Y) interacts with a short stretch of basic amino acids near the amino terminus of the basic-leucine zipper domain of ATF-2(195).

  6. Discovery of Inhibitors of Aberrant Gene Transcription from Libraries of DNA Binding Molecules: Inhibition of LEF-1 Mediated Gene Transcription and Oncogenic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Stover, James S.; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K.; Boger, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA–LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1 mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1 driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was: (1) the use of a technically non-demanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds. PMID:19216569

  7. Discovery of inhibitors of aberrant gene transcription from Libraries of DNA binding molecules: inhibition of LEF-1-mediated gene transcription and oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    Stover, James S; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-03-11

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA-LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1-mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1-driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was (1) the use of a technically nondemanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds.

  8. Effect of in vitro administered 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on DNA-binding activities of nuclear transcription factors in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seong Gu; Sasagawa, Hiromi; Matsumura, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    TCDD is a very toxic environmental contaminant which is known to cause a variety of toxic symptoms in many species. Because of a myriad of biochemical changes TCDD is known to induce in many test animals, it has been difficult to pinpoint the causative event common to all those symptoms in different species. One of the research avenues we have been following is identification of the pattern of TCDD-induced changes in DNA binding characteristics of nuclear transcription factors (NTFs), each of which has the property to trigger a set of coordinated changes in many gene expressions. Since in our previous work we studied animals affected by TCDD in vivo using gel mobility shift assay approached with32P labeled oligonucleotide probes, we examined in the current study the possibility whether we could establish an equivalent in vitro system in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells so as to be able to learn the similarities and the dissimilarities of TCDD-induced responses of NTFs between in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that, for a large part, this in vitro test system could reasonably reproduce the pattern of changes occurring in vivo at the early stages of TCDD's action in terms of induced changes in binding of thes NTSs to DNA. The key features were TCDD induced upregulation of NTFs binding to the response elements for AP-1, dioxin (DRE) and T3 (thyroid hormone) and down-regulation of those to response elements (REs) for c-Myc, Sp-1 and retinoic acid receptor (RARE). However, the time course required the changes in DNA binding activity was much shorter in vitro. To study the basic cause for such changes in NTF binding, we studied the effects of exogenously added EGF, forskolin, TPA (12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol acetate) and TNFalpha on the expression of TCDD's action on some of these NTFs. The results showed that these agents indeed greatly influence the outcome. The most influential agents were TNFalpha, forskolin and EGF. These results indicate that this in vitro

  9. Genomic Heat Shock Element Sequences Drive Cooperative Human Heat Shock Factor 1 DNA Binding and Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Alex M.; Makley, Leah N.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) activates expression of a variety of genes involved in cell survival, including protein chaperones, the protein degradation machinery, anti-apoptotic proteins, and transcription factors. Although HSF1 activation has been linked to amelioration of neurodegenerative disease, cancer cells exhibit a dependence on HSF1 for survival. Indeed, HSF1 drives a program of gene expression in cancer cells that is distinct from that activated in response to proteotoxic stress, and HSF1 DNA binding activity is elevated in cycling cells as compared with arrested cells. Active HSF1 homotrimerizes and binds to a DNA sequence consisting of inverted repeats of the pentameric sequence nGAAn, known as heat shock elements (HSEs). Recent comprehensive ChIP-seq experiments demonstrated that the architecture of HSEs is very diverse in the human genome, with deviations from the consensus sequence in the spacing, orientation, and extent of HSE repeats that could influence HSF1 DNA binding efficacy and the kinetics and magnitude of target gene expression. To understand the mechanisms that dictate binding specificity, HSF1 was purified as either a monomer or trimer and used to evaluate DNA-binding site preferences in vitro using fluorescence polarization and thermal denaturation profiling. These results were compared with quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in vivo. We demonstrate a role for specific orientations of extended HSE sequences in driving preferential HSF1 DNA binding to target loci in vivo. These studies provide a biochemical basis for understanding differential HSF1 target gene recognition and transcription in neurodegenerative disease and in cancer. PMID:25204655

  10. Molecular mechanisms of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Grove, Anne

    2010-10-01

    Bacteria and archaea encode members of the large multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family of transcriptional regulators. Generally, MarR homologs regulate activity of genes involved in antibiotic resistance, stress responses, virulence or catabolism of aromatic compounds. They constitute a diverse group of transcriptional regulators that includes both repressors and activators, and the conventional mode of regulation entails a genetic locus in which the MarR homolog and a gene under its regulation are encoded divergently; binding of the MarR homolog to the intergenic region typically represses transcription of both genes, while binding of a specific ligand to the transcription factor results in attenuated DNA binding and hence activated gene expression. For many homologs, the natural ligand is unknown. Crystal structures reveal a common architecture with a characteristic winged helix domain for DNA binding, and recent structural information of homologs solved both in the absence and presence of their respective ligands, as well as biochemical data, is finally converging to illuminate the mechanisms by which ligand-binding causes attenuated DNA binding. As MarR homologs regulate pathways that are critical to bacterial physiology, including virulence, a molecular understanding of mechanisms by which ligands affect a regulation of gene activity is essential. Specifying the position of ligand-binding pockets further has the potential to aid in identifying the ligands for MarR homologs for which the ligand remains unknown.

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) replication and transcription factor activates the K9 (vIRF) gene through two distinct cis elements by a non-DNA-binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keiji; Ishikawa, Kayo; Nishimura, Ken; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Do, Eunju; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2002-12-01

    The replication and transcription activator (RTA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), or human herpesvirus 8, a homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 or Rta, is a strong transactivator and inducer of lytic replication. RTA acting alone can induce lytic replication of KSHV in infected cell lines that originated from primary effusion lymphomas, leading to virus production. During the lytic replication process, RTA activates many kinds of genes, including polyadenylated nuclear RNA, K8, K9 (vIRF), ORF57, and so on. We focused here on the mechanism of how RTA upregulates the K9 (vIRF) promoter and identified two independent cis-acting elements in the K9 (vIRF) promoter that responded to RTA. These elements were finally confined to the sequence 5'-TCTGGGACAGTC-3' in responsive element (RE) I-2B and the sequence 5'-GTACTTAAAATA-3' in RE IIC-2, both of which did not share sequence homology. Multiple factors bound specifically with these elements, and their binding was correlated with the RTA-responsive activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with nuclear extract from infected cells and the N-terminal part of RTA expressed in Escherichia coli, however, did not show that RTA interacted directly with these elements, in contrast to the RTA responsive elements in the PAN/K12 promoter region, the ORF57/K8 promoter region. Thus, it was likely that RTA could transactivate several kinds of unique cis elements without directly binding to the responsive elements, probably through cooperation with other DNA-binding factors.

  12. Erythroblast transformation by FLI-1 depends upon its specific DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ano, Sabine; Pereira, Rui; Pironin, Martine; Lesault, Isabelle; Milley, Caroline; Lebigot, Ingrid; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2004-01-23

    FLI-1 is a transcriptional regulator of the ETS family of proteins. Insertional activation at the FLI-1 locus is an early event in F-murine leukemia virus-induced erythroleukemia. Consistent with its essential role in erythroid transformation, enforced expression of FLI-1 in primary erythroblasts strongly impairs the response of these cells to erythropoietin (Epo), a cytokine essential to erythropoiesis. We show here that point mutations in the ETS domain that abolished FLI-1 binding to specific DNA elements (ETS-binding sites) suppressed the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. The exchange of the entire ETS domain (DNA binding domain) of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 changed the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 and impaired FLI-1 transforming properties. In contrast, ETS domain swapping mutants that maintained the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 did not affect the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. Deletion and swapping mutants that failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of FLI-1 but impaired its transcriptional activation properties were also transformation-defective. Taken together, these results show that both the ability of FLI-1 to inhibit Epo-induced differentiation of erythroblasts and to confer enhanced cell survival in the absence of Epo critically depend upon FLI-1 ETS-binding site-dependent transcriptional activation properties.

  13. Distinct DNA binding sites contribute to the TCF transcriptional switch in C. elegans and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Chandan; Ravindranath, Aditi J; Mentink, Remco A; Chang, Mikyung V; Betist, Marco C; Yang, Yaxuan X; Koushika, Sandhya P; Korswagen, Hendrik C; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-02-01

    Regulation of gene expression by signaling pathways often occurs through a transcriptional switch, where the transcription factor responsible for signal-dependent gene activation represses the same targets in the absence of signaling. T-cell factors (TCFs) are transcription factors in the Wnt/ß-catenin pathway, which control numerous cell fate specification events in metazoans. The TCF transcriptional switch is mediated by many co-regulators that contribute to repression or activation of Wnt target genes. It is typically assumed that DNA recognition by TCFs is important for target gene location, but plays no role in the actual switch. TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) and some vertebrate TCF isoforms bind DNA through two distinct domains, a High Mobility Group (HMG) domain and a C-clamp, which recognize DNA motifs known as HMG and Helper sites, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that POP-1 (the C. elegans TCF) also activates target genes through HMG and Helper site interactions. Helper sites enhanced the ability of a synthetic enhancer to detect Wnt/ß-catenin signaling in several tissues and revealed an unsuspected role for POP-1 in regulating the C. elegans defecation cycle. Searching for HMG-Helper site clusters allowed the identification of a new POP-1 target gene active in the head muscles and gut. While Helper sites and the C-clamp are essential for activation of worm and fly Wnt targets, they are dispensable for TCF-dependent repression of targets in the absence of Wnt signaling. These data suggest that a fundamental change in TCF-DNA binding contributes to the transcriptional switch that occurs upon Wnt stimulation.

  14. A molecular modeling study of inhibitors of nuclear factor kappa-B (p50) DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Vineet; Sharma, Rakesh K.; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Otsuka, Masami; Ramos, Maria J.

    2003-12-01

    Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is an inducible transcription factor of the Rel family, and is sequestered in the cytoplasm by the IκB family of proteins. NF-κB can exist in several dimeric forms, but the p50/p65 heterodimer is the predominant one. Activation of NF-κB by a range of stimuli including viral products, and oxidative stress, leads to phosphorylation and proteasome dependent degradation of IκB, leading to the release of free NF-κB. This free NF-κB then binds to its target sites (κB sites in the DNA) to initiate transcription. These κB sites are also present in the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) of HIV-1, and hence NF-κB (p50 subunit) binding to LTR-DNA is critical in viral replication. Targeting direct p50-DNA binding, in this regard, is a novel approach to design anti-HIV gene expression inhibitors, which do not have the problem of resistance unlike in other anti-HIV strategies. The present study is a part of our search for leads for the specific inhibition of p50-DNA binding. We have been experimentally studying different types of these inhibitors, and in this work, we attempted to get a common definition of their structural mechanism onto p50-DNA binding. Using three different classes of inhibitors, we modelled their association with the DNA-Binding Region (DBR) of the p50 subunit of NF-κB. Docking studies were carried out using a genetic algorithm based program (GOLD). Further, to compare electrostatic complementarity in the association of the inhibitors with the DBR, Molecular Electrostatic Potentials (MEPs) were generated for the DBR and each inhibitor. The results of docking revealed a strong network of hydrogen bonding interactions for every active inhibitor, and the contrary for the less active ones. Further, the MEPs revealed that the DBR of p50 represents a surface of electropositive potential, and the active inhibitors represent a complementary electronegative surface. With the present modelling study we conclude that the principal

  15. A molecular modeling study of inhibitors of nuclear factor kappa-B (p50)--DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vineet; Sharma, Rakesh K; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Otsuka, Masami; Ramos, Maria J

    2003-12-01

    Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is an inducible transcription factor of the Rel family, and is sequestered in the cytoplasm by the IkappaB family of proteins. NF-kappaB can exist in several dimeric forms, but the p50/p65 heterodimer is the predominant one. Activation of NF-kappaB by a range of stimuli including viral products, and oxidative stress, leads to phosphorylation and proteasome dependent degradation of IkappaB, leading to the release of free NF-kappaB. This free NF-kappaB then binds to its target sites (KB sites in the DNA) to initiate transcription. These kappaB sites are also present in the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) of HIV-1, and hence NF-kappaB (p50 subunit) binding to LTR-DNA is critical in viral replication. Targeting direct p50-DNA binding, in this regard, is a novel approach to design anti-HIV gene expression inhibitors, which do not have the problem of resistance unlike in other anti-HIV strategies. The present study is a part of our search for leads for the specific inhibition of p50-DNA binding. We have been experimentally studying different types of these inhibitors, and in this work, we attempted to get a common definition of their structural mechanism onto p50-DNA binding. Using three different classes of inhibitors, we modelled their association with the DNA-Binding Region (DBR) of the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB. Docking studies were carried out using a genetic algorithm based program (GOLD). Further, to compare electrostatic complementarity in the association of the inhibitors with the DBR, Molecular Electrostatic Potentials (MEPs) were generated for the DBR and each inhibitor. The results of docking revealed a strong network of hydrogen bonding interactions for every active inhibitor, and the contrary for the less active ones. Further, the MEPs revealed that the DBR of p50 represents a surface of electropositive potential, and the active inhibitors represent a complementary electronegative surface. With the present modelling study we

  16. Genomewide analysis of Drosophila GAGA factor target genes reveals context-dependent DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel, Bas; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2003-01-01

    The association of sequence-specific DNA-binding factors with their cognate target sequences in vivo depends on the local molecular context, yet this context is poorly understood. To address this issue, we have performed genomewide mapping of in vivo target genes of Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF). The resulting list of ≈250 target genes indicates that GAF regulates many cellular pathways. We applied unbiased motif-based regression analysis to identify the sequence context that determines GAF binding. Our results confirm that GAF selectively associates with (GA)n repeat elements in vivo. GAF binding occurs in upstream regulatory regions, but less in downstream regions. Surprisingly, GAF binds abundantly to introns but is virtually absent from exons, even though the density of (GA)n is roughly the same. Intron binding occurs equally frequently in last introns compared with first introns, suggesting that GAF may not only regulate transcription initiation, but possibly also elongation. We provide evidence for cooperative binding of GAF to closely spaced (GA)n elements and explain the lack of GAF binding to exons by the absence of such closely spaced GA repeats. Our approach for revealing determinants of context-dependent DNA binding will be applicable to many other transcription factors. PMID:12601174

  17. Mutations on the DNA binding surface of TBP discriminate between yeast TATA and TATA-less gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Ivanka; Warfield, Linda; Hahn, Steven

    2014-08-01

    Most RNA polymerase (Pol) II promoters lack a TATA element, yet nearly all Pol II transcription requires TATA binding protein (TBP). While the TBP-TATA interaction is critical for transcription at TATA-containing promoters, it has been unclear whether TBP sequence-specific DNA contacts are required for transcription at TATA-less genes. Transcription factor IID (TFIID), the TBP-containing coactivator that functions at most TATA-less genes, recognizes short sequence-specific promoter elements in metazoans, but analogous promoter elements have not been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generated a set of mutations in the yeast TBP DNA binding surface and found that most support growth of yeast. Both in vivo and in vitro, many of these mutations are specifically defective for transcription of two TATA-containing genes with only minor defects in transcription of two TATA-less, TFIID-dependent genes. TBP binds several TATA-less promoters with apparent high affinity, but our results suggest that this binding is not important for transcription activity. Our results are consistent with the model that sequence-specific TBP-DNA contacts are not important at yeast TATA-less genes and suggest that other general transcription factors or coactivator subunits are responsible for recognition of TATA-less promoters. Our results also explain why yeast TBP derivatives defective for TATA binding appear defective in activated transcription.

  18. A novel AT-rich DNA binding protein that combines an HMG I-like DNA binding domain with a putative transcription domain.

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, G; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    There is growing evidence that AT-rich promoter elements play a role in transcription of plant genes. For the promoter of the nuclear gene for chloroplast glutamine synthetase from pea (GS2), the deletion of a 33-bp AT-rich sequence (box 1 native) from the 5' end of a GS2 promoter-beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion resulted in a 10-fold reduction in GUS activity. The box 1 native element was used in gel shift analysis and two distinct complexes were detected. One complex is related to the low-mobility complex reported previously for AT-rich elements from several other plant promoters. A multimer of the box 1 sequence was used to isolate a cDNA encoding an AT-rich DNA binding protein (ATBP-1). ATBP-1 is not a high-mobility group protein, but it is a novel protein that combines a high-mobility group I/Y-like DNA binding domain with a glutamine-rich putative transcriptional domain. PMID:7907505

  19. The Drosophila tissue-specific factor Grainyhead contains novel DNA-binding and dimerization domains which are conserved in the human protein CP2.

    PubMed

    Uv, A E; Thompson, C R; Bray, S J

    1994-06-01

    We have mapped the regions in the Drosophila melanogaster tissue-specific transcription factor Grainyhead that are required for DNA binding and dimerization. These functional domains correspond to regions conserved between Grainyhead and the vertebrate transcription factor CP2, which we show has similar activities. The identified DNA-binding domain is large (263 amino acids) but contains a smaller core that is able to interact with DNA at approximately 400-fold lower affinity. The major dimerization domain is located in a separate region of the protein and is required to stabilize the interactions with DNA. Our data also suggest that Grainyhead activity can be modulated by an N-terminal inhibitory domain.

  20. DNA-binding specificity and in vivo targets of Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear factor I

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Christina M.; Lazakovitch, Elena; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Lieb, Jason D.

    2009-01-01

    The conserved nuclear factor I (NFI) family of transcription factors is unique to animals and essential for mammalian development. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes a single NFI family member, whereas vertebrate genomes encode 4 distinct NFI protein subtypes (A, B, C, and X). NFI-1-deficient worms exhibit abnormalities, including reduced lifespan, defects in movement and pharyngeal pumping, and delayed egg-laying. To explore the functional basis of these phenotypes, we sought to comprehensively identify NFI-1-bound loci in C. elegans. We first established NFI-1 DNA-binding specificity using an in vitro DNA-selection strategy. Analysis yielded a consensus motif of TTGGCA(N)3TGCCAA, which occurs 586 times in the genome, a 100-fold higher frequency than expected. We next asked which sites were occupied by NFI-1 in vivo by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation of NFI-1 followed by microarray hybridization. Only 55 genomic locations were identified, an unexpectedly small target set. In vivo NFI-1 binding sites tend to be upstream of genes involved in core cellular processes, such as chromatin remodeling, mRNA splicing, and translation. Remarkably, 59 out of 70 (84%) of the C. briggsae orthologs of the identified targets contain conserved NFI binding sites in their promoters. These experiments provide a foundation for understanding how NFI-1 is recruited to unexpectedly few in vivo sites to perform its developmental functions, despite a vast over-representation of its binding motif. PMID:19584245

  1. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  2. GT-2: in vivo transcriptional activation activity and definition of novel twin DNA binding domains with reciprocal target sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ni, M; Dehesh, K; Tepperman, J M; Quail, P H

    1996-06-01

    GT-2 is a novel DNA binding protein that interacts with a triplet functionally defined, positively acting GT-box motifs (GT1-bx, GT2-bx, and GT3-bx) in the rice phytochrome A gene (PHYA) promoter. Data from a transient transfection assay used here show that recombinant GT-2 enhanced transcription from both homologous and heterologous GT-box-containing promoters, thereby indicating that this protein can function as a transcriptional activator in vivo. Previously, we have shown that GT-2 contains separate DNA binding determinants in its N- and C-terminal halves, with binding site preferences for the GT3-bx and GT2-bx promoter motifs, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the minimal DNA binding domains reside within dual 90-amino acid polypeptide segments encompassing duplicated sequences, termed trihelix regions, in each half of the molecule, plus 15 additional immediately adjacent amino acids downstream. These minimal binding domains retained considerable target sequence selectivity for the different GT-box motifs, but this selectivity was enhanced by a separate polypeptide segment farther downstream on the C-terminal side of each trihelix region. Therefore, the data indicate that the twin DNA binding domains of GT-2 each consist of a general GT-box recognition core with intrinsic differential binding activity toward closely related target motifs and a modified sequence conferring higher resolution reciprocal selectivity between these motifs.

  3. Drosophila damaged DNA-binding protein 1 is an essential factor for development.

    PubMed

    Takata, Kei-ichi; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2004-10-01

    The damaged DNA-binding protein (DDB) complex, thought to recognize (6-4) photoproducts and other lesions in DNA, has been implicated to have a role in global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) and E2F-1-mediated transcription. The complex consists of a heterodimer of p127 (DDB1) and p48 (DDB2), the latter also being known as XPE. We reported previously that in Drosophila expression of the DDB1 (D-DDB1) gene is controlled by the DRE/DREF system, and external injury to DNA is not essential for D-DDB1 function. In the present study of the function of D-DDB1 in a multicellular system, we prepared transgenic flies, which were knocked down for the D-DDB1 gene due to RNA interference (RNAi), and performed immunocytochemistry to ascertain the distribution of D-DDB1 in the eye imaginal disc. It was found to be abundant in the anterior of the morphogenetic furrow (MF). Whole-body overexpression of dsRNA of D-DDB1 in Drosophila using a GAL4-UAS targeted expression system induced melanotic tumors and caused complete lethality. When limited to the eye imaginal disc, a severe rough eye phenotype resulted. Correspondingly, all of the D-DDB1 gene knocked-out flies also died. D-DDB1 therefore appears to be an essential development-associated factor in a multicellular organism.

  4. Applying DNA affinity chromatography to specifically screen for sucrose-related DNA-binding transcriptional regulators of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Alkhateeb, Rabeaa S; Schulte, Fabian; Steffens, Tim; Loka, Tobias Pascal; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2016-08-20

    At a molecular level, the regulation of many important cellular processes is still obscure in xanthomonads, a bacterial group of outstanding relevance as world-wide plant pathogens and important for biotechnology as producers of the polysaccharide xanthan. Transcriptome analysis indicated a sucrose-dependent regulation of 18 genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) B100. The expression of 12 of these genes was clearly increased in the presence of sucrose. Only part of these genes was obviously involved in sucrose utilization. To identify regulatory proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, a DNA fragment-specific pull-down approach was established for Xcc. Putative promoter regions were identified and used to isolate DNA-binding proteins, which were separated by SDS PAGE and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. This led to the identification of four transcriptional regulators, among them the global transcriptional regulator Clp and a previously identified regulator of sucrose utilization, SuxR, plus a third DNA-binding transcriptional regulator encoded by xcc-b100_2861 and recently shown to interact with a cyclic di-GMP-binding protein. The fourth regulatory protein was encoded by xcc-b100_2791. These results indicate DNA fragment-specific pull-down experiments as promising approaches to screen for specific DNA-binding regulatory proteins in Xcc.

  5. Genome-wide specificity of DNA binding, gene regulation, and chromatin remodeling by TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Polstein, Lauren R; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Kocak, D Dewran; Vockley, Christopher M; Bledsoe, Peggy; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    Genome engineering technologies based on the CRISPR/Cas9 and TALE systems are enabling new approaches in science and biotechnology. However, the specificity of these tools in complex genomes and the role of chromatin structure in determining DNA binding are not well understood. We analyzed the genome-wide effects of TALE- and CRISPR-based transcriptional activators in human cells using ChIP-seq to assess DNA-binding specificity and RNA-seq to measure the specificity of perturbing the transcriptome. Additionally, DNase-seq was used to assess genome-wide chromatin remodeling that occurs as a result of their action. Our results show that these transcription factors are highly specific in both DNA binding and gene regulation and are able to open targeted regions of closed chromatin independent of gene activation. Collectively, these results underscore the potential for these technologies to make precise changes to gene expression for gene and cell therapies or fundamental studies of gene function.

  6. Mutation of serum response factor phosphorylation sites and the mechanism by which its DNA-binding activity is increased by casein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Manak, J R; Prywes, R

    1991-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylates the mammalian transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) on a serine residue(s) located within a region of the protein spanning amino acids 70 to 92, thereby enhancing its DNA-binding activity in vitro. We report here that serine 83 appears to be the residue phosphorylated by CKII but that three other serines in this region can also be involved in phosphorylation and the enhancement of DNA-binding activity. A mutant that contained glutamate residues in place of these serines had only low-level binding activity; however, when the serines were replaced with glutamates and further mutations were made that increased the negative charge of the region, the resulting mutant showed a constitutively high level of binding equal to that achieved by phosphorylation of wild-type SRF. We have investigated the mechanism by which phosphorylation of SRF increases its DNA-binding activity. We have ruled out the possibilities that phosphorylation affects SRF dimerization or relieves inhibition due to masking of the DNA-binding domain by an amino-terminal region of the protein. Rather, using partial proteolysis to probe SRF's structure, we find that the conformation of SRF's DNA-binding domain is altered by phosphorylation. Images PMID:2046671

  7. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  8. Transcriptional activation and repression by cellular DNA-binding protein C/EBP.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, D Q; Shih, C H

    1990-01-01

    A putative transcription factor, C/EBP, isolated from rat liver nuclei, has been shown to bind to at least two different sequence motifs: the CCAAT promoter domain and a core sequence [GTGG(T/A)(T/A)(T/A)G] common to many viral enhancers, including simian virus 40 and human hepatitis B virus. It has been proposed that C/EBP might function as a positive transcription factor by facilitating the communication between promoter and enhancer elements through its dual binding activities to DNA. Surprisingly, results from three different approaches suggest that C/EBP functions as a transcriptional repressor to hepatitis B virus and simian virus 40. Further investigation indicated that C/EBP can function as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor, depending on the reporter gene system. Images PMID:2157040

  9. Fungal CSL transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Background The CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factor family members are well-known components of the transmembrane receptor Notch signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in metazoan development. They function as context-dependent activators or repressors of transcription of their responsive genes, the promoters of which harbor the GTG(G/A)GAA consensus elements. Recently, several studies described Notch-independent activities of the CSL proteins. Results We have identified putative CSL genes in several fungal species, showing that this family is not confined to metazoans. We have analyzed their sequence conservation and identified the presence of well-defined domains typical of genuine CSL proteins. Furthermore, we have shown that the candidate fungal protein sequences contain highly conserved regions known to be required for sequence-specific DNA binding in their metazoan counterparts. The phylogenetic analysis of the newly identified fungal CSL proteins revealed the existence of two distinct classes, both of which are present in all the species studied. Conclusion Our findings support the evolutionary origin of the CSL transcription factor family in the last common ancestor of fungi and metazoans. We hypothesize that the ancestral CSL function involved DNA binding and Notch-independent regulation of transcription and that this function may still be shared, to a certain degree, by the present CSL family members from both fungi and metazoans. PMID:17629904

  10. DNA binding site for a factor(s) required to initiate simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; DePamphilis, M L

    1986-01-01

    Efficient initiation of DNA replication in the absence of nonspecific DNA repair synthesis was obtained by using a modification of the system developed by J.J. Li and T.J. Kelly [(1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 6973-6977]. Circular double-stranded DNA plasmids replicated in extracts of CV-1 cells only when the plasmids contained the cis-acting origin sequence for simian virus 40 DNA replication (ori) and the extract contained simian virus 40 large tumor antigen. Competition between plasmids containing ori and plasmids carrying deletions in and about ori served to identify a sequence that binds the rate-limiting factor(s) required to initiate DNA replication. The minimum binding site (nucleotides 72-5243) encompassed one-half of the simian virus 40 ori sequence that is required for initiation of replication (ori-core) plus the contiguous sequence on the late gene side of ori-core containing G + C-rich repeats that facilitates initiation (ori-auxiliary). This initiation factor binding site was specific for the simian virus 40 ori region, even though it excluded the high-affinity large tumor antigen DNA binding sites. Images PMID:3006062

  11. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  12. A DNA-binding factor specific for xenobiotic responsive elements of P-450c gene exists as a cryptic form in cytoplasm: Its possible translocation to nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa-Sehara, Atsuko; Yamane, Miyuki; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    1988-08-01

    Transcription of the drug-metabolizing cytochrome P-450c gene is induced by 3-methylcholanthrene or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Previously, the authors defined two xenobiotic responsive elements (XREs) of {approx}15 base pairs, both of which activate transcription in cis in response to these xenobiotics. Using a gel mobility shift assay, they have identified a factor that specifically binds to the XREs. This factor appears in nuclei of mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa-1 only when the cells are treated with the xenobiotics, while the factor is undetectable in the nuclei of a 3-methylcholanthrene-treated mutant of Hepa-1 with defective function of a xenobiotic receptor. In addition, the nuclear factor bound to the XRE in the gel was found to be associated with ({sup 3}H)TCDD when the cells were treated with it, suggesting that the xenobiotic receptor is at least a component of the DNA-binding factor. The cytoplasmic fraction from nontreated Hepa-1 cells also contains the factor as a cryptic form and prominently reveals its DNA-binding activity by incubation with 3-methylcholanthrene in vitro. These results not only suggest the involvement of the XRE-binding factor in transcriptional activation via XREs but also provide evidence that the binding of ligands to the preexisting factor in a cryptic form induces its XRE-binding activity, which is probably followed by its translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus.

  13. Steric mechanism of auto-inhibitory regulation of specific and non-specific DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6.

    PubMed

    De, Soumya; Chan, Anson C K; Coyne, H Jerome; Bhachech, Niraja; Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Okon, Mark; Murphy, Michael E P; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-04-03

    DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6 (or TEL) is auto-inhibited ~50-fold due to an α-helix that sterically blocks its ETS domain binding interface. Using NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this marginally stable helix is unfolded, and not displaced to a non-inhibitory position, when ETV6 is bound to DNA containing a consensus (5')GGAA(3') recognition site. Although significantly lower in affinity, binding to non-specific DNA is auto-inhibited ~5-fold and is also accompanied by helix unfolding. Based on NMR chemical shift perturbations, both specific and non-specific DNA are bound via the same canonical ETS domain interface. However, spectral perturbations are smaller for the non-specific complex, suggesting weaker and less well-defined interactions than in the specific complex. In parallel, the crystal structure of ETV6 bound to a specific DNA duplex was determined. The structure of this complex reveals that a non-conserved histidine residue in the ETS domain recognition helix helps establish the specificity of ETV6 for DNA-binding sites containing (5')GGAA(3')versus(5')GGAT(3'). These studies provide a unified steric mechanism for attenuating ETV6 binding to both specific and non-specific DNA and expand the repertoire of characterized auto-inhibitory strategies utilized to regulate ETS factors.

  14. Characterization of the Pathway-Specific Positive Transcriptional Regulator for Actinorhodin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as a DNA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Paloma; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Malpartida, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    The ActII-ORF4 protein has been characterized as a DNA-binding protein that positively regulates the transcription of the actinorhodin biosynthetic genes. The target regions for the ActII-ORF4 protein were located within the act cluster. These regions, at high copy number, generate a nonproducer strain by in vivo titration of the regulator. The mutant phenotype could be made to revert with extra copies of the wild-type actII-ORF4 gene but not with the actII-ORF4-177 mutant. His-tagged recombinant wild-type ActII-ORF4 and mutant ActII-ORF4-177 proteins were purified from Escherichia coli cultures; both showed specific DNA-binding activity for the actVI-ORF1–ORFA and actIII-actI intergenic regions. DNase I footprinting assays clearly located the DNA-binding sites within the −35 regions of the corresponding promoters, showing the consensus sequence 5′-TCGAG-3′. Although both gene products (wild-type and mutant ActII-ORF4) showed DNA-binding activity, only the wild-type gene was capable of activating transcription of the act genes; thus, two basic functions can be differentiated within the regulatory protein: a specific DNA-binding activity and a transcriptional activation of the act biosynthetic genes. PMID:10559161

  15. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    PubMed

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  16. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1.

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, J; Sancar, G B

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. We report here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 upstream repression sequence, that together regulate induction of PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. A prominent feature of the foot-printed region is a 22-base-pair palindrome. Deletion of the PHR1 upstream repression sequence increased the basal level expression of PHR1 in vivo and decreased induction after exposure of cells to UV radiation or methyl methanesulfonate, whereas insertion of the PRP binding site between the CYC1 upstream activation sequence and "TATA" sequence reduced basal level expression and conferred damage responsiveness upon a reporter gene. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription. Images PMID:1763039

  17. Functional Interplay between CBP and PCAF in Acetylation and Regulation of Transcription Factor KLF13 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chao-Zhong; Keller, Kimberly; Chen, Yangchao; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300 and PCAF participate in transcriptional activation by many factors. We have shown that both CBP/p300 and PCAF stimulate the transcriptional activation by KLF13, a member of the KLF/Sp1 family, either individually or cooperatively. Here we further investigated how CBP and PCAF acetylation regulate KLF13 activity, and how these two co-activators functionally interplay in the regulation of KLF13 activity. We found that CBP and PCAF acetylated KLF13 at specific lysine residues in the zinc finger domain of KLF13. The acetylation by CBP, however, resulted in disruption of KLF13 DNA binding. Although the acetyltransferase activity of CBP is not required for stimulating the DNA binding activity of all of the transcription factors that we have examined, the disruption of factor DNA binding by CBP acetylation is factor-specific. We further showed that PCAF and CBP act synergistically and antagonistically to regulate KLF13 DNA binding depending on the status of acetylation. PCAF blocked CBP acetylation and disruption of KLF13 DNA binding. Conversely, acetylation of KLF13 by CBP prevented PCAF stimulation of KLF13 DNA binding. PCAF blocked CBP disruption of KLF13 DNA binding by preventing CBP acetylation of KLF13. These results demonstrate that acetylation by CBP has distinct effects on transcription factor DNA binding, and that CBP and PCAF regulate each other functionally in their regulation of transcription factor DNA binding. PMID:12758070

  18. Dynamic phosphorylation of RelA on Ser42 and Ser45 in response to TNFα stimulation regulates DNA binding and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lanucara, Francesco; Lam, Connie; Mann, Jelena; Monie, Tom P.; Colombo, Stefano A. P.; Holman, Stephen W.; Boyd, James; Dange, Manohar C.; Mann, Derek A.; White, Michael R. H.

    2016-01-01

    The NF-κB signalling module controls transcription through a network of protein kinases such as the IKKs, as well as inhibitory proteins (IκBs) and transcription factors including RelA/p65. Phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits is critical for dictating system dynamics. Using both non-targeted discovery and quantitative selected reaction monitoring-targeted proteomics, we show that the cytokine TNFα induces dynamic multisite phosphorylation of RelA at a number of previously unidentified residues. Putative roles for many of these phosphorylation sites on RelA were predicted by modelling of various crystal structures. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation determination of Ser45 and Ser42 revealed preferential early phosphorylation of Ser45 in response to TNFα. Quantitative analyses subsequently confirmed differential roles for pSer42 and pSer45 in promoter-specific DNA binding and a role for both of these phosphosites in regulating transcription from the IL-6 promoter. These temporal dynamics suggest that RelA-mediated transcription is likely to be controlled by functionally distinct NF-κB proteoforms carrying different combinations of modifications, rather than a simple ‘one modification, one effect’ system. PMID:27466442

  19. DBD: a transcription factor prediction database.

    PubMed

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression influences almost all biological processes in an organism; sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors are critical to this control. For most genomes, the repertoire of transcription factors is only partially known. Hitherto transcription factor identification has been largely based on genome annotation pipelines that use pairwise sequence comparisons, which detect only those factors similar to known genes, or on functional classification schemes that amalgamate many types of proteins into the category of 'transcription factor'. Using a novel transcription factor identification method, the DBD transcription factor database fills this void, providing genome-wide transcription factor predictions for organisms from across the tree of life. The prediction method behind DBD identifies sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors through homology using profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) of domains. Thus, it is limited to factors that are homologus to those HMMs. The collection of HMMs is taken from two existing databases (Pfam and SUPERFAMILY), and is limited to models that exclusively detect transcription factors that specifically recognize DNA sequences. It does not include basal transcription factors or chromatin-associated proteins, for instance. Based on comparison with experimentally verified annotation, the prediction procedure is between 95% and 99% accurate. Between one quarter and one-half of our genome-wide predicted transcription factors represent previously uncharacterized proteins. The DBD (www.transcriptionfactor.org) consists of predicted transcription factor repertoires for 150 completely sequenced genomes, their domain assignments and the hand curated list of DNA-binding domain HMMs. Users can browse, search or download the predictions by genome, domain family or sequence identifier, view families of transcription factors based on domain architecture and receive predictions for a protein sequence.

  20. Dynamic DNA binding licenses a repair factor to bypass roadblocks in search of DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maxwell W.; Kim, Yoori; Williams, Gregory M.; Huck, John D.; Surtees, Jennifer A.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins search for specific targets via facilitated diffusion along a crowded genome. However, little is known about how crowded DNA modulates facilitated diffusion and target recognition. Here we use DNA curtains and single-molecule fluorescence imaging to investigate how Msh2–Msh3, a eukaryotic mismatch repair complex, navigates on crowded DNA. Msh2–Msh3 hops over nucleosomes and other protein roadblocks, but maintains sufficient contact with DNA to recognize a single lesion. In contrast, Msh2–Msh6 slides without hopping and is largely blocked by protein roadblocks. Remarkably, the Msh3-specific mispair-binding domain (MBD) licences a chimeric Msh2–Msh6(3MBD) to bypass nucleosomes. Our studies contrast how Msh2–Msh3 and Msh2–Msh6 navigate on a crowded genome and suggest how Msh2–Msh3 locates DNA lesions outside of replication-coupled repair. These results also provide insights into how DNA repair factors search for DNA lesions in the context of chromatin. PMID:26837705

  1. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  2. Redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding by reversible S-glutathiolation.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Molina, E P; De Lacoba, M G; Padilla, C A; Martinez-Galesteo, E; Barcena, J A; Lamas, S

    1999-09-01

    Redox control of the transcription factor c-Jun maps to a single cysteine in its DNA binding domain. However, the nature of the oxidized state of this cysteine and, thus, the potential molecular mechanisms accounting for the redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding remain unclear. To address this issue, we have analyzed the purified recombinant c-Jun DNA binding domain for redox-dependent thiol modifications and concomitant changes in DNA binding activity. We show that changes in the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione provide the potential to oxidize c-Jun sulfhydryls by mechanisms that include both protein disulfide formation and S-glutathiolation. We provide evidence that S-glutathiolation, which is specifically targeted to the cysteine residue located in the DNA binding site of the protein, may account for the reversible redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding. Furthermore, based on a molecular model of the S-glutathiolated protein, we discuss the structural elements facilitating S-glutathiolation and how this modification interferes with DNA binding. Given the structural similarities between the positively charged cysteine-containing DNA binding motif of c-Jun and the DNA binding site of related oxidant-sensitive transcriptional activators, the unprecedented phenomenon of redox-triggered S-thiolation of a transcription factor described in this report suggests a novel role for protein thiolation in the redox control of transcription.

  3. mTFE3, an X-linked transcriptional activator containing basic helix-loop-helix and zipper domains, utilizes the zipper to stabilize both DNA binding and multimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, C; Matera, A G; Cooper, C; Artandi, S; Blain, S; Ward, D C; Calame, K

    1992-01-01

    Southwestern (DNA-protein) screening of a murine L-cell cDNA library by using a probe for the microE3 site in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer yielded a clone, mTFE3, which is a member of the subset of basic helix-loop-helix (BHLH) proteins that also contain a leucine zipper (ZIP). Since the individual contribution of these domains is not well understood for proteins which contain them both, mutational analyses were performed to assess the functional roles of the HLH and ZIP regions for DNA binding and multimerization. The HLH region is stringently required for DNA binding but not for multimerization. The ZIP region is not stringently required for binding or multimerization, but stabilizes both multimer formation and DNA binding. A high degree of conservation at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels between the human transcription factor TFE3 and mTFE3 suggests that mTFE3 is the murine homolog of human TFE3. By using fluorescent in situ hybridization, mTFE3 was mapped to mouse chromosome X in band A2, which is just below the centromere. We show that in addition to the immunoglobulin heavy-chain microE3 site, mTFE3 binds to transcriptional elements important for lymphoid-specific, muscle-specific, and ubiquitously expressed genes. Binding of mTFE3 to DNA induces DNA bending. Images PMID:1732746

  4. Identification of Preferred DNA-Binding Sites for the Thermus thermophilus Transcriptional Regulator SbtR by the Combinatorial Approach REPSA

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Matthew D.; Clay, Emily; Hiam, Kamir J.; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    One of the first steps towards elucidating the biological function of a putative transcriptional regulator is to ascertain its preferred DNA-binding sequences. This may be rapidly and effectively achieved through the application of a combinatorial approach, one involving very large numbers of randomized oligonucleotides and reiterative selection and amplification steps to enrich for high-affinity nucleic acid-binding sequences. Previously, we had developed the novel combinatorial approach Restriction Endonuclease Protection, Selection and Amplification (REPSA), which relies not on the physical separation of ligand-nucleic acid complexes but instead selects on the basis of ligand-dependent inhibition of enzymatic template inactivation, specifically cleavage by type IIS restriction endonucleases. Thus, no prior knowledge of the ligand is required for REPSA, making it more amenable for discovery purposes. Here we describe using REPSA, massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics to identify the preferred DNA-binding sites for the transcriptional regulator SbtR, encoded by the TTHA0167 gene from the model extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus HB8. From the resulting position weight matrix, we can identify multiple operons potentially regulated by SbtR and postulate a biological role for this protein in regulating extracellular transport processes. Our study provides a proof-of-concept for the application of REPSA for the identification of preferred DNA-binding sites for orphan transcriptional regulators and a first step towards determining their possible biological roles. PMID:27428627

  5. A new mode of DNA binding distinguishes Capicua from other HMG-box factors and explains its mutation patterns in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forés, Marta; Samper, Núria; Barbacid, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    HMG-box proteins, including Sox/SRY (Sox) and TCF/LEF1 (TCF) family members, bind DNA via their HMG-box. This binding, however, is relatively weak and both Sox and TCF factors employ distinct mechanisms for enhancing their affinity and specificity for DNA. Here we report that Capicua (CIC), an HMG-box transcriptional repressor involved in Ras/MAPK signaling and cancer progression, employs an additional distinct mode of DNA binding that enables selective recognition of its targets. We find that, contrary to previous assumptions, the HMG-box of CIC does not bind DNA alone but instead requires a distant motif (referred to as C1) present at the C-terminus of all CIC proteins. The HMG-box and C1 domains are both necessary for binding specific TGAATGAA-like sites, do not function via dimerization, and are active in the absence of cofactors, suggesting that they form a bipartite structure for sequence-specific binding to DNA. We demonstrate that this binding mechanism operates throughout Drosophila development and in human cells, ensuring specific regulation of multiple CIC targets. It thus appears that HMG-box proteins generally depend on auxiliary DNA binding mechanisms for regulating their appropriate genomic targets, but that each sub-family has evolved unique strategies for this purpose. Finally, the key role of C1 in DNA binding also explains the fact that this domain is a hotspot for inactivating mutations in oligodendroglioma and other tumors, while being preserved in oncogenic CIC-DUX4 fusion chimeras associated to Ewing-like sarcomas. PMID:28278156

  6. DNA-Binding Factor Target Identification by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in Plants.

    PubMed

    Posé, David; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows the precise identification of genomic loci that physically interact with a protein of interest, whether that protein is a transcription factor, a core polymerase, a histone, or other chromatin-associated protein. In short, tissue is first cross-linked to freeze a population of DNA-protein interactions at a stage of interest. Chromatin is then extracted, fragmented, and incubated with a specific antibody against the protein of interest. Next, the resultant DNA-protein complexes are immunoprecipitated and captured using beads that bind to the antibody constant region. Samples are finally reverse cross-linked to separate the bound fragments and the DNA is purified. This DNA is analyzed by quantitative PCR for enrichment of genomic regions expected to be bound by the protein under study. The protocol detailed in this chapter has been successfully applied in the identification of target genes for seven transcriptional regulators of diverse classes involved in Arabidopsis thaliana floral transition.

  7. HTLV-I Tax protein stimulation of DNA binding of bZIP proteins by enhancing dimerization.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Green, M R

    1993-10-15

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  8. Yin Yang 1: a multifaceted protein beyond a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiyong; Cao, Paul; Wan, Mei Mei; Sui, Guangchao

    2010-01-01

    As a transcription factor, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) regulates the transcription of a dazzling list of genes and the number of its targets still mounts. Recent studies revealed that YY1 possesses functions independent of its DNA binding activity and its regulatory role in tumorigenesis has started to emerge.

  9. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  10. Molecular Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Integration Host Factor Reveals Novel Insights into the Mode of DNA Binding and Nucleoid Compaction*

    PubMed Central

    Sharadamma, Narayanaswamy; Harshavardhana, Yadumurthy; Ravishankar, Apoorva; Anand, Praveen; Chandra, Nagasuma; Muniyappa, K.

    2014-01-01

    The annotated whole-genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that Rv1388 (Mtihf) is likely to encode for a putative 20-kDa integration host factor (mIHF). However, very little is known about the functional properties of mIHF or the organization of the mycobacterial nucleoid. Molecular modeling of the mIHF three-dimensional structure, based on the cocrystal structure of Streptomyces coelicolor IHF duplex DNA, a bona fide relative of mIHF, revealed the presence of Arg-170, Arg-171, and Arg-173, which might be involved in DNA binding, and a conserved proline (Pro-150) in the tight turn. The phenotypic sensitivity of Escherichia coli ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains to UV and methyl methanesulfonate could be complemented with the wild-type Mtihf but not its alleles bearing mutations in the DNA-binding residues. Protein-DNA interaction assays revealed that wild-type mIHF, but not its DNA-binding variants, binds with high affinity to fragments containing attB and attP sites and curved DNA. Strikingly, the functionally important amino acid residues of mIHF and the mechanism(s) underlying its binding to DNA, DNA bending, and site-specific recombination are fundamentally different from that of E. coli IHFαβ. Furthermore, we reveal novel insights into IHF-mediated DNA compaction depending on the placement of its preferred binding sites; mIHF promotes DNA compaction into nucleoid-like or higher order filamentous structures. We therefore propose that mIHF is a distinct member of a subfamily of proteins that serve as essential cofactors in site-specific recombination and nucleoid organization and that these findings represent a significant advance in our understanding of the role(s) of nucleoid-associated proteins. PMID:25324543

  11. Mechanism for attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators by small molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Wilkinson, Steven P; Grove, Anne

    2009-07-31

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family control gene expression in a variety of metabolic processes in bacteria and archaea. Hypothetical uricase regulator (HucR), which belongs to the ligand-responsive branch of the MarR family, regulates uricase expression in Deinococcus radiodurans by binding a shared promoter region between uricase and HucR genes. We show here that HucR responds only to urate and, to a lesser extent, to xanthine by attenuated DNA binding, compared to other intermediates of purine degradation. Using molecular-dynamics-guided mutational analysis, we identified the ligand-binding site in HucR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and intrinsic Trp fluorescence have identified W20 from the N-terminal helix and R80 from helix 3, which serves as a scaffold for the DNA recognition helix, as being essential for ligand binding. Using structural data combined with in silico and in vitro analyses, we propose a mechanism for the attenuation of DNA binding in which a conformational change initiated by charge repulsion due to a bound ligand propagates to DNA recognition helices. This mechanism may apply generally to MarR homologs that bind anionic phenolic ligands.

  12. Spermine Attenuates the Action of the DNA Intercalator, Actinomycin D, on DNA Binding and the Inhibition of Transcription and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion. PMID:23144800

  13. Recruitment of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 into specific intranuclear compartments depends on tyrosine phosphorylation that affects its DNA-binding and transactivation potential.

    PubMed Central

    Ktistaki, E; Ktistakis, N T; Papadogeorgaki, E; Talianidis, I

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) is a prominent member of the family of liver-enriched transcription factors, playing a role in the expression of a large number of liver-specific genes. We report here that HNF-4 is a phosphoprotein and that phosphorylation at tyrosine residue(s) is important for its DNA-binding activity and, consequently, for its transactivation potential both in cell-free systems and in cultured cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation did not affect the transport of HNF-4 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus but had a dramatic effect on its subnuclear localization. HNF-4 was concentrated in distinct nuclear compartments, as evidenced by in situ immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. This compartmentalization disappeared when tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by genistein. The correlation between the intranuclear distribution of HNF-4 and its ability to activate endogenous target genes demonstrates a phosphorylation signal-dependent pathway in the regulation of transcription factor activity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7568236

  14. Synergistic activation of transcription is mediated by the N-terminal domain of Drosophila fushi tarazu homeoprotein and can occur without DNA binding by the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, J; Baler, R; Morrissey, D; Zuo, J; Lan, Y; Weir, M; Voellmy, R

    1993-01-01

    Synergistic activation of transcription by Drosophila segmentation genes in tissue culture cells provides a model with which to study combinatorial regulation. We examined the synergistic activation of an engrailed-derived promoter by the pair-rule proteins paired (PRD) and fushi tarazu (FTZ). Synergistic activation by PRD requires regions of the homeodomain or adjacent sequences, and that by FTZ requires the first 171 residues. Surprisingly, deletion of the FTZ homeodomain does not reduce the capacity of the protein for synergistic activation, although this mutation abolishes any detectable DNA-binding activity. This finding suggests that FTZ can function through protein-protein interactions with PRD or other components of the homeoprotein transcription complex, adding a new layer of mechanisms that could underlie the functional specificities and combinatorial regulation of homeoproteins. Images PMID:8095092

  15. Embryonic neural inducing factor churchill is not a DNA-binding zinc finger protein: solution structure reveals a solvent-exposed beta-sheet and zinc binuclear cluster.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian M; Buck-Koehntop, Bethany A; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2007-08-31

    Churchill is a zinc-containing protein that is involved in neural induction during embryogenesis. At the time of its discovery, it was thought on the basis of sequence alignment to contain two zinc fingers of the C4 type. Further, binding of an N-terminal GST-Churchill fusion protein to a particular DNA sequence was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation selection assay, suggesting that Churchill may function as a transcriptional regulator by sequence-specific DNA binding. We show by NMR solution structure determination that, far from containing canonical C4 zinc fingers, the protein contains three bound zinc ions in novel coordination sites, including an unusual binuclear zinc cluster. The secondary structure of Churchill is also unusual, consisting of a highly solvent-exposed single-layer beta-sheet. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and backbone relaxation measurements reveal that Churchill is unusually dynamic on a number of time scales, with the exception of regions surrounding the zinc coordinating sites, which serve to stabilize the otherwise unstructured N terminus and the single-layer beta-sheet. No binding of Churchill to the previously identified DNA sequence could be detected, and extensive searches using DNA sequence selection techniques could find no other DNA sequence that was bound by Churchill. Since the N-terminal amino acids of Churchill form part of the zinc-binding motif, the addition of a fusion protein at the N terminus causes loss of zinc and unfolding of Churchill. This observation most likely explains the published DNA-binding results, which would arise due to non-specific interaction of the unfolded protein in the immunoprecipitation selection assay. Since Churchill does not appear to bind DNA, we suggest that it may function in embryogenesis as a protein-interaction factor.

  16. Functional homology between the sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins nuclear factor I from HeLa cells and the TGGCA protein from chicken liver.

    PubMed Central

    Leegwater, P A; van der Vliet, P C; Rupp, R A; Nowock, J; Sippel, A E

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear factor I from HeLa cells, a protein with enhancing function in adenovirus DNA replication, and the chicken TGGCA protein are specific DNA-binding proteins that were first detected by independent methods and that appeared to have similar DNA sequence specificity. To test whether they are homologous proteins from different species we have compared (i) their DNA binding properties and (ii) their function in reconstituted adenovirus DNA replication systems. Using deletion and substitution mutants derived from the DNA binding site on the adenovirus 2 inverted terminal repeat, it was found that the two proteins protect the same 24-nucleotide region of both strands against DNase I digestion and that they have identical minimal recognition sequences of 15 bp containing dyad symmetry. Like nuclear factor I, the TGGCA protein enhances the initiation reaction of adenovirus 2 DNA replication in vitro in a DNA recognition site-dependent manner. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3709517

  17. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  18. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  19. Experimental determination of the evolvability of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2009-11-03

    Sequence-specific binding of a transcription factor to DNA is the central event in any transcriptional regulatory network. However, relatively little is known about the evolutionary plasticity of transcription factors. For example, the exact functional consequence of an amino acid substitution on the DNA-binding specificity of most transcription factors is currently not predictable. Furthermore, although the major structural families of transcription factors have been identified, the detailed DNA-binding repertoires within most families have not been characterized. We studied the sequence recognition code and evolvability of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family by creating all possible 95 single-point mutations of five DNA-contacting residues of Max, a human helix-loop-helix transcription factor and measured the detailed DNA-binding repertoire of each mutant. Our results show that the sequence-specific repertoire of Max accessible through single-point mutations is extremely limited, and we are able to predict 92% of the naturally occurring diversity at these positions. All naturally occurring basic regions were also found to be accessible through functional intermediates. Finally, we observed a set of amino acids that are functional in vitro but are not found to be used naturally, indicating that functionality alone is not sufficient for selection.

  20. Transcriptional control mediated by the ArcA two-component response regulator protein of Escherichia coli: characterization of DNA binding at target promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, A S; Lin, E C

    1996-01-01

    ArcA protein bearing an amino-terminal, oligohistidine extension has been purified, and its DNA binding activity has been characterized with or without prior incubation with carbamoyl phosphate. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I protection assays indicate that where the phosphorylated form of the ArcA protein (ArcA-P) is expected to act as a transcriptional repressor (e.g., of lctPRD and gltA-sdhCDAB), the effect is likely to be mediated by sequestration of cis-controlling transcriptional regulatory elements. In contrast, in the case of cydAB, for which ArcA-P is expected to function as a transcriptional activator, two discrete binding sites have been identified upstream of a known promoter, and activation from these sites is likely to be mediated by a mechanism typical of the type I class of prokaryotic transcriptional activators. An additional ArcA-P binding site has also been located downstream of the known promoter, and a distinct role for this site in the regulation of the cydAB operon during anoxic growth transitions is suggested. These results are discussed within the framework of an overall model of signaling by the Arc two-component signal transduction system in response to changes in aerobiosis. PMID:8892825

  1. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  2. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  3. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-06

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers.

  4. Using protein-binding microarrays to study transcription factor specificity: homologs, isoforms and complexes

    PubMed Central

    Andrilenas, Kellen K.; Penvose, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Protein–DNA binding is central to specificity in gene regulation, and methods for characterizing transcription factor (TF)–DNA binding remain crucial to studies of regulatory specificity. High-throughput (HT) technologies have revolutionized our ability to characterize protein–DNA binding by significantly increasing the number of binding measurements that can be performed. Protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) are a robust and powerful HT platform for studying DNA-binding specificity of TFs. Analysis of PBM-determined DNA-binding profiles has provided new insight into the scope and mechanisms of TF binding diversity. In this review, we focus specifically on the PBM technique and discuss its application to the study of TF specificity, in particular, the binding diversity of TF homologs and multi-protein complexes. PMID:25431149

  5. DNA binding and transcriptional regulatory activity of mammalian achaete-scute homologous (MASH) proteins revealed by interaction with a muscle-specific enhancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J E; Birren, S J; Saito, T; Anderson, D J

    1992-04-15

    The MASH genes are vertebrate homologues of achaete-scute, genes required for neuronal determination in Drosophila. The sequence of MASH1 and MASH2 contains a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif that is present in other transcriptional regulators such as MyoD and E12. In the absence of an authentic target for the MASH proteins, we examined their DNA binding and transcriptional regulatory activity by using a binding site (the E box) from the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene, a target of MyoD. Like myogenic bHLH proteins, the MASH proteins form heterooligomers with E12 that bind the MCK E box with high affinity in vitro. Unexpectedly, however, MASH1 and MASH2 also activate transcription of both exogenous and endogenous MCK in transfected C3H/10T1/2 fibroblasts. However, they do not induce myogenesis. Myogenic activity is not exclusively a property of the MyoD basic region, as substitution of this domain fails to confer myogenic activity on MASH1. These data suggest that different bHLH proteins may activate overlapping but distinct sets of target genes in the same cell type.

  6. A designed DNA binding motif that recognizes extended sites and spans two adjacent major grooves†

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jéssica; Mosquera, Jesús; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the rational design of a DNA-binding peptide construct composed of the DNA-contacting regions of two transcription factors (GCN4 and GAGA) linked through an AT-hook DNA anchor. The resulting chimera, which represents a new, non-natural DNA binding motif, binds with high affinity and selectivity to a long composite sequence of 13 base pairs (TCAT-AATT-GAGAG). PMID:27252825

  7. A Key Evolutionary Mutation Enhances DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gavin; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2016-04-05

    Forkhead box (FOX) transcription factors share a conserved forkhead DNA binding domain (FHD) and are key role players in the development of many eukaryotic species. Their involvement in various congenital disorders and cancers makes them clinically relevant targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, the FOXP subfamily of multidomain transcriptional repressors is unique in its ability to form DNA binding homo and heterodimers. The truncated FOXP2 FHD, in the absence of the leucine zipper, exists in equilibrium between monomeric and domain-swapped dimeric states in vitro. As a consequence, determining the DNA binding properties of the FOXP2 FHD becomes inherently difficult. In this work, two FOXP2 FHD hinge loop mutants have been generated to successfully prevent both the formation (A539P) and the dissociation (F541C) of the homodimers. This allows for the separation of the two species for downstream DNA binding studies. Comparison of DNA binding of the different species using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the wild-type FOXP2 FHD binds DNA as a monomer. However, comparison of the DNA-binding energetics of the monomer and wild-type FHD, reveals that there is a difference in the mechanism of binding between the two species. We conclude that the naturally occurring reverse mutation (P539A) seen in the FOXP subfamily increases DNA binding affinity and may increase the potential for nonspecific binding compared to other FOX family members.

  8. Differential use of SCL/TAL-1 DNA-binding domain in developmental hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kassouf, Mira T; Chagraoui, Hedia; Vyas, Paresh; Porcher, Catherine

    2008-08-15

    Dissecting the molecular mechanisms used by developmental regulators is essential to understand tissue specification/differentiation. SCL/TAL-1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor absolutely critical for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell specification and lineage maturation. Using in vitro and forced expression experimental systems, we previously suggested that SCL might have DNA-binding-independent functions. Here, to assess the requirements for SCL DNA-binding activity in vivo, we examined hematopoietic development in mice carrying a germline DNA-binding mutation. Remarkably, in contrast to complete absence of hematopoiesis and early lethality in scl-null embryos, specification of hematopoietic cells occurred in homozygous mutant embryos, indicating that direct DNA binding is dispensable for this process. Lethality was forestalled to later in development, although some mice survived to adulthood. Anemia was documented throughout development and in adulthood. Cellular and molecular studies showed requirements for SCL direct DNA binding in red cell maturation and indicated that scl expression is positively autoregulated in terminally differentiating erythroid cells. Thus, different mechanisms of SCL's action predominate depending on the developmental/cellular context: indirect DNA binding activities and/or sequestration of other nuclear regulators are sufficient in specification processes, whereas direct DNA binding functions with transcriptional autoregulation are critically required in terminal maturation processes.

  9. New Insights into Cooperative Binding of Homeodomain Transcription Factors PREP1 and PBX1 to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, Chiara; Ferrari, Elena; Blasi, Francesco; Musco, Giovanna; Bruckmann, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    PREP1 and PBX1 are homeodomain (HD) transcription factors that play crucial roles in embryonic development. Here, we present the first biophysical characterization of a PREP1 HD, and the NMR spectroscopic study of its DNA binding pocket. The data show that residues flanking the HD participate in DNA binding. The kinetic parameters for DNA binding of individual PREP1 and PBX1 HDs, and of their combination, show that isolated PREP1 and PBX1 HDs bind to DNA in a cooperative manner. A novel PREP1 motif, flanking the HD at the C-terminus, is required for cooperativity. PMID:28094776

  10. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  11. A mutation at proline-115 in the A-factor receptor protein of Streptomyces griseus abolishes DNA-binding ability but not ligand-binding ability.

    PubMed Central

    Onaka, H; Sugiyama, M; Horinouchi, S

    1997-01-01

    A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone) and its specific receptor protein (ArpA) are required for streptomycin production and aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces griseus. A mutant strain HO1 that produced streptomycin and formed aerial mycelium and spores was derived from an A-factor-deficient mutant, S. griseus HH1. The phenotypes of mutant HO1 were found to result from a single amino acid replacement of ArpA; the proline residue at position 115 in the wild-type ArpA was replaced by serine, yielding mutant ArpA (P115S). The mutant ArpA (P115S) was still able to form a homodimer and possessed A-factor-binding ability but lost the ability to bind DNA. The properties of P115S suggest that ArpA consists of two independently functional domains, one for A-factor binding and one for DNA binding, and that proline-115 plays an important role in DNA binding. This is in agreement with the idea that A-factor binding to the COOH-terminal domain of ArpA causes a subtle conformational change of the distal NH2-terminal DNA-binding domain, resulting in dissociation of ArpA from DNA. PMID:9098075

  12. Difference in DNA-binding abilities of Fur-homolog DNA binding protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Angshuman

    2016-10-01

    Gonorrhea is a severe disease infecting both men and women worldwide. The causative agent of the disease is Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The organism mostly affects human beings in iron restricted environments. In such an environment the organism produces a set of proteins which are mostly absent in iron rich environments. The expressions of the genes for the proteins are regulated by the transcription factor (TF) belonging to the Fur family. Interestingly, the same TF acts as the activator and repressor of genes. In this present work, an attempt has been made to analyze the molecular details of the differential DNA-binding activities of the TF from Neisseria gonorrhoeae to come up with a plausible molecular reason behind the difference DNA binding activities of the same TF. Computational modelling technique was used to build the three dimensional structure of the TF. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were employed to determine the binding interactions between the TF and the promoter DNA. With the help of the computational techniques, the biochemical reason behind the different modes of DNA binding by the TF was analyzed. Results from this analysis may be useful to future drug development endeavours to curtail the spread of Gonorrhea.

  13. Nerve growth factor inhibits the synthesis of a single-stranded DNA binding protein in pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12).

    PubMed Central

    Biocca, S; Cattaneo, A; Calissano, P

    1984-01-01

    Arrest of mitosis and neurite outgrowth induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12) is accompanied by a progressive inhibition of the synthesis of a protein that binds to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. Time course experiments show that this inhibition is already apparent after a 2-day incubation with NGF and is maximum (85-95%) upon achievement of complete PC12 cell differentiation. Inhibition of the synthesis of this single-stranded DNA binding protein after 48 hr of incubation with NGF is potentiated by concomitant treatment of PC12 cells with antimitotic drugs acting at different levels of DNA replication. Purification on a preparative scale of this protein and analysis of its major physicochemical properties show that: (i) it constitutes 0.5% of total soluble proteins of naive PC12 cells; (ii) its molecular weight measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE is Mr 34,000 (sucrose gradient centrifugation under nondenaturing conditions yields a sedimentation coefficient s20,w of 8.1 S, indicating that the native protein is an oligomer); (iii) amino acid analysis demonstrates a preponderance of acidic over basic residues, while electrofocusing experiments show that it has an isoelectric point around 8.0; (iv) approximately 15% of the protein is phosphorylated in vivo. It is postulated that control of the synthesis of this protein is connected with activation of a differentiative program triggered by NGF in the PC12 neoplastic cell line at some step(s) of DNA activity. Images PMID:6585787

  14. Proteopedia: 3D Visualization and Annotation of Transcription Factor-DNA Readout Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Saleebyan, Skyler B.; Holmes, Bailey T.; Karelina, Maria; Tam, Julia; Kim, Sharon Y.; Kim, Keziah H.; Dror, Iris; Hodis, Eran; Martz, Eric; Compeau, Patricia A.; Rohs, Remo

    2012-01-01

    3D visualization assists in identifying diverse mechanisms of protein-DNA recognition that can be observed for transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins. We used Proteopedia to illustrate transcription factor-DNA readout modes with a focus on DNA shape, which can be a function of either nucleotide sequence (Hox proteins) or base pairing…

  15. In Vivo Estradiol, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene Modulation of Association/Dissociation Kinetics for Estrogen Receptor, Interacting Co-Factors and DNA Binding Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    is preferred clinically (3, 5 , 7 , 13). It is our goal to understand the molecular and cellular basis of the tissue-specific actions of these...IFinal (14 May 01 - 23 May 02) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS In Vivo Estradiol, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene Modulation of DAMDl7-01-1-0498...Association/Dissociation Kinetics for Estrogen Receptor, Interacting Co-Factors and DNA Binding Sites 6. AUTHOR(S) Fred J. Schaufele, Ph.D. 7

  16. The Lon protease from the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii is transcriptionally linked to a cluster of putative membrane proteases and displays DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Diego E; Paggi, Roberto A; De Castro, Rosana E

    2011-05-20

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is universally distributed in bacteria, eukaryotic organelles and archaea. In comparison with bacterial and eukaryal Lon proteases, the biology of the archaeal Lon has been studied to a limited extent. In this study, the gene encoding the Lon protease of the alkaliphilic haloarchaeon Natrialba magadii (Nmlon) was cloned and sequenced, and the genetic organization of Nmlon was examined at the transcriptional level. Nmlon encodes a 84 kDa polypeptide with a pI of 4.42 which contains the ATPase, protease and membrane targeting domains of the archaeal-type LonB proteases. Nmlon is part of an operon that encodes membrane proteases and it is transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA in N. magadii cells at different growth stages. Accordingly, NmLon was detected in cell membranes of N. magadii throughout growth by Western blot analysis using specific anti-NmLon antibodies. Interestingly, in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified NmLon bound double stranded as well as single stranded DNA in the presence of elevated salt concentrations. This finding shows that DNA-binding is conserved in the LonA and LonB subfamilies and suggests that Lon-DNA interaction may be relevant for its function in haloarchaea.

  17. The Methanosarcina acetivorans thioredoxin system activates DNA binding of the redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator MsvR

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Ryan; McCarver, Addison C.; Isom, Catherine E.; Karr, Elizabeth A.; Lessner, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of biogas (methane) by anaerobic digestion is an important facet to renewable energy, but is subject to instability due to the sensitivity of strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea (methanogens) to environmental perturbations, such as oxygen. An understanding of the oxidant-sensing mechanisms used by methanogens may lead to the development of more oxidant tolerant (i.e. stable) methanogen strains. MsvR is a redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator that is found exclusively in methanogens. We show here that oxidation of MsvR from Methanosarcina acetivorans (MaMsvR) with hydrogen peroxide oxidizes cysteine thiols, which inactivates MaMsvR binding to its own promoter (PmsvR). Incubation of oxidized MaMsvR with the M. acetivorans thioredoxin system (NADPH, MaTrxR, and MaTrx7) results in reduction of the cysteines back to thiols and activation of PmsvR binding. These data confirm that cysteines are critical for the thiol-disulfide regulation of PmsvR binding by MaMsvR and support a role for the M. acetivorans thioredoxin system in the in vivo activation of MaMsvR. The results support the feasibility of using MaMsvR and PmsvR, along with the Methanosarcina genetic system, to design methanogen strains with oxidant-regulated gene expression systems, which may aid in stabilizing anaerobic digestion. PMID:25791378

  18. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) acts as an inhibitor of ID-1, -2 and -3 and promotes basic helix loop helix (bHLH) E47 DNA binding and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Chinaranagari, Swathi; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-05-01

    The four known ID proteins (ID1-4, Inhibitor of Differentiation) share a homologous helix loop helix (HLH) domain and act as dominant negative regulators of basic-HLH transcription factors. ID proteins also interact with many non-bHLH proteins in complex networks. The expression of ID proteins is increasingly observed in many cancers. Whereas ID-1, ID-2 and ID-3, are generally considered as tumor promoters, ID4 on the contrary has emerged as a tumor suppressor. In this study we demonstrate that ID4 heterodimerizes with ID-1, -2 and -3 and promote bHLH DNA binding, essentially acting as an inhibitor of inhibitors of differentiation proteins. Interaction of ID4 was observed with ID1, ID2 and ID3 that was dependent on intact HLH domain of ID4. Interaction with bHLH protein E47 required almost 3 fold higher concentration of ID4 as compared to ID1. Furthermore, inhibition of E47 DNA binding by ID1 was restored by ID4 in an EMSA binding assay. ID4 and ID1 were also colocalized in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. The alpha helix forming alanine stretch N-terminal, unique to HLH ID4 domain was required for optimum interaction. Ectopic expression of ID4 in DU145 prostate cancer line promoted E47 dependent expression of CDKNI p21. Thus counteracting the biological activities of ID-1, -2 and -3 by forming inactive heterodimers appears to be a novel mechanism of action of ID4. These results could have far reaching consequences in developing strategies to target ID proteins for cancer therapy and understanding biologically relevant ID-interactions.

  19. Inhibition of host cell RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription by poliovirus: Inactivation of specific transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, L.G.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Berk, A.J.; Dasgupta, A.

    1987-11-01

    The inhibition of transcription by RNA polymerase III in poliovirus-infected cells was studied. Experiments utilizing two different cell lines showed that the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase III was impaired by infection of these cells with the virus. The observed inhibition of transcription was not due to shut-off of host cell protein synthesis by poliovirus. Among four distinct components required for accurate transcription in vitro from cloned DNA templates, activities of RNA polymerase III and transcription factor TFIIIA were not significantly affected by virus infection. The activity of transcription factor TFIIIC, the limiting component required for transcription of RNA polymerase III genes, was severely inhibited in infected cells, whereas that of transcription factor TFIIIB was inhibited to a lesser extent. The sequence-specific DNA-binding of TFIIIC to the adenovirus VA1 gene internal promoted, however, was not altered by infection of cells with the virus. The authors conclude that (i) at least two transcription factors, TFIIIB and TFIIIC, are inhibited by infection of cells with poliovirtus, (ii) inactivation of TFIIIC does not involve destruction of its DNA-binding domain, and (iii) sequence-specific DNA binding by TFIIIC may be necessary but is not sufficient for the formation of productive transcription complexes.

  20. Identification of amino acids essential for DNA binding and dimerization in p67SRF: implications for a novel DNA-binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Sharrocks, A D; Gille, H; Shaw, P E

    1993-01-01

    The serum response factor (p67SRF) binds to a palindromic sequence in the c-fos serum response element (SRE). A second protein, p62TCF binds in conjunction with p67SRF to form a ternary complex, and it is through this complex that growth factor-induced transcriptional activation of c-fos is thought to take place. A 90-amino-acid peptide, coreSRF, is capable for dimerizing, binding DNA, and recruiting p62TCF. By using extensive site-directed mutagenesis we have investigated the role of individual coreSRF amino acids in DNA binding. Mutant phenotypes were defined by gel retardation and cross-linking analyses. Our results have identified residues essential for either DNA binding or dimerization. Three essential basic amino acids whose conservative mutation severely reduced DNA binding were identified. Evidence which is consistent with these residues being on the face of a DNA binding alpha-helix is presented. A phenylalanine residue and a hexameric hydrophobic box are identified as essential for dimerization. The amino acid phasing is consistent with the dimerization interface being presented as a continuous region on a beta-strand. A putative second alpha-helix acts as a linker between these two regions. This study indicates that p67SRF is a member of a protein family which, in common with many DNA binding proteins, utilize an alpha-helix for DNA binding. However, this alpha-helix is contained within a novel domain structure. Images PMID:8417320

  1. Transcriptional Repressor TrmBL2 from Thermococcus kodakarensis Forms Filamentous Nucleoprotein Structures and Competes with Histones for DNA Binding in a Salt- and DNA Supercoiling-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem K; Qu, Yuanyuan; Maruyama, Hugo; Lim, Ci J; Takeyasu, Kunio; Yan, Jie

    2015-06-19

    Architectural DNA proteins play important roles in the chromosomal DNA organization and global gene regulation in living cells. However, physiological functions of some DNA-binding proteins from archaea remain unclear. Recently, several abundant DNA-architectural proteins including histones, Alba, and TrmBL2 have been identified in model euryarchaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. Although histones and Alba proteins have been previously characterized, the DNA binding properties of TrmBL2 and its interplay with the other major architectural proteins in the chromosomal DNA organization and gene transcription regulation remain largely unexplored. Here, we report single-DNA studies showing that at low ionic strength (<300 mM KCl), TrmBL2 binds to DNA largely in non-sequence-specific manner with positive cooperativity, resulting in formation of stiff nucleoprotein filamentous patches, whereas at high ionic strength (>300 mM KCl) TrmBL2 switches to more sequence-specific interaction, suggesting the presence of high affinity TrmBL2-filament nucleation sites. Furthermore, in vitro assays indicate the existence of DNA binding competition between TrmBL2 and archaeal histones B from T. kodakarensis, which can be strongly modulated by DNA supercoiling and ionic strength of surrounding solution. Overall, these results advance our understanding of TrmBL2 DNA binding properties and provide important insights into potential functions of architectural proteins in nucleoid organization and gene regulation in T. kodakarensis.

  2. The effect of specific rhlA-las-box mutations on DNA binding and gene activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing transcriptional regulators RhlR and LasR.

    PubMed

    González-Valdez, Abigail; Servín-González, Luis; Juárez, Katy; Hernandez-Aligio, Alberto; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a free-living bacterium and an important opportunistic pathogen. The genes coding for virulence-associated traits are regulated at the level of transcription by the quorum-sensing response. In this response, the regulator LasR coupled with the autoinducer 3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3O-C12-HSL) activates transcription of genes for several virulence factors. LasR/3O-C12-HSL also activates transcription of rhlR, the gene coding for the transcriptional regulator RhlR, and of rhlI that encodes the synthase that produces the autoinducer butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) that interacts with RhlR. Genes activated by RhlR/C4-HSL include those involved in rhamnolipids production (like the rhlAB operon) and lecA, coding for PA-I lectin. The molecular basis of LasR/3O-C12-HSL- and RhlR/C4-HSLDNA-binding specificity (at the so-called las-boxes) has not been clearly determined, and the aim of this work was to contribute to its understanding. Therefore, we analyzed the interaction of LasR and RhlR to variants of the rhlA-las-box that were constructed based on the comparison of this las-box to the las-box of lecA. We conclude that LasR and RhlR DNA-binding specificity is a complex multifactorial phenomenon in which both positive and negative effects are involved and that binding of these proteins does not necessarily result in gene activation.

  3. Onecut transcription factors in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Peter A.; Gannon, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Developmental processes are remarkably well conserved among species, and among the most highly conserved developmental regulators are transcription factor families. The Onecut transcription factor family consists of three members known for their single “cut” DNA-binding domain and an aberrant homeodomain. The three members of the Onecut family are highly conserved from Drosophila to humans and have significant roles in regulating the development of diverse tissues derived from the ectoderm or endoderm, where they activate a number of gene families. Of note, the genetic interaction between Onecut family members and Neurogenin genes appears to be essential in multiple tissues for proper specification and development of unique cell types. This review highlights the importance of the Onecut factors in cell fate specification and organogenesis, highlighting their role in vertebrates, and discusses their role in the maintenance of cell fate and prevention of disease. We cover the essential spatial and temporal control of Onecut factor expression and how this tight regulation is required for proper specification and subsequent terminal differentiation of multiple tissue types including those within the retina, central nervous system, liver and pancreas. Beyond development, Onecut factors perform necessary functions in mature cell types; their misregulation can contribute to diseases such as pancreatic cancer. Given the importance of this family of transcription factors in development and disease, their consideration in essential transcription factor networks is underappreciated. PMID:28018056

  4. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H.; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation by reducing the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}/retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, Adam J.; Luo Zhengyu; Vincent, Karen A.; Akita, Geoffrey Y.; Cheng, Seng H.; Gregory, Richard J.; Jiang Canwen

    2007-12-21

    In response to cellular hypoxia, cardiomyocytes adapt to consume less oxygen by shifting ATP production from mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation to glycolysis. The transcriptional activation of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In this study, we examined whether HIF-1 was involved in the suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We showed that either hypoxia or adenovirus-mediated expression of a constitutively stable hybrid form (HIF-1{alpha}/VP16) suppressed mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by an accumulation of intracellular neutral lipid. Both treatments also reduced the mRNA levels of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mitochondrial import of fatty acids for {beta}-oxidation. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression of HIF-1{alpha}/VP16 in cardiomyocytes under normoxic conditions also mimicked the reduction in the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})/retinoid X receptor (RXR), in the presence or absence of a PPAR{alpha} ligand. These results suggest that HIF-1 may be involved in hypoxia-induced suppression of fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes by reducing the DNA binding activity of PPAR{alpha}/RXR.

  6. Autoactivation by a Candida glabrata copper metalloregulatory transcription factor requires critical minor groove interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K A; Thiele, D J

    1996-01-01

    Rapid transcriptional autoactivation of the Candida glabrata AMT1 copper metalloregulatory transcription factor gene is essential for survival in the presence of high extracellular copper concentrations. Analysis of the interactions between purified recombinant AMT1 protein and the AMT1 promoter metal regulatory element was carried out by a combination of missing-nucleoside analysis, ethylation interference, site-directed mutagenesis, and quantitative in vitro DNA binding studies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that monomeric AMT1 binds the metal regulatory element with very high affinity and utilizes critical contacts in both the major and minor grooves. A single adenosine residue in the minor groove, conserved in all known yeast Cu metalloregulatory transcription factor DNA binding sites, plays a critical role in both AMT1 DNA binding in vitro and Cu-responsive AMT1 gene transcription in vivo. Furthermore, a mutation in the AMT1 Cu-activated DNA binding domain which converts a single arginine, found in a conserved minor groove binding domain, to lysine markedly reduces AMT1 DNA binding affinity in vitro and results in a severe defect in the ability of C. glabrata cells to mount a protective response against Cu toxicity. PMID:8552101

  7. Characterization of DNA binding property of the HIV-1 host factor and tumor suppressor protein Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5).

    PubMed

    Das, Supratik; Banerjee, Baisakhi; Hossain, Maidul; Thangamuniyandi, Muruganandan; Dasgupta, Saumya; Chongdar, Nipa; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Basu, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5) is a component of the hSWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. The INI1 gene is either deleted or mutated in rhabdoid cancers like ATRT (Atypical terratoid and rhabdoid tumor). INI1 is also a host factor for HIV-1 replication. INI1 binds DNA non-specifically. However, the mechanism of DNA binding and its biological role are unknown. From agarose gel retardation assay (AGRA), Ni-NTA pull-down and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies we show that amino acids 105-183 of INI1 comprise the minimal DNA binding domain (DBD). The INI1 DBD is absent in plants and in yeast SNF5. It is present in Caenorhabditis elegans SNF5, Drosophila melanogaster homologue SNR1 and is a highly conserved domain in vertebrates. The DNA binding property of this domain in SNR1, that is only 58% identical to INI1/hSNF5, is conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies of INI1 DBD and INI1 DBD:DNA complexes at different concentrations show that the DBD exists as a monomer at low protein concentration and two molecules of monomer binds one molecule of DNA. At high protein concentration, it exists as a dimer and binds two DNA molecules. Furthermore, isothermal calorimetry (ITC) experiments demonstrate that the DBD monomer binds DNA with a stoichiometry (N) of ∼0.5 and Kd  = 0.94 µM whereas the DBD dimer binds two DNA molecules sequentially with K'd1 = 222 µM and K'd2 = 1.16 µM. Monomeric DBD binding to DNA is enthalpy driven (ΔH = -29.9 KJ/mole). Dimeric DBD binding to DNA is sequential with the first binding event driven by positive entropy (ΔH'1 = 115.7 KJ/mole, TΔS'1 = 136.8 KJ/mole) and the second binding event driven by negative enthalpy (ΔH'2 = -106.3 KJ/mole, TΔS'2 = -75.7 KJ/mole). Our model for INI1 DBD binding to DNA provides new insights into the mechanism of DNA binding by INI1.

  8. PCB-INDUCED CHANGES IN THE DNA BINDING OF SEVERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLUM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of persistent chemical pollutants prevalent in the environment despite the ban of their use for decades. Disturbances in brain development and cognition are among the neurotoxic manifestations of PCBs. The cellular and molecular basis...

  9. Mutual activation of Ets-1 and AML1 DNA binding by direct interaction of their autoinhibitory domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, W Y; Sieweke, M; Ogawa, E; Wee, H J; Englmeier, U; Graf, T; Ito, Y

    1999-01-01

    The transcription factors Ets-1 and AML1 (the alphaBl subunit of PEBP2/CBF) play critical roles in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, and cooperate in the transactivation of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta chain enhancer. The DNA binding capacity of both factors is blocked intramolecularly but can be activated by the removal of negative regulatory domains. These include the exon VII domain for Ets-1 and the negative regulatory domain for DNA binding (NRDB) for alphaB1. Here we report that the direct interaction between the two factors leads to a reciprocal stimulation of their DNA binding activity and activation of their transactivation function. Detailed mapping revealed two independent contact points involving the exon VII and NRDB regions as well as the two DNA binding domains. Using deletion variants and dominant interfering mutants, we demonstrate that the interaction between exon VII and NRDB is necessary and sufficient for cooperative DNA binding. The exon VII and NRDB motifs are highly conserved in evolution yet deleted in natural variants, suggesting that the mechanism described is of biological relevance. The mutual activation of DNA binding of Ets and AML1 through the intermolecular interaction of autoinhibitory domains may represent a novel principle for the regulation of transcription factor function. PMID:10075931

  10. Complex Patterns of Association between Pleiotropy and Transcription Factor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chesmore, Kevin N.; Bartlett, Jacquelaine; Cheng, Chao; Williams, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Pleiotropy has been claimed to constrain gene evolution but specific mechanisms and extent of these constraints have been difficult to demonstrate. The expansion of molecular data makes it possible to investigate these pleiotropic effects. Few classes of genes have been characterized as intensely as human transcription factors (TFs). We therefore analyzed the evolutionary rates of full TF proteins, along with their DNA binding domains and protein-protein interacting domains (PID) in light of the degree of pleiotropy, measured by the number of TF–TF interactions, or the number of DNA-binding targets. Data were extracted from the ENCODE Chip-Seq dataset, the String v 9.2 database, and the NHGRI GWAS catalog. Evolutionary rates of proteins and domains were calculated using the PAML CodeML package. Our analysis shows that the numbers of TF-TF interactions and DNA binding targets associated with constrained gene evolution; however, the constraint caused by the number of DNA binding targets was restricted to the DNA binding domains, whereas the number of TF-TF interactions constrained the full protein and did so more strongly. Additionally, we found a positive correlation between the number of protein–PIDs and the evolutionary rates of the protein–PIDs. These findings show that not only does pleiotropy associate with constrained protein evolution but the constraint differs by domain function. Finally, we show that GWAS associated TF genes are more highly pleiotropic. The GWAS data illustrates that mutations in highly pleiotropic genes are more likely to be associated with disease phenotypes. PMID:27635052

  11. CRTR-1, a developmentally regulated transcriptional repressor related to the CP2 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rodda, S; Sharma, S; Scherer, M; Chapman, G; Rathjen, P

    2001-02-02

    CP2-related proteins comprise a family of DNA-binding transcription factors that are generally activators of transcription and expressed ubiquitously. We reported a differential display polymerase chain reaction fragment, Psc2, which was expressed in a regulated fashion in mouse pluripotent cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report further characterization of the Psc2 cDNA and function. The Psc2 cDNA contained an open reading frame homologous to CP2 family proteins. Regions implicated in DNA binding and oligomeric complex formation, but not transcription activation, were conserved. Psc2 expression in vivo during embryogenesis and in the adult mouse demonstrated tight spatial and temporal regulation, with the highest levels of expression in the epithelial lining of distal convoluted tubules in embryonic and adult kidneys. Functional analysis demonstrated that PSC2 repressed transcription 2.5-15-fold when bound to a heterologous promoter in ES, 293T, and COS-1 cells. The N-terminal 52 amino acids of PSC2 were shown to be necessary and sufficient for this activity and did not share obvious homology with reported repressor motifs. These results represent the first report of a CP2 family member that is expressed in a developmentally regulated fashion in vivo and that acts as a direct repressor of transcription. Accordingly, the protein has been named CP2-Related Transcriptional Repressor-1 (CRTR-1).

  12. Identification and characterisation of Dof transcription factors in the cucumber genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber is susceptible to many foliage diseases. Although candidate genes for resistances to several pathogens in cucumber have been reported, the underlying defence mechanisms remain unclear. The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are a group of plant-specific transcription factors that ha...

  13. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  14. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  15. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  16. Forkhead transcription factors regulate mosquito reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Munro, James B.; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Cruz, Josefa; Lee, Iris W.; Heraty, John M.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Forkhead box (Fox) genes encode a family of transcription factors defined by a ‘winged helix’ DNA-binding domain. In this study we aimed to identify Fox factors that are expressed within the fat body of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and determine whether any of these are involved in the regulation of mosquito yolk protein gene expression. The Ae. aegypti genome contains eighteen loci that encode putative Fox factors. Our stringent cladistic analysis has profound implications for the use of Fox genes as phylogenetic markers. Twelve Ae. aegypti Fox genes are expressed within various tissues of adult females, six of which are expressed within the fat body. All six Fox genes expressed in the fat body displayed dynamic expression profiles following a blood meal. We knocked down the ’fat body Foxes’ through RNAi to determine whether these “knockdowns” hindered amino acid-induced vitellogenin gene expression. We also determined the effect of these knockdowns on the number of eggs deposited following a blood meal. Knockdown of FoxN1, FoxN2, FoxL, and FoxO, had a negative effect on amino acid- induced vitellogenin gene expression and resulted in significantly fewer eggs laid. Our analysis stresses the importance of Fox transcription factors in regulating mosquito reproduction. PMID:17681238

  17. TFClass: an expandable hierarchical classification of human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Edgar; Schoeps, Torsten; Dönitz, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    TFClass (http://tfclass.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de/) provides a comprehensive classification of human transcription factors based on their DNA-binding domains. Transcription factors constitute a large functional family of proteins directly regulating the activity of genes. Most of them are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, thus reading out the information encoded in cis-regulatory DNA elements of promoters, enhancers and other regulatory regions of a genome. TFClass is a database that classifies human transcription factors by a six-level classification schema, four of which are abstractions according to different criteria, while the fifth level represents TF genes and the sixth individual gene products. Altogether, nine superclasses have been identified, comprising 40 classes and 111 families. Counted by genes, 1558 human TFs have been classified so far or >2900 different TFs when including their isoforms generated by alternative splicing or protein processing events. With this classification, we hope to provide a basis for deciphering protein–DNA recognition codes; moreover, it can be used for constructing expanded transcriptional networks by inferring additional TF-target gene relations. PMID:23180794

  18. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    PubMed Central

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  19. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  20. Recent advances in the structural molecular biology of Ets transcription factors: interactions, interfaces and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Gileadi, Opher

    2014-02-01

    The Ets family of eukaryotic transcription factors is based around the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain. Although their DNA-binding selectivity is biochemically and structurally well characterized, structures of homodimeric and ternary complexes point to Ets domains functioning as versatile protein-interaction modules. In the present paper, we review the progress made over the last decade to elucidate the structural mechanisms involved in modulation of DNA binding and protein partner selection during dimerization. We see that Ets domains, although conserved around a core architecture, have evolved to utilize a variety of interaction surfaces and binding mechanisms, reflecting Ets domains as dynamic interfaces for both DNA and protein interaction. Furthermore, we discuss recent advances in drug development for inhibition of Ets factors, and the roles structural biology can play in their future.

  1. Effect of DNA binding on geminate CO recombination kinetics in CooA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas; Champion, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CooA proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding to RrCooA. The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes takes place on ultrafast timescales but remains non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the timescale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in RrCooA relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Analysis of our data reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted.

  2. FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER Negatively Regulates Ethylene Response DNA-Binding Factors by Activating an Ethylene-Responsive Factor to Control Arabidopsis Floral Organ Senescence and Abscission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Han; Li, Pei-Fang; Chen, Ming-Kun; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-08-01

    In this study of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we investigated the relationship between FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER (FYF) and Ethylene Response DNA-binding Factors (EDFs) and functionally analyzed a key FYF target, an Ethylene-Responsive Factor (ERF), that controls flower senescence/abscission. Ectopic expression of EDF1/2/3/4 caused promotion of flower senescence/abscission and the activation of the senescence-associated genes. The presence of a repressor domain in EDFs and the enhancement of the promotion of senescence/abscission in EDF1/2/3/4+SRDX (converting EDFs to strong repressors by fusion with the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motif repression domain SRDX) transgenic plants suggested that EDFs act as repressors. The significant reduction of β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression by 35S:FYF in EDF1/2/3/4:GUS plants indicates that EDF1/2/3/4 functions downstream of FYF in regulating flower senescence/abscission. In this study, we also characterized an ERF gene, FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER UP-REGULATING FACTOR1 (FUF1), which is up-regulated by FYF during flower development. Ectopic expression of FUF1 caused similar delayed flower senescence/abscission as seen in 35S:FYF plants. This phenotype was correlated with deficient abscission zone formation, ethylene insensitivity, and down-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 and abscission-associated genes in 35S:FUF1 flowers. In contrast, significant promotion of flower senescence/abscission and up-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 were observed in 35S:FUF1+SRDX transgenic dominant-negative plants, in which FUF1 is converted to a potent repressor by fusion to an SRDX-suppressing motif. Thus, FUF1 acts as an activator in suppressing EDF1/2/3/4 function and senescence/abscission of the flowers. Our results reveal that FYF regulates flower senescence/abscission by negatively regulating EDF1/2/3/4, which is the downstream gene in the ethylene response, by activating FUF1 in Arabidopsis.

  3. Role of non-coding RNA transcription around gene regulatory elements in transcription factor recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryotic cells produce a variety of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), many of which have been shown to play pivotal roles in biological processes such as differentiation, maintenance of pluripotency of stem cells, and cellular response to various stresses. Genome-wide analyses have revealed that many ncRNAs are transcribed around regulatory DNA elements located proximal or distal to gene promoters, but their biological functions are largely unknown. Recently, it has been demonstrated in yeast and mouse that ncRNA transcription around gene promoters and enhancers facilitates DNA binding of transcription factors to their target sites. These results suggest universal roles of promoter/enhancer-associated ncRNAs in the recruitment of transcription factors to their binding sites. PMID:27763805

  4. Signatures of DNA target selectivity by ETS transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Poon, Gregory M K; Kim, Hye Mi

    2017-03-16

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. DNA target specificity derives from combinatorial interactions with other proteins as well as intrinsic heterogeneity among ETS domains. Emerging evidence suggests molecular hydration as a fundamental feature that defines the intrinsic heterogeneity in DNA target selection and susceptibility to epigenetic DNA modification. This perspective invokes novel hypotheses in the regulation of ETS proteins in physiologic osmotic stress, their pioneering potential in heterochromatin, and the effects of passive and pharmacologic DNA demethylation on ETS regulation.

  5. Exploring the utility of organo-polyoxometalate hybrids to inhibit SOX transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SOX transcription factors constitute an attractive target class for intervention with small molecules as they play a prominent role in the field of regenerative biomedicine and cancer biology. However, rationally engineering specific inhibitors that interfere with transcription factor DNA interfaces continues to be a monumental challenge in the field of transcription factor chemical biology. Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic compounds that were previously shown to target the high-mobility group (HMG) of SOX proteins at nanomolar concentrations. In continuation of this work, we carried out an assessment of the selectivity of a panel of newly synthesized organo-polyoxometalate hybrids in targeting different transcription factor families to enable the usage of polyoxometalates as specific SOX transcription factor drugs. Results The residual DNA-binding activities of 15 different transcription factors were measured after treatment with a panel of diverse polyoxometalates. Polyoxometalates belonging to the Dawson structural class were found to be more potent inhibitors than the Keggin class. Further, organically modified Dawson polyoxometalates were found to be the most potent in inhibiting transcription factor DNA binding activity. The size of the polyoxometalates and its derivitization were found to be the key determinants of their potency. Conclusion Polyoxometalates are highly potent, nanomolar range inhibitors of the DNA binding activity of the Sox-HMG family. However, binding assays involving a limited subset of structurally diverse polyoxometalates revealed a low selectivity profile against different transcription factor families. Further progress in achieving selectivity and deciphering structure-activity relationship of POMs require the identification of POM binding sites on transcription factors using elaborate approaches like X-ray crystallography and multidimensional NMR. In summary, our report reaffirms that transcription factors are

  6. The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor: definition of its consensus binding sequence and analysis of its DNA binding and repressive properties.

    PubMed

    Pinte, Sébastien; Stankovic-Valentin, Nicolas; Deltour, Sophie; Rood, Brian R; Guérardel, Cateline; Leprince, Dominique

    2004-09-10

    HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a tumor suppressor gene located at chromosome 17p13.3, a region frequently hypermethylated or deleted in human tumors and in a contiguous-gene syndrome, the Miller-Dieker syndrome. HIC1 is a transcriptional repressor containing five Krüppel-like C(2)H(2) zinc fingers and an N-terminal dimerization and autonomous repression domain called BTB/POZ. Although some of the HIC1 transcriptional repression mechanisms have been recently deciphered, target genes are still to be discovered. In this study, we determined the consensus binding sequence for HIC1 and investigated its DNA binding properties. Using a selection and amplification of binding sites technique, we identified the sequence 5'-(C)/(G)NG(C)/(G)GGGCA(C)/(A) CC-3' as an optimal binding site. In silico and functional analyses fully validated this consensus and highlighted a GGCA core motif bound by zinc fingers 3 and 4. The BTB/POZ domain inhibits the binding of HIC1 to a single site but mediates cooperative binding to a probe containing five concatemerized binding sites, a property shared by other BTB/POZ proteins. Finally, full-length HIC1 proteins transiently expressed in RK13 cells and more importantly, endogenous HIC1 proteins from the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line, repress the transcription of a reporter gene through their direct binding to these sites, as confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The definition of the HIC1-specific DNA binding sequence as well as the requirement for multiple sites for optimal binding of the full-length protein are mandatory prerequisites for the identification and analyses of bona fide HIC1 target genes.

  7. Both HMG boxes in Hmo1 are essential for DNA binding in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Ayako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Kasahara, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Hmo1, a member of the high mobility group B family proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, associates with the promoters of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) to direct accurate transcriptional initiation. Here, to identify factors involved in the binding of Hmo1 to its targets and the mechanism of Hmo1-dependent transcriptional initiation, we developed a novel reporter system using the promoter of the RPG RPS5. A genetic screen did not identify any factors that influence Hmo1 binding, but did identify a number of mutations in Hmo1 that impair its DNA binding activity in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that Hmo1 binds to its target promoters autonomously without any aid of additional factors. Furthermore, characterization of Hmo1 mutants showed that the box A domain plays a pivotal role in DNA binding and may be required for the recognition of structural properties of target promoters that occur in native chromatin.

  8. Hyperglycemia and redox status regulate RUNX2 DNA-binding and an angiogenic phenotype in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mochin, Maria T; Underwood, Karen F; Cooper, Brandon; McLenithan, John C; Pierce, Adam D; Nalvarte, Cesar; Arbiser, Jack; Karlsson, Anna I; Moise, Alexander R; Moskovitz, Jackob; Passaniti, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by hyperglycemic conditions, which can induce cellular stress responses, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and anti-oxidant defenses that modulate intracellular signaling to prevent oxidative damage. The RUNX2 DNA-binding transcription factor is activated by a glucose-mediated intracellular pathway, plays an important role in endothelial cell (EC) function and angiogenesis, and is a target of oxidative stress. RUNX2 DNA-binding and EC differentiation in response to glucose were conserved in ECs from different tissues and inhibited by hyperglycemia, which stimulated ROS production through the aldose reductase glucose-utilization pathway. Furthermore, the redox status of cysteine and methionine residues regulated RUNX2 DNA-binding and reversal of oxidative inhibition was consistent with an endogenous Methionine sulfoxide reductase-A (MsrA) activity. Low molecular weight MsrA substrates and sulfoxide scavengers were potent inhibitors of RUNX2 DNA binding in the absence of oxidative stress, but acted as antioxidants to increase DNA binding in the presence of oxidants. MsrA was associated with RUNX2:DNA complexes, as measured by a sensitive, quantitative DNA-binding ELISA. The related RUNX2 protein family member, RUNX1, which contains an identical DNA-binding domain, was a catalytic substrate of recombinant MsrA. These findings define novel redox pathways involving aldose reductase and MsrA that regulate RUNX2 transcription factor activity and biological function in ECs. Targeting of these pathways could result in more effective strategies to alleviate the vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes or cancer.

  9. The intracisternal A-particle proximal enhancer-binding protein activates transcription and is identical to the RNA- and DNA-binding protein p54nrb/NonO.

    PubMed

    Basu, A; Dong, B; Krainer, A R; Howe, C C

    1997-02-01

    The long terminal repeats of murine intracisternal A particles (IAPs) contain an IAP proximal enhancer (IPE) element that is inactive in murine F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and active in the parietal endoderm cell line PYS-2. The element binds efficiently to a 60-kDa IPE-binding protein (IPEB) present in PYS-2 cells but poorly to F9 proteins, suggesting a role for IPEB in regulating IAP expression. We have purified calf thymus IPEB, which binds to the IPE and transactivates a reporter gene in HeLa cell extracts. Based on the peptide sequence of the purified calf IPEB, we have cloned a 420-bp cDNA and showed that the encoded protein is the homolog of human p54nrb and mouse NonO, which are characterized by the presence of two RNA recognition motifs. We show that p54nrb is an IPE-binding transcription activator with its DNA-binding and activation domains in the N- and C-terminal halves, respectively. The activation domain of p54nrb is active in HeLa, PYS-2, and F9 cells, whereas p54nrb as a whole molecule is active in HeLa and PYS-2 cells but not in F9 cells. Thus, the lack of activity of p54nrb in F9 cells is due to an ineffective DNA-binding domain. We demonstrate that p54nrb also binds to a pre-mRNA. Based on the close sequence relatedness of this protein to PSF, which is required for pre-mRNA splicing in vitro, we discuss the possibility that p54nrb has dual roles in transcription and splicing.

  10. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of DNA-binding (Id) Proteins and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Increased Apoptosis in Ovarian Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Park, Sea Hee; Moon, Sung Eun; Koo, Ja Seong; Moon, Hwa Sook; Joo, Bo Sun

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the expression of inhibitor of DNA-binding (Id) proteins and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the ovary according to female age using a mice model as the first step in investigating the potential role of Ids and VEGF in ovarian aging. C57BL inbred female mice of three age groups (6-9, 14-16, and 23-26 weeks) were injected with 5 IU pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) in order to synchronize the estrus cycle. After 48 h, ovarian expression of Ids and VEGF was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunohistochemistry. Ovarian apoptosis was examined by ovarian expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Expression of Id-1 and VEGF was decreased with advancing female age, but not Id-2, Id-3, and Id-4. In particular, their expressions were significantly decreased in aged mice of 23-26 weeks compared with the young mice of 6-9 weeks (p < 0.05). In contrast, ovarian apoptosis was greatly increased in the aged mice compared to the young mice. This result suggests that Id-1 may have an implicated role in ovarian aging by associating with VEGF.

  11. E1 initiator DNA binding specificity is unmasked by selective inhibition of non-specific DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Stenlund, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Initiator proteins are critical components of the DNA replication machinery and mark the site of initiation. This activity probably requires highly selective DNA binding; however, many initiators display modest specificity in vitro. We demonstrate that low specificity of the papillomavirus E1 initiator results from the presence of a non-specific DNA-binding activity, involved in melting, which masks the specificity intrinsic to the E1 DNA-binding domain. The viral factor E2 restores specificity through a physical interaction with E1 that suppresses non-specific binding. We propose that this arrangement, where one DNA-binding activity tethers the initiator to ori while another alters DNA structure, is a characteristic of other viral and cellular initiator proteins. This arrangement would provide an explanation for the low selectivity observed for DNA binding by initiator proteins. PMID:12574131

  12. Determination and inference of eukaryotic transcription factor sequence specificity.

    PubMed

    Weirauch, Matthew T; Yang, Ally; Albu, Mihai; Cote, Atina G; Montenegro-Montero, Alejandro; Drewe, Philipp; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Lambert, Samuel A; Mann, Ishminder; Cook, Kate; Zheng, Hong; Goity, Alejandra; van Bakel, Harm; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Galli, Mary; Lewsey, Mathew G; Huang, Eryong; Mukherjee, Tuhin; Chen, Xiaoting; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Shaulsky, Gad; Walhout, Albertha J M; Bouget, François-Yves; Ratsch, Gunnar; Larrondo, Luis F; Ecker, Joseph R; Hughes, Timothy R

    2014-09-11

    Transcription factor (TF) DNA sequence preferences direct their regulatory activity, but are currently known for only ∼1% of eukaryotic TFs. Broadly sampling DNA-binding domain (DBD) types from multiple eukaryotic clades, we determined DNA sequence preferences for >1,000 TFs encompassing 54 different DBD classes from 131 diverse eukaryotes. We find that closely related DBDs almost always have very similar DNA sequence preferences, enabling inference of motifs for ∼34% of the ∼170,000 known or predicted eukaryotic TFs. Sequences matching both measured and inferred motifs are enriched in chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) peaks and upstream of transcription start sites in diverse eukaryotic lineages. SNPs defining expression quantitative trait loci in Arabidopsis promoters are also enriched for predicted TF binding sites. Importantly, our motif "library" can be used to identify specific TFs whose binding may be altered by human disease risk alleles. These data present a powerful resource for mapping transcriptional networks across eukaryotes.

  13. Interferon gamma rapidly induces in human monocytes a DNA-binding factor that recognizes the gamma response region within the promoter of the gene for the high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K C; Finbloom, D S

    1992-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) transcriptionally activates several early-response genes in monocytes that are important for the ultimate phenotype of the activated macrophage. One of these genes is the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI). Recently, Pearse et al. [Pearse, R.N., Feinman, R. & Ravetch, J. V. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 11305-11309] defined within the promoter region of the Fc gamma RI gene an element, the gamma response region, which was necessary for IFN-gamma-induced enhancement of Fc gamma RI. In this report we describe the induction by IFN-gamma of a DNA-binding factor, FcRF gamma (Fc gamma RI DNA-binding factor, IFN-gamma induced), that specifically recognizes the gamma response region element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the presence of FcRF gamma in human monocytes within 1 min after exposure to IFN-gamma. On EMSA, FcRF gamma consisted of two complexes termed FcRF gamma 1 and FcRF gamma 2. The nuclear concentration of FcRF gamma rapidly increased, peaked at 15 min, and then fell after 1-2 hr. Dose-response studies revealed (i) as little as 0.05 ng of IFN-gamma per ml induced FcRF gamma, (ii) maximum activation occurred at 1 ng/ml, and (iii) steady-state levels of Fc gamma RI mRNA closely paralleled that of FcRF gamma. Since FcRF gamma was activated in cells normally not expressing Fc gamma RI RNA, other regulatory mechanisms must control Fc gamma RI-restricted tissue expression. Activation of FcRF gamma by IFN-gamma was inhibited by pretreatment with 500 nM staurosporin and 25 microM phenyl arsine oxide. These data suggest that a kinase and possibly a phosphatase activity are required for IFN-gamma-induced signaling of FcRF gamma in monocytes. Images PMID:1334553

  14. Azadiradione ameliorates polyglutamine expansion disease in Drosophila by potentiating DNA binding activity of heat shock factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Naibedya; Ghosh, Suvranil; Jana, Manas; Ganguli, Arnab; Komarov, Andrei; Paul, Soumyadip; Dwivedi, Vibha; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Jana, Nihar R.; Lakhotia, Subhash C.; Chakrabarti, Gopal; Misra, Anup K.; Mandal, Subhash C.; Pal, Mahadeb

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins with the expansion of polyglutamine tracts in the brain underlies progressive genetic neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) like Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA). An insensitive cellular proteotoxic stress response to non-native protein oligomers is common in such conditions. Indeed, upregulation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) function and its target protein chaperone expression has shown promising results in animal models of NDs. Using an HSF1 sensitive cell based reporter screening, we have isolated azadiradione (AZD) from the methanolic extract of seeds of Azadirachta indica, a plant known for its multifarious medicinal properties. We show that AZD ameliorates toxicity due to protein aggregation in cell and fly models of polyglutamine expansion diseases to a great extent. All these effects are correlated with activation of HSF1 function and expression of its target protein chaperone genes. Notably, HSF1 activation by AZD is independent of cellular HSP90 or proteasome function. Furthermore, we show that AZD directly interacts with purified human HSF1 with high specificity, and facilitates binding of HSF1 to its recognition sequence with higher affinity. These unique findings qualify AZD as an ideal lead molecule for consideration for drug development against NDs that affect millions worldwide. PMID:27835876

  15. Inhibition of AtMYB2 DNA-binding by nitric oxide involves cysteine S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Viviane; Vernal, Javier; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Grotewold, Erich; Cassia, Raul; Terenzi, Hernán

    2007-10-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) can influence the transcriptional activity of a wide set of Arabidopsis genes. The aim of the present work was to investigate if NO modifies DNA-binding activity of AtMYB2 (a typical R2R3-MYB from Arabidopsis thaliana), by a posttranslational modification of its conserved Cys53 residue. We cloned a fully active minimal DNA-binding domain of AtMYB2 spanning residues 19-125, hereafter called M2D. In EMSA assays, M2D binds the core binding site 5'-[A]AACC[A]-3'. The NO donors SNP and GSNO inhibit M2D DNA-binding. As expected for a Cys S-nitrosylation, the NO-mediated inhibitory effect was reversed by DTT, and S-nitrosylation of Cys53 in M2D was detected by biotin switch assays. These results demonstrate that the DNA-binding of M2D is inhibited by S-nitrosylation of Cys53 as a consequence of NO action, thus establishing for the first time a relationship between the redox state and DNA-binding in a plant MYB transcription factor.

  16. Auto-inhibition of ETV6 (TEL) DNA-binding: appended helices sterically block the ETS domain

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, H. Jerome; De, Soumya; Okon, Mark; Green, Sean M.; Bhachech, Niraja; Graves, Barbara J.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    2012-01-01

    ETV6 (or TEL), a transcriptional repressor belonging to the ETS family, is frequently involved in chromosomal translocations linked with human cancers. It displays a DNA-binding mode distinct from other ETS proteins due to the presence of a self-associating PNT domain. In this study, we used NMR spectroscopy to dissect the structural and dynamic bases for the auto-inhibition of ETV6 DNA-binding by sequences C-terminal to its ETS domain. The CID (C-terminal inhibitory domain) contains two helices, H4 and H5, which sterically block the DNA-binding interface of the ETS domain. Importantly, these appended helices are only marginally stable as revealed by amide hydrogen exchange and 15N relaxation measurements. The CID is thus poised to undergo a facile conformational change as required for DNA-binding. The CID also dampens millisecond timescale motions of the ETS domain hypothesized to be critical for the recognition of specific ETS target sequences. This work illustrates the use of appended sequences on conserved structural domains to generate biological diversity, and complements previous studies of the allosteric mechanism of ETS1 auto-inhibition to reveal both common and divergent features underlying the regulation of DNA-binding by ETS transcription factors. PMID:22584210

  17. FlbD has a DNA-binding activity near its carboxy terminus that recognizes ftr sequences involved in positive and negative regulation of flagellar gene transcription in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, D A; Van Way, S M; Blankenship, C A; Mullin, A H

    1994-01-01

    FlbD is a transcriptional regulatory protein that negatively autoregulates fliF, and it is required for expression of other Caulobacter crescentus flagellar genes, including flaN and flbG. In this report we have investigated the interaction between carboxy-terminal fragments of FlbD protein and enhancer-like ftr sequences in the promoter regions of fliF, flaN, and flbG. FlbDc87 is a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-FlbD fusion protein that carries the carboxy-terminal 87 amino acids of FlbD, and FlbDc87 binds to restriction fragments containing the promoter regions of fliF, flaN, and flbG, whereas a GST-FlbD fusion protein carrying the last 48 amino acids of FlbD failed to bind to these promoter regions. DNA footprint analysis demonstrated that FlbDc87 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that makes close contact with 11 nucleotides in ftr4, and 6 of these nucleotides were shown previously to function in negative regulation of fliF transcription in vivo (S. M. Van Way, A. Newton, A. H. Mullin, and D. A. Mullin, J. Bacteriol. 175:367-376, 1993). Three DNA fragments, each carrying an ftr4 mutation that resulted in elevated fliF transcript levels in vivo, were defective in binding to FlbDc87 in vitro. We also found that a missense mutation in the recognition helix of the putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of FlbDc87 resulted in defective binding to ftr4 in vitro. These data suggest that the binding of FlbDc87 to ftr4 is relevant to negative transcriptional regulation of fliF and that FlbD functions directly as a repressor. Footprint analysis showed that FlbDc87 also makes close contacts with specific nucleotides in ftr1, ftr2, and ftr3 in the flaN-flbG promoter region, and some of these nucleotides were shown previously to be required for regulated transcription of flaN and flbG (D. A. Mullin and A. Newton, J. Bacteriol. 175:2067-2076, 1993). Footprint analysis also revealed a new ftr-like sequence, ftr5, at -136 from the transcription start site of flb

  18. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  19. In vitro squelching of activated transcription by serum response factor: evidence for a common coactivator used by multiple transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Prywes, R; Zhu, H

    1992-01-01

    Low amounts of serum response factor (SRF) activate transcription in vitro from a fos promoter construct containing an SRF binding site. Using this human HeLa cell-derived in vitro transcription system, we have found that high amounts of SRF inhibited, or 'squelched', transcription from this construct. Transcription from several other promoters activated by different gene-specific factors, including CREB and the acidic activator VP16, was also inhibited by high amounts of SRF. Basal transcription, from TATA-only promoters, however, was not inhibited. These results suggest that SRF binds to a common factor(s) (termed coactivator) required for activated transcription by a diverse group of transcriptional activators. Inhibition of transcription by SRF could be blocked by a double stranded oligonucleotide containing an SRF binding site. Mutations in SRF which abolished its DNA binding activity also reduced its ability to inhibit transcription. In addition, a C-terminal truncation of SRF which reduced its ability to activate transcription also reduced SRF's ability to inhibit transcription. These results suggest that activation and inhibition of transcription may be mediated by SRF binding to the same factor and that SRF can only bind to this factor when SRF is bound to plasmid DNA. Images PMID:1531519

  20. Fission Yeast CSL Proteins Function as Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Oravcová, Martina; Teska, Mikoláš; Půta, František; Folk, Petr; Převorovský, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jk/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) family are key regulators of metazoan development and function as the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway implicated in various cell fate decisions. CSL proteins recognize specifically the GTG[G/A]AA sequence motif and several mutants compromised in their ability to bind DNA have been reported. In our previous studies we have identified a number of novel putative CSL family members in fungi, organisms lacking the Notch pathway. It is not clear whether these represent genuine CSL family members. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches we characterized the DNA binding properties of Cbf11 and Cbf12, the antagonistic CSL paralogs from the fission yeast, important for the proper coordination of cell cycle events and the regulation of cell adhesion. We have shown that a mutation of a conserved arginine residue abolishes DNA binding in both CSL paralogs, similar to the situation in mouse. We have also demonstrated the ability of Cbf11 and Cbf12 to activate gene expression in an autologous fission yeast reporter system. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the fission yeast CSL proteins are indeed genuine family members capable of functioning as transcription factors, and provide support for the ancient evolutionary origin of this important protein family. PMID:23555033

  1. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni < 0.5. This result is counterintuitive because there

  2. The functional landscape bound to the transcription factors of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by the experimental evidences accumulated in the last ten years and based on information deposited in RegulonDB, literature look up, and sequence analysis, we analyze the repertoire of 304 DNA-binding Transcription factors (TFs) in Escherichia coli K-12. These regulators were grouped in 78 evolutionary families and are regulating almost half of the total genes in this bacterium. In structural terms, 60% of TFs are composed by two-domains, 30% are monodomain, and 10% three- and four-structural domains. As previously noticed, the most abundant DNA-binding domain corresponds to the winged helix-turn-helix, with few alternative DNA-binding structures, resembling the hypothesis of successful protein structures with the emergence of new ones at low scales. In summary, we identified and described the characteristics associated to the DNA-binding TF in E. coli K-12. We also identified twelve functional modules based on a co-regulated gene matrix. Finally, diverse regulons were predicted based on direct associations between the TFs and potential regulated genes. This analysis should increase our knowledge about the gene regulation in the bacterium E. coli K-12, and provide more additional clues for comprehensive modelling of transcriptional regulatory networks in other bacteria.

  3. Adenovirus DNA-binding protein forms a multimeric protein complex with double-stranded DNA and enhances binding of nuclear factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Stuiver, M H; van der Vliet, P C

    1990-01-01

    The 72-kilodalton adenovirus DNA-binding protein (DBP) binds to single-stranded DNA as well as to RNA and double-stranded DNA and is essential for the replication of viral DNA. We investigated the binding of DBP to double-stranded DNA by gel retardation analysis. By using a 114-base-pair DNA fragment, five or six different complexes were observed by gel retardation. The mobility of these complexes is dependent on the DBP concentration, suggesting that the complexes arise by sequential binding of DBP molecules to the DNA. In contrast to binding to single-stranded DNA, the binding of DBP to double-stranded DNA appears to be noncooperative. DBP binds to linear DNA as well as to circular DNA, while linear DNA containing the adenovirus terminal protein was also recognized. No specificity for adenovirus origin sequences was observed. To study whether the binding of DBP could influence initiation of DNA replication, we analyzed the effect of DBP on the binding of nuclear factor I (NFI) and NFIII, two sequence-specific origin-recognizing proteins that enhance initiation. At subsaturating levels of NFI, DBP increases the rate of binding of NFI considerably, while no effect was seen on NFIII. This stimulation of NFI binding is specific for DBP and was not observed with another protein (NFIV), which forms a similar DNA-multimeric protein complex. In agreement with enhanced NFI binding, DBP stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro especially strongly at subsaturating NFI concentrations. We explain our results by assuming that DBP forms a complex with origin DNA that promotes formation of an alternative DNA structure, thereby facilitating the binding of NFI as well as the initiation of DNA replication via NFI. Images PMID:2293667

  4. De Novo Identification and Biophysical Characterization of Transcription Factor Binding Sites with Microfluidic Affinity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, Polly M.; Gerber, Doron; Tran, Danh; Zheng, Jiashun; Li, Hao; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated in part by protein transcription factors (TFs) that bind target regulatory DNA sequences. Predicting DNA binding sites and affinities from transcription factor sequence or structure is difficult; therefore, experimental data are required to link TFs to target sequences. We present a microfluidics-based approach for de novo discovery and quantitative biophysical characterization of DNA target sequences. We validated our technique by measuring sequence preferences for 28 S. cerevisiae TFs with a variety of DNA binding domains, including several that have proven difficult to study via other techniques. For each TF, we measured relative binding affinities to oligonucleotides covering all possible 8-bp DNA sequences to create a comprehensive map of sequence preferences; for 4 TFs, we also determined absolute affinities. We anticipate that these data and future use of this technique will provide information essential for understanding TF specificity, improving identification of regulatory sites, and reconstructing regulatory interactions. PMID:20802496

  5. Nitric oxide inhibits c-Jun DNA binding by specifically targeted S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Molina, E P; Lamas, S

    1999-05-28

    This study addresses potential molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of the transcription factor c-Jun by nitric oxide. We show that in the presence of the physiological sulfhydryl glutathione nitric oxide modifies the two cysteine residues contained in the DNA binding module of c-Jun in a selective and distinct way. Although nitric oxide induced the formation of an intermolecular disulfide bridge between cysteine residues in the leucine zipper site of c-Jun monomers, this same radical directed the covalent incorporation of stoichiometric amounts of glutathione to a single conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding site of the protein. We found that covalent dimerization of c-Jun apparently did not affect its DNA binding activity, whereas the formation of a mixed disulfide with glutathione correlated well with the inhibition of transcription factor binding to DNA. Furthermore, we provide experimental evidence that nitric oxide-induced S-glutathionylation and inhibition of c-Jun involves the formation of S-nitrosoglutathione. In conclusion, our results support the reversible formation of a mixed disulfide between glutathione and c-Jun as a potential mechanism by which nitrosative stress may be transduced into a functional response at the level of transcription.

  6. A filter microplate assay for quantitative analysis of DNA binding proteins using fluorescent DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, William C; Swartz, James R

    2011-08-15

    We present a rapid method for quantifying the apparent DNA binding affinity and capacity of recombinant transcription factors (TFs). We capture His6-tagged TFs using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose and incubate the immobilized TFs with fluorescently labeled cognate DNA probes. After washing, the strength of the fluorescence signal indicates the extent of DNA binding. The assay was validated using two pluripotency-regulating TFs: SOX2 and NANOG. Using competitive binding analysis with nonlabeled competitor DNA, we show that SOX2 and NANOG specifically bind to their consensus sequences. We also determined the apparent affinity of SOX2 and NANOG for their consensus sequences to be 54.2±9 and 44.0±6nM, respectively, in approximate agreement with literature values. Our assay does not require radioactivity, but radioactively labeling the TFs enables the measurement of absolute amounts of immobilized SOX2 and NANOG and, hence, a DNA-to-protein binding ratio. SOX2 possesses a 0.95 DNA-to-protein binding ratio, whereas NANOG possesses a 0.44 ratio, suggesting that most of the SOX2 and approximately half of the NANOG are competent for DNA binding. Alternatively, the NANOG dimer may be capable of binding only one DNA target. This flexible DNA binding assay enables the analysis of crude or purified samples with or without radioactivity.

  7. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  8. Regulation of Lactobacillus casei Sorbitol Utilization Genes Requires DNA-Binding Transcriptional Activator GutR and the Conserved Protein GutM▿

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Cristina; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the five genes (gutRMCBA) downstream from the previously described sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding Lactobacillus casei gutF gene revealed that they constitute a sorbitol (glucitol) utilization operon. The gutRM genes encode putative regulators, while the gutCBA genes encode the EIIC, EIIBC, and EIIA proteins of a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTSGut). The gut operon is transcribed as a polycistronic gutFRMCBA messenger, the expression of which is induced by sorbitol and repressed by glucose. gutR encodes a transcriptional regulator with two PTS-regulated domains, a galactitol-specific EIIB-like domain (EIIBGat domain) and a mannitol/fructose-specific EIIA-like domain (EIIAMtl domain). Its inactivation abolished gut operon transcription and sorbitol uptake, indicating that it acts as a transcriptional activator. In contrast, cells carrying a gutB mutation expressed the gut operon constitutively, but they failed to transport sorbitol, indicating that EIIBCGut negatively regulates GutR. A footprint analysis showed that GutR binds to a 35-bp sequence upstream from the gut promoter. A sequence comparison with the presumed promoter region of gut operons from various firmicutes revealed a GutR consensus motif that includes an inverted repeat. The regulation mechanism of the L. casei gut operon is therefore likely to be operative in other firmicutes. Finally, gutM codes for a conserved protein of unknown function present in all sequenced gut operons. A gutM mutant, the first constructed in a firmicute, showed drastically reduced gut operon expression and sorbitol uptake, indicating a regulatory role also for GutM. PMID:18676710

  9. Regulation of Lactobacillus casei sorbitol utilization genes requires DNA-binding transcriptional activator GutR and the conserved protein GutM.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2008-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the five genes (gutRMCBA) downstream from the previously described sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding Lactobacillus casei gutF gene revealed that they constitute a sorbitol (glucitol) utilization operon. The gutRM genes encode putative regulators, while the gutCBA genes encode the EIIC, EIIBC, and EIIA proteins of a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)). The gut operon is transcribed as a polycistronic gutFRMCBA messenger, the expression of which is induced by sorbitol and repressed by glucose. gutR encodes a transcriptional regulator with two PTS-regulated domains, a galactitol-specific EIIB-like domain (EIIB(Gat) domain) and a mannitol/fructose-specific EIIA-like domain (EIIA(Mtl) domain). Its inactivation abolished gut operon transcription and sorbitol uptake, indicating that it acts as a transcriptional activator. In contrast, cells carrying a gutB mutation expressed the gut operon constitutively, but they failed to transport sorbitol, indicating that EIIBC(Gut) negatively regulates GutR. A footprint analysis showed that GutR binds to a 35-bp sequence upstream from the gut promoter. A sequence comparison with the presumed promoter region of gut operons from various firmicutes revealed a GutR consensus motif that includes an inverted repeat. The regulation mechanism of the L. casei gut operon is therefore likely to be operative in other firmicutes. Finally, gutM codes for a conserved protein of unknown function present in all sequenced gut operons. A gutM mutant, the first constructed in a firmicute, showed drastically reduced gut operon expression and sorbitol uptake, indicating a regulatory role also for GutM.

  10. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  11. Characterization of DNA-binding-dependent and -independent functions of SCL/TAL1 during human erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Ravet, Emmanuel; Reynaud, Damien; Titeux, Monique; Izac, Brigitte; Fichelson, Serge; Roméo, Paul-Henri; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Pflumio, Françoise

    2004-05-01

    The transcription factor TAL1 has major functions during embryonic hematopoiesis and in adult erythropoiesis and megakaryocytopoiesis. These functions rely on different TAL1 structural domains that are responsible for dimerization, transactivation, and DNA binding. Previous work, most often done in mice, has shown that some TAL1 functions do not require DNA binding. To study the role of TAL1 and the relevance of the TAL1 DNA-binding domain in human erythropoiesis, we developed an approach that allows an efficient enforced wild-type or mutant TAL1 protein expression in human hematopoietic CD34(+) cells using a lentiviral vector. Differentiation capacities of the transduced cells were studied in a culture system that distinguishes early and late erythroid development. Results indicate that enforced TAL1 expression enhances long-term culture initiating cell (LTC-IC) potential and erythroid differentiation of human CD34(+) cells as shown by increased beta globin and porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) gene expressions and erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-Es), erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-Es), and glycophorin A-positive (GPA(+)) cell productions. Enforced expression of a TAL1 protein deleted of its DNA-binding domain (named Delta bTAL1) mimicked most TAL1 effects except for the LTC-IC enhancement, the down-regulation of the CD34 surface marker, and the GPA(+) cell production. These results provide the first functional indications of DNA-binding-dependent and -independent roles of TAL1 in human erythropoiesis.

  12. Identification of Transcriptional Targets of the Dual Function Transcription Factor/Phosphatase Eyes Absent

    PubMed Central

    Jemc, Jennifer; Rebay, Ilaria

    2007-01-01

    Drosophila eye specification and development relies on a collection of transcription factors termed the retinal determination gene network (RDGN). Two members of this network, Eyes absent (EYA) and Sine oculis (SO), form a transcriptional complex in which EYA provides the transactivation function while SO provides the DNA binding activity. EYA also functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase, raising the question of whether transcriptional output is dependent or independent of phosphatase activity. To explore this, we used microarrays together with binding site analysis, quantitative real-time PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation, genetics and in vivo expression analysis to identify new EYA-SO targets. In parallel, we examined the expression profiles of tissue expressing phosphatase mutant eya and found that reducing phosphatase activity did not globally impair transcriptional output. Among the targets identified by our analysis was the cell cycle regulatory gene, string (stg), suggesting that EYA and SO may influence cell proliferation through transcriptional regulation of stg. Future investigation into the regulation of stg and other EYA-SO targets identified in this study will help elucidate the transcriptional circuitries whereby output from the RDGN integrates with other signaling inputs to coordinate retinal development. PMID:17714699

  13. TAF4/4b·TAF12 Displays a Unique Mode of DNA Binding and Is Required for Core Promoter Function of a Subset of Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Kfir; Moshonov, Sandra; Elfakess, Rofa; Sharon, Michal; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin; Dikstein, Rivka

    2009-01-01

    The major core promoter-binding factor in polymerase II transcription machinery is TFIID, a complex consisting of TBP, the TATA box-binding protein, and 13 to 14 TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previously we found that the histone H2A-like TAF paralogs TAF4 and TAF4b possess DNA-binding activity. Whether TAF4/TAF4b DNA binding directs TFIID to a specific core promoter element or facilitates TFIID binding to established core promoter elements is not known. Here we analyzed the mode of TAF4b·TAF12 DNA binding and show that this complex binds DNA with high affinity. The DNA length required for optimal binding is ∼70 bp. Although the complex displays a weak sequence preference, the nucleotide composition is less important than the length of the DNA for high affinity binding. Comparative expression profiling of wild-type and a DNA-binding mutant of TAF4 revealed common core promoter features in the down-regulated genes that include a TATA-box and an Initiator. Further examination of the PEL98 gene from this group showed diminished Initiator activity and TFIID occupancy in TAF4 DNA-binding mutant cells. These findings suggest that DNA binding by TAF4/4b-TAF12 facilitates the association of TFIID with the core promoter of a subset of genes. PMID:19635797

  14. Structural insights into the autoregulation and cooperativity of the human transcription factor Ets-2.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joseph A; Cooper, Christopher D O; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-03-27

    Ets-2, like its closely related homologue Ets-1, is a member of the Ets family of DNA binding transcription factors. Both proteins are subject to multiple levels of regulation of their DNA binding and transactivation properties. One such regulatory mechanism is the presence of an autoinhibitory module, which in Ets-1 allosterically inhibits the DNA binding activity. This inhibition can be relieved by interaction with protein partners or cooperative binding to closely separated Ets binding sites in a palindromic arrangement. In this study we describe the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of a DNA complex of the Ets-2 Ets domain. The Ets domain crystallized with two distinct species in the asymmetric unit, which closely resemble the autoinhibited and DNA bound forms of Ets-1. This discovery prompted us to re-evaluate the current model for the autoinhibitory mechanism and the structural basis for cooperative DNA binding. In contrast to Ets-1, in which the autoinhibition is caused by a combination of allosteric and steric mechanisms, we were unable to find clear evidence for the allosteric mechanism in Ets-2. We also demonstrated two possibly distinct types of cooperative binding to substrates with Ets binding motifs separated by four and six base pairs and suggest possible molecular mechanisms for this behavior.

  15. Structural Insights into the Autoregulation and Cooperativity of the Human Transcription Factor Ets-2*

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Joseph A; Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets-2, like its closely related homologue Ets-1, is a member of the Ets family of DNA binding transcription factors. Both proteins are subject to multiple levels of regulation of their DNA binding and transactivation properties. One such regulatory mechanism is the presence of an autoinhibitory module, which in Ets-1 allosterically inhibits the DNA binding activity. This inhibition can be relieved by interaction with protein partners or cooperative binding to closely separated Ets binding sites in a palindromic arrangement. In this study we describe the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of a DNA complex of the Ets-2 Ets domain. The Ets domain crystallized with two distinct species in the asymmetric unit, which closely resemble the autoinhibited and DNA bound forms of Ets-1. This discovery prompted us to re-evaluate the current model for the autoinhibitory mechanism and the structural basis for cooperative DNA binding. In contrast to Ets-1, in which the autoinhibition is caused by a combination of allosteric and steric mechanisms, we were unable to find clear evidence for the allosteric mechanism in Ets-2. We also demonstrated two possibly distinct types of cooperative binding to substrates with Ets binding motifs separated by four and six base pairs and suggest possible molecular mechanisms for this behavior. PMID:25670864

  16. Inhibition of NF-kappaB DNA binding by nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, J R; Botting, C H; Panico, M; Morris, H R; Hay, R T

    1996-01-01

    It has been suggested that the NF-kappaB transcription factor family may mediate expression of the gene encoding the cytokine-inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). To establish if nitric oxide (NO) could in turn affect activity of NF-kappaB, the ability of NO-donor compounds to influence NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in vitro was investigated. NO-donor compounds sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) both inhibited the DNA binding activity of recombinant NF-kappaB p50 and p65 homodimers and of p50-p65 heterodimers. Inhibition of NF-kappaB p50 DNA binding by NO-donor compounds involved modification of the conserved redox-sensitive C62 residue, as a C62S p50 mutant was significantly more resistant to SNP-mediated inactivation. Non-reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that SNP could inhibit p50 DNA binding by mechanisms other than the formation of intersubunit disulphide bonds involving p50 residue C62. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of a synthetic NF-kappaB p5O peptide containing the C62 residue suggested that NO gas can modify C62 by S-nitrosylation. This study indicates that NO-donors can directly inhibit the DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB family proteins, suggesting that cellular NO provides another control mechanism for modulating the expression of NF-kappaB-responsive genes. PMID:8710491

  17. Why Transcription Factor Binding Sites Are Ten Nucleotides Long

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alexander J.; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled primarily by transcription factors, whose DNA binding sites are typically 10 nt long. We develop a population-genetic model to understand how the length and information content of such binding sites evolve. Our analysis is based on an inherent trade-off between specificity, which is greater in long binding sites, and robustness to mutation, which is greater in short binding sites. The evolutionary stable distribution of binding site lengths predicted by the model agrees with the empirical distribution (5–31 nt, with mean 9.9 nt for eukaryotes), and it is remarkably robust to variation in the underlying parameters of population size, mutation rate, number of transcription factor targets, and strength of selection for proper binding and selection against improper binding. In a systematic data set of eukaryotic and prokaryotic transcription factors we also uncover strong relationships between the length of a binding site and its information content per nucleotide, as well as between the number of targets a transcription factor regulates and the information content in its binding sites. Our analysis explains these features as well as the remarkable conservation of binding site characteristics across diverse taxa. PMID:22887818

  18. Epistatic relationships reveal the functional organization of yeast transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiashun; Benschop, Joris J; Shales, Michael; Kemmeren, Patrick; Greenblatt, Jack; Cagney, Gerard; Holstege, Frank; Li, Hao; Krogan, Nevan J

    2010-10-05

    The regulation of gene expression is, in large part, mediated by interplay between the general transcription factors (GTFs) that function to bring about the expression of many genes and site-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (STFs). Here, quantitative genetic profiling using the epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) approach allowed us to measure 48 391 pairwise genetic interactions, both negative (aggravating) and positive (alleviating), between and among genes encoding STFs and GTFs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This allowed us to both reconstruct regulatory models for specific subsets of transcription factors and identify global epistatic patterns. Overall, there was a much stronger preference for negative relative to positive genetic interactions among STFs than there was among GTFs. Negative genetic interactions, which often identify factors working in non-essential, redundant pathways, were also enriched for pairs of STFs that co-regulate similar sets of genes. Microarray analysis demonstrated that pairs of STFs that display negative genetic interactions regulate gene expression in an independent rather than coordinated manner. Collectively, these data suggest that parallel/compensating relationships between regulators, rather than linear pathways, often characterize transcriptional circuits.

  19. Identifying DNA Binding Motifs by Combining Data from Different Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Linyong; Resat, Haluk; Nagib Callaos; Katsuhisa Horimoto; Jake Chen; Amy Sze Chan

    2004-07-19

    A transcription factor regulates the expression of its target genes by binding to their operator regions. It functions by affecting the interactions between RNA polymerases and the gene's promoter. Many transcription factors bind to their targets by recognizing a specific DNA sequence pattern, which is referred to as a consensus sequence or a motif. Since it would remove the possible biases, combining biological data from different sources can be expected to improve the quality of the information extracted from the biological data. We analyzed the microarray gene expression data and the organism's genome sequence jointly to determine the transcription factor recognition sequences with more accuracy. Utilizing such a data integration approach, we have investigated the regulation of the photosynthesis genes of the purple non-sulphur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The photosynthesis genes in this organism are tightly regulated as a function of environmental growth conditions by three major regulatory systems, PrrB/PrrA, AppA/PpsR and FnrL. In this study, we have detected a previously undefined PrrA consensus sequence, improved the previously known DNA-binding motif of PpsR, and confirmed the consensus sequence of the global regulator FnrL.

  20. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-05

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  1. Cytokinin Response Factor 5 has transcriptional activity governed by its C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Striberny, Bernd; Melton, Anthony E; Schwacke, Rainer; Krause, Kirsten; Fischer, Karsten; Goertzen, Leslie R; Rashotte, Aaron M

    2017-02-01

    Cytokinin Response Factors (CRFs) are AP2/ERF transcription factors involved in cytokinin signal transduction. CRF proteins consist of a N-terminal dimerization domain (CRF domain), an AP2 DNA-binding domain, and a clade-specific C-terminal region of unknown function. Using a series of sequential deletions in yeast-2-hybrid assays, we provide evidence that the C-terminal region of Arabidopsis CRF5 can confer transactivation activity. Although comparative analyses identified evolutionarily conserved protein sequence within the C-terminal region, deletion experiments suggest that this transactivation domain has a partially redundant modular structure required for activation of target gene transcription.

  2. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  3. The Dof domain, a zinc finger DNA-binding domain conserved only in higher plants, truly functions as a Cys2/Cys2 Zn finger domain.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yoshimi; Ishiduka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Rie; Esaka, Muneharu

    2004-03-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are plant transcription factors that have a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, called the Dof domain. The Dof domain, which is composed of 52 amino acid residues, is similar to the Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain of GATA1 and steroid hormone receptors, but has a longer putative loop than that in the case of these zinc finger domains. The DNA-binding function of ascorbate oxidase gene binding protein (AOBP), a Dof protein, was investigated by gel retardation analysis. When Cys was replaced by His, the Dof domain could not function as a Cys3/His- or a Cys2/His2-type zinc finger. The characteristic longer loop was essential for DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, heavy metals such as Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the Dof domain. Manganese ion as well as zinc ion was coordinated by the Dof domain in vitro. On the other hand, the analysis using inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed that the Dof domain contained zinc ion but not manganese ion. Thus, the Dof domain was proved to function as a Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger domain.

  4. Structural basis of DNA recognition by PCG2 reveals a novel DNA binding mode for winged helix-turn-helix domains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junfeng; Huang, Jinguang; Zhao, Yanxiang; Liu, Huaian; Wang, Dawei; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Wensheng; Taylor, Ian A.; Peng, You-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The MBP1 family proteins are the DNA binding subunits of MBF cell-cycle transcription factor complexes and contain an N terminal winged helix-turn-helix (wHTH) DNA binding domain (DBD). Although the DNA binding mechanism of MBP1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively studied, the structural framework and the DNA binding mode of other MBP1 family proteins remains to be disclosed. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the DBD of PCG2, the Magnaporthe oryzae orthologue of MBP1, bound to MCB–DNA. The structure revealed that the wing, the 20-loop, helix A and helix B in PCG2–DBD are important elements for DNA binding. Unlike previously characterized wHTH proteins, PCG2–DBD utilizes the wing and helix-B to bind the minor groove and the major groove of the MCB–DNA whilst the 20-loop and helix A interact non-specifically with DNA. Notably, two glutamines Q89 and Q82 within the wing were found to recognize the MCB core CGCG sequence through making hydrogen bond interactions. Further in vitro assays confirmed essential roles of Q89 and Q82 in the DNA binding. These data together indicate that the MBP1 homologue PCG2 employs an unusual mode of binding to target DNA and demonstrate the versatility of wHTH domains. PMID:25550425

  5. Effects of Cigarette Smoke on the Activation of Oxidative Stress-Related Transcription Factors in Female A/J Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tharappel, Job C.; Cholewa, Jill; Espandiari, Parvaneh; Spear, Brett T.; Gairola, C. Gary; Glauert, Howard P.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke contains a high concentration of free radicals and induces oxidative stress in the lung and other tissues. Several transcription factors are known to be activated by oxidative stress, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Studies were therefore undertaken to examine if cigarette smoke could activate these transcription factors, as well as other transcription factors that may be important in lung carcinogenesis. Female A/J mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 42, or 56 days (6 hr/day, 5 days/wk). Cigarette smoke did not increase NF-κB activation at any of these times, but NF-κB DNA binding activity was lower after 15 days and 56 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of AP-1 was lower after 10 days and 56 days but was not changed after 42 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of HIF was quantitatively increased after 42 days of smoke exposure but decreased after 56 days. Whether the activation of other transcription factors in the lung could be altered after exposure to cigarette smoke was subsequently examined. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2, myc-CF1, RORE, and p53 were examined after 10 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53 were quantitatively increased, but those of myc-CF1 and RORE were unaffected. These studies show that cigarette smoke exposure leads to quantitative increases in DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53, while the activations of NF-κB, AP-1, and HIF are largely unaffected or reduced. PMID:20711931

  6. Dimerization-induced corepressor binding and relaxed DNA-binding specificity are critical for PML/RARA-induced immortalization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Pérès, Laurent; Honoré, Nicole; Nasr, Rihab; Zhu, Jun; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-06-13

    The pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia involves the transcriptional repression of master genes of myeloid differentiation by the promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML/RARA) oncogene. PML-enforced RARA homodimerization allows the tighter binding of corepressors, silencing RARA target genes. In addition, homodimerization dramatically extends the spectrum of DNA-binding sites of the fusion protein compared with those of normal RARA. Yet, any contribution of these two properties of PML/RARA to differentiation arrest and immortalization of primary mouse hematopoietic progenitors was unknown. We demonstrate that dimerization-induced silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT)-enhanced binding and relaxed DNA-binding site specificity are both required for efficient immortalization. Thus, enforced RARA dimerization is critical not only for triggering transcriptional repression but also for extending the repertoire of target genes. Our studies exemplify how dimerization-induced gain of functions converts an unessential transcription factor into a dominant oncogenic protein.

  7. Phosphorylation inhibits DNA-binding of alternatively spliced aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    SciTech Connect

    Kewley, Robyn J. . E-mail: rkewley@csu.edu.au; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2005-12-09

    The basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM homology (bHLH/PAS) transcription factor ARNT (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) is a key component of various pathways which induce the transcription of cytochrome P450 and hypoxia response genes. ARNT can be alternatively spliced to express Alt ARNT, containing an additional 15 amino acids immediately N-terminal to the DNA-binding basic region. Here, we show that ARNT and Alt ARNT proteins are differentially phosphorylated by protein kinase CKII in vitro. Phosphorylation had an inhibitory effect on DNA-binding to an E-box probe by Alt ARNT, but not ARNT, homodimers. This inhibitory phosphorylation occurs through Ser77. Moreover, a point mutant, Alt ARNT S77A, shows increased activity on an E-box reporter gene, consistent with Ser77 being a regulatory site in vivo. In contrast, DNA binding by an Alt ARNT/dioxin receptor heterodimer to the xenobiotic response element is not inhibited by phosphorylation with CKII, nor does Alt ARNT S77A behave differently from wild type Alt ARNT in the context of a dioxin receptor heterodimer.

  8. A novel cysteine-rich sequence-specific DNA-binding protein interacts with the conserved X-box motif of the human major histocompatibility complex class II genes via a repeated Cys-His domain and functions as a transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules function in the presentation of processed peptides to helper T cells. As most mammalian cells can endocytose and process foreign antigen, the critical determinant of an antigen-presenting cell is its ability to express class II MHC molecules. Expression of these molecules is usually restricted to cells of the immune system and dysregulated expression is hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and certain autoimmune diseases. Human complementary DNA clones encoding a newly identified, cysteine-rich transcription factor, NF-X1, which binds to the conserved X-box motif of class II MHC genes, were obtained, and the primary amino acid sequence deduced. The major open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 1,104 amino acids with a symmetrical organization. A central cysteine-rich portion encodes the DNA-binding domain, and is subdivided into seven repeated motifs. This motif is similar to but distinct from the LIM domain and the RING finger family, and is reminiscent of known metal-binding regions. The unique arrangement of cysteines indicates that the consensus sequence CX3CXL-XCGX1- 5HXCX3CHXGXC represents a novel cysteine-rich motif. Two lines of evidence indicate that the polypeptide encodes a potent and biologically relevant repressor of HLA-DRA transcription: (a) overexpression of NF-X1 from a retroviral construct strongly decreases transcription from the HLA-DRA promoter; and (b) the NF-X1 transcript is markedly induced late after induction with interferon gamma (IFN- gamma), coinciding with postinduction attenuation of HLA-DRA transcription. The NF-X1 protein may therefore play an important role in regulating the duration of an inflammatory response by limiting the period in which class II MHC molecules are induced by IFN-gamma. PMID:7964459

  9. Absence of a simple code: how transcription factors read the genome

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Matthew; Zhou, Tianyin; Yang, Lin; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) influence cell fate by interpreting the regulatory DNA within a genome. TFs recognize DNA in a specific manner; the mechanisms underlying this specificity have been identified for many TFs, based on three-dimensional structures of protein-DNA complexes. More recently, structural views have been complemented with data from high-throughput in vitro and in vivo explorations of the DNA binding preferences of many TFs. Together, these approaches have greatly expanded our understanding of TF-DNA interactions. However, the mechanisms by which TFs select in vivo binding sites and alter gene expression remain unclear. Recent work has highlighted the many variables that influence TF-DNA binding, while demonstrating that a biophysical understanding of these many factors will be central to understanding TF function. PMID:25129887

  10. Tailor-Made Zinc-Finger Transcription Factors Activate FLO11 Gene Expression with Phenotypic Consequences in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jia-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Che; Su, Mao-Chang; Moore, Michael; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Cys2His2 zinc fingers are eukaryotic DNA-binding motifs, capable of distinguishing different DNA sequences, and are suitable for engineering artificial transcription factors. In this work, we used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the ability of tailor-made zinc finger proteins to activate the expression of the FLO11 gene, with phenotypic consequences. Two three-finger peptides were identified, recognizing sites from the 5′ UTR of the FLO11 gene with nanomolar DNA-binding affinity. The three-finger domains and their combined six-finger motif, recognizing an 18-bp site, were fused to the activation domain of VP16 or VP64. These transcription factor constructs retained their DNA-binding ability, with the six-finger ones being the highest in affinity. However, when expressed in haploid yeast cells, only one three-finger recombinant transcription factor was able to activate the expression of FLO11 efficiently. Unlike in the wild-type, cells with such transcriptional activation displayed invasive growth and biofilm formation, without any requirement for glucose depletion. The VP16 and VP64 domains appeared to act equally well in the activation of FLO11 expression, with comparable effects in phenotypic alteration. We conclude that the functional activity of tailor-made transcription factors in cells is not easily predicted by the in vitro DNA-binding activity. PMID:17710146

  11. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORα (PPARα) AGONISTS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE INHIBITOR OF DNA BINDING (ID2) EXPRESSION IN RODENTS AND HUMAN CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a member of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor family whose members play important roles in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones,...

  12. DNA binding triggers tetramerization of the glucocorticoid receptor in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Presman, Diego M.; Ganguly, Sourav; Schiltz, R. Louis; Johnson, Thomas A.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors dynamically bind to chromatin and are essential for the regulation of genes. Although a large percentage of these proteins appear to self-associate to form dimers or higher order oligomers, the stoichiometry of DNA-bound transcription factors has been poorly characterized in vivo. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor widely believed to act as a dimer or a monomer. Using a unique set of imaging techniques coupled with a cell line containing an array of DNA binding elements, we show that GR is predominantly a tetramer when bound to its target DNA. We find that DNA binding triggers an interdomain allosteric regulation within the GR, leading to tetramerization. We therefore propose that dynamic changes in GR stoichiometry represent a previously unidentified level of regulation in steroid receptor activation. Quaternary structure analysis of other members of the steroid receptor family (estrogen, androgen, and progesterone receptors) reveals variation in oligomerization states among this family of transcription factors. Because GR’s oligomerization state has been implicated in therapy outcome, our findings open new doors to the rational design of novel GR ligands and redefine the quaternary structure of steroid receptors. PMID:27382178

  13. A dynamic mode of mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Sheila S; An, Luye; Hansen, Anders S; Xie, Liangqi; Darzacq, Xavier; Tjian, Robert

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, transcription is shut off, chromatin condenses, and most transcription factors (TFs) are reported to be excluded from chromosomes. How do daughter cells re-establish the original transcription program? Recent discoveries that a select set of TFs remain bound on mitotic chromosomes suggest a potential mechanism for maintaining transcriptional programs through the cell cycle termed mitotic bookmarking. Here we report instead that many TFs remain associated with chromosomes in mouse embryonic stem cells, and that the exclusion previously described is largely a fixation artifact. In particular, most TFs we tested are significantly enriched on mitotic chromosomes. Studies with Sox2 reveal that this mitotic interaction is more dynamic than in interphase and is facilitated by both DNA binding and nuclear import. Furthermore, this dynamic mode results from lack of transcriptional activation rather than decreased accessibility of underlying DNA sequences in mitosis. The nature of the cross-linking artifact prompts careful re-examination of the role of TFs in mitotic bookmarking. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22280.001 PMID:27855781

  14. Antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation by reducing nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding and prevents in vivo bone resorption induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyon Jong; Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Man; Lee, Seung Bok; Kim, Hyun-Duck; Su Kim, Ghi; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2006-05-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and bone mineral density or osteoporosis has recently been reported. As bone loss occurring in osteoporosis and inflammatory diseases is primarily due to increases in osteoclast number, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be relevant to osteoclast differentiation, which requires receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) frequently present in inflammatory conditions has a profound synergy with RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA), a strong antioxidant clinically used for some time, on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. At concentrations showing no growth inhibition, alpha-LA potently suppressed osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow-derived precursor cells driven either by a high-dose RANKL alone or by a low-dose RANKL plus TNF-alpha (RANKL/TNF-alpha). alpha-LA abolished ROS elevation by RANKL or RANKL/TNF-alpha and inhibited NF-kappaB activation in osteoclast precursor cells. Specifically, alpha-LA reduced DNA binding of NF-kappaB but did not inhibit IKK activation. Furthermore, alpha-LA greatly suppressed in vivo bone loss induced by RANKL or TNF-alpha in a calvarial remodeling model. Therefore, our data provide evidence that ROS plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation through NF-kappaB regulation and the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid has a therapeutic potential for bone erosive diseases.

  15. Evaluation of methods for modeling transcription-factor sequence specificity

    PubMed Central

    Weirauch, Matthew T.; Cote, Atina; Norel, Raquel; Annala, Matti; Zhao, Yue; Riley, Todd R.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cokelaer, Thomas; Vedenko, Anastasia; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Morris, Quaid D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic analyses often involve scanning for potential transcription-factor (TF) binding sites using models of the sequence specificity of DNA binding proteins. Many approaches have been developed to model and learn a protein’s binding specificity, but these methods have not been systematically compared. Here we applied 26 such approaches to in vitro protein binding microarray data for 66 mouse TFs belonging to various families. For 9 TFs, we also scored the resulting motif models on in vivo data, and found that the best in vitro–derived motifs performed similarly to motifs derived from in vivo data. Our results indicate that simple models based on mononucleotide position weight matrices learned by the best methods perform similarly to more complex models for most TFs examined, but fall short in specific cases (<10%). In addition, the best-performing motifs typically have relatively low information content, consistent with widespread degeneracy in eukaryotic TF sequence preferences. PMID:23354101

  16. Identification of Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulators by Yeast One-Hybrid Screens Using a Transcription Factor ORFeome.

    PubMed

    Breton, Ghislain; Kay, Steve A; Pruneda-Paz, José L

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and molecular approaches revealed that the circadian clock network structure is comprised of several interlocked positive and negative transcriptional feedback loops. The network evolved to sense and integrate inputs from environmental cues to adjust daily rhythms in physiological processes. Compiling evidence indicates that part of this regulation happens at the transcriptional level through subtle adjustments in the expression of core clock genes. Thus, to better understand the network and identify the molecular mechanisms of clock input pathways, it is imperative to determine how core clock genes are regulated. For this purpose we developed reagents for an unbiased approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) interacting with the promoters of core clock genes. At the center of this approach lies the yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) assay in which a pool of proteins fused to the GAL4 transcriptional activation domain are tested for their ability to interact with a selected promoter fragment in yeast cells. Taking advantage of the fact that Arabidopsis TF genes are well annotated, we generated a comprehensive TF clone collection (TF ORFeome) and used it to replace the standard cDNA pool strategy traditionally used in Y1H screens. The use of this TF clone collection substantially accelerates the comprehensive discovery of promoter-specific DNA binding activities among all Arabidopsis TFs. Considering that this strategy can be extended to the study of the promoter interactome of any Arabidopsis gene, we developed a low throughput protocol that can be universally implemented to screen the ~2000 TF clone library.

  17. CBP/p300 as a co-factor for the Microphthalmia transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Roberts, K; Gambino, G; Cook, A; Kouzarides, T; Goding, C R

    1997-06-26

    The Microphthalmia basic-Helix-Loop-Helix-Leucine Zipper (bHLH-LZ) transcription factor (Mi) plays a crucial role in the genesis of melanocytes; mice deficient for a functional (Microphthalmia) gene product lack all pigment cells. We show here that the Mi activation domain resides N-terminal to the DNA-binding domain and that as little as 18 amino acids are sufficient to mediate transcription activation. The minimal activation region of Mi is highly conserved in the related transcription factor TFE3 and is predicted to adopt an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation. This region of Mi is also highly conserved with a region of E1A known to be essential for binding the CBP/p300 transcription cofactor. Consistent with these observations, the Mi activation domain can interact in vitro with CBP specifically through a region of CBP required for complex formation with E1A, P/CAF and c-Fos, and anti p300 antibodies can co-immunoprecipitate Mi from both melanocyte and melanoma cell lines. In addition, co-transfection of a vector expressing CBP2 (aas 1621-1891) fused to the VP16 activation domain potentiated the ability of Mi to activate transcription, confirming the significance of the CBP-Mi interaction observed in vitro. These data suggest that transcription activation by Mi is achieved at least in part by recruitment of CBP. The parallels between transcription regulation by Microphthalmia in melanocytes and MyoD in muscle cells are discussed.

  18. The Fli-1 transcription factor regulates the expression of CCL5/RANTES1

    PubMed Central

    Lennard Richard, Mara L.; Sato, Shuzo; Suzuki, Eiji; Williams, Sarah; Nowling, Tamara K.; Zhang, Xian K.

    2014-01-01

    The Fli-1 transcription factor, an Ets family member, is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in human patients and murine models of lupus. Lupus-prone mice with reduced Fli-1 expression have significantly less nephritis, prolonged survival and decreased infiltrating inflammatory cells into the kidney. Inflammatory chemokines, including CCL5, are critical for attracting inflammatory cells. In this study, decreased CCL5 mRNA expression was observed in kidneys of lupus prone NZM2410 mice, with reduced Fli-1 expression. CCL5 protein expression was significantly decreased in endothelial cells transfected with Fli-1 specific siRNA compared to controls. Fli-1 binds to endogenous Ets binding sites in the distal region of the CCL5 promoter. Transient transfection assays demonstrate that Fli-1 drives transcription from the CCL5 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Both Ets1, another Ets family member, and Fli-1 drive transcription from the CCL5 promoter, although Fli-1 transactivation was significantly stronger. Ets1 acts as a dominant negative transcription factor to Fli-1, indicating that they may have at least one DNA binding site in common. Systematic deletion of DNA binding sites demonstrates the importance of the sites located within a 225bp region of the promoter. Mutation of the Fli-1 DNA binding domain significantly reduces transactivation of the CCL5 promoter by Fli-1. We have identified a novel regulator of transcription for CCL5. These results suggest that Fli-1 is a novel and critical regulator of proinflammatory chemokines and affects the pathogenesis of disease through the regulation of factors that recruit inflammatory cells to sites of inflammation. PMID:25098295

  19. The Fli-1 transcription factor regulates the expression of CCL5/RANTES.

    PubMed

    Lennard Richard, Mara L; Sato, Shuzo; Suzuki, Eiji; Williams, Sarah; Nowling, Tamara K; Zhang, Xian K

    2014-09-15

    The friend leukemia insertion site 1 (Fli-1) transcription factor, an Ets family member, is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus in human patients and murine models of lupus. Lupus-prone mice with reduced Fli-1 expression have significantly less nephritis, prolonged survival, and decreased infiltrating inflammatory cells into the kidney. Inflammatory chemokines, including CCL5, are critical for attracting inflammatory cells. In this study, decreased CCL5 mRNA expression was observed in kidneys of lupus-prone NZM2410 mice with reduced Fli-1 expression. CCL5 protein expression was significantly decreased in endothelial cells transfected with Fli-1-specific small interfering RNA compared with controls. Fli-1 binds to endogenous Ets binding sites in the distal region of the CCL5 promoter. Transient transfection assays demonstrate that Fli-1 drives transcription from the CCL5 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Both Ets1, another Ets family member, and Fli-1 drive transcription from the CCL5 promoter, although Fli-1 transactivation was significantly stronger. Ets1 acts as a dominant-negative transcription factor for Fli-1, indicating that they may have at least one DNA binding site in common. Systematic deletion of DNA binding sites demonstrates the importance of the sites located within a 225-bp region of the promoter. Mutation of the Fli-1 DNA binding domain significantly reduces transactivation of the CCL5 promoter by Fli-1. We identified a novel regulator of transcription for CCL5. These results suggest that Fli-1 is a novel and critical regulator of proinflammatory chemokines and affects the pathogenesis of disease through the regulation of factors that recruit inflammatory cells to sites of inflammation.

  20. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of the bHLH domain of Deadpan to single and tandem sites.

    PubMed

    Winston, R L; Millar, D P; Gottesfeld, J M; Kent, S B

    1999-04-20

    The basic helix-loop-helix domain of the Drosophila transcription factor Deadpan (Dpn) was prepared by total chemical protein synthesis in order to characterize its DNA binding properties. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to correlate structural changes in Dpn with physiologically relevant monovalent (KCl) and divalent (MgCl2) cation concentrations. In addition, we have used electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and fluorescence anisotropy methods to determine equilibrium dissociation constants for the interaction of Dpn with two biologically relevant promoters involved in neural development and sex determination pathways. In this study, we have optimized DNA binding conditions for Dpn, and we have found a markedly higher DNA binding affinity for Dpn than reported for other bHLH domain transcription factors. Dpn binds as a homodimer (Kd = 2.6 nM) to double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the binding site CACGCG. In addition, we found that Dpn bound with the same affinity to a single or tandem binding site, indicating no cooperativity between adjacent DNA-bound Dpn dimers. DNA binding was also monitored as a function of physiologically relevant KCl and MgCl2 concentrations, and we found that this activity was significantly different in the presence and absence of the nonspecific competitor poly(dI-dC). Moreover, Dpn displayed moderate sequence selectivity, exhibiting a 100-fold higher binding affinity for specific DNA than for poly(dI-dC). This study constitutes the first detailed biophysical characterization of the DNA binding properties of a bHLH protein.

  1. An evolutionary, structural and functional overview of the mammalian TEAD1 and TEAD2 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Landin-Malt, André; Benhaddou, Ataaillah; Zider, Alain; Flagiello, Domenico

    2016-10-10

    TEAD proteins constitute a family of highly conserved transcription factors, characterized by a DNA-binding domain called the TEA domain and a protein-binding domain that permits association with transcriptional co-activators. TEAD proteins are unable to induce transcription on their own. They have to interact with transcriptional cofactors to do so. Once TEADs bind their co-activators, the different complexes formed are known to regulate the expression of genes that are crucial for embryonic development, important for organ formation (heart, muscles), and involved in cell death and proliferation. In the first part of this review we describe what is known of the structure of TEAD proteins. We then focus on two members of the family: TEAD1 and TEAD2. First the different transcriptional cofactors are described. These proteins can be classified in three categories: i), cofactors regulating chromatin conformation, ii), cofactors able to bind DNA, and iii), transcriptional cofactors without DNA binding domain. Finally we discuss the recent findings that identified TEAD1 and 2 and its coactivators involved in cancer progression.

  2. The structural basis of acyl coenzyme A-dependent regulation of the transcription factor FadR

    PubMed Central

    van Aalten, Daan M.F.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Knudsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    FadR is an acyl-CoA-responsive transcription factor, regulating fatty acid biosynthetic and degradation genes in Escherichia coli. The apo-protein binds DNA as a homodimer, an interaction that is disrupted by binding of acyl-CoA. The recently described structure of apo-FadR shows a DNA binding domain coupled to an acyl-CoA binding domain with a novel fold, but does not explain how binding of the acyl-CoA effector molecule >30 Å away from the DNA binding site affects transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe the structures of the FadR–operator and FadR– myristoyl-CoA binary complexes. The FadR–DNA complex reveals a novel winged helix–turn–helix protein–DNA interaction, involving sequence-specific contacts from the wing to the minor groove. Binding of acyl-CoA results in dramatic conformational changes throughout the protein, with backbone shifts up to 4.5 Å. The net effect is a rearrangement of the DNA binding domains in the dimer, resulting in a change of 7.2 Å in separation of the DNA recognition helices and the loss of DNA binding, revealing the molecular basis of acyl-CoA-responsive regulation. PMID:11296236

  3. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski; Xu, Feifei; Ronne, Hans; Komorowski, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence) is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context. PMID:19014636

  4. Mutations that decrease DNA binding of the processivity factor of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase reduce viral yield, alter the kinetics of viral DNA replication, and decrease the fidelity of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changying; Hwang, Ying T; Randell, John C W; Coen, Donald M; Hwang, Charles B C

    2007-04-01

    The processivity subunit of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase, UL42, is essential for viral replication and possesses both Pol- and DNA-binding activities. Previous studies demonstrated that the substitution of alanine for each of four arginine residues, which reside on the positively charged surface of UL42, resulted in decreased DNA binding affinity and a decreased ability to synthesize long-chain DNA by the polymerase. In this study, the effects of each substitution on the production of viral progeny, viral DNA replication, and DNA replication fidelity were examined. Each substitution mutant was able to complement the replication of a UL42 null mutant in transient complementation assays and to support the replication of plasmid DNA containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) origin sequences in transient DNA replication assays. Mutant viruses containing each substitution and a lacZ insertion in a nonessential region of the genome were constructed and characterized. In single-cycle growth assays, the mutants produced significantly less progeny virus than the control virus containing wild-type UL42. Real-time PCR assays revealed that these UL42 mutants synthesized less viral DNA during the early phase of infection. Interestingly, during the late phase of infection, the mutant viruses synthesized larger amounts of viral DNA than the control virus. The frequencies of mutations of the virus-borne lacZ gene increased significantly in the substitution mutants compared to those observed for the control virus. These results demonstrate that the reduced DNA binding of UL42 is associated with significant effects on virus yields, viral DNA replication, and replication fidelity. Thus, a processivity factor can influence replication fidelity in mammalian cells.

  5. Sp1- and Krüppel-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kaczynski, Joanna; Cook, Tiffany; Urrutia, Raul

    2003-01-01

    Sp1-like proteins and Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are highly related zinc-finger proteins that are important components of the eukaryotic cellular transcriptional machinery. By regulating the expression of a large number of genes that have GC-rich promoters, Sp1-like/KLF transcription regulators may take part in virtually all facets of cellular function, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation. Individual members of the Sp1-like/KLF family can function as activators or repressors depending on which promoter they bind and the coregulators with which they interact. A long-standing research aim has been to define the mechanisms by which Sp1-like factors and KLFs regulate gene expression and cellular function in a cell- and promoter-specific manner. Most members of this family have been identified in mammals, with at least 21 Sp1-like/KLF proteins encoded in the human genome, and members are also found in frogs, worms and flies. Sp1-like/KLF proteins have highly conserved carboxy-terminal zinc-finger domains that function in DNA binding. The amino terminus, containing the transcription activation domain, can vary significantly between family members. PMID:12620113

  6. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  7. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-05-26

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner.

  8. Cloning and characterisation of a nuclear, site specific ssDNA binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smidt, M P; Russchen, B; Snippe, L; Wijnholds, J; Ab, G

    1995-01-01

    Estradiol inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene is mediated through the estrogen receptor and a variety of other DNA-binding proteins. In the present study we report the cloning and characterisation of a single-strand DNA binding protein that interacts with the lower strand of a complex regulatory site, which includes the major estrogen responsive element and a site that resembles the rat albumin site D (apoVLDL II site D). Based on its binding specificity determined with electro-mobility shift assays, the protein is named single-strand D-box binding factor (ssDBF). Analysis of the deduced 302 amino acid sequence revealed that the protein belongs to the heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B family (hnRNP A/B) and resembles other known eukaryotic single-strand DNA binding proteins. Transient transfection experiments in a chicken liver cell-line showed that the protein represses estrogen-induced transcription. A protein with similar binding characteristics is present in liver nuclear extract. The relevance of the occurrence of this protein to the expression of the apoVLDL II gene is discussed. Images PMID:7630716

  9. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  10. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  11. Identification of a novel DNA-binding protein to osmotin promoter.

    PubMed

    Xu, P; Ling, J; Li, D; Hasegawa, P M; Bressan, R A

    1998-12-01

    One novel osmotin promoter, binding-protein (OPBP1) gene, was isolated from salt-adapted tobacco suspension cells using yeast one-hybrid system. The OPBP1 interacted specifically in vivo with FA, a DNA sequence from the 5 upstream region of osmotin gene, which was essential for osmotin responsiveness. The deduced amino acid sequence of OPBP1 contained a conserved motif of a new gene family, AP2 family. This protein did not contain the typical motif found in the most known DNA-binding proteins and transcription factors.

  12. TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Paul J; Bokowiec, Marta T; Laudeman, Thomas W; Brannock, Jennifer F; Chen, Xianfeng; Timko, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription is a major control point in many biological processes. Transcription factors (TFs) can activate and/or repress the transcriptional rate of target genes and vascular plant genomes devote approximately 7% of their coding capacity to TFs. Global analysis of TFs has only been performed for three complete higher plant genomes – Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and rice (Oryza sativa). Presently, no large-scale analysis of TFs has been made from a member of the Solanaceae, one of the most important families of vascular plants. To fill this void, we have analysed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) TFs using a dataset of 1,159,022 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs) obtained by methylation filtering of the tobacco genome. An analytical pipeline was developed to isolate TF sequences from the GSR data set. This involved multiple (typically 10–15) independent searches with different versions of the TF family-defining domain(s) (normally the DNA-binding domain) followed by assembly into contigs and verification. Our analysis revealed that tobacco contains a minimum of 2,513 TFs representing all of the 64 well-characterised plant TF families. The number of TFs in tobacco is higher than previously reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Results TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors, is an integrative database that provides a portal to sequence and phylogeny data for the identified TFs, together with a large quantity of other data concerning TFs in tobacco. The database contains an individual page dedicated to each of the 64 TF families. These contain background information, domain architecture via Pfam links, a list of all sequences and an assessment of the minimum number of TFs in this family in tobacco. Downloadable phylogenetic trees of the major families are provided along with detailed information on the bioinformatic pipeline that was used to find all family members

  13. Recent discoveries concerning the involvement of transcription factors from the Grainyhead-like family in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mlacki, Michal; Kikulska, Agnieszka; Krzywinska, Ewa; Pawlak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The Grainyhead-like (GRHL) family of transcription factors has three mammalian members, which are currently termed Grainyhead-like 1 (GRHL1), Grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2), and Grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3). These factors adopt a DNA-binding immunoglobulin fold homologous to the DNA-binding domain of key tumor suppressor p53. Their patterns of expression are tissue and developmentally specific. Earlier studies of the GRHL proteins focused on their functions in mammalian development. In recent years, these factors have been linked to many different types of cancer: squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, breast cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma, neuroblastoma, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. The roles of GRHL proteins in these various types of cancer are complex, and in some cases appear to be contradictory: they can serve to promote cancer development, or they may act as tumor suppressors, depending on the particular GRHL protein involved and on the cancer type. The reasons for obvious discrepancies in results from different studies remain unclear. At the molecular level, the GRHL transcription factors regulate the expression of genes whose products are involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and polarity. We herein review the roles of GRHL proteins in cancer development, and we critically examine relevant molecular mechanisms, which were proposed by different authors. We also discuss the significance of recent discoveries implicating the involvement of GRHL transcription factors in cancer and highlight potential future applications of this knowledge in cancer treatment. PMID:26069269

  14. Association of a polynuclear iron-sulfur center with a mutant FNR protein enhances DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshilova, N; Beinert, H; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli, the transcription factor FNR (fumarate nitrate reduction) regulates gene expression in response to oxygen deprivation. To investigate how the activity of FNR is regulated by oxygen availability, two mutant proteins, DA154 and LH28-DA154, which have enhanced in vivo activity in the presence of oxygen, were purified and compared. Unlike other previously examined FNR preparations, the absorption spectrum of LH28-DA154 had two maxima at 324 nm and 419 nm, typical of iron-sulfur (Fe-S)-containing proteins. Consistent with these data, metal analysis showed that only the LH28-DA154 protein contained a significant amount of iron and acid-labile sulfide, and, by low temperature EPR spectroscopy, a signal typical of a [3Fe-4S]+ cluster was detected. The LH28-DA154 protein that contained the Fe-S cluster also contained a higher proportion of dimers and had a 3- to 4-fold higher apparent affinity for the target DNA than the DA154 protein. In agreement with this, we found that when the LH28-DA154 protein was treated with an iron chelator (alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl), it lost its characteristic absorption and the apparent affinity for DNA was reduced 6-fold. However, increased DNA binding and the characteristic absorption spectrum could be restored by in vitro reconstitution of the Fe-S center. DNA binding of the LH28-DA154 protein was also affected by the redox state of the Fe-S center, since protein exposed to oxygen bound 1/10th as much DNA as the protein reduced anaerobically with dithionite. The observation that DNA binding is enhanced when the Fe-S center is reduced indicates that the redox state of the Fe-S center affects the DNA-binding activity of this protein and suggests a possible mechanism for regulation of the wild-type protein. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7708673

  15. TFClass: a classification of human transcription factors and their rodent orthologs

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Edgar; Schoeps, Torsten; Haubrock, Martin; Dönitz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    TFClass aims at classifying eukaryotic transcription factors (TFs) according to their DNA-binding domains (DBDs). For this, a classification schema comprising four generic levels (superclass, class, family and subfamily) was defined that could accommodate all known DNA-binding human TFs. They were assigned to their (sub-)families as instances at two different levels, the corresponding TF genes and individual gene products (protein isoforms). In the present version, all mouse and rat orthologs have been linked to the human TFs, and the mouse orthologs have been arranged in an independent ontology. Many TFs were assigned with typical DNA-binding patterns and positional weight matrices derived from high-throughput in-vitro binding studies. Predicted TF binding sites from human gene upstream sequences are now also attached to each human TF whenever a PWM was available for this factor or one of his paralogs. TFClass is freely available at http://tfclass.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de/ through a web interface and for download in OBO format. PMID:25361979

  16. Determination and Inference of Eukaryotic Transcription Factor Sequence Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Mihai; Cote, Atina; Montenegro-Montero, Alejandro; Drewe, Philipp; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Lambert, Samuel A.; Mann, Ishminder; Cook, Kate; Zheng, Hong; Goity, Alejandra; van Bakel, Harm; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Galli, Mary; Lewsey, Mathew; Huang, Eryong; Mukherjee, Tuhin; Chen, Xiaoting; Reece-Hoyes, John S.; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Shaulsky, Gad; Walhout, Albertha J.M.; Bouget, François-Yves; Ratsch, Gunnar; Larrondo, Luis F.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription factor (TF) DNA sequence preferences direct their regulatory activity, but are currently known for only ~1% of all eukaryotic TFs. Broadly sampling DNA-binding domain (DBD) types from multiple eukaryotic clades, we determined DNA sequence preferences for >1,000 TFs encompassing 54 different DBD classes from 131 diverse eukaryotes. We find that closely related DBDs almost always have very similar DNA sequence preferences, enabling inference of motifs for ~34% of the ~170,000 known or predicted eukaryotic TFs. Sequences matching both measured and inferred motifs are enriched in ChIP-seq peaks and upstream of transcription start sites in diverse eukaryotic lineages. SNPs defining expression quantitative trait loci in Arabidopsis promoters are also enriched for predicted TF binding sites. Importantly, our motif “library” (http://cisbp.ccbr.utoronto.ca) can be used to identify specific TFs whose binding may be altered by human disease risk alleles. These data present a powerful resource for mapping transcriptional networks across eukaryotes. PMID:25215497

  17. Glutamine Metabolism Regulates the Pluripotency Transcription Factor OCT4

    PubMed Central

    Marsboom, Glenn; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Pohl-Avila, Nicole; Zhang, Yanmin; Yuan, Yang; Kang, Hojin; Hao, Bo; Brunengraber, Henri; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of pluripotency by cellular metabolism in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are not fully understood. We found that high levels of glutamine metabolism are essential to prevent degradation of OCT4, a key transcription factor regulating hESC pluripotency. Glutamine withdrawal depletes the endogenous anti-oxidant glutathione, which results in the oxidation of OCT4 cysteine residues required for its DNA binding and enhanced OCT4 degradation. The emergence of the OCT4lo cell population following glutamine withdrawal did not result in greater propensity for cell death. Instead, glutamine withdrawal during vascular differentiation of hESCs generated cells with greater angiogenic capacity, thus indicating that modulating glutamine metabolism enhances the differentiation and functional maturation of cells. These findings demonstrate that the pluripotency transcription factor OCT4 can serve as a metabolic-redox sensor in hESCs and that metabolic cues can act in concert with growth factor signaling to orchestrate stem cell differentiation. PMID:27346346

  18. A transcriptional repressive role for epithelial-specific ETS factor ELF3 on oestrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gajulapalli, Vijaya Narasihma Reddy; Samanthapudi, Venkata Subramanyam Kumar; Pulaganti, Madhusudana; Khumukcham, Saratchandra Singh; Malisetty, Vijaya Lakhsmi; Guruprasad, Lalitha; Chitta, Suresh Kumar; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2016-04-15

    Oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that primarily mediates oestrogen (E2)-dependent gene transcription required for mammary gland development. Coregulators critically regulate ERα transcription functions by directly interacting with it. In the present study, we report that ELF3, an epithelial-specific ETS transcription factor, acts as a transcriptional repressor of ERα. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis demonstrated that ELF3 strongly binds to ERα in the absence of E2, but ELF3 dissociation occurs upon E2 treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner suggesting that E2 negatively influences such interaction. Domain mapping studies further revealed that the ETS (E-twenty six) domain of ELF3 interacts with the DNA binding domain of ERα. Accordingly, ELF3 inhibited ERα's DNA binding activity by preventing receptor dimerization, partly explaining the mechanism by which ELF3 represses ERα transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression of ELF3 decreases ERα transcriptional activity as demonstrated by oestrogen response elements (ERE)-luciferase reporter assay or by endogenous ERα target genes. Conversely ELF3 knockdown increases ERα transcriptional activity. Consistent with these results, ELF3 ectopic expression decreases E2-dependent MCF7 cell proliferation whereas ELF3 knockdown increases it. We also found that E2 induces ELF3 expression in MCF7 cells suggesting a negative feedback regulation of ERα signalling in breast cancer cells. A small peptide sequence of ELF3 derived through functional interaction between ERα and ELF3 could inhibit DNA binding activity of ERα and breast cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that ELF3 is a novel transcriptional repressor of ERα in breast cancer cells. Peptide interaction studies further represent a novel therapeutic option in breast cancer therapy.

  19. E2F1 transcription factor and its impact on growth factor and cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Ertosun, Mustafa Gokhan; Hapil, Fatma Zehra; Osman Nidai, Ozes

    2016-10-01

    E2F1 is a transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. The transactivation capacity of E2F1 is regulated by pRb. In its hypophosphorylated form, pRb binds and inactivates DNA binding and transactivating functions of E2F1. The growth factor stimulation of cells leads to activation of CDKs (cyclin dependent kinases), which in turn phosphorylate Rb and hyperphosphorylated Rb is released from E2F1 or E2F1/DP complex, and free E2F1 can induce transcription of several genes involved in cell cycle entry, induction or inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, growth factors and cytokines generally utilize E2F1 to direct cells to either fate. Furthermore, E2F1 regulates expressions of various cytokines and growth factor receptors, establishing positive or negative feedback mechanisms. This review focuses on the relationship between E2F1 transcription factor and cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, TGF-beta, G-CSF, LIF), growth factors (EGF, KGF, VEGF, IGF, FGF, PDGF, HGF, NGF), and interferons (IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-γ).

  20. Biophysical characterizations of human mitochondrial transcription factor A and its binding to tumor suppressor p53

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tuck Seng; Rajagopalan, Sridharan; Freund, Stefan M.; Rutherford, Trevor J.; Andreeva, Antonina; Townsley, Fiona M.; Petrovich, Miriana; Fersht, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is a multi-functional protein, involved in different aspects of maintaining mitochondrial genome integrity. In this report, we characterized TFAM and its interaction with tumor suppressor p53 using various biophysical methods. DNA-free TFAM is a thermally unstable protein that is in equilibrium between monomers and dimers. Self-association of TFAM is modulated by its basic C-terminal tail. The DNA-binding ability of TFAM is mainly contributed by its first HMG-box, while the second HMG-box has low-DNA-binding capability. We also obtained backbone resonance assignments from the NMR spectra of both HMG-boxes of TFAM. TFAM binds primarily to the N-terminal transactivation domain of p53, with a Kd of 1.95 ± 0.19 μM. The C-terminal regulatory domain of p53 provides a secondary binding site for TFAM. The TFAM–p53-binding interface involves both TAD1 and TAD2 sub-domains of p53. Helices α1 and α2 of the HMG-box constitute the main p53-binding region. Since both TFAM and p53 binds preferentially to distorted DNA, the TFAM–p53 interaction is implicated in DNA damage and repair. In addition, the DNA-binding mechanism of TFAM and biological relevance of the TFAM–p53 interaction are discussed. PMID:19755502

  1. Sequence-specific DNA recognition by the thyroid transcription factor-1 homeodomain.

    PubMed Central

    Damante, G; Fabbro, D; Pellizzari, L; Civitareale, D; Guazzi, S; Polycarpou-Schwartz, M; Cauci, S; Quadrifoglio, F; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1994-01-01

    The molecular basis for the DNA binding specificity of the thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain (TTF-1HD) has been investigated. Methylation and ethylation interference experiments show that the TTF-1HD alone recapitulates the DNA binding properties of the entire protein. Studies carried out with mutant derivatives of TTF-1HD indicate a precise correspondence of some of its amino acid residues with specific bases in its binding site, allowing a crude orientation of the TTF-1HD within the protein-DNA complex. TTF-1HD shows an overall geometry of interaction with DNA similar to that previously observed for Antennapedia class HDs, even though the binding specificities of these two types of HDs are distinct. We demonstrate that the crucial difference between the binding sites of Antennapedia class and TTF-1 HDs is in the motifs 5'-TAAT-3', recognized by Antennapedia, and 5'-CAAG-3', preferentially bound by TTF-1. Furthermore, the binding of wild type and mutants TTF-1 HD to oligonucleotides containing either 5'-TAAT-3' or 5'-CAAG-3' indicate that only in the presence of the latter motif the Gln50 in TTF-1 HD is utilized for DNA recognition. Since the Gln at position 50 is an essential determinant for DNA binding specificity for several other HDs that bind to 5'-TAAT-3' containing sequences, we suggest that utilization by different HDs of key residues may depend on the sequence context and probably follows a precise hierarchy of contacts. Images PMID:7915030

  2. Locations of human and mouse genes encoding the RFX1 and RFX2 transcription factor proteins.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J; Hoffman, S; Ucla, C; Reith, W; Mach, B; Stubbs, L

    1996-07-01

    RFX transcription factors constitute a highly conserved family of site-specific DNA binding proteins involved in the expression of a variety of cellular and viral genes, including major histocompatibility complex class II genes and genes in human hepatitis B virus. Five members of the RFX gene family have been isolated from human and mouse, and all share a highly characteristic DNA binding domain that is distinct from other known DNA binding motifs. The human RFX1 and RFX2 genes have been assigned by in situ hybridization to chromosome 19p13.1 and 19p13.3, respectively. In this paper, we present data that localize RFX1 and RFX2 precisely within the detailed physical map of human chromosome 19 and genetic data that assign Rfx1 and Rfx2 to homologous regions of mouse chromosomes 8 and 17, respectively. These data define the established relationships between these homologous mouse and human regions in further detail and provide new tools for linking cloned genes to phenotypes in both species.

  3. DBD--taxonomically broad transcription factor predictions: new content and functionality.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Derek; Charoensawan, Varodom; Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2008-01-01

    DNA-binding domain (DBD) is a database of predicted sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) for all publicly available proteomes. The proteomes have increased from 150 in the initial version of DBD to over 700 in the current version. All predicted TFs must contain a significant match to a hidden Markov model representing a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain family. Access to TF predictions is provided through http://transcriptionfactor.org, where new search options are now provided such as searching by gene names in model organisms, searching for all proteins in a particular DBD family and specific organism. We illustrate the application of this type of search facility by contrasting trends of DBD family occurrence throughout the tree of life, highlighting the clear partition between eukaryotic and prokaryotic DBD expansions. The website content has been expanded to include dedicated pages for each TF containing domain assignment details, gene names, links to external databases and links to TFs with similar domain arrangements. We compare the increase in number of predicted TFs with proteome size in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Eukaryotes follow a slower rate of increase in TFs than prokaryotes, which could be due to the presence of splice variants or an increase in combinatorial control.

  4. Identification and genome-wide prediction of DNA binding specificities for the ApiAP2 family of regulators from the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Tracey L; De Silva, Erandi K; Olszewski, Kellen L; Elemento, Olivier; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-10-28

    The molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation in apicomplexan parasites remain poorly understood. Recently, the Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) family of DNA binding proteins was identified as a major class of transcriptional regulators that are found across all Apicomplexa. To gain insight into the regulatory role of these proteins in the malaria parasite, we have comprehensively surveyed the DNA-binding specificities of all 27 members of the ApiAP2 protein family from Plasmodium falciparum revealing unique binding preferences for the majority of these DNA binding proteins. In addition to high affinity primary motif interactions, we also observe interactions with secondary motifs. The ability of a number of ApiAP2 proteins to bind multiple, distinct motifs significantly increases the potential complexity of the transcriptional regulatory networks governed by the ApiAP2 family. Using these newly identified sequence motifs, we infer the trans-factors associated with previously reported plasmodial cis-elements and provide evidence that ApiAP2 proteins modulate key regulatory decisions at all stages of parasite development. Our results offer a detailed view of ApiAP2 DNA binding specificity and take the first step toward inferring comprehensive gene regulatory networks for P. falciparum.

  5. POU domain transcription factors from different subclasses stimulate adenovirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Verrijzer, C P; Strating, M; Mul, Y M; van der Vliet, P C

    1992-01-01

    POU domain proteins constitute a family of eukaryotic transcription factors that exert critical functions during development. They contain a conserved 160 amino acids DNA binding domain, the POU domain. Genetic data have demonstrated that some POU domain proteins are essential for the proliferation of specific cell types, suggesting a possible role in DNA replication. In addition, the ubiquitous POU transcription factor Oct-1 or its isolated POU domain enhances adenovirus DNA replication. Here we compared the DNA binding specificities of POU domain proteins from different subclasses. They exhibit overlapping, yet distinct binding site preferences. Furthermore, purified Pit-1, Oct-1, Oct-2, Oct-6, Oct-4 and zebrafish POU[C] could all stimulate adenovirus DNA replication in a reconstituted in vitro system. Thus, activation appears to depend on a property common to most POU domain proteins. Adenovirus DNA replication is also stimulated by the transcription factor NFI/CTF. In contrast to NFI, the POU domain did not enhance binding of precursor terminal protein-DNA polymerase to the origin nor did it stabilize the preinitiation complex. These results suggest that the POU domain acts on a rate limiting step after formation of the preinitiation complex. Images PMID:1475198

  6. Heat shock factor-4 (HSF-4a) represses basal transcription through interaction with TFIIF.

    PubMed

    Frejtag, W; Zhang, Y; Dai, R; Anderson, M G; Mivechi, N F

    2001-05-04

    The heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) regulate the expression of heat shock proteins (hsps), which are critical for normal cellular proliferation and differentiation. One of the HSFs, HSF-4, contains two alternative splice variants, one of which possesses transcriptional repressor properties in vivo. This repressor isoform inhibits basal transcription of hsps 27 and 90 in tissue culture cells. The molecular mechanisms of HSF-4a isoform-mediated transcriptional repression is unknown. Here, we present evidence that HSF-4a inhibits basal transcription in vivo when it is artificially targeted to basal promoters via the DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor, GAL4. By using a highly purified, reconstituted in vitro transcription system, we show that HSF-4a represses basal transcription at an early step during preinitiation complex assembly, as pre-assembled preinitiation complexes are refractory to the inhibitory effect on transcription. This repression occurs by the HSF-4a isoform, but not by the HSF-4b isoform, which we show is capable of activating transcription from a heat shock element-driven promoter in vitro. The repression of basal transcription by HSF-4a occurs through interaction with the basal transcription factor TFIIF. TFIIF interacts with a segment of HSF-4a that is required for the trimerization of HSF-4a, and deletion of this segment no longer inhibits basal transcription. These studies suggest that HSF-4a inhibits basal transcription both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, this is the first report identifying an interaction between a transcriptional repressor with the basal transcription factor TFIIF.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  8. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits T-cell activation by targeting both nuclear factor of activated T-cells and NF-kappaB transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Calzado, Marco A; Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, has been shown to reveal anti-inflammatory properties. Since T-cells play a key role in the onset of several inflammatory diseases, we have evaluated the immunosuppressive activity of CAPE in human T-cells, discovering that this phenolic compound is a potent inhibitor of early and late events in T-cell receptor-mediated T-cell activation. Moreover, we found that CAPE specifically inhibited both interleukin (IL)-2 gene transcription and IL-2 synthesis in stimulated T-cells. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of CAPE at the transcriptional level, we examined the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, nuclear factor of activated cells (NFAT), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors in Jurkat cells. We found that CAPE inhibited NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity without affecting the degradation of the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB inhibitory protein, IkappaBalpha. However, both NF-kappaB binding to DNA and transcriptional activity of a Gal4-p65 hybrid protein were clearly prevented in CAPE-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, CAPE inhibited both the DNA-binding and transcriptional activity of NFAT, a result that correlated with its ability to inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin-induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of this natural compound.

  9. Arabidopsis chromatin remodeling factor PICKLE interacts with transcription factor HY5 to regulate hypocotyl cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yanjun; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Xin; Tang, Weijiang; Wang, Wanqing; Huai, Junling; Xu, Gang; Chen, Dongqin; Li, Yunliang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2013-01-01

    Photomorphogenesis is a critical plant developmental process that involves light-mediated transcriptome changes, histone modifications, and inhibition of hypocotyl growth. However, the chromatin-based regulatory mechanism underlying this process remains largely unknown. Here, we identify ENHANCED PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (EPP1), previously known as PICKLE (PKL), an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor of the chromodomain/helicase/DNA binding family, as a repressor of photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that PKL/EPP1 expression is repressed by light in the hypocotyls in a photoreceptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, we reveal that the transcription factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) binds to the promoters of cell elongation-related genes and recruits PKL/EPP1 through their physical interaction. PKL/EPP1 in turn negatively regulates HY5 by repressing trimethylation of histone H3 Lys 27 at the target loci, thereby regulating the expression of these genes and, thus, hypocotyl elongation. We also show that HY5 possesses transcriptional repression activity. Our study reveals a crucial role for a chromatin remodeling factor in repressing photomorphogenesis and demonstrates that transcription factor-mediated recruitment of chromatin-remodeling machinery is important for plant development in response to changing light environments.

  10. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs.

  11. Systematic functional profiling of transcription factor networks in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Maeng, Shinae; Lee, Kyung-Tae; So, Yee-Seul; Hong, Joohyeon; Choi, Jaeyoung; Byun, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hyelim; Bang, Soohyun; Song, Min-Hee; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Seo-Young; Ji, Je-Hyun; Park, Goun; Kwon, Hyojeong; Cha, Suyeon; Meyers, Gena Lee; Wang, Li Li; Jang, Jooyoung; Janbon, Guilhem; Adedoyin, Gloria; Kim, Taeyup; Averette, Anna K.; Heitman, Joseph; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Yin-Won; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in humans, but its overall biological and pathogenic regulatory circuits remain elusive, particularly due to the presence of an evolutionarily divergent set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we report the construction of a high-quality library of 322 signature-tagged gene-deletion strains for 155 putative TF genes previously predicted using the DNA-binding domain TF database, and examine their in vitro and in vivo phenotypic traits under 32 distinct growth conditions. At least one phenotypic trait is exhibited by 145 out of 155 TF mutants (93%) and ∼85% of them (132/155) are functionally characterized for the first time in this study. The genotypic and phenotypic data for each TF are available in the C. neoformans TF phenome database (http://tf.cryptococcus.org). In conclusion, our phenome-based functional analysis of the C. neoformans TF mutant library provides key insights into transcriptional networks of basidiomycetous fungi and human fungal pathogens. PMID:25849373

  12. Xenopus transcription factor IIIA-dependent DNA renaturation.

    PubMed

    Fiser-Littell, R M; Hanas, J S

    1988-11-15

    Kinetic and titration analyses are used to elucidate the mechanism by which Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a protein required for 5 S RNA synthesis by RNA polymerase III, promotes DNA renaturation. TFIIIA promotes 50% renaturation of complementary strands (303 bases) in 45 s. Analyses of the renaturation kinetics indicate the rate-limiting step in this TFIIIA-dependent reaction is first order. TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation is a stoichiometric rather than a catalytic process. The renaturation rates for specific and nonspecific DNA are very similar, indicating lack of sequence specificity in this TFIIIA-dependent process. In the nanomolar concentration range of protein and DNA, renaturation occurs at a ratio of about one TFIIIA molecule/single strand (303 bases). Elevated reaction temperatures strongly stimulate TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation; at 45 degrees C, renaturation of the 303-base pair fragment nears completion in about 5 s. The ability of TFIIIA to rapidly promote DNA renaturation is unique when compared with Escherichia coli recA protein, single-stranded DNA binding protein, or bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein. This mechanism by which TFIIIA promotes DNA renaturation is compatible with features of 5 S RNA gene transcription.

  13. Expression of Drosophila forkhead transcription factors during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Soo Young; Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-03-28

    The Drosophila forkhead (Dfkh) family of transcription factors has over 40 family members. One Dfkh family member, BF2 (aka FoxD1), has been shown, by targeted disruption, to be essential for kidney development. In order to determine if other Dfkh family members were involved in kidney development and to search for new members of this family, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed using degenerate primers of the consensus sequence of the DNA binding domain of this family and developing rat kidney RNA. The RT-PCR product was used to probe RNA from a developing rat kidney (neonatal), from a 20-day old kidney, and from an adult kidney. The RT-PCR product hybridized only to a developing kidney RNA transcript of ∼2.3 kb (the size of BF2). A lambda gt10 mouse neonatal kidney library was then screened, using the above-described RT-PCR product as a probe. Three lambda phage clones were isolated that strongly hybridized to the RT-PCR probe. Sequencing of the RT-PCR product and the lambda phage clones isolated from the developing kidney library revealed Dfkh BF2. In summary, only Dfkh family member BF2, which has already been shown to be essential for nephrogenesis, was identified in our screen and no other candidate Dfkh family members were identified.

  14. Exploring the DNA-binding specificities of zinc fingers with DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Huang, Xiaohua; Choo, Yen; Church, George M.

    2001-01-01

    A key step in the regulation of networks that control gene expression is the sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to their DNA recognition sites. A more complete understanding of these DNA–protein interactions will permit a more comprehensive and quantitative mapping of the regulatory pathways within cells, as well as a deeper understanding of the potential functions of individual genes regulated by newly identified DNA-binding sites. Here we describe a DNA microarray-based method to characterize sequence-specific DNA recognition by zinc-finger proteins. A phage display library, prepared by randomizing critical amino acid residues in the second of three fingers of the mouse Zif268 domain, provided a rich source of zinc-finger proteins with variant DNA-binding specificities. Microarrays containing all possible 3-bp binding sites for the variable zinc fingers permitted the quantitation of the binding site preferences of the entire library, pools of zinc fingers corresponding to different rounds of selection from this library, as well as individual Zif268 variants that were isolated from the library by using specific DNA sequences. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays for genome-wide identification of putative transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:11404456

  15. Targeting Transcription Factors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are commonly deregulated in the pathogenesis of human cancer and are a major class of cancer cell dependencies. Consequently, targeting of TFs can be highly effective in treating particular malignancies, as highlighted by the clinical efficacy of agents that target nuclear hormone receptors. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of TFs as drug targets in oncology, with an emphasis on the emerging chemical approaches to modulate TF function. The remarkable diversity and potency of TFs as drivers of cell transformation justifies a continued pursuit of TFs as therapeutic targets for drug discovery. PMID:26645049

  16. The mouse albumin enhancer contains a negative regulatory element that interacts with a novel DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, R S; Boczko, E M; Darnell, J E; Babiss, L E

    1990-01-01

    The far-upstream mouse albumin enhancer (-10.5 to -8.43 kilobases) has both positive and negative regulatory domains which contribute to the rate and tissue specificity of albumin gene transcription. (R. S. Herbst, N. Friedman, J. E. Darnell, Jr., and L. E. Babiss, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:1553-1557). In this work, the negative regulatory region has been functionally localized to sequences -8.7 to -8.43 kilobases upstream of the albumin gene cap site. In the absence of the albumin-modulating region (in which there are binding sites for the transcription factor C/EBP), the negative region can suppress a neighboring positive-acting element, thereby interfering with albumin enhancer function. The negative region is also capable of negating the positive action of the heterologous transthyretin enhancer in an orientation-independent fashion. Within this negative-acting region we can detect two DNA-binding sites, both of which are recognized by a protein present in all cell types tested. This DNA-binding activity is not competed for by any of a series of known DNA-binding sites, and hence this new protein is a candidate for a role in suppressing the albumin gene in nonhepatic cells. Images PMID:2370857

  17. OCTAMER-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS: GENOMICS AND FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2015-01-01

    The Octamer-binding proteins (Oct) are a group of highly conserved transcription factors that specifically bind to the octamer motif (ATGCAAAT) and closely related sequences that are found in promoters and enhancers of a wide variety of both ubiquitously expressed and cell type-specific genes. Oct factors belong to the larger family of POU domain factors that are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved bipartite DNA binding domain, consisting of an amino-terminal specific subdomain (POUS) and a carboxyl-terminal homeo-subdomain (POUH). Eleven Oct proteins have been named (Oct1-11), and currently, eight genes encoding Oct proteins (Oct1, Oct2, Oct3/4, Oct6, Oct7, Oct8, Oct9, and Oct11) have been cloned and characterized. Oct1 and Oct2 are widely expressed in adult tissues, while other Oct proteins are much more restricted in their expression patterns. Oct proteins are implicated in crucial and versatile biological events, such as embryogenesis, neurogenesis, immunity, and body glucose and amino acid metabolism. The aberrant expression and null function of Oct proteins have also been linked to various diseases, including deafness, diabetes and cancer. In this review, I will report both the genomic structure and major functions of individual Oct proteins in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23747866

  18. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  19. A systematic analysis of factors localized to damaged chromatin reveals PARP-dependent recruitment of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Izhar, Lior; Adamson, Britt; Ciccia, Alberto; Lewis, Jedd; Pontano-Vaites, Laura; Leng, Yumei; Liang, Anthony C.; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Harper, J. Wade; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Localization to sites of DNA damage is a hallmark of DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. To identify new DDR factors, we screened epitope-tagged proteins for localization to sites of chromatin damaged by UV laser microirradiation and found >120 proteins that localize to damaged chromatin. These include the BAF tumor suppressor complex and the ALS candidate protein TAF15. TAF15 contains multiple domains that bind damaged chromatin in a PARP-dependent manner, suggesting a possible role as glue that tethers multiple PAR chains together. Many positives were transcription factors and >70% of randomly tested transcription factors localized to sites of DNA damage and approximately 90% were PARP-dependent for localization. Mutational analyses showed that localization to damaged chromatin is DNA-binding domain-dependent. By examining Hoechst staining patterns at damage sites, we see evidence of chromatin decompaction that is PARP-dependent. We propose that PARP-regulated chromatin remodeling at sites of damage allows transient accessibility of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26004182

  20. Lack of Ligand-Selective Binding of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor to Putative DNA Binding Sites Regulating Expression of Bax and Paraoxonase 1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA. PMID:24200861

  1. Propensity for HBZ-SP1 isoform of HTLV-I to inhibit c-Jun activity correlates with sequestration of c-Jun into nuclear bodies rather than inhibition of its DNA-binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, Isabelle; Hivin, Patrick; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Lemasson, Isabelle; Barbeau, Benoit; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2009-09-01

    HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) contains a C-terminal zipper domain involved in its interaction with c-Jun. This interaction leads to a reduction of c-Jun DNA-binding activity and prevents the protein from activating transcription of AP-1-dependent promoters. However, it remained unclear whether the negative effect of HBZ-SP1 was due to its weak DNA-binding activity or to its capacity to target cellular factors to transcriptionally-inactive nuclear bodies. To answer this question, we produced a mutant in which specific residues present in the modulatory and DNA-binding domain of HBZ-SP1 were substituted for the corresponding c-Fos amino acids to improve the DNA-binding activity of the c-Jun/HBZ-SP1 heterodimer. The stability of the mutant, its interaction with c-Jun, DNA-binding activity of the resulting heterodimer, and its effect on the c-Jun activity were tested. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the repression of c-Jun activity in vivo is mainly due to the HBZ-SP1-mediated sequestration of c-Jun to the HBZ-NBs.

  2. Distinct Roles for Interfacial Hydration in Site-Specific DNA Recognition by ETS-Family Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Xhani, Suela; Esaki, Shingo; Huang, Kenneth; Erlitzki, Noa; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-03-15

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. Unlike other ETS homologs, such as Ets-1, DNA recognition by PU.1 is highly sensitive to its osmotic environment due to excess interfacial hydration in the complex. To interrogate interfacial hydration in the two homologs, we mutated a highly conserved tyrosine residue, which is exclusively engaged in coordinating a well-defined water contact between the protein and DNA among ETS proteins, to phenylalanine. The loss of this water-mediated contact blunted the osmotic sensitivity of PU.1/DNA binding, but did not alter binding under normo-osmotic conditions, suggesting that PU.1 has evolved to maximize osmotic sensitivity. The homologous mutation in Ets-1, which was minimally sensitive to osmotic stress due to a sparsely hydrated interface, reduced DNA-binding affinity at normal osmolality but the complex became stabilized by osmotic stress. Molecular dynamics simulations of wildtype and mutant PU.1 and Ets-1 in their free and DNA-bound states, which recapitulated experimental features of the proteins, showed that abrogation of this tyrosine-mediated water contact perturbed the Ets-1/DNA complex not through disruption of interfacial hydration, but by inhibiting local dynamics induced specifically in the bound state. Thus, a configurationally identical water-mediated contact plays mechanistically distinct roles in mediating DNA recognition by structurally homologous ETS transcription factors.

  3. Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) contains a multifunctional transcriptional activation domain important for inter- and intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X; Bieker, J J

    1996-01-01

    Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) is a red cell-restricted transcriptional activator that plays a dominant role in establishing high levels of beta-globin gene expression during erythroid ontogeny. Although its DNA binding domain belongs to the well-studied class of Krüppel-like zinc fingers, its proline-rich activation region has not been thoroughly examined. We have analyzed this region by monitoring the functional effects of its mutagenesis upon EKLF activity in vivo and in vitro. First, using co-transfection assays, we find that the transactivation region contains discrete stimulatory and inhibitory subdomains. Second, in vitro binding assays indicate that the inhibitory domain exerts its effect in cis by interfering with DNA binding. Third, in vivo competition assays demonstrate that EKLF interacts with a positive-acting cellular factor, and that the domain responsible for this trans interaction lies within a 40 amino acid sequence that is coincident with the EKLF minimal transactivation domain. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of this domain implies that conformation and/or phosphorylation status of its central core may be critical for such interactions. These results point towards post-translational steric and/or allosteric control of EKLF function that may be important not just for its DNA binding ability, but also for its potential to interact with other proteins that fully establish the correct stereospecific array leading to efficient switching of beta-globin transcription during development. Images PMID:8918466

  4. Identification of procollagen promoter DNA-binding proteins: effects of dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, C.; Cutroneo, K.R.

    1987-05-01

    Glucocorticoids selectively decrease procollagen synthesis by decreasing procollagen mRNA transcription. Dexamethasone coordinately decreased total cellular type I and type III procollagen mRNAs in mouse embryonic skin fibroblasts. Since sequence specific DNA-binding proteins are known to modulate eukaryotic gene expression the authors identified in mouse fibroblasts nuclear proteins which bind to types I and III procollagen promoter DNAs. Nuclear proteins were electrophoresed, blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with /sup 32/P-end-labeled type I and type III procollagen promoter DNAs in the presence of equimolar amounts of /sup 32/P-end-labeled vector DNA. Differences in total DNA binding were noted by the densitometric scans of the nuclear proteins. Dexamethasone treatment enhanced total DNA binding. Increasing the NaCl concentration decreased the number of promoter DNA-binding proteins without altering the relative specificity for the promoter DNAs. Promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was also inhibited by increasing concentrations of E. coli DNA. The number of DNA-binding proteins was greater for type III procollagen promoter DNA. The effect of dexamethasone treatment on promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was determined.

  5. A novel bipartite nuclear localization signal with an atypically long linker in DOF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Jonas; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ruzicic, Slobodan

    2010-05-01

    Large molecules require a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for translocation into the nucleus. Classical NLSs are rich in basic amino acids and they represent three groups, based on their structural features: SV40 T-antigen-type, yeast mating factor Matalpha-2-type, and bipartite NLSs. DNA-binding-with-one-finger (DOF) transcription factors play important roles in plants, and although their nuclear localization has been demonstrated in several cases, public protein localization prediction tools fail to detect NLS motifs in these proteins. Here, we demonstrate that an atypical bipartite NLS with a 17 amino acid long linker between its flanking basic regions directs Arabidopsis thaliana DOF proteins to the cell nucleus. The novel bipartite NLS is highly conserved in plant DOF transcription factors, including the single DOF protein in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  6. An embryonic demethylation mechanism involving binding of transcription factors to replicating DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, K; Silke, J; Georgiev, O; Marti, P; Giovannini, N; Rungger, D

    1998-01-01

    In vertebrates, transcriptionally active promoters are undermethylated. Since the transcription factor Sp1, and more recently NF-kappaB, have been implicated in the demethylation process, we examined the effect of transcription factors on demethylation by injecting in vitro methylated plasmid DNA into Xenopus fertilized eggs. We found that various transactivation domains, including a strong acidic activation domain from the viral protein VP16, can enhance demethylation of a promoter region when fused to a DNA binding domain which recognizes the promoter. Furthermore, demethylation occurs only after the midblastula transition, when the general transcription machinery of the host embryo becomes available. Nevertheless, transcription factor binding need not be followed by actual transcription, since demethylation is not blocked by alpha-amanitin treatment. Finally, replication of the target DNA is a prerequisite for efficient demethylation since only plasmids that carry the bovine papilloma virus sequences which support plasmid replication after the midblastula transition are demethylated. No demethylation is detectable in the oocyte system where DNA is not replicated. These results suggest that, in the Xenopus embryo, promoters for which transcription factors are available are demethylated by a replication-dependent, possibly passive mechanism. PMID:9482741

  7. The transcription factors ATF-1 and CREB-1 bind constitutively to the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) DNA recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Kvietikova, I; Wenger, R H; Marti, H H; Gassmann, M

    1995-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was first described as a DNA binding activity that specifically recognizes an 8 bp motif known to be essential for hypoxia-inducible erythropoietin gene transcription. Subsequently HIF-1 activity has also been found in cell lines which do not express erythropoietin, suggesting that HIF-1 is part of a widespread oxygen sensing mechanism. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays HIF-1 DNA binding activity is only detectable in nuclear extracts of cells cultivated in a low oxygen atmosphere. In addition to HIF-1, a constitutive DNA binding activity also specifically binds the HIF1 probe. Here we report that CRE and AP1 oligonucleotides efficiently competed for binding of the HIF1 probe to this constitutive factor, whereas HIF-1 activity itself remained unaffected. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the CRE binding factors ATF-1 and CREB-1 supershifted the constitutive factors ATF-1 and CREB-1 supershifted the constitutive factor, while Jun and Fos family members, which constitute the AP-1 factor, were immunologically undetectable. Recombinant ATF-1 and CREB-1 proteins bound HIF1 probes either as homodimers or as heterodimers, indicating a new binding specificity for ATF-1/CREB-1. Finally, reporter gene assays in HeLa cells treated with either a cAMP analogue or a phorbol ester suggest that the PKA, but not the PKC signalling pathway is involved in oxygen sensing. Images PMID:8524640

  8. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  9. Drosophila Mi-2 negatively regulates dDREF by inhibiting its DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Fumiko; Ohshima, Nobuko; Kwon, Eun-Jeong; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2002-07-01

    Drosophila melanogaster DNA replication-related element (DRE) factor (dDREF) is a transcriptional regulatory factor required for the expression of genes carrying the 5'-TATCGATA DRE. dDREF has been reported to bind to a sequence in the chromatin boundary element, and thus, dDREF may play a part in regulating insulator activity. To generate further insights into dDREF function, we carried out a Saccharomyces cerevisiae two-hybrid screening with DREF polypeptide as bait and identified Mi-2 as a DREF-interacting protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the C-terminal region of Drosophila Mi-2 (dMi-2) specifically binds to the DNA-binding domain of dDREF. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that dMi-2 thereby inhibits the DNA-binding activity of dDREF. Ectopic expression of dDREF and dMi-2 in eye imaginal discs resulted in severe and mild rough-eye phenotypes, respectively, whereas flies simultaneously expressing both proteins exhibited almost-normal eye phenotypes. Half-dose reduction of the dMi-2 gene enhanced the DREF-induced rough-eye phenotype. Immunostaining of polytene chromosomes of salivary glands showed that dDREF and dMi-2 bind in mutually exclusive ways. These lines of evidence define a novel function of dMi-2 in the negative regulation of dDREF by its DNA-binding activity. Finally, we postulated that dDREF and dMi-2 may demonstrate reciprocal regulation of their functions.

  10. Transcriptional Regulation by Hypoxia Inducible Factors

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular response to oxygen deprivation is governed largely by a family of transcription factors known as Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which HIFs regulate the transcriptional apparatus to enable the cellular and organismal response to hypoxia. We discuss here how the various HIF polypeptides, their post-translational modifications, binding partners and transcriptional cofactors affect RNA polymerase II activity to drive context-dependent transcriptional programs during hypoxia. PMID:24099156

  11. E2fl1 is a meiosis-specific transcription factor in the protist Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tian, Miao; Yan, Guan-Xiong; Shodhan, Anura; Miao, Wei

    2017-01-02

    Members of the E2F family of transcription factors have been reported to regulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle control, DNA replication, and DNA repair in multicellular eukaryotes. Here, E2FL1, a meiosis-specific E2F transcription factor gene, was identified in the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Loss of this gene resulted in meiotic arrest prior to anaphase I. The cytological experiments revealed that the meiotic homologous pairing was not affected in the absence of E2FL1, but the paired homologous chromosomes did not separate and assumed a peculiar tandem arrangement. This is the first time that an E2F family member has been shown to regulate meiotic events. Moreover, BrdU incorporation showed that DSB processing during meiosis was abnormal upon the deletion of E2FL1. Transcriptome sequencing analysis revealed that E2FL1 knockout decreased the expression of genes involved in DNA replication and DNA repair in T. thermophila, suggesting that the function of E2F is highly conserved in eukaryotes. In addition, E2FL1 deletion inhibited the expression of related homologous chromosome segregation genes in T. thermophila. The result may explain the meiotic arrest phenotype at anaphase I. Finally, by searching for E2F DNA-binding motifs in the entire T. thermophila genome, we identified 714 genes containing at least one E2F DNA-binding motif; of these, 235 downregulated represent putative E2FL1 target genes.

  12. Identification and characterization of Mlr1,2: two mouse homologues of Mblk-1, a transcription factor from the honeybee brain(1).

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takekazu; Park, Jung-Min; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2003-01-30

    We previously identified the Mblk-1 gene in the honeybee brain, which encodes a transcription factor containing two DNA binding motifs, termed RHF1 and 2 (Takeuchi et al. (2001) Insect Mol. Biol. 121, 134-140). Here, we identified two mouse Mblk1 homologues, Mlr1 and Mlr2. Both encode proteins containing a single DNA-binding motif highly conserved with RHF2 and activate transcription mediated by a DNA element recognized by honeybee Mblk-1. Mlr1 was expressed predominantly in the spermatocytes of the testis, while Mlr2 was expressed in various tissues other than testis. Mlr1 transcripts were lost in the testis of W/W(v) mutant mice, suggesting a role in spermatogenesis.

  13. PDGF inactivates forkhead family transcription factor by activation of Akt in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam; Lenin, Mahimainathan; Calhaun, Cheresa; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Abboud, Hanna E

    2003-02-01

    Regulation of the forkhead domain transcription factors by PDGF has not been studied. In this report, we investigated the role of PDGF-induced Akt in regulating forkhead domain protein FKHRL1 in glomerular mesangial cells. PDGF increased phosphorylation of FKHRL1 in a time- and PI 3 kinase-dependent manner. Expression of dominant negative Akt by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer blocked PDGF-induced FKHRL1 phosphorylation. PDGF inhibited transcription of a forkhead DNA binding element-driven reporter gene. This inhibition was mimicked by constitutively active myristoylated Akt. Moreover, FKHR1-mediated transcription of the reporter gene was completely attenuated by both PDGF and Myr-Akt. One of the targets of forkhead transcription factors is the proapoptotic Fas ligand (FasL) gene. PDGF, as well as Myr-Akt, inhibited transcription of FasL. In contrast, inhibition of PI 3 kinase and dominant negative Akt increased FasL gene transcription, suggesting that suppression of PI 3 kinase/Akt signalling may induce apoptosis in mesangial cells via upregulation of FasL expression. However, expression of dominant negative Akt by adenovirus did not induce apoptosis in mesangial cells, suggesting that Akt-independent antiapoptotic mechanisms also exist. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that PDGF inactivates forkhead domain transcription factor by Akt-dependent phosphorylation and that suppression of Akt signalling is not sufficient to induce apoptosis in mesangial cells.

  14. Transcription of follicle-stimulating hormone subunit genes is modulated by porcine LIM homeobox transcription factors, LHX2 and LHX3

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, Saishu; KATO, Takako; NISHIMURA, Naoto; KANNO, Naoko; CHEN, Mo; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Hiroto; KATO, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The LIM-homeobox transcription factors LHX2 and LHX3s (LHX3a and LHX3b) are thought to be involved in regulating the pituitary glycoprotein hormone subunit genes Cga and Fshβ. These two factors show considerable differences in their amino acid sequences for DNA binding and protein-protein interactions and in their vital function in pituitary development. Hence, we compared the DNA binding properties and transcriptional activities of Cga and Fshβ between LHX2 and LHX3s. A gel mobility shift assay for approximately 1.1 kb upstream of Cga and 2.0 kb upstream of Fshβ varied in binding profiles between LHX2 and LHX3s. DNase I footprinting revealed DNA binding sites in 8 regions of the Cga promoter for LHX2 and LHX3s with small differences in the binding range and strength. In the Fshβ promoter, 14 binding sites were identified for LHX2 and LHX3, respectively. There were alternative binding sites to either gene in addition to similar differences observed in the Cga promoter. The transcriptional activities of LHX2 and LHX3s according to a reporter assay showed cell-type dependent activity with repression in the pituitary gonadotrope lineage LβT2 cells and stimulation in Chinese hamster ovary lineage CHO cells. Reactivity of LHX2 and LHX3s was observed in all regions, and differences were observed in the 5'-upstream region of Fshβ. However, immunohistochemistry showed that LHX2 resides in a small number of gonadotropes in contrast to LHX3. Thus, LHX3 mainly controls Cga and Fshβ expression. PMID:26853788

  15. Toward an atomistic model for predicting transcription-factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Endres, Robert G; Schulthess, Thomas C; Wingreen, Ned S

    2004-11-01

    Identifying the specific DNA-binding sites of transcription-factor proteins is essential to understanding the regulation of gene expression in the cell. Bioinformatics approaches are fast compared to experiments, but require prior knowledge of multiple binding sites for each protein. Here, we present an atomistic force-field method to predict binding sites based only on the X-ray structure of a related bound complex. Specific flexible contacts between the protein and DNA are modeled by a library of amino acid side-chain rotamers. Using the example of the mouse transcription factor, Zif268, a well-studied zinc-finger protein, we show that the protein sequence alone, without the detailed experimental structure, gives a strong bias toward the consensus binding site.

  16. SOX family transcription factors involved in diverse cellular events during development.

    PubMed

    She, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2015-12-01

    In metazoa, SOX family transcription factors play many diverse roles. In vertebrate, they are well-known regulators of numerous developmental processes. Wide-ranging studies have demonstrated the co-expression of SOX proteins in various developing tissues and that they occur in an overlapping manner and show functional redundancy. In particular, studies focusing on the HMG box of SOX proteins have revealed that the HMG box regulates DNA-binding properties, and mediates both the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SOX proteins and their physical interactions with partner proteins. Posttranslational modifications are further implicated in the regulation of the transcriptional activities of SOX proteins. In this review, we discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the SOX-partner factor interactions and the functional modes of SOX-partner complexes during development. We particularly emphasize the representative roles of the SOX group proteins in major tissues during developmental and physiological processes.

  17. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  18. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  19. Mechanism for regulation of the putrescine utilization pathway by the transcription factor PuuR in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Naoki; Kurihara, Shin; Kitahara, Yuzuru; Asada, Kei; Kato, Kenji; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, putrescine is metabolized to succinate for use as a carbon and nitrogen source by the putrescine utilization pathway (Puu pathway). One gene in the puu gene cluster encodes a transcription factor, PuuR, which has a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. DNA microarray analysis of an E. coli puuR mutant, in which three amino acid residues in the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif of PuuR were mutated to alanine to eliminate DNA binding of PuuR, suggested that PuuR is a negative regulator of puu genes. Results of gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses suggested that PuuR binds to the promoter regions of puuA and puuD. The binding of wild-type PuuR to a DNA probe containing PuuR recognition sites was diminished with increasing putrescine concentrations in vitro. These results suggest that PuuR regulates the intracellular putrescine concentration by the transcriptional regulation of genes in the Puu pathway, including puuR itself. The puu gene cluster is found in E. coli and closely related enterobacteria, but this gene cluster is uncommon in other bacterial groups. E. coli and related enterobacteria may have gained the Puu pathway as an adaptation for survival in the mammalian intestine, an environment in which polyamines exist at relatively high concentrations.

  20. Mechanism for Regulation of the Putrescine Utilization Pathway by the Transcription Factor PuuR in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Kurihara, Shin; Kitahara, Yuzuru; Asada, Kei; Kato, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, putrescine is metabolized to succinate for use as a carbon and nitrogen source by the putrescine utilization pathway (Puu pathway). One gene in the puu gene cluster encodes a transcription factor, PuuR, which has a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. DNA microarray analysis of an E. coli puuR mutant, in which three amino acid residues in the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif of PuuR were mutated to alanine to eliminate DNA binding of PuuR, suggested that PuuR is a negative regulator of puu genes. Results of gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses suggested that PuuR binds to the promoter regions of puuA and puuD. The binding of wild-type PuuR to a DNA probe containing PuuR recognition sites was diminished with increasing putrescine concentrations in vitro. These results suggest that PuuR regulates the intracellular putrescine concentration by the transcriptional regulation of genes in the Puu pathway, including puuR itself. The puu gene cluster is found in E. coli and closely related enterobacteria, but this gene cluster is uncommon in other bacterial groups. E. coli and related enterobacteria may have gained the Puu pathway as an adaptation for survival in the mammalian intestine, an environment in which polyamines exist at relatively high concentrations. PMID:22522900

  1. Casticin inhibits the activity of transcription factor Sp1 and the methylation of RECK in MGC803 gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; He, Kefei; Huang, Li; Zhang, Lingyan; Liu, Aixue; Zhang, Jiren

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of casticin on reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK) gene expression and intracellular methylation levels in MGC803 gastric cancer cells. Cells were treated with 1, 10 and 30 µmol/l casticin. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to determine the protein expression and mRNA levels of RECK and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was used to detect RECK methylation. In addition, MGC803 cell proliferation was measured by an MTT assay and the DNA-binding activity of transcription factor Sp1 was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrated that treatment with 1, 10 and 30 µmol/l casticin significantly increased RECK protein expression and mRNA levels. In addition, casticin (30 µmol/l) decreased RECK promoter methylation levels by 31%, global DNA methylation levels by 39% and nuclear methylation activity by 71.6%. Furthermore, casticin downregulated the mRNA levels and protein expression of DNMT1. The MTT assay demonstrated that MGC803 cell proliferation was inhibited by casticin treatment and DNA binding assays indicated that casticin reduced the DNA-binding activity of Sp1. The present study therefore indicated that casticin inhibits the proliferation of gastric cancer MGC803 cells by upregulating RECK gene expression and reducing intracellular methylation levels. PMID:28352361

  2. Comparative genomics of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent transcription factor regulons in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, Inna A.

    2016-01-01

    The MocR-subfamily transcription factors (MocR-TFs) characterized by the GntR-family DNA-binding domain and aminotransferase-like sensory domain are broadly distributed among certain lineages of Bacteria. Characterized MocR-TFs bind pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) and control transcription of genes involved in PLP, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine metabolism via binding specific DNA operator sites. To identify putative target genes and DNA binding motifs of MocR-TFs, we performed comparative genomics analysis of over 250 bacterial genomes. The reconstructed regulons for 825 MocR-TFs comprise structural genes from over 200 protein families involved in diverse biological processes. Using the genome context and metabolic subsystem analysis we tentatively assigned functional roles for 38 out of 86 orthologous groups of studied regulators. Most of these MocR-TF regulons are involved in PLP metabolism, as well as utilization of GABA, taurine and ectoine. The remaining studied MocR-TF regulators presumably control genes encoding enzymes involved in reduction/oxidation processes, various transporters and PLP-dependent enzymes, for example aminotransferases. Predicted DNA binding motifs of MocR-TFs are generally similar in each orthologous group and are characterized by two to four repeated sequences. Identified motifs were classified according to their structures. Motifs with direct and/or inverted repeat symmetry constitute the majority of inferred DNA motifs, suggesting preferable TF dimerization in head-to-tail or head-to-head configuration. The obtained genomic collection of in silico reconstructed MocR-TF motifs and regulons in Bacteria provides a basis for future experimental characterization of molecular mechanisms for various regulators in this family. PMID:28348826

  3. Crystal structure of the adenovirus DNA binding protein reveals a hook-on model for cooperative DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, P A; Tsernoglou, D; Tucker, A D; Coenjaerts, F E; Leenders, H; van der Vliet, P C

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus single-stranded DNA binding protein (Ad DBP) is a multifunctional protein required, amongst other things, for DNA replication and transcription control. It binds to single- and double-stranded DNA, as well as to RNA, in a sequence-independent manner. Like other single-stranded DNA binding proteins, it binds ssDNA, cooperatively. We report the crystal structure, at 2.6 A resolution, of the nucleic acid binding domain. This domain is active in DNA replication. The protein contains two zinc atoms in different, novel coordinations. The zinc atoms appear to be required for the stability of the protein fold rather than being involved in direct contacts with the DNA. The crystal structure shows that the protein contains a 17 amino acid C-terminal extension which hooks onto a second molecule, thereby forming a protein chain. Deletion of this C-terminal arm reduces cooperativity in DNA binding, suggesting a hook-on model for cooperativity. Based on this structural work and mutant studies, we propose that DBP forms a protein core around which the single-stranded DNA winds. Images PMID:8039495

  4. Transcription factor-based biosensors enlightened by the analyte

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-López, Raul; Ruiz, Raul; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Whole cell biosensors (WCBs) have multiple applications for environmental monitoring, detecting a wide range of pollutants. WCBs depend critically on the sensitivity and specificity of the transcription factor (TF) used to detect the analyte. We describe the mechanism of regulation and the structural and biochemical properties of TF families that are used, or could be used, for the development of environmental WCBs. Focusing on the chemical nature of the analyte, we review TFs that respond to aromatic compounds (XylS-AraC, XylR-NtrC, and LysR), metal ions (MerR, ArsR, DtxR, Fur, and NikR) or antibiotics (TetR and MarR). Analyzing the structural domains involved in DNA recognition, we highlight the similitudes in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of these TF families. Opposite to DBDs, the wide range of analytes detected by TFs results in a diversity of structures at the effector binding domain. The modular architecture of TFs opens the possibility of engineering TFs with hybrid DNA and effector specificities. Yet, the lack of a crisp correlation between structural domains and specific functions makes this a challenging task. PMID:26191047

  5. Nanopore sensing of individual transcription factors bound to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Allison; Atas, Evrim; Meller, Amit

    2015-06-01

    Transcription factor (TF)-DNA interactions are the primary control point in regulation of gene expression. Characterization of these interactions is essential for understanding genetic regulation of biological systems and developing novel therapies to treat cellular malfunctions. Solid-state nanopores are a highly versatile class of single-molecule sensors that can provide rich information about local properties of long charged biopolymers using the current blockage patterns generated during analyte translocation, and provide a novel platform for characterization of TF-DNA interactions. The DNA-binding domain of the TF Early Growth Response Protein 1 (EGR1), a prototypical zinc finger protein known as zif268, is used as a model system for this study. zif268 adopts two distinct bound conformations corresponding to specific and nonspecific binding, according to the local DNA sequence. Here we implement a solid-state nanopore platform for direct, label- and tether-free single-molecule detection of zif268 bound to DNA. We demonstrate detection of single zif268 TFs bound to DNA according to current blockage sublevels and duration of translocation through the nanopore. We further show that the nanopore can detect and discriminate both specific and nonspecific binding conformations of zif268 on DNA via the distinct current blockage patterns corresponding to each of these two known binding modes.

  6. An integrated model of transcription factor diffusion shows the importance of intersegmental transfer and quaternary protein structure for target site finding.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hugo G; Sewitz, Sven; Andrews, Steven S; Lipkow, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational model of transcription factor motion that explains both the observed rapid target finding of transcription factors, and how this motion influences protein and genome structure. Using the Smoldyn software, we modelled transcription factor motion arising from a combination of unrestricted 3D diffusion in the nucleoplasm, sliding along the DNA filament, and transferring directly between filament sections by intersegmental transfer. This presents a fine-grain picture of the way in which transcription factors find their targets two orders of magnitude faster than 3D diffusion alone allows. Eukaryotic genomes contain sections of nucleosome free regions (NFRs) around the promoters; our model shows that the presence and size of these NFRs can be explained as their acting as antennas on which transcription factors slide to reach their targets. Additionally, our model shows that intersegmental transfer may have shaped the quaternary structure of transcription factors: sequence specific DNA binding proteins are unusually enriched in dimers and tetramers, perhaps because these allow intersegmental transfer, which accelerates target site finding. Finally, our model shows that a 'hopping' motion can emerge from 3D diffusion on small scales. This explains the apparently long sliding lengths that have been observed for some DNA binding proteins observed in vitro. Together, these results suggest that transcription factor diffusion dynamics help drive the evolution of protein and genome structure.

  7. Cell-cycle-specific interaction of nuclear DNA-binding proteins with a CCAAT sequence from the human thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, G B; Gudas, J M; Pardee, A B

    1987-01-01

    Induction of thymidine kinase parallels the onset of DNA synthesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the thymidine kinase gene, we have examined whether specific nuclear factors interact in a cell-cycle-dependent manner with sequences upstream of this gene. Two inverted CCAAT boxes near the transcriptional initiation sites were observed to form complexes with nuclear DNA-binding proteins. The nature of the complexes changes dramatically as the cells approach DNA synthesis and correlates well with the previously reported transcriptional increase of the thymidine kinase gene. Images PMID:3479796

  8. Recognition site of nuclear factor I, a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein from HeLa cells that stimulates adenovirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Leegwater, P A; van Driel, W; van der Vliet, P C

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear factor I is a 47-kd protein, isolated from nuclei of HeLa cells, that binds specifically to the inverted terminal repeat of the adenovirus (Ad) DNA and enhances Ad DNA replication in vitro. We have studied the DNA sequence specificity of nuclear factor I binding using cloned terminal fragments of the Ad2 genome and a set of deletion mutants. Binding of nuclear factor I protects nucleotides 19-42 of Ad2 DNA against DNase I digestion. Filter binding assays show that deletion of the first 23 nucleotides does not impair binding while a deletion of 24 nucleotides reduces binding severely. However, binding studies on Ad12 DNA indicate that nucleotide 24 can be mutated. Fragments containing the first 40 bp are bound normally while the first 38 bp are insufficient to sustain binding. Taken together, these results indicate that the minimal recognition site of nuclear factor I contains 15 or 16 nucleotides, located from nucleotide 25 to nucleotide 39 or 40 of the Ad2 DNA. This site contains two of the four conserved nucleotide sequences in this region. Sequences flanking the minimal recognition site may reduce the binding affinity of nuclear factor I. In accordance with these binding studies, DNA replication of a fragment that carries the sequence of the terminal 40 nucleotides of Ad2 at one molecular end is enhanced by nuclear factor I in an in vitro replication system. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:4040852

  9. Fox transcription factors: from development to disease.

    PubMed

    Golson, Maria L; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2016-12-15

    Forkhead box (Fox) transcription factors are evolutionarily conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. They regulate diverse biological processes both during development and throughout adult life. Mutations in many Fox genes are associated with human disease and, as such, various animal models have been generated to study the function of these transcription factors in mechanistic detail. In many cases, the absence of even a single Fox transcription factor is lethal. In this Primer, we provide an overview of the Fox family, highlighting several key Fox transcription factor families that are important for mammalian development.

  10. Structure-based predictions broadly link transcription factor mutations to gene expression changes in cancers.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Justin; Bernard, Brady; Reynolds, Sheila; Plaisier, Christopher L; Shmulevich, Ilya; Baliga, Nitin S

    2014-12-01

    Thousands of unique mutations in transcription factors (TFs) arise in cancers, and the functional and biological roles of relatively few of these have been characterized. Here, we used structure-based methods developed specifically for DNA-binding proteins to systematically predict the consequences of mutations in several TFs that are frequently mutated in cancers. The explicit consideration of protein-DNA interactions was crucial to explain the roles and prevalence of mutations in TP53 and RUNX1 in cancers, and resulted in a higher specificity of detection for known p53-regulated genes among genetic associations between TP53 genotypes and genome-wide expression in The Cancer Genome Atlas, compared to existing methods of mutation assessment. Biophysical predictions also indicated that the relative prevalence of TP53 missense mutations in cancer is proportional to their thermodynamic impacts on protein stability and DNA binding, which is consistent with the selection for the loss of p53 transcriptional function in cancers. Structure and thermodynamics-based predictions of the impacts of missense mutations that focus on specific molecular functions may be increasingly useful for the precise and large-scale inference of aberrant molecular phenotypes in cancer and other complex diseases.

  11. INSIGHTS FROM GENOMIC PROFILING OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    A crucial question in the field of gene regulation is whether the location at which a transcription factor binds influences its effectiveness or the mechanism by which it regulates transcription. Comprehensive transcription factor binding maps are needed to address these issues, and genome-wide mapping is now possible thanks to the technological advances of ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq. This review discusses how recent genomic profiling of transcription factors gives insight into how binding specificity is achieved and what features of chromatin influence the ability of transcription factors to interact with the genome, and also suggests future experiments to further our understanding of the causes and consequences of transcription factor-genome interactions. PMID:19668247

  12. The transcription factor GATA-6 regulates pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M.G.; York, Allen J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The transcriptional code that programs maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factor GATA-4. The highly related transcription factor GATA-6 is also expressed in the adult heart, although its role in controlling the hypertrophic program is unknown. Objective To determine the role of GATA-6 in cardiac hypertrophy and homeostasis. Methods and Results Here we performed a cardiomyocyte-specific conditional gene targeting approach for Gata6, as well as a transgenic approach to overexpress GATA-6 in the mouse heart. Deletion of Gata6-loxP with Nkx2.5-cre produced late embryonic lethality with heart defects, while deletion with β-myosin heavy chain-cre (βMHC-cre) produced viable adults with greater than 95% loss of GATA-6 protein in the heart. These later mice were subjected to pressure overload induced hypertrophy for 2 and 6 weeks, which showed a significant reduction in cardiac hypertrophy similar to that observed Gata4 heart-specific deleted mice. Gata6-deleted mice subjected to pressure overload also developed heart failure while control mice maintained proper cardiac function. Gata6-deleted mice also developed less cardiac hypertrophy following 2 weeks of angiotensin II/phenylephrine infusion. Controlled GATA-6 overexpression in the heart induced hypertrophy with aging and predisposed to greater hypertrophy with pressure overload stimulation. Combinatorial deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 from the adult heart resulted in dilated cardiomyopathy and lethality by 16 weeks of age. Mechanistically, deletion of Gata6 from the heart resulted in fundamental changes in the levels of key regulatory genes and myocyte differentiation-specific genes. Conclusions These results indicate that GATA-6 is both necessary and sufficient for regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response and differentiated gene expression, both alone and in coordination with GATA-4. PMID:20705924

  13. Agouti regulates adipocyte transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, R L; Stephens, J M

    2001-04-01

    Agouti is a secreted paracrine factor that regulates pigmentation in hair follicle melanocytes. Several dominant mutations cause ectopic expression of agouti, resulting in a phenotype characterized by yellow fur, adult-onset obesity and diabetes, increased linear growth and skeletal mass, and increased susceptibility to tumors. Humans also produce agouti protein, but the highest levels of agouti in humans are found in adipose tissue. To mimic the human agouti expression pattern in mice, transgenic mice (aP2-agouti) that express agouti in adipose tissue were generated. The transgenic mice develop a mild form of obesity, and they are sensitized to the action of insulin. We correlated the levels of specific regulators of insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation with these phenotypic changes in adipose tissue. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1, STAT3, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma protein levels were elevated in the transgenic mice. Treatment of mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes recapitulated these effects. These data demonstrate that agouti has potent effects on adipose tissue. We hypothesize that agouti increases adiposity and promotes insulin sensitivity by acting directly on adipocytes via PPAR-gamma.

  14. Purification & Characterization of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nagore, LI; Nadeau, RJ; Guo, Q; Jadhav, YLA; Jarrett, HW; Haskins, WE

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are essential for the expression of all proteins, including those involved in human health and disease. However, TFs are resistant to proteomic characterization because they are frequently masked by more abundant proteins due to the limited dynamic range of capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and protein database searching. Purification methods, particularly strategies that exploit the high affinity of TFs for DNA response elements on gene promoters, can enrich TFs prior to proteomic analysis to improve dynamic range and penetrance of the TF proteome. For example, trapping of TF complexes specific for particular response elements has been achieved by recovering the element DNA-protein complex on solid supports. Additional methods for improving dynamic range include two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis incorporating electrophoretic mobility shift assays and Southwestern blotting for detection. Here we review methods for TF purification and characterization. We fully expect that future investigations will apply these and other methods to illuminate this important but challenging proteome. PMID:23832591

  15. Regulation of organogenesis and stem cell properties by T-box transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuo; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    T-box transcription factors containing the common DNA-binding domain T-box contribute to the organization of multiple tissues in vertebrates and invertebrates. In mammals, 17 T-box genes are divided into five subfamilies depending on their amino acid homology. The proper distribution and expression of individual T-box transcription factors in different tissues enable regulation of the proliferation and differentiation of tissue-specific stem cells and progenitor cells in a suitable time schedule for tissue organization. Consequently, uncontrollable expressions of T-box genes induce abnormal tissue organization, and eventually cause various diseases with malformation and malfunction of tissues and organs. Furthermore, some T-box transcription factors are essential for maintaining embryonic stem cell pluripotency, improving the quality of induced pluripotent stem cells, and inducing cell-lineage conversion of differentiated cells. These lines of evidence indicate fundamental roles of T-box transcription factors in tissue organization and stem cell properties, and suggest that these transcription factors will be useful for developing therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine.

  16. AP2/ERF family transcription factors in plant abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Mizoi, Junya; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2012-02-01

    In terrestrial environments, temperature and water conditions are highly variable, and extreme temperatures and water conditions affect the survival, growth and reproduction of plants. To protect cells and sustain growth under such conditions of abiotic stress, plants respond to unfavourable changes in their environments in developmental, physiological and biochemical ways. These responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors. The AP2/ERF family is a large family of plant-specific transcription factors that share a well-conserved DNA-binding domain. This transcription factor family includes DRE-binding proteins (DREBs), which activate the expression of abiotic stress-responsive genes via specific binding to the dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat (DRE/CRT) cis-acting element in their promoters. In this review, we discuss the functions of the AP2/ERF-type transcription factors in plant abiotic stress responses, with special emphasis on the regulations and functions of two major types of DREBs, DREB1/CBF and DREB2. In addition, we summarise the involvement of other AP2/ERF-type transcription factors in abiotic stress responses, which has recently become clear. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress.

  17. A GC-rich element confers epidermal growth factor responsiveness to transcription from the gastrin promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, J L; Demediuk, B; Brand, S J

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha are important determinants of mucosal integrity in the gastrointestinal tract, and they act both directly and indirectly to prevent ulceration in the stomach. Consistent with this physiological role, EGF stimulates transcription of gastrin, a peptide hormone which regulates gastric acid secretion and mucosal growth. EGF stimulation of gastrin transcription is mediated by a GC-rich gastrin EGF response element (gERE) (GGGGCGGGGTGGGGGG) which lies between -54 and -68 in the human gastrin promoter. The gERE sequence also confers weaker responsiveness to phorbol ester stimulation. The gERE sequence differs from previously described EGF response elements. The gERE DNA sequence specifically interacts with a GH4 DNA-binding protein distinct from previously described transcription factors (Egr-1 and AP2) which bind GC-rich sequences and mediate transcriptional activation by growth factors. Furthermore, the gERE element does not bind the Sp1 transcription factor even though the gERE sequence contains a high-affinity Sp1-binding site (GGCGGG). Images PMID:2017173

  18. Evolutionarily conserved Ets family members display distinct DNA binding specificities [published erratum appears in J Exp Med 1993 Sep 1;178(3):1133

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Members of the Ets family of proto-oncogenes encode sequence-specific transcription factors that bind to a purine-rich motif centered around a conserved GGA trinucleotide. Ets binding sites have been identified in the transcriptional regulatory regions of multiple T cell genes including the T cell receptor alpha and beta (TCR-alpha and -beta) enhancers and the IL-2 enhancer, as well as in the enhancers of several T cell-trophic viruses including Maloney sarcoma virus, human leukemia virus type 1, and human immunodeficiency virus-2. T cells express multiple members of the Ets gene family including Ets-1, Ets-2, GABP alpha, Elf-1, and Fli-1. The different patterns of expression and protein-protein interactions of these different Ets family members undoubtedly contribute to their ability to specifically regulate distinct sets of T cell genes. However, previous studies have suggested that different Ets family members might also display distinct DNA binding specificities. In this report, we have examined the DNA binding characteristics of two Ets family members, Ets-1 and Elf-1, that are highly expressed in T cells. The results demonstrate that the minimal DNA binding domain of these proteins consists of adjacent basic and putative alpha-helical regions that are conserved in all of the known Ets family members. Both regions are required for DNA binding activity. In vitro binding studies demonstrated that Ets-1 and Elf-1 display distinct DNA binding specificities, and, thereby interact preferentially with different naturally occurring Ets binding sites. A comparison of known Ets binding sites identified three nucleotides at the 3' end of these sequences that control the differential binding of the Ets-1 and Elf-1 proteins. These results are consistent with a model in which different Ets family members regulate the expression of different T cell genes by binding preferentially to purine-rich sequences that share a GGA core motif, but contain distinct flanking sequences

  19. Scaling factors: transcription factors regulating subcellular domains.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason C; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Developing cells acquire mature fates in part by selective (i.e. qualitatively different) expression of a few cell-specific genes. However, all cells share the same basic repertoire of molecular and subcellular building blocks. Therefore, cells must also specialize according to quantitative differences in cell-specific distributions of those common molecular resources. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that evolutionarily-conserved transcription factors called scaling factors (SFs) regulate quantitative differences among mature cell types. SFs: (1) are induced during late stages of cell maturation; (2) are dedicated to specific subcellular domains; and, thus, (3) allow cells to emphasize specific subcellular features. We identify candidate SFs and discuss one in detail: MIST1 (BHLHA15, vertebrates)/DIMM (CG8667, Drosophila); professional secretory cells use this SF to scale up regulated secretion. Because cells use SFs to develop their mature properties and also to adapt them to ever-changing environmental conditions, SF aberrations likely contribute to diseases of adult onset.

  20. Defining a minimal estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chambon, P; White, J H

    1993-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcriptional regulator which binds to cognate palindromic DNA sequences known as estrogen response elements (EREs). A 66 amino acid core region which contains two zinc fingers and is highly conserved among the nuclear receptors is essential for site specific DNA recognition. However, it remains unclear how many flanking amino acids in addition to the zinc finger core are required for DNA binding. Here, we have characterized the minimal DNA binding region of the human ER by analysing the DNA binding properties of a series of deletion mutants expressed in bacteria. We find that the 66 amino acid zinc finger core of the DBD fails to bind DNA, and that the C-terminal end of the minimal ER DBD required for binding to perfectly palindromic EREs corresponds to the limit of 100% amino acid homology between the chicken and human receptors, which represents the boundary between regions C and D in the ER. Moreover, amino acids of region D up to 30 residues C-terminal to the zinc fingers greatly stabilize DNA binding by the DBD to perfectly palindromic EREs and are absolutely required for formation of gel retardation complexes by the DBD on certain physiological imperfectly palindromic EREs. These results indicate that in addition to the zinc finger core, amino acids C-terminal to the core in regions C and D play a key role in DNA binding by the ER, particularly to imperfectly palindromic response elements. The ER DBD expressed in E. coli binds as a dimer to ERE palindromes in a highly cooperative manner and forms only low levels of monomeric protein-DNA complexes on either palindromic or half-palindromic response elements. Conversion of ER amino acids 222 to 226, which lie within region C, to the corresponding residues of the human RAR alpha abolishes formation of dimeric protein-DNA complexes. Conversely, replacement of the same region of RAR alpha with ER residues 222 to 226 creates a derivative that, unlike the RAR alpha DBD, binds

  1. Molecular cloning and DNA binding characterization of DAF-16 orthologs from Ancylostoma hookworms⋆

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Frank, Daniel; Hawdon, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Infective hookworm L3s encounter a host-specific signal during infection that re-initiates a suspended developmental pathway, resulting in development to the adult stage. This resumption of development in the host is analogous to recovery of developmentally arrested Caenorhabditis elegans dauer larvae in response to favorable environmental signals. Dauer recovery in C. elegans dauers and hookworm L3s is mediated by insulin-like signaling (ILS). A key output of ILS in C. elegans is the forkhead transcription factor DAF-16, which controls the expression of genes required for maintenance of the dauer stage. The similarity between recovery pathways of L3s and dauers suggests that DAF-16 functions similarly in hookworm L3 activation. To test this, orthologs of Ce-DAF-16 were isolated from the hookworms Ancylostoma caninum and Ancylostoma ceylanicum. The protein sequences of hookworm DAF-16 DNA binding domains were identical, and shared 94% identity with the b and c isoforms of Ce-DAF-16. Ac-DAF-16 expressed in HEK293 kidney cells bound strongly to the conserved DAF family binding element (DBE), but not to a random DNA sequence. Ac-DAF-16 was able to drive transcription of a reporter gene located downstream of six copies of the DBE in NIH3T3 cells under starved conditions. Addition of serum caused a decrease in reporter gene expression, indicating that DAF-16 is negatively regulated by growth factor stimulation. These data confirm the presence of DAF-16 orthologs in hookworms, and demonstrate that Ac-DAF-16 binds to and drives transcription from a conserved DAF-16 family DNA binding element. PMID:18930062

  2. Structural effects of the L145Q, V157F, and R282W cancer-associated mutations in the p53 DNA-binding core domain.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Sara; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-06-14

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor involved in many important signaling pathways, such as apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. In over half of human cancers, p53 function is compromised by a mutation in its gene. Mutations in the p53 DNA-binding core domain destabilize the structure and reduce DNA-binding activity. We performed molecular dynamics simulations at physiological temperature to study the structural and dynamic effects of the L145Q, V157F, and R282W cancer-associated mutations in comparison to the wild-type protein. While there were common regions of destabilization in the mutant simulations, structural changes particular to individual mutations were also observed. Significant backbone deviations of the H2 helix and S7-S8 loop were observed in all mutant simulations; the H2 helix binds to DNA. In addition, the L145Q and V157F mutations, which are located in the β-sandwich core of the domain, disrupted the β-sheet structure and the loop-sheet-helix motif. The R282W mutation caused distortion of the loop-sheet-helix motif, but otherwise this mutant was similar to the wild-type structure. The introduction of these mutations caused rearrangement of the DNA-binding surface, consistent with their reduced DNA-binding activity. The simulations reveal detailed effects of the mutations on the stability and dynamics of p53 that may provide insight for therapeutic approaches.

  3. The Arabidopsis thaliana TCP transcription factors: A broadening horizon beyond development.

    PubMed

    Li, Shutian

    2015-01-01

    The TCP family of transcription factors is named after the first 4 characterized members, namely TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 (TB1) from maize (Zea mays), CYCLOIDEA (CYC) from snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus), as well as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN FACTOR1 (PCF1) and PCF2 from rice (Oryza sativa). Phylogenic analysis of this plant-specific protein family unveils a conserved bHLH-containing DNA-binding motif known as the TCP domain. In accordance with the structure of this shared domain, TCP proteins are grouped into class I (TCP-P) and class II (TCP-C), which are suggested to antagonistically modulate plant growth and development via competitively binding similar cis-regulatory modules called site II elements. Over the last decades, TCPs across the plant kingdom have been demonstrated to control a plethora of plant processes. Notably, TCPs also regulate plant development and defense responses via stimulating the biosynthetic pathways of bioactive metabolites, such as brassinosteroid (BR), jasmonic acid (JA) and flavonoids. Besides, mutagenesis analysis coupled with biochemical experiments identifies several crucial amino acids located within the TCP domain, which confer the redox sensitivity of class I TCPs and determine the distinct DNA-binding properties of TCPs. In this review, developmental functions of TCPs in various biological pathways are briefly described with an emphasis on their involvement in the synthesis of bioactive substances. Furthermore, novel biochemical aspects of TCPs with respect to redox regulation and DNA-binding preferences are elaborated. In addition, the unexpected participation of TCPs in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) and defense against insects indicates that the widely recognized developmental regulators are capable of fine-tuning defense signaling and thereby enable plants to evade deleterious developmental phenotypes. Altogether, these recent impressive breakthroughs remarkably advance our understanding as to how TCPs integrate

  4. A sequence-specific DNA-binding factor (VF1) from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cells binds to three adjacent sites in the xisA upstream region.

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, C J; Brusca, J S; Ramasubramanian, T S; Wei, T F; Golden, J W

    1990-01-01

    A DNA-binding factor (VF1) partially purified from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cell extracts by heparin-Sepharose chromatography was found to have affinity for the xisA upstream region. The xisA gene is required for excision of an 11-kilobase element from the nifD gene during heterocyst differentiation. Previous studies of the xisA upstream sequences demonstrated that deletion of this region is required for the expression of xisA from heterologous promoters in vegetative cells. Mobility shift assays with a labeled 250-base-pair fragment containing the binding sites revealed three distinct DNA-protein complexes. Competition experiments showed that VF1 also bound to the upstream sequences of the rbcL and glnA genes, but the rbcL and glnA fragments showed only single complexes in mobility shift assays. The upstream region of the nifH gene formed a weak complex with VF1. DNase footprinting and deletion analysis of the xisA binding site mapped the binding to a 66-base-pair region containing three repeats of the consensus recognition sequence ACATT. Images PMID:2118506

  5. The transcription factor, the Cdk, its cyclin and their regulator: directing the transcriptional response to a nutritional signal.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, K; Fisher, F; McAndrew, P C; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex prevents transcription of PHO5 by inhibiting the ability of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor Pho4 to activate transcription in response to high phosphate conditions. In low phosphate the Pho80-Pho85 complex is inactivated and Pho4 is then able to activate the acid phosphatase gene PHO5. We show here that Pho4 and the homeobox protein Pho2 interact in vivo and act cooperatively to activate the PHO5 UAS, with interaction being regulated by the phosphate switch. In addition, we also demonstrate that an additional factor, Pho81, interacts in high phosphate with both the Pho80 cyclin and with Pho4. In low phosphate, Pho80 and Pho81 dissociate from Pho4, but retain the ability to interact with each other. The evidence presented here supports the idea that Pho81 acts as a phosphate-sensitive trigger that regulates the ability of the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex to bind Pho4, while DNA binding by Pho4 is dependent on the phosphate-sensitive interaction with Pho2. Images PMID:7957107

  6. NonO enhances the association of many DNA-binding proteins to their targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y S; Yang, M C; Tucker, P W; Capra, J D

    1997-06-15

    NonO is an unusual nucleic acid binding protein not only in that it binds both DNA and RNA but that it does so via functionally separable domains. Here we document that NonO enhances the binding of some (E47, OTF-1 and OTF-2) but not all (PEA3) conventional sequence-specific transcription factors to their recognition sites in artificial substrates as well as in an immunoglobulin VHpromoter. We also show that NonO induces the binding of the Ku complex to DNA ends. Ku has no known DNA sequence specificity. These enhancement of binding effects are NonO concentration dependent. Using the E box activity of E47 as a model, kinetic studies demonstrate that the association rate of the protein-DNA complex increases in the presence of NonO while the dissociation rate remains the same, thereby increasing the sum total of the interaction. Oligo competition experiments indicate that NonO does not contact the target DNA in order to enhance the binding activity of DNA binding proteins. Rather, methylation interference analysis reveals that the induced E47 binding-activity has the same DNA-binding sequence specificity as the normal binding. This result suggests that one of the effects of NonO is to induce a true protein-DNA interaction. In this way, it might be possible for NonO to play a crucial role in gene regulation.

  7. Combinatorial bZIP dimers display complex DNA-binding specificity landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José A; Reinke, Aaron W; Bhimsaria, Devesh; Keating, Amy E; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2017-01-01

    How transcription factor dimerization impacts DNA-binding specificity is poorly understood. Guided by protein dimerization properties, we examined DNA binding specificities of 270 human bZIP pairs. DNA interactomes of 80 heterodimers and 22 homodimers revealed that 72% of heterodimer motifs correspond to conjoined half-sites preferred by partnering monomers. Remarkably, the remaining motifs are composed of variably-spaced half-sites (12%) or ‘emergent’ sites (16%) that cannot be readily inferred from half-site preferences of partnering monomers. These binding sites were biochemically validated by EMSA-FRET analysis and validated in vivo by ChIP-seq data from human cell lines. Focusing on ATF3, we observed distinct cognate site preferences conferred by different bZIP partners, and demonstrated that genome-wide binding of ATF3 is best explained by considering many dimers in which it participates. Importantly, our compendium of bZIP-DNA interactomes predicted bZIP binding to 156 disease associated SNPs, of which only 20 were previously annotated with known bZIP motifs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19272.001 PMID:28186491

  8. Eos and pegasus, two members of the Ikaros family of proteins with distinct DNA binding activities.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, J; Holmes, M; Chong, B; Crossley, M

    2000-12-08

    Members of the Ikaros family of transcription factors, Ikaros, Aiolos, and Helios, are expressed in lymphocytes and have been implicated in controlling lymphoid development. These proteins contain two characteristic clusters of zinc fingers, an N-terminal domain important for DNA recognition, and a C-terminal domain that mediates homo- and heterotypic associations between family members. The conservation of these domains is such that all three proteins recognize related DNA sequences, and all are capable of dimerizing with other family members. Here we describe two additional Ikaros family proteins, Eos and Pegasus. Eos is most highly related to Helios and shares its DNA binding and protein association properties. Pegasus is related to other Ikaros proteins in its C-terminal dimerization domain but contains a divergent N-terminal zinc finger domain. Pegasus self-associates and binds to other family members but recognizes distinct DNA-binding sites. Eos and Pegasus repress the expression of reporter genes containing their recognition elements. Our results suggest that these proteins may associate with previously described Ikaros family proteins in lymphoid cells and play additional roles in other tissues.

  9. p53 inhibits DNA replication in vitro in a DNA-binding-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S D; Farmer, G; Prives, C

    1995-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene product is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is necessary for the G1 arrest of many cell types. Consistent with its role as a cell cycle checkpoint factor, p53 has been shown to be capable of both transcriptional activation and repression. Here we show a new potential role for p53 as a DNA-binding-dependent regulator of DNA replication. Constructs containing multiple copies of the ribosomal gene cluster (RGC) p53 binding site cloned on the late side of the polyomavirus origin were used in in vitro replication assays. In the presence of p53, the replication of these constructs was strongly inhibited, while the replication of constructs containing a mutant version of the RGC site was not affected by p53. Several tumor-derived mutant p53 proteins were unable to inhibit replication of the construct with wild-type RGC sites. Additionally, the transactivator GAL4-VP16 was unable to inhibit replication of a construct containing GAL4 binding sites adjacent to the polyomavirus origin. We also show that the inhibition by p53 can occur from sites cloned as far as 600 bp from the origin. Preincubation experiments suggest that p53 inhibits replication at a step mediated by ATP, possibly by inhibiting the binding of polyomavirus T antigen to the core origin. The presence of an endogenous p53 binding site in the polyomavirus origin suggests potential mechanisms for the observed inhibition. PMID:8524220

  10. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valmor J.; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  11. Nucleotide Specificity of DNA Binding of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor:ARNT Complex Is Unaffected by Ligand Structure

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) and a wide variety of structurally diverse ligands through its ability to translocate into the nucleus and bind to a specific DNA recognition site (the dioxin-responsive element [DRE]) adjacent to responsive genes. Although the sequence of the DRE is well defined, several reports suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may vary depending on the structure of its bound ligand. Given the potential toxicological significance of this hypothesis, an unbiased DNA-selection-and-PCR-amplification approach was utilized to directly determine whether binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding. Guinea pig hepatic cytosolic AhR activated in vitro by equipotent concentrations of TCDD, 3-methylcholanthrene, β-naphthoflavone, indirubin, L-kynurenine, or YH439 was incubated with a pool of DNA oligonucleotides containing a 15-base pair variable region consisting of all possible nucleotides. The AhR-bound oligonucleotides isolated by immunoprecipitation were PCR amplified and used in subsequent rounds of selection. Sequence analysis of a total of 196 isolated oligonucleotides revealed that each ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complex only bound to DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides; no non-DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides were identified. These results demonstrate that the binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists do not appear to alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding and suggest that stimulation of gene expression mediated by direct DNA binding of ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complexes is DRE dependent. PMID:24136190

  12. Pharmacological targeting of the transcription factor SOX18 delays breast cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Jeroen; Fontaine, Frank; Moustaqil, Mehdi; Mittal, Deepak; Sierecki, Emma; Sacilotto, Natalia; Zuegg, Johannes; Robertson, Avril AB; Holmes, Kelly; Salim, Angela A; Mamidyala, Sreeman; Butler, Mark S; Robinson, Ashley S; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Johnston, Wayne; Alexandrov, Kirill; Black, Brian L; Hogan, Benjamin M; De Val, Sarah; Capon, Robert J; Carroll, Jason S; Bailey, Timothy L; Koopman, Peter; Jauch, Ralf; Smyth, Mark J; Cooper, Matthew A; Gambin, Yann; Francois, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacological targeting of transcription factors holds great promise for the development of new therapeutics, but strategies based on blockade of DNA binding, nuclear shuttling, or individual protein partner recruitment have yielded limited success to date. Transcription factors typically engage in complex interaction networks, likely masking the effects of specifically inhibiting single protein-protein interactions. Here, we used a combination of genomic, proteomic and biophysical methods to discover a suite of protein-protein interactions involving the SOX18 transcription factor, a known regulator of vascular development and disease. We describe a small-molecule that is able to disrupt a discrete subset of SOX18-dependent interactions. This compound selectively suppressed SOX18 transcriptional outputs in vitro and interfered with vascular development in zebrafish larvae. In a mouse pre-clinical model of breast cancer, treatment with this inhibitor significantly improved survival by reducing tumour vascular density and metastatic spread. Our studies validate an interactome-based molecular strategy to interfere with transcription factor activity, for the development of novel disease therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21221.001 PMID:28137359

  13. Imperatorin inhibits T-cell proliferation by targeting the transcription factor NFAT.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Ballero, Mauro; Bremner, Paul; Appendino, Giovanni; Fiebich, Bernd L; Heinrich, Michael; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-11-01

    In our ongoing research into anti-inflammatory compounds from medicinal plants in the Mediterranean area, we have isolated several furanocoumarins from the roots of Oppopanax chironium (L.), and have evaluated them for activity related to T-cell functionality. Heraclenin (1) and imperatorin (2) significantly inhibited T cell receptor-mediated proliferation in human primary T cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In transient transfection experiments with a plasmid containing the IL-2 promoter we found that imperatorin is a potent inhibitor of IL-2 gene transcription. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of imperatorin at the transcriptional level, we examined the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of NF-kappaB, NFAT, and AP-1 transcription factors in Jurkat T cells. We found that imperatorin inhibited both the NFAT binding to DNA and transcriptional activities, without affecting significantly the activation of the NF-kappaB and AP-1 transcription factors. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of natural furanocoumarins.

  14. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-01-01

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing. PMID:26404236

  15. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulation by NFAT transcription factors: new roles for an old player

    PubMed Central

    Mognol, G P; Carneiro, F R G; Robbs, B K; Faget, D V; Viola, J P B

    2016-01-01

    The NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) family of transcription factors consists of four Ca2+-regulated members (NFAT1–NFAT4), which were first described in T lymphocytes. In addition to their well-documented role in T lymphocytes, where they control gene expression during cell activation and differentiation, NFAT proteins are also expressed in a wide range of cells and tissue types and regulate genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. The NFAT proteins share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD), which allows all NFAT members to bind to the same DNA sequence in enhancers or promoter regions. The same DNA-binding specificity suggests redundant roles for the NFAT proteins, which is true during the regulation of some genes such as IL-2 and p21. However, it has become increasingly clear that different NFAT proteins and even isoforms can have unique functions. In this review, we address the possible reasons for these distinct roles, particularly regarding N- and C-terminal transactivation regions (TADs) and the partner proteins that interact with these TADs. We also discuss the genes regulated by NFAT during cell cycle regulation and apoptosis and the role of NFAT during tumorigenesis. PMID:27100893

  16. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulation by NFAT transcription factors: new roles for an old player.

    PubMed

    Mognol, G P; Carneiro, F R G; Robbs, B K; Faget, D V; Viola, J P B

    2016-04-21

    The NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) family of transcription factors consists of four Ca(2+)-regulated members (NFAT1-NFAT4), which were first described in T lymphocytes. In addition to their well-documented role in T lymphocytes, where they control gene expression during cell activation and differentiation, NFAT proteins are also expressed in a wide range of cells and tissue types and regulate genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. The NFAT proteins share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD), which allows all NFAT members to bind to the same DNA sequence in enhancers or promoter regions. The same DNA-binding specificity suggests redundant roles for the NFAT proteins, which is true during the regulation of some genes such as IL-2 and p21. However, it has become increasingly clear that different NFAT proteins and even isoforms can have unique functions. In this review, we address the possible reasons for these distinct roles, particularly regarding N- and C-terminal transactivation regions (TADs) and the partner proteins that interact with these TADs. We also discuss the genes regulated by NFAT during cell cycle regulation and apoptosis and the role of NFAT during tumorigenesis.

  17. Biochemistry of the tale transcription factors PREP, MEIS, and PBX in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, E; Penkov, D; Mateos, D; De Florian, G; Torres, M; Blasi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    TALE (three amino acids loop extension) homeodomain transcription factors are required in various steps of embryo development, in many adult physiological functions, and are involved in important pathologies. This review focuses on the PREP, MEIS, and PBX sub-families of TALE factors and aims at giving information on their biochemical properties, i.e., structure, interactors, and interaction surfaces. Members of the three sets of protein form dimers in which the common partner is PBX but they can also directly interact with other proteins forming higher-order complexes, in particular HOX. Finally, recent advances in determining the genome-wide DNA-binding sites of PREP1, MEIS1, and PBX1, and their partial correspondence with the binding sites of some HOX proteins, are reviewed. These studies have generated a few general rules that can be applied to all members of the three gene families. PREP and MEIS recognize slightly different consensus sequences: PREP prefers to bind to promoters and to have PBX as a DNA-binding partner; MEIS prefers HOX as partner, and both PREP and MEIS drive PBX to their own binding sites. This outlines the clear individuality of the PREP and MEIS proteins, the former mostly devoted to basic cellular functions, the latter more to developmental functions.

  18. Foxp transcription factors suppress a non-pulmonary gene expression program to permit proper lung development.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanru; Morley, Michael; Lu, MinMin; Zhou, Su; Stewart, Kathleen; French, Catherine A; Tucker, Haley O; Fisher, Simon E; Morrisey, Edward E

    2016-08-15

    The inhibitory mechanisms that prevent gene expression programs from one tissue to be expressed in another are poorly understood. Foxp1/2/4 are forkhead transcription factors that repress gene expression and are individually important for endoderm development. We show that combined loss of all three Foxp1/2/4 family members in the developing anterior foregut endoderm leads to a loss of lung endoderm lineage commitment and subsequent development. Foxp1/2/4 deficient lungs express high levels of transcriptional regulators not normally expressed in the developing lung, including Pax2, Pax8, Pax9 and the Hoxa9-13 cluster. Ectopic expression of these transcriptional regulators is accompanied by decreased expression of lung restricted transcription factors including Nkx2-1, Sox2, and Sox9. Foxp1 binds to conserved forkhead DNA binding sites within the Hoxa9-13 cluster, indicating a direct repression mechanism. Thus, Foxp1/2/4 are essential for promoting lung endoderm development by repressing expression of non-pulmonary transcription factors.

  19. Transcription factor choice in the Hippo signaling pathway: homothorax and yorkie regulation of the microRNA bantam in the progenitor domain of the Drosophila eye imaginal disc

    PubMed Central

    Peng, H. Wayne; Slattery, Matthew; Mann, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    The accurate control of cell proliferation and survival is critical for animal development. The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway regulates both of these parameters by controlling the nuclear availability of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki), which regulates downstream target genes together with Scalloped (Sd), a DNA-binding protein. Here we provide evidence that Yki can also regulate target genes in conjunction with Homothorax (Hth) and Teashirt (Tsh), two DNA-binding transcription factors expressed in the uncommitted progenitor cells of the Drosophila eye imaginal disc. Clonal analyses demonstrate that Hth and Tsh promote cell proliferation and protect eye progenitor cells from apoptosis. Genetic epistasis experiments suggest that Hth and Tsh execute these functions with Yki, in part by up-regulating the microRNA bantam. A physical interaction between Hth and Yki can be detected in cell culture, and we show that Hth and Yki are bound to a DNA sequence ∼14 kb upstream of the bantam hairpin in eye imaginal disc cells, arguing that this regulation is direct. These data suggest that the Hippo pathway uses different DNA-binding transcription factors depending on the cellular context. In the eye disc, Hth and Tsh provide spatial information to this pathway, promoting cell proliferation and survival in the progenitor domain. PMID:19762509

  20. JcDof1, a Dof transcription factor gene, is associated with the light-mediated circadian clock in Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Yang, Ming-Feng; Wang, Dan; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shi-Hua

    2010-07-01

    Jatropha curcas is an economically important plant in terms of its seed oil. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this plant response to light signals are unknown. One group of DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) transcription factor genes exhibits circadian rhythms and plays a crucial role in the control of flowering time by photoperiod perception in plants. In the present study, a full-length cDNA designated JcDof1, containing a conserved Dof-DNA-binding domain, was isolated from J. curcas seedlings by yeast one hybrid library. Subcellular localization assays and yeast one hybrid systems confirmed that JcDof1 was localized to the onion epidermal cell nucleus, and exhibited DNA-binding and transcriptional activation activities in yeast. The JcDof1 expression was characterized by a circadian-clock oscillation under long day, short day and continuous light conditions, whereas in the etiolated cotyledons under continuous dark conditions, JcDof1 expression remained at relatively basal levels. Red and blue light downregulated the JcDof1 expression, but this effect was not observed under far-red light. Taken together, these results suggested that JcDof1 was a circadian clock-Dof transcription factor gene responding to light signals.

  1. Oncogenic Cooperation Between PI3K/Akt Signaling and Transcription Factor Runx2 Promotes the Invasive Properties of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Sandhya; Browne, Gillian; Padmanabhan, Srivatsan; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt/PKB promotes cancer cell growth and invasion through several downstream targets. Identification of novel substrates may provide new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Our study shows that Akt phosphorylates the cancer related transcription factor Runx2 resulting in stimulated DNA binding of the purified recombinant protein in vitro. Pharmacological inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway in breast cancer cells reduces DNA binding activity of Runx2 with concomitant reduction in the expression of metastasis related Runx2 target genes. Akt phosphorylates Runx2 at three critical residues within the runt DNA binding domain to enhance its in vivo genomic interactions with a target gene promoter, MMP13. Mutation of these three phosphorylation sites reduces Runx2 DNA binding activity, but does not interefere with CBFβ-Runx2 interactions. Consequently, expression of multiple metastasis-related genes is decreased and Runx2 mediated cell invasion is supressed. Thus, our work identifies Runx2 as a novel and important downstream mediator of the PI3K/Akt pathway that is linked to metastatic properties of breast cancer cells. PMID:23389849

  2. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat.

  3. Solution structure of an archaeal DNA binding protein with an eukaryotic zinc finger fold.

    PubMed

    Guillière, Florence; Danioux, Chloé; Jaubert, Carole; Desnoues, Nicole; Delepierre, Muriel; Prangishvili, David; Sezonov, Guennadi; Guijarro, J Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    While the basal transcription machinery in archaea is eukaryal-like, transcription factors in archaea and their viruses are usually related to bacterial transcription factors. Nevertheless, some of these organisms show predicted classical zinc fingers motifs of the C2H2 type, which are almost exclusively found in proteins of eukaryotes and most often associated with transcription regulators. In this work, we focused on the protein AFV1p06 from the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus AFV1. The sequence of the protein consists of the classical eukaryotic C2H2 motif with the fourth histidine coordinating zinc missing, as well as of N- and C-terminal extensions. We showed that the protein AFV1p06 binds zinc and solved its solution structure by NMR. AFV1p06 displays a zinc finger fold with a novel structure extension and disordered N- and C-termini. Structure calculations show that a glutamic acid residue that coordinates zinc replaces the fourth histidine of the C2H2 motif. Electromobility gel shift assays indicate that the protein binds to DNA with different affinities depending on the DNA sequence. AFV1p06 is the first experimentally characterised archaeal zinc finger protein with a DNA binding activity. The AFV1p06 protein family has homologues in diverse viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea. A phylogenetic analysis points out a common origin of archaeal and eukaryotic C2H2 zinc fingers.

  4. Repression of the heat shock factor 1 transcriptional activation domain is modulated by constitutive phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, M P; Morimoto, R I

    1997-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) is constitutively expressed in mammalian cells and negatively regulated for DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Upon exposure to heat shock and other forms of chemical and physiological stress, these activities of HSF1 are rapidly induced. In this report, we demonstrate that constitutive phosphorylation of HSF1 at serine residues distal to the transcriptional activation domain functions to repress transactivation. Tryptic phosphopeptide analysis of a collection of chimeric GAL4-HSF1 deletion and point mutants identified a region of constitutive phosphorylation encompassing serine residues 303 and 307. The significance of phosphorylation at serines 303 and 307 in the regulation of HSF1 transcriptional activity was demonstrated by transient transfection and assay of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct. Whereas the transfected wild-type GAL4-HSF1 chimera is repressed for transcriptional activity and derepressed by heat shock, mutation of serines 303 and 307 to alanine results in derepression to a high level of constitutive activity. Similar results were obtained with mutation of these serine residues in the context of full-length HSF1. These data reveal that constitutive phosphorylation of serines 303 and 307 has an important role in the negative regulation of HSF1 transcriptional activity at control temperatures. PMID:9121459

  5. Heat shock factor-4 (HSF-4a) is a repressor of HSF-1 mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Frejtag, W; Dai, R; Mivechi, N F

    2001-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) regulate the expression of heat shock proteins and other molecular chaperones that are involved in cellular processes from higher order assembly to protein degradation and apoptosis. Among the human HSFs, HSF-4 is expressed as at least two splice variants. One isoform (HSF-4b) possesses a transcriptional activation domain, but this region is absent in the other isoform (HSF-4a). We have recently shown that the HSF-4a isoform represses basal transcription from heterologous promoters both in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that HSF-4a and HSF-4b have dramatically different effects on HSF-1-containing nuclear bodies, which form after heat shock. While the expression of HSF-4b colocalizes with nuclear granules, the expression of HSF-4a prevents their formation. In addition, there is a concurrent reduction of HSF-1 in the nucleus, and there is reduction in its DNA binding activity and in HSE-dependent transcription of a reporter gene. To better understand the mechanism by which HSF-4a represses transcription, we inducibly expressed HSF-4a in cells and found that HSF-4a binds to the heat shock element (HSE) during attenuation of the heat shock response. Thus HSF-4a is an active repressor of HSF-1-mediated transcription. This repressor function makes the HSF-4a isoform unique within the HSF family.

  6. Neighboring genes for DNA-binding proteins rescue male sterility in Drosophila hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Liénard, Marjorie A.; Araripe, Luciana O.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Crosses between closely related animal species often result in male hybrids that are sterile, and the molecular and functional basis of genetic factors for hybrid male sterility is of great interest. Here, we report a molecular and functional analysis of HMS1, a region of 9.2 kb in chromosome 3 of Drosophila mauritiana, which results in virtually complete hybrid male sterility when homozygous in the genetic background of sibling species Drosophila simulans. The HMS1 region contains two strong candidate genes for the genetic incompatibility, agt and Taf1. Both encode unrelated DNA-binding proteins, agt for an alkyl-cysteine-S-alkyltransferase and Taf1 for a subunit of transcription factor TFIID that serves as a multifunctional transcriptional regulator. The contribution of each gene to hybrid male sterility was assessed by means of germ-line transformation, with constructs containing complete agt and Taf1 genomic sequences as well as various chimeric constructs. Both agt and Taf1 contribute about equally to HMS1 hybrid male sterility. Transgenes containing either locus rescue sterility in about one-half of the males, and among fertile males the number of offspring is in the normal range. This finding suggests compensatory proliferation of the rescued, nondysfunctional germ cells. Results with chimeric transgenes imply that the hybrid incompatibilities result from interactions among nucleotide differences residing along both agt and Taf1. Our results challenge a number of preliminary generalizations about the molecular and functional basis of hybrid male sterility, and strongly reinforce the role of DNA-binding proteins as a class of genes contributing to the maintenance of postzygotic reproductive isolation. PMID:27357670

  7. Creating cellular diversity through transcription factor competition

    PubMed Central

    Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    The development of blood cells has long served as a model system to study the generation of diverse mature cells from multipotent progenitors. The article by Org et al (2015) reveals how transcription factor competition on primed DNA templates may contribute to embryonic blood cell specification during the early stages of mesoderm development. The study not only provides new insights into the functionality of the key haematopoietic transcription factor Scl/Tal1, but also provides a potentially widely applicable framework for transcription factor-mediated cell fate specification. PMID:25680687

  8. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  9. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade.

  10. A highly organized structure mediating nuclear localization of a Myb2 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Hong-Ming; Wei, Shu-Yi; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Lee, Yu; Kuo, Chung-Chi; Indra, Dharmu; Chen, Chinpan; Ong, Shiou-Jeng; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear proteins usually contain specific peptide sequences, referred to as nuclear localization signals (NLSs), for nuclear import. These signals remain unexplored in the protozoan pathogen, Trichomonas vaginalis. The nuclear import of a Myb2 transcription factor was studied here using immunodetection of a hemagglutinin-tagged Myb2 overexpressed in the parasite. The tagged Myb2 was localized to the nucleus as punctate signals. With mutations of its polybasic sequences, 48KKQK51 and 61KR62, Myb2 was localized to the nucleus, but the signal was diffusive. When fused to a C-terminal non-nuclear protein, the Myb2 sequence spanning amino acid (aa) residues 48 to 143, which is embedded within the R2R3 DNA-binding domain (aa 40 to 156), was essential and sufficient for efficient nuclear import of a bacterial tetracycline repressor (TetR), and yet the transport efficiency was reduced with an additional fusion of a firefly luciferase to TetR, while classical NLSs from the simian virus 40 T-antigen had no function in this assay system. Myb2 nuclear import and DNA-binding activity were substantially perturbed with mutation of a conserved isoleucine (I74) in helix 2 to proline that altered secondary structure and ternary folding of the R2R3 domain. Disruption of DNA-binding activity alone by point mutation of a lysine residue, K51, preceding the structural domain had little effect on Myb2 nuclear localization, suggesting that nuclear translocation of Myb2, which requires an ordered structural domain, is independent of its DNA binding activity. These findings provide useful information for testing whether myriad Mybs in the parasite use a common module to regulate nuclear import.

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus Rta tetramers make high-affinity interactions with repetitive DNA elements in the Mta promoter to stimulate DNA binding of RBP-Jk/CSL.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Diana; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Gonzalez-Lopez, Olga; Lukac, David M

    2011-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8 [HHV-8]) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and lymphoproliferative diseases. We previously demonstrated that the KSHV lytic switch protein Rta stimulates DNA binding of the cellular RBP-Jk/CSL protein, the nuclear component of the Notch pathway, on Rta target promoters. In the current study, we define the promoter requirements for formation of transcriptionally productive Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. We show that highly pure Rta footprints 7 copies of a previously undescribed repetitive element in the promoter of the essential KSHV Mta gene. We have termed this element the "CANT repeat." CANT repeats are found on both strands of DNA and have a consensus sequence of ANTGTAACANT(A/T)(A/T)T. We demonstrate that Rta tetramers make high-affinity interactions (i.e., nM) with 64 bp of the Mta promoter but not single CANT units. The number of CANT repeats, their presence in palindromes, and their positions relative to the RBP-Jk binding site determine the optimal target for Rta stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding and formation of ternary Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. DNA binding and tetramerization mutants of Rta fail to stimulate RBP-Jk DNA binding. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that RBP-Jk DNA binding is broadly, but selectively, stimulated across the entire KSHV genome during reactivation. We propose a model in which tetramerization of Rta allows it to straddle RBP-Jk and contact repeat units on both sides of RBP-Jk. Our study integrates high-affinity Rta DNA binding with the requirement for a cellular transcription factor in Rta transactivation.

  12. A Plant Immune Receptor Detects Pathogen Effectors that Target WRKY Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Panagiotis F; Duxbury, Zane; Huh, Sung Un; Ma, Yan; Segonzac, Cécile; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Cevik, Volkan; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Saucet, Simon B; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Menke, Frank L H; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2015-05-21

    Defense against pathogens in multicellular eukaryotes depends on intracellular immune receptors, yet surveillance by these receptors is poorly understood. Several plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immune receptors carry fusions with other protein domains. The Arabidopsis RRS1-R NB-LRR protein carries a C-terminal WRKY DNA binding domain and forms a receptor complex with RPS4, another NB-LRR protein. This complex detects the bacterial effectors AvrRps4 or PopP2 and then activates defense. Both bacterial proteins interact with the RRS1 WRKY domain, and PopP2 acetylates lysines to block DNA binding. PopP2 and AvrRps4 interact with other WRKY domain-containing proteins, suggesting these effectors interfere with WRKY transcription factor-dependent defense, and RPS4/RRS1 has integrated a "decoy" domain that enables detection of effectors that target WRKY proteins. We propose that NB-LRR receptor pairs, one member of which carries an additional protein domain, enable perception of pathogen effectors whose function is to target that domain.

  13. Using sequence-specific chemical and structural properties of DNA to predict transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Amy L; Hlavacek, William S; Unkefer, Pat J; Mu, Fangping

    2010-11-18

    An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the DNA binding sites recognized by each transcription factor (TF). Conventional approaches to prediction of TF binding sites involve the definition of consensus sequences or position-specific weight matrices and rely on statistical analysis of DNA sequences of known binding sites. Here, we present a method called SiteSleuth in which DNA structure prediction, computational chemistry, and machine learning are applied to develop models for TF binding sites. In this approach, binary classifiers are trained to discriminate between true and false binding sites based on the sequence-specific chemical and structural features of DNA. These features are determined via molecular dynamics calculations in which we consider each base in different local neighborhoods. For each of 54 TFs in Escherichia coli, for which at least five DNA binding sites are documented in RegulonDB, the TF binding sites and portions of the non-coding genome sequence are mapped to feature vectors and used in training. According to cross-validation analysis and a comparison of computational predictions against ChIP-chip data available for the TF Fis, SiteSleuth outperforms three conventional approaches: Match, MATRIX SEARCH, and the method of Berg and von Hippel. SiteSleuth also outperforms QPMEME, a method similar to SiteSleuth in that it involves a learning algorithm. The main advantage of SiteSleuth is a lower false positive rate.

  14. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles.

    PubMed

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T; Arenillas, David; Zhao, Xiaobei; Valen, Eivind; Yusuf, Dimas; Lenhard, Boris; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Sandelin, Albin

    2010-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database to date: the database now holds 457 non-redundant, curated profiles. The new entries include the first batch of profiles derived from ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip whole-genome binding experiments, and 177 yeast TF binding profiles. The introduction of a yeast division brings the convenience of JASPAR to an active research community. As binding models are refined by newer data, the JASPAR database now uses versioning of matrices: in this release, 12% of the older models were updated to improved versions. Classification of TF families has been improved by adopting a new DNA-binding domain nomenclature. A curated catalog of mammalian TFs is provided, extending the use of the JASPAR profiles to additional TFs belonging to the same structural family. The changes in the database set the system ready for more rapid acquisition of new high-throughput data sources. Additionally, three new special collections provide matrix profile data produced by recent alternative high-throughput approaches.

  15. Structure of a bacterial quorum-sensing transcription factor complexed with pheromone and DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Pappas, T.; Brace, J.; Miller, P.; Oulmassov, T.; Molyneaux, J.; Anderson, J.; Bashkin, J.; Winans, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Cornell Univ.; Monsanto Co.

    2002-06-27

    Many proteobacteria are able to monitor their population densities through the release of pheromones known as N-acylhomoserine lactones. At high population densities, these pheromones elicit diverse responses that include bioluminescence, biofilm formation, production of antimicrobials, DNA exchange, pathogenesis and symbiosis1. Many of these regulatory systems require a pheromone-dependent transcription factor similar to the LuxR protein of Vibrio fischeri. Here we present the structure of a LuxR-type protein. TraR of Agrobacterium tumefaciens was solved at 1.66 A as a complex with the pheromone N-3-oxooctanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OOHL) and its TraR DNA-binding site. The amino-terminal domain of TraR is an {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich that binds OOHL, whereas the carboxy-terminal domain contains a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. The TraR dimer displays a two-fold symmetry axis in each domain; however, these two axes of symmetry are at an approximately 90 degree angle, resulting in a pronounced overall asymmetry of the complex. The pheromone lies fully embedded within the protein with virtually no solvent contact, and makes numerous hydrophobic contacts with the protein as well as four hydrogen bonds: three direct and one water-mediated.

  16. p53 inhibits DNA replication in vitro in a DNA-binding-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.D.; Farmer, G.; Prives, C.

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses new findings that the tumor supressor gene product p53 may play a role as a DNA-binding-dependent regulator of DNA replication. The results were obtained using polyomavirus in replication assays. Details regarding effects on cell growth arrest and transcriptional activation are discussed. 61 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Transcription factors expressed in olfactory bulb local progenitor cells revealed by genome-wide transcriptome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Gordon R. O.; Baudhuin, Ariane; Vranizan, Karen; Ngai, John

    2011-01-01

    The local progenitor population in the olfactory bulb (OB) gives rise to mitral and tufted projection neurons during embryonic development. In contrast, OB interneurons are derived from sources outside the bulb where neurogenesis continues throughout life. While many of the genes involved in OB interneuron development have been characterized, the genetic pathways driving local progenitor cell differentiation in this tissue are largely unknown. To better understand this process, we used transcriptional profiling to monitor gene expression of whole OB at daily intervals from embryonic day 11 through birth, generating a compendium of gene expression encompassing the major developmental events of this tissue. Through hierarchical clustering, bioinformatics analysis, and validation by RNA in situ hybridizations, we identified a large number of transcription factors, DNA binding proteins, and cell cycle-related genes expressed by the local neural progenitor cells (NPCs) of the embryonic OB. Further in silico analysis of transcription factor binding sites identified an enrichment of genes regulated by the E2F-Rb pathway among those expressed in the local NPC population. Together these results provide initial insights into the molecular identity of the OB local NPC population and the transcription factor networks that may regulate their function. PMID:21194568

  18. Human GATA-3 trans-activation, DNA-binding, and nuclear localization activities are organized into distinct structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Gu, L; Romeo, P H; Bories, D; Motohashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Engel, J D

    1994-01-01

    GATA-3 is a zinc finger transcription factor which is expressed in a highly restricted and strongly conserved tissue distribution pattern in vertebrate organisms, specifically, in a subset of hematopoietic cells, in cells within the central and peripheral nervous systems, in the kidney, and in placental trophoblasts. Tissue-specific cellular genes regulated by GATA-3 have been identified in T lymphocytes and the placenta, while GATA-3-regulated genes in the nervous system and kidney have not yet been defined. We prepared monoclonal antibodies with which we could dissect the biochemical and functional properties of human GATA-3. The results of these experiments show some anticipated phenotypes, for example, the definition of discrete domains required for specific DNA-binding site recognition (amino acids 303 to 348) and trans activation (amino acids 30 to 74). The signaling sequence for nuclear localization of human GATA-3 is a property conferred by sequences within and surrounding the amino finger (amino acids 249 to 311) of the protein, thereby assigning a function to this domain and thus explaining the curious observation that this zinc finger is dispensable for DNA binding by the GATA family of transcription factors. Images PMID:8114750

  19. Sleep Loss Reduces the DNA-Binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to Specific Clock Genes in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), −6, −12, and −18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and −6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven. PMID:22039518

  20. Sleep loss reduces the DNA-binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to specific clock genes in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mongrain, Valérie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), -6, -12, and -18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and -6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven.

  1. In vitro DNA binding studies of Aspartame, an artificial sweetener.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2013-03-05

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. In this work the interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with Aspartame (APM), an artificial sweeteners was studied at physiological pH. DNA binding study of APM is useful to understand APM-DNA interaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and safer artificial sweeteners. The interaction was investigated using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD). Hypochromism and red shift are shown in UV absorption band of APM. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to APM was observed and the binding constants (Kf) of DNA with APM and corresponding number of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy changes (ΔH) and entropy changes (ΔS) were calculated to be +181kJmol(-1) and +681Jmol(-1)K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Moreover, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD) results are indicative of non-intercalative DNA binding nature of APM. We suggest that APM interacts with calf thymus DNA via groove binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 5×10(+4)M(-1).

  2. Characterization of the Antirrhinum floral homeotic MADS-box gene deficiens: evidence for DNA binding and autoregulation of its persistent expression throughout flower development.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz-Sommer, Z; Hue, I; Huijser, P; Flor, P J; Hansen, R; Tetens, F; Lönnig, W E; Saedler, H; Sommer, H

    1992-01-01

    We have determined the structure of the floral homeotic deficiens (defA) gene whose mutants display sepaloid petals and carpelloid stamens, and have analysed its spatial and temporal expression pattern. In addition, several mutant alleles (morphoalleles) were studied. The results of these analyses define three functional domains of the DEF A protein and identify in the deficiens promoter a possible cis-acting binding site for a transcription factor which specifically upregulates expression of deficiens in petals and stamens. In vitro DNA binding studies show that DEF A binds to specific DNA motifs as a heterodimer, together with the protein product of the floral homeotic globosa gene, thus demonstrating that the protein encoded by deficiens is a DNA binding protein. Furthermore, Northern analysis of a temperature sensitive allele at permissive and non-permissive temperatures provides evidence for autoregulation of the persistent expression of deficiens throughout flower development. A possible mechanism of autoregulation is discussed. Images PMID:1346760

  3. Learning, memory, and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Michael V; Alemi, Lily; Harum, Karen H

    2003-03-01

    Cognitive disorders in children have traditionally been described in terms of clinical phenotypes or syndromes, chromosomal lesions, metabolic disorders, or neuropathology. Relatively little is known about how these disorders affect the chemical reactions involved in learning and memory. Experiments in fruit flies, snails, and mice have revealed some highly conserved pathways that are involved in learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity, which is the primary substrate for memory storage. These can be divided into short-term memory storage through local changes in synapses, and long-term storage mediated by activation of transcription to translate new proteins that modify synaptic function. This review summarizes evidence that disruptions in these pathways are involved in human cognitive disorders, including neurofibromatosis type I, Coffin-Lowry syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis-2, Down syndrome, X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, cretinism, Huntington disease, and lead poisoning.

  4. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain protein Lmo2, and Ldb1 and binds a bipartite E-box-GATA DNA sequence motif. In addition, SSBP2 was found to augment transcription of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of the E-box-GATA-binding complex, in an Ldb1-dependent manner and to increase endogenous Ldb1 and Lmo2 protein levels, E-box-GATA DNA-binding activity, and P4.2 and β-globin expression in erythroid progenitors. Finally, SSBP2 was demonstrated to inhibit Ldb1 and Lmo2 interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM, prevent RLIM-mediated Ldb1 ubiquitination, and protect Ldb1 and Lmo2 from proteasomal degradation. These results define a novel biochemical function for SSBPs in regulating the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins. PMID:17437998

  5. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jutta C.; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L.; Quail, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5′-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  6. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosen, Barry P; Tamás, Markus J

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  7. The Complex Role of the ZNF224 Transcription Factor in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, E; Sodaro, G; Montano, G; Grosso, M; Lupo, A; Costanzo, P

    2017-01-01

    ZNF224 is a member of the Kruppel-associated box zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) family. It was originally identified as a transcriptional repressor involved in gene-specific silencing through the recruitment of the corepressor KAP1, chromatin-modifying activities, and the arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 on the promoter of its target genes. Recent findings indicate that ZNF224 can behave both as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene in different human cancers. The transcriptional regulatory properties of ZNF224 in these systems appear to be complex and influenced by specific sets of interactors. ZNF224 can also act as a transcription cofactor for other DNA-binding proteins. A role for ZNF224 in transcriptional activation has also emerged. Here, we review the state of the literature supporting both roles of ZNF224 in cancer. We also examine the functional activity of ZNF224 as a transcription factor and the influence of protein partners on its dual behavior. Increasing information on the mechanism through which ZNF224 can operate could lead to the identification of agents capable of modulating ZNF224 function, thus potentially paving the way to new therapeutic strategies for treatment of cancer.

  8. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  9. Myocyte enhancer factor (MEF) 2C: a tissue-restricted member of the MEF-2 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J F; Schwarz, J J; Olson, E N

    1993-01-01

    MEF-2 is a muscle-specific DNA binding activity that recognizes an A+T-rich sequence found in the control regions of numerous muscle-specific genes. The recent cloning of MEF-2 showed that it belongs to the MADS (MCM1, Agamous, Deficiens, and serum-response factor) box family of transcription factors and that MEF-2 mRNA is expressed ubiquitously. Here we describe the cloning of a member of the MEF-2 gene family, referred to as MEF-2C, that is nearly identical to other MEF-2 gene products in the MADS box but diverges from other members of the family outside of this domain. MEF-2C binds the MEF-2 site with high affinity and can activate transcription of a reporter gene linked to tandem copies of that site. In contrast to previously described members of the MEF-2 family, MEF-2C transcripts are highly enriched in skeletal muscle, spleen, and brain of adult mice and are upregulated during myoblast differentiation. These results suggest that the MEF-2 site is a target for a diverse family of proteins that regulates transcription in a variety of cell types. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8506376

  10. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  11. Novel plant-GARP-like transcription factors in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chin-Hung; Su, Li-Hsin; Gillin, Frances D

    2006-03-01

    GARP homologues constitute a large family of DNA-binding proteins in plants that may be needed for a variety of key cellular functions including regulation of transcription, phosphotransfer signaling, and differentiation. However, no member of this gene family has been reported to date in yeast, animals, or protozoan parasites. We have identified four genes with putative GARP domains in the Giardia lamblia genome (GARP-like protein or GLP). The glp1 mRNA levels increased slightly during encystation. Epitope-tagged GLP1 localized to both nuclei and the proportion of stained Giardia cells increased by 10-fold during encystation. Recombinant GLP1 specifically bound to both the regulated cwp1 and constitutive ran gene promoters in their double-stranded configurations. The C-terminal region of GLP1 containing the GARP-like domain encoded the DNA binding activity. Mutation analysis revealed that an (A/G)ATCN sequence was required for binding of GLP1 to these promoters. We also found that GLP2 recognized similar binding sites. Using mutated plasmids and transfection assays, we demonstrated that the GLP1/2 binding sites are positive cis-acting elements of the cwp1 and ran gene promoters in both trophozoites and encysting cells. GLP1 is the first GARP family gene found in protozoan parasites. Our results suggest that GLP1 may be an important transcriptional activator and that its binding sites are positive promoter elements for certain Giardia genes.

  12. Artificial zinc finger DNA binding domains: versatile tools for genome engineering and modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mir A; Barrow, Joeva J; Shen, Yong; Haq, Md Imdadul; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Genome editing and alteration of gene expression by synthetic DNA binding activities gained a lot of momentum over the last decade. This is due to the development of new DNA binding molecules with enhanced binding specificity. The most commonly used DNA binding modules are zinc fingers (ZFs), TALE-domains, and the RNA component of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These binding modules are fused or linked to either nucleases that cut the DNA and induce DNA repair processes, or to protein domains that activate or repress transcription of genes close to the targeted site in the genome. This review focuses on the structure, design, and applications of ZF DNA binding domains (ZFDBDs). ZFDBDs are relatively small and have been shown to penetrate the cell membrane without additional tags suggesting that they could be delivered to cells without a DNA or RNA intermediate. Advanced algorithms that are based on extensive knowledge of the mode of ZF/DNA interactions are used to design the amino acid composition of ZFDBDs so that they bind to unique sites in the genome. Off-target binding has been a concern for all synthetic DNA binding molecules. Thus, increasing the specificity and affinity of ZFDBDs will have a significant impact on their use in analytical or therapeutic settings.

  13. Mitotic retention of gene expression patterns by the cell fate-determining transcription factor Runx2

    PubMed Central

    Young, Daniel W.; Hassan, Mohammad Q.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Galindo, Mario; Javed, Amjad; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Furcinitti, Paul; Lapointe, David; Montecino, Martin; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    During cell division, cessation of transcription is coupled with mitotic chromosome condensation. A fundamental biological question is how gene expression patterns are retained during mitosis to ensure the phenotype of progeny cells. We suggest that cell fate-determining transcription factors provide an epigenetic mechanism for the retention of gene expression patterns during cell division. Runx proteins are lineage-specific transcription factors that are essential for hematopoietic, neuronal, gastrointestinal, and osteogenic cell fates. Here we show that Runx2 protein is stable during cell division and remains associated with chromosomes during mitosis through sequence-specific DNA binding. Using siRNA-mediated silencing, mitotic cell synchronization, and expression profiling, we identify Runx2-regulated genes that are modulated postmitotically. Novel target genes involved in cell growth and differentiation were validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Importantly, we find that during mitosis, when transcription is shut down, Runx2 selectively occupies target gene promoters, and Runx2 deficiency alters mitotic histone modifications. We conclude that Runx proteins have an active role in retaining phenotype during cell division to support lineage-specific control of gene expression in progeny cells. PMID:17360627

  14. The DOF transcription factor OBP1 is involved in cell cycle regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Skirycz, Aleksandra; Radziejwoski, Amandine; Busch, Wolfgang; Hannah, Matthew A; Czeszejko, Joanna; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Zanor, Maria-Inès; Lohmann, Jan U; De Veylder, Lieven; Witt, Isabell; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2008-12-01

    In contrast to animal growth, plant growth is largely post-embryonic. Therefore plants have developed new mechanisms to precisely regulate cell proliferation by means of internal and external stimuli whilst the general core cell cycle machinery is conserved between eukaryotes. In this work we demonstrate a role for the Arabidopsis thaliana DNA-binding-with-one-finger (DOF) transcription factor OBP1 in the control of cell division upon developmental signalling. Inducible overexpression of OBP1 resulted in a significant overrepresentation of cell cycle genes among the upregulated transcripts. Direct targets of OBP1, as verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation, include at least the core cell cycle gene CYCD3;3 and the replication-specific transcription factor gene AtDOF2;3. Consistent with our molecular data, short-term activation of OBP1 in cell cultures affected cell cycle re-entry, shortening the duration of the G(1) phase and the overall length of the cell cycle, whilst constitutive overexpression of OBP1 in plants influenced cell size and cell number, leading to a dwarfish phenotype. Expression during embryogenesis, germination and lateral root initiation suggests an important role for OBP1 in cell cycle re-entry, operating as a transcriptional regulator of key cell cycle genes. Our findings provide significant input into our understanding of how cell cycle activity is incorporated into plant growth and development.

  15. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Juli D; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-04-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints.

  16. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Juli D.; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-01-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints. PMID:27058369

  17. Crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor IIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; De Angelis, Jacqueline; Roeder, Robert G.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-12-13

    The x-ray structure of a C-terminal fragment of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor (TF) IIF has been determined at 1.02-{angstrom} resolution. The {alpha}/{beta} structure is strikingly similar to the globular domain of linker histone H5 and the DNA-binding domain of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3{gamma} (HNF-3{gamma}), making it a winged-helix protein. The surface electrostatic properties of this compact domain differ significantly from those of bona fide winged-helix transcription factors (HNF-3{gamma} and RFX1) and from the winged-helix domains found within the RAP30 subunit of TFIIF and the {beta} subunit of TFIIE. RAP74 has been shown to interact with the TFIIF-associated C-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1, and a putative phosphatase binding site has been identified within the RAP74 winged-helix domain.

  18. neptune, a Krüppel-like transcription factor that participates in primitive erythropoiesis in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Huber, T L; Perkins, A C; Deconinck, A E; Chan, F Y; Mead, P E; Zon, L I

    2001-09-18

    The specification of the erythroid lineage from hematopoietic stem cells requires the expression and activity of lineage-specific transcription factors. One transcription factor family that has several members involved in hematopoiesis is the Krüppel-like factor (KLF) family [1]. For example, erythroid KLF (EKLF) regulates beta-globin expression during erythroid differentiation [2-6]. KLFs share a highly conserved zinc finger-based DNA binding domain (DBD) that mediates binding to CACCC-box and GC-rich sites, both of which are frequently found in the promoters of hematopoietic genes. Here, we identified a novel Xenopus KLF gene, neptune, which is highly expressed in the ventral blood island (VBI), cranial ganglia, and hatching and cement glands. neptune expression is induced in response to components of the BMP-4 signaling pathway in injected animal cap explants. Similar to its family member, EKLF, Neptune can bind CACCC-box and GC-rich DNA elements. We show that Neptune cooperates with the hematopoietic transcription factor XGATA-1 to enhance globin induction in animal cap explants. A fusion protein comprised of Neptune's DBD and the Drosophila engrailed repressor domain suppresses the induction of globin in ventral marginal zones and in animal caps. These studies demonstrate that Neptune is a positive regulator of primitive erythropoiesis in Xenopus.

  19. Pioneer transcription factors in cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2014-12-15

    A subset of eukaryotic transcription factors possesses the remarkable ability to reprogram one type of cell into another. The transcription factors that reprogram cell fate are invariably those that are crucial for the initial cell programming in embryonic development. To elicit cell programming or reprogramming, transcription factors must be able to engage genes that are developmentally silenced and inappropriate for expression in the original cell. Developmentally silenced genes are typically embedded in "closed" chromatin that is covered by nucleosomes and not hypersensitive to nuclease probes such as DNase I. Biochemical and genomic studies have shown that transcription factors with the highest reprogramming activity often have the special ability to engage their target sites on nucleosomal DNA, thus behaving as "pioneer factors" to initiate events in closed chromatin. Other reprogramming factors appear dependent on pioneer factors for engaging nucleosomes and closed chromatin. However, certain genomic domains in which nucleosomes are occluded by higher-order chromatin structures, such as in heterochromatin, are resistant to pioneer factor binding. Understanding the means by which pioneer factors can engage closed chromatin and how heterochromatin can prevent such binding promises to advance our ability to reprogram cell fates at will and is the topic of this review.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification of the Target Genes of AP2-O, a Plasmodium AP2-Family Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Izumi; Iwanaga, Shiroh; Kato, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Issei; Yuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Stage-specific transcription is a fundamental biological process in the life cycle of the Plasmodium parasite. Proteins containing the AP2 DNA-binding domain are responsible for stage-specific transcriptional regulation and belong to the only known family of transcription factors in Plasmodium parasites. Comprehensive identification of their target genes will advance our understanding of the molecular basis of stage-specific transcriptional regulation and stage-specific parasite development. AP2-O is an AP2 family transcription factor that is expressed in the mosquito midgut-invading stage, called the ookinete, and is essential for normal morphogenesis of this stage. In this study, we identified the genome-wide target genes of AP2-O by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing and elucidate how this AP2 family transcription factor contributes to the formation of this motile stage. The analysis revealed that AP2-O binds specifically to the upstream genomic regions of more than 500 genes, suggesting that approximately 10% of the parasite genome is directly regulated by AP2-O. These genes are involved in distinct biological processes such as morphogenesis, locomotion, midgut penetration, protection against mosquito immunity and preparation for subsequent oocyst development. This direct and global regulation by AP2-O provides a model for gene regulation in Plasmodium parasites and may explain how these parasites manage to control their complex life cycle using a small number of sequence-specific AP2 transcription factors. PMID:26018192

  1. Specificity of DNA binding of the c-Myc/Max and ARNT/ARNT dimers at the CACGTG recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, H I; Yang, J H

    1999-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix proteins that interact with the DNA recognition site CACGTG include the c-Myc/Max heterodimer and the ARNT (Ahreceptornucleartranslocator) homodimer. We have utilized a PCR-based protocol to identify high affinity binding sites of either the c-Myc/Max or ARNT/ARNT dimers and analyzed the ability of these dimers to interact with their derived consensus sequences and activate genes. chi(2)analysis of the selected DNA recognition sites revealed that DNA binding of the ARNT homodimer is symmetric, resulting in the consensus sequence RTCACGTGAY. Gel shift analysis demonstrated that the flanking nucleotides play an important role in dictating DNA binding affinity of the ARNT homodimer. These flanking sequences also regulate the ability of ARNT to competitively displace the c-Myc/Max heterodimer from a CACGTG-containing sequence. However, transient transfection analyses in CV-1 cells revealed that ARNT and c-Myc/Max exhibited similar abilities to activate transcription through each other's consensus sequences. Taken together, these results indicate that although binding affinity of these dimers for the CACGTG core sequences may be differentially influenced by flanking nucleotides, transcriptional activity may also be determined by other factors, such as cellular concentrations of these proteins and their co-activators. PMID:10454619

  2. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  3. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O'Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  4. Transcription factors make a turn into migration

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of the brain depends on a tightly regulated process of proliferation, neuronal fate specification and migration which eventually leads to the final architecture of the cerebral cortex. The specification of different neuronal subtypes depends on a complex developmental program mastered by several transcription factors. Besides, it was shown that the same transcription factors can subsequently control neural migration. However, the mechanisms of this regulation are still unclear. Two papers recently published by Heng et al.1 and Nóbrega-Pereira et al.2 confirm that these transcription factors are involved in controlling neural migration. In addition, these studies show that these transcription factors can control neural migration via different molecular mechanisms: Heng and coworkers show that Neurogenin 2 controls neural migration by directly regulating the expression of the small GTPase Rnd2 (a modulator of cytoskeletal dynamics); whereas Nóbrega-Pereira and colleagues demonstrate that Nkx2-1 establishes the response to guidance cues, in migrating interneurons, by directly regulating the expression of the semaphorin receptor Neuropilin 2. Taken together, these findings support the idea that transcription factors are reused during development to control neural migration and they shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. PMID:19262164

  5. Phosphorylation of Krüppel-like Factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF) and C-terminal Binding Protein 2 (CtBP2) by Homeodomain-interacting Protein Kinase 2 (HIPK2) Modulates KLF3 DNA Binding and Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Vitri; Kwok, Alister; Lee, Stella; Lee, Ming Min; Tan, Yee Mun; Nicholas, Hannah R.; Isono, Kyo-ichi; Wienert, Beeke; Mak, Ka Sin; Knights, Alexander J.; Quinlan, Kate G. R.; Cordwell, Stuart J.; Funnell, Alister P. W.; Pearson, Richard C. M; Crossley, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF), a member of the Krüppel-like factor (KLF) family of transcription factors, is a widely expressed transcriptional repressor with diverse biological roles. Although there is considerable understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow KLF3 to silence the activity of its target genes, less is known about the signal transduction pathways and post-translational modifications that modulate KLF3 activity in response to physiological stimuli. We observed that KLF3 is modified in a range of different tissues and found that the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) can both bind and phosphorylate KLF3. Mass spectrometry identified serine 249 as the primary phosphorylation site. Mutation of this site reduces the ability of KLF3 to bind DNA and repress transcription. Furthermore, we also determined that HIPK2 can phosphorylate the KLF3 co-repressor C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) at serine 428. Finally, we found that phosphorylation of KLF3 and CtBP2 by HIPK2 strengthens the interaction between these two factors and increases transcriptional repression by KLF3. Taken together, our results indicate that HIPK2 potentiates the activity of KLF3. PMID:25659434

  6. Alternative splicing in the fiddler crab cognate ecdysteroid receptor: variation in receptor isoform expression and DNA binding properties in response to hormone.

    PubMed

    Durica, David S; Das, Sunetra; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Phillips, Barret; Kappalli, Sudha; Anilkumar, Gopinathan

    2014-09-15

    RXR cDNA cloning from three Uca species led to the identification of 4 conserved isoforms, indicative of alternative splicing in the hinge and ligand binding domains (LBD). Sequencing of overlapping clones from a Ucapugilator genomic library identified EcR isoforms matching previously identified cDNA variants; in addition, a cryptic exon in the LBD was detected and evidence for expression of this new isoform was obtained from next-generation sequencing. RNA-seq analysis also identified a new amino terminal EcR variant. EcR and RXR transcript abundance increases throughout ovarian maturation in U. pugilator, while cognate receptor transcript abundance remains constant in a related Indo-Pacific species with a different reproductive strategy. To examine if crab RXR LBD isoforms have different physical properties in vitro, electromobility shift assays were performed with different EcR isoforms. The cognate crab and fruit fly receptors differ in their responses to hormone. Ecdysteroids did not increase DNA binding for the crab heterodimers, while ecdysteroids stimulate binding for Drosophilamelanogaster EcR/USP heterodimers. In swapping experiments, UpEcR/USP heterodimers did not show ligand-responsive differences in DNA binding; both crab RXR LBD isoforms, however, conferred ligand-responsive increases in DNA binding with DmEcRs. These data indicate that both UpRXR LBD isoforms can heterodimerize with the heterologous DmEcR receptors and promote ligand and DNA binding. Unresponsiveness of the cognate receptors to ecdysteroid, however, suggest additional factors may be required to mediate endogenous, perhaps isoform-specific, differences in EcR conformation, consistent with previously reported effects of UpRXR isoforms on UpEcR ligand-binding affinities.

  7. Conformational Dynamics and the Binding of Specific and Nonspecific DNA by the Autoinhibited Transcription Factor Ets-1.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-07-26

    The affinity of the Ets-1 transcription factor for DNA is autoinhibited by an intrinsically disordered serine-rich region (SRR) and a helical inhibitory module (IM) appended to its winged helix-turn-helix ETS domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, we investigated how Ets-1 recognizes specific versus nonspecific DNA, with a focus on the roles of protein dynamics and autoinhibition in these processes. Upon binding either DNA, the two marginally stable N-terminal helices of the IM predominantly unfold, but still sample partially ordered conformations. Also, on the basis of amide chemical shift perturbation mapping, Ets-1 associates with both specific and nonspecific DNA through the same canonical ETS domain interface. These interactions are structurally independent of the SRR, and thus autoinhibition does not impart DNA-binding specificity. However, relative to the pronounced NMR spectroscopic changes in Ets-1 resulting from specific DNA binding, the spectra of the nonspecific DNA complexes showed conformational exchange broadening and lacked several diagnostic amide and indole signals attributable to hydrogen bonding interactions seen in reported X-ray crystallographic structures of this transcription factor with its cognate DNA sequences. Such differences are highlighted by the chemical shift and relaxation properties of several interfacial lysine and arginine side chains. Collectively, these data support a general model in which Ets-1 interacts with nonspecific DNA via dynamic electrostatic interactions, whereas hydrogen bonding drives the formation of well-ordered complexes with specific DNA.

  8. Evolution of hematopoiesis: Three members of the PU.1 transcription factor family in a cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. K.; Sun, X.; Miracle, A. L.; Litman, G. W.; Rothenberg, E. V.

    2001-01-01

    T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes are present in jawed vertebrates, including cartilaginous fishes, but not in jawless vertebrates or invertebrates. The origins of these lineages may be understood in terms of evolutionary changes in the structure and regulation of transcription factors that control lymphocyte development, such as PU.1. The identification and characterization of three members of the PU.1 family of transcription factors in a cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria, are described here. Two of these genes are orthologs of mammalian PU.1 and Spi-C, respectively, whereas the third gene, Spi-D, is a different family member. In addition, a PU.1-like gene has been identified in a jawless vertebrate, Petromyzon marinus (sea lamprey). Both DNA-binding and transactivation domains are highly conserved between mammalian and skate PU.1, in marked contrast to lamprey Spi, in which similarity is evident only in the DNA-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data suggests that the appearance of Spi-C may predate the divergence of the jawed and jawless vertebrates and that Spi-D arose before the divergence of the cartilaginous fish from the lineage leading to the mammals. The tissue-specific expression patterns of skate PU.1 and Spi-C suggest that these genes share regulatory as well as structural properties with their mammalian orthologs.

  9. Yeast one-hybrid screens for detection of transcription factor DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2011-01-01

    The yeast one-hybrid system is widely recognized as a valuable and straightforward technique to study interactions between transcription factors and DNA. By means of one-hybrid screens, transcription factors or other DNA-binding proteins, expressed from cDNA expression libraries, can be identified due to the interactions with a DNA sequence-of-interest that is linked to a reporter gene, such as the yeast HIS3 gene. Usually, the library is constructed in an E. coli-yeast shuttle vector designed for production of hybrid proteins consisting of a library protein and the trans-activating domain (AD) from the yeast GAL4 transcription factor. Here, we describe an optimized system of vectors for one-hybrid screenings together with detailed step-wise protocols, an elaborate trouble-shooting guide and many technical tips to conduct successful screenings. This system and other yeast genetic selection procedures derived from one-hybrid methodology proved highly useful to help understanding the regulatory networks controlling expression of the genome.

  10. The plant RWP-RK transcription factors: key regulators of nitrogen responses and of gametophyte development.

    PubMed

    Chardin, Camille; Girin, Thomas; Roudier, François; Meyer, Christian; Krapp, Anne

    2014-10-01

    The plant specific RWP-RK family of transcription factors, initially identified in legumes and Chlamydomonas, are found in all vascular plants, green algae, and slime molds. These proteins possess a characteristic RWP-RK motif, which mediates DNA binding. Based on phylogenetic and domain analyses, we classified the RWP-RK proteins of six different species in two subfamilies: the NIN-like proteins (NLPs), which carry an additional PB1 domain at their C-terminus, and the RWP-RK domain proteins (RKDs), which are divided into three subgroups. Although, the functional analysis of this family is still in its infancy, several RWP-RK proteins have a key role in regulating responses to nitrogen availability. The nodulation-specific NIN proteins are involved in nodule organogenesis and rhizobial infection under nitrogen starvation conditions. Arabidopsis NLP7 in particular is a major player in the primary nitrate response. Several RKDs act as transcription factors involved in egg cell specification and differentiation or gametogenesis in algae, the latter modulated by nitrogen availability. Further studies are required to extend the general picture of the functional role of these exciting transcription factors.

  11. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W

    2015-08-01

    The use of a method of coupling DNA was investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP (CAAT/enhancer binding protein) fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry used is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3' end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose that couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture, and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes, including E2A, c-Myc, and Myo-D, were also purified, but myogenin and NFκB were not. Therefore, this approach proved to be valuable for both affinity chromatography and the trapping approach.

  12. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  13. Structures of mithramycin analogues bound to DNA and implications for targeting transcription factor FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Caixia; Weidenbach, Stevi; Cano, Kristin E.; Wang, Zhonghua; Mitra, Prithiba; Ivanov, Dmitri N.; Rohr, Jürgen; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have been considered undruggable, but this paradigm has been recently challenged. DNA binding natural product mithramycin (MTM) is a potent antagonist of oncogenic transcription factor EWS–FLI1. Structural details of MTM recognition of DNA, including the FLI1 binding sequence GGA(A/T), are needed to understand how MTM interferes with EWS–FLI1. We report a crystal structure of an MTM analogue MTM SA–Trp bound to a DNA oligomer containing a site GGCC, and two structures of a novel analogue MTM SA–Phe in complex with DNA. MTM SA–Phe is bound to sites AGGG and GGGT on one DNA, and to AGGG and GGGA(T) (a FLI1 binding site) on the other, revealing how MTM recognizes different DNA sequences. Unexpectedly, at sub-micromolar concentrations MTMs stabilize FLI1–DNA complex on GGAA repeats, which are critical for the oncogenic function of EWS–FLI1. We also directly demonstrate by nuclear magnetic resonance formation of a ternary FLI1–DNA–MTM complex on a single GGAA FLI1/MTM binding site. These biochemical and structural data and a new FLI1–DNA structure suggest that MTM binds the minor groove and perturbs FLI1 bound nearby in the major groove. This ternary complex model may lead to development of novel MTM analogues that selectively target EWS–FLI1 or other oncogenic transcription factors, as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:27587584

  14. Transcription Factors Expressed in Lateral Organ Boundaries: Identification of Downstream Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Patricia S

    2010-07-12

    The processes of lateral organ initiation and patterning are central to the generation of mature plant form. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is essential to our understanding of plant development. Communication between the shoot apical meristem and initiating organ primordia is important both for functioning of the meristem and for proper organ patterning, and very little is known about this process. In particular, the boundary between meristem and leaf is emerging as a critical region that is important for SAM maintenance and regulation of organogenesis. The goal of this project was to characterize three boundary-expressed genes that encode predicted transcription factors. Specifically, we have studied LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB), LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1), and LATERAL ORGAN FUSION2 (LOF2). LOB encodes the founding member of the LOB-DOMAIN (LBD) plant-specific DNA binding transcription factor family and LOF1 and LOF2 encode paralogous MYB-domain transcription factors. We characterized the genetic relationship between these three genes and other boundary and meristem genes. We also used an ectopic inducible expression system to identify direct targets of LOB.

  15. Cloning, chromosomal mapping and characterization of the human metal-regulatory transcription factor MTF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brugnera, E; Georgiev, O; Radtke, F; Heuchel, R; Baker, E; Sutherland, G R; Schaffner, W

    1994-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small cysteine-rich proteins that bind heavy metal ions such as zinc, cadmium and copper with high affinity, and have been functionally implicated in heavy metal detoxification and radical scavenging. Transcription of metallothioneins genes is induced by exposure of cells to heavy metals. This induction is mediated by metal-responsive promoter elements (MREs). We have previously cloned the cDNA of an MRE-binding transcription factor (MTF-1) from the mouse. Here we present the human cDNA equivalent of this metal-regulatory factor. Human MTF-1 is a protein of 753 amino acids with 93% amino acid sequence identity to mouse MTF-1 and has an extension of 78 amino acids at the C-terminus without counterpart in the mouse. The factors of both species have the same overall structure including six zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. We have physically mapped the human MTF-1 gene to human chromosome 1 where it localizes to the short arm in the region 1p32-34, most likely 1p33. Both human and mouse MTF-1 when produced in transfected mammalian cells strongly bind to a consensus MRE of metallothionein promoters. However, human MTF-1 is more effective than the mouse MTF-1 clone in mediating zinc-induced transcription. Images PMID:8065932

  16. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Kornepati, Anand V R; Marshall, Joy B; Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-12-29

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such "synergistic activation mediators" can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed.

  17. PTEN downregulates p75NTR expression by decreasing DNA-binding activity of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Sherri L.; Guy, Clifford S.; Mearow, Karen M.

    2009-02-13

    p75NTR is expressed throughout the nervous system and its dysregulation is associated with pathological conditions. We have recently demonstrated a signalling cascade initiated by laminin (LN), which upregulates PTEN and downregulates p75NTR. Here we investigate the mechanism by which PTEN modulates p75NTR. Studies using PTEN mutants show that its protein phosphatase activity directly modulates p75NTR protein expression. Nuclear relocalization of PTEN subsequent to LN stimulation suggests transcriptional control of p75NTR expression, which was confirmed following EMSA and ChIP analysis of Sp1 transcription factor binding activity. LN and PTEN independently decrease the DNA-binding ability of PTEN to the p75NTR promoter. Sp1 regulation of p75NTR occurs via dephosphorylation of Sp1, thus reducing p75NTR transcription and protein expression. This mechanism represents a novel regulatory pathway which controls the expression level of a receptor with broad implications not only for the development of the nervous system but also for progression of pathological conditions.

  18. A stable transcription factor complex nucleated by oligomeric AML1–ETO controls leukaemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Lan; Jiang, Yanwen; Kost, Nils; Soong, T. David; Chen, Wei-Yi; Tang, Zhanyun; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Elemento, Olivier; Fischle, Wolfgang; Melnick, Ari; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Roeder, Robert G.

    2013-06-30

    Transcription factors are frequently altered in leukaemia through chromosomal translocation, mutation or aberrant expression. AML1–ETO, a fusion protein generated by the t(8;21) translocation in acute myeloid leukaemia, is a transcription factor implicated in both gene repression and activation. AML1–ETO oligomerization, mediated by the NHR2 domain, is critical for leukaemogenesis, making it important to identify co-regulatory factors that ‘read’ the NHR2 oligomerization and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Here we show that, in human leukaemic cells, AML1–ETO resides in and functions through a stable AML1–ETO-containing transcription factor complex (AETFC) that contains several haematopoietic transcription (co)factors. These AETFC components stabilize the complex through multivalent interactions, provide multiple DNA-binding domains for diverse target genes, co-localize genome wide, cooperatively regulate gene expression, and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Within the AETFC complex, AML1–ETO oligomerization is required for a specific interaction between the oligomerized NHR2 domain and a novel NHR2-binding (N2B) motif in E proteins. Crystallographic analysis of the NHR2–N2B complex reveals a unique interaction pattern in which an N2B peptide makes direct contact with side chains of two NHR2 domains as a dimer, providing a novel model of how dimeric/oligomeric transcription factors create a new protein-binding interface through dimerization/oligomerization. Intriguingly, disruption of this interaction by point mutations abrogates AML1–ETO-induced haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell self-renewal and leukaemogenesis. These results reveal new mechanisms of action of AML1–ETO, and provide a potential therapeutic target in t(8;21)-positive acute myeloid leukaemia.

  19. Fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1) contains a novel DNA-binding domain, repeats of the score and three amino acid peptide (STP), conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans.

    PubMed

    Takiya, Shigeharu; Ishikawa, Tetsurou; Ohtsuka, Katsuya; Nishita, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The predicted transcriptional regulatory factor for the fibroin gene of the silkworm Bombyx mori, fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1), was purified by sequential DNA affinity column chromatography, and cDNA clones corresponding to FMBP-1 were isolated from a library. The N-terminal half of FMBP-1 has a weak similarity to the DNA-binding domain of several transcriptional regulatory factors in higher plants. The C-terminal half contains four tandem repeats of a novel 23 amino acid motif, which we named the score and three amino acid peptide (STP). Other genes containing STP repeats were found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. Mutational analysis of FMBP-1 showed that the STP repeats form a novel DNA-binding domain. Sequences flanking STP repeats modulated DNA-binding activity. The FMBP-1 gene was expressed during the fourth to fifth instar. FMBP-1 activity appeared to be regulated at the transcriptional level and by the post-transcriptional modification.

  20. Prediction of zinc finger DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K

    1995-04-01

    Using the neural network algorithm with back-propagation training procedure, we analysed the zinc finger DNA binding protein sequences. We incorporated the characteristic patterns around the zinc finger motifs TFIIIA type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-13-His-X2-5-His) and the steroid hormone receptor type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-15-Cys-X2-5-Cys-X15-16-Cys-X4-5-Cys-X8-10- Cys-X2-3-Cys) in the neural network algorithm. The patterns used in the neural network were the amino acid pattern, the electric charge and polarity pattern, the side-chain chemical property and subproperty patterns, the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity patterns and the secondary structure propensity pattern. Two consecutive patterns were also considered. Each pattern was incorporated in the single layer perceptron algorithm and the combinations of patterns were considered in the two-layer perceptron algorithm. As for the TFIIIA type zinc finger DNA binding motifs, the prediction results of the two-layer perceptron algorithm reached up to 96.9% discrimination, and the prediction results of the discriminant analysis using the combination of several characters reached up to 97.0%. As for the steroid hormone receptor type zinc finger, the prediction results of neural network algorithm and the discriminant analyses reached up to 96.0%.

  1. Characterization of the sea urchin mitochondrial transcription factor A reveals unusual features.

    PubMed

    Deceglie, Stefania; Lionetti, Claudia; Stewart, James B; Habermann, Bianca; Roberti, Marina; Cantatore, Palmiro; Loguercio Polosa, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchin mtDNA is transcribed via a different mechanism compared to vertebrates. To gain information on the apparatus of sea urchin mitochondrial transcription we have characterized the DNA binding properties of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). The protein contains two HMG box domains but, differently from vertebrates, displays a very short C-terminal tail. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the distribution of tail length is mixed in the different lineages, indicating that it is a trait that undergoes rapid changes during evolution. Homology modeling suggests that the protein adopts the same configuration of the human counterpart and possibly a similar mode of binding to DNA. DNase I footprinting showed that TFAM specifically contacts mtDNA at a fixed distance from three AT-rich consensus sequences that were supposed to act as transcriptional initiation sites. Bound sequences are homologous and contain an inverted repeat motif, which resembles that involved in the intercalation of human TFAM in LSP DNA. The here reported data indicate that sea urchin TFAM specifically binds mtDNA. The protein could intercalate residues at the DNA inverted motif and, despite its short tail, might have a role in mitochondrial transcription.

  2. Identification and characterization of novel parathyroid-specific transcription factor Glial Cells Missing Homolog B (GCMB) mutations in eight families with autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bowl, Michael R; Mirczuk, Samantha M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Piret, Sian E; Cranston, Treena; Southam, Lorraine; Allgrove, Jeremy; Bahl, Shailini; Brain, Caroline; Loughlin, John; Mughal, Zulf; Ryan, Fiona; Shaw, Nick; Thakker, Yogini V; Tiosano, Dov; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2010-05-15

    GCMB is a member of the small transcription factor family GCM (glial cells missing), which are important regulators of development, present in vertebrates and some invertebrates. In man, GCMB encodes a 506 amino acid parathyroid gland-specific protein, mutations of which have been reported to cause both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism. We ascertained 18 affected individuals from 12 families with autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism and have investigated them for GCMB abnormalities. Four different homozygous germline mutations were identified in eight families that originate from the Indian Subcontinent. These consisted of a novel nonsense mutation R39X; a missense mutation, R47L in two families; a novel missense mutation, R110W; and a novel frameshifting deletion, I298fsX307 in four families. Haplotype analysis, using polymorphic microsatellites from chromosome 6p23-24, revealed that R47L and I298fsX307 mutations arose either as ancient founders, or recurrent de novo mutations. Functional studies including: subcellular localization studies, EMSAs and luciferase-reporter assays, were undertaken and these demonstrated that: the R39X mutant failed to localize to the nucleus; the R47L and R110W mutants both lost DNA-binding ability; and the I298fsX307 mutant had reduced transactivational ability. In order to gain further insights, we undertook 3D-modeling of the GCMB DNA-binding domain, which revealed that the R110 residue is likely important for the structural integrity of helix 2, which forms part of the GCMB/DNA binding interface. Thus, our results, which expand the spectrum of hypoparathyroidism-associated GCMB mutations, help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DNA-binding and transactivation that are required for this parathyroid-specific transcription factor.

  3. Transcription factor activation following exposure of an intact lung preparation to metallic particulate matter.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, James M; Silbajoris, Robert; Huang, Tony; Jaspers, Ilona

    2002-01-01

    Metallic constituents contained in ambient particulate matter have been associated with adverse effects in a number of epidemiologic, in vitro, and in vivo studies. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is a metallic by-product of the combustion of fossil fuel oil, which has been shown to induce a variety of proinflammatory responses in lung cells. We have examined signaling pathways activated in response to ROFA exposure and recently reported that ROFA treatment activates multiple mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in the rat lung. In the present study we extended our investigations on the mechanism of toxicity of ROFA to include transcription factors whose activities are regulated by MAP kinases as well as possible effectors of transcriptional changes that mediate the effects of ROFA. We applied immunohistochemical methods to detect ROFA-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF kappa B), activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), c-Jun, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in intact lung tissue and confirmed and characterized their functional activation using DNA binding assays. We performed these studies using a perfused rabbit lung model that is devoid of blood elements in order to distinguish between intrinsic lung cell effects and effects that are secondary to inflammatory cell influx. We report here that exposure to ROFA results in a rapid activation of all of the transcription factors studied by exerting direct effects on lung cells. These findings validate the use of immunohistochemistry to detect transcription factor activation in vivo and demonstrate the utility of studying signaling changes in response to environmental exposures. PMID:12361922

  4. Structural insight into DNA binding and oligomerization of the multifunctional Cox protein of bacteriophage P2.

    PubMed

    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Odegrip, Richard; Sehlén, Wilhelmina; Skaar, Karin; Svensson, Linda M; Massad, Tariq; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 is a small multifunctional DNA-binding protein. It is involved in site-specific recombination leading to P2 prophage excision and functions as a transcriptional repressor of the P2 Pc promoter. Furthermore, it transcriptionally activates the unrelated, defective prophage P4 that depends on phage P2 late gene products for lytic growth. In this article, we have investigated the structural determinants to understand how P2 Cox performs these different functions. We have solved the structure of P2 Cox to 2.4 Å resolution. Interestingly, P2 Cox crystallized in a continuous oligomeric spiral with its DNA-binding helix and wing positioned outwards. The extended C-terminal part of P2 Cox is largely responsible for the oligomerization in the structure. The spacing between the repeating DNA-binding elements along the helical P2 Cox filament is consistent with DNA binding along the filament. Functional analyses of alanine mutants in P2 Cox argue for the importance of key residues for protein function. We here present the first structure from the Cox protein family and, together with previous biochemical observations, propose that P2 Cox achieves its various functions by specific binding of DNA while wrapping the DNA around its helical oligomer.

  5. Targeting a DNA binding motif of the EVI1 protein by a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Sicot, Géraldine; Cui, Xiaohui; Vogel, Marion; Wuertzer, Charles A; Lezon-Geyda, Kimberly; Wheeler, John; Harki, Daniel A; Muzikar, Katy A; Stolper, Daniel A; Dervan, Peter B; Perkins, Archibald S

    2011-12-06

    The zinc finger protein EVI1 is causally associated with acute myeloid leukemogenesis, and inhibition of its function with a small molecule therapeutic may provide effective therapy for EVI1-expressing leukemias. In this paper we describe the development of a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide to specifically block EVI1 binding to DNA. We first identify essential domains for leukemogenesis through structure-function studies on both EVI1 and the t(3;21)(q26;q22)-derived RUNX1-MDS1-EVI1 (RME) protein, which revealed that DNA binding to the cognate motif GACAAGATA via the first of two zinc finger domains (ZF1, encompassing fingers 1-7) is essential transforming activity. To inhibit DNA binding via ZF1, we synthesized a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide 1, designed to bind to a subsite within the GACAAGATA motif and thereby block EVI1 binding. DNase I footprinting and electromobility shift assays revealed a specific and high affinity interaction between polyamide 1 and the GACAAGATA motif. In an in vivo CAT reporter assay using NIH-3T3-derived cell line with a chromosome-embedded tet-inducible EVI1-VP16 as well as an EVI1-responsive reporter, polyamide 1 completely blocked EVI1-responsive reporter activity. Growth of a leukemic cell line bearing overexpressed EVI1 was also inhibited by treatment with polyamide 1, while a control cell line lacking EVI1 was not. Finally, colony formation by RME was attenuated by polyamide 1 in a serial replating assay. These studies provide evidence that a cell permeable small molecule may effectively block the activity of a leukemogenic transcription factor and provide a valuable tool to dissect critical functions of EVI1 in leukemogenesis.

  6. Hey bHLH transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Weber, David; Wiese, Cornelia; Gessler, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Hey bHLH transcription factors are direct targets of canonical Notch signaling. The three mammalian Hey proteins are closely related to Hes proteins and they primarily repress target genes by either directly binding to core promoters or by inhibiting other transcriptional activators. Individual candidate gene approaches and systematic screens identified a number of Hey target genes, which often encode other transcription factors involved in various developmental processes. Here, we review data on interaction partners and target genes and conclude with a model for Hey target gene regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how expression of Hey proteins affects processes like cell fate decisions and differentiation, e.g., in cardiovascular, skeletal, and neural development or oncogenesis and how this relates to the observed developmental defects and phenotypes observed in various knockout mice.

  7. The GATA transcription factor GtaC regulates early developmental gene expression dynamics in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Balaji; Cai, Huaqing; Devreotes, Peter N; Shaulsky, Gad; Katoh-Kurasawa, Mariko

    2015-07-06

    In many systems, including the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, development is often marked by dynamic morphological and transcriptional changes orchestrated by key transcription factors. However, efforts to examine sequential genome-wide changes of gene regulation in developmental processes have been fairly limited. Here we report the developmental regulatory dynamics of GtaC, a GATA-type zinc-finger transcription factor, through the analyses of serial ChIP- and RNA-sequencing data. GtaC is essential for developmental progression, decoding extracellular cAMP pulses during early development and may play a role in mediating cell-type differentiation at later stages. We find that GtaC exhibits temporally distinctive DNA-binding patterns concordant with each developmental stage. We identify direct GtaC targets and observe cotemporaneous GtaC-binding and developmental expression regulation. Our results suggest that GtaC regulates multiple physiological processes as Dictyostelium transitions from a group of unicellular amoebae to an integrated multicellular organism.

  8. Quantifying the dynamics of the oligomeric transcription factor STAT3 by pair correlation of molecular brightness.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Pandžić, Elvis; Yang, Zhengmin; Ng, Ivan H W; Jans, David A; Bogoyevitch, Marie A; Gratton, Enrico; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-03-24

    Oligomerization of transcription factors controls their translocation into the nucleus and DNA-binding activity. Here we present a fluorescence microscopy analysis termed pCOMB (pair correlation of molecular brightness) that tracks the mobility of different oligomeric species within live cell nuclear architecture. pCOMB amplifies the signal from the brightest species present and filters the dynamics of the extracted oligomeric population based on arrival time between two locations. We use this method to demonstrate a dependence of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mobility on oligomeric state. We find that on entering the nucleus STAT3 dimers must first bind DNA to form STAT3 tetramers, which are also DNA-bound but exhibit a different mobility signature. Examining the dimer-to-tetramer transition by a cross-pair correlation analysis (cpCOMB) reveals that chromatin accessibility modulates STAT3 tetramer formation. Thus, the pCOMB approach is suitable for mapping the impact oligomerization on transcription factor dynamics.

  9. Quantifying the dynamics of the oligomeric transcription factor STAT3 by pair correlation of molecular brightness

    PubMed Central

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Pandžić, Elvis; Yang, Zhengmin; Ng, Ivan H. W.; Jans, David A.; Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Gratton, Enrico; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of transcription factors controls their translocation into the nucleus and DNA-binding activity. Here we present a fluorescence microscopy analysis termed pCOMB (pair correlation of molecular brightness) that tracks the mobility of different oligomeric species within live cell nuclear architecture. pCOMB amplifies the signal from the brightest species present and filters the dynamics of the extracted oligomeric population based on arrival time between two locations. We use this method to demonstrate a dependence of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mobility on oligomeric state. We find that on entering the nucleus STAT3 dimers must first bind DNA to form STAT3 tetramers, which are also DNA-bound but exhibit a different mobility signature. Examining the dimer-to-tetramer transition by a cross-pair correlation analysis (cpCOMB) reveals that chromatin accessibility modulates STAT3 tetramer formation. Thus, the pCOMB approach is suitable for mapping the impact oligomerization on transcription factor dynamics. PMID:27009358

  10. Genome-wide analysis of plant-specific Dof transcription factor family in tomato.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Chanjuan; Zhang, Tingyan; Hu, Tixu; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Taotao; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2013-06-01

    The Dof (DNA binding with One Finger) family encoding single zinc finger proteins has been known as a family of plant-specific transcription factors. These transcription factors are involved in a variety of functions of importance for different biological processes in plants. In the current study, we identified 34 Dof family genes in tomato, distributed on 11 chromosomes. A complete overview of SlDof genes in tomato is presented, including the gene structures, chromosome locations, phylogeny, protein motifs and evolution pattern. Phylogenetic analysis of 34 SlDof proteins resulted in four classes constituting six clusters. In addition, a comparative analysis between these genes in tomato, Arabidopsis and rice was also performed. The tomato Dof family expansion has been dated to recent duplication events, and segmental duplication is predominant for the SlDof genes. Furthermore, the SlDof genes displayed differential expression either in their transcript abundance or in their expression patterns under normal growth conditions. This is the first step towards genome-wide analyses of the Dof genes in tomato. Our study provides a very useful reference for cloning and functional analysis of the members of this gene family in tomato and other species.

  11. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  12. YeTFaSCo: a database of evaluated yeast transcription factor sequence specificities

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Carl G.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a prevalent system for the analysis of transcriptional networks. As a result, multiple DNA-binding sequence specificities (motifs) have been derived for most yeast transcription factors (TFs). However, motifs from different studies are often inconsistent with each other, making subsequent analyses complicated and confusing. Here, we have created YeTFaSCo (The Yeast Transcription Factor Specificity Compendium, http://yetfasco.ccbr.utoronto.ca/), an extensive collection of S. cerevisiae TF specificities. YeTFaSCo differs from related databases by being more comprehensive (including 1709 motifs for 256 proteins or protein complexes), and by evaluating the motifs using multiple objective quality metrics. The metrics include correlation between motif matches and ChIP-chip data, gene expression patterns, and GO terms, as well as motif agreement between different studies. YeTFaSCo also features an index of ‘expert-curated’ motifs, each associated with a confidence assessment. In addition, the database website features tools for motif analysis, including a sequence scanning function and precomputed genome-browser tracks of motif occurrences across the entire yeast genome. Users can also search the database for motifs that are similar to a query motif. PMID:22102575

  13. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92–198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  14. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σS-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σS has been proposed to result largely from competition between σS and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σS binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σS protein proficient for EσS complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σS requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σS are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by EσS. PMID:25578965

  15. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  16. Barley MLA Immune Receptors Directly Interfere with Antagonistically Acting Transcription Factors to Initiate Disease Resistance Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Yu, Deshui; Jiao, Jian; Jing, Shaojuan; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat (NLR)–containing proteins in plants and animals mediate pathogen sensing inside host cells and mount innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) mildew A (MLA) locus encodes coiled-coil (CC)–type NLRs mediating disease resistance against the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis. Here, we report direct interactions between MLA and two antagonistically acting transcription factors, MYB6 and WRKY1. The N-terminal CC signaling domain of MLA interacts with MYB6 to stimulate its DNA binding activity. MYB6 functions as a positive regulator of basal and MLA-mediated immunity responses to B. graminis. MYB6 DNA binding is antagonized by direct association with WRKY1 repressor, which in turn also interacts with the MLA CC domain. The activated form of full-length MLA10 receptor is needed to release MYB6 activator from WRKY1 repression and to stimulate MYB6-dependent gene expression. This implies that, while sequestered by the WRKY1 repressor in the presence of the resting immune receptor, MYB6 acts as an immediate and positive postactivation signaling component of the active state of MLA during transcriptional reprogramming for innate immune responses. PMID:23532068

  17. TCP transcription factors: architectures of plant form.

    PubMed

    Manassero, Nora G Uberti; Viola, Ivana L; Welchen, Elina; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    After its initial definition in 1999, the TCP family of transcription factors has become the focus of a multiplicity of studies related with plant development at the cellular, organ, and tissue levels. Evidence has accumulated indicating that TCP transcription factors are the main regulators of plant form and architecture and constitute a tool through which evolution shapes plant diversity. The TCP transcription factors act in a multiplicity of pathways related with cell proliferation and hormone responses. In recent years, the molecular pathways of TCP protein action and biochemical studies on their mode of interaction with DNA have begun to shed light on their mechanism of action. However, the available information is fragmented and a unifying view of TCP protein action is lacking, as well as detailed structural studies of the TCP-DNA complex. Also important, the possible role of TCP proteins as integrators of plant developmental responses to the environment has deserved little attention. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the structure and functions of TCP transcription factors and analyze future perspectives for the study of the role of these proteins and their use to modify plant development.

  18. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  19. Opposite Orientations of a Transcription Factor Heterodimer Bind DNA Cooperatively with Interaction Partners but Have Different Effects on Interferon-β Gene Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Veronica; Kerppola, Tom Klaus

    2012-01-01

    ATF2-Jun, IRF3, and HMGI recognize a composite regulatory element within the interferon-β enhancer (IFNb). Cooperative ATF2-Jun-IRF3 complex formation at IFNb has been proposed to require a fixed orientation of ATF2-Jun binding. Our results show that ATF2-Jun heterodimers bound IFNb in both orientations alone and in association with IRF3 and HMGI. Two sets of symmetrically located amino acid residues in ATF2 and Jun facilitated the interactions between heterodimers bound in opposite orientations and IRF3 at IFNb. IRF3 and HMGI bound IFNb in association with both orientations of ATF2-Jun heterodimers with the same cooperativity. ATF2-Jun heterodimers that bound IFNb in opposite orientations in vitro had different effects on interferon-β gene transcription when they were co-expressed with IRF3 in cultured cells. These heterodimers had different transcriptional activities at different endogenous genes. Different regions of ATF2 and Jun mediated their orientation-dependent transcriptional activities at different genes. These studies revealed that cooperative DNA binding does not require a unique nucleoprotein complex configuration, and that transcription factor complexes that bind the same enhancer in different configurations can have different transcriptional activities. PMID:22843696

  20. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  1. The activation of a specific DNA binding protein by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Teale, B.; Singh, S.; Cohen, D.

    1995-08-30

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the quality of ionizing radiation is critical for activation of a radiation-specific DNA binding protein. We have previously shown that after exposing Epstein Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells to ionizing radiation, a specific DNA binding factor appears in the nucleus apparently as a result of translocation from the cytoplasm. This protein binds to a number of different genomic sequences and a consensus motif has been identified. Because the protein was not activated by UV light, it was of interest whether high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation was capable of activation. We describe here the activation of a specific DNA binding protein by high LET neutron radiation. The protein binds a region adjacent to and overlapping with the distal repeat within a 179 base-pair fragment of the well-characterized Simian Virus (SV40) bidirectional promoter/enhancer element. The appearance of the DNA binding activity was dose dependent and reached a maximum level by 90 min postirradiation. A reduction in DNA binding activity was evident at later times after irradiation. The specific nature of this response and the rapidity of activation may indicate a pivotal role for this protein in repair or in some other aspect of the cellular response to radiation damage. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Mutational analysis of the Acropora millepora PaxD paired domain highlights the importance of the linker region for DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Karin; Scholten, Ingo; Nordström, Johanna; Larhammar, Dan; Miller, David

    2003-11-27

    Pax transcription factors are found in animals, from simple sponges to insects and vertebrates. The defining feature of Pax proteins is the DNA-binding paired domain (PD), which consists of two helix-turn-helix subdomains, joined with a linker region. Despite high specificity in vivo, the paired domains of different Pax proteins bind similar consensus DNA sequences in vitro. Using bandshift techniques, we show here that the paired domain of the Acropora millepora PaxD protein, which unambiguously belongs to the Pax3/7 group, does not bind to three defined paired domain-binding sites. Domain swapping experiments and site-directed mutagenesis identified two amino acid residues in the linker region of the paired domain as critical to DNA binding; G70 and S71 are highly conserved in Pax proteins, but differ in PaxD (L70 and N71). The PaxD data thus highlight the importance of the linker region, and particularly G70 and S71, in DNA binding by Pax proteins.

  3. Gene Expression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Putative Transcription Factors whiB1-7 in Redox Environments

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Christer; Luna, Brian; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Agarwal, Nisheeth; Bishai, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The seven WhiB proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) are widely believed to be redox-sensing transcription factors due to their binding of iron-sulfur clusters and similarities to DNA binding proteins. Here, we explored the nature of this hypothesized relationship. We exposed M.tb to physiologic conditions such as gradual hypoxia, nitric oxide (NO), cyclic AMP and in vivo conditions, and measured transcription of the whiB genes. We found whiB3 to be induced both by hypoxia and NO, whiB7 to be induced in macrophage-like cells, and whiB4 to be induced in mouse lung. Cyclic AMP induced whiB1,−2, −4, −6 and −7. Our data indicate that the M.tb whiB genes are induced independently by various stimuli which may add versatility to their suggested redox-sensing properties. PMID:22829866

  4. GOLDEN 2-LIKE Transcription Factors of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Ji, Meiling; Wen, Binbin; Liu, Li; Li, Shaoxuan; Chen, Xiude; Gao, Dongsheng; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are members of the GARP family of Myb transcription factors with an established relationship to chloroplast development in the plant kingdom. In the last century, Golden2 was proposed as a second golden producing factor and identified as controlling cellular differentiation in maize leaves. Then, GLKs were also found to play roles in disease defense and their function is conserved in regulating chloroplast development. Recently, research on GLKs has rapidly increased and shown that GLKs control chloroplast development in green and non-green tissues. Moreover, links between phytohormones and GLKs were verified. In this mini-review, we summarize the history, conservation, function, potential targets and degradation of GLKs. PMID:27757121

  5. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  6. Cell-free production of transducible transcription factors for nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William C.; Patel, Kedar G.; Lee, Jieun; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; Wong, H. Edward; Cooke, John P.; Swartz, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a defined set of transcription factors chosen from Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc, Klf4, Nanog, and Lin28 can directly reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency. These reprogrammed cells are referred to as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To date, iPSCs have been successfully generated using lentiviruses, retroviruses, adenoviruses, plasmids, transposons, and recombinant proteins. Nucleic acid-based approaches raise concerns about genomic instability. In contrast, a protein-based approach for iPSC generation can avoid DNA integration concerns as well as provide greater control over the concentration, timing, and sequence of transcription factor stimulation. Researchers recently demonstrated that polyarginine peptide conjugation can deliver recombinant protein reprogramming factor (RF) cargoes into cells and reprogram somatic cells into iPSCs. However, the protein-based approach requires a significant amount of protein for the reprogramming process. Producing fusion reprogramming factors in the large amounts required for this approach using traditional heterologous in vivo production methods is difficult and cumbersome since toxicity, product aggregation, and proteolysis by endogenous proteases limit yields. In this work, we show that cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a viable option for producing soluble and functional transducible transcription factors for nuclear reprogramming. We used an E. coli-based cell-free protein synthesis system to express the above set of six human RFs as fusion proteins, each with a nona-arginine (R9) protein transduction domain. Using the flexibility offered by the CFPS platform, we successfully addressed proteolysis and protein solubility problems to produce full-length and soluble R9-RF fusions. We subsequently showed that R9-Oct3/4, R9-Sox2, and R9-Nanog exhibit cognate DNA binding activities, R9-Nanog translocates across the plasma and nuclear membranes, and R9-Sox2 exerts transcriptional activity on a known

  7. CitI, a Transcription Factor Involved in Regulation of Citrate Metabolism in Lactic Acid Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mauricio G.; Magni, Christian; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma

    2005-01-01

    A large variety of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can utilize citrate under fermentative conditions. Although much information concerning the metabolic pathways leading to citrate utilization by LAB has been gathered, the mechanisms regulating these pathways are obscure. In Weissella paramesenteroides (formerly called Leuconostoc paramesenteroides), transcription of the citMDEFCGRP citrate operon and the upstream divergent gene citI is induced by the presence of citrate in the medium. Although genetic experiments have suggested that CitI is a transcriptional activator whose activity can be modulated in response to citrate availability, specific details of the interaction between CitI and DNA remained unknown. In this study, we show that CitI recognizes two A+T-rich operator sites located between citI and citM and that the DNA-binding affinity of CitI is increased by citrate. Subsequently, this citrate signal propagation leads to the activation of the cit operon through an enhanced recruitment of RNA polymerase to its promoters. Our results indicate that the control of CitI by the cellular pools of citrate provides a mechanism for sensing the availability of citrate and adjusting the expression of the cit operon accordingly. In addition, this is the first reported example of a transcription factor directly functioning as a citrate-activated switch allowing the cell to optimize the generation of metabolic energy. PMID:16030208

  8. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  9. Essential role for the planarian intestinal GATA transcription factor in stem cells and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Natasha M.; Oviedo, Néstor J.; Sage, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The cellular turnover of adult tissues and injury-induced repair proceed through an exquisite integration of proliferation, differentiation, and survival signals that involve stem/progenitor cell populations, their progeny, and differentiated tissues. GATA factors are DNA binding proteins that control stem cells and the development of tissues by activating or repressing transcription. Here we examined the role of GATA transcription factors in Schmidtea mediterranea, a freshwater planarian that provides an excellent model to investigate gene function in adult stem cells, regeneration, and differentiation. Smed-gata4/5/6, the homolog of the three mammalian GATA-4,-5,-6 factors is expressed at high levels in differentiated gut cells but also at lower levels in neoblast populations, the planarian stem cells. Smed-gata4/5/6 knock-down results in broad differentiation defects, especially in response to injury. These defects are not restricted to the intestinal lineage. In particular, at late time points during the response to injury, loss of Smed-gata4/5/6 leads to decreased neoblast proliferation and to gene expression changes in several neoblast subpopulations. Thus, Smed-gata4/5/6 plays a key evolutionary conserved role in intestinal differentiation in planarians. These data further support a model in which defects in the intestinal lineage can indirectly affect other differentiation pathways in planarians. PMID:27542689

  10. Essential role for the planarian intestinal GATA transcription factor in stem cells and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Flores, Natasha M; Oviedo, Néstor J; Sage, Julien

    2016-10-01

    The cellular turnover of adult tissues and injury-induced repair proceed through an exquisite integration of proliferation, differentiation, and survival signals that involve stem/progenitor cell populations, their progeny, and differentiated tissues. GATA factors are DNA binding proteins that control stem cells and the development of tissues by activating or repressing transcription. Here we examined the role of GATA transcription factors in Schmidtea mediterranea, a freshwater planarian that provides an excellent model to investigate gene function in adult stem cells, regeneration, and differentiation. Smed-gata4/5/6, the homolog of the three mammalian GATA-4,-5,-6 factors is expressed at high levels in differentiated gut cells but also at lower levels in neoblast populations, the planarian stem cells. Smed-gata4/5/6 knock-down results in broad differentiation defects, especially in response to injury. These defects are not restricted to the intestinal lineage. In particular, at late time points during the response to injury, loss of Smed-gata4/5/6 leads to decreased neoblast proliferation and to gene expression changes in several neoblast subpopulations. Thus, Smed-gata4/5/6 plays a key evolutionary conserved role in intestinal differentiation in planarians. These data further support a model in which defects in the intestinal lineage can indirectly affect other differentiation pathways in planarians.

  11. Mutations in the zinc fingers of ADR1 that change the specificity of DNA binding and transactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Thukral, S K; Morrison, M L; Young, E T

    1992-01-01

    ADR1 is a yeast transcription factor that contains two zinc fingers of the Cys-2-His-2 (C2H2) class. Mutations that change the specificity of DNA binding of ADR1 to its target site, upstream activation sequence 1 (UAS1), have been identified at three positions in the first zinc finger. Mutations Arg-115 to Gln, His-118 to Thr, and Arg-121 to Asn led to new specificities of DNA binding at adjacent positions 10, 9, and 8 (3'-GAG-5') in UAS1. Arg-115 is at the finger tip, and His-118 and Arg-121 are at positions 3 and 6, respectively, in the alpha helix of finger 1. One double mutant displayed the binding specificity expected from the properties of its constituent new-specificity mutations. Mutations in the second finger that allowed its binding site to be identified through loss-of-contact phenotypes were made. These mutations imply a tail-to-tail orientation of the two ADR1 monomers on their adjacent binding sites. Finger 1 is aligned on UAS1 in an amino-to-carboxyl-terminal orientation along the guanine-rich strand in a 3'-to-5' direction. One of the ADR1 mutants was functional in vivo with both its cognate binding site and wild-type UAS1, but the other two mutants were defective in transactivation despite their ability to bind with high affinity to their cognate binding sites. Images PMID:1588970

  12. Phase Behavior of DNA in the Presence of DNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Le Treut, Guillaume; Képès, François; Orland, Henri

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the thermodynamical equilibrium of DNA chains interacting with a solution of nonspecific binding proteins, we implemented a Flory-Huggins free energy model. We explored the dependence on DNA and protein concentrations of the DNA collapse. For physiologically relevant values of the DNA-protein affinity, this collapse gives rise to a biphasic regime with a dense and a dilute phase; the corresponding phase diagram was computed. Using an approach based on Hamiltonian paths, we show that the dense phase has either a molten globule or a crystalline structure, depending on the DNA bending rigidity, which is influenced by the ionic strength. These results are valid at the thermodynamical equilibrium and therefore should be consistent with many biological processes, whose characteristic timescales range typically from 1 ms to 10 s. Our model may thus be applied to biological phenomena that involve DNA-binding proteins, such as DNA condensation with crystalline order, which occurs in some bacteria to protect their chromosome from detrimental factors; or transcription initiation, which occurs in clusters called transcription factories that are reminiscent of the dense phase characterized in this study. PMID:26745409

  13. Novel DNA-binding properties of the RNA-binding protein TIAR.

    PubMed

    Suswam, Esther A; Li, Yan Yan; Mahtani, Harry; King, Peter H

    2005-01-01

    TIA-1 related protein binds avidly to uridine-rich elements in mRNA and pre-mRNAs of a wide range of genes, including interleukin (IL)-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The protein has diverse regulatory roles, which in part depend on the locus of binding within the transcript, including translational control, splicing and apoptosis. Here, we observed selective and potent inhibition of TIAR-RNP complex formation with IL-8 and VEGF 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) using thymidine-rich deoxyoligonucleotide (ODN) sequences derived from the VEFG 3'-UTR. We show by ultraviolet crosslinking and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that TIAR can bind directly to single-stranded, thymidine-rich ODNs but not to double-stranded ODNs containing the same sequence. TIAR had a nearly 6-fold greater affinity for DNA than RNA (K(d)app = 1.6x10(-9) M versus 9.4 x 10(-9) M). Truncation of TIAR indicated that the high affinity DNA-binding site overlaps with the RNA-binding site involving RNA recognition motif 2 (RRM2). However, RRM1 alone could also bind to DNA. Finally, we show that TIAR can be displaced from single-stranded DNA by active transcription through the binding site. These results provide a potential mechanism by which TIAR can shuttle between RNA and DNA ligands.

  14. Dichotomous Life of DNA Binding High Mobility Group Box1 Protein in Human Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Lohani, Neelam; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2016-01-01

    The High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an extremely versatile, highly conserved nuclear protein, with its unique intracellular and extracellular functions mediated by its relatively simple domain structure. Within the nucleus, HMGB1 binds to DNA minor groove in a nonspecific manner and causes bends in the double helix thus helps in recruiting a number of DNA binding protein and transcription factors, to facilitate transcription of various genes. HMGB1 also helps in DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, V (D) J recombination, and assembly of nucleosome on the chromatin. On contrary, under pathological conditions HMGB1 displays inflammatory response by interaction with specific cell surface receptors like RAGE, TLR-4, TLR9, and TLR2 and activates NF-kB downstream signaling pathways. The upregulation of HMGB1 is directly associated with the pathogenesis of cancer, sepsis, ischemia, hemorrhagic shock, anorexia, rheumatic disease, periodontal disease etc. Therefore, HMGB1 has been considered as a promising target in the treatment of various human diseases. The interest in HMGB1 is evident and reflected in the exponential increase in the recent publications, and therefore there is a need for an update on the understanding of the role of HMGB1 in pathogenesis and its potential application of HMGB1 as a therapeutic target in a number of human diseases.

  15. UV-damaged DNA binding protein-1 and de-etiolated-1 regulate golden 2-like transcription factor by assembling a cullin 4-based ubiquitin ligase in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fleshy fruit undergo a novel developmental program that ends in the irreversible process of ripening and eventual tissue senescence. During these maturation processes, fruit undergo numerous physiological, biochemical and structural alterations, making them more attractive to seed dispersal organism...

  16. Context influences on TALE-DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Julia M; Barrera, Luis A; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-06-11

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE-DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000-20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE-DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design.

  17. Prediction and validation of protein-protein interactors from genome-wide DNA-binding data using a knowledge-based machine-learning approach.

    PubMed

    Waardenberg, Ashley J; Homan, Bernou; Mohamed, Stephanie; Harvey, Richard P; Bouveret, Romaric

    2016-09-01

    The ability to accurately predict the DNA targets and interacting cofactors of transcriptional regulators from genome-wide data can significantly advance our understanding of gene regulatory networks. NKX2-5 is a homeodomain transcription factor that sits high in the cardiac gene regulatory network and is essential for normal heart development. We previously identified genomic targets for NKX2-5 in mouse HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes using DNA-adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID). Here, we apply machine learning algorithms and propose a knowledge-based feature selection method for predicting NKX2-5 protein : protein interactions based on motif grammar in genome-wide DNA-binding data. We assessed model performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and a completely independent DamID experiment performed with replicates. In addition to identifying previously described NKX2-5-interacting proteins, including GATA, HAND and TBX family members, a number of novel interactors were identified, with direct protein : protein interactions between NKX2-5 and retinoid X receptor (RXR), paired-related homeobox (PRRX) and Ikaros zinc fingers (IKZF) validated using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We also found that the interaction of RXRα with NKX2-5 mutations found in congenital heart disease (Q187H, R189G and R190H) was altered. These findings highlight an intuitive approach to accessing protein-protein interaction information of transcription factors in DNA-binding experiments.

  18. Prediction and validation of protein–protein interactors from genome-wide DNA-binding data using a knowledge-based machine-learning approach

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Bernou; Mohamed, Stephanie; Harvey, Richard P.; Bouveret, Romaric

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately predict the DNA targets and interacting cofactors of transcriptional regulators from genome-wide data can significantly advance our understanding of gene regulatory networks. NKX2-5 is a homeodomain transcription factor that sits high in the cardiac gene regulatory network and is essential for normal heart development. We previously identified genomic targets for NKX2-5 in mouse HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes using DNA-adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID). Here, we apply machine learning algorithms and propose a knowledge-based feature selection method for predicting NKX2-5 protein : protein interactions based on motif grammar in genome-wide DNA-binding data. We assessed model performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and a completely independent DamID experiment performed with replicates. In addition to identifying previously described NKX2-5-interacting proteins, including GATA, HAND and TBX family members, a number of novel interactors were identified, with direct protein : protein interactions between NKX2-5 and retinoid X receptor (RXR), paired-related homeobox (PRRX) and Ikaros zinc fingers (IKZF) validated using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We also found that the interaction of RXRα with NKX2-5 mutations found in congenital heart disease (Q187H, R189G and R190H) was altered. These findings highlight an intuitive approach to accessing protein–protein interaction information of transcription factors in DNA-binding experiments. PMID:27683156

  19. The semidominant Mi(b) mutation identifies a role for the HLH domain in DNA binding in addition to its role in protein dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrímsson, E; Nii, A; Fisher, D E; Ferré-D'Amaré, A R; McCormick, R J; Russell, L B; Burley, S K; Ward, J M; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1996-01-01

    The mouse microphthalmia (mi) locus encodes a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factor called MITF (microphthalmia transcription factor). Mutations at mi affect the development of several different cell types, including melanocytes, mast cells, osteoclasts and pigmented epithelial cells of the eye. Here we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of the semidominant Microphthalmia(brwnish) (Mi(b)) mutation. We show that this mutation primarily affects melanocytes and produces retinal degeneration. The mutation is a G to A transition leading to a Gly244Glu substitution in helix 2 of the HLH dimerization domain. This location is surprising since other semidominant mi mutations characterized to date have been shown to affect DNA binding or transcriptional activation domains of MITF and act as dominant negatives, while mutations that affect MITF dimerization are inherited recessively. Gel retardation assays showed that while the mutant MITF(Mi-b) protein retains its dimerization potential, it is defective in its ability to bind DNA. Computer modeling suggested that the Gly244Glu mutation might disrupt DNA binding by interfering with productive docking of the protein dimer onto DNA. The Mi(b) mutation therefore appears to dissociate a DNA recognition function of the HLH domain from its role in protein dimerization. Images PMID:8947051

  20. Length of the ORF, position of the first AUG and the Kozak motif are important factors in potential dual-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Wang, Ping; Fu, Yujie; Zheng, Yufang; Tang, Quan; Si, Lizhen; You, Jin; Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Yufei; Zhou, Li; Wei, Zejun; Lin, Bin; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2010-04-01

    A single mammalian transcript normally encodes one protein, but the transcript of GNAS (G-protein alpha-subunit) contains two reading frames and produces two structurally unrelated proteins, XLalphas and ALEX. No other confirmed GNAS-like dual-coding transcripts have been reported to date, even though many such candidate genes have been predicted by bioinformatics analysis. In this study, we constructed a series of vectors to test how two protein products were translated from a single transcript in vitro. The length of the ORF (open reading frame), position of the first AUG and the Kozak motif were found to be important factors. These factors, as well as 55-bp NMD (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay) rule, were used in a bioinformatics search for candidate dual-coding transcripts. A total of 1307, 750 and 474 two-ORF-containing transcripts were found in human, mouse and rat, respectively, of which 170, 89 and 70, respectively, were found to be potential dual-coding transcripts. Most transcripts showed low conservation among species. Interestingly, dual-coding transcripts were significantly enriched for transcripts from the zinc-finger protein family, which are usually DNA-binding proteins involved in regulation of the transcription process.

  1. Modulation of transcription factors by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Shishodia, Shishir; Singh, Tulika; Chaturvedi, Madan M

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric that has been consumed as a dietary spice for ages. Turmeric is widely used in traditional Indian medicine to cure biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. Extensive investigation over the last five decades has indicated that curcumin reduces blood cholesterol, prevents low-density lipoprotein oxidation, inhibits platelet aggregation, suppresses thrombosis and myocardial infarction, suppresses symptoms associated with type II diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease, inhibits HIV replication, enhances wound healing, protects from liver injury, increases bile secretion, protects from cataract formation, and protects from pulmonary toxicity and fibrosis. Evidence indicates that the divergent effects of curcumin are dependent on its pleiotropic molecular effects. These include the regulation of signal transduction pathways and direct modulation of several enzymatic activities. Most of these signaling cascades lead to the activation of transcription factors. Curcumin has been found to modulate the activity of several key transcription factors and, in turn, the cellular expression profiles. Curcumin has been shown to elicit vital cellular responses such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation by activating a cascade of molecular events. In this chapter, we briefly review the effects of curcumin on transcription factors NF-KB, AP-1, Egr-1, STATs, PPAR-gamma, beta-catenin, nrf2, EpRE, p53, CBP, and androgen receptor (AR) and AR-related cofactors giving major emphasis to the molecular mechanisms of its action.

  2. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya.

  3. DNA binding studies of Vinca alkaloids: experimental and computational evidence.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Prateek; Gupta, Surendra P; Pandav, Kumud; Barthwal, Ritu; Jayaram, B; Kumar, Surat

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence studies on the indole alkaloids vinblastine sulfate, vincristine sulfate, vincamine and catharanthine have demonstrated the DNA binding ability of these molecules. The binding mode of these molecules in the minor groove of DNA is non-specific. A new parameter of the purine-pyrimidine base sequence specificty was observed in order to define the non-specific DNA binding of ligands. Catharanthine had shown 'same' pattern of 'Pu-Py' specificity while evaluating its DNA binding profile. The proton resonances of a DNA decamer duplex were assigned. The models of the drug:DNA complexes were analyzed for DNA binding features. The effect of temperature on the DNA binding was also evaluated.

  4. Quantifying the effect of environment stability on the transcription factor repertoire of marine microbes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) regulate cellular functions in prokaryotes, often in response to environmental stimuli. Thus, the environment exerts constant selective pressure on the TF gene content of microbial communities. Recently a study on marine Synechococcus strains detected differences in their genomic TF content related to environmental adaptation, but so far the effect of environmental parameters on the content of TFs in bacterial communities has not been systematically investigated. Results We quantified the effect of environment stability on the transcription factor repertoire of marine pelagic microbes from the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome using interpolated physico-chemical parameters and multivariate statistics. Thirty-five percent of the difference in relative TF abundances between samples could be explained by environment stability. Six percent was attributable to spatial distance but none to a combination of both spatial distance and stability. Some individual TFs showed a stronger relationship to environment stability and space than the total TF pool. Conclusions Environmental stability appears to have a clearly detectable effect on TF gene content in bacterioplanktonic communities described by the GOS metagenome. Interpolated environmental parameters were shown to compare well to in situ measurements and were essential for quantifying the effect of the environment on the TF content. It is demonstrated that comprehensive and well-structured contextual data will strongly enhance our ability to interpret the functional potential of microbes from metagenomic data. PMID:22587903

  5. HIV-1 Vpu Accessory Protein Induces Caspase-mediated Cleavage of IRF3 Transcription Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Waheed, Abdul A.; Zhang, Zai-Rong; Freed, Eric O.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Vpu is an accessory protein encoded by HIV-1 that interferes with multiple host-cell functions. Herein we report that expression of Vpu by transfection into 293T cells causes partial proteolytic cleavage of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor in the innate anti-viral response. Vpu-induced IRF3 cleavage is mediated by caspases and occurs mainly at Asp-121. Cleavage produces a C-terminal fragment of ∼37 kDa that comprises the IRF dimerization and transactivation domains but lacks the DNA-binding domain. A similar cleavage is observed upon infection of the Jurkat T-cell line with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1. Two other HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vif and Vpr, also contribute to the induction of IRF3 cleavage in both the transfection and the infection systems. The C-terminal IRF3 fragment interferes with the transcriptional activity of full-length IRF3. Cleavage of IRF3 under all of these conditions correlates with cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an indicator of apoptosis. We conclude that Vpu contributes to the attenuation of the anti-viral response by partial inactivation of IRF3 while host cells undergo apoptosis. PMID:25352594

  6. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  7. Zelda is differentially required for chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and gene expression in the early Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Katharine N.; Bondra, Eliana R.; Moshe, Arbel; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Lieb, Jason D.; Kaplan, Tommy; McKay, Daniel J.; Harrison, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from a specified germ cell to a population of pluripotent cells occurs rapidly following fertilization. During this developmental transition, the zygotic genome is largely transcriptionally quiescent and undergoes significant chromatin remodeling. In Drosophila, the DNA-binding protein Zelda (also known as Vielfaltig) is required for this transition and for transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome. Open chromatin is associated with Zelda-bound loci, as well as more generally with regions of active transcription. Nonetheless, the extent to which Zelda influences chromatin accessibility across the genome is largely unknown. Here we used formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements to determine the role of Zelda in regulating regions of open chromatin in the early embryo. We demonstrate that Zelda is essential for hundreds of regions of open chromatin. This Zelda-mediated chromatin accessibility facilitates transcription-factor recruitment and early gene expression. Thus, Zelda possesses some key characteristics of a pioneer factor. Unexpectedly, chromatin at a large subset of Zelda-bound regions remains open even in the absence of Zelda. The GAGA factor-binding motif and embryonic GAGA factor binding are specifically enriched in these regions. We propose that both Zelda and GAGA factor function to specify sites of open chromatin and together facilitate the remodeling of the early embryonic genome. PMID:26335634

  8. Efficient biotinylation and single-step purification of tagged transcription factors in mammalian cells and transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Ernie; Rodriguez, Patrick; Bonte, Edgar; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Katsantoni, Eleni; Heck, Albert; Grosveld, Frank; Strouboulis, John

    2003-06-01

    Proteomic approaches require simple and efficient protein purification methodologies that are amenable to high throughput. Biotinylation is an attractive approach for protein complex purification due to the very high affinity of avidin/streptavidin for biotinylated templates. Here, we describe an approach for the single-step purification of transcription factor complex(es) based on specific in vivo biotinylation. We expressed the bacterial BirA biotin ligase in mammalian cells and demonstrated very efficient biotinylation of a hematopoietic transcription factor bearing a small (23-aa) artificial peptide tag. Biotinylation of the tagged transcription factor altered neither the factor's protein interactions or DNA binding properties in vivo nor its subnuclear distribution. Using this approach, we isolated the biotin-tagged transcription factor and at least one other known interacting protein from crude nuclear extracts by direct binding to streptavidin beads. Finally, this method works efficiently in transgenic mice, thus raising the prospect of using biotinylation tagging in protein complex purification directly from animal tissues. Therefore, BirA-mediated biotinylation of tagged proteins provides the basis for the single-step purification of proteins from mammalian cells.

  9. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  10. High-Resolution Mapping of In vivo Genomic Transcription Factor Binding Sites Using In situ DNase I Footprinting and ChIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Chumsakul, Onuma; Nakamura, Kensuke; Kurata, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Hobman, Jon L.; Ogasawara, Naotake; Oshima, Taku; Ishikawa, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Accurate identification of the DNA-binding sites of transcription factors and other DNA-binding proteins on the genome is crucial to understanding their molecular interactions with DNA. Here, we describe a new method: Genome Footprinting by high-throughput sequencing (GeF-seq), which combines in vivo DNase I digestion of genomic DNA with ChIP coupled with high-throughput sequencing. We have determined the in vivo binding sites of a Bacillus subtilis global regulator, AbrB, using GeF-seq. This method shows that exact DNA-binding sequences, which were protected from in vivo DNase I digestion, were resolved at a comparable resolution to that achieved by in vitro DNase I footprinting, and this was simply attained without the necessity of prediction by peak-calling programs. Moreover, DNase I digestion of the bacterial nucleoid resolved the closely positioned AbrB-binding sites, which had previously appeared as one peak in ChAP-chip and ChAP-seq experiments. The high-resolution determination of AbrB-binding sites using GeF-seq enabled us to identify bipartite TGGNA motifs in 96% of the AbrB-binding sites. Interestingly, in a thousand binding sites with very low-binding intensities, single TGGNA motifs were also identified. Thus, GeF-seq is a powerful method to elucidate the molecular mechanism of target protein binding to its cognate DNA sequences. PMID:23580539

  11. Arabidopsis WRKY2 transcription factor mediates seed germination and postgermination arrest of development by abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenbo; Yu, Diqiu

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant WRKY DNA-binding transcription factors are key regulators in certain developmental programs. A number of studies have suggested that WRKY genes may mediate seed germination and postgermination growth. However, it is unclear whether WRKY genes mediate ABA-dependent seed germination and postgermination growth arrest. Results To determine directly the role of Arabidopsis WRKY2 transcription factor during ABA-dependent seed germination and postgermination growth arrest, we isolated T-DNA insertion mutants. Two independent T-DNA insertion mutants for WRKY2 were hypersensitive to ABA responses only during seed germination and postgermination early growth. wrky2 mutants displayed delayed or decreased expression of ABI5 and ABI3, but increased or prolonged expression of Em1 and Em6. wrky2 mutants and wild type showed similar levels of expression for miR159 and its target genes MYB33 and MYB101. Analysis of WRKY2 expression level in ABA-insensitive and ABA-deficient mutants abi5-1, abi3-1, aba2-3 and aba3-1 further indicated that ABA-induced WRKY2 accumulation during germination and postgermination early growth requires ABI5, ABI3, ABA2 and ABA3. Conclusion ABA hypersensitivity of the wrky2 mutants during seed germination and postgermination early seedling establishment is attributable to elevated mRNA levels of ABI5, ABI3 and ABI5-induced Em1 and Em6 in the mutants. WRKY2-mediated ABA responses are independent of miR159 and its target genes MYB33 and MYB101. ABI5, ABI3, ABA2 and ABA3 are important regulators of the transcripts of WRKY2 by ABA treatment. Our results suggest that WRKY2 transcription factor mediates seed germination and postgermination developmental arrest by ABA. PMID:19622176

  12. The COUP-TFII variant lacking a DNA-binding domain inhibits the activation of the Cyp7a1 promoter through physical interaction with COUP-TFII.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tomoko; Suehiro, Jun-ichi; Miyazaki, Hideki; Minami, Takashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiki; Miyazono, Kohei; Watabe, Tetsuro

    2013-06-01

    The COUP-TFII (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II) nuclear receptor, which is composed of a DNA-binding domain and a ligand-binding domain, exerts pleiotropic effects on development and cell differentiation by regulating the transcription of its target genes, including Cyp7a1 (cytochrome P450, family 7, subfamily a, polypeptide 1), which plays important roles in catabolism of cholesterol in the liver. Although multiple variants of COUP-TFII exist, their roles in the regulation of Cyp7a1 expression have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the roles of COUP-TFII-V2 (variant 2), which lacks a DNA-binding domain, in the regulation of the transcriptional control of the Cyp7a1 gene by COUP-TFII in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We found that COUP-TFII-V2 was significantly expressed in Huh7 cells, in which Cyp7a1 was not expressed. Furthermore, knockdown of COUP-TFII-V2 enhanced endogenous Cyp7a1 expression in Huh7 cells. Although COUP-TFII activates the Cyp7a1 promoter through direct binding to DNA, this activation was affected by COUP-TFII-V2, which physically interacted with COUP-TFII and inhibited its DNA-binding ability. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that COUP-TFII-V2 inhibited the binding of endogenous COUP-TFII to the intact Cyp7a1 promoter. The results of the present study suggest that COUP-TFII-V2 negatively regulates the function of COUP-TFII by inhibiting its binding to DNA to decrease Cyp7a1 expression.

  13. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    PubMed

    Kashanian