Science.gov

Sample records for dnae2 complement dna

  1. Error-prone DnaE2 Balances the Genome Mutation Rates in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ran; Chen, Jiang-He; Feng, Wan-Wan; Zhang, Zheng; Yin, Jun; Li, Ze-Shuo; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    dnaE is an alpha subunit of the tripartite protein complex of DNA polymerase III that is responsible for the replication of bacterial genome. The dnaE gene is often duplicated in many bacteria, and the duplicated dnaE gene was reported dispensable for cell survivals and error-prone in DNA replication in a mystery. In this study, we found that all sequenced myxobacterial genomes possessed two dnaE genes. The duplicate dnaE genes were both highly conserved but evolved divergently, suggesting their importance in myxobacteria. Using Myxococcus xanthus DK1622 as a model, we confirmed that dnaE1 (MXAN_5844) was essential for cell survival, while dnaE2 (MXAN_3982) was dispensable and encoded an error-prone enzyme for replication. The deletion of dnaE2 had small effects on cellular growth and social motility, but significantly decreased the development and sporulation abilities, which could be recovered by the complementation of dnaE2. The expression of dnaE1 was always greatly higher than that of dnaE2 in either the growth or developmental stage. However, overexpression of dnaE2 could not make dnaE1 deletable, probably due to their protein structural and functional divergences. The dnaE2 overexpression not only improved the growth, development and sporulation abilities, but also raised the genome mutation rate of M. xanthus. We argued that the low-expressed error-prone DnaE2 played as a balancer for the genome mutation rates, ensuring low mutation rates for cell adaptation in new environments but avoiding damages from high mutation rates to cells.

  2. Error-prone DnaE2 Balances the Genome Mutation Rates in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ran; Chen, Jiang-he; Feng, Wan-wan; Zhang, Zheng; Yin, Jun; Li, Ze-shuo; Li, Yue-zhong

    2017-01-01

    dnaE is an alpha subunit of the tripartite protein complex of DNA polymerase III that is responsible for the replication of bacterial genome. The dnaE gene is often duplicated in many bacteria, and the duplicated dnaE gene was reported dispensable for cell survivals and error-prone in DNA replication in a mystery. In this study, we found that all sequenced myxobacterial genomes possessed two dnaE genes. The duplicate dnaE genes were both highly conserved but evolved divergently, suggesting their importance in myxobacteria. Using Myxococcus xanthus DK1622 as a model, we confirmed that dnaE1 (MXAN_5844) was essential for cell survival, while dnaE2 (MXAN_3982) was dispensable and encoded an error-prone enzyme for replication. The deletion of dnaE2 had small effects on cellular growth and social motility, but significantly decreased the development and sporulation abilities, which could be recovered by the complementation of dnaE2. The expression of dnaE1 was always greatly higher than that of dnaE2 in either the growth or developmental stage. However, overexpression of dnaE2 could not make dnaE1 deletable, probably due to their protein structural and functional divergences. The dnaE2 overexpression not only improved the growth, development and sporulation abilities, but also raised the genome mutation rate of M. xanthus. We argued that the low-expressed error-prone DnaE2 played as a balancer for the genome mutation rates, ensuring low mutation rates for cell adaptation in new environments but avoiding damages from high mutation rates to cells. PMID:28203231

  3. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fungal infections and some parasitic infections such as malaria . Normal Results Total blood complement level: 41 to ... Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis Malaria Protein in diet Rheumatoid arthritis Septicemia Shock Systemic ...

  4. Metals and DNA: molecular left-handed complements.

    PubMed

    Barton, J K

    1986-08-15

    Chiral metal complexes provide unique molecular probes for DNA. Chiral reagents that "recognize" different local structures along the DNA strand have been designed by a process in which the asymmetry in shape and size of the complex is matched to that of the DNA helical groove. As a result, the chiral metal complexes provide very sensitive probes for local helical structure, both left- and right-handed. Direct coordination of chiral complexes to the DNA bases adds an element of sequence selectivity to the probe design. With a suitable reactive metal center, reagents that target chemically specific sites along the strand may be developed. One such chiral reagent, which cleaves left-handed DNA sites with photoactivation, has been useful in mapping this distinct conformation and examining its biological role. The conformation-specific molecular cleaver, much like a DNA-binding enzyme, recognizes and reacts at discrete sites along the DNA strand. These site-specific chiral metal complexes provide exciting new tools for probing the local variations in DNA structure and its role in the regulation of gene expression.

  5. Complementation between polymerase- and exonuclease-deficient mitochondrial DNA polymerase mutants in genomically engineered flies

    PubMed Central

    Macao, Bertil; Grönke, Sebastian; Siibak, Triinu; Stewart, James B; Baggio, Francesca; Dols, Jacqueline; Partridge, Linda; Falkenberg, Maria; Wredenberg, Anna; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-01-01

    Replication errors are the main cause of mtDNA mutations and a compelling approach to decrease mutation levels would therefore be to increase the fidelity of the catalytic subunit (POLγA) of the mtDNA polymerase. Here we genomically engineered the tamas locus, encoding fly POLγA, and introduced alleles expressing exonuclease- (exo-) and polymerase-deficient (pol-) POLγA versions. The exo- mutant leads to accumulation of point mutations and linear deletions of mtDNA, whereas pol- mutants cause mtDNA depletion. The mutant tamas alleles are developmentally lethal but can complement each other in trans resulting in viable flies with clonally expanded mtDNA mutations. Reconstitution of human mtDNA replication in vitro confirms that replication is a highly dynamic process where POLγA goes on and off the template to allow complementation during proofreading and elongation. The created fly models are valuable tools to study germ line transmission of mtDNA and the pathophysiology of POLγA mutation disease. PMID:26554610

  6. Clinical characteristics, DNA repair, and complementation groups in xeroderma pigmentosum patients from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hashem, N; Bootsma, D; Keijzer, W; Greene, A; Coriell, L; Thomas, G; Cleaver, J E

    1980-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) has been reported to be unusually frequent among Middle Eastern populations. This report describes the first survey of DNA repair characteristics among Egyptians. Sixteen XP patients were contacted, and biopsies from eight were analyzed for unscheduled DNA synthesis, strand breakage during pyrimidine dimer excision, and complementation groups. The patients were equally distributed between Complementation Groups A and C. Unscheduled synthesis and strand breaks were significantly higher in Group C than in Group A cells. Central nervous system disorders were found in all of the Group A patients and in none of the Group C patients. No clinical symptoms were observed in the heterozygotes. A 2-month-old sib of an XP patient was free of symptoms, but unscheduled synthesis and strand breakage in cultures from this sib were the same as in the related XP homozygote. From the relative frequencies of each complementation group found in various parts of the world, we offer a hypothesis concerning the relative sizes and roles for gene products specified by the alleles or genes corresponding to each complementation group.

  7. Interallelic complementation provides functional evidence for cohesin-cohesin interactions on DNA.

    PubMed

    Eng, Thomas; Guacci, Vincent; Koshland, Douglas

    2015-11-15

    The cohesin complex (Mcd1p, Smc1p, Smc3p, and Scc3p) has multiple roles in chromosome architecture, such as promoting sister chromatid cohesion, chromosome condensation, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. The prevailing embrace model for sister chromatid cohesion posits that a single cohesin complex entraps both sister chromatids. We report interallelic complementation between pairs of nonfunctional mcd1 alleles (mcd1-1 and mcd1-Q266) or smc3 alleles (smc3-42 and smc3-K113R). Cells bearing individual mcd1 or smc3 mutant alleles are inviable and defective for both sister chromatid cohesion and condensation. However, cells coexpressing two defective mcd1 or two defective smc3 alleles are viable and have cohesion and condensation. Because cohesin contains only a single copy of Smc3p or Mcd1p, these examples of interallelic complementation must result from interplay or communication between the two defective cohesin complexes, each harboring one of the mutant allele products. Neither mcd1-1p nor smc3-42p is bound to chromosomes when expressed individually at its restrictive temperature. However, their chromosome binding is restored when they are coexpressed with their chromosome-bound interallelic complementing partner. Our results support a mechanism by which multiple cohesin complexes interact on DNA to mediate cohesion and condensation.

  8. UV damage-specific DNA-binding protein in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, H.; Fujiwara, Y. )

    1991-03-29

    The gel mobility shift assay method revealed a specifically ultraviolet (UV) damage recognizing, DNA-binding protein in nuclear extracts of normal human cells. The resulted DNA/protein complexes caused the two retarded mobility shifts. Four xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XPE) fibroblast strains derived from unrelated Japanese families were not deficient in such a DNA damage recognition/binding protein because of the normal complex formation and gel mobility shifts, although we confirmed the reported lack of the protein in the European XPE (XP2RO and XP3RO) cells. Thus, the absence of this binding protein is not always commonly observed in all the XPE strains, and the partially repair-deficient and intermediately UV-hypersensitive phenotype of XPE cells are much similar whether or not they lack the protein.

  9. Quantitative determination of anti-dsDNA antibodies and antibody/dsDNA stoichiometries in prepared, soluble complement-fixing antibody/dsDNA immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R P; Horgan, C

    1984-10-01

    We have investigated quantitatively the complement-mediated binding of prepared, soluble 125I-7S IgG antibody/3H-dsDNA immune complexes to human red blood cells (RBCs). We have performed these studies by using a detailed modification of the RBC-CF assay [Pedersen et al., J. Immun. Meth. 38, 269-280 (1980)] which now allows for the simultaneous measurement of both 3H-DNA and 125I-binding to the cells. Our results indicate that, in the case of three SLE patients, their anti-dsDNA antibody titers are sufficiently high that a small fraction of their 125I-7S IgG antibodies (ca 0.1-0.2%) can be identified as specifically anti-dsDNA. We have also used an indirect method (with 125I-labelled rabbit anti-human IgG) for the determination of IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies in complement-fixing antibody/dsDNA immune complexes that bind to RBCs, and the results of these measurements are in reasonable agreement with the direct binding experiments. These studies have also allowed us to estimate the antibody/DNA stoichiometries in complement-fixing immune complexes. The results of these experiments may provide a useful standard for the analysis of monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibodies.

  10. Complementation of an Escherichia coli pyrF mutant with DNA from Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Peck, H.D. Jr.; Przybyla, A.E.

    1986-02-01

    A PyrF/sup -/ mutant of Escherichia coli (SK1108, pyrF::Tn5 Kan/sup r/) was complemented with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) structural gene for orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase. Either orientation of a 1.6-kilobase-pair D. vulgaris DNA fragment (pLP3B or pLP3A) complemented the PyrF/sup -/ strain suggesting that the D. vulgaris pyrF promoter was functional. The apparent product of the D. vulgaris pyrF gene was a single 26-kilodalton polypeptide. These results demonstrate the utility of E. coli cloning systems in studying metabolic and energetic pathways in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  11. Complementation of DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group C by the transfer of human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, G.P.; Athwal, R.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Complementation of DNA excision repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group C (XP-C) has been achieved by the transfer of human chromosome 5. Individual human chromosomes tagged with a selectable marker were transferred to XP-C cells by microcell fusion from mouse-human hybrid cell lines each bearing a single different human chromosome. Analysis of the chromosome transfer clones revealed that introduction of chromosome 5 into XP-C cells corrected the DNA repair defect as well as UV-sensitive phenotypes, while chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 9, 13, 15, 17, and 21 failed to complement. The introduced chromosome 5 in complemented UV[sup r] clones was distinguished from the parental XP-C chromosomes by polymorphism for dinucleotide (CA)[sub n] repeats at two loci, D5S117 and D5S209. In addition, an intact marked chromosome 5 was rescued into mouse cells from a complemented UV[sup r] clone by microcell fusion. Five subclones of a complemented clone that had lost the marked chromosome 5 exhibited UV-sensitive and repair-deficient phenotypes identical to parental XP-C cells. Concordant loss of the transferred chromosome and reappearance of XP-C phenotype further confirmed the presence of a DNA repair gene on human chromosome 5. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. In-Frame cDNA Library Combined with Protein Complementation Assay Identifies ARL11-Binding Partners

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, Ilkyun; Jung, Yoonsuh; McConkey, David; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5′-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an “in-frame cDNA library.” We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11), cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1). Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5′-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems. PMID:23272234

  13. In-frame cDNA library combined with protein complementation assay identifies ARL11-binding partners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, Ilkyun; Jung, Yoonsuh; McConkey, David; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5'-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an "in-frame cDNA library." We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11), cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1). Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5'-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems.

  14. Inherited mitochondrial DNA variants can affect complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways: insights into mitochondrial–nuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cristina Kenney, M.; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R.; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Cáceres-del-Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Vawter, Marquis; Michal Jazwinski, S.; Miceli, Michael; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in developed countries. While linked to genetic polymorphisms in the complement pathway, there are many individuals with high risk alleles that do not develop AMD, suggesting that other ‘modifiers’ may be involved. Mitochondrial (mt) haplogroups, defined by accumulations of specific mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which represent population origins, may be one such modifier. J haplogroup has been associated with high risk for AMD while the H haplogroup is protective. It has been difficult to assign biological consequences for haplogroups so we created human ARPE-19 cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which have identical nuclei but mitochondria of either J or H haplogroups, to investigate their effects upon bioenergetics and molecular pathways. J cybrids have altered bioenergetic profiles compared with H cybrids. Q-PCR analyses show significantly lower expression levels for seven respiratory complex genes encoded by mtDNA. J and H cybrids have significantly altered expression of eight nuclear genes of the alternative complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways. Sequencing of the entire mtDNA was carried out for all the cybrids to identify haplogroup and non-haplogroup defining SNPs. mtDNA can mediate cellular bioenergetics and expression levels of nuclear genes related to complement, inflammation and apoptosis. Sequencing data suggest that observed effects are not due to rare mtDNA variants but rather the combination of SNPs representing the J versus H haplogroups. These findings represent a paradigm shift in our concepts of mt–nuclear interactions. PMID:24584571

  15. A human ortholog of archaeal DNA repair protein Hef is defective in Fanconi anemia complementation group M.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Medhurst, Annette L; Ling, Chen; Xue, Yutong; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bier, Patrick; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Stone, Stacie; Dokal, Inderjeet; Mathew, Christopher G; Hoatlin, Maureen; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Wang, Weidong

    2005-09-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic disease characterized by genomic instability and cancer predisposition. Nine genes involved in Fanconi anemia have been identified; their products participate in a DNA damage-response network involving BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 2,3). We previously purified a Fanconi anemia core complex containing the FANCL ubiquitin ligase and six other Fanconi anemia-associated proteins. Each protein in this complex is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2, a key reaction in the Fanconi anemia DNA damage-response pathway. Here we show that another component of this complex, FAAP250, is mutant in individuals with Fanconi anemia of a new complementation group (FA-M). FAAP250 or FANCM has sequence similarity to known DNA-repair proteins, including archaeal Hef, yeast MPH1 and human ERCC4 or XPF. FANCM can dissociate DNA triplex, possibly owing to its ability to translocate on duplex DNA. FANCM is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and becomes hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage. Our data suggest an evolutionary link between Fanconi anemia-associated proteins and DNA repair; FANCM may act as an engine that translocates the Fanconi anemia core complex along DNA.

  16. Complementation of a DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells by transfer of human chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, G.P.; Athwal, R.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Complementation of the repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group A was achieved by the transfer of human chromosome 9. A set of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each containing a single Ecogpt-marked human chromosome, was used as a source of donor chromosomes. Chromosome transfer to XPTG-1 cells, a hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient mutant of simian virus 40-transformed complementation group A cells, was achieved by microcell fusion and selection for Ecogpt. Chromosome-transfer clones of XPTG-1 cells, each containing a different human donor chromosome, were analyzed for complementation of sensitivity to UV irradiation. Among all the clones, increased levels of resistance to UV was observed only in clones containing chromosome 9. Since our recipient cell line XPTG-1 is hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient, cultivation of Ecogpt+ clones in medium containing 6-thioguanine permits selection of cells for loss of the marker and, by inference, transferred chromosome 9. Clones isolated for growth in 6-thioguanine, which have lost the Ecogpt-marked chromosome, exhibited a UV-sensitive phenotype, confirming the presence of the repair gene(s) for complementation group A on chromosome 9.

  17. Assignment of the XRCC2 human DNA repair gene to chromosome 7q36 by complementation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.J.; Thompson, L.H.; Zhao, Y.

    1995-04-10

    The V79 hamster cell line irs1 is a repair-deficient mutant hypersensitive to radiation and DNA-reactive chemical agents. Somatic cell hybrids were formed by fusing irs1 cells with human lymphocytes and selecting for complementation in medium containing concentrations of mitomycin C (MMC) that are toxic to irs1. Thirty-eight MMC-resistant hybrids showed extensive segregation of human chromosomes, with 35 of them retaining human chromosome 7, as indicated by molecular marker and cytogenetic analyses. Inter-Alu-PCR products from the DNA of hybrids, when used as a fluorescence in situ hybridization probe onto normal human metaphases, indicated that one resistant hybrid was monochromosomal for chromosome 7 and that the three resistant hybrids shown to be negative for chromosome 7 markers have retained portions of chromosome 7, with region 7q36 being the smallest common region. MMC-sensitive subclones of a resistant hybrid lost human chromosome 7. Therefore, the gene complementing the repair defect, XRCC2 (X-ray repair cross complementing), is assigned to human chromosome 7q36. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-07-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene.

  19. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Satokata, I; Ogita, Z; Uchida, T; Okada, Y

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene. Images PMID:2748601

  20. Ancient DNA complements microfossil record in deep-sea subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Lejzerowicz, Franck; Esling, Philippe; Majewski, Wojciech; Szczuciński, Witold; Decelle, Johan; Obadia, Cyril; Arbizu, Pedro Martinez; Pawlowski, Jan

    2013-08-23

    Deep-sea subsurface sediments are the most important archives of marine biodiversity. Until now, these archives were studied mainly using the microfossil record, disregarding large amounts of DNA accumulated on the deep-sea floor. Accessing ancient DNA (aDNA) molecules preserved down-core would offer unique insights into the history of marine biodiversity, including both fossilized and non-fossilized taxa. Here, we recover aDNA of eukaryotic origin across four cores collected at abyssal depths in the South Atlantic, in up to 32.5 thousand-year-old sediment layers. Our study focuses on Foraminifera and Radiolaria, two major groups of marine microfossils also comprising diverse non-fossilized taxa. We describe their assemblages in down-core sediment layers applying both micropalaeontological and environmental DNA sequencing approaches. Short fragments of the foraminiferal and radiolarian small subunit rRNA gene recovered from sedimentary DNA extracts provide evidence that eukaryotic aDNA is preserved in deep-sea sediments encompassing the last glacial maximum. Most aDNA were assigned to non-fossilized taxa that also dominate in molecular studies of modern environments. Our study reveals the potential of aDNA to better document the evolution of past marine ecosystems and opens new horizons for the development of deep-sea palaeogenomics.

  1. Lac Repressor Mediated DNA Looping: Monte Carlo Simulation of Constrained DNA Molecules Complemented with Current Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Biton, Yoav Y.; Kumar, Sandip; Dunlap, David; Swigon, David

    2014-01-01

    Tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments can be used to detect time-resolved loop formation in a single DNA molecule by measuring changes in the length of a DNA tether. Interpretation of such experiments is greatly aided by computer simulations of DNA looping which allow one to analyze the structure of the looped DNA and estimate DNA-protein binding constants specific for the loop formation process. We here present a new Monte Carlo scheme for accurate simulation of DNA configurations subject to geometric constraints and apply this method to Lac repressor mediated DNA looping, comparing the simulation results with new experimental data obtained by the TPM technique. Our simulations, taking into account the details of attachment of DNA ends and fluctuations of the looped subsegment of the DNA, reveal the origin of the double-peaked distribution of RMS values observed by TPM experiments by showing that the average RMS value for anti-parallel loop types is smaller than that of parallel loop types. The simulations also reveal that the looping probabilities for the anti-parallel loop types are significantly higher than those of the parallel loop types, even for loops of length 600 and 900 base pairs, and that the correct proportion between the heights of the peaks in the distribution can only be attained when loops with flexible Lac repressor conformation are taken into account. Comparison of the in silico and in vitro results yields estimates for the dissociation constants characterizing the binding affinity between O1 and Oid DNA operators and the dimeric arms of the Lac repressor. PMID:24800809

  2. Isolation of cDNA clones specifying the fourth component of mouse complement and its isotype, sex-limited protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, M; Takahashi, M; Natsuume-Sakai, S; Nonaka, M; Tanaka, S; Shimizu, A; Honjo, T

    1984-01-01

    cDNA clones specific for the fourth component of mouse complement (C4) and its hormonally regulated isotype, sex-linked protein (Slp), were isolated using as a probe a 20-mer synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to a known sequence of human C4 cDNA. Two types of clones, one specific for C4 (pFC4/10, with a 3.7 kilobase insert) and one specific for Slp (pFSlp/1, with a 4.7 kilobase insert), were isolated from liver cDNA libraries constructed from the Slp-producing FM mouse strain. The cDNA inserts of these clones shared 70% of the restriction sites determined. Only one type of clone was isolated from the Slp-negative DBA/1 strain; this type showed restriction maps indistinguishable from that of pFC4/10. pFC4/10 and pFSlp/1 displayed extensive homology: 94% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the C4a region and 92% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the thiol-ester region. An Arg-Gln-Lys-Arg sequence in the beta-alpha junction and a Cys-Ala-Glu-Gln sequence in the thiol-ester site were identified for both proteins. A remarkable divergency between C4 and Slp sequences was recognized in the region immediately following the C4a sequence. PMID:6208559

  3. Preferential association of a functional variant in complement receptor 2 with antibodies to double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Giles, Brendan M; Taylor, Rhonda L; Yette, Gabriel A; Lough, Kara M; Ng, Han Leng; Abraham, Lawrence J; Wu, Hui; Kelly, Jennifer A; Glenn, Stuart B; Adler, Adam J; Williams, Adrienne H; Comeau, Mary E; Ziegler, Julie T; Marion, Miranda; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Dam; Lee, Hye-Soon; Criswell, Lindsey A; Freedman, Barry I; Gilkeson, Gary S; Guthridge, Joel M; Jacob, Chaim O; James, Judith A; Kamen, Diane L; Merrill, Joan T; Sivils, Kathy Moser; Niewold, Timothy B; Petri, Michelle A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D; Scofield, R Hal; Stevens, Anne M; Vilá, Luis M; Vyse, Timothy J; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Harley, John B; Langefeld, Carl D; Gaffney, Patrick M; Brown, Elizabeth E; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Ulgiati, Daniela; Tsao, Betty P; Boackle, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 152700) is characterised by the production of antibodies to nuclear antigens. We previously identified variants in complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) that were associated with decreased risk of SLE. This study aimed to identify the causal variant for this association. Methods Genotyped and imputed genetic variants spanning CR2 were assessed for association with SLE in 15 750 case-control subjects from four ancestral groups. Allele-specific functional effects of associated variants were determined using quantitative real-time PCR, quantitative flow cytometry, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR. Results The strongest association signal was detected at rs1876453 in intron 1 of CR2 (pmeta=4.2×10−4, OR 0.85), specifically when subjects were stratified based on the presence of dsDNA autoantibodies (case-control pmeta=7.6×10−7, OR 0.71; case-only pmeta=1.9×10−4, OR 0.75). Although allele-specific effects on B cell CR2 mRNA or protein levels were not identified, levels of complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35) mRNA and protein were significantly higher on B cells of subjects harbouring the minor allele (p=0.0248 and p=0.0006, respectively). The minor allele altered the formation of several DNA protein complexes by EMSA, including one containing CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), an effect that was confirmed by ChIP-PCR. Conclusions These data suggest that rs1876453 in CR2 has long-range effects on gene regulation that decrease susceptibility to lupus. Since the minor allele at rs1876453 is preferentially associated with reduced risk of the highly specific dsDNA autoantibodies that are present in preclinical, active and severe lupus, understanding its mechanisms will have important therapeutic implications. PMID:25180293

  4. DNA sequences of Alu elements indicate a recent replacement of the human autosomal genetic complement

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, A.; Deininger, P.L.; Batzer, M.A.

    1996-04-30

    DNA sequences of neutral nuclear autosomal loci, compared across diverse human populations, provide a previously untapped perspective into the mode and tempo of the emergence of modern humans and a critical comparison with published clonally inherited mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome measurements of human diversity. We obtained over 55 kilobases of sequence from three autosomal loci encompassing Alu repeats for representatives of diverse human populations as well as orthologous sequences for other hominoid species at one of these loci. Nucleotide diversity was exceedingly low. Most individuals and populations were identical. Only a single nucleotide difference distinguished presumed ancestral alleles from descendants. These results differ from those expected if alleles from divergent archaic populations were maintained through multiregional continuity. The observed virtual lack of sequence polymorphism is the signature of a recent single origin for modern humans, with general replacement of archaic populations. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  6. Human ERCC5 cDNA-cosmid complementation for excision repair and bipartite amino acid domains conserved with RAD proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    MacInnes, M A; Dickson, J A; Hernandez, R R; Learmonth, D; Lin, G Y; Mudgett, J S; Park, M S; Schauer, S; Reynolds, R J; Strniste, G F

    1993-01-01

    Several human genes related to DNA excision repair (ER) have been isolated via ER cross-species complementation (ERCC) of UV-sensitive CHO cells. We have now isolated and characterized cDNAs for the human ERCC5 gene that complement CHO UV135 cells. The ERCC5 mRNA size is about 4.6 kb. Our available cDNA clones are partial length, and no single clone was active for UV135 complementation. When cDNAs were mixed pairwise with a cosmid clone containing an overlapping 5'-end segment of the ERCC5 gene, DNA transfer produced UV-resistant colonies with 60 to 95% correction of UV resistance relative to either a genomic ERCC5 DNA transformant or the CHO AA8 progenitor cells. cDNA-cosmid transformants regained intermediate levels (20 to 45%) of ER-dependent reactivation of a UV-damaged pSVCATgpt reporter plasmid. Our evidence strongly implicates an in situ recombination mechanism in cDNA-cosmid complementation for ER. The complete deduced amino acid sequence of ERCC5 was reconstructed from several cDNA clones encoding a predicted protein of 1,186 amino acids. The ERCC5 protein has extensive sequence similarities, in bipartite domains A and B, to products of RAD repair genes of two yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad13. Sequence, structural, and functional data taken together indicate that ERCC5 and its relatives are probable functional homologs. A second locus represented by S. cerevisiae YKL510 and S. pombe rad2 genes is structurally distinct from the ERCC5 locus but retains vestigial A and B domain similarities. Our analyses suggest that ERCC5 is a nuclear-localized protein with one or more highly conserved helix-loop-helix segments within domains A and B. Images PMID:8413238

  7. Human ERCC5 cDNA-cosmid complementation for excision repair and bipartite amino acid domains conserved with RAD proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.A.; Dickson, J.A.; Hernandez, R.R.; Lin, G.Y.; Park, M.S.; Schauer, S.; Reynolds, R.J.; Strniste, G.F. ); Learmonth, D. ); Mudgett, J.S. ); Yu, J.Y. )

    1993-10-01

    Several human genes related to DNA excision repair (ER) have been isolated via ER cross-species complementation (ERCC) of UV-sensitive CHO cells. The authors have now isolated and characterized cDNAs for the human ERCC5 gene that complement CHO UV135 cells. The ERCC5 mRNA size is about 4.6 kb. Their available cDNA clones are partial length, and no single clone was active for UV135 complementation. When cDNAs were mixed pairwise with a cosmid clone containing an overlapping 5[prime]-end segment of the ERCC5 gene, DNA transfer produced UV-resistant colonies with 60 to 95% correction of UV resistance relative to either a genomic ERCC5 DNA transformant or the CHO AA8 progenitor cells. cDNA-cosmid transformants regained intermediate levels (20 to 45%) of ER-dependent reactivation of a UV-damaged pSVCATgpt reporter plasmid. Their evidence strongly implicates an in situ recombination mechanism in cDNA-cosmid complementation for ER. The complete deduced amino acid sequence of ERCC5 was reconstructed for several cDNA clones encoding a predicted protein of 1,186 amino acids. The ERCC5 protein has extensive sequence similarities, in bipartite domains A and B, to products of RAD repair genes of two yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad13. Sequence, structural, and functional data taken together indicate that ERCC5 and its relatives are probable functional homologs. A second locus represented by S. cerevisiae YKL510 and S. pombe rad2 genes is structurally distinct from the ERCC5 locus but retains vestigial A and B domain similarities. Their analyses suggest that ERCC5 is a nuclear-localized protein with one or more highly conserved helix-loop-helix segments within domains A and B. 69 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Isolation of a gene encoding a chaperonin-like protein by complementation of yeast amino acid transport mutants with human cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Segel, G B; Boal, T R; Cardillo, T S; Murant, F G; Lichtman, M A; Sherman, F

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA library in lambda-yes plasmid was used to transform a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in histidine biosynthesis (his4-401) and histidine permease (hip1-614) and with the general amino acid permease (GAP) repressed by excess ammonium. We investigated three plasmids complementing the transport defect on a medium with a low concentration of histidine. Inserts in these plasmids hybridized with human genomic but not yeast genomic DNA, indicating their human origin. mRNA corresponding to the human DNA insert was produced by each yeast transformant. Complementation of the histidine transport defect was confirmed by direct measurement of histidine uptake, which was increased 15- to 65-fold in the transformants as compared with the parental strain. Competitive inhibition studies, measurement of citrulline uptake, and lack of complementation in gap1- strains indicated that the human cDNA genes code for proteins that prevent GAP repression by ammonium. The amino acid sequence encoded by one of the cDNA clones is related to T-complex proteins, which suggests a "chaperonin"-like function. We suggest that the human chaperonin-like protein stabilizes the NPR1 gene product and prevents inactivation of GAP. Images PMID:1352881

  9. Correction of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D mutant cell phenotypes by chromosome and gene transfer: Involvement of the human ERCC2 DNA repair gene

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.L.; McDaniel, L.D.; Johns, D.; Schultz, R.A. ); Friedberg, E.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Cultured cells from individuals afflicted with the genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) exhibit sensitivity to UV radiation and defective nucleotide excision repair. Complementation of these mutant phenotypes after the introduction of single human chromosomes from repair-proficient cells into XP cells has provided a means of mapping the genes involved in this disease. The authors now report the phenotypic correction of XP cells from genetic complementation group D (XP-D) by a single human chromosome designated Tneo. Detailed molecular characterization of Tneo revealed a rearranged structure involving human chromosomes 16 and 19, including the excision repair cross-complementing 2 (ERCC2) gene from the previously described human DNA repair gene cluster at 19q13.2-q13.3. Direct transfer of a cosmid bearing the ERCC2 gene conferred UV resistance to XP-D cells.

  10. Complementation of the UV-sensitive phenotype of a xeroderma pigmentosum human cell line by transfection with a cDNA clone library

    SciTech Connect

    Teitz, T.; Naiman, T.; Avissar, S.S.; Bar, S.; Okayama, H.; Canaani, D.

    1987-12-01

    In previous work, a xeroderma pigmentosum cell line belonging to complementation group C was established by transformation with origin-defective simian virus 40. We now report the complementation of the UV sensitivity of this cell line by gene transfer. A human cDNA clone library constructed in a mammalian expression vector, and itself incorporated in a lambda phage vector, was introduced into the cells as a calcium phosphate precipitate. Following selection to G418 resistance, provided by the neo gene of the vector, transformants were selected for UV resistance. Twenty-one cell clones were obtained with UV-resistance levels typical of normal human fibroblasts. All transformants contained vector DNA sequences in their nuclei. Upon further propagation in the absence of selection for G418 resistance, about half of the primary transformants remained UV-resistant. Secondary transformants were generated by transfection with a partial digest of total chromosomal DNA from one of these stable transformants. This resulted in 15 G418-resistant clones, 2 of which exhibited a UV-resistant phenotype. The other primary clones lost UV resistance rapidly when subcultured in the absence of G418. Importantly, several retained UV resistance under G418 selection pressure. The acquisition of UV resistance by secondary transformants derived by transfection of DNA from a stable primary transformant, and the linkage between G418 and UV resistances in the unstable primary transformants, strongly suggests that the transformants acquired UV resistance through DNA-mediated gene transfer and not by reversion.

  11. Selective enrichment of environmental DNA libraries for genes encoding nonribosomal peptides and polyketides by phosphopantetheine transferase-dependent complementation of siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Banik, Jacob J; Owen, Jeremy G; Craig, Jeffrey W; Brady, Sean F

    2013-01-18

    The cloning of DNA directly from environmental samples provides a means to functionally access biosynthetic gene clusters present in the genomes of the large fraction of bacteria that remains recalcitrant to growth in the laboratory. Herein, we demonstrate a method by which complementation of phosphopantetheine transferase deletion mutants can be used to restore siderophore biosynthesis and to therefore selectively enrich eDNA libraries for nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene sequences to unprecedented levels. The common use of NRPS/PKS-derived siderophores across bacterial taxa makes this method generalizable and should allow for the facile selective enrichment of NRPS/PKS-containing biosynthetic gene clusters from large environmental DNA libraries using a wide variety of phylogenetically diverse bacterial hosts.

  12. Selective enrichment of environmental DNA libraries for genes encoding nonribosomal peptides and polyketides by phosphopantetheine transferase-dependent complementation of siderophore biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Banik, Jacob J.; Owen, Jeremy G.; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Brady, Sean F.

    2012-01-01

    The cloning of DNA directly from environmental samples provides a means to functionally access biosynthetic gene clusters present in the genomes of the large fraction of bacteria that remains recalcitrant to growth in the laboratory. Herein we demonstrate a method by which complementation of phosphopantetheine transferase deletion mutants can be used to restore siderophore biosynthesis and to therefore selectively enrich eDNA libraries for nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene sequences to unprecedented levels. The common use of NRPS/PKS-derived siderophores across bacterial taxa makes this method generalizable and should allow for the facile selective enrichment of NRPS/PKS-containing biosynthetic gene clusters from large environmental DNA libraries using a wide variety of phylogenetically diverse bacterial hosts. PMID:23072412

  13. Isolation of a human cDNA for heme A:farnesyltransferase by functional complementation of a yeast cox10 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Glerum, D M; Tzagoloff, A

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned the human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX10 gene by functional complementation of a yeast cox10 null mutant. The 2.8-kb cDNA encoding the human heme A:farnesyltransferase codes for a 443-aa protein with high homology to the yeast and bacterial farnesylases. The human COX10 homolog, however, does not complement the mutation as efficiently as the yeast COX10 protein, likely due to the heterologous environment. PCR amplification and Southern analysis confirm the existence of a large mRNA for the human protein, with an unusually long 3' untranslated region. This clone can now be used to screen patients with inherited deficiencies in cytochrome oxidase in which the mutations remain unidentified and are likely to reside in a protein influencing the assembly of the enzyme. Images PMID:8078902

  14. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  15. CD14 and Complement Crosstalk and Largely Mediate the Transcriptional Response to Escherichia coli in Human Whole Blood as Revealed by DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Corinna; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation like in sepsis is still lacking specific diagnostic markers and effective therapeutics. The first line of defense against intruding pathogens and endogenous damage signals is pattern recognition by e.g., complement and Toll-like receptors (TLR). Combined inhibition of a key complement component (C3 and C5) and TLR-co-receptor CD14 has been shown to attenuate certain systemic inflammatory responses. Using DNA microarray and gene annotation analyses, we aimed to decipher the effect of combined inhibition of C3 and CD14 on the transcriptional response to bacterial challenge in human whole blood. Importantly, combined inhibition reversed the transcriptional changes of 70% of the 2335 genes which significantly responded to heat-inactivated Escherichia coli by on average 80%. Single inhibition was less efficient (p<0.001) but revealed a suppressive effect of C3 on 21% of the responding genes which was partially counteracted by CD14. Furthermore, CD14 dependency of the Escherichia coli-induced response was increased in C5-deficient compared to C5-sufficient blood. The observed crucial distinct and synergistic roles for complement and CD14 on the transcriptional level correspond to their broad impact on the inflammatory response in human blood, and their combined inhibition may become inevitable in the early treatment of acute systemic inflammation. PMID:25706641

  16. Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (FANCD2) functions independently of BRCA2- and RAD51-associated homologous recombination in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akihiro; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z; Chen, Junjie; Couch, Fergus J

    2005-04-15

    The BRCA2 breast cancer tumor suppressor is involved in the repair of double strand breaks and broken replication forks by homologous recombination through its interaction with DNA repair protein Rad51. Cells defective in BRCA2.FANCD1 are extremely sensitive to mitomycin C (MMC) similarly to cells deficient in any of the Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group proteins (FANC). These observations suggest that the FA pathway and the BRCA2 and Rad51 repair pathway may be linked, although a functional connection between these pathways in DNA damage signaling remains to be determined. Here, we systematically investigated the interaction between these pathways. We show that in response to DNA damage, BRCA2-dependent Rad51 nuclear focus formation was normal in the absence of FANCD2 and that FANCD2 nuclear focus formation and mono-ubiquitination appeared normal in BRCA2-deficient cells. We report that the absence of BRCA2 substantially reduced homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks, whereas the absence of FANCD2 had little effect. Furthermore, we established that depletion of BRCA2 or Rad51 had a greater effect on cell survival in response to MMC than depletion of FANCD2 and that depletion of BRCA2 in FANCD2 mutant cells further sensitized these cells to MMC. Our results suggest that FANCD2 mediates double strand DNA break repair independently of Rad51-associated homologous recombination.

  17. recA gene of Escherichia coli complements defects in DNA repair and mutagenesis in Streptomyces fradiae JS6 (mcr-6).

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, P; Baltz, R H

    1987-01-01

    Streptomyces fradiae JS6 (mcr-6) is a mutant which is defective in repair of DNA damage induced by a variety of chemical mutagens and UV light. JS6 is also defective in error-prone (mutagenic) DNA repair (J. Stonesifer and R. H. Baltz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:1180-1183, 1985). The recA gene of Escherichia coli, cloned in a bifunctional vector that replicates in E. coli and Streptomyces spp., complemented the mutation in S. fradiae JS6, indicating that E. coli and S. fradiae express similar SOS responses and that the mcr+ gene product of S. fradiae is functionally analogous to the protein encoded by the recA gene of E. coli. PMID:3308856

  18. Dynamics of interaction between complement-fixing antibody/dsDNA immune complexes and erythrocytes. In vitro studies and potential general applications to clinical immune complex testing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Hooper, M.; Burge, J.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble antibody//sub 3/H-double-stranded PM2 DNA (dsDNA) immune complexes were briefly opsonized with complement and then allowed to bind to human erythrocytes (via complement receptors). The cells were washed and subsequently a volume of autologous blood in a variety of media was added, and the release of the bound immune complexes from the erythrocytes was studied as a function of temperature and time. After 1-2 h, the majority of the bound immune complexes were not released into the serum during blood clotting at either 37 degrees C or room temperature, but there was a considerably greater release of the immune complexes into the plasma of blood that was anticoagulated with EDTA. Similar results were obtained using various conditions of opsonization and also using complexes that contained lower molecular weight dsDNA. Thus, the kinetics of release of these antibody/dsDNA immune complexes differed substantially from the kinetics of release of antibody/bovine serum albumin complexes that was reported by others. Studies using the solution phase C1q immune complex binding assay confirmed that in approximately half of the SLE samples that were positive for immune complexes, there was a significantly higher level of detectable immune complexes in plasma vs. serum. Freshly drawn erythrocytes from some SLE patients exhibiting this plasma/serum discrepancy had IgG antigen on their surface that was released by incubation in EDTA plasma. Thus, the higher levels of immune complexes observed in EDTA plasma vs. serum using the C1q assay may often reflect the existence of immune complexes circulating in vivo bound to erythrocytes.

  19. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein is driven to nucleotide excision repair sites by the electrostatic potential of distorted DNA.

    PubMed

    Camenisch, Ulrike; Dip, Ramiro; Vitanescu, Mirela; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2007-12-01

    The presumed DNA-binding cleft of xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein, a key regulatory subunit of the eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair complex, displays a distinctive array of 6 positively charged amino acid side chains. Here, the molecular function of these closely spaced electropositive residues has been tested by systematic site-directed mutagenesis. After the introduction of single amino acid substitutions, the mutants were probed for protein-DNA interactions in electrophoretic mobility shift and photochemical crosslinking assays. This analysis led to the identification of a critical hot-spot for DNA substrate recognition composed of two neighboring lysines at codons 141 and 179 of the human XPA sequence. The replacement of other basic side chains in the DNA interaction domain conferred more moderate defects of substrate binding. When the function of XPA was tested as a fusion product with either mCherry or green-fluorescent protein, a glutamate substitution of one of the positively charged residues at positions 141 and 179 was sufficient to decrease DNA repair activity in human fibroblasts. Thus, the removal of a single cationic side chain abolished DNA-binding activity and significant excision repair defects could be induced by single charge inversions on the XPA surface, indicating that this molecular sensor participates in substrate recognition by monitoring the electrostatic potential of distorted DNA repair sites.

  20. Human inhibitor of the first component of complement, C1: characterization of cDNA clones and localization of the gene to chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A E; Whitehead, A S; Harrison, R A; Dauphinais, A; Bruns, G A; Cicardi, M; Rosen, F S

    1986-01-01

    C1 inhibitor is a heavily glycosylated plasma protein that regulates the activity of the first component of complement (C1) by inactivation of the serine protease subcomponents, C1r and C1s. C1 inhibitor cDNA clones have been isolated, and one of these (pC1INH1, 950 base pairs) has been partially sequenced. Sequence analysis demonstrates that the C1 inhibitor is a member of the serpin "superfamily" of protease inhibitors. In the region sequenced, C1 inhibitor has 22% identity with antithrombin III, 26% with alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and 18% with human angiotensinogen. C1 inhibitor has a larger amino-terminal extension than do the other plasma protease inhibitors. In addition, inspection of residues that are invariant among the other protease inhibitors shows that C1 inhibitor differs at 14 of 41 of these positions. Thus, it appears that C1 inhibitor diverged from the group relatively early in evolution, although probably after the divergence of angiotensinogen. Southern blot analysis of BamHI-digested DNA from normal individuals and from rodent-human somatic cell hybrid cell lines (that contain a limited but varied human chromosome complement) was used to localize the human C1 inhibitor gene to chromosome 11. Images PMID:3458172

  1. Synthesis of triazole-linked oligonucleotides with high affinity to DNA complements and an analysis of their compatibility with biosystems.

    PubMed

    Varizhuk, Anna M; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Novikov, Roman A; Chizhov, Alexandr O; Smirnov, Igor P; Chuvilin, Andrey N; Tatarinova, Olga N; Fisunov, Gleb Y; Pozmogova, Galina E; Florentiev, Vladimir L

    2013-06-21

    New oligonucleotide analogues with triazole internucleotide linkages were synthesized, and their hybridization properties were studied. The analogues demonstrated DNA binding affinities similar to those of unmodified oligonucleotides. The modification was shown to protect the oligonucleotides from nuclease hydrolysis. The modified oligonucleotides were tested as PCR primers. Modifications remote from the 3'-terminus were tolerated by polymerases. Our results suggest that these new oligonucleotide analogues are among the most promising triazole DNA mimics characterized to date.

  2. Virgin Olive Oil Enriched with Its Own Phenols or Complemented with Thyme Phenols Improves DNA Protection against Oxidation and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in Hyperlipidemic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Romeu, Marta; Rubió, Laura; Sánchez-Martos, Vanessa; Castañer, Olga; de la Torre, Rafael; Valls, Rosa M; Ras, Rosa; Pedret, Anna; Catalán, Úrsula; López de las Hazas, María del Carmen; Motilva, María J; Fitó, Montserrat; Solà, Rosa; Giralt, Montserrat

    2016-03-09

    The effects of virgin olive oil (VOO) enriched with its own phenolic compounds (PC) and/or thyme PC on the protection against oxidative DNA damage and antioxidant endogenous enzymatic system (AEES) were estimated in 33 hyperlipidemic subjects after the consumption of VOO, VOO enriched with its own PC (FVOO), or VOO complemented with thyme PC (FVOOT). Compared to pre-intervention, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a marker for DNA damage) decreased in the FVOO intervention and to a greater extent in the FVOOT with a parallel significant increase in olive and thyme phenolic metabolites. Superoxide dismutase (AEES enzyme) significantly increased in the FVOO intervention and to a greater extent in the FVOOT with a parallel significant increase in thyme phenolic metabolites. When all three oils were compared, FVOOT appeared to have the greatest effect in protecting against oxidative DNA damage and improving AEES. The sustained intake of a FVOOT improves DNA protection against oxidation and AEES probably due to a greater bioavailability of thyme PC in hyperlipidemic subjects.

  3. Molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding the Epstein-Barr virus/C3d receptor (complement receptor type 2) of human B lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.D.; Cooper, N.R.; Tack, B.F.; Nemerow, G.R.

    1987-12-01

    Complementary DNA clones for complement receptor type 2 (CR2), the B-lymphocyte membrane protein that serves as the receptor for Epstein-Barr virus and the C3d complement fragment, were obtained by screening a lambda gt11 library generated from Raji B lymphoblastoid cell mRNA. A 4.2-kilobase (kb) clone, representing the entire coding sequence of the protein plus untranslated 5' and 3' nucleotide sequences was obtained and sequenced. The 4.2-kb clone, which contains all but about 500 base pairs (bp) of the 5' untranslated region of the full-length CR2 mRNA, consists of 63 bp of 5' untranslated nucleotide sequence followed successively by a start codon, a 20-amino acid hydrophobic signal peptide, 1005 amino acids having a repeating motif, a 28-amino acid probable transmembrane domain, and a 34-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein indicates that the extracellular domain consists entirely of 16 tandemly arranged repeating elements, each 60-75 amino acids in length, which are identified by multiple conserved residues. This repeating motif also occurs in the C3b/C4b receptor, several complement proteins, and a number of noncomplement proteins. In CR2, the 16 repeats occur in four clusters of four repeats each. Approximately 10% of the deduced amino acid sequence, including the amino and carboxyl termini, was confirmed by amino acid sequencing of tryptic peptides derived from purified CR2. The nucleotide and derived amino acid sequence of CR2 and related studies are presented here.

  4. Interplay between base excision repair activity and toxicity of 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases in an E. coli complementation system.

    PubMed

    Troll, Christopher J; Adhikary, Suraj; Cueff, Marie; Mitra, Ileena; Eichman, Brandt F; Camps, Manel

    2014-01-01

    DNA glycosylases carry out the first step of base excision repair by removing damaged bases from DNA. The N3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases specialize in alkylation repair and are either constitutively expressed or induced by exposure to alkylating agents. To study the functional and evolutionary significance of constitutive versus inducible expression, we expressed two closely related yeast 3MeA DNA glycosylases - inducible Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAG and constitutive S. pombe Mag1 - in a glycosylase-deficient Escherichia coli strain. In both cases, constitutive expression conferred resistance to alkylating agent exposure. However, in the absence of exogenous alkylation, high levels of expression of both glycosylases were deleterious. We attribute this toxicity to excessive glycosylase activity, since suppressing spMag1 expression correlated with improved growth in liquid culture, and spMag1 mutants exhibiting decreased glycosylase activity showed improved growth and viability. Selection of a random spMag1 mutant library for increased survival in the presence of exogenous alkylation resulted in the selection of hypomorphic mutants, providing evidence for the presence of a genetic barrier to the evolution of enhanced glycosylase activity when constitutively expressed. We also show that low levels of 3MeA glycosylase expression improve fitness in our glycosylase-deficient host, implying that 3MeA glycosylase activity is likely necessary for repair of endogenous lesions. These findings suggest that 3MeA glycosylase activity is evolutionarily conserved for repair of endogenously produced alkyl lesions, and that inducible expression represents a common strategy to rectify deleterious effects of excessive 3MeA activity in the absence of exogenous alkylation challenge.

  5. Repair of damaged DNA by extracts from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A revertant and expression of a protein absent in its parental cell line.

    PubMed

    Jones, C J; Cleaver, J E; Wood, R D

    1992-03-11

    Cells derived from individuals with mutations in the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A gene (XP-A gene) are hypersensitive to UV light and have a severe defect in nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA. UV-resistant revertant cell lines can arise from XP-A cells in culture. Cells of one such revertant, XP129, were previously shown to remove (6-4) photoproducts from irradiated DNA, but to have poor repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. To analyze the biochemical nature of the reversion, whole cell extracts were prepared from the SV40-immortalized fibroblast cell lines XP12RO (an XP-A cell line), the revertant XP129 (derived from XP12RO), and 1BR.3N (from a normal individual). The ability of extracts to carry out repair synthesis in UV-irradiated DNA was examined, and immunoblots were performed using antiserum that recognizes XP-A protein. XP12RO extracts exhibited a very low level of repair and no detectable XP-A protein, but repair activity could be conferred by adding purified XP-A protein to the reaction mixture. XP129 extracts have essentially normal repair synthesis consistent with the observation that most repair of UV-irradiated DNA by extracts appears to occur at (6-4) photoproducts. An XP-A polypeptide of normal size was present in XP129, but in reduced amounts. The results indicate that in XP129 a mutational event has converted the inactive XP12RO XP-A gene into a form which expresses an active XP-A protein.

  6. A critical evaluation of how ancient DNA bulk bone metabarcoding complements traditional morphological analysis of fossil assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grealy, Alicia C.; McDowell, Matthew C.; Scofield, Paul; Murray, Dáithí C.; Fusco, Diana A.; Haile, James; Prideaux, Gavin J.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-11-01

    When pooled for extraction as a bulk sample, the DNA within morphologically unidentifiable fossil bones can, using next-generation sequencing, yield valuable taxonomic data. This method has been proposed as a means to rapidly and cost-effectively assess general ancient DNA preservation at a site, and to investigate temporal and spatial changes in biodiversity; however, several caveats have yet to be considered. We critically evaluated the bulk bone metabarcoding (BBM) method in terms of its: (i) repeatability, by quantifying sampling and technical variance through a nested experimental design containing sub-samples and replicates at several stages; (ii) accuracy, by comparing morphological and molecular family-level identifications; and (iii) overall utility, by applying the approach to two independent Holocene fossil deposits, Bat Cave (Kangaroo Island, Australia) and Finsch's Folly (Canterbury, New Zealand). For both sites, bone and bone powder sub-sampling were found to contribute significantly to variance in molecularly identified family assemblage, while the contribution of library preparation and sequencing was almost negligible. Nevertheless, total variance was small. Sampling over 80% fewer bones than was required to morphologically identify the taxonomic assemblages, we found that the families identified molecularly are a subset of the families identified morphologically and, for the most part, represent the most abundant families in the fossil record. In addition, we detected a range of extinct, extant and endangered taxa, including some that are rare in the fossil record. Given the relatively low sampling effort of the BBM approach compared with morphological approaches, these results suggest that BBM is largely consistent, accurate, sensitive, and therefore widely applicable. Furthermore, we assessed the overall benefits and caveats of the method, and suggest a workflow for palaeontologists, archaeologists, and geneticists that will help mitigate these

  7. Partial complementation of a DNA ligase I deficiency by DNA ligase III and its impact on cell survival and telomere stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Le Chalony, Catherine; Hoffschir, Françoise; Gauthier, Laurent R; Gross, Julia; Biard, Denis S; Boussin, François D; Pennaneach, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    DNA ligase I (LigI) plays a central role in the joining of strand interruptions during replication and repair. In our current study, we provide evidence that DNA ligase III (LigIII) and XRCC1, which form a complex that functions in single-strand break repair, are required for the proliferation of mammalian LigI-depleted cells. We show from our data that in cells with either dysfunctional LigI activity or depleted of this enzyme, both LigIII and XRCC1 are retained on the chromatin and accumulate at replication foci. We also demonstrate that the LigI and LigIII proteins cooperate to inhibit sister chromatid exchanges but that only LigI prevents telomere sister fusions. Taken together, these results suggest that in cells with dysfunctional LigI, LigIII contributes to the ligation of replication intermediates but not to the prevention of telomeric instability.

  8. A partial genomic DNA clone for the alpha subunit of the mouse complement receptor type 3 and cellular adhesion molecule Mac-1.

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, L; Roman, J M; Teplow, D B; Dreyer, W J; Gee, C E; Larson, R S; Roberts, T M; Springer, T A

    1986-01-01

    A genomic clone coding for the alpha subunit of the mouse complement receptor type 3 and the cellular adhesion molecule Mac-1 has been isolated directly from a genomic library using synthetic oligonucleotide probes based on the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein. The identity of the clone has been established by DNA sequencing and in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The gene is present in a single copy in the murine genome. The region containing the amino-terminal exon has been sequenced. RNA gel blotting shows that the Mac-1 alpha-subunit mRNA is 6 kilobases in length. Mac-1 alpha-subunit mRNA is present in macrophages but not T lymphoma or L cells. During gamma interferon-stimulated maturation of the mouse premyelocytic cell line M1, Mac-1 alpha-subunit mRNA is induced. This corresponds with the tissue distribution of the Mac-1 alpha subunit, showing expression is regulated at least partially at the message level. Images PMID:2942940

  9. Mitochondria and the success of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: from nuclear-mitochondrial interactions to mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, Stefan; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard

    2005-01-01

    The overall success of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is rather unsatisfactory, both in terms of efficacy and from an animal health and welfare point of view. Most research activities have concentrated on epigenetic reprogramming problems as one major cause of SCNT failure. The present review addresses the limited success of mammalian SCNT from yet another viewpoint, the mitochondrial perspective. Mitochondria have a broad range of critical functions in cellular energy supply, cell signalling and programmed cell death and, thus, affect embryonic and fetal development, suggesting that inadequate or perturbed mitochondrial functions may adversely affect SCNT success. A survey of perinatal clinical data from human subjects with deficient mitochondrial respiratory chain activity has revealed a plethora of phenotypes that have striking similarities with abnormalities commonly encountered in SCNT fetuses and offspring. We discuss the limited experimental data on nuclear-mitochondrial interaction effects in SCNT and explore the potential effects in the context of new findings about the biology of mitochondria. These include mitochondrial fusion/fission, mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination, processes that are likely to be affected by and impact on SCNT cloning. Furthermore, we indicate pathways that could link epigenetic reprogramming and mitochondria effects in SCNT and address questions and perspectives for future research.

  10. Decreased complement mediated binding of antibody//sup 3/-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Buschbacher, R.; Brunner, C.M.; Hess, C.E.; O'Brien, W.M.; Wanebo, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The complement mediated binding of prepared antibody//sup 3/H-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells obtained from a number of patient populations has been investigated. Patients with solid tumors have binding activity similar to that seen in a normal group of individuals. However, a significant fraction of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies have lowered binding activity compared with normal subjects. Quantitative studies indicate the lowered activity probably arises due to a decrease in complement receptors on the respective red blood cells. The potential importance and implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

  11. Characterization of the interaction between P143 and LEF-3 from two different baculovirus species: Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus LEF-3 can complement Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus LEF-3 in supporting DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tricia; Sahri, Daniela; Carstens, Eric B

    2004-01-01

    The baculovirus protein P143 is essential for viral DNA replication in vivo, likely as a DNA helicase. We have demonstrated that another viral protein, LEF-3, first described as a single-stranded DNA binding protein, is required for transporting P143 into the nuclei of insect cells. Both of these proteins, along with several other early viral proteins, are also essential for DNA replication in transient assays. We now describe the identification, nucleotide sequences, and transcription patterns of the Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) homologues of p143 and lef-3 and demonstrate that CfMNPV LEF-3 is also responsible for P143 localization to the nucleus. We predicted that the interaction between P143 and LEF-3 might be critical for cross-species complementation of DNA replication. Support for this hypothesis was generated by substitution of heterologous P143 and LEF-3 between two different baculovirus species, Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus and CfMNPV, in transient DNA replication assays. The results suggest that the P143-LEF-3 complex is an important baculovirus replication factor.

  12. Complementation of the embryo-lethal T-DNA insertion mutant of AUXIN-BINDING-PROTEIN 1 (ABP1) with abp1 point mutated versions reveals crosstalk of ABP1 and phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Effendi, Yunus; Ferro, Noel; Labusch, Corinna; Geisler, Markus; Scherer, Günther F E

    2015-01-01

    The function of the extracytoplasmic AUXIN-BINDING-PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is largely enigmatic. We complemented a homozygous T-DNA insertion null mutant of ABP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana Wassilewskia with three mutated and one wild-type (wt) ABP1 cDNA, all tagged C-terminally with a strepII-FLAG tag upstream the KDEL signal. Based on in silico modelling, the abp1 mutants were predicted to have altered geometries of the auxin binding pocket and calculated auxin binding energies lower than the wt. Phenotypes linked to auxin transport were compromised in these three complemented abp1 mutants. Red light effects, such as elongation of hypocotyls in constant red (R) and far-red (FR) light, in white light supplemented by FR light simulating shade, and inhibition of gravitropism by R or FR, were all compromised in the complemented lines. Using auxin- or light-induced expression of marker genes, we showed that auxin-induced expression was delayed already after 10 min, and light-induced expression within 60 min, even though TIR1/AFB or phyB are thought to act as receptors relevant for gene expression regulation. The expression of marker genes in seedlings responding to both auxin and shade showed that for both stimuli regulation of marker gene expression was altered after 10-20 min in the wild type and phyB mutant. The rapidity of expression responses provides a framework for the mechanics of functional interaction of ABP1 and phyB to trigger interwoven signalling pathways.

  13. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  14. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  15. Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus LEF-3-P143 complex can complement DNA replication and budded virus in an AcMNPV LEF-3-P143 double knockout bacmid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mei; Carstens, Eric B

    2012-02-01

    Transient replication assays using Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) genes suggested that the interactions between P143, the viral helicase and LEF-3, a ssDNA-binding protein, may represent virus species specificity determinants. P143 and LEF-3 are essential for DNA replication in these assays and together with IE-1, the major immediate-early transcription factor, may be part of the viral replisome. In the current report, a lef-3/p143 double-knockout AcMNPV bacmid was constructed that was defective for viral DNA replication and late gene expression. When the homologous lef-3/p143 CfMNPV genes were introduced into this double-knockout bacmid, DNA replication was restored but the level of replication was lower, budded virus production was delayed, and the yields were reduced from those in an AcMNPV-rescue bacmid. These results suggest that to maximize virus replication, baculovirus replisome assembly and function requires protein-protein interactions between P143 and LEF-3, and other viral proteins.

  16. Platelet-mediated transformation of mtDNA-less human cells: Analysis of phenotypic variability among clones from normal individuals-and complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation causing myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chomyn, A.; Lai, S.T.; Shakeley, R.; Attardi, G. ); Bresolin, N.; Scarlato, G. )

    1994-06-01

    In the present work, the authors demonstrate the possibility of using human blood platelets as mitochondrial donors for the repopulation of mtDNA-less ([rho][sup o]) cells. The noninvasive nature of platelet isolation, combined with the prolonged viability of platelet mitochondria and the simplicity and efficiency of the mitochondria-transfer procedure, has substantially increased the applicability of the [rho][sup o] cell transformation approach for mitochondrial genetic analysis and for the study of mtDNA-linked diseases. This approach has been applied to platelets from several normal human individuals and one individual affected by the myoclonic-epilepsy-and-ragged-red-fibers (MERRF) encephalomyopathy. A certain variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the platelet-derived [rho][sup o] cell transformants from a given normal subject, and it was shown to be unrelated to their mtDNA content. The results of sequential transfer of mitochondria from selected transformants into a [rho][sup o] cell line different from the first [rho][sup o] acceptor strongly suggest that this variability reflected, at least in part, differences in nuclear gene content and/or activity among the original recipient cells. A much greater variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the transformants derived from the MERRF patient and was found to be related to the presence and amount of the mitochondrial tRNA[sup Lys] mutation associated with the MERRF syndrome. An analysis of the relationship between proportion of mtDNA carrying the MERRF mutation and degree of respiratory activity in various transformations derived from the MERRF patient revealed an unusual complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation, possibly reflecting the distribution of mutant mtDNA among the platelet mitochondria. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Cloning of a chicken liver cDNA encoding 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylase and 5-aminoimidazole-4-N-succinocarboxamide ribonucleotide synthetase by functional complementation of Escherichia coli pur mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z D; Dixon, J E; Zalkin, H

    1990-01-01

    We have used functional complementation of Escherichia coli pur mutants to clone avian cDNA encoding 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) carboxylase-5-aminoimidazole-4-N-succinocarboxamide ribonucleotide (SAICAR) synthetase, the bifunctional enzyme catalyzing steps 6 and 7 in the pathway for de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. Mutational analyses have been used to establish the structure-function relationship: NH2-SAICAR synthetase-AIR carboxylase-COOH. The amino acid sequence of the SAICAR synthetase domain is homologous to that of bacterial purC-encoded enzymes, and the sequence of the following AIR carboxylase domain is homologous to that of bacterial purE-encoded enzymes. In E. coli, AIR carboxylase is the product of genes purEK with the purK subunit postulated to have a role in CO2 binding. The avian enzyme lacks sequences corresponding to purK yet functions in E. coli. Functional complementation of E. coli pur mutants can be used to clone additional avian cDNAs for de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. Images PMID:1691501

  18. Use of the genomic matching technique to complement multiplex STR profiling reduces DNA profiling costs in high volume crimes and intelligence led screens.

    PubMed

    Laird, R; Dawkins, R L; Gaudieri, S

    2005-07-16

    The genomic matching technique (GMT) targets duplicated polymorphic sequences within genomic blocks in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC), differentiating between individuals at the DNA level using a single primer pair per block. The GMT is currently used to supplement human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing to match donor and recipient pairs for bone marrow transplantation and has the potential to be employed as a powerful exclusion tool in forensic biology. The GMT is highly reproducible, produces DNA profiles from less than 1 ng of DNA and was successfully employed to profile a range of forensic samples including buccal swabs, handled objects and fingerprints. Furthermore, GMT profiles from a single genomic block in the MHC are likely to be more discriminatory than known highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci such as ACTBP2. As such, the GMT can reduce the cost of investigations that require profiling of multiple suspects or samples from one or more crime scenes and could be extended to profile genomic blocks in other polymorphic genetic systems in the human genome.

  19. Trans-complementation by human apurinic endonuclease (Ape) of hypersensitivity to DNA damage and spontaneous mutator phenotype in apn1-yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D M; Bennett, R A; Marquis, J C; Ansari, P; Demple, B

    1995-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA are potentially lethal and mutagenic. 'Class II' AP endonucleases initiate the repair of these and other DNA lesions. In yeast, the predominant enzyme of this type is Apn1, and its elimination sensitizes the cells to killing by simple alkylating agents or oxidants, and raises the rate of spontaneous mutation. We investigated the ability of the major human class II AP endonuclease, Ape, which is structurally unrelated to Apn1, to replace the yeast enzyme in vivo. Confocal immunomicroscopy studies indicate that approximately 25% of the Ape expressed in yeast is present in the nucleus. High-level Ape expression corresponding to approximately 7000 molecules per nucleus, equal to the normal Apn1 copy number, restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate to near wild-type levels in Apn1-deficient (apn1-) yeast. Ape expression in apn1- yeast provided little protection against H2O2 challenges, consistent with the weak 3'-repair diesterase activity of the human enzyme. Ape expression at approximately 2000 molecules per nucleus reduced the spontaneous mutation rate of apn1- yeast to that seen for wild-type cells. Because Ape has a powerful AP endonuclease but weak 3'-diesterase activity, these findings indicate that endogenously generated AP sites can drive spontaneous mutagenesis. Images PMID:8559661

  20. Complementation of snf1, a mutation affecting global regulation of carbon metabolism in yeast, by a plant protein kinase cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, A; Sabelli, P A; Dickinson, J R; Cole, D; Richardson, M; Kreis, M; Shewry, P R; Halford, N G

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA, cRKIN1, encoding a putative homologue of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) SNF1-encoded protein-serine/threonine kinase, has been isolated from a library prepared from rye endosperm mRNA. Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of cRKIN1-related transcripts in developing endosperms but not in shoots, and Southern blot analysis showed the presence of a small gene family. SNF1 plays a central role in carbon catabolite repression in yeast and expression of the RKIN1 sequence in yeast snf1 mutants restored SNF1 function. This suggests that the RKIN1 protein has a role in the control of carbon metabolism in endosperms of rye. Images PMID:1924320

  1. Outline of Hungarian Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of Hungarian complement constructions and the syntactic operations needed to account for them. The expository framework (and the implicit framework of the research itself) is based upon that of Rosenbaum (1967). The aim of the paper is to arrive at a rough picture of the kinds of structures and syntactic…

  2. Verbal Complementizers in Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hossam Eldin Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A class of Modern Standard Arabic complementizers known as "'?inna' and its sisters" demonstrate unique case and word order restrictions. While CPs in Arabic allow both Subject-Verb (SV) and Verb-Subject (VS) word order and their subjects show nominative morphology, CPs introduced by "?inna" ban a verb from directly following…

  3. Molecular and cellular analysis of the DNA repair defect in a patient in Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D who has the clinical features of Xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Broughton, B.C.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A.; Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F.; Lehmann, A.R.; Vermeulen, W.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Botta, E.; Stefanini, M.

    1995-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are quite distinct genetic disorders that are associated with defects in excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. A few patients have been described previously with the clinical features of both disorders. In this paper we describe an individual in this category who has unusual cellular responses to UV light. We show that his cultured fibroblasts and lymphocytes are extremely sensitive to irradiation with UV-C, despite a level of nucleotide excision repair that is 30%-40% that of normal cells. The deficiency is assigned to the XP-D complementation group, and we have identified two causative mutations in the XPD gene: a gly{yields}arg change at amino acid 675 in the allele inherited from the patient`s mother and a -1 frameshift at amino acid 669 in the allele inherited from his father. These mutations are in the C-terminal 20% of the 760-amino-acid XPD protein, in a region where we have recently identified several mutations in patients with trichothiodystrophy. 44 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-13

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  5. Complements do not lie

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:22674942

  6. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  7. IXO: The Instrument Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.; IWG, IXO

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) has recently been created as a mission concept by a joint team of NASA, ESA and JAXA scientists, based on the previous Constellation-X and XEUS concepts. Definition of the IXO instruments is still under evolution, but the core instrument complement will include a Wide Field X-ray Imager, an X-ray Calorimeter / Narrow Field X-ray Imager, and an X-ray Grating Spectrometer. Other, modest additional instruments (such as a hard X-ray capability, a polarimeter, and a high time resolution detector) will also be considered. We present the current status of the IXO instrument complement and offer the opportunity for discussion of ideas relevant to the IXO mission concept process.

  8. Development of a lambda-based complementation assay for the preliminary localization of lacI mutants from the Big Blue mouse: implications for a DNA-sequencing strategy.

    PubMed

    Gu, M; Ahmed, A; Wei, C; Gorelick, N; Glickman, B W

    1994-06-01

    in the 32-208-bp region. This complementation assay can potentially reduce the amount of DNA sequencing necessary to produce a mutational spectrum by optimising the choice of sequencing primers, and thus provide a significant saving of the material and time required. Furthermore, evidence indicates that the restriction of the mutational target to the NC+ region extends these savings without reducing the usefulness of the mutational specificity data.

  9. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  10. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis. PMID:28118378

  11. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  12. Complement inhibition in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2013-02-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively new and deserves closer attention. In this article, we summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer.

  13. Complement System in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pankita H.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24901241

  14. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    were validated; they induced myeloid colonies in vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus...cDNA libraries, complementation The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cleveland, OH 44195 Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with...Martin-Padura, P. Mancuso, P. Marighetti, C. Rabascio, G. Pruneri, L. D. Shultz, and F. Bertolini. 2008. Human acute leukemia cells injected in NOD

  15. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel J. Lindner, M.D., Ph.D...YYYY) 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 201 31 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones...vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus, cDNA libraries

  16. Nouns, Verbs and NP Complements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, J. T.

    This paper investigates restrictions on three types of noun-phrase complements (gerundive, infinitive, clause) in English and seeks to point out some parallels between the occurrence of these three types in object positions. The author first presents a list of verbs which may be followed by noun-phrase complements; he then considers the occurrence…

  17. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  18. Gene for ataxia-telangiectasia complementation group D (ATDC)

    DOEpatents

    Murnane, J.P.; Painter, R.B.; Kapp, L.N.; Yu, L.C.

    1995-03-07

    Disclosed herein is a new gene, an AT gene for complementation group D, the ATDC gene and fragments thereof. Nucleic acid probes for the gene are provided as well as proteins encoded by the gene, cDNA therefrom, preferably a 3 kilobase (kb) cDNA, and recombinant nucleic acid molecules for expression of the proteins. Further disclosed are methods to detect mutations in the gene, preferably methods employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also disclosed are methods to detect AT genes from other AT complementation groups. 30 figs.

  19. Gene for ataxia-telangiectasia complementation group D (ATDC)

    DOEpatents

    Murnane, John P.; Painter, Robert B.; Kapp, Leon N.; Yu, Loh-Chung

    1995-03-07

    Disclosed herein is a new gene, an AT gene for complementation group D, the ATDC gene and fragments thereof. Nucleic acid probes for said gene are provided as well as proteins encoded by said gene, cDNA therefrom, preferably a 3 kilobase (kb) cDNA, and recombinant nucleic acid molecules for expression of said proteins. Further disclosed are methods to detect mutations in said gene, preferably methods employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also disclosed are methods to detect AT genes from other AT complementation groups.

  20. Complement in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Maria V; Sim, Robert B

    2011-09-16

    The complement system consists of about 35-40 proteins and glycoproteins present in blood plasma or on cell surfaces. Its main biological function is to recognise "foreign" particles and macromolecules, and to promote their elimination either by opsonisation or lysis. Although historically complement has been studied as a system for immune defence against bacteria, it has an important homeostatic role in which it recognises damaged or altered "self" components. Thus complement has major roles in both immune defence against microorganisms, and in clearance of damaged or "used" host components. Since complement proteins opsonise or lyse cells, complement can damage healthy host cells and tissues. The system is regulated by many endogenous regulatory proteins. Regulation is sometimes imperfect and both too much and too little complement activation is associated with many diseases. Excessive or inappropriate activation can cause tissue damage in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), multiple sclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury (e.g. ischemic stroke). Insufficient complement activity is associated with susceptibility to infection (mainly bacterial) and development of autoimmune disease, like SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus).

  1. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  2. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host. PMID:28066433

  3. Genetics of the complement system.

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, P

    1975-01-01

    The complement system, unlike the coagulation system, was largely characterized by in-vitro techniques which did not make use of genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient subjects therefore has served largely to increase our knowledge of the in-vivo role of complement. At the present time its clearest role is in the resistance to infection; obviously in the case of C3 deficiency and bacterial infection and possibly more subtly in the case of deficiency of the early active complement components and low virulence organisms. There is so far no evidence that genetic complement deficiency interferes with antibody formation or with the generation of tolerance as has been suggested in the pas (Azar et al, 1968; Dukor and Hartmann, 1973). PMID:768477

  4. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  5. Luciferase fragment complementation imaging in preclinical cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Madryn C.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    The luciferase fragment complementation assay (LFCA) enables molecular events to be non-invasively imaged in live cells in vitro and in vivo in a comparatively cheap and safe manner. It is a development of previous enzyme complementation assays in which reporter genes are split into two, individually enzymatically inactive, fragments that are able to complement one another upon interaction. This complementation can be used to externally visualize cellular activities. In recent years, the number of studies which have used LFCAs to probe questions relevant to cancer have increased, and this review summarizes the most significant and interesting of these. In particular, it focuses on work conducted on the epidermal growth factor, nuclear and chemokine receptor families, and intracellular signaling pathways, including IP3, cAMP, Akt, cMyc, NRF2 and Rho GTPases. LFCAs which have been developed to image DNA methylation and detect RNA transcripts are also discussed. PMID:25594026

  6. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  7. Mycoplasma polysaccharide protects against complement

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Jeffrey R.; Simmons, Warren L.; Daubenspeck, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Although they lack a cell wall, mycoplasmas do possess a glycocalyx. The interactions between the glycocalyx, mycoplasmal surface proteins and host complement were explored using the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis as a model. It was previously shown that the length of the tandem repeat region of the surface lipoprotein Vsa is associated with susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Cells producing a long Vsa containing about 40 repeats are resistant to complement, whereas strains that produce a short Vsa of five or fewer repeats are susceptible. We show here that the length of the Vsa protein modulates the affinity of the M. pulmonis EPS-I polysaccharide for the mycoplasma cell surface, with more EPS-I being associated with mycoplasmas producing a short Vsa protein. An examination of mutants that lack EPS-I revealed that planktonic mycoplasmas were highly susceptible to complement killing even when the Vsa protein was long, demonstrating that both EPS-I and Vsa length contribute to resistance. In contrast, the mycoplasmas were resistant to complement even in the absence of EPS-I when the cells were encased in a biofilm. PMID:22504437

  8. Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Green A.

    2006-01-01

    With the growth of standardized assessment benchmarks in both the public and private paradigms, testing performance matters to institutions more than ever. In an attempt to take as many hindering variables out of this process, such as test anxiety, socioeconomic influences, and latency in cognition, Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum seeks…

  9. Role of complement in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Fiane, A E

    2002-01-01

    The xenotransplantation research is driven by the increasing gap between the number of patients with end-stage organ failure on waiting lists for transplantation and the supply of allografts. The lack of success in developing suitable artificial organs for permanent treatment of organ failure has further strengthened the need for xenotransplantation research. Pigs are now generally accepted to be the source animal of choice. Transplantation of pig organs to humans faces several barriers which have to be overcome before it comes to clinical application: (1) anatomical and physiological conditions; (2) immunological rejection mechanisms; (3) molecular compatibility between signal molecules of the two species; (4) risk of transmission of microorganisms, particularly pig endogenous retroviruses; and (5) legal and ethical aspects both with respect to the animal and the recipient. Here we will focus on the role of the complement system in the rejection of immediately vascularized pig-to-primate xenografts. The hyperacute rejection occurring within minutes after transplantation is mediated by binding of natural antibodies to the Galalpha(l-3)Gal epitope on the endothelial cells with subsequent complement activation. Whereas inhibition of complement activation protects against hyperacute rejection, the role of complement in the later rejection phases is less clarified.

  10. Sentential Complementation--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuessel, Frank H., Jr.

    A review of traditional and transformational studies on the phenomenon of sentential complementation (noun clauses) reveals many areas of agreement. Although some adherents of generative grammar may have occasionally obscured this aspect because of the offensive nature of their criticism of other modes of analysis, it is seen that, in several…

  11. Characterization of group A Streptococcus strains recovered from Mexican children with pharyngitis by automated DNA sequencing of virulence-related genes: unexpectedly large variation in the gene (sic) encoding a complement-inhibiting protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, L M; Stockbauer, K E; Pan, X; Cravioto, A; Musser, J M

    1997-01-01

    Sequence variation was studied in several target genes in 54 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) cultured from children with pharyngitis in Mexico City. Although 16 distinct emm alleles were identified, only 4 had not been previously described. Virtually all bacteria (31 of 33 [94%] with the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene (speA) had emm1-related, emm3, or emm6 alleles. The gene (sic) encoding an extracellular GAS protein that inhibits complement function was unusually variable among isolates with the emm1 family of alleles, with a total of seven variants identified. The data suggest that many GAS strains infecting Mexican children are genetically similar to organisms commonly encountered in the United States and western Europe. Sequence variation in the sic gene is useful for rapid differentiation among GAS isolates with the emm1 family of alleles. PMID:9399523

  12. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  13. Cloning of three human multifunctional de novo purine biosynthetic genes by functional complementation of yeast mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, D; Brake, A J; Kiefer, M C; Young, D; Barr, P J

    1990-01-01

    Functional complementation of mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to clone three multifunctional human genes involved in de novo purine biosynthesis. A HepG2 cDNA library constructed in a yeast expression vector was used to transform yeast strains with mutations in adenine biosynthetic genes. Clones were isolated that complement mutations in the yeast ADE2, ADE3, and ADE8 genes. The cDNA that complemented the ade8 (phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase, GART) mutation, also complemented the ade5 (phosphoribosylglycinamide synthetase) and ade7 [phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase (AIRS; also known as PAIS)] mutations, indicating that it is the human trifunctional GART gene. Supporting data include homology between the AIRS and GART domains of this gene and the published sequence of these domains from other organisms, and localization of the cloned gene to human chromosome 21, where the GART gene has been shown to map. The cDNA that complemented ade2 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase) also complemented ade1 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase), supporting earlier data suggesting that in some organisms these functions are part of a bifunctional protein. The cDNA that complemented ade3 (formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase) is different from the recently isolated human cDNA encoding this enzyme and instead appears to encode a related mitochondrial enzyme. Images PMID:2183217

  14. Cockayne syndrome complementation group B associated with xeroderma pigmentosum phenotype.

    PubMed

    Itoh, T; Cleaver, J E; Yamaizumi, M

    1996-02-01

    Two siblings have been reported whose clinical manifestations (cutaneous photosensitivity and central nervous system dysfunction) are strongly reminiscent of the DeSanctis-Cacchione syndrome (DCS) variant of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a severe form of XP. Fibroblasts from the siblings showed UV sensitivity, a failure of recovery of RNA synthesis (RRS) after UV-irradiation, and a normal level of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS), which were, unexpectedly, the biochemical characteristics usually associated with Cockayne syndrome (CS). However, no complementation group assignment in these cells has yet been performed. We here report that these patients can be assigned to CS complementation group B (CSB) by cell fusion complementation analysis. To our knowledge, these are the first patients with defects in the CSB gene to be associated with an XP phenotype. The results imply that the gene product from the CSB gene must interact with the gene products involved in excision repair and associated with XP.

  15. Differential Expression of Complement Markers in Normal and AMD Transmitochondrial Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Nashine, Sonali; Chwa, Marilyn; Kazemian, Mina; Thaker, Kunal; Lu, Stephanie; Nesburn, Anthony; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and abnormalities in the complement pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was designed to determine the effects of mtDNA from AMD subjects on the complement pathway. Methods Transmitochondrial cybrids were prepared by fusing platelets from AMD and age-matched Normal subjects with Rho0 (lacking mtDNA) human ARPE-19 cells. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were performed to examine gene and protein expression profiles, respectively, of complement markers in these cybrids. Bioenergetic profiles of Normal and AMD cybrids were examined using the Seahorse XF24 flux analyzer. Results Significant decreases in the gene and protein expression of complement inhibitors, along with significantly higher levels of complement activators, were found in AMD cybrids compared to Older-Normal cybrids. Seahorse flux data demonstrated that the bioenergetic profiles for Older-Normal and Older-AMD cybrid samples were similar to each other but were lower compared to Young-Normal cybrid samples. Conclusion In summary, since all cybrids had identical nuclei and differed only in mtDNA content, the observed changes in components of complement pathways can be attributed to mtDNA variations in the AMD subjects, suggesting that mitochondrial genome and retrograde signaling play critical roles in this disease. Furthermore, the similar bioenergetic profiles of AMD and Older-Normal cybrids indicate that the signaling between mitochondria and nuclei are probably not via a respiratory pathway. PMID:27486856

  16. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  17. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Although meningitis can be life-threatening, individuals with complement component ... leaves affected individuals prone to recurrent episodes of meningitis. Learn more about the genes associated with complement ...

  18. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  19. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries Daniel Lindner The Cleveland Clinic Cleveland, OH 44195 We have...MDS cell pools. This validation will ensure that the insert causes the desired phenotype. Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus, cDNA libraries...A., I. Martin-Padura, P. Mancuso, P. Marighetti, C. Rabascio, G. Pruneri, L. D. Shultz, and F. Bertolini. 2008. Human acute leukemia cells injected

  20. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  1. The Semantics of Complementation in English: A Cognitive Semantic Account of Two English Complement Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on complementation in English and other languages have traditionally focused on syntactic issues, most notably on the constituent structures of different complement types. As a result, they have neglected the role of meaning in the choice of different complements. This paper investigates the semantics of complementation within the…

  2. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  3. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  4. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  5. Subversion of complement by hematophagous parasites

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Hélène; Skelly, Patrick; Zipfel, Peter F.; Losson, Bertrand; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly micro-organisms but also parasites, that have evolved countermeasures. The characterization of how pathogens evade complement attack is a rapidly developing field of current research. In recent years, multiple complement evasion strategies have been characterized. In this review, we focus on complement escape mechanisms expressed by hematophagous parasites, a heterogeneous group of metazoan parasites that share the property of ingesting the whole blood of their host. Complement inhibition is crucial for parasite survival within the host tissue or to facilitate blood feeding. Finally, complement inhibition by hematophagous parasites may also contribute to their success as pathogen vectors. PMID:18762211

  6. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  7. Serum complement and immunoconglutinin in malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, R K

    1975-01-01

    Serum haemolytic complement activity and C3 were significantly decreased in 35 malnourished children. The changes were more pronounced in those with infection. Electrophoretically altered forms of complement C were detected in 14. There was an inverse correlation between C3 levels and immunoconglutinin titres. Nutritional rehabilitation and eradication of infection reversed the abnormalities. It is suggested that reduced complement function in malnutrition is the combined result of impaired synthesis, complement activation in vivo, and changes in plasma volume, and that it may contribute to an increased susceptibility to infection in undernourished individuals. PMID:807166

  8. Rapid complementation method for classifying excision repair-defective xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, J E

    1982-11-01

    A rapid method has been developed that permits demonstration of complementation between different cell strains from ultraviolet-sensitive xeroderma pigmentosum patients. Combining polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion with low doses of ultraviolet light to eliminate unfused sensitive cells, the method permits assignment of cell strains to complementation groups by visual inspection, avoiding use of laborious methods involving autoradiography. This method can be augmented by measuring DNA repair synthesis, which shows large quantitative differences between fusions that result in complementation and those that do not.

  9. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  10. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  11. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  12. The role of complement in AMD.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Lauer, Nadine; Skerka, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common form of blindness in the western world and genetic variations of several complement genes, including the complement regulator Factor H, the central complement component C3, Factor B, C2, and also Factor I confer a risk for the disease. However deletion of a chromosomal segment in the Factor H gene cluster on human chromosome 1, which results in the deficiency of the terminal pathway regulator CFHR1, and of the putative complement regulator CFHR3 has a protective effect for development of AMD. The Factor H gene encodes two proteins Factor H and FHL1 which are derived from alternatively processed transcripts. In particular a sequence variation at position 402 of both Factor H and FHL1 is associated with a risk for AMD. A tyrosine residue at position 402 represents the protective and a histidine residue the risk variant. AMD is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, which can be caused by defective and inappropriate regulation of the continuously activated alternative complement pathway. This activation generates complement effector products and inflammatory mediators that stimulate further inflammatory reactions. Defective regulation can lead to formation of immune deposits, drusen and ultimately translate into damage of retinal pigment epithelial cells, rupture of the interface between these epithelial cells and the Bruch's membrane and vision loss. Here we describe the role of complement in the retina and summarize the current concept how defective or inappropriate local complement control contributes to inflammation and the pathophysiology of AMD.

  13. Progress and Trends in Complement Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have proven to be a highly successful and exciting period for the field of complement-directed drug discovery and development. Driven by promising experiences with the first marketed complement drugs, increased knowledge about the involvement of complement in health and disease, and improvements in structural and analytical techniques as well as animal models of disease, the field has seen a surge in creative approaches to therapeutically intervene at various stages of the cascade. An impressive panel of compounds that show promise in clinical trials is meanwhile being lined up in the pipelines of both small biotechnology and big pharmaceutical companies. Yet with this new focus on complement-targeted therapeutics, important questions concerning target selection, point and length of intervention, safety, and drug delivery emerge. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases and affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This chapter highlights the key changes in the field that shape our current perception of complement-targeted drugs and provides a brief overview of recent strategies and emerging trends. Selected examples of complement-related diseases and inhibitor classes are highlighted to illustrate the diversity and creativity in field. PMID:22990692

  14. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  15. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  16. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium.

    PubMed

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; Del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  17. Properdin in Complement Activation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lesher, AM; B, Nilsson; Song, W-C

    2013-01-01

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: 1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, 2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and 3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases. PMID:23816404

  18. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  19. CD46: the 'multitasker' of complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Fara, Antonella Francesca; Dasgupta, Prokar; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-01

    Complement is undeniably quintessential for innate immunity by detecting and eliminating infectious microorganisms. Recent work, however, highlights an equally profound impact of complement on the induction and regulation of a wide range of immune cells. In particular, the complement regulator CD46 emerges as a key sensor of immune activation and a vital modulator of adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of CD46-mediated signalling events and their functional consequences on immune-competent cells with a specific focus on those in CD4(+) T cells. We will also discuss the promises and challenges that potential therapeutic modulation of CD46 may hold and pose.

  20. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Soon; Vasquez, Hernan G.; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry; Zand, Behrouz; Han, Hee-Dong; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Huang, Jie; Miyake, Takahito; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J.; Ivan, Cristina; Baggerly, Keith; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications. PMID:24613353

  1. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  2. On complements of coradicals of finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, V. A.; Sorokina, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Let F be an ω-local Fitting formation, and G a finite group that can be represented in the form of a product of n subnormal subgroups whose F-coradicals are ω-soluble, and whose Sylow p-subgroups are abelian for any p\\inω. It is established that there exist ω-complements of the F-coradical of G. New theorems on the existence of complements of coradicals of a group are obtained as corollaries. For an ω-local formation F, conditions are established for the existence of complements and ω-complements of the F-coradical of a group in any of its extensions. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  3. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  4. Complement and thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oku, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kono, Michihiro; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Kato, Masaru; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Amengual, Olga; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of complement activation in the pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was first reported in murine models of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-related pregnancy morbidities. We previously reported that complement activation is prevalent and may function as a source of procoagulant cell activation in the sera of APS patients. Recently, autoantibodies against C1q, a component of complement 1, were reported to be correlated with complement activation in systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies target neoepitopes of deformed C1q bound to various molecules (i.e., anionic phospholipids) and induce accelerated complement activation. We found that anti-C1q antibodies are more frequently detected in primary APS patients than in control patients and in refractory APS patients with repeated thrombotic events. The titer of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in refractory APS patients than in APS patients without flare. The binding of C1q to anionic phospholipids may be associated with the surge in complement activation in patients with anti-C1q antibodies when triggered by 'second-hit' biological stressors such as infection. Such stressors will induce overexpression of anionic phospholipids, with subsequent increases in deformed C1q that is targeted by anti-C1q antibodies.

  5. Complement in therapy and disease: Regulating the complement system with antibody-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Strumane, Kristin; Ruuls, Sigrid R; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2015-10-01

    Complement is recognized as a key player in a wide range of normal as well as disease-related immune, developmental and homeostatic processes. Knowledge of complement components, structures, interactions, and cross-talk with other biological systems continues to grow and this leads to novel treatments for cancer, infectious, autoimmune- or age-related diseases as well as for preventing transplantation rejection. Antibodies are superbly suited to be developed into therapeutics with appropriate complement stimulatory or inhibitory activity. Here we review the design, development and future of antibody-based drugs that enhance or dampen the complement system.

  6. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  7. State of Büchi Complementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Fogarty, Seth; Vardi, Moshe Y.; Tsay, Yih-Kuen

    Büchi complementation has been studied for five decades since the formalism was introduced in 1960. Known complementation constructions can be classified into Ramsey-based, determinization-based, rank-based, and slice-based approaches. For the performance of these approaches, there have been several complexity analyses but very few experimental results. What especially lacks is a comparative experiment on all the four approaches to see how they perform in practice. In this paper, we review the state of Büchi complementation, propose several optimization heuristics, and perform comparative experimentation on the four approaches. The experimental results show that the determinization-based Safra-Piterman construction outperforms the other three and our heuristics substantially improve the Safra-Piterman construction and the slice-based construction.

  8. Applying Complement Therapeutics to Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Edimara S.; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis. PMID:26341313

  9. Applying complement therapeutics to rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Reis, Edimara S; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2015-12-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis.

  10. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  11. Identification of three complementation units in the gerA spore germination locus of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Zuberi, A R; Feavers, I M; Moir, A

    1985-01-01

    The gerA locus, mutations in which affect the germination response of spores to L-alanine and related amino acids, is contained within a 6-kilobase region of DNA cloned in phage and plasmid vectors. Fragments from this region, subcloned in the shuttle vector pHV33, were introduced into Bacillus subtilis, and their ability to complement chromosomal gerA mutations in a recE4 background was examined. Although the plasmids were somewhat unstable, it was possible to score complementation within spore-containing colonies on nutrient agar by their ability to reduce 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride in an overlay. These studies have assigned the 10 gerA mutations tested to three complementation groups. An analysis of Tn1000 insertions into the cloned DNA of two relatively stable plasmids that together encompass the entire gerA region has identified more precisely the location and extent of the complementation units; recombination studies and in vitro mutagenesis were used to further delineate the extents of two of the units. The evidence suggests that the three complementation units are adjacent and that they are probably capable of separate transcription. PMID:2985546

  12. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  13. Inhibition of complement-mediated cytolysis by the terminal complement inhibitor of herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed

    Rother, R P; Rollins, S A; Fodor, W L; Albrecht, J C; Setter, E; Fleckenstein, B; Squinto, S P

    1994-02-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is a lymphotropic herpesvirus that induces T-cell transformation in vitro and causes lymphomas and leukemias in New World primates other than its natural host, the squirrel monkey. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HVS genome revealed two open reading frames with significant homology to genes for human complement regulatory molecules. One of these genes encodes a predicted protein (designated HVSCD59) with 48% amino acid sequence identity to the human terminal complement regulatory protein CD59 (HuCD59). The CD59 homolog from squirrel monkey (SMCD59) was cloned, and the corresponding amino acid sequence showed 69% identity with HVSCD59. BALB/3T3 cells stably expressing HVSCD59, SMCD59, or HuCD59 were equally protected from complement-mediated lysis by human serum. However, only HVSCD59-expressing cells were effectively protected from complement-mediated lysis when challenged with rat serum, suggesting that HVSCD59 was less species restrictive. The complement regulatory activity of HVSCD59 and SMCD59 occurred after C3b deposition, indicating terminal complement inhibition. Treatment of BALB/3T3 stable transfectants with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C prior to complement attack decreased the complement regulatory function of HVSCD59, suggesting cell surface attachment via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. Cells expressing HVSCD59 effectively inhibited complement-mediated lysis by squirrel monkey serum in comparison with SMCD59-expressing cells. Finally HVSCD59-specific transcripts were detected in owl monkey cells permissive for lytic HVS replication but not in T cells transformed by HVS, which failed to produce virions. These data are the first to demonstrate a functional, virally encoded terminal complement inhibitor and suggest that HVSCD59 represents a humoral immune evasion mechanism supporting the lytic life cycle of HVS.

  14. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G associated with Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, W.; Jaspers, N.G.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J. ); Jaeken, J. )

    1993-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are two rare inherited disorders with a clinical and cellular hypersensitivity to the UV component of the sunlight spectrum. Although the two traits are generally considered as clinically and genetically distinct entities, on the biochemical level a defect in the nucleotide excision-repair (NER) pathway is involved in both. Classical CS patients are primarily deficient in the preferential repair of DNA damage in actively transcribed genes, whereas in most XP patients the genetic defect affects both [open quotes]preferential[close quotes] and [open quotes]overall[close quotes] NER modalities. Here the authors report a genetic study of two unrelated, severely affected patients with the clinical characteristics of CS but with a biochemical defect typical of XP. By complementation analysis, using somatic cell fusion and nuclear microinjection of cloned repair genes, they assign these two patients to XP complementation group G, which previously was not associated with CS. This observation extends the earlier identification of two patients with a rare combined XP/CS phenotype within XP complementation groups B and D, respectively. It indicates that some mutations in at least three of the seven genes known to be involved in XP also can result in a picture of partial or even full-blown CS. It is concluded that the syndromes XP and CS are biochemically closely related and may be part of a broader clinical disease spectrum. The authors suggest, as a possible molecular mechanism underlying this relation, that the XPGC repair gene has an additional vital function, as shown for some other NER genes. 33 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. A detailed genetic analysis of the late complementation groups of simian virus 40.

    PubMed

    Mertz, J E

    1984-01-15

    A simple mixed-plaque assay procedure for determining complementation between pairs of SV40 mutants is described. Since the data obtained can be quantified with respect to both the relative numbers and sizes of plaques, this method is less likely than other complementation assay procedures to yield false-positive results and gives some indication as to the efficiency of the complementation. This quantitative assay procedure, which works with both viral DNA and virions, was used to examine the complementation properties of a variety of late region temperature-sensitive and deletion mutants of SV40. Conclusions reached from these studies included (i) the complementation observed between tsB and tsC mutants is definitely intragenic; (ii) D mutants define a true complementation group; (iii) sequences within the last 68 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of VP-3 are necessary for expression of the D function; and (iv) when linked to the last 19 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of VP-1, the first 136 amino-terminal amino acids of VP-2 are sufficient for expression of the E function. Lastly, the collection of deletion mutants described here may be useful in identifying both structural and regulatory functions of the virion proteins and in analyzing some aspects of viral mRNA biogenesis.

  16. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  1. The complement system: an evolution in progress

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-01-01

    The complement system, which consists of three independent but interacting pathways, constitutes a powerful arm of innate immunity. Its major function is to recognize and destroy pathogenic microorganisms as well as eliminate modified self-antigens. Although it is a fine-tuned system with innate capacity to discriminate self from non-self as well as danger from non-danger signals, an unwarranted activation can nonetheless occur and cause tissue destruction. To prevent such activation, specific regulators present both in plasma and on the cell surface tightly control it. Data accumulated over the past four decades have also shown that the complement system is capable of not only cross-talk with the activation cascades of plasma––i.e. blood coagulation, contact activation, and the kinin/kallikrein system––but also serving as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. It is for these reasons that the various activation steps of the complement system have been recently targeted for therapy to treat diseases in which the role of complement is beyond doubt. This trend will certainly continue for years to come, especially as novel concepts guiding the field into areas never contemplated before are continuing to be discovered. PMID:27990282

  2. Emai Sentence Complements in Typological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Ronald P.; Egbokhare, Francis O.

    This paper explores the syntactic and semantic character of previously undescribed sentence complements (SCs) in Emai, a Benue-Congo language of Nigeria's Edoid group. Data come from ongoing documentation incorporating oral narrative texts as well as dictionary and grammar descriptions. To delineate the grammatical properties of SCs, the paper…

  3. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Jönsson G, Sjöholm AG, Truedsson L, Bengtsson AA, Braconier JH, Sturfelt G. Rheumatological manifestations, organ damage ... 31. Review. Citation on PubMed Truedsson L, Bengtsson AA, Sturfelt G. Complement deficiencies and systemic lupus erythematosus. ...

  4. Complement Constructions in English: Fairly Difficult for EFL Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazeli, Fatemeh; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    2012-01-01

    Complement constructions vary significantly in English and Persian. There are more complementation structures in English than in Persian and a complement structure in Persian might have more than one equivalent in English. Producing complement structures (CSs) in English is very difficult for native speakers of Persian, especially in an EFL…

  5. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  6. Targeted Inhibition of Complement Using Complement Receptor 2-Conjugated Inhibitors Attenuates EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases. PMID:23079547

  7. Targeted inhibition of complement using complement receptor 2-conjugated inhibitors attenuates EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-11-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases.

  8. The effects of soluble recombinant complement receptor 1 on complement-mediated experimental glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Couser, W G; Johnson, R J; Young, B A; Yeh, C G; Toth, C A; Rudolph, A R

    1995-05-01

    Complement is a major mediator of tissue injury in several types of glomerulonephritis. However, no therapeutic agents that inhibit complement activation are available for human use. sCR1 (TP10, BRL 55736) is a recombinant, soluble human complement receptor 1 (CR1) molecule lacking transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that inhibits C3 and C5 convertase activity by preferentially binding C4b and C3b. To test the efficacy of sCR1 on complement-mediated glomerulonephritis, rats were pretreated with sCR1 (60 mg/kg per day) before and during the induction of three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis (concanavalin A and antithymocyte serum models of proliferative glomerulonephritis, passive Heyman nephritis). Daily sCR1 and complement hemolytic activity levels were measured, and renal histology and urine protein excretion were examined. Mean serum sCR1 levels of 100 to 200 micrograms/mL were maintained with a reduction in complement hemolytic activity to less than 15% in most animals. In the antithymocyte serum model, sCR1-treated animals had significant reductions in mesangiolysis, glomerular platelet and macrophage infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In the concanavalin A model, sCR1 significantly reduced glomerular C3 and fibrin deposits, platelet infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In passive Heymann nephritis, proteinuria was also significantly reduced (199 +/- 8.5 versus 125 +/- 16 mg/day, P < 0.002) at 5 days. It was concluded that sCR1 significantly reduces both morphologic and functional consequences of several different types of complement-mediated glomerulonephritis and deserves evaluation as a potential therapeutic agent in complement-mediated immune glomerular disease in humans.

  9. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  10. Can Cell Bound Complement Activation Products Predict Inherited Complement Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the classical pathway complement system has long been implicated in stimulating immune complex mediated tissue destruction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C3 and C4 complement levels are utilized as part of SLE diagnosis and monitoring criteria. Recently, cell bound complement activation products (CBCAPs) have shown increased sensitivity in diagnosing and monitoring lupus activity, compared to traditional markers. CBCAPs are increasingly utilized in rheumatology practice as additional serological markers in evaluating SLE patients. We report a case of a patient diagnosed with SLE that had chronically low C3 and C4, along with negative CBCAPs. We surmise that the patient has an inherited complement deficiency as the etiology of her SLE and that CBCAPs could be used to predict such deficiency. PMID:28074166

  11. Tanker avionics and aircrew complement evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moss, R W; Barbato, G J

    1982-11-01

    This paper describes an effort to determine control and display criteria for operating SAC's KC-135 tanker with a reduced crew complement. The Tanker Avionics and Aircrew Complement Evaluation (TAACE) Program was a four-phase effort addressing the control and display design issues associated with operating the tanker without the navigator position. Discussed are: the mission analysis phase, during which the tanker's operational responsibilities were defined and documented; the design phase, during which alternative crew station design concepts were developed; the mockup evaluation phase, which accomplished initial SAC crew member assessment of cockpit designs; and the simulation phase, which validated the useability of the crew system redesign. The paper also describes a recommended crew station configuration and discusses some of the philosophy underlying the selection of cockpit hardware and systems.

  12. Soluble human complement receptor type 1 inhibits complement-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Swift, A J; Collins, T S; Bugelski, P; Winkelstein, J A

    1994-09-01

    Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) is a powerful inhibitor of complement activation. Because of this ability, sCR1 may prove to be an important therapeutic agent that can be used to block the immunopathologic effects of uncontrolled complement activation in a variety of clinically significant disorders. Although several previous studies have examined the ability of sCR1 to inhibit complemented-mediated immunopathologic damage, there is no information on its ability to interfere with the host's defense against infection. In the current experiments sCR1 exerted a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on the phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro. Not only di sCR1 inhibit complement-dependent opsonization of the pneumococcus but at higher concentrations it also inhibited the ingestion of bacteria which had been previously opsonized. Furthermore, when rats were injected with sCR1, it inhibited both their serum hemolytic activity and serum opsonic activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Finally, for rats treated with sCR1, the 50% lethal dose was S. pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These data demonstrate that sCR1 significantly inhibits complement-mediated host against bacterial infection.

  13. Incorporation of Host Complement Regulatory Proteins into Newcastle Disease Virus Enhances Complement Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Moanaro; Johnson, John B.; Kumar, Sandeep R. P.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2012-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, is inherently tumor selective and is currently being considered as a clinical oncolytic virus and vaccine vector. In this study, we analyzed the effect of complement on the neutralization of NDV purified from embryonated chicken eggs, a common source for virus production. Fresh normal human serum (NHS) neutralized NDV by multiple pathways of complement activation, independent of neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization was associated with C3 deposition and the activation of C2, C3, C4, and C5 components. Interestingly, NDV grown in mammalian cell lines was resistant to complement neutralization by NHS. To confirm whether the incorporation of regulators of complement activity (RCA) into the viral envelope afforded complement resistance, we grew NDV in CHO cells stably transfected with CD46 or HeLa cells, which strongly express CD46 and CD55. NDV grown in RCA-expressing cells was resistant to complement by incorporating CD46 and CD55 on virions. Mammalian CD46 and CD55 molecules on virions exhibited homologous restriction, since chicken sera devoid of neutralizing antibodies to NDV were able to effectively neutralize these virions. The incorporation of chicken RCA into NDV produced in embryonated eggs similarly provided species specificity toward chicken sera. PMID:22973037

  14. COMPLEMENT REGULATION IN RENAL DISEASE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit; Sharma, Shweta; Quigg, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is tightly regulated by plasma and cell-associated complement regulatory proteins (CRPs), such as factor H (fH), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Animal models of disease have provided considerable insights into the important roles for CRPs in the kidney. Mice deficient in fH have excessive fluid phase C3 activation and inactivation leading to deposition of iC3b in glomerular capillary walls (GCW), comparable to dense deposit disease. In contrast, when fH lacks C-terminal surface targeting regions, local activation on the GCW leads to a disease reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathy. The uniquely rodent protein, CR1-related y (Crry), has features analogous to human MCP. Defective Crry leads to unrestricted alternative pathway activation in the tubulointerstitium (TI) resulting in pathological features ranging from TMA, acute kidney injury and TI nephritis. In the presence of initiators of the classical or lectin pathways, commonly in the form of immune complexes in human glomerular diseases, complement regulation on self is stressed, with the potential for recruitment of the spontaneously active alternative pathway. The threshold for this activation is set by CRPs; pathology is more likely when complement regulation is defective. Within the endocapillary region of the GCW, fH is key, while DAF and Crry are protective on mesangial cells and podocytes. Arguably, acquired alterations in these CRPs is a more common event, extending from pathological states of cellular injury or production of inhibitory antibodies, to physiological fine tuning of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24161042

  15. Detection of complement activation by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE).

    PubMed

    Arroyave, C M; Tan, E M

    1976-01-01

    Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was used as a method of detecting activation of the third component of the complement system (C3). Highly purified C3, normal human serum (NHS), EDTA-treated plasma and serum activated with aggregated human immunoglobulin (agg-IgG) or inulin were used as sources of C3 and/or C3 split products. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement was assayed in the presence of EGTA (10 mM) and MgCl2 (0.3 mM), conditions which block activation of the classical pathway. When purified native C3, fresh NHS and fresh EDTA-plasma were tested in CIE against either antisera to whole C3 or to C3 split products, only one precipitin line was found, which was identified as native C3. However, when serum activated with agg-IgG or inulin were tested against the same reagents, two precipitin lines were seen. The first, with more cathodal mobility was identical to that of native C3. The second line had a more anodal mobility, was distinctly separated from the first and contained C3c and C3d as shown immunochemically with specific antisera. Native C3 and split products of C3 were identified by this CIE method in patients showing evidence of activated complement by having subnormal total complement (CH50) levels. When C3 split products were identified, the C3c-C3d precipitin line could always be distinguished from native C3 by its different electrophoretic mobility, even when C3 concentrations in serum varied from 0.25 mg/ml to 1.5 mg/ml. The sensitivity of CIE was compared to that of CH50 by asssaying at different time intervals after agg-IgG was added to fresh NHS. C3c-C3d split products were detected by CIE before any fall in CH50 and at all times when a significant decrease in CH50 was present. This study shows that the CIE technique is a highly sensitive, specific and rapid method for detecting activation of the complement system via classical or alternative pathways in human disease.

  16. Expression cloning of multiple human cDNAs that complement the phenotypic defects of ataxia-telangiectasia group D fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Meyn, M S; Lu-Kuo, J M; Herzing, L B

    1993-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an inherited human disease of unknown etiology associated with neurologic degeneration, immune dysfunction, cancer risk, and genetic instability. A-T cells are sensitive to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic drugs, offering the possibility of cloning A-T genes by phenotypic complementation. We have used this sensitivity to isolate the first human cDNAs reported to complement A-T cells in culture. Complementation group D A-T fibroblasts were transfected with an episomal vector-based human cDNA library, approximately 610,000 resultant transformants were treated with the radiomimetic drug streptonigrin-resistant, and nine unrelated cDNAs were recovered from 29 surviving streptonigrin-resistant clones. Five cDNAs were mapped, but none localized to 11q23, the site of A-T complementation group A and C loci. Four of the mapped cDNAs conferred mutagen resistance to A-T D fibroblasts on secondary transfection. One cDNA was identified as a fragment of dek, a gene involved in acute myeloid leukemia. The dek cDNA fragment and pCAT4.5, a 4.5-kb cDNA that mapped to 17p11, independently complemented three different phenotypic abnormalities of A-T D fibroblasts (mutagen sensitivity, hyper-recombination, and radio-resistant DNA synthesis). The pCAT4.5 cDNA did not complement the mutagen sensitivity of an A-T group C fibroblast line, suggesting that it represents a candidate disease gene for group D A-T. Our results indicate that phenotypic complementation alone is insufficient evidence to prove that a candidate cDNA is an A-T disease gene. The complementing cDNAs may represent previously uncharacterized genes that function in the same pathway as does the A-T gene product(s) in the regulation of cellular responses to DNA damage. Images Figure 2 PMID:7504406

  17. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD.

  18. The sequence and topology of human complement component C9.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, K K; Kocher, H P; Luzio, J P; Jackson, P; Tschopp, J

    1985-01-01

    A partial nucleotide sequence of human complement component C9 cDNA representing 94% of the coding region of the mature protein is presented. The amino acid sequence predicted from the open reading frame of this cDNA concurs with the amino acid sequence at the amino-terminal end of three proteolytic fragments of purified C9 protein. No long stretches of hydrophobic residues are present, even in the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule which reacts with lipid-soluble photoaffinity probes. Monoclonal antibody epitopes have been mapped by comparing overlapping fragments of C9 molecule to which the antibodies bind on Western blots. Several of these epitopes map to small regions containing other surface features (e.g., proteolytic cleavage sites and N-linked oligosaccharide). The amino-terminal half of C9 is rich in cysteine residues and contains a region with a high level of homology to the LDL receptor cysteine-rich domains. A model for C9 topology based on these findings is proposed. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:4018030

  19. Complement research in the 18th-21st centuries: Progress comes with new technology.

    PubMed

    Sim, R B; Schwaeble, W; Fujita, T

    2016-10-01

    The complement system has been studied for about 120 years. Progress in defining this large and complex system has been dependent on the research technologies available, but since the introduction of protein chromatography, electrophoresis, and antibody-based assay methods in the 1950s and 60s, and sequencing of proteins and DNA in the 70s and 80s, there has been very rapid accumulation of data. With more recent improvements in 3D structure determination (nmr and X-ray crystallography), the structures of most of the complement proteins have now been solved. Complement research since 1990 has been greatly stimulated by the discoveries of the multiple proteins in the lectin pathway, the strong association of Factor H, C3, Factor B allelic variants with adult macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, and the introduction of the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody as a therapy for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. Potential new roles for complement in tissue development and the search for novel therapeutics suggest a very active future for complement research.

  20. Complementing asteroseismology with 4MOST spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, R. S.; 4MOST Consortium; 4MOST Spectroscopy Consortium

    2016-09-01

    4MOST is a wide-field, high-multiplex spectroscopic survey facility under development for the VISTA telescope of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Its main science drivers are in the areas of galactic archeology, high-energy physics, galaxy evolution and cosmology. 4MOST will in particular provide the spectroscopic complements to the large area surveys coming from space missions like Gaia, eROSITA, Euclid, and PLATO. 4MOST will have an unique operations concept in which 5-years public surveys from both the consortium and the ESO community will be combined and observed in parallel during each exposure, resulting in more than 25 million spectra of targets spread over a large fraction of the southern sky. As a dedicated spectroscopic survey facility with a large field-of-view, a high multiplex that can be reconfigured quickly, and with a broad wavelength coverage, 4MOST is particularly well suited to complement the upcoming asteroseismology space missions like TESS and PLATO. Here we show that, by dedicating the observing time during twilight and poor observing conditions to bright stars, 4MOST will obtain resolution {R>18 000} spectra of nearly all stars brighter than ˜ 12th magnitude at Dec < 30o every ˜ 2 years. 4MOST is also expected to spectroscopically complement any fainter asteroseismology target to be observed with PLATO. These observations will provide a chemical characterization of nearly all stars to be observed with the TESS and PLATO missions and place any planets found in a full chemo-dynamical context of the star formation history of the Galaxy, yield very accurate ages and masses for all stars that can be characterized with asteroseismology, and allow removal of contaminants from target samples (e.g., spectroscopic binaries).

  1. VISUALIZATION OF MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS BY FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kerppola, Tom K.

    2008-01-01

    The visualization of protein complexes in living cells enables validation of protein interactions in their normal environment and determination of their subcellular localization. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay has been used to visualize interactions among multiple proteins in many cell types and organisms. This assay is based on the association between two fluorescent-protein fragments when they are brought together by an interaction between proteins fused to the fragments. Modified forms of this assay have been used to visualize the competition between alternative interaction partners and the covalent modification of proteins by ubiquitin family peptides. PMID:16625152

  2. Soluble complement receptor 1 inhibits both complement and granulocyte activation during ex vivo hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Himmelfarb, J; McMonagle, E; Holbrook, D; Toth, C

    1995-10-01

    Hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes results in both complement and granulocyte activation. We investigated the effects of soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), a potent complement inhibitor, on both complement and granulocyte activation in an ex vivo model of dialysis. Measurements were made of complement activation (radioimmunoassay for C3a desArg) as well as granulocyte activation (flow cytometric measurements of reactive oxygen species production, granulocyte CD11b/CD18 (MAC-1) expression and CD62L (L-selectin) expression). sCR1 completely abolished the generation of plasma C3a desArg during ex vivo hemodialysis. Without sCR1, C3a desArg levels rose from 968 +/- 373 ng/ml to 4961 +/- 40 ng/ml by the end of the ex vivo procedure (p < 0.001). sCR1 also completely inhibited MAC-1 upregulation and L-selectin shedding from granulocytes during ex vivo hemodialysis. With sCR1 there was still a statistically significant increase in granulocyte reactive oxygen species production (from 2.42 +/- 0.1 fluorescence channels to 6.47 +/- 0.7 fluorescence channels, p < 0.01) but a 50% inhibition when compared with experiments without sCR1 (3.15 +/- 0.5 to 11.2 +/- 1.9, p < 0.01). We conclude that sCR1 completely abolishes complement activation and changes in granulocyte cell adhesion molecules during ex vivo hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes. sCR1 partially inhibits granulocyte reactive oxygen species formation.

  3. The Production of Complement Clauses in Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steel, Gillian; Rose, Miranda; Eadie, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to provide a comprehensive description of complement-clause production in children with language impairment. Complement clauses were examined with respect to types of complement structure produced, verb use, and both semantic and syntactic accuracy. Method: A group of 17 children with language impairment…

  4. The Complement System in Flavivirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Conde, Jonas N; Silva, Emiliana M; Barbosa, Angela S; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of flavivirus infections has increased dramatically in recent decades in tropical and sub-tropical climates worldwide, affecting hundreds of millions of people each year. The Flaviviridae family includes dengue, West Nile, Zika, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever viruses that are typically transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks, and cause a wide range of symptoms, such as fever, shock, meningitis, paralysis, birth defects, and death. The flavivirus genome is composed of a single positive-sense RNA molecule encoding a single viral polyprotein. This polyprotein is further processed by viral and host proteases into three structural proteins (C, prM/M, E) and seven non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5) that are involved in viral replication and pathogenicity. The complement system has been described to play an important role in flavivirus infection either by protecting the host and/or by influencing disease pathogenesis. In this mini-review, we will explore the role of complement system inhibition and/or activation against infection by the Flavivirus genus, with an emphasis on dengue and West Nile viruses.

  5. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-12-24

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials.

  6. The Complement System in Flavivirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Jonas N.; Silva, Emiliana M.; Barbosa, Angela S.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of flavivirus infections has increased dramatically in recent decades in tropical and sub-tropical climates worldwide, affecting hundreds of millions of people each year. The Flaviviridae family includes dengue, West Nile, Zika, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever viruses that are typically transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks, and cause a wide range of symptoms, such as fever, shock, meningitis, paralysis, birth defects, and death. The flavivirus genome is composed of a single positive-sense RNA molecule encoding a single viral polyprotein. This polyprotein is further processed by viral and host proteases into three structural proteins (C, prM/M, E) and seven non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5) that are involved in viral replication and pathogenicity. The complement system has been described to play an important role in flavivirus infection either by protecting the host and/or by influencing disease pathogenesis. In this mini-review, we will explore the role of complement system inhibition and/or activation against infection by the Flavivirus genus, with an emphasis on dengue and West Nile viruses. PMID:28261172

  7. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials. PMID:28058212

  8. Hijacking Complement Regulatory Proteins for Bacterial Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Hovingh, Elise S.; van den Broek, Bryan; Jongerius, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system plays an important role in the defense against invading pathogens, inflammation and homeostasis. Invading microbes, such as bacteria, directly activate the complement system resulting in the formation of chemoattractants and in effective labeling of the bacteria for phagocytosis. In addition, formation of the membrane attack complex is responsible for direct killing of Gram-negative bacteria. In turn, bacteria have evolved several ways to evade complement activation on their surface in order to be able to colonize and invade the human host. One important mechanism of bacterial escape is attraction of complement regulatory proteins to the microbial surface. These molecules are present in the human body for tight regulation of the complement system to prevent damage to host self-surfaces. Therefore, recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface results in decreased complement activation on the microbial surface which favors bacterial survival. This review will discuss recent advances in understanding the binding of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface at the molecular level. This includes, new insights that have become available concerning specific conserved motives on complement regulatory proteins that are favorable for microbial binding. Finally, complement evasion molecules are of high importance for vaccine development due to their dominant role in bacterial survival, high immunogenicity and homology as well as their presence on the bacterial surface. Here, the use of complement evasion molecules for vaccine development will be discussed. PMID:28066340

  9. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ.

  10. Variola virus immune evasion design: expression of a highly efficient inhibitor of human complement.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, Ariella M; Liu, Yu; Nie, Zhiping; Jimenez, Robert

    2002-06-25

    Variola virus, the most virulent member of the genus Orthopoxvirus, specifically infects humans and has no other animal reservoir. Variola causes the contagious disease smallpox, which has a 30-40% mortality rate. Conversely, the prototype orthopoxvirus, vaccinia, causes no disease in immunocompetent humans and was used in the global eradication of smallpox, which ended in 1977. However, the threat of smallpox persists because clandestine stockpiles of variola still exist. Although variola and vaccinia share remarkable DNA homology, the strict human tropism of variola suggests that its proteins are better suited than those of vaccinia to overcome the human immune response. Here, we demonstrate the functional advantage of a variola complement regulatory protein over that of its vaccinia homologue. Because authentic variola proteins are not available for study, we molecularly engineered and characterized the smallpox inhibitor of complement enzymes (SPICE), a homologue of a vaccinia virulence factor, vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP). SPICE is nearly 100-fold more potent than VCP at inactivating human C3b and 6-fold more potent at inactivating C4b. SPICE is also more human complement-specific than is VCP. By inactivating complement components, SPICE serves to inhibit the formation of the C3/C5 convertases necessary for complement-mediated viral clearance. SPICE provides the first evidence that variola proteins are particularly adept at overcoming human immunity, and the decreased function of VCP suggests one reason why the vaccinia virus vaccine was associated with relatively low mortality. Disabling SPICE may be therapeutically useful if smallpox reemerges.

  11. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Manandhar, Surya P; Popadiak, Katarzyna; Riesbeck, Kristian; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A) resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  12. Complement components in Nigerians with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Onyemelukwe, G C

    1989-10-01

    Serum complement components C1q, C3, C4, factor B, and C3d breakdown products were measured in asthmatic Nigerians and in age-matched and sex-matched controls. C3 mean level was higher than in controls while C1q and C4 mean levels were lower than in controls. High levels of C3d in asthmatic patients suggest the possible role of C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins in the etiopathogenesis of perennial asthma in Nigerian patients in a tropical environment with ubiquitous airborne allergens and infective agents. The significantly elevated levels of IgM and IgG may suggest recurrent respiratory challenge of perennial antigens in our environment.

  13. The minimal gene complement of mycoplasma genitalium

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, C.M.; Gocayne, J.D.; White, O.

    1995-10-20

    The complete nucleotide sequence (580,070 base pairs) of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome, the smallest known genome of any free-living organism, has been determined by whole-genome random sequencing and assembly. A total of only 470 predicted coding regions were identified that include genes required for DNA replication, transcription and translation, DNA repair, cellular transport, and energy metabolism. Comparison of this genome to that of Haemophilus influenzae suggests that differences in genome content are reflected as profound differences in physiology and metabolic capacity between these two organisms. 43 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. A complementation method for functional analysis of mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Santos, Juana Maria; Cao, Huibi; Wang, Anan; Koehler, David R.; Martin, Bernard; Navab, Roya; Hu, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Our progress in understanding mammalian gene function has lagged behind that of gene identification. New methods for mammalian gene functional analysis are needed to accelerate the process. In yeast, the powerful genetic shuffle system allows deletion of any chromosomal gene by homologous recombination and episomal expression of a mutant allele in the same cell. Here, we report a method for mammalian cells, which employs a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector to synthesize small hairpin (sh) RNAs to knock-down the expression of an endogenous gene by targeting untranslated regions (UTRs). The vector simultaneously expresses an exogenous version of the same gene (wild-type or mutant allele) lacking the UTRs for functional analysis. We demonstrated the utility of the method by using PRPF3, which encodes the human RNA splicing factor Hprp3p. Recently, missense mutations in PRPF3 were found to cause autosomal-dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa, a form of genetic eye diseases affecting the retina. We knocked-down endogenous PRPF3 in multiple cell lines and rescued the phenotype (cell death) with exogenous PRPF3 cDNA, thereby creating a genetic complementation method. Because Ad vectors can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types, and many tissues in vivo, this method could have a wide application for gene function studies. PMID:15944448

  15. Complement inhibition: a promising concept for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively novel and deserves closer attention. In this paper, we will summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:23706991

  16. Interspecies complementation analysis of xeroderma pigmentosum and UV-sensitive Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanini, M.; Keijzer, W.; Westerveld, A.; Bootsma, D.

    1985-12-01

    Complementation analysis was performed 24 h after fusion of UV-sensitive CHO cells (CHO 12 RO) with XP cells of complementation groups A, B, C, D, F and G. The parental cells are characterized by low levels of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). In all combinations, the UDS levels observed in heterokaryons were higher than those in parental mutant cells, clearly indicating cooperation of human and Chinese hamster repair functions. In heterokaryons of CHO 12 RO with XP-A and XP-C cells, the UDS values reached about the normal human level, whereas in heterokaryons with XP-B, XP-D and XP-F, UDS was restored at a level approaching that in wild-type CHO cells. The results obtained after fusion of CHO cells with two representative cell strains from the XP-G group, XP 2 BI and XP 3 BR, were inconsistent. Fusion with XP 3 BR cells yielded UDS levels ranging from wild-type Chinese hamster to normal human, whereas fusion with XP 2 BI cells resulted in a slight increase in UDS which even after 48 h remained below the level found in wild-type CHO cells. The occurrence of complementation in these interspecies heterokaryons indicates that the genetic defect in the CHO 12 RO cells is different from the defects in the XP complementation groups tested.

  17. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G patient with a novel homozygous missense mutation and no neurological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Shinichi; Takigawa, Masahiro; Igarashi, Naoya; Nagai, Yayoi; Amano, Hiroo; Ishikawa, Osamu; Khan, Sikandar G; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2012-04-01

    We describe an unusual xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patient with a mutation in XP complementation group G, representing only the third reported Japanese XP-G patient. A 40-year-old men (XP3HM), born from consanguineous parents experienced sun sensitivity and pigmentary changes of sun-exposed skin since childhood. He developed a squamous cell carcinoma on his lower lip at the age of 40. He has neither neurological abnormalities nor Cockayne syndrome. The primary fibroblasts of the patient were hypersensitive to killing by UV (D(0) = 0.6 J/m(2)) and the post-UV unscheduled DNA synthesis was 8% of normal. Host cell reactivation complementation analysis implicated XP complementation group G. We identified a novel homozygous mutation (c.194T>C) in a conserved portion of the XPG(ERCC5) gene, resulting in a predicted amino acid change; p.L65P. We confirmed that this genetic change reduced DNA repair thus linking this mutation to increased skin cancer.

  18. Identification of hot spots in the variola virus complement inhibitor (SPICE) for human complement regulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Pyaram, Kalyani; Mullick, Jayati; Sahu, Arvind

    2008-04-01

    Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, encodes a soluble complement regulator named SPICE. Previously, SPICE has been shown to be much more potent in inactivating human complement than the vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP), although they differ only in 11 amino acid residues. In the present study, we have expressed SPICE, VCP, and mutants of VCP by substituting each or more of the 11 non-variant VCP residues with the corresponding residue of SPICE to identify hot spots that impart functional advantage to SPICE over VCP. Our data indicate that (i) SPICE is approximately 90-fold more potent than VCP in inactivating human C3b, and the residues Y98, Y103, K108 and K120 are predominantly responsible for its enhanced activity; (ii) SPICE is 5.4-fold more potent in inactivating human C4b, and residues Y98, Y103, K108, K120 and L193 mainly dictate this increase; (iii) the classical pathway decay-accelerating activity of activity is only twofold higher than that of VCP, and the 11 mutations in SPICE do not significantly affect this activity; (iv) SPICE possesses significantly greater binding ability to human C3b compared to VCP, although its binding to human C4b is lower than that of VCP; (v) residue N144 is largely responsible for the increased binding of SPICE to human C3b; and (vi) the human specificity of SPICE is dictated primarily by residues Y98, Y103, K108, and K120 since these are enough to formulate VCP as potent as SPICE. Together, these results suggest that principally 4 of the 11 residues that differ between SPICE and VCP partake in its enhanced function against human complement.

  19. Complement-mediated regulation of metabolism and basic cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Complement is well appreciated as critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and functions by direct pathogen destruction and through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental processes of the cell, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Novel identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism, and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings. PMID:27533012

  20. Protein ultrastructure and the nanoscience of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Boesen, Thomas

    2011-09-16

    The complement system constitutes an important barrier to infection of the human body. Over more than four decades structural properties of the proteins of the complement system have been investigated with X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, small-angle scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Here, we review the accumulated evidence that the nm-scaled dimensions and conformational changes of these proteins support functions of the complement system with regard to tissue distribution, molecular crowding effects, avidity binding, and conformational regulation of complement activation. In the targeting of complement activation to the surfaces of nanoparticulate material, such as engineered nanoparticles or fragments of the microbial cell wall, these processes play intimately together. This way the complement system is an excellent example where nanoscience may serve to unravel the molecular biology of the immune response.

  1. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Metabolism and Basic Cellular Processes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-08-16

    Complement is well appreciated as a critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and works by directly destroying them through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Newly identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription-factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings.

  2. Altmetrics - a complement to conventional metrics.

    PubMed

    Melero, Remedios

    2015-01-01

    Emerging metrics based on article-level does not exclude traditional metrics based on citations to the journal, but complements them. Both can be employed in conjunction to offer a richer picture of an article use from immediate to long terms. Article-level metrics (ALM) is the result of the aggregation of different data sources and the collection of content from multiple social network services. Sources used for the aggregation can be broken down into five categories: usage, captures, mentions, social media and citations. Data sources depend on the tool, but they include classic metrics indicators based on citations, academic social networks (Mendeley, CiteULike, Delicious) and social media (Facebook, Twitter, blogs, or Youtube, among others). Altmetrics is not synonymous with alternative metrics. Altmetrics are normally early available and allow to assess the social impact of scholarly outputs, almost at the real time. This paper overviews briefly the meaning of altmetrics and describes some of the existing tools used to apply this new metrics: Public Library of Science--Article-Level Metrics, Altmetric, Impactstory and Plum.

  3. Complement activation in very early Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, H; Finch, C E; Kemper, C; Atkinson, J; McKeel, D; Morris, J C; Price, J L

    2005-01-01

    The activation of the classical complement (C)-system in early-stage Alzheimer disease (AD) and nondemented aging was examined with immunohistochemistry in subjects assessed by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). Activation (staining for C3 and C4 fragments) was found in all brains with amyloid deposits, including all nondemented (CDR 0) cases, with either small numbers of diffuse plaques or with sufficient plaques and tangles to indicate preclinical AD. Staining for C3 and C4 increased in parallel with plaque density in very mild to severe clinical AD. A subset of very mild AD (CDR 0.5) cases also showed C1q (on plaques) and C5b-9 (on neuritic plaques and tangles), whereas these C-fragments were consistently found in severe AD (CDR 3). Mirror section (split-face) analysis showed that C1q, C3, and apoJ (clusterin) occurred on the same plaques. However, C-system regulators CD59, CR1, DAF, and MCP were not detected on plaques or tangles at any stage, indicating that C-activation related to AD is incompletely controlled.

  4. Altmetrics – a complement to conventional metrics

    PubMed Central

    Melero, Remedios

    2015-01-01

    Emerging metrics based on article-level does not exclude traditional metrics based on citations to the journal, but complements them. Both can be employed in conjunction to offer a richer picture of an article use from immediate to long terms. Article-level metrics (ALM) is the result of the aggregation of different data sources and the collection of content from multiple social network services. Sources used for the aggregation can be broken down into five categories: usage, captures, mentions, social media and citations. Data sources depend on the tool, but they include classic metrics indicators based on citations, academic social networks (Mendeley, CiteULike, Delicious) and social media (Facebook, Twitter, blogs, or Youtube, among others). Altmetrics is not synonymous with alternative metrics. Altmetrics are normally early available and allow to assess the social impact of scholarly outputs, almost at the real time. This paper overviews briefly the meaning of altmetrics and describes some of the existing tools used to apply this new metrics: Public Library of Science - Article-Level Metrics, Altmetric, Impactstory and Plum. PMID:26110028

  5. Complement component 5 promotes lethal thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Kengo; Mizuno, Masashi; Shimizu, Mie; Nagano, Fumihiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Imai, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones promote platelet aggregation and thrombosis; this is followed by induction of coagulation disorder, which results in exhaustion of coagulation factors. Complement component 5 (C5) is known to be associated with platelet aggregation and coagulation system activation. To date, the pathological mechanism underlying liver injury has remained unclear. Here, we investigated whether C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice received single tail vein injections of purified, unfractionated histones obtained from calf thymus (45–75 μg/g). Subsequently, the mice were monitored for survival for up to 72 h. Based on the survival data, the 45 μg/g dose was used for analysis of blood cell count, liver function, blood coagulation ability, and promotion of platelet aggregation and platelet/leukocyte aggregate (PLA) production by extracellular histones. C5-deficient mice were protected from lethal thrombosis and had milder thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy, and liver injury with embolism and lower PLA production than C5-sufficient mice. These results indicate that C5 is associated with coagulation disorders, PLA production, and embolism-induced liver injury. In conclusion, C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. PMID:28205538

  6. Genetic complementation studies of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, A L

    1979-12-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from two individuals with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) were found to have decreased activities of arylsulfatases (aryl-sulfate sulfohydrolase, EC 3.1.6.1) A, B, and C as well as iduronate-sulfate sulfatase, sulfamidase, and N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase. The activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase was decreased in one line but not in the other. Mixtures of MSD cell extracts with extracts from normal cells did not result in inhibition of normal sulfatase activities. Mixtures of MSD cell extracts with extracts of fibroblasts from patients with Hunter or Sanfilippo A syndrome did not activate iduronate-sulfate sulfatase or sulfamidase activity. Heterokaryons formed by fusion of MSD cells with Sanfilippo A fibroblasts demonstrated a partial correction of the enzyme deficiency. In similar manner, MSD-Hunter heterokaryons showed a significant increase in iduronate-sulfate-sulfatase activity. Genetic complementation in heterokaryons of MSD fibroblasts and cells of either Sanfilippo A or Hunter syndrome implies a genetic defect in MSD different from that causing specific sulfatase deficiencies.

  7. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  8. Complement: A primer for the coming therapeutic revolution.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Scott R

    2017-04-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Originally characterized as a single serum component contributing to the killing of bacteria, we now know that there are close to sixty complement proteins, multiple activation pathways and a wide range of effector functions mediated by complement. The system plays a critical role in host defense against bacteria, viruses, fungi and other pathogens. However, inappropriate complement activation contributes to the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases and many inflammatory syndromes. Over the last several decades, therapeutic approaches to inhibit complement activation at various steps in the pathways have met with initial success, particularly at the level of the terminal pathway. This success, combined with insight from animal model studies, has lead to an unprecedented effort by biotech and pharmaceutical companies to begin developing complement inhibitors. As a result, complement has been brought for the first time to the attention of pharmacologists, toxicologists, project managers and others in the drug development industry, as well as those in the investment world. The purpose of this primer is to provide a broad overview of complement immunobiology to help those new to complement understand the rationale behind the current therapeutic directions and the investment potential of these new therapeutics.

  9. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  12. Complement response after experimental bacterial infection in various nutritional states.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, M; Ishii, S; Nishioka, K; Shimada, K

    1979-01-01

    In malnourished rats, nutritionally rehabilitated rats at various stages, and in well nourished rats, levels of serum complement after bacterial infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, as well as tuberculin reactivity, were examined. The elevation of complement showed a peak 2--3 days after infection, herein called the first complement response. A reelevation occurred at a later stage, 7--14 days after infection, and is referred to as the second complement response. The first complement response was observed in all the rats after Staphylococcus aureus infection but it was greater in well nourished rats. In malnourished rats, only the first complement response was observed and the tuberculin reaction and second complement response were lacking. After 1 week of nutritional rehabilitation, 40% of the rats showed recovery of tuberculin responses and both the first and second complement responses were observed. Nutritionally rehabilitated rats treated longer than 2 weeks, together with the well nourished control rats, showed positive tuberculin reactivity. The second complement response was also observed in such rats when bacterial infection was severe but not with mild infection. PMID:511223

  13. Complement--tapping into new sites and effector systems.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Kemper, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Complement is traditionally known to be a system of serum proteins that provide protection against pathogens through direct cell lysis and the mobilization of innate and adaptive immunity. However, recent work indicates that the complement system has additional physiological roles beyond those in host defence. In this Opinion article, we describe the new modes and locations of complement activation that enable it to interact with other cell effector systems, such as growth factor receptors, inflammasomes and metabolic pathways. We propose that the location of complement activation dictates its function.

  14. Production of random DNA oligomers for scalable DNA computing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sixue S L; Johnson, John J X; Hughes, Bradley S T; Karabay, Dundar A O; Bader, Karson D W; Austin, Allen; Austin, Alan; Habib, Aisha; Hatef, Husnia; Joshi, Megha; Nguyen, Lawrence; Mills, Allen P

    2009-01-01

    While remarkably complex networks of connected DNA molecules can form from a relatively small number of distinct oligomer strands, a large computational space created by DNA reactions would ultimately require the use of many distinct DNA strands. The automatic synthesis of this many distinct strands is economically prohibitive. We present here a new approach to producing distinct DNA oligomers based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a few random template sequences. As an example, we designed a DNA template sequence consisting of a 50-mer random DNA segment flanked by two 20-mer invariant primer sequences. Amplification of a dilute sample containing about 30 different template molecules allows us to obtain around 10(11) copies of these molecules and their complements. We demonstrate the use of these amplicons to implement some of the vector operations that will be required in a DNA implementation of an analog neural network.

  15. Complement is a central mediator of radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and clinical response.

    PubMed

    Surace, Laura; Lysenko, Veronika; Fontana, Andrea Orlando; Cecconi, Virginia; Janssen, Hans; Bicvic, Antonela; Okoniewski, Michal; Pruschy, Martin; Dummer, Reinhard; Neefjes, Jacques; Knuth, Alexander; Gupta, Anurag; van den Broek, Maries

    2015-04-21

    Radiotherapy induces DNA damage and cell death, but recent data suggest that concomitant immune stimulation is an integral part of the therapeutic action of ionizing radiation. It is poorly understood how radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. Here we report that radiotherapy induced tumor cell death and transiently activated complement both in murine and human tumors. The local production of pro-inflammatory anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a was crucial to the tumor response to radiotherapy and concomitant stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. Dexamethasone, a drug frequently given during radiotherapy, limited complement activation and the anti-tumor effects of the immune system. Overall, our findings indicate that anaphylatoxins are key players in radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and the ensuing clinical responses.

  16. Replication of chicken anemia virus (CAV) requires apoptin and is complemented by VP3 of human torque teno virus (TTV).

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Kamahora, Toshio; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Murakami, Kyoko; Hino, Shigeo

    2009-03-01

    To test requirement for apoptin in the replication of chicken anemia virus (CAV), an apoptin-knockout clone, pCAV/Ap(-), was constructed. DNA replication was completely abolished in cells transfected with replicative form of CAV/Ap(-). A reverse mutant competent in apoptin production regained the full level of DNA replication. DNA replication and virus-like particle (VLP) production of CAV/Ap(-) was fully complemented by supplementation of the wild-type apoptin. The virus yield of a point mutant, CAV/ApT(108)I, was 1/40 that of the wild type, even though its DNA replication level was full. The infectious titer of CAV was fully complemented by supplementing apoptin. Progeny virus was free from reverse mutation for T(108)I. To localize the domain within apoptin molecule inevitable for CAV replication, apoptin-mutant expressing plasmids, pAp1, pAp2, pAp3, and pAp4, were constructed by deleting amino acids 10-36, 31-59, 59-88 and 80-112, respectively. While Ap1 and Ap2 were preferentially localized in nuclei, Ap3 and Ap4 were mainly present in cytoplasm. Although complementation capacity of Ap3 and Ap4 was 1/10 of the wild type, neither of them completely lost its activity. VP3 of TTV did fully complement the DNA replication and VLP of CAV/Ap(-). These data suggest that apoptin is inevitable not only for DNA replication but also VLP of CAV. The common feature of apoptin and TTV-VP3 presented another evidence for close relatedness of CAV and TTV.

  17. Superimposed Code Theoretic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    complements of one another and the DNA duplex formed is a Watson - Crick (WC) duplex. However, there are many instances when the formation of non-WC...that the user’s requirements for probe selection are met based on the Watson - Crick probe locality within a target. The second type, called

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD27 complements its Escherichia coli homolog in damage repair but not mutation avoidance.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Gaku; Daigaku, Yasukazu; Nagata, Yuki; Ihara, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2004-06-01

    In eukaryotes, the flap endonuclease of Rad27/Fen-1 is thought to play a critical role in lagging-strand DNA replication by removing ribonucleotides present at the 5' ends of Okazaki fragments, and in base excision repair by cleaving a 5' flap structure that may result during base excision repair. Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad27Delta mutants further display a repeat tract instability phenotype and a high rate of forward mutations to canavanine resistance that result from duplications of DNA sequence, indicating a role in mutation avoidance. Two conserved motifs in Rad27/Fen-1 show homology to the 5' --> 3' exonuclease domain of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. The strain defective in the 5' --> 3' exonuclease domain in DNA polymerase I shows essentially the same phenotype as the yeast rad27Delta strain. In this study, we expressed the yeast RAD27 gene in an E. coli strain lacking the 5' --> 3' exonuclease domain in DNA polymerase I in order to test whether eukaryotic RAD27/FEN-1 can complement the defect of its bacterial homolog. We found that the yeast Rad27 protein complements sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate in an E. coli mutant. On the other hand, Rad27 protein did not reduce the high rate of spontaneous mutagenesis in the E. coli tonB gene which results from duplication of DNA. These results indicate that the yeast Rad27 and E. coli 5' --> 3' exonuclease act on the same substrate. We argue that the lack of mutation avoidance of yeast RAD27 in E. coli results from a lack of interaction between the yeast Rad27 protein and the E. coli replication clamp (beta-clamp).

  19. Characterization and expression analysis of a complement component gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Dong, Ying; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    The complement system plays a crucial role in the innate immune system of animals. It can be activated by distinct yet overlapping classical, alternative and lectin pathways. In the alternative pathway, complement factor B (Bf) serves as the catalytic subunit of complement component 3 (C3) convertase, which plays the central role among three activation pathways. In this study, the Bf gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), termed AjBf, was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of AjBf was 3231 bp in length barring the poly (A) tail. It contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2742 bp encoding 913 amino acids, a 105 bp 5'-UTR (5'-terminal untranslated region) and a 384 bp 3'-UTR. AjBf was a mosaic protein with six CCP (complement control protein) domains, a VWA (von Willebrand factor A) domain, and a serine protease domain. The deduced molecular weight of AjBf protein was 101 kDa. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expression level of AjBf in A. japonicus was obviously higher at larval stage than that at embryonic stage. Expression detection in different tissues showed that AjBf expressed higher in coelomocytes than in other four tissues. In addation, AjBf expression in different tissues was induced significantly after LPS or PolyI:C challenge. These results indicated that AjBf plays an important role in immune responses to pathogen infection.

  20. Keeping It All Going-Complement Meets Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Kemper, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is an evolutionary old and crucial component of innate immunity, which is key to the detection and removal of invading pathogens. It was initially discovered as a liver-derived sentinel system circulating in serum, the lymph, and interstitial fluids that mediate the opsonization and lytic killing of bacteria, fungi, and viruses and the initiation of the general inflammatory responses. Although work performed specifically in the last five decades identified complement also as a critical instructor of adaptive immunity-indicating that complement's function is likely broader than initially anticipated-the dominant opinion among researchers and clinicians was that the key complement functions were in principle defined. However, there is now a growing realization that complement activity goes well beyond "classic" immune functions and that this system is also required for normal (neuronal) development and activity and general cell and tissue integrity and homeostasis. Furthermore, the recent discovery that complement activation is not confined to the extracellular space but occurs within cells led to the surprising understanding that complement is involved in the regulation of basic processes of the cell, particularly those of metabolic nature-mostly via novel crosstalks between complement and intracellular sensor, and effector, pathways that had been overlooked because of their spatial separation. These paradigm shifts in the field led to a renaissance in complement research and provide new platforms to now better understand the molecular pathways underlying the wide-reaching effects of complement functions in immunity and beyond. In this review, we will cover the current knowledge about complement's emerging relationship with the cellular metabolism machinery with a focus on the functional differences between serum-circulating versus intracellularly active complement during normal cell survival and induction of effector functions. We will also

  1. The role of complement inhibitors beyond controlling inflammation.

    PubMed

    Blom, A M

    2017-03-26

    The complement system is an arm of innate immunity that aids in the removal of pathogens and dying cells. Due to its harmful, pro-inflammatory potential, complement is controlled by several soluble and membrane-bound inhibitors. This family of complement regulators has been recently extended by the discovery of several new members, and it is becoming apparent that these proteins harbour additional functions. In this review, the current state of knowledge of the physiological functions of four complement regulators will be described: cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), CUB and sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1), sushi domain-containing protein 4 (SUSD4) and CD59. Complement activation is involved in both the development of and defence against cancer. COMP expression is pro-oncogenic, whereas CSMD1 and SUSD4 act as tumour suppressors. These effects may be related in part to the complex influence of complement on cancer but also depend on unrelated functions such as the protection of cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress conveyed by intracellular COMP. CD59 is the main inhibitor of the membrane attack complex, and its deficiency leads to complement attack on erythrocytes and severe haemolytic anaemia, which is now amenable to treatment with an inhibitor of C5 cleavage. Unexpectedly, the intracellular pool of CD59 is crucial for insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. This finding is one of several relating to the intracellular functions of complement proteins, which until recently were only considered to be present in the extracellular space. Understanding the alternative functions of complement inhibitors may unravel unexpected links between complement and other physiological systems, but is also important for better design of therapeutic complement inhibition.

  2. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  3. Rescue of Xrcc1 knockout mouse embryo lethality by transgene-complementation.

    PubMed

    Tebbs, Robert S; Thompson, Larry H; Cleaver, James E

    2003-12-09

    Xrcc1 knockout embryos show increased DNA breakage and apoptosis in tissues of the embryo proper prior to death at embryonic day E6.5. An additional deficiency in Trp53 allows Xrcc1(-/-) embryos to enlarge slightly and initiate gastrulation although ultimately death is delayed by less than 24h. Death presumably results from DNA damage that reaches toxic levels in the post-implantation mouse embryo. To investigate the level of XRCC1 protein needed for successful mouse development, we derived Xrcc1 transgene-complemented Xrcc1(-/-) mice that express Xrcc1 within the normal range or at a greatly reduced level (<10% normal). The greatly reduced XRCC1 protein level destabilized the XRCC1 partner protein DNA ligase III (LIG3) but still allowed for successful mouse development and healthy, fertile adults. Fibroblasts from these animals exhibited almost normal alkylation sensitivity measured by differential cytotoxicity. Thus, a large reduction of both XRCC1 and DNA ligase III has no observable effect on mouse embryogenesis and post-natal development, and no significant effect on cellular sensitivity to DNA alkylation. The presence of XRCC1, even at reduced levels of expression, is therefore capable of supporting mouse development and DNA repair.

  4. Assessing reprogramming by chimera formation and tetraploid complementation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Xia, Bao-long; Li, Wei; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can be evaluated by pluripotent markers expression, embryoid body aggregation, teratoma formation, chimera contribution and even more, tetraploid complementation. Whether iPS cells in general are functionally equivalent to normal ESCs is difficult to establish. Here, we present the detailed procedure for chimera formation and tetraploid complementation, the most stringent criterion, to assessing pluripotency.

  5. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable percentage of patients with warm autoantibodies are very likely to activate complement in vivo. Therapy of IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia mainly aims to decrease autoantibody production. However, most of these treatments require time to become effective and will not stop immediate ongoing complement-mediated hemolysis nor prevent hemolysis of transfused red blood cells. Therefore pharmacological inhibition of the complement system might be a suitable approach to halt or at least attenuate ongoing hemolysis and improve the recovery of red blood cell transfusion in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In recent years, several complement inhibitors have become available in the clinic, some of them with proven efficacy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In the present review, we give a short introduction on the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by an overview on the complement system with a special focus on its regulation. Finally, we will discuss complement inhibitors with regard to their potential efficacy to halt or attenuate hemolysis in complement-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:26521297

  6. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  7. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    PubMed

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  8. Complement Attack against Aspergillus and Corresponding Evasion Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis shows a high mortality rate particularly in immunocompromised patients. Perpetually increasing numbers of affected patients highlight the importance of a clearer understanding of interactions between innate immunity and fungi. Innate immunity is considered to be the most significant host defence against invasive fungal infections. Complement represents a crucial part of this first line defence and comprises direct effects against invading pathogens as well as bridging functions to other parts of the immune network. However, despite the potency of complement to attack foreign pathogens, the prevalence of invasive fungal infections is increasing. Two possible reasons may explain that phenomenon: First, complement activation might be insufficient for an effective antifungal defence in risk patients (due to, e.g., low complement levels, poor recognition of fungal surface, or missing interplay with other immune elements in immunocompromised patients). On the other hand, fungi may have developed evasion strategies to avoid recognition and/or eradication by complement. In this review, we summarize the most important interactions between Aspergillus and the complement system. We describe the various ways of complement activation by Aspergillus and the antifungal effects of the system, and also show proven and probable mechanisms of Aspergillus for complement evasion.

  9. The complement system in ischemia-reperfusion injuries.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, William B; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Stahl, Gregory L

    2012-11-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation following ischemia and reperfusion of various organs have been recognized for many years. Many reviews have been written over the last several decades outlining the role of complement in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This short review provides a current state of the art knowledge on the complement pathways activated, complement components involved and a review of the clinical biologics/inhibitors used in the clinical setting of ischemia/reperfusion. This is not a complete review of the complement system in ischemia and reperfusion injury but will give the reader an updated view point of the field, potential clinical use of complement inhibitors, and the future studies needed to advance the field.

  10. The Complement System in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Gorsuch, William B.; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation following ischemia and reperfusion of various organs has been recognized for many years. Many reviews have been written over the last several decades outlining the role of complement in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This short review provides a current state of the art knowledge on the complement pathways activated, complement components involved and a review of the clinical biologics/inhibitors used in the clinical setting of ischemia/reperfusion. This is not a complete review of the complement system in ischemia and reperfusion injury but will give the reader an updated view point of the field, potential clinical use of complement inhibitors, and the future studies needed to advance the field. PMID:22964228

  11. Construction of the plasmid, expression by Chinese hamster ovary cell, purification and characterization of the first three short consensus repeat modules of human complement receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Takagawa, Hiroaki; Iwakaji, Hirofumi; Miyagawa, Shuji; Wang, Pi-Chao; Ishii, Noriyuki

    2009-04-01

    Short consensus repeat (SCR1-3), the first three SCR modules from N-terminus of type 1 complement receptor (CR1), is expected to accelerate dissociation of complement components and suppress complement activity by binding the main component of complement C4b. In order to clarify the three-dimensional structure, which triggers the activity of SCR1-3 on complement, we constructed an over-expression system in CHO DG44 cells which facilitated mass production of SCR1-3. The mass production was achieved by a two-stage culture system and optimum culture conditions using ASF104N medium and MTX-, NaBu-containing alpha-MEM/10% FBS medium, respectively. The constructed gene of SCR1-3 was confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequence analysis, and the expressed protein by CHO DG44 cells was confirmed by western blotting. The expressed SCR1-3 was proved containing N-linked sugar chain, an important factor to the proper expression of protein, by the cleavage with glycosidase of N-linked oligosaccharide (PNGase F). The suppression effect of the yield protein on complement-mediated inflammation was investigated by haemolytic assay and necrosis assay of stromal cells. Both assays showed that SCR1-3 possessed complement control activity. However, residing sugar chain on SCR1-3 did not show significant difference in the complement control activity.

  12. Atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome Associated with a Hybrid Complement Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bourn, David; Powell, Helen M; Warwicker, Paul; Diaz-Torres, Martha L; Sampson, Anne; Mead, Paul; Webb, Michelle; Pirson, Yves; Jackson, Michael S; Hughes, Anne; Wood, Katrina M; Goodship, Judith A; Goodship, Timothy H. J

    2006-01-01

    Background Sequence analysis of the regulators of complement activation (RCA) cluster of genes at chromosome position 1q32 shows evidence of several large genomic duplications. These duplications have resulted in a high degree of sequence identity between the gene for factor H (CFH) and the genes for the five factor H-related proteins (CFHL1–5; aliases CFHR1–5). CFH mutations have been described in association with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS). The majority of the mutations are missense changes that cluster in the C-terminal region and impair the ability of factor H to regulate surface-bound C3b. Some have arisen as a result of gene conversion between CFH and CFHL1. In this study we tested the hypothesis that nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats in the RCA cluster could result in the formation of a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene that predisposes to the development of aHUS. Methods and Findings In a family with many cases of aHUS that segregate with the RCA cluster we used cDNA analysis, gene sequencing, and Southern blotting to show that affected individuals carry a heterozygous CFH/CFHL1 hybrid gene in which exons 1–21 are derived from CFH and exons 22/23 from CFHL1. This hybrid encodes a protein product identical to a functionally significant CFH mutant (c.3572C>T, S1191L and c.3590T>C, V1197A) that has been previously described in association with aHUS. Conclusions CFH mutation screening is recommended in all aHUS patients prior to renal transplantation because of the high risk of disease recurrence post-transplant in those known to have a CFH mutation. Because of our finding it will be necessary to implement additional screening strategies that will detect a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene. PMID:17076561

  13. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001), were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  14. Free Energy Gap and Statistical Thermodynamic Fidelity of DNA Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    reverse-complement unless otherwise stated. For strand x, let Nx denote its complement. A (perfect) Watson - Crick duplex is the joining of complement...is possible for complementary sequences to form a non-perfectly aligned duplex, we will call any x W Nx duplex a Watson - Crick (WC) duplex. Two...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FREE ENERGY GAP AND STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMIC FIDELITY OF DNA CODES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-07

  15. Complementation of a Fanconi anemia group A cell line by UbA{sup 52}

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, R.E.; Heina, J.A.; Jakobs, P.M.

    1994-09-01

    Cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) display chromosomal instability and increased sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC) and diepoxybutane (DEB) relative to normal cells. Several genes act in this pathway of DNA damage processing based upon four known complementation groups in FA. We have made a cDNA expression library in a vector with a G418 selectable marker to identify FA genes other than the FA-C group. Approximately 1 x 10{sup 6} independent cDNA clones were isolated with an average cDNA size of 1.5 kb. Five cell lines resistant to MMC and DEB were isolated from 6 x 10{sup 6} G418-resistant transfectants from 65 individual transfections of the FA-A fibroblast line GM6914. The isolated cell lines also showed normal chromosome stability. The same cDNA (600 bp) was recovered from three independent cell lines by PCR using flanking sequence primers. The gene has sequence identity with a known gene, the ubiquitin fusion gene, UbA{sub 52}. Interestingly, each of the cDNAs were inserted in antisense orientation relative to the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter as determined by sequencing and PCR using UbA{sub 52}-specific internal primers. Southern blot analysis indicated the cell lines had distinct chromosomal insertion sites. Mutation analysis by chemical cleavage showed no reading frame mutations, indicating that UbA{sub 52} is not the FA-A gene. Re-transfection with the UbA{sub 52} gene in antisense gave complementation for MMC, DEB and chromosome stability to varying degrees. Re-transfection of the antisense construct with the CMV promotor removed or with a sense construct did not alter the MMC sensitivity. We conclude that the antisense UbA{sub 52} gene has a non-specific effect, perhaps acting by altering the cell cycle or susceptibility to apoptosis.

  16. DNA Code Validation Using Experimental Fluorescence Measurements and Thermodynamic Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    1 SUMMARY A DNA code is a collection of single-stranded DNA molecules. In DNA hybridization assays, the formation of any Watson - Crick ...combinations represent the canonical Watson - Crick pairings. To obtain the reverse complement of a strand of DNA , one must first reverse the order of the... DNA codes. Using software designed by A.Macula and V. Rykov, (Macula, 2003), a set of 13 pairs, (X, WC(X)), of Watson - Crick reverse complementary

  17. Keeping It All Going—Complement Meets Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Martin; Kemper, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is an evolutionary old and crucial component of innate immunity, which is key to the detection and removal of invading pathogens. It was initially discovered as a liver-derived sentinel system circulating in serum, the lymph, and interstitial fluids that mediate the opsonization and lytic killing of bacteria, fungi, and viruses and the initiation of the general inflammatory responses. Although work performed specifically in the last five decades identified complement also as a critical instructor of adaptive immunity—indicating that complement’s function is likely broader than initially anticipated—the dominant opinion among researchers and clinicians was that the key complement functions were in principle defined. However, there is now a growing realization that complement activity goes well beyond “classic” immune functions and that this system is also required for normal (neuronal) development and activity and general cell and tissue integrity and homeostasis. Furthermore, the recent discovery that complement activation is not confined to the extracellular space but occurs within cells led to the surprising understanding that complement is involved in the regulation of basic processes of the cell, particularly those of metabolic nature—mostly via novel crosstalks between complement and intracellular sensor, and effector, pathways that had been overlooked because of their spatial separation. These paradigm shifts in the field led to a renaissance in complement research and provide new platforms to now better understand the molecular pathways underlying the wide-reaching effects of complement functions in immunity and beyond. In this review, we will cover the current knowledge about complement’s emerging relationship with the cellular metabolism machinery with a focus on the functional differences between serum-circulating versus intracellularly active complement during normal cell survival and induction of effector functions

  18. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  19. COMPLEMENT FIXATION TEST IN EXPERIMENTAL CLINICAL AND SUBCLINICAL MELIOIDOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Clara; Johnston, Margaret M.

    1961-01-01

    Nigg, Clara (University of California, Berkeley), and Margaret M. Johnston. Complement fixation test in experimental clinical and subclinical melioidosis. J. Bacteriol. 82:159–168. 1961.—Soluble stable antigens prepared from Pseudomonas pseudomallei gave 4+ complement fixation reactions in a dilution of 1 to 8,000 when tested with specific rabbit antiserum diluted 1 to 10,000. The complement fixation reaction was positive in 100% of experimentally infected rabbits 9 to 11 days postinfection. Infected guinea pigs and monkeys showed similar results. Monkeys inoculated with very small infecting doses of P. pseudomallei developed positive complement fixation reactions in the absence of clinical manifestation of infection. An anamnestic complement-fixing antibody response could be induced in such monkeys, after the titer had dropped to approximately the preinfection level, by inoculating very small doses of viable P. pseudomallei or larger doses of killed melioidosis vaccine. The complement fixation test described appeared to be both sensitive and specific, and should be of value in human melioidosis which cannot be diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations alone. It is suggested that subclinical infections may play a role in the epidemiology of human meliodosis. The potential application of the complement fixation test to serological surveys in areas where melioidosis occurs endemically is discussed. PMID:13729013

  20. Complement factor B expression profile in a spontaneous uveitis model.

    PubMed

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Stangassinger, Manfred; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2010-12-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis serves as a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. Unpredictable relapses and ongoing inflammation in the eyes of diseased horses as well as in humans lead to destruction of the retina and finally result in blindness. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to inflammation and retinal degeneration are not well understood. An initial screening for differentially regulated proteins in sera of uveitic cases compared to healthy controls revealed an increase of the alternative pathway complement component factor B in ERU cases. To determine the activation status of the complement system, sera were subsequently examined for complement split products. We could demonstrate a significant higher concentration of the activation products B/Ba, B/Bb, Bb neoantigen, iC3b and C3d in uveitic condition compared to healthy controls, whereas for C5b-9 no differences were detected. Additionally, we investigated complement activation directly in the retina by immunohistochemistry, since it is the main target organ of this autoimmune disease. Interestingly, infiltrating cells co-expressed activated factor Bb neoantigen, complement split product C3d as well as CD68, a macrophage marker. In this study, we could demonstrate activation of the complement system both systemically as well as in the eye, the target organ of spontaneous recurrent uveitis. Based on these novel findings, we postulate a novel role for macrophages in connection with complement synthesis at the site of inflammation.

  1. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  2. Complement in Pancreatic Disease—Perpetrator or Savior?

    PubMed Central

    Bettac, Lucas; Denk, Stephanie; Seufferlein, Thomas; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is a major pillar of the humoral innate immune system. As a first line of defense against pathogens, it mediates early inflammatory response and links different branches of humoral and cellular immunity. Disorders affecting the exocrine pancreas, such as acute pancreatitis, potentially lead to a life-threatening systemic inflammatory response with aberrant activation of complement and coagulation cascades. Pancreatic proteases can activate key effectors of the complement system, which in turn drive local and systemic inflammation. Beyond that, the extent of pancreas–complement interaction covers complex pro- and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, which to this day remain to be fully elucidated. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the pathophysiological role of complement in diseases of the exocrine pancreas, based on existing experimental and clinical data. Participation of complement in acute and chronic pancreatitis is addressed, as well as its role in tumor immunology. Therapeutic strategies targeting complement in these diseases have long been proposed but have not yet arrived in the clinical setting. PMID:28144242

  3. Complement activity and pharmacological inhibition in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Pierre; Martel, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    While complement is the most important component of humoral autoimmunity, and inflammation plays a key role in atherosclerosis, relatively few studies have looked at complement implications in atherosclerosis and its complications. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation and is also involved in atherosclerosis; it activates complement and colocalizes with activated complement proteins within the infarcting myocardium and the active atherosclerotic plaques. As new agents capable of modulating complement activity are being developed, new targets for the management of atherosclerosis are emerging that are related to autoimmunity and inflammation. The present paper reviews the putative roles of the various complement activation pathways in the development of atherosclerosis, in ST segment elevation and non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, and in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. It also provides a perspective on new therapeutic interventions being developed to modulate complement activity. These interventions include the C1 esterase inhibitor, which may be consumed in some inflammatory states resulting in the loss of one of the mechanisms inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways; TP10, a recombinant protein of the soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which inhibits the C3 and C5 convertases of the common pathway by binding C3b and C4b; a truncated version of the soluble complement receptor type 1 CRI lacking the C4b binding site which selectively inhibits the alternative pathway; and pexelizumab, a monoclonal antibody selectively blocking C5 to prevent the activation of the terminal pathway that is involved in excessive inflammation and autoimmune responses. PMID:16498508

  4. Coordinate expression of Escherichia coli dnaA and dnaN genes.

    PubMed

    Sako, T; Sakakibara, Y

    1980-01-01

    The defects of temperature-sensitive dnaA and dnaN mutants of Escherichia coli are complemented by a recombinant lambda phage, which carries the bacterial DNA segment composed of two EcoRI segments of 1.0 and 3.3 kilobases. Derivatives of the phage, which have an insertion segment of Tn3 in the dnaA gene, are much less active in expressing the dnaN gene function than the parent phage. The dnaN gene activity was determined as the efficiency of superinfecting phage to suppress loss of the viability of lambda lysogenic dnaN59 cells at the non-permissive temperature. Deletions that include the end of the dnaA gene distal to the dnaN gene also reduce the expression of the dnaN gene function. Deletion and insertion in the dnaN gene do not affect the expression of the dnaA gene function. The expression of the dnaN gene function by the dnaA- dnaN+ phages remains weak upon simultaneous infection with dnaA+ dnaN- phages. Thus the insertion and deletion of the dnaA gene influence in cis the expresion of the dnaN gene. We propose that the dnaA and dnaN genes constitute an operon, where the former is upstream to the latter.

  5. Fanconi anemia complementation group A cells are hypersensitive to chromium(VI)-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Vilcheck, Susan K; O'Brien, Travis J; Pritchard, Daryl E; Ha, Linan; Ceryak, Susan; Fornsaglio, Jamie L; Patierno, Steven R

    2002-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diverse developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure, and a markedly increased incidence of malignancy. FA cells are hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, suggesting a general defect in the repair of DNA cross-links. Some forms of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] are implicated as respiratory carcinogens and induce several types of DNA lesions, including ternary DNA-Cr-DNA interstrand cross-links (Cr-DDC). We hypothesized that human FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells would be hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis. Using phosphatidylserine translocation and caspase-3 activation, human FA-A fibroblasts were found to be markedly hypersensitive to chromium-induced apoptosis compared with CRL-1634 cells, which are normal human foreskin fibroblasts (CRL). The clonogenicity of FA-A cells was also significantly decreased compared with CRL cells after Cr(VI) treatment. There was no significant difference in either Cr(VI) uptake or Cr-DNA adduct formation between FA-A and CRL cells. These results show that FA-A cells are hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr-induced apoptosis and that this hypersensitivity is not due to increased Cr(VI) uptake or increased Cr-DNA adduct formation. The results also suggest that Cr-DDC may be proapoptotic lesions. These results are the first to show that FA cells are hypersensitive to an environmentally relevant DNA cross-linking agent. PMID:12426130

  6. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  7. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  8. Complement requirement for virus neutralization by antibody and reduced serum complement levels associated with experimental equine herpesvirus 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, D B; Myrup, A C; Dutta, S K

    1981-01-01

    Pony foals, negative for detectable serum-neutralizing antibody to equine herpesvirus 1 by the standard tube-culture virus neutralization test, were experimentally infected with equine herpesvirus 1. Complement-requiring (CR) and non-complement-requiring (NCR) serum-neutralizing antibodies were evaluated in preinfection and postinfection sera by means of a complement-enhanced plaque reduction assay. Low levels of CR antibodies were found in the preinfection sera of only group II ponies. Upon infection, CR antibodies were detected by day 2 postinfection and reached peak titers between 7 and 14 days postinfection in the antisera of all ponies. NCR antibodies were detected later than CR antibodies and at levels approximately 40 to 150 times lower than the latter. CR/NCR ratios indicated that complement requirement was greatest early in the acute stages of disease and that this requirement decreased during the convalescent phase. Fractionation of 1-week and 2-week postinfection antisera of group I ponies indicated the CR antibody activity resided in both the 7S and 19S fractions. Total serum complement levels of the ponies were quantified throughout the infection with an equine anti-goat erythrocyte hemolytic system. In vivo, complement levels were depressed for all ponies during the first 2 weeks of infection. A decline in complement levels was seen as early as day 2, and they decreased to an average of 35% of preinfection levels on day 10 postinfection for all ponies. PMID:6260672

  9. Cloning of a human galactokinase gene (GK2) on chromosome 15 by complementation in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R T; Peterson, C L; Calman, A F; Herskowitz, I; O'Donnell, J J

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) was isolated by complementation of a galactokinase-deficient (gal1-) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 458 amino acids with 29% identity to galactokinase of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Previous studies have mapped a human galactokinase gene (GK1) to chromosome 17q23-25, closely linked to thymidine kinase. The galactokinase gene that we have isolated (GK2) is located on chromosome 15. The relationship between the disease locus for galactokinase deficiency galactosemia, which is responsible for cataracts in newborns and possibly presenile cataracts in adults, and the two galactokinase loci is unknown. Images PMID:1438294

  10. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Pallera, Haree K.; Kumar, Parvathi S.; Mauriello, Clifford T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Phelps, Cody A.; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M.; Pascal, Stephen M.; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  11. Complement factor I from flatfish half-smooth tongue (Cynoglossus semilaevis) exhibited anti-microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinsong; Li, Xihong; Chen, Yadong; Lu, Yang; Yu, Mengjun; Chen, Xuejie; Zhang, Wenting; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Luming; Chen, Songlin; Sha, Zhenxia

    2015-11-01

    Complement factor I (Cfi) is a soluble serine protease which plays a crucial role in the modulation of complement cascades. In the presence of substrate modulating cofactors (such as complement factor H, C4bp, CR1, etc), Cfi cleaves and inactivates C3b and C4b, thereby controlling the complement-mediated processes. In this study, we sequenced and characterized Cfi gene from Cynoglossus Semilaevis (designated as CsCfi) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of CsCfi was 2230 bp in length, including a 98 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 164 bp 3'-UTR and a 1968 bp open reading frame (ORF). It encoded a polypeptide of 656 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 72.28 kDa and an isoelectric point of 7.71. A signal peptide was defined at N-terminus, resulting in a 626-residue mature protein. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that Cfi proteins were well conserved with the typical modular architecture and identical active sites throughout the vertebrates, which suggested the conserved function of Cfi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsCfi and the homologous Cfi sequences from teleosts clustered into a clade, separating from another clade from the cartilaginous fish and other vertebrates. Tissue expression profile analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that CsCfi mRNA constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, with the predominant expression in liver and the lowest in stomach. Temporal expression levels of CsCfi after challenging with Vibrio anguillarum showed different expression patterns in intestine, spleen, skin, blood, head kidney and liver. The recombinant CsCfi (rCsCfi) protein showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shewanella putrefaciens. The research revealed that CsCfi plays an important role in C. Semilaevis immunity.

  12. Complement: a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, George; Yang, Kun; Lambris, John D

    2010-09-01

    Nearly a century after the significance of the human complement system was recognized, we have come to realize that its functions extend far beyond the elimination of microbes. Complement acts as a rapid and efficient immune surveillance system that has distinct effects on healthy and altered host cells and foreign intruders. By eliminating cellular debris and infectious microbes, orchestrating immune responses and sending 'danger' signals, complement contributes substantially to homeostasis, but it can also take action against healthy cells if not properly controlled. This review describes our updated view of the function, structure and dynamics of the complement network, highlights its interconnection with immunity at large and with other endogenous pathways, and illustrates its multiple roles in homeostasis and disease.

  13. The Complement-Fixation Test in Hepatic Coccidiosis of Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M. Elaine

    1961-01-01

    Antibodies to Eimeria stiedae were measured in rabbit serum by complement fixation. The titre rose to a maximum at about the 22nd day after infection, remained at this level for about 20 days and then declined. Antibodies were still detectable up to 160 days after infection. Evidence of past or present slight E. stiedae infection was found in clinically normal rabbits whose sera fixed complement with E. stiedae antigens. Challenge of rabbits which had recovered from a near-fatal infection had no effect upon the complement fixation titres of their sera. The serum of a rabbit which had been injected with alum-precipitated antigen fixed complement with E. stiedae antigens. However, the animal was still susceptible to a superimposed oral infection which had the effect of further increasing the serum titre. PMID:14493840

  14. Complement in immune and inflammatory disorders: therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    With the awareness that immune-inflammatory crosstalk is at the heart of many disorders, the desire for novel immunomodulatory strategies in the therapy of such diseases has grown dramatically. As a prime initiator and important modulator of immunological and inflammatory processes, the complement system has emerged as an attractive target for early and upstream intervention in inflammatory diseases and has moved into the spotlight of drug discovery. While prevalent conditions such as age-related macular degeneration have attracted the most attention, the diverse array of complement-mediated pathologies, with distinct underlying mechanisms, demands a multifaceted arsenal of therapeutic strategies. Fortunately, efforts in recent years have not only introduced the first complement inhibitors to the clinic but also filled the pipelines with promising candidates. With a focus on immunomodulatory strategies, this review discusses complement-directed therapeutic concepts and highlights promising candidate molecules. PMID:23564578

  15. Immobilization of soluble complement receptor 1 on islets.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen M; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-07-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans (islets) is a promising method to treat insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Control of complement activation is necessary to improve graft survival in alloislet and xenoislet transplantation. In this study, human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) was immobilized on the islet cell surface through poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) without loss of islet cell viability or insulin secretion ability. sCR1 on islets effectively inhibits complement activation and protects islets against attack by xenoreactive antibodies and complement. This method will be an efficient means to control early islet loss in clinical islet transplantation and realize xenoislet transplantation in the future.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a complement-depleting factor from king cobra, Ophiophagus hannah.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Sun, Qian-Yun; Jin, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2012-09-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF) is an anti-complement factor existing in cobra venom. CVF proteins have been purified from the venoms of Naja haje, Naja siamensis, Naja atra, Naja kaouthia, Naja naja, Naja melanoleuca and Austrelaps superbus, but only three full-length cDNA sequences of CVF are available. In the present work, a cobra venom factor termed OVF was purified from the crude venom of Ophiophagus hannah by successive gel filtration, ion-exchange and heparin affinity chromatography steps. The purified OVF was homogenous on the SDS-PAGE gel with an apparent molecular weight of 140 kDa under non-reducing conditions. Under reducing conditions, OVF was divided into three bands with apparent molecular weight of 72 kDa (α chain), 45 kDa (β chain) and 32 kDa (γ chain), respectively. OVF consumed complement components with anti-complement activity of 154 units per mg. By using Reverse transcription-PCR and 5'-RACE assay, the open reading frame of OVF was obtained. MALDI-TOF and protein sequencing assays confirmed the cloned cDNA coding for OVF protein. The cDNA sequence of OVF is conservative when aligned with that of other CVFs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed OVF is closer to CVF from N. kaouthia than to AVF-1 and AVF-2 from A. superbus. Our results demonstrated that OVF has its unique features as following: 1) The N-terminal amino acid sequence of OVF γ chain is different from that of other known CVFs, suggesting that the OVF γ chain might be further processed; 2) Unlike N. kaouthia CVF and A. superbus AVF-1, which have potential N-linked glycosylation sites located in both α and β chain, OVF only has N-linked glycosylation site in its α chain as revealed by Schiff's reagent staining and protein sequence analysis; 3) In addition to the 27 well conserved cysteine residues in all known CVFs, OVF have an additional cysteine residue in its γ chain. Understanding the importance of above mentioned specific characteristics might provide useful information on structure

  17. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4−/− Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4−/− mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  18. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  19. Complement involvement in kidney diseases: From physiopathology to therapeutical targeting.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2015-05-06

    Complement cascade is involved in several renal diseases and in renal transplantation. The different components of the complement cascade might represent an optimal target for innovative therapies. In the first section of the paper the authors review the physiopathology of complement involvement in renal diseases and transplantation. In some cases this led to a reclassification of renal diseases moving from a histopathological to a physiopathological classification. The principal issues afforded are: renal diseases with complement over activation, renal diseases with complement dysregulation, progression of renal diseases and renal transplantation. In the second section the authors discuss the several complement components that could represent a therapeutic target. Even if only the anti C5 monoclonal antibody is on the market, many targets as C1, C3, C5a and C5aR are the object of national or international trials. In addition, many molecules proved to be effective in vitro or in preclinical trials and are waiting to move to human trials in the future.

  20. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  1. Derivatives of human complement component C3 for therapeutic complement depletion: a novel class of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Fritzinger, David C; Hew, Brian E; Lee, June Q; Newhouse, James; Alam, Maqsudul; Ciallella, John R; Bowers, Mallory; Gorsuch, William B; Guikema, Benjamin J; Stahl, Gregory L; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    To obtain proteins with the complement-depleting activity of Cobra Venom Factor (CVF), but with less immunogenicity, we have prepared human C3/CVF hybrid proteins, in which the C-terminus of the alpha-chain of human C3 is exchanged with homologous regions of the C-terminus of the beta-chain of CVF. We show that these hybrid proteins are able to deplete complement, both in vitro and in vivo. One hybrid protein, HC3-1496, is shown to be effective in reducing complement-mediated damage in two disease models in mice, collagen-induced arthritis and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Human C3/CVF hybrid proteins represent a novel class ofbiologicals as potential therapeutic agents in many diseases where complement is involved in the pathogenesis.

  2. Plasma Complement Components and Activation Fragments: Associations with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Genotypes and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Robyn; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth; Atkinson, John P.; Giclas, Patricia C.; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several genes encoding complement system components and fragments are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was conducted to determine whether alterations in circulating levels of these markers of complement activation and regulation are also independently associated with advanced AMD and whether they are related to AMD genotypes. Methods Plasma and DNA samples were selected from individuals in our AMD registry who had progressed to or developed the advanced stages of AMD, including 58 with geographic atrophy and 62 with neovascular disease. Subjects of similar age and sex, but without AMD, and who did not progress were included as controls (n = 60). Plasma complment components (C3, CFB, CFI, CFH, and factor D) and activation fragments (Bb, C3a, C5a, iC3b, and SC5b-9) were analyzed. DNA samples were genotyped for seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in six genes previously shown to be associated with AMD: CFB, CFH, C2, C3, and CFI and the LOC387715/ARMS2 gene region. The association between AMD and each complement biomarker was assessed by using logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and proinflammatory risk factors: smoking and body mass index (BMI). Functional genomic analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the complement markers and genotypes. Concordance, or C, statistics were calculated to assess the effect of complement components and activation fragments in an AMD gene-environment prediction model. Results The highest quartiles of Bb and C5a were significantly associated with advanced AMD, when compared with the lowest quartiles. In multivariate models without genetic variants, the odds ratio (OR) for Bb was 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-8.6), and the OR for C5a was 3.6 (95% CI = 1.2-10.3). With adjustment for genetic variants, these ORs were substantially higher. The alternative pathway regulator CFH was inversely associated with AMD in the model without genotypes (OR = 0.3; P = 0

  3. Disease-causing mutations in genes of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Jensenius, Jens C; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-06-10

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of "conventional" complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles.

  4. Disease-Causing Mutations in Genes of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Jensenius, Jens C.; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of “conventional” complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles. PMID:21664996

  5. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  10. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein acts as a processivity factor.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M W; Yang, L

    2000-05-19

    We have previously shown that endonucleases present in a protein complex, which has specificity for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, locate sites of damage in DNA by a processive mechanism of action in normal human lymphoblastoid cells. In contrast, the endonucleases present in this complex from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) cells locate damage sites by a distributive or significantly less processive mechanism. Since the XPA protein has been shown to be responsible for the DNA repair defect in XPA cells, this protein was examined for involvement in the mechanism of target site location of these endonucleases. A recombinant XPA protein, produced by expression of the normal XPA cDNA in E. coli, was isolated and purified. The results show that the recombinant XPA protein was able to correct the defect in ability of the XPA endonucleases to act by a processive mechanism of action on UVC irradiated DNA. These studies indicate that the XPA protein, in addition to a role in damage recognition or damage verification, may function as a processivity factor.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of the Innate Immunity-Related Complement System in Spleen Tissue of Ctenopharyngodon idella Infected with Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yunfei; Xu, Xiaoyan; Shen, Yubang; Hu, Moyan; Zhang, Meng; Li, Lisen; Lv, Liqun; Li, Jiale

    2016-01-01

    The grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is an important commercial farmed herbivorous fish species in China, but is susceptible to Aeromonas hydrophila infections. In the present study, we performed de novo RNA-Seq sequencing of spleen tissue from specimens of a disease-resistant family, which were given intra-peritoneal injections containing PBS with or without a dose of A. hydrophila. The fish were sampled from the control group at 0 h, and from the experimental group at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. 122.18 million clean reads were obtained from the normalized cDNA libraries; these were assembled into 425,260 contigs and then 191,795 transcripts. Of those, 52,668 transcripts were annotated with the NCBI Nr database, and 41,347 of the annotated transcripts were assigned into 90 functional groups. 20,569 unigenes were classified into six main categories, including 38 secondary KEGG pathways. 2,992 unigenes were used in the analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). 89 of the putative DEGs were related to the immune system and 41 of them were involved in the complement and coagulation cascades pathway. This study provides insights into the complement and complement-related pathways involved in innate immunity, through expression profile analysis of the genomic resources in C. idella. We conclude that complement and complement-related genes play important roles during defense against A. hydrophila infection. The immune response is activated at 4 h after the bacterial injections, indicating that the complement pathways are activated at the early stage of bacterial infection. The study has improved our understanding of the immune response mechanisms in C. idella to bacterial pathogens. PMID:27383749

  12. Complement activation by antibodies to Sm in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, U K; Fong, S; Hoch, S; Cook, R D; Vaughan, J H; Curd, J G

    1983-02-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantitate antibodies to Sm (anti-Sm) and to measure complement activation by anti-Sm in vitro. Anti-Sm in plasma of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were bound to purified Sm bound to polyvinyl chloride microtitre plates and assayed for bound IgG or IgM using enzyme linked anti-gamma or anti-mu. The activation of C4 by anti-Sm was measured by adding diluted normal human serum (complement) to the wells and quantitating the amount of C4 bound to the well surface using (Fab')2 goat anti-C4 followed by enzyme linked rabbit anti-goat IgG. The plasmas of 12 of 36 patients with SLE contained anti-Sm and all 12 activated complement (complement activating anti-Sm). Twenty-eight plasmas containing anti-Sm from 12 patients with SLE were studied. Ten of the 12 patients had anti-Sm of the IgG class whereas two had anti-Sm of both IgG and IgM classes. The amount of C4 activating anti-Sm correlated significantly with the in vivo activation of C4 measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis for C4d and C4, suggesting that complement activation by anti-Sm is important in vivo.

  13. Complement activation by Coccidioides immitis: in vitro and clinical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Yam, P; Petz, L D; Williams, P L; Stevens, D A

    1980-01-01

    Mycelial- or spherule-phase derivatives of Coccidioides immitis caused a decrease in vitro of total hemolytic complement in serum from a nonsensitized person. Activation involved both classic and alternative pathways as shown by deprssion of hemolytic C4 and by generation of products of activation of components C3, C4, and factor B. In addition, functional complement activity or immunoreactive levels of complement components or both were measured in 23 patients with self-limited or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. Low total hemolytic complement was found in nine, usually during the early phase of primary illness, and was transient. Hemolytic C4 was low, and the effect of inulin to decrease complement levels was blunted, suggested both classic and alternative pathways may be deficient. However, associated depression of immunoreactive levels of components assayed (C3, C4, C5, factor B, and properdin) was not consistently found. This disparity raises the possibility of enhanced in vitro inactivation analogous to activation by immune complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6901703

  14. Physicochemical signatures of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Tardiff, Mark F.; Xu, Zhixiang; Hourcade, Dennis; Pham, Christine; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-03-21

    Nanoparticles are potentially powerful therapeutic tools that have the capacity to target drug payloads and imaging agents. However, some nanoparticles can activate complement, a branch of the innate immune system, and cause adverse side-effects. Recently, we developed an in vitro hemolytic assay protocol for measuring the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity of serum samples and applied this protocol to several nanoparticle formulations that differed in size, surface charge, and surface chemistry; quantifying the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity using a metric called Residual Hemolytic Activity (RHA). In the present work, we have used a decision tree learning algorithm to derive the rules for estimating nanoparticle-dependent complement response based on the data generated from the hemolytic assay studies. Our results indicate that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, namely, size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and mole percentage of the active surface ligand of a nanoparticle, can serve as good descriptors for prediction of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation in the decision tree modeling framework. The robustness and predictability of the model can be improved by training the model with additional data points that are uniformly distributed in the RHA/physicochemical descriptor space and by incorporating instability effects on nanoparticle physicochemical properties into the model.

  15. Complement factor H in host defense and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Parente, Raffaella; Clark, Simon J; Inforzato, Antonio; Day, Anthony J

    2016-12-10

    Complement is the major humoral component of the innate immune system. It recognizes pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns, and initiates the immune response in coordination with innate and adaptive immunity. When activated, the complement system unleashes powerful cytotoxic and inflammatory mechanisms, and thus its tight control is crucial to prevent damage to host tissues and allow restoration of immune homeostasis. Factor H is the major soluble inhibitor of complement, where its binding to self markers (i.e., particular glycan structures) prevents complement activation and amplification on host surfaces. Not surprisingly, mutations and polymorphisms that affect recognition of self by factor H are associated with diseases of complement dysregulation, such as age-related macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. In addition, pathogens (i.e., non-self) and cancer cells (i.e., altered-self) can hijack factor H to evade the immune response. Here we review recent (and not so recent) literature on the structure and function of factor H, including the emerging roles of this protein in the pathophysiology of infectious diseases and cancer.

  16. Cloning of Salmonella typhimurium DNA encoding mutagenic DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.M.; Sedgwick, S.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli is encoded by the umuDC operon. Salmonella typhimurium DNA which has homology with E. coli umuC and is able to complement E. coli umuC122::Tn5 and umuC36 mutations has been cloned. Complementation of umuD44 mutants and hybridization with E. coli umuD also occurred, but these activities were much weaker than with umuC. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the composition of the cloned fragment is different from the E. coli umuDC operon. Therefore, a umu-like function of S. typhimurium has been found; the phenotype of this function is weaker than that of its E. coli counterpart, which is consistent with the weak mutagenic response of S. typhimurium to UV compared with the response in E. coli.

  17. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew P.; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A.; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide–treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  18. Superimposed Code Theorectic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    that the hybridization that occurs between a DNA strand and its Watson - Crick complement can be used to perform mathematical computation. This research... Watson - Crick (WC) duplex, e.g., TCGCA TCGCA . Note that non-WC duplexes can form and such a formation is called a cross-hybridization. Cross...5’GAAAGTCGCGTA3’ Watson Crick (WC) Duplexes TACGCGACTTTC Cross Hybridized (CH) Duplexes ATTTTTGCGTTA GAAAAAGAAGAA Coding Strands for Ligation

  19. COMPLEMENT-FIXATION TITERS IN EXPERIMENTAL COCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN RABBITS1

    PubMed Central

    Brosbe, Edwin A.; Kietzman, Jewell N.; Kurnick, Nathaniel B.

    1964-01-01

    Brosbe, Edwin A. (Veterans Administration Hospital, Long Beach, Calif.), Jewell N. Kietzman, and Nathaniel B. Kurnick. Complement-fixation titers in experimental coccidioidomycosis. J. Bacteriol. 88:233–241. 1964.—The course of experimental coccicioidomycosis in rabbits was followed with complement-fixation (CF) tests. Uniformity of complement-fixing antibody response to large infective doses was observed, and levels as high as 1:4,096 in the New Zealand albino and 1:16,384 in the Dutch rabbit were attained. Mortality reflected the size of the inoculum rather than the level of CF titer. Animals receiving additional challenges displayed no marked elevation in titer, although high titers persisted. Nitrogen mustard, for the most part, did not influence the CF titer. Images PMID:14197893

  20. Serum immunoglobulins and complement (C'3) in oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Sklavounou, A D; Laskaris, G; Angelopoulos, A P

    1983-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins and complement (C'3) were determined by single radial immunodiffusion according to the method of Mancini and co-workers in fifty patients with oral lichen planus and twenty persons with clinically normal oral mucosa. Significantly increased levels of serum IgG (p less than 0.05) and a significant reduction of serum IgA concentration (p less than 0.05) in the experimental group as compared with normal controls were observed. Mean serum IgM and complement (C'3) levels were similar in patients and controls. No correlation between disease variety or extensiveness and immunoglobulin or complement levels was noticed. These results suggest that patients with oral lichen planus may have a generalized immunologic disorder in which humoral immunity is disturbed. Whether humoral immunity is of etiologic significance, contributes to the disease process, or, finally, represents an event secondary to the pathologic changes seen in the disease remains to be determined.

  1. The Complement System in Neuropathic and Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fritzinger, David C.; Benjamin, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Certain types of pain are major unmet medical needs that affect more than 8 percent of the population. Neuropathic pain can be caused by many pathogenic processes including injury, autoimmune disease, neurological disease, endocrine dysfunction, infection, toxin exposure, and substance abuse and is frequently resistant to available pain therapies. The same can be said of postsurgical pain, which can arise from uncontrolled inflammation around the wound site. The complement system is part of the innate immune system and can both initiate and sustain acute and chronic inflammatory pain. Here we review the complement system and original investigations that identify potential drug targets within this system. Drugs that act to inhibit the complement system could fill major gaps in our current standard of care for neuropathic pain states. PMID:28154610

  2. Variants in Complement Factor H and Complement Factor H-Related Protein Genes, CFHR3 and CFHR1, Affect Complement Activation in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Zhai, Ya-Ling; Wang, Feng-Mei; Hou, Ping; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Xu, Da-Min; Shi, Su-Fang; Liu, Li-Jun; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Novak, Jan; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation is common in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and associated with disease severity. Our recent genome-wide association study of IgAN identified susceptibility loci on 1q32 containing the complement regulatory protein-encoding genes CFH and CFHR1–5, with rs6677604 in CFH as the top single-nucleotide polymorphism and CFHR3–1 deletion (CFHR3–1∆) as the top signal for copy number variation. In this study, to explore the clinical effects of variation in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 on IgAN susceptibility and progression, we enrolled two populations. Group 1 included 1178 subjects with IgAN and available genome-wide association study data. Group 2 included 365 subjects with IgAN and available clinical follow-up data. In group 1, rs6677604 was associated with mesangial C3 deposition by genotype–phenotype correlation analysis. In group 2, we detected a linkage between the rs6677604-A allele and CFHR3–1∆ and found that the rs6677604-A allele was associated with higher serum levels of CFH and lower levels of the complement activation split product C3a. Furthermore, CFH levels were positively associated with circulating C3 levels and negatively associated with mesangial C3 deposition. Moreover, serum levels of the pathogenic galactose-deficient glycoform of IgA1 were also associated with the degree of mesangial C3 deposition in patients with IgAN. Our findings suggest that genetic variants in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 affect complement activation and thereby, predispose patients to develop IgAN. PMID:25205734

  3. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection. PMID

  4. 670-nm light treatment reduces complement propagation following retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Complement activation is associated with the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We aimed to investigate whether 670-nm light treatment reduces the propagation of complement in a light-induced model of atrophic AMD. Methods Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with 9 J/cm2 670-nm light for 3 minutes daily over 5 days; other animals were sham treated. Animals were exposed to white light (1,000 lux) for 24 h, after which animals were kept in dim light (5 lux) for 7 days. Expression of complement genes was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry. Counts were made of C3-expressing monocytes/microglia using in situ hybridization. Photoreceptor death was also assessed using outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness measurements, and oxidative stress using immunohistochemistry for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Results Following light damage, retinas pretreated with 670-nm light had reduced immunoreactivity for the oxidative damage maker 4-HNE in the ONL and outer segments, compared to controls. In conjunction, there was significant reduction in retinal expression of complement genes C1s, C2, C3, C4b, C3aR1, and C5r1 following 670 nm treatment. In situ hybridization, coupled with immunoreactivity for the marker ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1), revealed that C3 is expressed by infiltrating microglia/monocytes in subretinal space following light damage, which were significantly reduced in number after 670 nm treatment. Additionally, immunohistochemistry for C3 revealed a decrease in C3 deposition in the ONL following 670 nm treatment. Conclusions Our data indicate that 670-nm light pretreatment reduces lipid peroxidation and complement propagation in the degenerating retina. These findings have relevance to the cellular events of complement activation underling the pathogenesis of AMD, and highlight the potential of 670-nm light as a non-invasive anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:23181358

  5. Animal venoms/toxins and the complement system.

    PubMed

    Tambourgi, Denise V; van den Berg, Carmen W

    2014-10-01

    Nature is a wealthy source of agents that have been shown to be beneficial to human health, but nature is also a rich source of potential dangerous health damaging compounds. This review will summarise and discuss the agents from the animal kingdom that have been shown to interact with the human complement (C) system. Most of these agents are toxins found in animal venoms and animal secretions. In addition to the mechanism of action of these toxins, their contribution to the field of complement, their role in human pathology and the potential benefit to the venomous animal itself will be discussed. Potential therapeutic applications will also be discussed.

  6. Restricted Quadratic Forms, Inertia Theorems and the Schur Complement,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    subspace S , the usual orthogonal complement of S. Definition 3.1. For an mxn matrix C, the generalized , or Moore - Penrose , inverse is the unique nym...References D. Carlson, E. Haynsworth and T. Markham (1974); A generalization of the Schur complement by means of the Moore - Penrose Inverse , SIAM 3...A The results of §2 are direct in the sense that they do not Involve any inversion of the matrix A. It will here be shown that when the Moore - Penrose

  7. Reincarnation of ancient links between coagulation and complement.

    PubMed

    Conway, E M

    2015-06-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have developed means to contain wounds by simultaneously limiting bleeding and eliminating pathogens and damaged host cells via the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. Disease emerges when there is unchecked activation of innate immune and/or coagulation responses. A key component of innate immunity is the complement system. Concurrent excess activation of coagulation and complement - two major blood-borne proteolytic pathways - is evident in numerous diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, venous thromboembolic disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, arthritis, cancer, and infectious diseases. Delineating the cross-talk between these two cascades will uncover novel therapeutic insights.

  8. Cigarette smoke can activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro by modifying the third component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, R R; Ghebrehiwet, B; Janoff, A

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with significant increases in the number of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes and neutrophils. A potent chemoattractant for these cells is C5a, a peptide generated during complement (C) activation. We, therefore, investigated the possibility that cigarette smoke could activate the complement system in vitro. Our results show that factor(s) (mol wt less than 1,000) present in an aqueous solution of whole, unfiltered cigarette smoke can deplete the hemolytic capacity of whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. The particle-free, filtered gas phase of cigarette smoke is inactive. The smoke factor(s) do not activate serum C1, but do deplete serum C4 activity. Treatment of purified human C3 with whole smoke solution modifies the molecule such that its subsequent addition to serum (containing Mg/EGTA to block the classical pathway) results in consumption of hemolytic complement by activation of the alternative pathway. Smoke-modified C3 shows increased anodal migration in agarose electrophoresis, but this is not due to proteolytic cleavage of the molecule as evidenced by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In contrast to methylamine-treated C3, C3 treated with smoke is only partially susceptible to the action of the complement regulatory proteins Factors H and I. In addition, smoke-modified C3 has diminished binding to Factor H as compared with methylamine-treated C3. Finally, smoke-modified C3 incorporates [14C]methylamine which suggests that the thiolester bond may be intact. These data indicate that aqueous whole cigarette smoke solution can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement, perhaps by a previously unrecognized mechanism. Should this occur in vivo, complement activation might partly account for the extensive pulmonary leukocyte recruitment observed in smokers. Images PMID:3156879

  9. Chimeric Autofluorescent Proteins as Photophysical Model System for Multicolor Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sébastien; Oven-Krockhaus, Sven Zur; Veerabagu, Manikandan; Rodado, Virtudes Mira; Berendzen, Kenneth W; Meixner, Alfred J; Harter, Klaus; Schleifenbaum, Frank E

    2017-03-10

    The yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is frequently used in a protein complementation assay called bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and is employed to visualize protein-protein interactions. In this analysis, two different, nonfluorescent fragments of YFP are genetically attached to proteins of interest. Upon interaction of these proteins, the YFP fragments are brought into proximity close enough to reconstitute their original structure, enabling fluorescence. BiFC allows for a straightforward readout of protein-protein interactions and furthermore facilitates their functional investigation by in vivo imaging. Furthermore, it has been observed that the available color range in BiFC can be extended upon complementing fragments of different proteins that are, like YFP, derived from the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein, thereby allowing for a multiplexed investigation of protein-protein interactions. Some spectral characteristics of "multicolor" BiFC (mcBiFC) complexes have been reported before; however, no in-depth analysis has been performed yet. Therefore, little is known about the photophysical characteristics of these mcBiFC complexes because a proper characterization essentially relies on in vitro data. This is particularly difficult for fragments of autofluorescent proteins (AFPs) because they show a very strong tendency to form supramolecular aggregates which precipitate ex vivo. In this study, this intrinsic difficulty is overcome by directly fusing the coding DNA of different AFP fragments. Translation of the genetic sequence in Escherichia coli leads to fully functional, highly soluble fluorescent proteins with distinct properties. On the basis of their construction, they are designated chimeric AFPs, or BiFC chimeras, here. Comparison of their spectral characteristics with experimental in vivo BiFC data confirmed the utility of the chimeric proteins as a BiFC model system. In this study, nine different chimeras were thoroughly

  10. Expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein predicts cisplatin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tan-Chen; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Cho, Hsin-Ching; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chiang, I-Ping; Ho, Shu-Peng

    2011-05-01

    DNA repair has been suggested to be a major cause of spontaneous drug resistance in patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADC). Among the DNA repair-related proteins, excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been shown to be essential for repairing cisplatin-induced interstrand cross-linkage. However, the role of other DNA repair-related proteins in drug resistance has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization and microarray analysis to identify the DNA repair-related genes associated with cisplatin resistance. We focused on the association of XPC protein expression, which plays a pivotal role in the earliest response to global genomic repair, with the survival of LADC patients. Using suppression subtractive hybridization and a microarray analysis to identify drug resistance-associated DNA repair-related genes, we found that the mRNA levels of ERCC1, MSH-3, MSH-6 and XPC were significantly increased in LADC patients. Since the results of ERCC1 mRNA expression corresponded well with those in previous reports, in this study we focused on the clinical correlation between XPC expression and patient survival. The level of XPC protein was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses. We detected the XPC protein in 46 (43%) of 107 pathological LADC samples. XPC protein expression correlated with tumor stage, cigarette smoking and poor survival. In the in vitro experiments with LADC cell lines, increased XPC expression was associated with elevated drug resistance, and silencing of XPC expression reduced cisplatin resistance. Our results suggest that XPC expression predicts drug resistance in LADC.

  11. Cercarial glycocalyx of Schistosoma mansoni activates human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, J C; Caulfield, J P

    1986-01-01

    Human complement activation by cercariae and schistosomula of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni was studied in vitro. Cercariae are composed of tails which are shed after infection of the host and bodies which transform into the larvae or schistosomula after infection. After incubation in fresh normal human serum (NHS), cercarial tails bound more anti-C3 antibodies than did cercarial bodies (CB), and the tails were rapidly lysed, while the attached CB remained intact. Complement activation by cercariae was dependent on the alternative pathway but was independent of antibody, as shown by C3 deposition by hypogammaglobulinemic human sera. By transmission microscopy, the fibrillar glycocalyx on both CB and tails was stained by NHS but not by heat-inactivated serum (HI-NHS). The glycocalyx was labeled with periodate and tritiated borohydride, and parasites were incubated in NHS and HI-NHS. After solubilization, the labeled glycocalyx on organisms incubated in NHS but not HI-NHS bound anti-C3 antibodies. Of the CB incubated with eserine sulfate to prevent transformation, 78% +/- 10% were dead after culture for 24 h in NHS. In contrast, 21% +/- 12% of the CB were dead after culture in HI-NHS. Schistosomula incubated in NHS bound 37% of the amount of anti-C3 antibodies bound by cercariae but were not killed by NHS. In conclusion, the cercarial glycocalyx activated human complement, and schistosomula were less susceptible to killing than cercariae because they had less glycocalyx and activated less complement. Images PMID:3940995

  12. Children's Understanding of the Addition/Subtraction Complement Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbeyns, Joke; Peters, Greet; De Smedt, Bert; Ghesquière, Pol; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the last decades, children's understanding of mathematical principles has become an important research topic. Different from the commutativity and inversion principles, only few studies have focused on children's understanding of the addition/subtraction complement principle (if a - b = c, then c + b = a), mainly relying on verbal…

  13. Loss of Infinitival Complementation in Romanian Diachronic Syntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Maria

    2009-01-01

    For the most part, my study is a descriptive analysis of infinitival complement clauses and the corresponding subjunctive clauses in Romanian, that is, obligatory control (OC) structures. OC is a relation of obligatory coreferentiality between a matrix argument (controller) and the null subject of the subordinate (controlee) of the same sentence.…

  14. Complement activation of electrogenic ion transport in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    McCole, D F; Otti, B; Newsholme, P; Baird, A W

    1997-11-15

    The complement cascade is an important component in many immune and inflammatory reactions and may contribute to both the diarrhoea and inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Isolated rat colonic mucosae were voltage clamped in Ussing chambers. Basolateral addition of zymosan-activated whole human serum (ZAS) induced a rapid onset, transient inward short circuit current (SCC). This response was concentration dependent and was significantly attenuated by pre-heating ZAS at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Depletion of complement from normal human serum with cobra venom factor (CVF) significantly lowered SCC responses. Chloride was the primary charge carrying ion as responses to ZAS were abolished in the presence of the loop diuretic bumetanide. The complement component C3a stimulated ion transport but not to the same extent as whole serum. Exogenous C5 was without effect. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam significantly attenuated the response to ZAS. These findings support the possibility that complement activation may contribute to the pathophysiology of secretory diarrhoea since activation of electrogenic chloride secretion converts intestinal epithelia to a state of net fluid secretion.

  15. Juvenile Justice and a Strengths Perspective: Complement or Clash?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Does the new realm of positive psychology and strength-based strategies complement or clash with the remedial discipline of social control traditionally practiced in juvenile justice programs? Many welcome the balance of positive psychology, the strengths perspective, and coping and resilience studies. Although emerging from different disciplines,…

  16. Detection of surface bound complement at increasing serum anticoagulant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, S; Askendal, A; Lindahl, T L; Tengvall, P

    2008-04-01

    Surface mediated immune complement activation can be detected by a variety of antibody utilizing methods such as ELISA, fluorescence- or radiolabelling techniques, QCM, and ellipsometry. In the present work we investigated how the common anticoagulants heparin, dalteparin, fondaparinux and sodium citrate affected the binding of anti-complement factor 3c (anti-C3c) on a model complement activator surface, immobilised IgG, after incubation in human blood serum. The results show, as expected, that different anticoagulants affect the antibody binding differently. Increasing amounts of heparin, dalteparin and sodium citrate in normal serum resulted in a decreasing anti-C3c binding. The antibody deposition was not sensitive for the fondaparinux concentration. Surprisingly high concentrations of anti-coagulantia were needed to completely eradicate the antibody binding. Experiments in EGTA-serum showed that anticoagulants interfered directly with both the classical and alternative pathways. Control C3a-des arg ELISA measurements show that the lowered antibody surface binding was not a result of complement depletion in serum. Kallikrein generation by hydrophilic glass surfaces was not affected by high anticoagulant concentrations.

  17. Complement and contact activation in term neonates after fetal acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, J.; Wagner, M.; Strauss, E.; Obladen, M.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate complement and contact activation after fetal acidosis.
METHODS—Fifteen term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy after umbilical arterial pH < 7.10 were compared with 15 healthy neonates with umbilical arterial pH > 7.20. Determinations of the complement function and C1-inhibitor activity were performed as kinetic tests 22-28 hours after birth. C1q, C1-inhibitor, and factor B concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion and those of C3a, C5a, and factor XIIa by enzyme immunoabsorbent assay.
RESULTS—Median complement function (46 vs 73 %), C1q (4.3 vs 9.1 mg/dl), and factor B (5.2 vs 7.7 mg/dl) decreased after fetal acidosis. The activated split products C3a (260 vs 185 µg/l), C5a (5.0 vs 0.6 µg/l), and factor XIIa (3.2 vs 1.3 µg/l) increased in the neonates after fetal acidosis. No differences were found in the concentration and activity of C1-inhibitor.
CONCLUSIONS—Complement and contact activation occurred in the newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Activation of these systems generates mediators which can trigger inflammation and tissue injury.

 PMID:9577283

  18. Heterogeneity of Lethals in a "Simple" Lethal Complementation Group

    PubMed Central

    Janca, Frank C.; Woloshyn, Effie P.; Nash, David

    1986-01-01

    Of 24 ethyl methanesulphonate-induced, recessive-lethal mutations in the region 9E1-9F13 of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster , eight fall into a typically homogeneous lethal complementation group associated with the raspberry (ras) locus. Mutations in this group have previously been shown to be pleiotropic, affecting not only ras but also two other genetic entities, gua1 and pur1, which yield auxotrophic mutations.—The eight new mutations have been characterized phenotypically in double heterozygotes with gua1, pur1 and ras mutations. Despite their homogeneity in lethal complementation tests, the mutations prove quite diverse. For example, two mutations have little or no effect on eye color in double heterozygotes with ras2 . The differences between the lethals are allele-specific and cannot be explained as a trivial outcome of a hypomorphic series.—Taken alone, the lethal complementation studies mask the complexity of the locus and the diversity of its recessive lethal alleles. By extension, we argue that the general use of lethal saturation studies provides an unduly simplified image of genetic organization. We suggest that the reason why recessive lethal mutations rarely present complex complementation patterns is that complex loci tend to produce mutations that affect several subfunctions. PMID:3080355

  19. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  20. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  1. Hair: A Diagnostic Tool to Complement Blood Serum and Urine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maugh, Thomas H., II

    1978-01-01

    Trace elements and some drugs can be identified in hair and it seems likely that other organic chemicals will be identifiable in the future. Since hair is so easily collected, stored, and analyzed it promises to be an ideal complement to serum and urine analysis as a diagnostic tool. (BB)

  2. Complement activation and effect of eculizumab in scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Devresse, Arnaud; Aydin, Selda; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Demoulin, Nathalie; Stordeur, Patrick; Lambert, Catherine; Gastoldi, Sara; Pirson, Yves; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a life-threatening complication of systemic sclerosis characterized by abrupt onset of hypertension, thrombotic microangiopathy, and kidney injury. The mechanisms of the disease remain ill-defined, but a growing body of evidence suggests that activation of the complement system may be involved. Methods: Here, we report the case of a patient presenting with severe SRC and strong evidence of complement activation, both in serum and in the kidney, in the absence of genetic defect of the complement system. Results: Immunofluorescence studies on kidney biopsy showed significant deposits of C1q and C4d in the endothelium of renal arterioles, pointing toward activation of the classical pathway. Because of the dramatic clinical and histological severity, and the lack of response to early treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and plasma exchange, the patient was treated with the specific C5 blocker eculizumab. Contrarily to conventional treatment, eculizumab efficiently blocked C5b-9 deposition ex vivo and maintained hematological remission. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure a few weeks later. Postmortem examination of the heart showed diffuse patchy interstitial fibrosis, the typical lesion of systemic sclerosis-related cardiomyopathy, but normal coronary arteries and myocardial microvasculature. Conclusion: SRC may lead to complement system activation through the classical pathway. Early administration of C5 inhibitor eculizumab may have therapeutic potential in patients with life-threatening SRC refractory to conventional treatment using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:27472742

  3. Complement modulates the cutaneous microbiome and inflammatory milieu

    PubMed Central

    Chehoud, Christel; Rafail, Stavros; Tyldsley, Amanda S.; Seykora, John T.; Lambris, John D.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The skin is colonized by a plethora of microbes that include commensals and potential pathogens, but it is currently unknown how cutaneous host immune mechanisms influence the composition, diversity, and quantity of the skin microbiota. Here we reveal an interactive role for complement in cutaneous host–microbiome interactions. Inhibiting signaling of the complement component C5a receptor (C5aR) altered the composition and diversity of the skin microbiota as revealed by deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. In parallel, we demonstrate that C5aR inhibition results in down-regulation of genes encoding cutaneous antimicrobial peptides, pattern recognition receptors, and proinflammatory mediators. Immunohistochemistry of inflammatory cell infiltrates in the skin showed reduced numbers of macrophages and lymphocytes with C5aR inhibition. Further, comparing cutaneous gene expression in germ-free mice vs. conventionally raised mice suggests that the commensal microbiota regulates expression of complement genes in the skin. These findings demonstrate a component of host immunity that impacts colonization of the skin by the commensal microbiota and vice versa, a critical step toward understanding host–microbe immune mutualism of the skin and its implications for health and disease. Additionally, we reveal a role for complement in homeostatic host–microbiome interactions of the skin. PMID:23980152

  4. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  6. Complement and IL-22: partnering up for border patrol.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Kemper, Claudia

    2014-10-16

    Intestinal pathobionts that escape into the periphery can cause serious morbidity and death. In this issue of Immunity, Hasegawa et al. (2014) show that the host's protective measures against such events include interleukin-22-driven systemic elimination of pathobionts via complement regulation.

  7. Complementation of multiple sulfatase deficiency in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed

    Fedde, K; Horwitz, A L

    1984-05-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is an inherited disorder characterized by deficient activity of seven different sulfatases. Genetic complementation for steroid sulfatase (STS), arylsulfatase A, and N-acetylgalactosamine 6-SO4 sulfatase was demonstrated in somatic cell hybrids between MSD fibroblasts and mouse cells ( LA9 ) or Chinese hamster cells ( CHW ). In an electrophoretic system that separates human and rodent STS isozymes, enzyme from hybrids migrated as human enzyme. We concluded that the rodent cell complemented the MSD deficiency and allowed normal expression of the STS structural gene. Some MSD- LA9 hybrids showed significant levels of human arylsulfatase A activity, as shown by the immunoprecipitation of active enzyme by human-specific antiserum. Complementation was also suggested for N-acetylgalactosamine 6- sulfatate sulfatase (GalNAc-6S sulfatase) in several MSD- LA9 hybrids by the demonstration of a significant increase in activity (10-fold) over that of the GalNAc-6S sulfatase-deficient parental mouse and MSD cells. Thus, it was possible to demonstrate complementation for more than one sulfatase in a single MSD-rodent hybrid. Normal levels of sulfatase activity in hybrids indicate that the sulfatase structural genes are intact in MSD cells.

  8. Superimposed Code Theoretic Analysis of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Codes and DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hybridization that occurs between a DNA strand and its Watson - Crick complement can be used to perform mathematical computation. This research addresses how the...are 5′→3′ and strands with strikethrough are 3′→5′. A dsDNA duplex formed between a strand and its reverse complement is called a Watson - Crick (WC...3’ 5’ 3’ 5’TACGCGACTTTC3’ 5’GAAAGTCGCGTA3’ ATCAAACGATGC GCATCGTTTGAT Watson Crick (WC) Duplexes TACGCGACTTTC

  9. Carnivorous Nutrition in Pitcher Plants (Nepenthes spp.) via an Unusual Complement of Endogenous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Ozar, Brittany; Sensen, Christoph W; Schriemer, David C

    2016-09-02

    Plants belonging to the genus Nepenthes are carnivorous, using specialized pitfall traps called "pitchers" that attract, capture, and digest insects as a primary source of nutrients. We have used RNA sequencing to generate a cDNA library from the Nepenthes pitchers and applied it to mass spectrometry-based identification of the enzymes secreted into the pitcher fluid using a nonspecific digestion strategy superior to trypsin in this application. This first complete catalog of the pitcher fluid subproteome includes enzymes across a variety of functional classes. The most abundant proteins present in the secreted fluid are proteases, nucleases, peroxidases, chitinases, a phosphatase, and a glucanase. Nitrogen recovery involves a particularly rich complement of proteases. In addition to the two expected aspartic proteases, we discovered three novel nepenthensins, two prolyl endopeptidases that we name neprosins, and a putative serine carboxypeptidase. Additional proteins identified are relevant to pathogen-defense and secretion mechanisms. The full complement of acid-stable enzymes discovered in this study suggests that carnivory in the genus Nepenthes can be sustained by plant-based mechanisms alone and does not absolutely require bacterial symbiosis.

  10. Isolation and cloning of a Azospirillum lipoferum locus that complements Escherichia coli proU mutant.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, A K; Mishra, B M

    1998-05-15

    Glycine betaine relieved sodium chloride-mediated inhibition of growth in Azospirillum lipoferum ATCC 29708. 35S-methionine labelling of proteins after salinity up-shock revealed strong induction of a 30 kDa protein which cross-reacted with the anti-glycine betaine binding protein antibody from Escherichia coli. This suggested that A. lipoferum had a salinity-induced ProU-like high-affinity glycine betaine transport system. A genomic library of A. lipoferum ATCC 29708 was screened for the proU-like gene by complementation of a proU mutant of E. coli. Four recombinant cosmids, capable of restoring growth of the proU mutant on plates containing 600 mM NaCl and 1 mM glycine betaine were selected. Selected recombinant cosmids hybridized with a proU gene probe from E. coli. Complementation of E. coli proU mutant with the A. lipoferum genomic DNA was evident by the ability of proU mutant (containing selected recombinant cosmids) to grow on minimal medium supplemented with 600 mM NaCl and 1 mM glycine betaine.

  11. Complementation for an essential ancillary nonstructural protein function across parvovirus genera

    PubMed Central

    Mihaylov, Ivailo S.; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses encode a small number of ancillary proteins that differ substantially between genera. Within the genus Protoparvovirus, minute virus of mice (MVM) encodes three isoforms of its ancillary protein NS2, while human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), in the genus Bocaparvovirus, encodes an NP1 protein that is unrelated in primary sequence to MVM NS2. To search for functional overlap between NS2 and NP1, we generated murine A9 cell populations that inducibly express HBoV1 NP1. These were used to test whether NP1 expression could complement specific defects resulting from depletion of MVM NS2 isoforms. NP1 induction had little impact on cell viability or cell cycle progression in uninfected cells, and was unable to complement late defects in MVM virion production associated with low NS2 levels. However, NP1 did relocate to MVM replication centers, and supports both the normal expansion of these foci and overcomes the early paralysis of DNA replication in NS2-null infections. PMID:25194919

  12. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  13. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  14. Structural and Thermodynamic Signatures of DNA Recognition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Biswas, Tapan

    2011-09-06

    An essential protein, DnaA, binds to 9-bp DNA sites within the origin of replication oriC. These binding events are prerequisite to forming an enigmatic nucleoprotein scaffold that initiates replication. The number, sequences, positions, and orientations of these short DNA sites, or DnaA boxes, within the oriCs of different bacteria vary considerably. To investigate features of DnaA boxes that are important for binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA (MtDnaA), we have determined the crystal structures of the DNA binding domain (DBD) of MtDnaA bound to a cognate MtDnaA-box (at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution) and to a consensus Escherichia coli DnaA-box (at 2.3 {angstrom}). These structures, complemented by calorimetric equilibrium binding studies of MtDnaA DBD in a series of DnaA-box variants, reveal the main determinants of DNA recognition and establish the [T/C][T/A][G/A]TCCACA sequence as a high-affinity MtDnaA-box. Bioinformatic and calorimetric analyses indicate that DnaA-box sequences in mycobacterial oriCs generally differ from the optimal binding sequence. This sequence variation occurs commonly at the first 2 bp, making an in vivo mycobacterial DnaA-box effectively a 7-mer and not a 9-mer. We demonstrate that the decrease in the affinity of these MtDnaA-box variants for MtDnaA DBD relative to that of the highest-affinity box TTGTCCACA is less than 10-fold. The understanding of DnaA-box recognition by MtDnaA and E. coli DnaA enables one to map DnaA-box sequences in the genomes of M. tuberculosis and other eubacteria.

  15. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  16. The role of complement in age-related macular degeneration: heparan sulphate, a ZIP code for complement factor H?

    PubMed

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Keenan, Tiarnan D L; Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed nations and has been associated with complement dysregulation in the central retina. The Y402H polymorphism in the complement regulatory protein factor H (CFH) can confer a >5-fold increased risk of developing AMD and is present in approximately 30% of people of European descent. CFH, in conjunction with other factors, regulates complement activation in host tissues, and the Y402H polymorphism has been found to alter the protein's specificity for heparan sulphate (HS) - a complex polysaccharide found ubiquitously in mammals. HS, which is present on the cell surface and also in the extracellular matrix, exhibits huge structural diversity due to variations in the level/pattern of sulphation, where particular structures may act as 'ZIP codes' for different tissue/cellular locations. Recent work has demonstrated that CFH contains two HS-binding domains that each recognize specific HS ZIP codes, allowing differential recognition of Bruch's membrane (in the eye) or the glomerular basement membrane (in the kidney). Importantly, the Y402H polymorphism impairs the binding of CFH to the HS in Bruch's membrane, which could result in increased complement activation and chronic local inflammation (in 402H individuals) and thereby contribute to AMD pathology.

  17. Plasma complement and vascular complement deposition in patients with coronary artery disease with and without inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD) are associated with accelerated coronary artery disease (CAD), which may result from both systemic and vascular wall inflammation. There are indications that complement may be involved in the pathogenesis of CAD in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). This study aimed to evaluate the associations between circulating complement and complement activation products with mononuclear cell infiltrates (MCI, surrogate marker of vascular inflammation) in the aortic media and adventitia in IRDCAD and non-IRDCAD patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Furthermore, we compared complement activation product deposition patterns in rare aorta adventitial and medial biopsies from SLE, RA and non-IRD patients. Methods We examined plasma C3 (p-C3) and terminal complement complexes (p-TCC) in 28 IRDCAD (SLE = 3; RA = 25), 52 non-IRDCAD patients, and 32 IRDNo CAD (RA = 32) from the Feiring Heart Biopsy Study. Aortic biopsies taken from the CAD only patients during CABG were previously evaluated for adventitial MCIs. The rare aortic biopsies from 3 SLE, 3 RA and 3 non-IRDCAD were assessed for the presence of C3 and C3d using immunohistochemistry. Results IRDCAD patients had higher p-TCC than non-IRDCAD or IRDNo CAD patients (p<0.0001), but a similar p-C3 level (p = 0.42). Circulating C3 was associated with IRD duration (ρ, p-value: 0.46, 0.03). In multiple logistic regression analysis, IRD remained significantly related to the presence and size of MCI (p<0.05). C3 was present in all tissue samples. C3d was detected in the media of all patients and only in the adventitia of IRD patients (diffuse in all SLE and focal in one RA). Conclusion The independent association of IRD status with MCI and the observed C3d deposition supports the unique relationship between rheumatic disease, and, in particular, SLE with the complement system. Exaggerated systemic and vascular complement activation may

  18. Development of Word Order in German Complement-Clause Constructions: Effects of Input Frequencies, Lexical Items, and Discourse Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Silke; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the development of word order in German children's spontaneous production of complement clauses. From soon after their second birthday, young German children use both verb final complements with complementizers and verb-second complements without complementizers. By their third birthday they use both kinds of complement clauses with…

  19. Complement Factor H Binds to Human Serum Apolipoprotein E and Mediates Complement Regulation on High Density Lipoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Karita; van Kessel, Kok; Nissilä, Eija; Metso, Jari; Johansson, Tiira; Miettinen, Sini; Varjosalo, Markku; Kirveskari, Juha; Kuusela, Pentti; Chroni, Angelika; Jauhiainen, Matti; van Strijp, Jos; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2015-11-27

    The alternative pathway of complement is an important part of the innate immunity response against foreign particles invading the human body. To avoid damage to host cells, it needs to be efficiently down-regulated by plasma factor H (FH) as exemplified by various diseases caused by mutations in its domains 19-20 (FH19-20) and 5-7 (FH5-7). These regions are also the main interaction sites for microbial pathogens that bind host FH to evade complement attack. We previously showed that inhibition of FH binding by a recombinant FH5-7 construct impairs survival of FH binding pathogens in human blood. In this study we found that upon exposure to full blood, the addition of FH5-7 reduces survival of, surprisingly, also those microbes that are not able to bind FH. This effect was mediated by inhibition of complement regulation and subsequently enhanced neutrophil phagocytosis by FH5-7. We found that although FH5-7 does not reduce complement regulation in the actual fluid phase of plasma, it reduces regulation on HDL particles in plasma. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry we revealed that FH interacts with serum apolipoprotein E (apoE) via FH5-7 domains. Furthermore, binding of FH5-7 to HDL was dependent on the concentration of apoE on the HDL particles. These findings explain why the addition of FH5-7 to plasma leads to excessive complement activation and phagocytosis of microbes in full anticoagulated blood. In conclusion, our data show how FH interacts with apoE molecules via domains 5-7 and regulates alternative pathway activation on plasma HDL particles.

  20. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  1. The role of complement in C3 glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Chen, Qian; Wiech, Thorsten; Goodship, Tim; Johnson, Sally; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Nester, Clara; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Noris, Marina; Pickering, Matthew; Smith, Richard

    2015-09-01

    C3 glomerulopathy describes a spectrum of disorders with glomerular pathology associated with C3 cleavage product deposition and with defective complement action and regulation (Fakhouri et al., 2010; Sethi et al., 2012b). Kidney biopsies from these patients show glomerular accumulation or deposition of C3 cleavage fragments, but no or minor deposition of immunoglobulins (Appel et al., 2005; D'Agati and Bomback, 2012; Servais et al., 2007; Sethi and Fervenza, 2011). At present the current situation asks for a better definition of the underlining disease mechanisms, for precise biomarkers, and for a treatment for this disease. The complement system is a self activating and propelling enzymatic cascade type system in which inactive, soluble plasma components are activated spontaneously and lead into an amplification loop (Zipfel and Skerka, 2009). Activation of the alternative pathway is spontaneous, occurs by default, and cascade progression leads to amplification by complement activators. The system however is self-controlled by multiple regulators and inhibitors, like Factor H that control cascade progression in fluid phase and on surfaces. The activated complement system generates a series of potent effector components and activation products, which damage foreign-, as well as modified self cells, recruit innate immune cells to the site of action, coordinate inflammation and the response of the adaptive immune system in form of B cells and T lymphocytes (Kohl, 2006; Medzhitov and Janeway, 2002; Ogden and Elkon, 2006; Carroll, 2004; Kemper and Atkinson, 2007; Morgan, 1999; Muller-Eberhard, 1986; Ricklin et al., 2010). Complement controls homeostasis and multiple reactions in the vertebrate organism including defense against microbial infections (Diaz-Guillen et al., 1999; Mastellos and Lambris, 2002; Nordahl et al., 2004; Ricklin et al., 2010). In consequence defective control of the spontaneous self amplifying cascade or regulation is associated with numerous

  2. Complement activation in Ghanaian children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Helegbe, Gideon K; Goka, Bamenla Q; Kurtzhals, Joergen AL; Addae, Michael M; Ollaga, Edwin; Tetteh, John KA; Dodoo, Daniel; Ofori, Michael F; Obeng-Adjei, George; Hirayama, Kenji; Awandare, Gordon A; Akanmori, Bartholomew D

    2007-01-01

    Background Severe anaemia (SA), intravascular haemolysis (IVH) and respiratory distress (RD) are severe forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, with RD reported to be of prognostic importance in African children with malarial anaemia. Complement factors have been implicated in the mechanism leading to excess anaemia in acute P. falciparum infection. Methods The direct Coombs test (DCT) and flow cytometry were used to investigate the mean levels of RBC-bound complement fragments (C3d and C3bαβ) and the regulatory proteins [complement receptor 1 (CD35) and decay accelerating factor (CD55)] in children with discrete clinical forms of P. falciparum malaria. The relationship between the findings and clinical parameters including coma, haemoglobin (Hb) levels and RD were investigated. Results Of the 484 samples tested, 131(27%) were positive in DCT, out of which 115/131 (87.8%) were positive for C3d alone while 16/131 (12.2%) were positive for either IgG alone or both. 67.4% of the study population were below 5 years of age and DCT positivity was more common in this age group relative to children who were 5 years or older (Odds ratio, OR = 3.8; 95%CI, 2.2–6.7, p < 0.001). DCT correlated significantly with RD (β = -304, p = 0.006), but multiple regression analysis revealed that, Hb (β = -0.341, p = 0.012) and coma (β = -0.256, p = 0.034) were stronger predictors of RD than DCT (β = 0.228, p = 0.061). DCT was also not associated with IVH, p = 0.19, while spleen size was inversely correlated with Hb (r = -402, p = 0.001). Flow cytometry showed similar mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) values of CD35, CD55 and C3bαβ levels on the surfaces of RBC in patients and asymptomatic controls (AC). However, binding of C3bαβ correlated significantly with CD35 or CD55 (p < 0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that complement activation contributed to anaemia in acute childhood P. falciparum malaria, possibly through induction of erythrophagocytosis and haemolysis. In

  3. Complement-dependent antibody cytotoxicity test of chicken antibody with duck complement used against cells of a Marek's disease lymphoma-derived cell line (MSB-1).

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, C; Kodama, H; Mikami, T

    1979-01-01

    Complement-dependent antibody cytotoxicity (CDAC) against cells of a lymphoblastoid cell line (MSB-1) derived from Marek's disease lymphoma was investigated in a chicken antibody system using complements from several animal species. Cytotoxicity was seldom observed when rabbit, guinea pig, or chicken complements were used in the presence of hyperimmune chicken serum against MSB-1. With duck complement, however, cytotoxicity was always observed. Therefore, duck complement appears to be suitable for assay of hyperimmune chicken serum against MSB-1 cells by the CDAC test.

  4. MCM-GINS and MCM-MCM interactions in vivo visualised by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Gökhan; MacNeill, Stuart A

    2009-01-01

    Background Each of the three individual components of the CMG complex (Cdc45, MCM and GINS) is essential for chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic cells, both for the initiation of replication at origins and also for normal replication fork progression. The MCM complex is a DNA helicase that most likely functions as the catalytic core of the replicative helicase, unwinding the parental duplex DNA ahead of the moving replication fork, whereas Cdc45 and the GINS complex are believed to act as accessory factors for MCM. Results To investigate interactions between components of the CMG complex, we have used bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe for the first time, to analyse protein-protein interactions between GINS and MCM subunits expressed from their native chromosomal loci. We demonstrate interactions between GINS and MCM in the nuclei of exponentially-growing fission yeast cells and on chromatin in binucleate S-phase cells. In addition we present evidence of MCM-MCM interactions in diploid fission yeast cells. As with GINS-MCM interactions, MCM-MCM interactions also occur on chromatin in S-phase cells. Conclusion Bimolecular fluorescence complementation can be used in fission yeast to visualise interactions between two of the three components of the CMG complex, offering the prospect that this technique could in the future be used to allow studies on replication protein dynamics in living S. pombe cells. PMID:19228417

  5. Free Energy Gap and Statistical Thermodynamic Fidelity of DNA Codes (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    reverse-complement unless otherwise stated. For strand x, let Nx denote its complement. A (perfect) Watson - Crick duplex is the joining of complement...is possible for complementary sequences to form a non-perfectly aligned duplex, we will call any x W Nx duplex a Watson - Crick (WC) duplex. Two...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FREE ENERGY GAP AND STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMIC FIDELITY OF DNA CODES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-07

  6. Complements Spurned: Our Experience with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Vidya S.; Chaterjee, Rudrarpan; Sood, Ankita; Sajjan, Basavaraj; Kaushik, Aniruddha; Vyahalkar, Sameer V.

    2017-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disorder resulting from a dysregulated activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system. It results in significant morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed and treated promptly. It lends itself to myriad renal and extrarenal manifestations, all potentially disabling. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to complement C5 is now the widely accepted norm for treatment. However, in resource-limited settings, plasma exchange if instituted early may be as beneficial. We report a case of aHUS treated with extended plasma exchange with excellent results. Critical care monitoring is essential for the management of the disease in view of a tendency to develop multiple complications. Long-term immunosuppression may be successful in maintaining remission. PMID:28250608

  7. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia’s strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to recognize. We show here that schizophrenia’s association with the MHC locus arises in substantial part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles promoted widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression and associated with schizophrenia in proportion to their tendency to promote greater expression of C4A in the brain. Human C4 protein localized at neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals affected with schizophrenia. PMID:26814963

  8. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A; Handsaker, Robert E; Daly, Mark J; Carroll, Michael C; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-02-11

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to identify. Here we show that this association arises in part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles generated widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression in the brain, with each common C4 allele associating with schizophrenia in proportion to its tendency to generate greater expression of C4A. Human C4 protein localized to neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia.

  9. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  10. Complement depletion aggravates Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia and septic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sakiniene, E; Bremell, T; Tarkowski, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of the complement system in Staphylococcus aureus arthritis and septicaemia. The murine model of haematogenously acquired septic arthritis was used, injecting intravenously toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), producing S. aureus LS-1. Complement was depleted using cobra venom factor (CVF). Evaluation of arthritis was performed clinically and histopathologically. In addition, the effect of complement depletion on the phagocytic activity of leucocytes was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Six days after inoculation of S. aureus the prevalence of arthritis in decomplemented mice was three-fold higher than that in controls (91% versus 25%). The clinical severity of arthritis at the end of the experiment, expressed as arthritic index, was 7.3 and 1.9, respectively. These findings were confirmed by histological index of synovitis as well as of cartilage and/or bone destruction being significantly higher in decomplemented mice than in controls (9.8 ± 1.7 versus 4.9 ± 1.2, P < 0.05; and 7.9 ± 1.7 versus 3.0 ± 0.9, P < 0.05, respectively). Also, the septicaemia-induced mortality was clearly higher in decomplemented mice compared with the controls. CVF treatment significantly reduced in vivo polymorphonuclear cell-dependent inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of olive oil and mirroring the capacity of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) to migrate and/or extravasate. Besides, the decomplementation procedure significantly impaired phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leucocytes in vitro, since the number of phagocytes being able to ingest bacteria decreased by 50% when the cells were maintained in decomplemented serum compared with those in intact serum. The conclusion is that complement depletion aggravates the clinical course of S. aureus arthritis and septicaemia, possibly by a combination of decreased migration/extravasation of PMNC and an impairment of phagocytosis. PMID:9933426

  11. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.

  12. Killing of Gyrodactylus salaris (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) mediated by host complement.

    PubMed

    Harris, P D; Soleng, A; Bakke, T A

    1998-08-01

    Gyrodactylus salaris, an important pathogen of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, has been shown to be highly sensitive to factors in host serum and mucus, being killed rapidly (50% within 1 h) by serum at a dilution of 1:200. The time needed for killing was inversely proportional to serum concentration. Similar effects were noted using host mucus, which contained approximately 1/20th of the anti-Gyrodactylus activity of serum. Serum activity was abolished completely by heating at 45 degrees C for 30 min, and by addition of EDTA, but not by EGTA + 1 mM magnesium ions. Activity was not dependent on whether the serum was from infected or naive fishes, nor was it species specific. Attempts to pre-coat parasites in salmon anti-Gyrodactylus antibodies also failed to enhance the activity of fresh serum. These observations suggest that killing is due to the complement system of the host, acting via the alternate pathway. G. salaris appears to be exceptionally sensitive to complement, being killed at concentrations which could be experienced in vivo. The role of complement in the protection of fishes against gyrodactylid infection therefore deserves further investigation.

  13. Lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfang; Chen, Liyong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Huaying; Su, Peng; Han, Yinglun; Feng, Bo; Qiao, Xu; Zhao, Jing; Ma, Ning; Liu, Huijie; Zheng, Zhen; Li, Qingwei

    2013-02-01

    An alternative adaptive-immune system is present in the most basal vertebrates--lampreys and hagfish--the only surviving jawless vertebrates. These eel-like fish use leucine-rich repeat-based receptors for Ag recognition instead of the Ig-based receptors used in jawed vertebrates. We report that in Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica), variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR)B interacts with C1q and C3 proteins to mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity for bacteria and tumor cells. The immune-based lysis involves deposition of VLRB and C1q-like protein complex on the surface of target cells, activation of C3, and ultimate disruption of cell wall integrity. The demonstration of functional interaction between VLRB and complement components in lamprey provides evidence for the emergence of cooperative innate and adaptive-immune responses at a pivotal point in vertebrate evolution, before or in parallel with the evolution of Ig-based Abs and the classical complement-activation pathway.

  14. [The practical assessment of complement involvement in anaphylactoid reactions].

    PubMed

    Watkins, J

    1982-01-01

    While no single test is entirely satisfactory for the investigation of anaphylactoid response to intravenous anaesthetic drugs, changes in plasma chemistry are particularly easy to measure and may be carried out at centres remote from the clinical incident. Analysis should be carried out on a sequence of blood samples taken into EDTA over the 24 hours following such reaction. Few reactions are classical Type I, IgE antibody mediated, reactions and most involved the complement proteins in some specific manner. By measuring changes in the levels and activity of the complement proteins, particularly C3, C4 and C5, between samples, it is possible to deduce the likely mechanism of a reaction and thus to advise more wisely on future treatment of the patient. Although levels of any plasma protein may be readily measured by single radial immunodiffusion (Mancini technique) using appropriate specific antisera, one assessment of complement activity (degree of conversion) has until now largely been restricted to technically exacting Laurell immunoelectrophoresis. Two simple immunoelectrophoretic techniques are described here which do not require such expertise.

  15. Metabolic Complementation in Bacterial Communities: Necessary Conditions and Optimality

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Matteo; Ponce-de-León, Miguel; Peretó, Juli; Montero, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial communities may display metabolic complementation, in which different members of the association partially contribute to the same biosynthetic pathway. In this way, the end product of the pathway is synthesized by the community as a whole. However, the emergence and the benefits of such complementation are poorly understood. Herein, we present a simple model to analyze the metabolic interactions among bacteria, including the host in the case of endosymbiotic bacteria. The model considers two cell populations, with both cell types encoding for the same linear biosynthetic pathway. We have found that, for metabolic complementation to emerge as an optimal strategy, both product inhibition and large permeabilities are needed. In the light of these results, we then consider the patterns found in the case of tryptophan biosynthesis in the endosymbiont consortium hosted by the aphid Cinara cedri. Using in-silico computed physicochemical properties of metabolites of this and other biosynthetic pathways, we verified that the splitting point of the pathway corresponds to the most permeable intermediate. PMID:27774085

  16. Complement Interaction with Trypanosomatid Promastigotes in Normal Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Mercedes; Moreno, Inmaculada; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Toraño, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    In normal human serum (NHS), axenic promastigotes of Crithidia, Phytomonas, and Leishmania trigger complement activation, and from 1.2 to 1.8 × 105 C3 molecules are deposited per promastigote within 2.5 min. In Leishmania, promastigote C3 binding capacity remains constant during in vitro metacyclogenesis. C3 deposition on promastigotes activated through the classical complement pathway reaches a 50% maximum after ∼50 s, and represents >85% of total C3 bound. In C1q- and C2-deficient human sera, promastigotes cannot activate the classical pathway (CP) unless purified C1q or C2 factors, respectively, are supplemented, demonstrating a requirement for CP factor in promastigote C3 opsonization. NHS depleted of natural anti-Leishmania antibodies cannot trigger promastigote CP activation, but IgM addition restores C3 binding. Furthermore, Leishmania binds natural antibodies in ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA)-treated NHS; after EDTA removal, promastigote-bound IgM triggers C3 deposition in natural antibody-depleted NHS. Serum collectins and pentraxins thus do not participate significantly in NHS promastigote C3 opsonization. Real-time kinetic analysis of promastigote CP-mediated lysis indicates that between 85–95% of parasites are killed within 2.5 min of serum contact. These data indicate that successful Leishmania infection in man must immediately follow promastigote transmission, and that Leishmania evasion strategies are shaped by the selective pressure exerted by complement. PMID:11854358

  17. Therapeutic inhibition of the alternative complement pathway attenuates chronic EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trent R; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited.

  18. Therapeutic Inhibition of the Alternative Complement Pathway Attenuates Chronic EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.; Schoeb, Trent R.; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited. PMID:23337717

  19. Complement-triggered pathways orchestrate regenerative responses throughout phylogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; DeAngelis, Robert A.; Lambris, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Adult tissue plasticity, cell reprogramming, and organ regeneration are major challenges in the field of modern regenerative medicine. Devising strategies to increase the regenerative capacity of tissues holds great promise for dealing with donor organ shortages and low transplantation outcomes and also provides essential impetus to tissue bioengineering approaches for organ repair and replacement. The inherent ability of cells to reprogram their fate by switching into an embryonic-like, pluripotent progenitor state is an evolutionary vestige that in mammals has been retained mostly in fetal tissues and persists only in a few organs of the adult body. Tissue regeneration reflects the capacity of terminally differentiated cells to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate in response to acute injury or environmental stress signals. In lower vertebrates, this regenerative capacity extends to several organs and remarkably culminates in precise tissue patterning, through cellular transdifferentiation and complex morphogenetic processes that can faithfully reconstruct entire body parts. Many lessons have been learned from robust regeneration models in amphibians such as the newt and axolotl. However, the dynamic interactions between the regenerating tissue, the surrounding stroma, and the host immune response, as it adapts to the actively proliferating tissue, remain ill-defined. The regenerating zone, through a sequence of distinct molecular events, adopts phenotypic plasticity and undergoes rigorous tissue remodeling that, in turn, evokes a significant inflammatory response. Complement is a primordial sentinel of the innate immune response that engages in multiple inflammatory cascades as it becomes activated during tissue injury and remodeling. In this respect, complement proteins have been implicated in tissue and organ regeneration in both urodeles and mammals. Distinct complement-triggered pathways have been shown to modulate critical responses that promote tissue

  20. Role of Streptococcus pneumoniae Proteins in Evasion of Complement-Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Andre, Greiciely O; Converso, Thiago R; Politano, Walter R; Ferraz, Lucio F C; Ribeiro, Marcelo L; Leite, Luciana C C; Darrieux, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The complement system plays a central role in immune defense against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In order to evade complement attack, pneumococci have evolved a number of mechanisms that limit complement mediated opsonization and subsequent phagocytosis. This review focuses on the strategies employed by pneumococci to circumvent complement mediated immunity, both in vitro and in vivo. At last, since many of the proteins involved in interactions with complement components are vaccine candidates in different stages of validation, we explore the use of these antigens alone or in combination, as potential vaccine approaches that aim at elimination or drastic reduction in the ability of this bacterium to evade complement.

  1. Role of Streptococcus pneumoniae Proteins in Evasion of Complement-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Greiciely O.; Converso, Thiago R.; Politano, Walter R.; Ferraz, Lucio F. C.; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Darrieux, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The complement system plays a central role in immune defense against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In order to evade complement attack, pneumococci have evolved a number of mechanisms that limit complement mediated opsonization and subsequent phagocytosis. This review focuses on the strategies employed by pneumococci to circumvent complement mediated immunity, both in vitro and in vivo. At last, since many of the proteins involved in interactions with complement components are vaccine candidates in different stages of validation, we explore the use of these antigens alone or in combination, as potential vaccine approaches that aim at elimination or drastic reduction in the ability of this bacterium to evade complement. PMID:28265264

  2. Microsatellite Organization in the B Chromosome and A Chromosome Complement in Astyanax (Characiformes, Characidae) Species.

    PubMed

    Piscor, Diovani; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P

    2016-01-01

    The organization of microsatellites in B and sex chromosomes has been linked to chromosomal evolution in a number of animal groups. Here, the chromosomal organizations of (CA)15, (GA)15, (CG)15, (GACA)4, and (GATA)8 microsatellites were examined in several Astyanax species with different diploid numbers: Astyanax mexicanus (2n = 50 + 1 B chromosome), A. altiparanae (2n = 50), A. marionae (2n = 48), A. fasciatus (2n = 46), and A. schubarti (2n = 36). The (CA)15 and (GA)15 microsatellites were dispersed across the chromosomes of A. altiparanae and A. fasciatus but were also observed as clusters (CA and GA for A. altiparanae, and CA for A. fasciatus). In A. marionae and A. schubarti, the (CA)15 and (GA)15 microsatellites were dispersed but were also observed as clustered signals and coincident with heterochromatic regions. In all 4 of these species, the (CG)15 and (GACA)4 microsatellites were dispersed across chromosomes, and the (GATA)8 microsatellite was co-localized with 5S rDNA. In A. mexicanus, the (CA)15, (GA)15, (CG)15, (GATA)8, and (GACA)4 microsatellites were weakly detected and dispersed across the chromosomes of the A complement. On the B chromosome, signals for the different microsatellites were weak, strong, absent, weak, and absent, respectively. The distribution of microsatellites and the locational relationship between microsatellites and 5S rDNA are discussed, and a possible evolutionary pathway is proposed for microsatellites in Astyanax.

  3. Aptamer–biotin–streptavidin–C1q complexes can trigger the classical complement pathway to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John Gordon

    2010-02-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are regarded as rivals for antibodies and as such are being investigated for their therapeutic potential. In the present work, it is shown that two different high-affinity DNA aptamers developed previously by Ferreira et al. against MUC1 antigen (designated MUC1-5TR-1 and MUC1-S1.3/S2.2) on MCF7 breast cancer cells can be linked to the first component of complement (C1q) via a biotin–streptavidin system and induce significant killing of MCF7 cells in vitro. Cell viability was assessed by Trypan blue uptake and absorbance at 590 nm of stained cells following buffer washes and lysis in 1% SDS. While the killing effect is demonstrable versus various controls, dependent on aptamer dose, and reproducible, it appears to kill maximally about half of treated MCF7 cells. Possible reasons for the marginal killing effect include antigenic shedding in vitro and membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs) on the cell surface such as CD46, CD55, and CD59 which act to inhibit complement-mediated lysis of cells. Future in vitro research could benefit from application of mCRP-specific aptamers in combination with anti-MUC1 aptamers to overcome surface protective mechanisms while attacking the plasma membrane of MCF7 cells or other MUC1-expressing cancer cells. However, in vivo such a combination could have deleterious effects on normal MUC1-expressing cells as well.

  4. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  5. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  10. [Significance of the complement system for xenotransplantation: strategies for therapeutic intervention].

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M; Haferkamp, A; Pomer, S; Chrupcala, M; Wosnik, A; Heckl-Ostreicher, B

    1998-01-01

    Hyperacute graft rejection triggered by the activation of the recipient's complement system represents the major obstacle to successful xenotransplantation. After the binding of preformed antibodies to vascular glycoproteins complement-induced activation and injury of endothelial cells with subsequent thrombosis leads to rapid destruction of foreign tissues. Inhibition of complement activation is therefore considered as a prerequisite for xenograft survival. Recent animal and cell culture experiments suggest that support of the physiological regulation of the complement system appears to be most promising. Besides the application of soluble complement inhibitors (e.g. soluble complement receptor 1, sCR1; C1 inhibitor) the genetic transfer of human membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (e.g. DAF, CD59) offers new chances to protect the xenograft against the cytolytic complement attack. Results from the authors' experiments shall be included in a short overview to the issue.

  11. Semisynthetic tRNA complement mediates in vitro protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenling; Stein, Viktor; Tnimov, Zakir; Mureev, Sergey; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2015-04-08

    Genetic code expansion is a key objective of synthetic biology and protein engineering. Most efforts in this direction are focused on reassigning termination or decoding quadruplet codons. While the redundancy of genetic code provides a large number of potentially reassignable codons, their utility is diminished by the inevitable interaction with cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. To address this problem, we sought to establish an in vitro protein synthesis system with a simplified synthetic tRNA complement, thereby orthogonalizing some of the sense codons. This quantitative in vitro peptide synthesis assay allowed us to analyze the ability of synthetic tRNAs to decode all of 61 sense codons. We observed that, with the exception of isoacceptors for Asn, Glu, and Ile, the majority of 48 synthetic Escherichia coli tRNAs could support protein translation in the cell-free system. We purified to homogeneity functional Asn, Glu, and Ile tRNAs from the native E. coli tRNA mixture, and by combining them with synthetic tRNAs, we formulated a semisynthetic tRNA complement for all 20 amino acids. We further demonstrated that this tRNA complement could restore the protein translation activity of tRNA-depleted E. coli lysate to a level comparable to that of total native tRNA. To confirm that the developed system could efficiently synthesize long polypeptides, we expressed three different sequences coding for superfolder GFP. This novel semisynthetic translation system is a powerful tool for tRNA engineering and potentially enables the reassignment of at least 9 sense codons coding for Ser, Arg, Leu, Pro, Thr, and Gly.

  12. Functionality and Usability Assessment of the Complement Generation Tool (CGT): A Preliminary Review (Evaluation de la Fonctionnalite et de la Convivialite de Generation de Complements (CGT) - Examen Preliminaire)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Functionality and Usability Assessment of the Complement Generation Tool (CGT) A preliminary review Wenbi Wang...Functionality and Usability Assessment of the Complement Generation Tool (CGT) A preliminary review Wenbi Wang Defence R&D...que représentée par le ministre de la Défense nationale, 2011 DRDC Toronto TM 2011-057 i Abstract …….. The Complement Generation Tool

  13. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  14. Mouse embryos' fusion for the tetraploid complementation assay.

    PubMed

    Gertsenstein, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Production of the germline-competent chimeras using genetically modified ES cell lines is an essential step in the establishment of novel mouse models. In addition chimeras provide a powerful tool to study the cell lineage and to analyze complex phenotypes of mutant mice. Mouse chimeras with tetraploid embryos are used to rescue extraembryonic defects, to analyze an impact of gene function on specific lineage, to study the interaction between embryonic and extraembryonic tissues, and to produce mutant embryos and mice for the phenotype analysis. Tetraploid embryos are generated by the fusion of two blastomeres of the mouse embryo. The applications of tetraploid complementation assay and the protocol are described below.

  15. Approximate Schur complement preconditioning of the lowest order nodal discretizations

    SciTech Connect

    Moulton, J.D.; Ascher, U.M.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Particular classes of nodal methods and mixed hybrid finite element methods lead to equivalent, robust and accurate discretizations of 2nd order elliptic PDEs. However, widespread popularity of these discretizations has been hindered by the awkward linear systems which result. The present work exploits this awkwardness, which provides a natural partitioning of the linear system, by defining two optimal preconditioners based on approximate Schur complements. Central to the optimal performance of these preconditioners is their sparsity structure which is compatible with Dendy`s black box multigrid code.

  16. [Role of complement system in the pathogenesis of AMD].

    PubMed

    Machalińska, Anna; Karczewicz, Danuta

    2009-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD), is the leading cause of blindness in individuals over age 50 years old. The pathogenesis of AMD is still not well understood with both genetic and environmental factors known to influence susceptibility to this condition. Data accumulated in the last decade implicate the chronic inflammatory processes as playing an important role in the progression of AMD. According to the recent findings, complement system is suggested to be a triggering point of the initiation of pathologic inflammatory response in the development and clinical course of AMD.

  17. Quaternions, hexadecanions and the Schur complement in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Salomon S.; de Oliveira, Marcos C.

    2013-03-01

    We review the mathematical object invented by Sir William Rowan Hamilton, which he called quaternion, and we study its association with the matrix structure known as complement of Schur. We analyze the positivity of quaternions when represented by 2 × 2 matrices. We extend this very concept to the larger mathematical object, which generalizes the quaternion, the hexadecanion, which we shall define and use. We apply Schur's method to a quantum state that describes a beam of particles characterized by discrete degrees of freedom, the internal parity and the spin, as proposed by Lee and Yang (1956 Phys. Rev. 104 822).

  18. A Gammaherpesvirus Complement Regulatory Protein Promotes Initiation of Infection by Activation of Protein Kinase Akt/PKB

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Beatrix; Adler, Barbara; Jonjic, Stipan; Stewart, James P.; Adler, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Background Viruses have evolved to evade the host's complement system. The open reading frames 4 (ORF4) of gammaherpesviruses encode homologs of regulators of complement activation (RCA) proteins, which inhibit complement activation at the level of C3 and C4 deposition. Besides complement regulation, these proteins are involved in heparan sulfate and glycosaminoglycan binding, and in case of MHV-68, also in viral DNA synthesis in macrophages. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we made use of MHV-68 to study the role of ORF4 during infection of fibroblasts. While attachment and penetration of virions lacking the RCA protein were not affected, we observed a delayed delivery of the viral genome to the nucleus of infected cells. Analysis of the phosphorylation status of a variety of kinases revealed a significant reduction in phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt in cells infected with ORF4 mutant virus, when compared to cells infected with wt virus. Consistent with a role of Akt activation in initial stages of infection, inhibition of Akt signaling in wt virus infected cells resulted in a phenotype resembling the phenotype of the ORF4 mutant virus, and activation of Akt by addition of insulin partially reversed the phenotype of the ORF4 mutant virus. Importantly, the homologous ORF4 of KSHV was able to rescue the phenotype of the MHV-68 ORF4 mutant, indicating that ORF4 is functionally conserved and that ORF4 of KSHV might have a similar function in infection initiation. Conclusions/Significance In summary, our studies demonstrate that ORF4 contributes to efficient infection by activation of the protein kinase Akt and thus reveal a novel function of a gammaherpesvirus RCA protein. PMID:20657771

  19. Molecular heterogeneity in deficiency of complement protein C2 type I.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Circolo, A; Lokki, M L; Shackelford, P G; Wetsel, R A; Colten, H R

    1998-01-01

    Deficiency of the complement protein C2 (C2D), one of the most common genetic deficiencies of the complement system, is associated with rheumatological disorders and increased susceptibility to infection. Two types of C2D have been recognized, each in the context of specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes; type I, a deletion, frameshift and premature stop codon resulting in absence of detectable C2 protein synthesis, and type II, missense mutations resulting in a block in secretion of C2 proteins. Analysis of C2 expression in a child with C2 deficiency, a MHC haplotype different from those associated with type I or II C2D, and recurrent infections revealed additional molecular heterogeneity among C2 deficient patients. No detectable C2 protein was synthesized in the child's fibroblasts under conditions supporting C2 synthesis and secretion in normals and the child's C2 mRNA was reduced to 42% of normal. Nucleotide sequencing of RT-PCR fibroblast mRNA and genomic DNA revealed a type I C2 deficiency (28 base-pair deletion) on one allele and a previously unrecognized two base-pair deletion in exon 2 on the other. Expression of the closely linked factor B gene was markedly decreased (Bf mRNA 25% of normal), though Bf was up-regulated appropriately by interferon-gamma and the flanking sequence containing the Bf promoter was normal in this C2-deficient patient. Moreover, the concentration of Bf protein was normal in the patient's plasma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9616367

  20. Diagnosis of eight groups of xeroderma pigmentosum by genetic complementation using recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshiharu; Okura, Masae; Ishii-Osai, Yasue; Hida, Tokimasa

    2016-10-01

    Because patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) must avoid ultraviolet (UV) light from an early age, an early diagnosis of this disorder is essential. XP is composed of seven genetic complementation groups, XP-A to -G, and a variant type (XP-V). To establish an easy and accurate diagnosis of the eight disease groups, we constructed recombinant adenoviruses that expressed one of the XP cDNA. When fibroblasts derived from patients with XP-A, -B, -C, -D, -F or -G were infected with the adenovirus expressing XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, XPF or XPG, respectively, and UV-C at 5-20 J/m(2) was irradiated, cell viability was clearly recovered by the corresponding recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, XP-E and XP-V cells were not significantly sensitive to UV irradiation and were barely complemented by the matched recombinant adenoviruses. However, co-infection of Ad-XPA with Ad-XPE increased survival rate of XP-E cells after UV-C exposure. When XP-V cell strains, including one derived from a Japanese patient, were infected with Ad-XPV, exposed to UV-B and cultured with 1 mmol/L of caffeine, flow cytometry detected a characteristic decrease in the S phase in all the XP-V cell strains. From these results, the eight groups of XP could be differentiated by utilizing a set of recombinant adenoviruses, indicating that our procedure provides a convenient and correct diagnostic method for all the XP groups including XP-E and XP-V.

  1. Phenotypic characterization and complementation analysis of Bacillus subtilis 6S RNA single and double deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Philipp G; Burenina, Olga Y; Weber, Michael H W; Elkina, Daria A; Nesterchuk, Mikhail V; Sergiev, Petr V; Hartmann, Roland K; Kubareva, Elena A

    2015-10-01

    6S RNA, a global regulator of transcription in bacteria, binds to housekeeping RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzymes to competitively inhibit transcription from DNA promoters. Bacillus subtilis encodes two 6S RNA homologs whose differential functions are as yet unclear. We constructed derivative strains of B. subtilis PY79 lacking 6S-1 RNA (ΔbsrA), 6S-2 RNA (ΔbsrB) or both (ΔbsrAB) to study the physiological role of the two 6S RNAs. We observed two growth phenotypes of mutant strains: (i) accelerated decrease of optical density toward extended stationary phase and (ii) faster outgrowth from stationary phase under alkaline stress conditions (pH 9.8). The first phenotype was observed for bacteria lacking bsrA, and even more pronounced for ΔbsrAB bacteria, but not for those lacking bsrB. The magnitude of the second phenotype was relatively weak for ΔbsrB, moderate for ΔbsrA and again strongest for ΔbsrAB bacteria. Whereas ΔbsrAB bacteria complemented with bsrB or bsrA (strains ΔbsrAB + B and ΔbsrAB + A) mimicked the phenotypes of the ΔbsrA and ΔbsrB strains, respectively, complementation with the gene ssrS encoding Escherichia coli 6S RNA failed to cure the "low stationary optical density" phenotype of the double mutant, despite ssrS expression, in line with previous findings. Finally, proteomics (two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, 2D-DIGE) of B. subtilis 6S RNA deletion strains unveiled a set of proteins that were expressed at higher levels particularly during exponential growth and preferentially in mutant strains lacking 6S-2 RNA. Several of these proteins are involved in metabolism and stress responses.

  2. Mutants deleted in the agnogene of simian virus 40 define a new complementation group.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, J E; Murphy, A; Barkan, A

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of the DNA sequence of the late leader region of simian virus 40 indicates that it might encode a 61-amino acid, highly basic protein, LP-1. Mutants deleted in this region are viable, but they produce infectious progeny more slowly than wild-type virus in established monkey cells. On the basis of the rates of appearance and the sizes of mixed plaques formed after cotransfections with pairs of mutants, we found that mutants defective in the synthesis of LP-1 complementation was also observed in infections with virions and was bidirectional. Therefore, these mutants define a new complementation group, group G. In addition, a protein of the appropriate molecular weight for LP-1 (approximately 8 X 10(3) ) was synthesized by wild-type virus-infected cells but not by mock-infected or group G gene mutant-infected cells. This protein, whose identity has been established definitively by Jay et al. (Nature (London) 291:346-349, 1981), was synthesized at a high rate at late times after infection, was present predominantly in the cytoplasmic fraction of cells, possessed a fairly short half-life, and was absent from mature virions. Once formed, virions of group G gene mutants behaved biologically and physically like virions of wild-type virus. On the basis of these findings and other known properties of LP-1 and mutants defective in LP-1 synthesis, we hypothesize that LP-1 functions to facilitate virion assembly, possibly by serving as a nonreusable scaffolding protein. Images PMID:6296443

  3. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  5. Non-Finite Complements in Russian, Serbian/Croatian, and Macedonian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bo Ra

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the coherence properties of non-finite complements in Russian, Serbian/Croatian, and Macedonian. I demonstrate that Slavic non-finite complements do not project a uniform syntactic structure. The maximal projection of non-finite complements is not fixed but depends on the selectional properties of the matrix verb. I present…

  6. The Object Complement in "Bahasa Malaysia." Colorado Research in Linguistics, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devillers, Colette

    Together with a study of object complements, a succinct description of the Malay classifier construction is given. Object complementation is studied in a generative-transformational framework. For sentence object complements, four types of surface structure are proposed, but it is claimed that two types of deep structure trees underlie the…

  7. Ultraviolet light-resistant primary transfectants of xeroderma pigmentosum cells are also DNA repair-proficient

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, M.; Naiman, T.; Canaani, D. )

    1989-08-15

    In a previous work, an immortal xeroderma pigmentosum cell line belonging to complementation group C was complemented to a UV-resistant phenotype by transfection with a human cDNA clone library. We now report that the primary transformants selected for UV-resistance also acquired normal levels of DNA repair. This was assessed both by measurement of UV-induced ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation and by equilibrium sedimentation analysis of repair-DNA synthesis. Therefore, the transduced DNA element which confers normal UV-resistance also corrects the excision repair defect of the xeroderma pigmentosum group C cell line.

  8. High prevalence of complement component C6 deficiency among African-Americans in the South-eastern USA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z-B; Atkinson, T P; Hovanky, K T; Boppana, S B; Dai, Y L; Densen, P; Go, R C P; Jablecki, J S; Volanakis, J E

    2000-01-01

    Complement component C6 is a part of the membrane attack complex that forms a pore-like structure in cell membranes following complement activation. Deficiency of terminal complement components including C6 predisposes individuals to infection with Neisseriae. Using polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis followed by DNA sequencing, we screened genomic DNA from 200 randomly chosen blacks and an equal number from whites for three loss-of-function C6 mutations. Ten blacks and two whites were found to be heterozygous for one of the mutations. Two of the mutations, 1195delC and 1936delG, were found exclusively in black individuals. A third previously undescribed mutation, 878delA, was found at equal frequency among the two groups. The difference between the two groups was significant (P = 0.027), indicating that C6 deficiency due to these three mutations is more common among blacks than whites in the local area, principally Jefferson County, Alabama. In addition, three previously undescribed point mutations, two of which result in amino acid substitutions, were identified within exon 6. A review of the county health department records over the past 6 years revealed a higher incidence of meningococcal meningitis in blacks due to serogroups Y and W-135 which paralleled the difference in the estimated prevalence of C6 deficiency. Among black residents of the county (n = 235 598) there were 15 cases of meningitis due to these two serogroups, compared with two cases in the white population (n = 422 604) (P = 0.002). We conclude that C6 deficiency is more common among blacks than whites in the south-eastern United States, with a frequency approaching 1 in 1600 black individuals. PMID:10632667

  9. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-20

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies.

  10. Identification of the Fanconi anemia complementation group I gene, FANCI.

    PubMed

    Dorsman, Josephine C; Levitus, Marieke; Rockx, Davy; Rooimans, Martin A; Oostra, Anneke B; Haitjema, Anneke; Bakker, Sietske T; Steltenpool, Jûrgen; Schuler, Dezsö; Mohan, Sheila; Schindler, Detlev; Arwert, Fré; Pals, Gerard; Mathew, Christopher G; Waisfisz, Quinten; de Winter, Johan P; Joenje, Hans

    2007-01-01

    To identify the gene underlying Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group I we studied informative FA-I families by a genome-wide linkage analysis, which resulted in 4 candidate regions together encompassing 351 genes. Candidates were selected via bioinformatics and data mining on the basis of their resemblance to other FA genes/proteins acting in the FA pathway, such as: degree of evolutionary conservation, presence of nuclear localization signals and pattern of tissue-dependent expression. We found a candidate, KIAA1794 on chromosome 15q25-26, to be mutated in 8 affected individuals previously assigned to complementation group I. Western blots of endogenous FANCI indicated that functionally active KIAA1794 protein is lacking in FA-I individuals. Knock-down of KIAA1794 expression by siRNA in HeLa cells caused excessive chromosomal breakage induced by mitomycin C, a hallmark of FA cells. Furthermore, phenotypic reversion of a patient-derived cell line was associated with a secondary genetic alteration at the KIAA1794 locus. These data add up to two conclusions. First, KIAA1794 is a FA gene. Second, this gene is identical to FANCI, since the patient cell lines found mutated in this study included the reference cell line for group I, EUFA592.

  11. Complement Coercion: Distinguishing Between Type-Shifting and Pragmatic Inferencing

    PubMed Central

    Katsika, Argyro; Braze, David; Deo, Ashwini; Piñango, Maria Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Although Complement Coercion has been systematically associated with computational cost, there remains a serious confound in the experimental evidence built up in previous studies. The confound arises from the fact that lexico-semantic differences within the set of verbs assumed to involve coercion have not been taken into consideration. From among the set of verbs that have been reported to exhibit complement coercion effects we identified two clear semantic classes - aspectual verbs and psychological verbs. We hypothesize that the semantic difference between the two should result in differing processing profiles. Aspectual predicates (begin) trigger coercion and processing cost while psychological predicates (enjoy) do not. Evidence from an eye-tracking experiment supports our hypothesis. Coercion costs are restricted to aspectual predicates while no such effects are found with psychological predicates. These findings have implications for how these two kinds of predicates might be lexically encoded as well as for whether the observed interpolation of eventive meaning can be attributed to type-shifting (e.g. McElree et al., 2001) or to pragmatic-inferential processes (e.g. De Almeida, 2004). PMID:26925175

  12. Complement-Opsonized HIV-1 Overcomes Restriction in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Wilfried; Steger, Marion; Knackmuss, Ulla; Blatzer, Michael; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Doppler, Wolfgang; White, Tommy E.; Hörtnagl, Paul; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Hackl, Hubert; Moris, Arnaud; Keppler, Oliver T.; Wilflingseder, Doris

    2015-01-01

    DCs express intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms to specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Thus, DCs are productively infected only at very low levels with HIV-1, and this non-permissiveness of DCs is suggested to go along with viral evasion. We now illustrate that complement-opsonized HIV-1 (HIV-C) efficiently bypasses SAMHD1 restriction and productively infects DCs including BDCA-1 DCs. Efficient DC infection by HIV-C was also observed using single-cycle HIV-C, and correlated with a remarkable elevated SAMHD1 T592 phosphorylation but not SAMHD1 degradation. If SAMHD1 phosphorylation was blocked using a CDK2-inhibitor HIV-C-induced DC infection was also significantly abrogated. Additionally, we found a higher maturation and co-stimulatory potential, aberrant type I interferon expression and signaling as well as a stronger induction of cellular immune responses in HIV-C-treated DCs. Collectively, our data highlight a novel protective mechanism mediated by complement opsonization of HIV to effectively promote DC immune functions, which might be in the future exploited to tackle HIV infection. PMID:26121641

  13. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  14. SELF-RECOGNITION OF DNA FROM LIFE PROCESSES TO DNA COMPUTATION

    PubMed Central

    NG, WEI DA; WONG, CHEE KEONG BENJAMIN

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the first appearance of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) in 1953, it has fascinated multitudes with its simplicity. With a modest syllabus of four nucleotides (adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine), it codes for the complexity of life around us. In this paper, we investigate how the structure of DNA codes for life processes and how we can take advantage of its minuscule size, mechanism of self-recognition and self-assembly for “bottom-up” nanotechnology. High hopes are also placed on miniaturizing present computing technology using DNA computing based on two fundamental features; massive parallelism of DNA strands and Watson–Crick complementarity. Advances in DNA-based computation and algorithmic assembly are then used to complement researches in DNA nanotechnology. PMID:20640192

  15. The human gene for xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G (XPG) maps to 13q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, S.; Corlet, J.; Scherly, D.; Clarkson, S.G. ); Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D. ); Wood, R.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Recently, a human cDNA was isolated that restores normal levels of UV resistance and DNA repair synthesis when expressed in vivo in a lymphoblastoid cell line representing XP group G. The XP-G complementing gene (XPG) generates an mRNA of [approximately]4 kb and encodes a protein (XPGC) with homology to the RAD2 DNA repair protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One hundred twenty nanograms of labeled probe was mixed with 2 [mu]g of human C[sub 0]t-1 DNA as a competitor for repetitive elements. Denaturation, dehydration, hybridization, and washing were performed as described. Probe detection was achieved by incubating metaphase spreads sequentially with 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red, 5 [mu]g/ml biotinylated goat anti-avidin antibody, and 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red. R-banding was revealed after incubation with fluorescein-labeled anti-BrdU mouse monoclonal antibody. Chromosomes were counter-stained with 0.06 [mu]g/ml DAPI in Citifluor. Analysis of 40 metaphase spreads showed paired signals on both copies of chromosome 13 at band 13q33. No other paired signals were seen consistently on any other chromosome. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Advances in the understanding of Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group D2 Protein (FANCD2) in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yihang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Herbert; Fei, Peiwen

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare human genetic disease, resulting from dysfunction in any of 17 known complementation proteins: FANC-A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M, N, O, P, Q & S, and other unknowns. Besides the severe bone marrow failure, an extremely high incidence of cancer as well as many other clinic symptoms associated with FA patients, FA cells are known of insufficiency in homologous recombination, DNA mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, translesion DNA synthesis, and other molecular defects, leading to genome instability. Those similar molecular and cellular/tissue features show that all FA proteins function in one common signaling pathway, namely, the FA pathway. The monoubiquitination of FANCD2 is the central step of the FA pathway activation upon DNA damage or during DNA replication. The molecular functions of FANCD2 emerge as a very attractive filed of investigation in cancer research. Herein, we review the recent progresses in FANCD2 functions at these rapidly progressed aspects.

  17. Complementation Test of Rpe65 Knockout and Tvrm148

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Charles B.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Foster, Stephanie L.; Duncan, Todd; Redmond, T. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. A mouse mutation, tvrm148, was previously reported as resulting in retinal degeneration. Tvrm148 and Rpe65 map between markers D3Mit147 and D3Mit19 on a genetic map, but the physical map places RPE65 outside the markers. We asked if Rpe65 or perhaps another nearby gene is mutated and if the mutant reduced 11-cis-retinal levels. We studied the impact of the tvrm148 mutation on visual function, morphology, and retinoid levels. Methods. Normal phase HPLC was used to measure retinoid levels. Rpe65+/+, tvrm148/+ (T+/−), tvrm148/tvrm148 (T−/−), RPE65KO/KO (Rpe65−/−), and Rpe65T/− mice visual function was measured by optokinetic tracking (OKT) and electroretinography (ERG). Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). qRT-PCR was used to measure Rpe65 mRNA levels. Immunoblotting measured the size and amount of RPE65 protein. Results. The knockout and tvrm148 alleles did not complement. No 11-cis-retinal was detected in T−/− or Rpe65−/− mice. Visual acuity in Rpe65+/+ and T+/− mouse was ∼0.382 c/d, but 0.037 c/d in T−/− mice at postnatal day 210 (P210). ERG response in T−/− mice was undetectable except at bright flash intensities. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness in T−/− mice was ∼70% of Rpe65+/+ by P210. Rpe65 mRNA levels in T−/− mice were unchanged, yet 14.5% of Rpe65+/+ protein levels was detected. Protein size was unchanged. Conclusions. A complementation test revealed the RPE65 knockout and tvrm148 alleles do not complement, proving that the tvrm148 mutation is in Rpe65. Behavioral, physiological, molecular, biochemical, and histological approaches indicate that tvrm148 is a null allele of Rpe65. PMID:23778877

  18. [Pharmacological modulation of the complement system: an opportunity for successful xenotransplantation].

    PubMed

    Heckl-Ostreicher, B; Kirschfink, M

    1995-04-01

    Hyperacute graft rejection triggered by the activation of the recipient's complement system represents the major obstacle to a successful xenotransplantation. Inhibition of complement activation is, therefore, considered as a prerequisite for xenograft survival. Support of the physiological regulation of the complement system appears to be the most promising strategy as indicated by first results from animal xenograft experiments. The transfer of human membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins offers new chances to protect the xenograft against the cytolytic complement attack. Another approach aims at interfering with receptor/ligand interaction of the adhesion molecules CR3 and CR4 (CD11b,c/CD18). All strategies of complement intervention have to consider the important function of complement within the immunological defense.

  19. Low-dose targeted complement inhibition protects against renal disease and other manifestations of autoimmune disease in MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Carl; Qiao, Fei; Song, Hongbin; Gilkeson, Gary S; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2008-01-15

    Complement appears to play a dual role in the progression of systemic lupus erythematosus, serving a beneficial role in enhancing immune complex clearance, while serving a pathogenic role in inducing local inflammation. To investigate these different roles of complement in a therapeutic setting, MRL/lpr mice were treated with the targeted murine C3 complement inhibitor, CR2-Crry, from 16 to 24 wk of age (after the development of proteinuria). The targeting moiety, CR2, binds to C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation and has the potential to provide complement inhibition locally without causing systemic inhibition. Administration of CR2-Crry i.v., at a dose of 0.25 mg once a week, was associated with a significant survival benefit, improved kidney function, and a significant reduction in glomerulonephritis and renal vasculitis. The presence of skin lesions and lung bronchiolar and vascular inflammation was also dramatically reduced by CR2-Crry treatment. CR2-Crry treatment also resulted in a significant reduction in autoantibody production, as measured by anti-dsDNA Ab levels, and did not cause an increase in circulating immune complex levels. These effects on autoimmunity and circulating immune complexes represent significant potential advantages over the use of Crry-Ig in MRL/lpr mice, a systemic counterpart of CR2-Crry. CR2-Crry localized preferentially to the kidneys in 16-wk MRL/lpr mice with a kidney-localized half-life of approximately 24 h. Thus, targeted complement inhibition at the C3 level is an effective treatment in murine lupus, even beginning after onset of disease.

  20. Complementing ultrafast shape recognition with an optical isomerism descriptor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Lafleur, Karine; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the mixed product of three vectors spanning four molecular locations as a descriptor of optical isomerism. This descriptor is very efficient as it does not require molecular superposition, and is very robust in discriminating between a given isomer and its mirror image. In particular, conformational isomers that are mirror images of each other, as well as optical isomers have opposite sign of the descriptor value. For efficient database searches, the optical isomerism descriptor can be used to complement an available ultrafast shape recognition (USR) method based solely on distances, which is not able to distinguish enantiomers. By an extensive comparison of the USR-based similarity score with an approach based on Gaussian molecular volume overlap, the accuracy and completeness of the former are discussed.

  1. Polymorphism of the complement receptor for C3bi.

    PubMed Central

    Russ, G R; Haddad, A P; Tait, B D; d'Apice, A J

    1985-01-01

    RM2.184, a mouse IgG2a monoclonal antibody, recognizes a polymorphic determinant on the complement receptor for C3bi which is present on granulocytes and monocytes. The RM2.184 epitope is distinct from the monomorphic determinant recognized by the monoclonal antibody OKM1. The RM2.184 epitope is probably on the alpha subunit and dependent on the association of the alpha and beta subunits for its configuration, as it can not be detected after the subunits have been dissociated. The phenotypic frequency of the RM2.184 antigen is approximately 14%, and its segregation in families is independent of HLA and consistent with an autosomal co-dominant mode of inheritance. Images PMID:2414326

  2. AMD and the alternative complement pathway: genetics and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Perciliz L; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-06-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular neurodegenerative disorder and is the leading cause of legal blindness in Western societies, with a prevalence of up to 8 % over the age of 60, which continues to increase with age. AMD is characterized by the progressive breakdown of the macula (the central region of the retina), resulting in the loss of central vision including visual acuity. While its molecular etiology remains unclear, advances in genetics and genomics have illuminated the genetic architecture of the disease and have generated attractive pathomechanistic hypotheses. Here, we review the genetic architecture of AMD, considering the contribution of both common and rare alleles to susceptibility, and we explore the possible mechanistic links between photoreceptor degeneration and the alternative complement pathway, a cascade that has emerged as the most potent genetic driver of this disorder.

  3. Generation of human organs in pigs via interspecies blastocyst complementation.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Platero Luengo, A; Gil, M A; Suzuki, K; Cuello, C; Morales Valencia, M; Parrilla, I; Martinez, C A; Nohalez, A; Roca, J; Martinez, E A; Izpisua Belmonte, J C

    2016-10-01

    More than eighteen years have passed since the first derivation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but their clinical use is still met with several challenges, such as ethical concerns regarding the need of human embryos, tissue rejection after transplantation and tumour formation. The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enables the access to patient-derived pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and opens the door for personalized medicine as tissues/organs can potentially be generated from the same genetic background as the patient recipients, thus avoiding immune rejections or complication of immunosuppression strategies. In this regard, successful replacement, or augmentation, of the function of damaged tissue by patient-derived differentiated stem cells provides a promising cell replacement therapy for many devastating human diseases. Although human iPSCs can proliferate unlimitedly in culture and harbour the potential to generate all cell types in the adult body, currently, the functionality of differentiated cells is limited. An alternative strategy to realize the full potential of human iPSC for regenerative medicine is the in vivo tissue generation in large animal species via interspecies blastocyst complementation. As this technology is still in its infancy and there remains more questions than answers, thus in this review, we mainly focus the discussion on the conceptual framework, the emerging technologies and recent advances involved with interspecies blastocyst complementation, and will refer the readers to other more in-depth reviews on dynamic pluripotent stem cell states, genome editing and interspecies chimeras. Likewise, other emerging alternatives to combat the growing shortage of human organs, such as xenotransplantation or tissue engineering, topics that has been extensively reviewed, will not be covered here.

  4. Complement factor B activation in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Ivan; Dalloul, Mudar; Wong, Karen A; Bakare, Olufunke; Schweis, Franz; Garala, Maya; Alam, Amit; Medranda, Giorgio; Lekovic, Jovana; Shuaib, Waqas; Tedjasukmana, Andreas; Little, Perry; Hanono, Daniel; Wijetilaka, Ruvini; Weedon, Jeremy; Lin, Jun; Toledano, Roulhac d'Arby; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Bb, the active fragment of complement factor B (fB), has been reported to be a predictor of preeclampsia. However, conflicting results have been found by some investigators. We hypothesized that the disagreement in findings may be due to the racial/ethnic differences among various study groups, and that fB activation is significant in women of an ethnic minority with preeclampsia. We investigated the maternal and fetal levels of Bb (the activated fB fragment) in pregnant women of an ethnic minority with or without preeclampsia. We enrolled 291 pregnant women (96% of an ethnic minority, including 78% African-American). Thirteen percent of these were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Maternal venous blood was collected from all participants together with fetal umbilical cord blood samples from 154 deliveries in the 291 women. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate analyses. Maternal Bb levels were significantly higher in the preeclamptic group than in the nonpreeclamptic group. Levels of Bb in fetal cord blood were similar in both groups. Subgroup analyses of African-American patients' results confirmed the study hypothesis that there would be a significant increase in Bb in the maternal blood of the preeclamptic group and no increase in Bb in the fetal cord blood of this group. These results suggest that a maternal immune response through complement fB might play a role in the development of preeclampsia, particularly in African-American patients.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of DNA-quantum dot conjugates for the fluorescence ratiometric detection of unlabelled DNA.

    PubMed

    Page, Leah Elizabeth; Zhang, Xi; Tyrakowski, Christina Marie; Ho, Chiun-Teh; Snee, Preston Todd

    2016-11-21

    A quantum dot-based ratiometrically responsive fluorescent sensor for unlabeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is reported. Several technical issues concerning the development of high yield ssDNA-QD conjugation chemistry were addressed. The DNA sensor was synthesized by conjugating methacrylic phosphoramidite-functional oligonucleotides to water-soluble cadmium zinc sulfide core/zinc sulfide shell quantum dots (CdZnS/ZnS QDs). Duplex DNA was formed when the QD-bound ssDNA was incubated with its complement. Next, titration with PicoGreen resulted in FRET energy transfer from the dot to the dsDNA intercalating dye. The resulting ratio of the dye to QD integrated emissions is a calibratable metric for label-free DNA detection with a LOD of 3.8 nmol.

  6. Recombinant Complement Receptor 2 Radiolabeled with [99mTc(CO)3]+ : A Potential New Radiopharmaceutical for Imaging Activated Complement

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, James M.; Yahya, Norhakim; Thakor, David; Razavi, Reza; Smith, Richard; Sacks, Steven; Mullen, Gregory E. D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and synthesis of a new Tc-99m labeled bioconjugate for imaging activated complement, based on Short Consensus Repeats 1 and 2 of Complement Receptor 2 (CR2), the binding domain for C3d. To avoid non specific modification of CR2 and the potential for modifying lysine residues critical to the CR2/C3d contact surface, we engineered a new protein, recombinant CR2 (rCR2), to include the C-terminal sequence VFPLECHHHHHH, a hexahistidine tag (for site-specific radiolabeling with [99mTc(CO)3(OH2)3]+). The protein was characterized by N-terminal sequencing, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography. To test the function of the recombinant CR2, binding to C3d was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The function was further confirmed by binding of rCR2 to C3d+ red blood cells (RBC) which were generated by deposition of human or rat C3d and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The affinity of rCR2 for C3d+, in presence of 150 mM NaCl, was measured using surface plasma resonance giving rise to a KD≈500 nM. Radiolabeling of rCR2 or an inactive mutant of rCR2 (K41E CR2) or an unrelated protein of a similar size (C2A) with [99mTc(CO)3(OH2)3]+ at gave radiochemical yields >95%. Site-specifically radiolabeled rCR2 bound to C3d to C3d+ RBC. Binding of radiolabeled rCR2 to C3d was inhibited by anti-C3d and the radiolabeled inactive mutant K41E CR2 and C2A did not bind to C3d+ RBCs. We conclude that rCR2-Tc99m has excellent radiolabeling, stability and C3d binding characteristics and warrants in vivo evaluation as an activated complement imaging agent. PMID:21494666

  7. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  8. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F: Report of a case and review of Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Tofuku, Yukari; Nobeyama, Yoshimasa; Kamide, Ryoichi; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2015-09-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by extraordinary sensitivity to sunlight, resulting in cutaneous malignant tumors. Among XP, XP-F presents relatively uniquely in Japanese. To clarify the characteristics of this group, we describe a case of XP-F and review Japanese cases previously reported. A 50-year-old Japanese woman was referred to us with multiple, variously sized, light- or dark-brown macules on the face and sunlight-exposed extremities. She had experienced bulla formation with approximately 10 min of sunlight exposure during her elementary school years. Her parents had been first cousins, and her mother and sister had photosensitivity. She showed no neurological or developmental abnormalities. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation testing revealed normal levels for minimal erythema dose with UV-A and UV-B. Sensitivity to UV-C and DNA repair ability in the patient's fibroblasts were indicated between that in normal individuals and that in an XP-A patient. Complementation assay revealed that transfection of the XPF gene led most efficient DNA repair compared with the other XP genes. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with XP-F. Twenty-three cases of Japanese patients (six males, 17 females) with XP-F have been reported, including the present case. Our review suggested a relatively high prevalence of 50% (11/22) for cutaneous malignant tumors. A significant difference was evident in the mean age at first medical consultation between patients with cutaneous malignant tumors (53.6 years) and patients without such tumors (30.8 years). This suggests that cutaneous malignant tumors could occur in the age range of 30-50 years in XP-F patients.

  9. Functional genetic expression of eukaryotic DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, K; Cameron, J R; Davis, R W

    1976-01-01

    We have isolated a segment of DNA from the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) as a viable molecular hybrid of bacteriophage lambda DNA which, when integrated into the chromosome of an E. coli histidine auxotroph, allows this bacterium to grow in the absence of histidine. The nonrevertable, histidine auxotroph lacks the enzymatic activity of imidazole glycerol phosphate (IGP) dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.19). From genetic experiments, we conclude that expression of the segment of yeast DNA results in the production of a diffusible substance and that transcription necessary for the complementation is most likely initiated from the segment of eukaryotic DNA. Images PMID:775490

  10. Prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Tongshan; Xu, Jun; Chen, WenJiao; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to identify the prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 (XRCC1) in patients with gastric cancer undergoing surgery and platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to evaluate XRCC1 protein expression profiles on surgical specimens of 612 gastric cancer patients. The relationship between XRCC1 expression and existing prognostic factors, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Among 612 patients staged Ⅱ/Ⅲ in our study, 182 (29.74%) were evaluated as XRCC1 IHC positive. XRCC1 expression was not significantly related to OS (P = 0.347) or DFS (P = 0.297). Compared with surgery only, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the OS (P = 0.031). And the patients with negative XRCC1 expression benefited more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.049). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor size, T category, N category, vascular or nerve invasion and platinum-based chemotherapy were good prognostic factors for OS (P < 0.05). Though XRCC1 plays an important role in DNA repair pathways, no significant relationship is found in XRCC1 expression and OS among gastric cancer in our study. Conclusions XRCC1 might be an alternative prognostic marker for the patients of gastric cancer after radical resection. The patients with negative XRCC1 expression can benefit more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27478321

  11. Screening for in planta protein-protein interactions combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation with flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Understanding protein and gene function requires identifying interaction partners using biochemical, molecular or genetic tools. In plants, searching for novel protein-protein interactions is limited to protein purification assays, heterologous in vivo systems such as the yeast-two-hybrid or mutant screens. Ideally one would be able to search for novel protein partners in living plant cells. We demonstrate that it is possible to screen for novel protein-protein interactions from a random library in protoplasted Arabidopsis plant cells and recover some of the interacting partners. Our screen is based on capturing the bi-molecular complementation of mYFP between an YN-bait fusion partner and a completely random prey YC-cDNA library with FACS. The candidate interactions were confirmed using in planta BiFC assays and in planta FRET-FLIM assays. From this work, we show that the well characterized protein Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase 3 (CPK3) interacts with APX3, HMGB5, ORP2A and a ricin B-related lectin domain containing protein At2g39050. This is one of the first randomin planta screens to be successfully employed. PMID:22789293

  12. Localization of the expression of complement component 3 in the human endometrium by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayegh, R.A.; Tao, Xiao Jing; Awwad, J.T.

    1996-04-01

    C3 production by the human endometrium has been previously described. The objective of the current study was to localize the site of expression and regulation of the third component of complement, C3, in the endometrium. Eight secretory and eight proliferative archival endometrial samples from hysterectomy and endometrial biopsy specimens were used for in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis was performed with a radiolabeled riboprobe synthesized from a 736-bp template representing sequence 1944-2680 of the human C3 complementary DNA. Duplicate sections were hybridized with sense and antisense riboprobes. Resultant autoradiograms were analyzed qualitatively by light- and darkfield microscopy. In proliferative endometrium, minimal expression of C3 was observed and was limited to a few stromal patches and glands throughout the section. In the secretory samples, prominent C3 expression was observed in both the glands and stroma of the basalis layer. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3. Endometrial stromal and glandular cells express the C3 gene. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3, but other nondistinct lymphoid elements scattered in the stroma may be expressing C3. There was a visibly more intense expression of C3 in the basalis layer of the secretory endometrium than in proliferative endometrium. The spatial and temporal pattern of C3 expression may have implications in normal menstrual physiology and in the immunological response of the endometrium to the invading trophoblast during placentation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Interspecies Complementation of the LuxR Family Pathway-Specific Regulator Involved in Macrolide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mo, SangJoon; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-01-01

    PikD is a widely known pathway-specific regulator for controlling pikromycin production in Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, which is a representative of the large ATP-binding regulator of the LuxR family (LAL) in Streptomyces sp. RapH and FkbN also belong to the LAL family of transcriptional regulators, which show greatest homology with the ATP-binding motif and helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of PikD. Overexpression of pikD and heterologous expression of rapH and fkbN led to enhanced production of pikromycin by approximately 1.8-, 1.6-, and 1.6-fold in S. venezuelae, respectively. Cross-complementation of rapH and fkbN in the pikD deletion mutant (ΔpikD) restored pikromycin and derived macrolactone production. Overall, these results show that heterologous expression of rapH and fkbN leads to the overproduction of pikromycin and its congeners from the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway in S. venezuelae, and they have the same functionality as the pathwayspecific transcriptional activator for the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway in the ΔpikD strain. These results also show extensive "cross-communication" between pathway-specific regulators of streptomycetes and suggest revision of the current paradigm for pathwayspecific versus global regulation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces species.

  14. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J.; Stover, Cordula M.

    2015-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia). PMID:25646095

  15. Increased sensitivity of early apoptotic cells to complement-mediated lysis.

    PubMed

    Attali, Gitit; Gancz, Dana; Fishelson, Zvi

    2004-11-01

    Opsonization of apoptotic cells with complement proteins contributes to their clearance by phagocytes. Little is known about the lytic effects of complement on apoptotic cells. Sensitivity of cells treated with anti-Fas antibody (Jurkat cells), staurosporine or etoposide (Raji cells) to lysis by complement was examined. As shown here, early apoptotic cells are more sensitive to lysis by antibody and complement than control cells. More complement C3 and C9 bound to apoptotic than to control cells, even though antibody binding was similar. Enhanced killing and C3/C9 deposition were blocked by benzyloxy-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone, a pan-caspase inhibitor. Complement-mediated lysis of early apoptotic cells was also prevented by inhibitors of caspases 6, 8, 9 or 10. In contrast, caspase inhibitors had no effect on the lysis of non-apoptotic Jurkat and Raji cells. Early apoptotic Jurkat cells were also more sensitive to lysis by the pore formers streptolysin O and melittin. Sensitivity of Jurkat Bcl-2 transfectants to lysis by complement was analyzed. Enhanced Bcl-2 expression was associated with reduced C3 deposition and lower sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. These results demonstrate that at an early stage in apoptosis, following caspase activation, cells become sensitive to necrotic-type death by complement and other pore formers. Furthermore, they suggest that Bcl-2 is actively protecting Jurkat cells from complement-mediated lysis.

  16. A pathogenic role of complement in arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Ulrich O; Bode, Marlies; Köhl, Jörg; Ehmke, Heimo

    2017-03-01

    The self-amplifying cascade of messenger and effector molecules of the complement system serves as a powerful danger-sensing system that protects the host from a hostile microbial environment, while maintaining proper tissue and organ function through effective clearance of altered or dying cells. As an important effector arm of innate immunity, it also plays important roles in the regulation of adaptive immunity. Innate and adaptive immune responses have been identified as crucial players in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage. In line with this view, complement activation may drive the pathology of hypertension and hypertensive injury through its impact on innate and adaptive immune responses. It is well known that complement activation can cause tissue inflammation and injury and complement-inhibitory drugs are effective treatments for several inflammatory diseases. In addition to these proinflammatory properties, complement cleavage fragments of C3 and C5 can exert anti-inflammatory effects that dampen the inflammatory response to injury. Recent experimental data strongly support a role for complement in arterial hypertension. The remarkably similar clinical and histopathological features of malignant nephrosclerosis and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is driven by complement activation, suggest a role for complement also in the development of malignant nephrosclerosis. Herein, we will review canonical and noncanonical pathways of complement activation as the framework to understand the multiple roles of complement in arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage.

  17. The role of complement in CD4⁺ T cell homeostasis and effector functions.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaëlle; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-02-01

    The complement system is among the evolutionary oldest 'players' of the immune system. It was discovered in 1896 by Jules Bordet as a heat-labile fraction of the serum responsible for the opsonisation and subsequent killing of bacteria. The decades between the 1920s and 1990s then marked the discovery and biochemical characterization of the proteins comprising the complement system. Today, complement is defined as a complex system consisting of more than 30 membrane-bound and soluble plasma proteins, which are activated in a cascade-like manner, very similarly to the caspase proteases and blood coagulation systems. Complement is engrained in the immunologist's mind as a serum-effective, quintessential part of innate immunity, vitally required for the detection and removal of pathogens or other dangerous entities. Three decades ago, this rather confined definition was challenged and then refined when it was shown that complement participates vitally in the induction and regulation of B cell responses, thus adaptive immunity. Similarly, research work published in more recent years supports an equally important role for the complement system in shaping T cell responses. Today, we are again facing paradigm shifts in the field: complement is actively involved in the negative control of T cell effector immune responses, and thus, by definition in immune homeostasis. Further, while serum complement activity is without doubt fundamental in the defence against invading pathogens, local immune cell-derived production of complement emerges as key mediator of complement's impact on adaptive immune responses. And finally, the impact of complement on metabolic pathways and the crosstalk between complement and other immune effector systems is likely more extensive than previously anticipated and is fertile ground for future discoveries. In this review, we will discuss these emerging new roles of complement, with a focus on Th1 cell biology.

  18. Blood SC5b-9 complement levels increase at parturition during term and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramirez, Javier; Zurita, Luis; Paredes, Yuriria; Arredondo, José Luis; Galindo-Sevilla, Norma

    2015-06-01

    We explored the hypothesis that complement, an innate and adaptive immune effector, is active in the plasma of parturient women and is deposited on fetal membranes collected after delivery. A cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate complement activity at parturition. Pregnant women (n = 97) between 15 and 41 years of age were enrolled in a hospital protocol during the perinatal period to assess both SC5b-9 complement activity in blood and complement deposition on fetal membranes during parturition. Soluble SC5b-9 complement activity in plasma fractions was measured using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that included specific anti-complement antibodies. Complement deposition on membranes was analyzed using immuno-dot blots and immunohistochemistry. Soluble SC5b-9 complement complex levels were increased in the plasma of women during term labor (TL; median 3361; range 1726-5670 ng/mL), preterm labor (PL; median 2958; range 1552-7092 ng/mL), and preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM; median 2272; range 167-6540 ng/mL) compared with pregnant women who were not in labor (P; median 1384; range 174-4570 ng/mL; P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Active complement, as assessed by the C9 neo-antigen in C5b-9 complexes, was deposited on fetal membranes, with no difference between term and preterm delivery. The deposition of active complement on fetal membranes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Women who underwent non-labor-indicated Cesarean sections did not exhibit complement deposition. Soluble SC5b-9 complement complex levels increased in the plasma of women during parturition, and complement C5b-9 complexes were deposited on fetal membranes.

  19. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-12-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection.

  20. DNA transformation via local heat shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Meadow Anderson, L.; Yang, Jui-Ming; Lin, Liwei; Yang, Haw

    2007-07-01

    This work describes transformation of foreign DNA into bacterial host cells by local heat shock using a microfluidic system with on-chip, built-in platinum heaters. Plasmid DNA encoding ampicillin resistance and a fluorescent protein can be effectively transformed into the DH5α chemically competent E. coli using this device. Results further demonstrate that only one-thousandth of volume is required to obtain transformation efficiencies as good as or better than conventional practices. As such, this work complements other lab-on-a-chip technologies for potential gene cloning/therapy and protein expression applications.

  1. Complement-activated oligodendroglia: a new pathogenic entity identified by immunostaining with antibodies to human complement proteins C3d and C4d.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Akiyama, H; McGeer, P L

    1990-05-04

    Clusters of oligodendroglial fibers were identified immunohistochemically in human brain tissue with antibodies to the complement proteins C3d and C4d in several neurological disorders. These included Pick's, Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive supranuclear palsy and Shy-Drager syndrome. These complement-activated oligodendroglia occurred in selected areas of gray and white matter. They were rarely observed in control tissue. Immunogold electron microscopy established that the C4d antibody was attached to degenerating myelin sheaths. These data indicate attachment of classical complement pathway proteins to selective oligodendroglia in several neurological disorders.

  2. The complement system and its role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, C; Holmstrup, P; Van Dyke, T E; Nielsen, C H

    2015-06-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease in tooth supporting tissues, induced by bacteria growing in a biofilm on tooth surfaces. Components of the complement system are present in the periodontal tissue and the system is activated in periodontitis. Continuous complement activation and modulation by bacteria within the biofilm in periodontal pockets, however, may enhance local tissue destruction, providing the biofilm with both essential nutrients and space to grow. A more profound understanding of the mechanisms involved in complement-derived tissue degradation may facilitate the development of new treatment concepts for periodontitis. Further studies on the role of complement in periodontitis pathogenesis may also contribute to the understanding of why some individuals fail to resolve periodontitis. Here, we review evidence that links complement to the pathogenesis of periodontitis with an emphasis on interaction of complement with bacteria from periodontitis-associated biofilm.

  3. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  4. Comprehensive and comparative transcription analyses of the complement pathway in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Köbis, Judith M; Rebl, Alexander; Kühn, Carsten; Korytář, Tomáš; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is one of the most ancient and most essential innate immune cascades throughout the animal kingdom. Survival of aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout, depends on this early inducible, efficient immune cascade. Despite increasing research on genes coding for complement components in bony fish, some complement-related genes are still unknown in salmonid fish. In the present study, we characterize the genes encoding complement factor D (CFD), CD93 molecule (CD93), and C-type lectin domain family 4, member M (CLEC4M) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Subsequently, we performed comprehensive and comparative expression analyses of 36 complement genes including CFD, CD93, and CLEC4M and further putative complement-associated genes to obtain general information about the functional gene interaction within the complement pathway in fish. These quantification analyses were conducted in liver, spleen and gills of healthy fish of two rainbow trout strains, selected for survival (strain BORN) and growth (Import strain), respectively. The present expression study clearly confirms for rainbow trout that liver represents the primary site of complement expression. Spleen and gills also express most complement genes, although the mean transcript levels were generally lower than in liver. The transcription data suggest a contribution of spleen and gills to complement activity. The comparison of the two rainbow trout strains revealed a generally similar complement gene expression. However, a significantly lower expression of numerous genes especially in spleen seems characteristic for the BORN strain. This suggests a strain-specific complement pathway regulation under the selected rearing conditions.

  5. Complement in lupus nephritis: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The complement system consists of 3 pathways and more than 30 proteins, including those with biological activity that directly or indirectly mediate the effects of this system, plus a set of regulatory proteins necessary to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The role for complement in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is paradoxic. On one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classic pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, immune complex-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathologic features that are logical consequences of complement activation. By using accurate mouse models of SLE, we have gained remarkable insights into pathogenic features likely relevant to the human disease, and the ability to test potential therapies, some of which have made it to standard clinical use. Studies in genetically altered mice and using recombinant protein inhibitors of complement have confirmed what was believed but unproven-early complement proteins C1q and C4 are protective whereas complement activation later in the pathways is proinflammatory and deleterious. Two complement inhibitors, soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10, Avant Immunotherapeutics, Needham, MA) and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (Eculizumab, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cheshire, CT) have been shown to inhibit complement safely and now are being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Although these and others earlier in their clinical development hold promise to be used therapeutically in lupus nephritis, this optimism must be tempered by the fact that the clinical trials to prove this remain fraught with obstacles.

  6. Versatility of the complement system in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and brain homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Franca; De Blasio, Daiana; Zangari, Rosalia; Zanier, Elisa R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier (BBB) damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain) and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury). This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement cascade

  7. Generation of Viable Mice from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) Through Tetraploid Complementation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lan; Gao, Shaorong

    2015-01-01

    Tetraploid complementation assay is the most rigorous criteria for pluripotency characterization of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Pluripotent stem cells could complement the developmental deficiency of tetraploid embryos and thus support the full-term mice development. Here we describe the protocol for tetraploid complementation using iPSCs to produce viable all-iPSC mice.

  8. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  9. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group f polymorphisms influence risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong-Bin; Xie, Chen; Zhang, Ru-You; Hu, Shao-Shan; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2013-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory investigation of whether variation in six common SNPs of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F (XPF) is associated with risk of glioma in a Chinese population. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 207 glioma cases and 236 cancer-free controls by a 384-well plate format on the Sequenom MassARRAY platform (Sequenom, San Diego, USA). The rs1800067 G and rs2276466 G allele frequencies were significantly higher in the glioma group than controls. Individuals with the rs1800067 GG genotype were at greater risk of glioma when compared with the A/A genotype in the codominant model, with an OR (95% CI) of 2.63 (1.04-7.25). The rs2276466 polymorphism was significantly associated with moderate increased risk of glioma in codominant and dominant models, with ORs (95% CI) of 1.90 (1.05-3.44) and 1.55 (1.07-2.47), respectively. The combination genotype of rs1800067 G and rs2276466 G alleles was associated with a reduced risk of glioma (OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.19-0.98). These findings indicate that genetic variants of the XPF gene have critical functions in the development of glioma.

  10. Sex chromosome complement involvement in angiotensin receptor sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Dadam, Florencia M; Cisternas, Carla D; Macchione, Ana F; Godino, Andrea; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Cambiasso, María J; Vivas, Laura M; Caeiro, Ximena E

    2017-02-27

    This study aimed to define whether sex chromosome complement (SCC) may differentially modulate sex differences in relative gene expression of basal Agtr1a, Agtr2, and Mas1 receptors at fore/hindbrain nuclei and at medulla/cortical kidney. Samples were collected from gonadectomized male (XX and XY) and female (XX and XY) mice of the "four core genotypes" model. At brain level, a SCC effect at the area postrema was demonstrated. An increase in mRNA level of Agtr1a and Agtr1a/Agtr2 ratio in XY-SCC mice was associated with a decrease in Mas1 compared to XX-SCC mice. In the renal cortex, a SCC effect for Agtr2 and Mas1 was observed. Regardless of sex (male or female), XX-SCC mice expressed higher levels of mRNA Agtr2 and Mas1 than XY-SCC mice {F(1,12) = 6,126,p < 0.05; F(1,21) = 5,143,p < 0.05}. Furthermore, XX-female mice showed a significant increase in Mas1 expression compared to XY-female mice. These results reveal a SCC modulatory effect at central and kidney level on angiotensin receptor expression, with an enhancement of the vasodilatory arm in XX-mice and an increase in the vasoconstriction arm in XY-mice, which may underlie sex differences in the regulation of arterial pressure.

  11. Versatile microfluidic complement fixation test for disease biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Shi, ZhuanZhuan; Fang, Can; Gao, AnXiu; Li, Chang Ming; Yu, Ling

    2016-04-15

    The complement fixation test (CFT) is a serological test that can be used to detect the presence of specific antibodies or antigens to diagnose infections, particularly diseases caused by microbes that are not easily detected by standard culture methods. We report here, for the first time, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)/glass slide hybrid microfluidic device that was used to manipulate the solution compartment and communication within the microchannel to establish sampler and indicator systems of CFT. Two types of on-chip CFT, solution-based and solid phase agar-based assays, were successfully demonstrated for biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and recombinant avian influenza A (rH7N9) virus protein detection. In addition, the feasibility of the on-chip CFT in assaying real biopsy was successfully demonstrated by specifically detecting rH7N9 and CEA in human serum. The results demonstrated that the miniaturized assay format significantly reduced the assay time and sample consumption. Exemption from protein immobilization, blocking, complicated washing steps and expensive enzyme/fluorescein conjugates highlights the merits of on-chip CFT over ELISA. Most attractively, the on-chip agar-based CFT results can be imaged and analysed by smartphone, strengthening its point-of-care application potential. We anticipate that the on-chip CFT reported herein will be a useful supplemental or back-up tool for on-chip immunoassays such as ELISA for disease diagnosis and food inspection.

  12. Large Covariance Estimation by Thresholding Principal Orthogonal Complements.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of a high-dimensional covariance with a conditional sparsity structure and fast-diverging eigenvalues. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix in an approximate factor model, we allow for the presence of some cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common but unobservable factors. We introduce the Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) method to explore such an approximate factor structure with sparsity. The POET estimator includes the sample covariance matrix, the factor-based covariance matrix (Fan, Fan, and Lv, 2008), the thresholding estimator (Bickel and Levina, 2008) and the adaptive thresholding estimator (Cai and Liu, 2011) as specific examples. We provide mathematical insights when the factor analysis is approximately the same as the principal component analysis for high-dimensional data. The rates of convergence of the sparse residual covariance matrix and the conditional sparse covariance matrix are studied under various norms. It is shown that the impact of estimating the unknown factors vanishes as the dimensionality increases. The uniform rates of convergence for the unobserved factors and their factor loadings are derived. The asymptotic results are also verified by extensive simulation studies. Finally, a real data application on portfolio allocation is presented.

  13. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-01-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a ‘multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a ‘split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration. PMID:26841837

  14. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation.

    PubMed

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L; Morgan, B Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-02-04

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a 'multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a 'split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration.

  15. Molecular genetics of the fourth component of human complement

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.C.

    1987-05-15

    The fourth component of complement in humans is coded for by two closely linked loci, i.e., C4A and C4B, that have been positioned within the class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex along with the genes for C2, Bf, and steroid 21-OH. Both C4 loci are highly polymorphic and certain alleles, particularly the nulls, are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disease. About one-half of the null alleles are due to a large deletion that includes both a C4 and flanking 21-OH gene. Despite the near identity of the products of the two loci, the proteins differ dramatically in their efficiency of covalent binding to antigen. The amino acid substitutions responsible for the functional differences have been identified and they are clustered relatively near the covalent binding site within the C4d region of the ..cap alpha.. chain. These observations support the hypothesis that the susceptibility to autoimmune disease is related to the structural variation of the C4 protein.

  16. Large Covariance Estimation by Thresholding Principal Orthogonal Complements

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of a high-dimensional covariance with a conditional sparsity structure and fast-diverging eigenvalues. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix in an approximate factor model, we allow for the presence of some cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common but unobservable factors. We introduce the Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) method to explore such an approximate factor structure with sparsity. The POET estimator includes the sample covariance matrix, the factor-based covariance matrix (Fan, Fan, and Lv, 2008), the thresholding estimator (Bickel and Levina, 2008) and the adaptive thresholding estimator (Cai and Liu, 2011) as specific examples. We provide mathematical insights when the factor analysis is approximately the same as the principal component analysis for high-dimensional data. The rates of convergence of the sparse residual covariance matrix and the conditional sparse covariance matrix are studied under various norms. It is shown that the impact of estimating the unknown factors vanishes as the dimensionality increases. The uniform rates of convergence for the unobserved factors and their factor loadings are derived. The asymptotic results are also verified by extensive simulation studies. Finally, a real data application on portfolio allocation is presented. PMID:24348088

  17. Complement C5a Generation by Staphylococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Satorius, Ashley E.; Szafranski, Jacob; Pyne, Derek; Ghanesan, Mahesh; Solomon, Michael J.; Newton, Duane W.; Bortz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms production is a central feature of nosocomial infection of catheters and other medical devices used in resuscitation and critical care. However, the very effective biofilm forming pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis often produces a modest host inflammatory response and few of the signs and symptoms associated with more virulent pathogens. To examine the impact of bacterial biofilm formation on provocation of an innate immune response, we studied the elaboration of the major complement anaphylatoxin C5a by human serum upon contact with S. epidermidis biofilms. Wildtype S. epidermidis and mutants of sarA (a regulatory protein that promotes synthesis of the biofilm-forming polysaccharide intercellular adhesin, PIA) and icaB (responsible for post-export processing of PIA) were studied. C5a release, as a function of exposed biofilm surface area, was on the order of 1 fmol cm−2 sec−1 and was dependent on the presence of PIA. Experimental results were used to inform a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of C5a release by an infected central venous catheter, one of S. epidermidis' primary means of causing human disease. These simulations revealed that the magnitude of C5a release on a superior vena cava catheter completely covered with S. epidermidis would be lower than necessary to alert circulating leukocytes. Combined, the experimental and computational results are highly consistent with clinical observations in which the clinical signs of central line associated bloodstream infection are often muted in association with this important pathogen. PMID:23459111

  18. Elastase and metalloproteinase activities regulate soluble complement receptor 1 release.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Hess, C; Miot, S; Spertini, O; Lutz, H; Schifferli, J A

    1999-11-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is cleaved from the surface of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the membrane-proximal region to yield a soluble fragment (sCR1) that contains the functional domains. The enzymes involved in this cleavage are produced by the PMN itself, since in vitro stimulation of purified PMN is followed by sCR1 release. Purified human neutrophil elastase (HNE) cleaved CR1 from erythrocytes and urinary vesicles originating from podocytes and enhanced tenfold the cleavage of CR1 from activated PMN. The largest fragment released from PMN by HNE was identical in size to CR1 shed spontaneously. The CR1 fragments cleaved from erythrocytes were functional. The shedding of sCR1 by activated PMN was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (80 +/- 10%), alpha1-antiprotease (50 +/- 5%) and elafin (60 +/- 5%). Furthermore the cleavage was blocked by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (70 +/- 6 %) as well as by a monoclonal antibody against human neutrophil collagenase MMP8 (40 +/- 10%). Maximal inhibition of sCR1 shedding was obtained by a combination of 1,10-phenanthroline with elafin (86 +/- 6%). These inhibitors had no effect on L-selectin shedding, indicating that the cleavage of CR1 was specific. In conclusion, elastase or elastase-like activity may be responsible for the shedding of functional sCR1 in vivo, and this activity is controlled by the local release of PMN metalloproteases and alpha1antiprotease.

  19. Complement Factor H Inhibits CD47-Mediated Resolution of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Calippe, Bertrand; Augustin, Sebastien; Beguier, Fanny; Charles-Messance, Hugo; Poupel, Lucie; Conart, Jean-Baptiste; Hu, Shulong J; Lavalette, Sophie; Fauvet, Alexandre; Rayes, Julie; Levy, Olivier; Raoul, William; Fitting, Catherine; Denèfle, Thomas; Pickering, Matthew C; Harris, Claire; Jorieux, Sylvie; Sullivan, Patrick M; Sahel, José-Alain; Karoyan, Philippe; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Guillonneau, Xavier; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Sennlaub, Florian

    2017-02-21

    Variants of the CFH gene, encoding complement factor H (CFH), show strong association with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of blindness. Here, we used murine models of AMD to examine the contribution of CFH to disease etiology. Cfh deletion protected the mice from the pathogenic subretinal accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MP) that characterize AMD and showed accelerated resolution of inflammation. MP persistence arose secondary to binding of CFH to CD11b, which obstructed the homeostatic elimination of MPs from the subretinal space mediated by thrombospsondin-1 (TSP-1) activation of CD47. The AMD-associated CFH(H402) variant markedly increased this inhibitory effect on microglial cells, supporting a causal link to disease etiology. This mechanism is not restricted to the eye, as similar results were observed in a model of acute sterile peritonitis. Pharmacological activation of CD47 accelerated resolution of both subretinal and peritoneal inflammation, with implications for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease.

  20. Mapping biochemical networks with protein fragment complementation assays.

    PubMed

    Remy, Ingrid; Michnick, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    Cellular biochemical machineries, what we call pathways, consist of dynamically assembling and disassembling macromolecular complexes. Although our models for the organization of biochemical machines are derived largely from in vitro experiments, do they reflect their organization in intact, living cells? We have developed a general experimental strategy that addresses this question by allowing the quantitative probing of molecular interactions in intact, living cells. The experimental strategy is based on Protein fragment Complementation Assays (PCA), a method whereby protein interactions are coupled to refolding of enzymes from cognate fragments where reconstitution of enzyme activity acts as the detector of a protein interaction. A biochemical machine or pathway is defined by grouping interacting proteins into those that are perturbed in the same way by common factors (hormones, metabolites, enzyme inhibitors, etc.). In this chapter we review some of the essential principles of PCA and provide details and protocols for applications of PCA, particularly in mammalian cells, based on three PCA reporters, dihydrofolate reductase, green fluorescent protein, and β-lactamase.

  1. Fanconi anemia complementation group FANCD2 protein serine 331 phosphorylation is important for fanconi anemia pathway function and BRCA2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Gang; Wilson, James B; Chen, Xiaoyong; Krause, Diane S; Xiao, Yuxuan; Jones, Nigel J; Kupfer, Gary M

    2009-11-15

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility syndrome with at least 13 complementation groups (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCI, FANCJ, FANCL, FANCM, and FANCN). Our laboratory has previously described several regulatory phosphorylation events for core complex member proteins FANCG and FANCA by phosphorylation. In this study, we report a novel phosphorylation site serine 331 (S331) of FANCD2, the pivotal downstream player of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Phosphorylation of S331 is important for its DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitylation, resistance to DNA cross-linkers, and in vivo interaction with FANCD1/BRCA2. A phosphomimetic mutation at S331 restores all of these phenotypes to wild-type. In vitro and in vivo experiments show that phosphorylation of S331 is mediated by CHK1, the S-phase checkpoint kinase implicated in the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

  2. Anti-Complement Treatment in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria: Where we Stand and Where we are Going

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a clonal, non-malignant, hematological disorder characterized by the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells and progeny mature blood cells which are deficient in some surface proteins, including the two complement regulators CD55 and CD59. PNH is the paradigm of diseases implying complement dysregulation as main pathogenic mechanism; in fact, PNH erythrocytes are uncapable to modulate on their surface physiologic complement activation, which eventually leads to the typical clinical hallmark of PNH – the chronic complement-mediated intravascular anemia. Indeed, due to the lack of CD55 complement is continuously activated on erythrocyte surface, which subsequently enables the terminal lytic complement because of the lack of CD59, finally resulting in erythrocyte lysis. The availability of eculizumab as the first complement inhibitor for clinical use renewed the interest for this rare hematological disease. Indeed, in the last decad the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody has proven effective for the treatment of PNH, resulting in a sustained control of complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis, with a remarkable clinical benefit. Anti-complement treatment allowed transfusion independence in at least half of PNH patients receiving eculizumab, with adequate control of all hemolysis-associated symptoms even in almost all remaining patients. In addition, the risk of thromboembolic events – an other clinical hallmark of PNH, which significantly affects prognosis and survival – seems substantially reduced on eculizumab treatment, apparently resulting in improved survival. Even with all these remarkable effects, eculizumab treatment does not result in hemoglobin normalization, and most patients remain anemic. It has been demonstrated that this is due to persistent activation of the early phases of complement activation (upstream the C5), leading to complement-mediated extravascular hemolysis. Ongoing researches are focusing on

  3. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  4. Hardware Acceleration Of Multi-Deme Genetic Algorithm for DNA Codeword Searching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    C and G are complementary to each other. A Watson - Crick complement of a DNA sequence is another DNA sequence which replaces all the A with T or vise...versa and replaces all the T with A or vise versa, and also switches the 5’ and 3’ ends. A DNA sequence binds most stably with its Watson - Crick ...complement and the structure they form is called Watson - Crick (WC) duplex. Figure 1 (a) shows an example of a WC duplex. We refer to the non-WC duplex

  5. Characterization of iron superoxide dismutase cDNAs from plants obtained by genetic complementation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Camp, W; Bowler, C; Villarroel, R; Tsang, E W; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1990-01-01

    The inability of superoxide dismutase (SOD; superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1)-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli to grow aerobically on minimal medium can be restored by functional complementation with a heterologous SOD-encoding sequence. Based upon this property, a phenotypic selection system has been developed for the isolation of clones containing eukaryotic SOD cDNAs. cDNA expression libraries from both Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Arabidopsis thaliana were transformed into a SOD-deficient E. coli strain by electroporation, and clones containing functional SODs were selected by growth on minimal medium. Analysis of these clones revealed the identity of cDNAs encoding the iron form of superoxide dismutase (FeSOD)--the first SODs of this type to be cloned from eukaryotes. The presence of this enzyme in these two divergent plant species challenges previous ideas that FeSOD is found in only a few plant families. In addition, these results show the potential for shotgun cloning of eukaryotic genes by complementation of bacterial mutants, particularly when it is combined with a highly efficient transformation method, such as electroporation. Images PMID:2263641

  6. A Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rad52 Allele Expressing a C-Terminal Truncation Protein: Activities and Intragenic Complementation of Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boundy-Mills, K. L.; Livingston, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    A nonsense allele of the yeast RAD52 gene, rad52-327, which expresses the N-terminal 65% of the protein was compared to two missense alleles, rad52-1 and rad52-2, and to a deletion allele. While the rad52-1 and the deletion mutants have severe defects in DNA repair, recombination and sporulation, the rad52-327 and rad52-2 mutants retain either partial or complete capabilities in repair and recombination. These two mutants behave similarly in most tests of repair and recombination during mitotic growth. One difference between these two alleles is that a homozygous rad52-2 diploid fails to sporulate, whereas the homozygous rad52-327 diploid sporulates weakly. The low level of sporulation by the rad52-327 diploid is accompanied by a low percentage of spore viability. Among these viable spores the frequency of crossing over for markers along chromosome VII is the same as that found in wild-type spores. rad52-327 complements rad52-2 for repair and sporulation. Weaker intragenic complementation occurs between rad52-327 and rad52-1. PMID:8417987

  7. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  8. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-22

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and potent complement evasion strategy, which is predicated upon an arsenal of potent inhibitory proteins. One of these, the staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), acts at the level of the C3 convertase (C3bBb) and impairs downstream complement function by trapping the convertase in a stable but inactive state. Previously, we have shown that SCIN binds C3b directly and competitively inhibits binding of human factor H and, to a lesser degree, that of factor B to C3b. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of SCIN bound to C3b and C3c at 7.5 and 3.5 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively, and show that SCIN binds a critical functional area on C3b. Most significantly, the SCIN binding site sterically occludes the binding sites of both factor H and factor B. Our results give insight into SCIN binding to activated derivatives of C3, explain how SCIN can recognize C3b in the absence of other complement components, and provide a structural basis for the competitive C3b-binding properties of SCIN. In the future, this may suggest templates for the design of novel complement inhibitors based upon the SCIN structure.

  9. Mismatch repair genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae: HexA confers a mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli by negative complementation.

    PubMed

    Prudhomme, M; Méjean, V; Martin, B; Claverys, J P

    1991-11-01

    DNA repair systems able to correct base pair mismatches within newly replicated DNA or within heteroduplex molecules produced during recombination are widespread among living organisms. Evidence that such generalized mismatch repair systems evolved from a common ancestor is particularly strong for two of them, the Hex system of the gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae and the Mut system of the gram-negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The homology existing between HexA and MutS and between HexB and MutL prompted us to investigate the effect of expressing hex genes in E. coli. Complementation of mutS or mutL mutations, which confer a mutator phenotype, was assayed by introducing on a multicopy plasmid the hexA and hexB genes, under the control of an inducible promoter, either individually or together in E. coli strains. No decrease in mutation rate was conferred by either hexA or hexB gene expression. However, a negative complementation effect was observed in wild-type E. coli cells: expression of hexA resulted in a typical Mut- mutator phenotype. hexB gene expression did not increase the mutation rate either individually or in conjunction with hexA. Since expression of hexA did not affect the mutation rate in mutS mutant cells and the hexA-induced mutator effect was recA independent, it is concluded that this effect results from inhibition of the Mut system. We suggest that HexA, like its homolog MutS, binds to mismatches resulting from replication errors, but in doing so it protects them from repair by the Mut system. In agreement with this hypothesis, an increase in mutS gene copy number abolished the hexA-induced mutator phenotype. HexA protein could prevent repair either by being unable to interact with Mut proteins or by producing nonfunctional repair complexes.

  10. Collectin liver 1 and collectin kidney 1 and other complement-associated pattern recognition molecules in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Troldborg, A; Thiel, S; Jensen, L; Hansen, S; Laska, M J; Deleuran, B; Jensenius, J C; Stengaard-Pedersen, K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the involvement of collectin liver 1 (CL-L1) and collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) and other pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) of the lectin pathway of the complement system in a cross-sectional cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Concentrations in plasma of CL-L1, CL-K1, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), M-ficolin, H-ficolin and L-ficolin were determined in 58 patients with SLE and 65 healthy controls using time-resolved immunoflourometric assays. The SLE patients' demographic, diagnostic, clinical and biochemical data and collection of plasma samples were performed prospectively during 4 months. CL-L1, CL-K1 and M-ficolin plasma concentrations were lower in SLE patients than healthy controls (P-values < 0·001, 0·033 and < 0·001, respectively). H-ficolin concentration was higher in SLE patients (P < 0·0001). CL-L1 and CL-K1 plasma concentrations in the individuals correlated in both patients and controls. Patients with low complement component 3 (C3) demonstrated a negative correlation between C3 and CL-L1 and CL-K1 (P = 0·022 and 0.031, respectively). Patients positive for anti-dsDNA antibodies had lower levels of MBL in plasma than patients negative for anti-dsDNA antibodies (P = 0·02). In a cross-sectional cohort of SLE patients, we found differences in the plasma concentrations of CL-L1, CL-K1, M-ficolin and H-ficolin compared to a group of healthy controls. Alterations in plasma concentrations of the PRMs of the lectin pathway in SLE patients and associations to key elements of the disease support the hypothesis that the lectin pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26154564

  11. Complement activity is associated with disease severity in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Lotte; Cats, Elisabeth A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Jansen, Marc D.; Piepers, Sanne; Veldink, Jan Herman; Franssen, Hessel; Stork, Abraham C.J.; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; van Strijp, Jos A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high innate activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement is associated with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and whether levels of innate complement activity or the potential of anti-GM1 antibodies to activate the complement system correlate with disease severity. Methods: We performed a case-control study including 79 patients with MMN and 79 matched healthy controls. Muscle weakness was documented with Medical Research Council scale sum score and axonal loss with nerve conduction studies. Activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement was assessed by ELISA. We also determined serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) concentrations and polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) and quantified complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies by ELISA. Results: Activity of the classical and lectin pathways, MBL2 genotypes, and serum MBL concentrations did not differ between patients and controls. Complement activation by anti-GM1 IgM antibodies was exclusively mediated through the classical pathway and correlated with antibody titers (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that both high innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and high complement-activating capacity of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were significantly associated with more severe muscle weakness and axonal loss. Conclusion: High innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and efficient complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies are determinants of disease severity in patients with MMN. These findings underline the importance of anti-GM1 antibody–mediated complement activation in the pathogenesis and clinical course of MMN. PMID:26161430

  12. Complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Johnson, Alex C; Lojovich, Sarah J; Bauer, Ashley J; Marsh, Henry C; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2013-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a major obstetric problem defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria associated with compromised placental perfusion. Although activation of the complement system is increased in preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy, it remains unclear whether excess complement activation is a cause or consequence of placental ischemia. Therefore, we hypothesized that complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension. We employed the reduced utero-placental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia in the rat to induce hypertension in the third trimester and evaluated the effect of inhibiting complement activation with a soluble recombinant form of an endogenous complement regulator, human complement receptor 1 (sCR1; CDX-1135). On day 14 of a 21-day gestation, rats received either RUPP or Sham surgery and 15 mg/kg/day sCR1 or saline intravenously on days 14-18. Circulating complement component 3 decreased and complement activation product C3a increased in RUPP vs. Sham (p<0.05), indicating complement activation had occurred. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) measured on day 19 increased in RUPP vs. Sham rats (109.8±2.8 mmHg vs. 93.6±1.6 mmHg). Treatment with sCR1 significantly reduced elevated MAP in RUPP rats (98.4±3.6 mmHg, p<0.05) and reduced C3a production. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in RUPP compared to Sham rats, and the decrease in VEGF was not affected by sCR1 treatment. Thus, these studies have identified a mechanistic link between complement activation and the pregnancy complication of hypertension apart from free plasma VEGF and have identified complement inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in preeclampsia.

  13. Detection and characterisation of Complement protein activity in bovine milk by bactericidal sequestration assay.

    PubMed

    Maye, Susan; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Kelly, Philip M

    2015-08-01

    While the Complement protein system in human milk is well characterised, there is little information on its presence and activity in bovine milk. Complement forms part of the innate immune system, hence the importance of its contribution during milk ingestion to the overall defences of the neonate. A bactericidal sequestration assay, featuring a Complement sensitive strain, Escherichia coli 0111, originally used to characterise Complement activity in human milk was successfully applied to freshly drawn bovine milk samples, thus, providing an opportunity to compare Complement activities in both human and bovine milks. Although not identical in response, the levels of Complement activity in bovine milk were found to be closely comparable with that of human milk. Differential counts of Esch. coli 0111 after 2 h incubation were 6.20 and 6.06 log CFU/ml, for raw bovine and human milks, respectively - the lower value representing a stronger Complement response. Exposing bovine milk to a range of thermal treatments e.g. 42, 45, 65, 72, 85 or 95 °C for 10 min, progressively inhibited Complement activity by increasing temperature, thus confirming the heat labile nature of this immune protein system. Low level Complement activity was found, however, in 65 and 72 °C heat treated samples and in retailed pasteurised milk which highlights the outer limit to which high temperature, short time (HTST) industrial thermal processes should be applied if retention of activity is a priority. Concentration of Complement in the fat phase was evident following cream separation, and this was also reflected in the further loss of activity recorded in low fat variants of retailed pasteurised milk. Laboratory-based churning of the cream during simulated buttermaking generated an aqueous (buttermilk) phase with higher levels of Complement activity than the fat phase, thus pointing to a likely association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) layer.

  14. Genetic basis of human complement C8[beta] deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, T.; Rittner, C.; Schneider, P.M. ); Haensch, G. ); Spaeth, P. ); Tedesco, F. )

    1993-06-01

    The eighth component of human complement (c8) is a serum protein consisting of three chains ([alpha], [beta], and [gamma]) and encoded by three different genes, C8A, C8B, and C8G. C8A and C8B are closely linked on chromosome 1p, whereas C8G is located on chromosome 9q. In the serum the [beta] subunit is non-covalently bound to the disulfide-linked [alpha]-[gamma] subunit. Patients with C8[beta] deficiency suffer from recurrent neisserial infections such as meningitis. Exon-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with primer pairs from the flanking intron sequences was used to amplify all 12 C8B exons separately. No difference regarding the exon sizes was observed in a C8[beta]-deficient patient compared with a normal person. Therefore, direct sequence analysis of all exon-specific PCR products from normal and C8[beta]-deficient individuals was carried out. As a cause for C8[beta] deficiency, we found a single C-T exchange in exon 9 leading to a stop codon. An allele-specific PCR system was designed to detect the normal and the deficiency allele simultaneously. Using this approach as well as PCR typing of the Taql polymorphism located in intron 11, five families with 7 C8[beta]-deficient members were investigated. The mutation was not found to be restricted to one of the two Taql RFLP alleles. The mutant allele was observed in all families investigated and can therefore be regarded as a major cause of C8[beta] deficiency in the Caucasian population. In addition, two C8[beta]-deficient patients were found to be heterozygous for the C-T exchange. The molecular basis of the alleles without this point mutation also causing deficiency has not yet been defined. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Complement component C7 deficiency in two Spanish families.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Sonia; Sánchez, Berta; Alvarez, Antonia José; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Lanuza, Amparo; Luque, Rafael; Wichmann, Ingeborg; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio

    2004-12-01

    Different genetic mutations have been described in complement component C7 deficiency, a molecular defect clinically associated with an increased susceptibility to neisserial recurrent infections. In this work we report the genetic basis of C7 deficiency in two different Spanish families (family 1 and family 2). In family 1, of Gypsy ethnical background, exon-specific polymerase chain reaction and sequencing revealed a not previously described single base deletion of nucleotide 1309 (exon 10) in the patient, as well as in her father, leading to a stop codon that causes the premature truncation of the C7 protein (K416 X 419). Additionally, the patient and her mother displayed a missense mutation at position 1135 (exon 9) located in the first nucleotide of the codon GGG (CGG), resulting in a change of amino acid (G357R). This mutation was firstly described in individuals of Moroccan Sephardic Jewish ancestry and has been also reported among Spaniards. In family 2, another novel mutation was found in homozygosity in two siblings; a two base-pair deletion of nucleotides 1922 and 1923 in exon 14 leading to the generation of a downstream stop codon causing the truncation of the C7 protein product (S620 X 630). Our results provide more evidence for the heterogeneous molecular basis of C7 deficiency as well as for the subsequent susceptibility to meningococcal disease, since different families carry different molecular defects. On the other hand, certain C7 defects appear to be prevalent in individuals from certain populations or living in defined geographical areas.

  16. The atmospheric escape at Mars: complementing the scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilensten, Jean; Simon, Cyril; Barthélémy, Mathieu; Thissen, Roland; Ehrenreich, David; Gronoff, Guillaume; Witasse, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly ener- getic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. This study assesses the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions.We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a 2 case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering ...), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished but complement the other processes and allow writing the scenario of the Mars escape. We show that the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible.When simulating the hot Jupiter HD209458b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+.

  17. Complement: a unique innate immune sensor for danger signals.

    PubMed

    Gasque, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    The complement (C) inflammatory cascade is part of the phylogenetically ancient innate immune response and is crucial to our natural ability to ward off infection. It has three critical physiologic activities: (i) defending against microbial infections by triggering the generation of a membranolytic complex (C5b9 complex) at the surface of the pathogen and C fragments (named opsonins, i.e., C1q, C3b and iC3b) which interact with C cell surface receptors (CR1, CR3 and CR4) to promote phagocytosis. Soluble C anaphylatoxins (C4a, C3a and C5a) greatly control the local pro-inflammatory response through the chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes; (ii) bridging innate and adaptive immunity (essentially through C receptor type 2, CR2, expressed by B cells) and (iii) disposing of immune complexes and the products of the inflammatory injury (i.e., other danger signals, e.g., toxic cell debris and apoptotic corpses) to ensure the protection and healing of the host. The regulatory mechanisms of C are finely balanced so that, on the one hand, the deposition of C is focused on the surface of invading microorganisms and, on the other hand, the deposition of C on normal cells is limited by several key C inhibitors (e.g., CD46, CD55 and CD59). Knowledge of the unique molecular and cellular innate immunological interactions that occur in the development and resolution of pathology should facilitate the design of effective therapeutic strategies to fight selectively against intruders.

  18. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  19. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  20. [The answer reaction of system complement on correction of hypoxia of hydazepam and succinic acid].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L N

    2011-01-01

    Investigated functionally activation of human complement in vivo an model of high hypoxia (6-7,5 km) as without correction, so at the phone of medicine hydazepam and succinic acid. Discover that by analysis of the sensitive to complement components one can estimate effects of high hypoxia and her pharmacological correction.

  1. Syntactic and Semantic Coordination in Finite Complement-Clause Constructions: A Diary-Based Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köymen, Bahar; Lieven, Elena; Brandt, Silke

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the coordination of matrix and subordinate clauses within finite complement-clause constructions. The data come from diary and audio recordings which include the utterances produced by an American English-speaking child, L, between the ages 1;08 and 3;05. We extracted all the finite complement-clause constructions that L…

  2. Complement Coercion Is Not Modulated by Competition: Evidence from Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisson, Steven; McElree, Brian

    2008-01-01

    An eye-movement study examined the processing of expressions requiring complement coercion (J. Pustejovsky, 1995), in which a noun phrase that does not denote an event (e.g., the book) appears as the complement of an event-selecting verb (e.g., began the book). Previous studies demonstrated that these expressions are more costly to process …

  3. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  4. Studies on the influence of ozone on complement-mediated killing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Doroszkiewicz, W; Sikorska, I; Jankowski, S

    1994-10-01

    The role of ozone in the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter anitratus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to serum was investigated. It was found that ozone-treated cells were more susceptible to complement-mediated killing serum. These results suggest that ozone damage or change of cell membrane leads to a more rapid penetration of the membrane attack complex of complement.

  5. Complement modulation of T cell immune responses during homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2014-11-01

    The complement system is an ancient and critical effector mechanism of the innate immune system as it senses, kills, and clears infectious and/or dangerous particles and alerts the immune system to the presence of the infection and/or danger. Interestingly, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated a clear role for complement in the adaptive immune system as well. Of note, a number of recent studies have identified previously unknown roles for complement proteins, receptors, and regulators in T cell function. Here, we will review recent data demonstrating the influence of complement proteins C1q, C3b/iC3b, C3a (and C3aR), and C5a (and C5aR) and complement regulators DAF (CD55) and CD46 (MCP) on T cell function during homeostasis and disease. Although new concepts are beginning to emerge in the field of complement regulation of T cell function, future experiments should focus on whether complement is interacting directly with the T cell or is having an indirect effect on T cell function via APCs, the cytokine milieu, or downstream complement activation products. Importantly, the identification of the pivotal molecular pathways in the human systems will be beneficial in the translation of concepts derived from model systems to therapeutic targeting for treatment of human disorders.

  6. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia.

  7. Commercially Available Complement Component-Depleted Sera Are Unexpectedly Codepleted of Ficolin-2

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Allison M.; Geno, K. Aaron; Dalecki, Alex G.; Cheng, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    The ficolins are a family of innate pattern recognition molecules that are known to bind acetylated compounds and activate complement through the association of mannose binding lectin (MBL)/ficolin-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Their importance has more recently become appreciated, as they have been shown to play a role in a variety of disease processes from infection to autoimmunity. While studying ficolin-2-mediated complement deposition on Streptococcus pneumoniae, we found that sera depleted of C1q or other complement components were also codepleted of ficolin-2 but not ficolin-1, ficolin-3, or MBL. MBL present in C1q-depleted sera was able to mediate complement deposition on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting the presence of MASPs. We found that complement was activated on pneumococci in C1q-depleted serum only after opsonization with exogenous recombinant ficolin-2 (rFicolin-2). Also, no complement deposition was observed in C1q-depleted serum when pneumococci were opsonized with rFicolin-2 mutated at its lysine-57 residue, where MASPs are known to associate. Thus, these depleted sera are a unique tool to study ficolin-2-mediated complement pathways; however, one should be aware that ficolin-2 is absent from complement component-depleted sera. PMID:25030054

  8. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Viviana P; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K; Abdeladhim, Maha; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-01-13

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases.

  9. Methods for Quantitative Detection of Antibody-induced Complement Activation on Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal1. Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis1-4. However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  10. Exploring the Innate Immune System: Using Complement-Medicated Cell Lysis in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kevin G.

    2008-01-01

    The protein complement pathway comprises an important part of the innate immunity. The use of serum to demonstrate complement-mediated destruction across a series of bacterial dilutions allows an instructor to introduce a number of important biological concepts such as bacterial growth, activation cascades, and adaptive versus innate immunity.

  11. The Indicative and Subjunctive "da"-complements in Serbian A Syntactic-Semantic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorovic, Natasa

    2012-01-01

    A syntactic-semantic investigation of subjunctive and indicative "da"-complements in Serbian is conducted in this project. After a careful comparison of Serbian sentence constructions with "da"-complements to the equivalent sentence structures in languages of the Balkans as well as other Slavic languages, it is clearly…

  12. The Manuscript That We Finished: Structural Separation Reduces the Cost of Complement Coercion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowder, Matthew W.; Gordon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments examined the effects of sentence structure on the processing of complement coercion, in which an event-selecting verb combines with a complement that represents an entity (e.g., "began the memo"). Previous work has demonstrated that these expressions impose a processing cost, which has been attributed to the…

  13. Decay-accelerating factor protects human tumor cells from complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, N K; Walter, E I; Smith-Mensah, W H; Ratnoff, W D; Tykocinski, M L; Medof, M E

    1988-01-01

    The disialoganglioside GD2 is expressed on a wide spectrum of human tumor types, including neuroblastomas and melanomas. Upon binding of 3F8, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for GD2, neuroblastomas and some melanomas are sensitive to killing by human complement, whereas some melanomas are not. To investigate the mechanism underlying these differences in complement mediated cytotoxicity, complement-insensitive melanoma cell lines were compared with respect to expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein that protects blood cells from autologous complement attack. While DAF was undetectable among neuroblastomas, it was present in complement-insensitive melanomas. When the function of DAF was blocked by anti-DAF MAb, C3 uptake and complement-mediated lysis of the insensitive melanoma lines were markedly enhanced. F(ab')2 fragments were as effective in enhancing lysis as intact anti-DAF MAb. The DAF-negative and DAF-positive melanoma cell lines were comparably resistant to passive lysis by cobra venom factor-treated serum. The data suggest that in some tumors, DAF activity accounts for their resistance to complement-mediated killing. The ability to render these cells complement-sensitive by blocking DAF function may have implications for immunotherapy. PMID:2450893

  14. Interactions of the complement system with molecules of extracellular matrix: relevance for joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Heinegård, Dick; Saxne, Tore; Blom, Anna M

    2012-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease affecting all structures of the joint. Understanding the pathology behind the development of RA is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies as well as for developing novel markers to predict disease onset. Several molecules normally hidden within the cartilage tissue are exposed to complement components in the synovial fluid upon cartilage breakdown. Some of these have been shown to activate complement and toll-like receptors, which may enhance an already existing inflammatory response, thereby worsening the course of disease. Other cartilage-resident molecules have in contrast shown to possess complement-inhibitory properties. Knowledge about mechanisms behind pathological complement activation in the joints will hopefully lead to methods which allow us to distinguish patients with pathological complement activation from those where other inflammatory pathways are predominant. This will help to elucidate which patients will benefit from complement inhibitory therapies, which are thought to aid a specific subset of patients or patients at a certain stage of disease. Future challenges are to target the complement inhibition specifically to the joints to minimize systemic complement blockade.

  15. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  16. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Viviana P.; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K.; Abdeladhim, Maha; Ferreira Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A.; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Horácio Pereira, Marcos; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Gontijo, Nelder F.; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host’s skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases. PMID:26758086

  17. Probable systemic lupus erythematosus with cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPS).

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, D; Weinstein, A

    2016-08-01

    Complement activation is a key feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Detection of cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPS) occurs more frequently than serum hypocomplementemia in definite lupus. We describe a patient with normocomplementemic probable SLE who did not fulfill ACR classification criteria for lupus, but the diagnosis was supported by the presence of CB-CAPS.

  18. VEGF regulates local inhibitory complement proteins in the eye and kidney

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Lindsay S.; Firth, Rachel; Aponik, Lyndsey; Sakimoto, Susumu; Aguilar, Edith; Welsh, Gavin I.; Richards, Anna; Usui, Yoshihiko; Satchell, Simon C.; Kuzmuk, Valeryia; Coward, Richard J.; Goult, Jonathan; Bull, Katherine R.; Bharti, Kapil; Westenskow, Peter D.; Michael, Iacovos P.; Saleem, Moin A.

    2016-01-01

    Outer retinal and renal glomerular functions rely on specialized vasculature maintained by VEGF that is produced by neighboring epithelial cells, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and podocytes, respectively. Dysregulation of RPE- and podocyte-derived VEGF is associated with neovascularization in wet age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), choriocapillaris degeneration, and glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Since complement activation and genetic variants in inhibitory complement factor H (CFH) are also features of both ARMD and TMA, we hypothesized that VEGF and CFH interact. Here, we demonstrated that VEGF inhibition decreases local CFH and other complement regulators in the eye and kidney through reduced VEGFR2/PKC-α/CREB signaling. Patient podocytes and RPE cells carrying disease-associated CFH genetic variants had more alternative complement pathway deposits than controls. These deposits were increased by VEGF antagonism, a common wet ARMD treatment, suggesting that VEGF inhibition could reduce cellular complement regulatory capacity. VEGF antagonism also increased markers of endothelial cell activation, which was partially reduced by genetic complement inhibition. Together, these results suggest that VEGF protects the retinal and glomerular microvasculature, not only through VEGFR2-mediated vasculotrophism, but also through modulation of local complement proteins that could protect against complement-mediated damage. Though further study is warranted, these findings could be relevant for patients receiving VEGF antagonists. PMID:27918307

  19. Activation of complement pathways after contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Robert, Stephanie; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Cotman, Carl W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cellular inflammatory response is initiated, and inflammatory cytokines are synthesized, following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the complement cascade, a major component of both the innate and adaptive immune response, is also activated following experimental SCI. We investigated the pathways, cellular localization, timecourse, and degree of complement activation in rat spinal cord following acute contusion-induced SCI using the New York University (NYU) weight drop impactor. Mild and severe injuries (12.5 and 50 mm drop heights) at 1, 7, and 42 days post injury time points were evaluated. Classical (C1q and C4), alternative (Factor B) and terminal (C5b-9) complement pathways were strongly activated within 1 day of SCI. Complement protein immunoreactivity was predominantly found in cell types vulnerable to degeneration, neurons and oligodendrocytes, and was not generally observed in inflammatory or astroglial cells. Surprisingly, immunoreactivity for complement proteins was also evident 6 weeks after injury, and complement activation was observed as far as 20 mm rostral to the site of injury. Axonal staining by C1q and Factor B was also observed, suggesting a potential role for the complement cascade in demyelination or axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that complement activation plays a role in SCI.

  20. Patterns of association in the human metaphase complement: ring analysis and estimation of associativity of specific chromosome regions.

    PubMed

    Rodman, T C; Flehinger, B J; Squire, R D

    1978-02-23

    The pattern of metaphase chromosome association in the human complement was studied by two methods of statistical analysis of interchromosomal distances. Those methods included ring analysis in which a characteristic position of the centromere of each chromosome relative to the center of a two dimensional representation of a metaphase complement was defined, and estimation of the capacity for associativity of each of three regions of each chromosome: the centromere (c) and the ends of each arm (p, q). The following information was obtained: 1. In general, the distance from the center is directly related to chromosome size. 2. The most notable deviation from that size-related progression is displayed by the X chromosomes. The markedly peripheral position of the X is characteristic of both X's of the female and the single X of the male. 3. The relative associativity of each chromosome of the complement is, in general, inversely related to size with an additional preferential capacity of associativity displayed by the acrocentric chromosomes. Analyses of the different inter-regional classes established that the supplementary associativity factor of the acrocentric chromosomes was inherent in their pericentromeric and p-arm regions and excluded the ends of the q arms from participation in that factor. 4. Those analyses demonstrated that the specific morphology or 'geometry' of the acrocentric chromosomes contributes little to their high relative associativity. In addition to the tendency for the c/p regions of the acrocentric chromosomes to associate with each other, presumably because of their common function in nucleolar organization, those regions also displayed a propensity to associate with the distal regions of the arms of other chromosomes. A molecular basis for that propensity other than that of ribosomal DNA is postulated to be that of other fractions of highly reiterated DNA sequences. 5. Analysis of the relative associativities of each of the three regions

  1. Complement System Part I – Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Church, Sarah Elizabeth; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here, we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical, and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins, and the membrane-attack-complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure–function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly, we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors. PMID:26082779

  2. Molecular basis of intracistronic complementation in the Passover locus of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, S N; Frei, E; Schalet, A P; Wyman, R J

    1995-03-14

    The only demonstrated mechanism for intracistronic genetic complementation requires physical interaction of protein subunits to create a functional molecule. We demonstrate another and perhaps quite general mechanism utilizing proteins with unique and shared domains. The Drosophila neural mutant Passover (Pas) disrupts specific synaptic connections. Alleles of a lethal complementation group exhibit a complex pattern of complementation with Pas alleles. Whereas all heterozygotes between these lethal alleles and Pas are viable, only some alleles complement the neural defect of Pas. Lethal and neural functions are separately encoded by two proteins that have distinct N-terminal domains and a common C-terminal portion. Neural-specific and lethal-specific mutations map to unique exons, while neural-lethal mutations map to shared exons. Combinations of lethal and neural alleles result in production of both proteins and demonstrate intracistronic complementation.

  3. Molecular basis of intracistronic complementation in the Passover locus of Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, S N; Frei, E; Schalet, A P; Wyman, R J

    1995-01-01

    The only demonstrated mechanism for intracistronic genetic complementation requires physical interaction of protein subunits to create a functional molecule. We demonstrate another and perhaps quite general mechanism utilizing proteins with unique and shared domains. The Drosophila neural mutant Passover (Pas) disrupts specific synaptic connections. Alleles of a lethal complementation group exhibit a complex pattern of complementation with Pas alleles. Whereas all heterozygotes between these lethal alleles and Pas are viable, only some alleles complement the neural defect of Pas. Lethal and neural functions are separately encoded by two proteins that have distinct N-terminal domains and a common C-terminal portion. Neural-specific and lethal-specific mutations map to unique exons, while neural-lethal mutations map to shared exons. Combinations of lethal and neural alleles result in production of both proteins and demonstrate intracistronic complementation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7892218

  4. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second

  5. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  6. The Simple Chordate Ciona intestinalis Has a Reduced Complement of Genes Associated with Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Edward C; Azzinaro, Paul A; Vierra, David A; Howlett, Niall G; Irvine, Steven Q

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer risk. FA is associated with mutation in one of 24 genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA pathway to orchestrate the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Few model organisms exist for the study of FA. Seeking a model organism with a simpler version of the FA pathway, we searched the genome of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis for homologs of the human FA-associated proteins. BLAST searches, sequence alignments, hydropathy comparisons, maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling were used to infer the likelihood of homology between C. intestinalis and human FA proteins. Our analysis indicates that C. intestinalis indeed has a simpler and potentially functional FA pathway. The C. intestinalis genome was searched for candidates for homology to 24 human FA and FA-associated proteins. Support was found for the existence of homologs for 13 of these 24 human genes in C. intestinalis. Members of each of the three commonly recognized FA gene functional groups were found. In group I, we identified homologs of FANCE, FANCL, FANCM, and UBE2T/FANCT. Both members of group II, FANCD2 and FANCI, have homologs in C. intestinalis. In group III, we found evidence for homologs of FANCJ, FANCO, FANCQ/ERCC4, FANCR/RAD51, and FANCS/BRCA1, as well as the FA-associated proteins ERCC1 and FAN1. Evidence was very weak for the existence of homologs in C. intestinalis for any other recognized FA genes. This work supports the notion that C. intestinalis, as a close relative of vertebrates, but having a much reduced complement of FA genes, offers a means of studying the function of certain FA proteins in a simpler pathway than that of vertebrate cells.

  7. Oral Vaccination with Heat Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis Activates the Complement System to Protect against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Moreno-Cid, Juan A.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar. PMID:24842853

  8. The genome sequence and effector complement of the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini

    PubMed Central

    Nemri, Adnane; Saunders, Diane G. O.; Anderson, Claire; Upadhyaya, Narayana M.; Win, Joe; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Jones, David A.; Kamoun, Sophien; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi cause serious yield reductions on crops, including wheat, barley, soybean, coffee, and represent real threats to global food security. Of these fungi, the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini has been developed most extensively over the past 80 years as a model to understand the molecular mechanisms that underpin pathogenesis. During infection, M. lini secretes virulence effectors to promote disease. The number of these effectors, their function and their degree of conservation across rust fungal species is unknown. To assess this, we sequenced and assembled de novo the genome of M. lini isolate CH5 into 21,130 scaffolds spanning 189 Mbp (scaffold N50 of 31 kbp). Global analysis of the DNA sequence revealed that repetitive elements, primarily retrotransposons, make up at least 45% of the genome. Using ab initio predictions, transcriptome data and homology searches, we identified 16,271 putative protein-coding genes. An analysis pipeline was then implemented to predict the effector complement of M. lini and compare it to that of the poplar rust, wheat stem rust and wheat stripe rust pathogens to identify conserved and species-specific effector candidates. Previous knowledge of four cloned M. lini avirulence effector proteins and two basidiomycete effectors was used to optimize parameters of the effector prediction pipeline. Markov clustering based on sequence similarity was performed to group effector candidates from all four rust pathogens. Clusters containing at least one member from M. lini were further analyzed and prioritized based on features including expression in isolated haustoria and infected leaf tissue and conservation across rust species. Herein, we describe 200 of 940 clusters that ranked highest on our priority list, representing 725 flax rust candidate effectors. Our findings on this important model rust species provide insight into how effectors of rust fungi are conserved across species and how they may act to promote infection on their

  9. The Simple Chordate Ciona intestinalis Has a Reduced Complement of Genes Associated with Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Edward C.; Azzinaro, Paul A.; Vierra, David A.; Howlett, Niall G.; Irvine, Steven Q.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer risk. FA is associated with mutation in one of 24 genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA pathway to orchestrate the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Few model organisms exist for the study of FA. Seeking a model organism with a simpler version of the FA pathway, we searched the genome of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis for homologs of the human FA-associated proteins. BLAST searches, sequence alignments, hydropathy comparisons, maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling were used to infer the likelihood of homology between C. intestinalis and human FA proteins. Our analysis indicates that C. intestinalis indeed has a simpler and potentially functional FA pathway. The C. intestinalis genome was searched for candidates for homology to 24 human FA and FA-associated proteins. Support was found for the existence of homologs for 13 of these 24 human genes in C. intestinalis. Members of each of the three commonly recognized FA gene functional groups were found. In group I, we identified homologs of FANCE, FANCL, FANCM, and UBE2T/FANCT. Both members of group II, FANCD2 and FANCI, have homologs in C. intestinalis. In group III, we found evidence for homologs of FANCJ, FANCO, FANCQ/ERCC4, FANCR/RAD51, and FANCS/BRCA1, as well as the FA-associated proteins ERCC1 and FAN1. Evidence was very weak for the existence of homologs in C. intestinalis for any other recognized FA genes. This work supports the notion that C. intestinalis, as a close relative of vertebrates, but having a much reduced complement of FA genes, offers a means of studying the function of certain FA proteins in a simpler pathway than that of vertebrate cells. PMID:27279728

  10. Two iron-regulated cation transporters from tomato complement metal uptake-deficient yeast mutants.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, U; Mas Marques, A; Buckhout, T J

    2001-03-01

    Although iron deficiency poses severe nutritional problems to crop plants, to date iron transporters have only been characterized from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To extend our molecular knowledge of Fe transport in crop plants, we have isolated two cDNAs (LeIRT1 and LeIRT2) from a library constructed from roots of iron-deficient tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants, using the Arabidopsis iron transporter cDNA, IRTI, as a probe. Their deduced polypeptides display 64% and 62% identical amino acid residues to the IRT1 protein, respectively. Transcript level analyses revealed that both genes were predominantly expressed in roots. Transcription of LeIRT2 was unaffected by the iron status of the plant, while expression of LeIRT1 was strongly enhanced by iron limitation. The growth defect of an iron uptake-deficient yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant was complemented by LeIRT1 and LeIRT2 when ligated to a yeast expression plasmid. Transport assays revealed that iron uptake was restored in the transformed yeast cells. This uptake was temperature-dependent and saturable, and Fe2+ rather than Fe3+ was the preferred substrate. A number of divalent metal ions inhibited Fe2+ uptake when supplied at 100-fold or 10-fold excess. Manganese, zinc and copper uptake-deficient yeast mutants were also rescued by the two tomato cDNAs, suggesting that their gene products have a broad substrate range. The gene structure was determined by polymerase chain reaction experiments and, surprisingly, both genes are arranged in tandem with a tail-to-tail orientation.

  11. Interaction of complement and leukocytes in severe acute pancreatitis: potential for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Werner; Klafs, Martina; Kirschfink, Michael; Hackert, Thilo; Schneider, Lutz; Gebhard, Martha-Maria; Büchler, Markus W; Werner, Jens

    2006-11-01

    In acute pancreatitis, local as well as systemic organ complications are mediated by the activation of various inflammatory cascades. The role of complement in this setting is unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the level of complement activation in experimental pancreatitis, to evaluate the interaction of complement and leukocyte-endothelium activation, and to assess the effects of complement inhibition by soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in this setting. Necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in Wistar rats by the combination of intravenous cerulein and retrograde infusion of glycodeoxycholic acid into the biliopancreatic duct; edematous pancreatitis was induced by intravenous cerulein only. In control animals, a sham operation (midline laparotomy) was performed. Complement activation, leukocyte sequestration, and pancreatic as well as pulmonary injury were assessed in the presence/absence of sCR1. Increased levels of C3a were found in necrotizing but not in edematous pancreatitis. When complement activation in necrotizing pancreatitis was blocked by sCR1, levels of C3a and total hemolytic activity (CH50) were decreased. Leukocyte-endothelial interaction, as assessed by intravital microscopy, and pancreatic as well as pulmonary organ injury (wet-to-dry weight ratio, MPO activity, and histology) were ameliorated by sCR1. As a result of the present study, necrotizing but not edematous pancreatitis is characterized by significant and early complement activation. Based on the interaction of complement and leukocytes, complement inhibition by sCR1 may be a valuable option in the treatment of leukocyte-associated organ injury in severe pancreatitis.

  12. Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gaidutšik, Ilja; Sedman, Tiina; Sillamaa, Sirelin; Sedman, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cellular energy metabolism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of nuclear genes influence the stability of mitochondrial genome; however, most corresponding gene products act indirectly and the actual molecular mechanisms of mtDNA inheritance remain poorly characterized. Recently, we found that a Superfamily II helicase Irc3 is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. Here we show that Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme. Irc3 modulates mtDNA metabolic intermediates by preferential binding and unwinding Holliday junctions and replication fork structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the loss of Irc3 can be complemented with mitochondrially targeted RecG of Escherichia coli. We suggest that Irc3 could support the stability of mtDNA by stimulating fork regression and branch migration or by inhibiting the formation of irregular branched molecules. PMID:27194389

  13. DEPPDB - DNA electrostatic potential properties database. Electrostatic properties of genome DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Osypov, Alexander A; Krutinin, Gleb G; Krutinina, Eugenia A; Kamzolova, Svetlana G

    2012-04-01

    Electrostatic properties of genome DNA are important to its interactions with different proteins, in particular, related to transcription. DEPPDB - DNA Electrostatic Potential (and other Physical) Properties Database - provides information on the electrostatic and other physical properties of genome DNA combined with its sequence and annotation of biological and structural properties of genomes and their elements. Genomes are organized on taxonomical basis, supporting comparative and evolutionary studies. Currently, DEPPDB contains all completely sequenced bacterial, viral, mitochondrial, and plastids genomes according to the NCBI RefSeq, and some model eukaryotic genomes. Data for promoters, regulation sites, binding proteins, etc., are incorporated from established DBs and literature. The database is complemented by analytical tools. User sequences calculations are available. Case studies discovered electrostatics complementing DNA bending in E.coli plasmid BNT2 promoter functioning, possibly affecting host-environment metabolic switch. Transcription factors binding sites gravitate to high potential regions, confirming the electrostatics universal importance in protein-DNA interactions beyond the classical promoter-RNA polymerase recognition and regulation. Other genome elements, such as terminators, also show electrostatic peculiarities. Most intriguing are gene starts, exhibiting taxonomic correlations. The necessity of the genome electrostatic properties studies is discussed.

  14. Functional Analysis of Variants of Unknown Significance in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Using Complementation of a Synthetic Lethal Interaction with PARP Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0569 TITLE: Functional Analysis of Variants of Unknown Significance in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Using Complementation of a...synergistic decrease in cell survival in cells with loss of function of either BRCA1 or BRCA2 and loss or inhibition of Parp1 activity15,17. SLI has...Develop a robust assay by which individual VUSs can be tested for their effect on BRCA1 /2 function by expressing a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (cDNA) carrying the

  15. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  16. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  17. Electroluminescent TCC, C3dg and fB/Bb epitope assays for profiling complement cascade activation in vitro using an activated complement serum calibration standard.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, B Jansen; Bergseth, G; Mollnes, T E; Shaw, A M

    2014-01-15

    Electroluminescent assays for epitopes on the complement components C3dg, terminal complement complex (TCC) and factor B/Bb (fB/Bb) have been developed with capture and detection antibodies to produce detection limits C3dg=91±9ng/mL, TCC=3±0.1ng/mL and fB=55.7±0.1ng/mL. The assay performance was assessed against a series of zymosan and heat aggregated IgG (HAIgG) in vitro activations of complement using a calibrated activated complement serum (ACS) as calibration standard. The ACS standard was stable within 20% accuracy over a 6-month period with freeze-thaw cycles as required. Differential activation of the complement cascade was observed for TCC showing a pseudo-first order formation half-life of 3.5h after activation with zymosan. The C3dg activation fragment indicates a 10% total activation for both activation agents. The kinetic-epitope analysis for fB indicates that the capture epitope is on the fB/Bb protein fragment which can then become covered by the formation of C3bBb or C3bBbP complexes during the time course of the cascade.

  18. Analysis of point mutations in an ultraviolet-irradiated shuttle vector plasmid propagated in cells from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum patients in complementation groups A and F

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, T.; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J.; Sato, M.; Kraemer, K.H.; Takebe, H. )

    1991-06-15

    To assess the contribution to mutagenesis by human DNA repair defects, a UV-treated shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was passed through fibroblasts derived from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients in two different DNA repair complementation groups (A and F). Patients with XP have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of skin cancer, and defects in DNA repair. The XP DNA repair defects represented by complementation groups A (XP-A) and F (XP-F) are more common in Japan than in Europe or the United States. In comparison to results with DNA repair-proficient human cells (W138-VA13), UV-treated pZ189 passed through the XP-A (XP2OS(SV)) or XP-F (XP2YO(SV)) cells showed fewer surviving plasmids (XP-A less than XP-F) and a higher frequency of mutated plasmids (XP-A greater than XP-F). Base sequence analysis of more than 200 mutated plasmids showed the major type of base substitution mutation to be the G:C----A:T transition with all three cell lines. The XP-A and XP-F cells revealed a higher frequency of G:C----A:T transitions and a lower frequency of transversions among plasmids with single or tandem mutations and a lower frequency of plasmids with multiple point mutations compared to the normal line. The spectrum of mutations in pZ189 with the XP-A cells was similar to that with the XP-F cells. Seventy-six to 91% of the single base substitution mutations occurred at G:C base pairs in which the 5{prime}-neighboring base of the cytosine was thymine or cytosine. These studies indicate that the DNA repair defects in Japanese XP patients in complementation groups A and F result in different frequencies of plasmid survival and mutagenesis but in similar types of mutagenic abnormalities despite marked differences in clinical features.

  19. Complement Opsonization Promotes Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ellegård, Rada; Nyström, Sofia; Rondahl, Elin; Serrander, Lena; Bergström, Tomas; Sjöwall, Christopher; Eriksson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections globally, with a very high prevalence in many countries. During HSV-2 infection, viral particles become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both present in genital fluids, which could influence the activation of immune responses. In genital mucosa, the primary target cells for HSV-2 infection are epithelial cells, but resident immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), are also infected. DCs are the activators of the ensuing immune responses directed against HSV-2, and the aim of this study was to examine the effects opsonization of HSV-2, either with complement alone or with complement and antibodies, had on the infection of immature DCs and their ability to mount inflammatory and antiviral responses. Complement opsonization of HSV-2 enhanced both the direct infection of immature DCs and their production of new infectious viral particles. The enhanced infection required activation of the complement cascade and functional complement receptor 3. Furthermore, HSV-2 infection of DCs required endocytosis of viral particles and their delivery into an acid endosomal compartment. The presence of complement in combination with HSV-1- or HSV-2-specific antibodies more or less abolished HSV-2 infection of DCs. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of studying HSV-2 infection under conditions that ensue in vivo, i.e., conditions under which the virions are covered in complement fragments and complement fragments and antibodies, as these shape the infection and the subsequent immune response and need to be further elucidated. IMPORTANCE During HSV-2 infection, viral particles should become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both present in genital fluids, which could influence the activation of the immune responses. The dendritic cells are activators of the immune responses directed against HSV-2, and the aim of this study was to examine the

  20. Mutations that decrease DNA binding of the processivity factor of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase reduce viral yield, alter the kinetics of viral DNA replication, and decrease the fidelity of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changying; Hwang, Ying T; Randell, John C W; Coen, Donald M; Hwang, Charles B C

    2007-04-01

    The processivity subunit of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase, UL42, is essential for viral replication and possesses both Pol- and DNA-binding activities. Previous studies demonstrated that the substitution of alanine for each of four arginine residues, which reside on the positively charged surface of UL42, resulted in decreased DNA binding affinity and a decreased ability to synthesize long-chain DNA by the polymerase. In this study, the effects of each substitution on the production of viral progeny, viral DNA replication, and DNA replication fidelity were examined. Each substitution mutant was able to complement the replication of a UL42 null mutant in transient complementation assays and to support the replication of plasmid DNA containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) origin sequences in transient DNA replication assays. Mutant viruses containing each substitution and a lacZ insertion in a nonessential region of the genome were constructed and characterized. In single-cycle growth assays, the mutants produced significantly less progeny virus than the control virus containing wild-type UL42. Real-time PCR assays revealed that these UL42 mutants synthesized less viral DNA during the early phase of infection. Interestingly, during the late phase of infection, the mutant viruses synthesized larger amounts of viral DNA than the control virus. The frequencies of mutations of the virus-borne lacZ gene increased significantly in the substitution mutants compared to those observed for the control virus. These results demonstrate that the reduced DNA binding of UL42 is associated with significant effects on virus yields, viral DNA replication, and replication fidelity. Thus, a processivity factor can influence replication fidelity in mammalian cells.

  1. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: A link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Arthur J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of pre-eclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we used a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to analyze sera of women with classic or atypical HELLP syndrome, pre-eclampsia with severe features, normal pregnancies, and healthy nonpregnant women. Sera were also evaluated using levels of the terminal product of complement activation (C5b-9). We tested the in vitro ability of eculizumab to inhibit complement activation in HELLP serum. Increased complement activation was observed in participants with classic or atypical HELLP compared with those with normal pregnancies and nonpregnant controls. Mixing HELLP serum with eculizumab-containing serum resulted in a significant decrease in cell killing compared with HELLP serum alone. We found that HELLP syndrome is associated with increased complement activation as assessed with the modified Ham test. This assay may aid in the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome and could confirm that its pathophysiology is related to that of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  2. Flavonoids from the leaves of Litsea japonica and their anti-complement activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Joongku; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Chan-Soo; Kim, Young-Ho; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu

    2005-04-01

    Four flavonoids, epicatechin (1), afzelin (2), quercitrin (3), and tiliroside (4), were isolated from the leaves of Litsea japonica (Thunb.) Jussieu (Lauraceae). The structures of compounds were identified by comparing their chemical and spectral data with those previously reported. The flavonoids (1-4) were tested for their anti-complement activity against classical pathway of complement system. Compounds 2-4 showed inhibitory activity against complement system with IC50 values of 258, 440, and 101 microm, respectively, whereas 1 was inactive. For the evaluation of the structure-activity relationship of 5,7-dihydroxyflavones, myricitrin (5) from Juglans mandshurica also tested for it's anti-complement activity and is inactive in this assay system. Furthermore, compounds 2, 3, and 5 were hydrolyzed with naringinase to give kaempferol (2a), quercetin (3a), and myricetin (5a), and these were also tested for their activity. Of the three aglycones, 2a exhibited anti-complement activity with an IC50 value of 730 microM, while 3a and 5a were inactive. The inhibitory potencies of 2, 2a, 3, 3a, 5, and 5a against complement activity increased in inverse proportion to number of free hydroxyls on B-ring of 5,7-dihydroxyflavone. Of the compounds tested, 4 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the complement system.

  3. Complement-dependent control of teratoma formation by embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koch, Cody A; Jordan, Corinne E; Platt, Jeffrey L

    2006-10-01

    The fetus has pluripotent stem cells that when transferred to mature individuals can generate tumors. However, for reasons yet unknown, tumors form rarely in the fetus and/or the mother during normal gestation. We questioned whether the complement system might protect against tumor formation by pluripotent stem cells. Murine embryonic stem cells were notably more susceptible than cardiomyocytes differentiated from those cells to lysis by complement in heterologous and homologous sera. Treatment of embryonic stem cells with heterologous serum averted tumor formation after residual cells were transplanted into mice. Confirming the importance of homologous complement in preventing formation of tumors, untreated embryonic stem cells formed tumors more quickly in C3-deficient than in wild-type mice. Susceptibility of embryonic stem cells to complement required an intact alternative pathway and was owed at least in part to a relative deficiency of sialic acid on cell surfaces compared with differentiated cells. Susceptibility to complement and resistance to tumors was inversely related to the number of cells transferred. These findings show that formation of tumors from embryonic stem cells is controlled in part by the alternative pathway of complement and suggest that susceptibility to complement might represent a general property of pluripotent stem cells that can be exploited to prevent tumor formation.

  4. Factor H in Porcine Seminal Plasma Protects Sperm against Complement Attack in Genital Tracts*

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Tomohisa; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Maeda, Toshinaga; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nishi, Katsuji; Ohkubo, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    We found that factor H (FH) exists in porcine seminal plasma. Purified FH strongly inhibited serum alternative pathway complement activation against lipopolysaccharide. The molecular weight, pI, and heparin-binding activity of the purified protein were different from those of purified FH from porcine serum. The complement regulatory activity of seminal plasma FH was ∼2-fold stronger than that of serum FH. Treatment of purified serum FH with sialidase and N-glycosidase F gave almost the same results as those of seminal plasma FH. The deletion of sialic acid from the carbohydrate chains of both FHs contributed to heparin-binding and complement regulatory activities. Results of reverse transcriptase-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry showed that seminal plasma FH is mainly secreted from epithelial cells of the seminal vesicle in male genital tracts. FH was also detected in the outer acrosomal region of ejaculated sperm by immunofluorescence staining, and found that the purified FH from the sperm membrane has the same complement regulatory activity as that of seminal plasma FH. The ejaculated sperm possessing FH in the outer acrosomal region considerably evaded complement attack. We also found that there is strong complement activity in fluids from female genital tract ducts. These findings indicate that FH bound to the outer acrosomal region and soluble FH play important roles in protecting sperm against complement attack in male and female genital tracts. PMID:19920146

  5. Glial cell responses, complement, and clusterin in the central nervous system following dorsal root transection.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Persson, J K; Svensson, M; Aldskogius, H

    1998-07-01

    We have examined the glial cell response, the possible expression of compounds associated with the complement cascade, including the putative complement inhibitor clusterin, and their cellular association during Wallerian degeneration in the central nervous system. Examination of the proliferation pattern revealed an overall greater mitotic activity after rhizotomy, an exclusive involvement of microglia in this proliferation after peripheral nerve injury, but, in addition, a small fraction of proliferating astrocytes after rhizotomy. Immunostaining with the phagocytic cell marker ED1 gradually became very prominent after rhizotomy, possibly reflecting a response to the extensive nerve fiber disintegration. Lumbar dorsal rhizotomy did not induce endogenous immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition or complement expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn, dorsal funiculus, or gracile nucleus. This is in marked contrast to the situation after peripheral nerve injury, which appears to activate the entire complement cascade in the vicinity of the central sensory processes. Clusterin, a multifunctional protein with complement inhibitory effects, was markedly upregulated in the dorsal funiculus in astrocytes. In addition, there was an intense induction of clusterin expression in the degenerating white matter in oligodendrocytes, possibly reflecting a degeneration process in these cells. The findings suggest that 1) complement expression by microglial cells is intimately associated with IgG deposition; 2) axotomized neuronal perikarya, but not degenerating central fibers, undergo changes which induce such deposition; and 3) clusterin is not related to complement expression following neuronal injury but participates in regulating the state of oligodendrocytes during Wallerian degeneration.

  6. Complement's hidden arsenal: New insights and novel functions inside the cell.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Elvington, Michelle; Kulkarni, Hrishikesh S; Atkinson, John P

    2017-04-01

    A key component of both innate and adaptive immunity, new understandings of the complement system are expanding its roles beyond that traditionally appreciated. Evidence is accumulating that complement has an intracellular arsenal of components that provide not only immune defense, but also assist in key interactions for host cell functions. Although early work has primarily centered on T cells, the intracellular complement system likely functions in many if not most cells of the body. Some of these functions may trace their origins to the primitive complement system that began as a primeval form of C3 likely tasked for protection from intracellular pathogen invasion. This later expanded to include extracellular defense as C3 became a secreted protein to patrol the vasculature. Other components were added to the growing system including regulators to protect host cells from the indiscriminate effects of this potent system. Contemporary cells may retain some of these vestigial remnants. We now know that a) C3 serves as a damage-associated molecular pattern (in particular by coating pathogens that translocate into cells), b) most cells store C3 and recycle C3(H2O) for immediate use, and c) C3 assists in cellular survival and metabolic reprogramming. Other components also are part of this hidden arsenal including C5, properdin, factors H and B, and complement receptors. Importantly, better definition of the intracellular complement system may translate into new target discovery to assist in creating the next generation of complement therapeutics.

  7. Complement therapeutics in inflammatory diseases: promising drug candidates for C3-targeted intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Hajishengallis, George; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an increasing appreciation that complement dysregulation lies at the heart of numerous immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders. Complement inhibitors are therefore being evaluated as new therapeutic options in various clinical translation programs and the first clinically approved complement-targeted drugs have profoundly impacted the management of certain complement-mediated diseases. Among the many members of the intricate protein network of complement, the central component C3 represents a ‘hot-spot’ for complement-targeted therapeutic intervention. C3 modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses and is linked to diverse immunomodulatory systems and biological processes that affect human pathophysiology. Compelling evidence from preclinical disease models has shown that C3 interception may offer multiple benefits over existing therapies or even reveal novel therapeutic avenues in disorders that are not commonly regarded complement-driven, such as periodontal disease. Using the clinically-developed compstatin family of C3 inhibitors and periodontitis as illustrative examples, this review highlights emerging therapeutic concepts and developments in the design of C3-targeted drug candidates as novel immunotherapeutics for oral and systemic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26332138

  8. Development of a large scale human complement source for use in bacterial immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Charlotte; Kuisma, Eeva; Alexander, Frances; Allen, Lauren; Tipton, Thomas; Ram, Sanjay; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-05-31

    The serum bactericidal assay is the correlate of protection for meningococcal disease but the use and comparison of functional immunological assays for the assessment of meningococcal vaccines is complicated by the sourcing of human complement. This is due to high levels of immunity in the population acquired through natural meningococcal carriage and means that many individuals must be screened to find donors with suitably low bactericidal titres against the target strain. The use of different donors for each meningococcal strain means that comparisons of assay responses between strains and between laboratories is difficult. We have developed a method for IgG-depletion of 300 ml batches of pooled human lepirudin-derived plasma using Protein G sepharose affinity chromatography that retains complement activity. However, IgG-depletion also removed C1q. This was also eluted from the affinity matrix, concentrated and added to the complement source. The final complement source retained mean alternative pathway activity of 96.8% and total haemolytic activity of 84.2% in four batches. Complement components C3, C5, properdin and factor H were retained following the process and the IgG-depleted complement was shown to be suitable for use in antibody-mediated complement deposition and serum bactericidal activity assays against serogroup B meningococci. The generation of large IgG-depleted batches of pooled human plasma allows for the comparison of immunological responses to diverse meningococcal strain panels in large clinical trials.

  9. [The role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of Borrelia infection].

    PubMed

    Gęca, Aleksandra; Mazurek, Urszula; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Niedworok, Elżbieta; Ziółko, Ewa; Kokot, Teresa

    2012-07-20

    Complement factor H (CFH) is one of the most important negative regulators of the alternative pathway of the complement system. It is a glycoprotein belonging to the protein H family, which is synthesized mainly in the liver and is composed into a globular protein consisting of 60 amino acid domains in the serum. It shows specificity for C3b molecule of the complement system present in the serum or bound to the cell surface. It inhibits the steady formation of C3 convertase enzymes and the binding of C2 to C4b and factor B to C3b. It accelerates the decomposition of C2a into C4b and the displacement of Bb from C3b. The present paper discusses the composition, properties and functions of the complement factor and the family it belongs to. The paper focuses in particular on its role in the pathogenesis of an infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus. Through binding CFH and other related proteins, bacteria of the Borrelia species inhibit the key effect of the alternative pathway of the complement system - the lysis of spirochete cells dependent on the complement's activation. The mechanism enables pathogens to spread in the host organism and facilitates the evolution of the disease. Discovering the immune mechanisms of the infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus may allow for implementing a therapy blocking the binding of complement factor H early enough, apart from the standard treatment of the disease.

  10. Therapeutic targeting of the complement system in age-related macular degeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Troutbeck, Robyn; Al-Qureshi, Salmaan; Guymer, Robyn H

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has produced pivotal change in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of global blindness. In this time, the complement system has featured as a unifying theme for several elements of new evidence: initially, the discovery of complement proteins within drusen and subsequently, the association between AMD and mutations in various complement pathway genes, most notably complement factor H. Increasingly, a wealth of data are pointing towards a role for chronic local inflammation and complement activation in the patho-aetiology of AMD. These findings have paved the way for the exploration of a new paradigm of therapy in AMD management; targeting of specific molecular constituents in the complement pathway thus producing dampening or inhibition of the inflammatory response. Such an approach has the potential to intervene earlier in the disease process and ideally before vision is compromised. In this review we discuss the role of the complement system in AMD, novel therapies in preclinical evaluation and clinical trial, and whether these have a part to play in reducing the burden of disease.

  11. Evidence for intrathecal synthesis of alternative pathway complement activation proteins in experimental meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, P. F.; Frei, K.; Fontana, A.; Eugster, H. P.; Ault, B. H.; Barnum, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Complement has been shown to contribute to intrathecal inflammation in bacterial meningitis. However, the cellular source of complement in the infected central nervous system has not been determined. In this study, we analyzed protein and mRNA expression of two alternative pathway complement activation proteins, C3 and factor B, in the brains of mice with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis. Complement protein levels were found elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of infected mice, compared with mock-infected animals. In the course of the disease, enhanced C3 and factor B mRNA expression was detected on pyramidal neurons and Purkinje cells within 6 hours, peaking at 12 hours and then gradually decreasing by 72 hours after infection. In addition, leukocytes infiltrating the subarachnoid space, within 12 to 24 hours, expressed mRNA for C3 and factor B. The cellular infiltration increased dramatically up to 72 hours. Intraperitoneal injection of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha up-regulated C3 and factor B mRNA expression on neurons in normal mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha may represent one cytokine regulating complement expression in this model of bacterial meningitis. However, additional mediators may be involved in regulation of intrathecal complement expression, as infected mice deficient of TNF/lymphotoxin-alpha genes did not demonstrate attenuated complement expression in the brain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9327721

  12. The role of complement in antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Chedid, Marcio F; Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have suggested that the complement system has an active role in both acute and chronic allograft rejection. These studies have been facilitated by improved techniques to detect antibody-mediated organ rejection, including immunohistological staining for C4d deposition in the allograft and solid-phase assays that identify donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) in the serum of transplant recipients. Studies with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against complement component C5, have shown that activation of the terminal complement pathway is necessary for the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients of living-donor kidney allografts who have high levels of DSAs. The extent to which complement activation drives chronic antibody-mediated injury leading to organ rejection is less clear. In chronic antibody-mediated injury, early complement activation might facilitate chemotaxis of inflammatory cells into the allograft in a process that later becomes somewhat independent of DSA levels and complement factors. In this Review, we discuss the different roles that the complement system might have in antibody-mediated allograft rejection, with specific emphasis on renal transplantation.

  13. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C cells remove pyrimidine dimers selectively from the transcribed strand of active genes

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, J.; van Hoffen, A.; Karcagi, V.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mullenders, L.H. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA fragments of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes in primary normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells. Using strand-specific probes, we show that in normal cells, preferential repair of the 5{prime} part of the ADA gene is due to the rapid and efficient repair of the transcribed strand. Within 8 h after irradiation with UV at 10 J m-2, 70% of the pyrimidine dimers in this strand are removed. The nontranscribed strand is repaired at a much slower rate, with 30% dimers removed after 8 h. Repair of the transcribed strand in XP-C cells occurs at a rate indistinguishable from that in normal cells, but the nontranscribed strand is not repaired significantly in these cells. Similar results were obtained for the DHFR gene. In the 3{prime} part of the ADA gene, however, both normal and XP-C cells perform fast and efficient repair of either strand, which is likely to be caused by the presence of transcription units on both strands. The factor defective in XP-C cells is apparently involved in the processing of DNA damage in inactive parts of the genome, including nontranscribed strands of active genes. These findings have important implications for the understanding of the mechanism of UV-induced excision repair and mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  14. Polydom: a secreted protein with pentraxin, complement control protein, epidermal growth factor and von Willebrand factor A domains.

    PubMed Central

    Gilgès, D; Vinit, M A; Callebaut, I; Coulombel, L; Cacheux, V; Romeo, P H; Vigon, I

    2000-01-01

    To identify extracellular proteins with epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains that are potentially involved in the control of haemopoiesis, we performed degenerate reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR on the murine bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5 and isolated a new partial cDNA encoding EGF-like domains related to those in the Notch proteins. Cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA showed that it encoded a new extracellular multi-domain protein that we named polydom. This 387 kDa mosaic protein contained a signal peptide followed by a new association of eight different protein domains, including a pentraxin domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain, ten EGF domains, and 34 complement control protein modules. The human polydom mRNA is strongly expressed in placenta, its expression in the other tissues being weak or undetectable. The particular multidomain structure of the encoded protein suggests an important biological role in cellular adhesion and/or in the immune system. PMID:11062057

  15. Selective inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by sCR1[desLHR-A] protects the rabbit isolated heart from human complement-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Gralinski, M R; Wiater, B C; Assenmacher, A N; Lucchesi, B R

    1996-09-01

    Evidence is presented that treatment with a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, sCR1[desLHR-A], protects the ex vivo perfused rabbit heart from human complement-mediated injury. Hearts from male New Zealand white rabbits were perfused in the Langendorff mode. After equilibration, normal human plasma was added to the perfusate as a source of complement. Concomitant with the addition of human plasma, vehicle (n = 13), soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) (n = 10), or sCR1[desLHR-A], a truncated version of sCR1 that lacks the C4b binding region (n = 10) was included in the perfusate. Hemodynamic variables were obtained for all groups before (baseline) and after the addition of human plasma. Compared to vehicle-treated hearts, variables recorded during perfusion with human plasma including coronary perfusion pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, and left ventricular end diastolic pressure, along with a reduction of creatine kinase efflux, were improved in hearts perfused with either complement inhibitor. In addition, in vitro hemolysis assays were utilized to discriminate between the classical and alternative pathways. The addition of sCR1 to human serum prevented both the classical and alternative pathway-mediated hemolysis while sCR1[desLHR-A] prevented only the alternative pathway-mediated lysis. This study indicates that deletion of the C4b-binding site from sCR1 results in a new pharmacological moiety, sCR1[desLHR-A], that primarily inhibits the alternative pathway of human complement.

  16. Identification of C3b-Binding Small-Molecule Complement Inhibitors Using Cheminformatics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Skaff, D Andrew; Chatterjee, Arindam; Hanning, Anders; Walker, John K; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2017-03-15

    The complement system is an elegantly regulated biochemical cascade formed by the collective molecular recognition properties and proteolytic activities of more than two dozen membrane-bound or serum proteins. Complement plays diverse roles in human physiology, such as acting as a sentry against invading microorganisms, priming of the adaptive immune response, and removal of immune complexes. However, dysregulation of complement can serve as a trigger for a wide range of human diseases, which include autoimmune, inflammatory, and degenerative conditions. Despite several potential advantages of modulating complement with small-molecule inhibitors, small-molecule drugs are highly underrepresented in the current complement-directed therapeutics pipeline. In this study, we have employed a cheminformatics drug discovery approach based on the extensive structural and functional knowledge available for the central proteolytic fragment of the cascade, C3b. Using parallel in silico screening methodologies, we identified 45 small molecules that putatively bind C3b near ligand-guided functional hot spots. Surface plasmon resonance experiments resulted in the validation of seven dose-dependent C3b-binding compounds. Competition-based biochemical assays demonstrated the ability of several C3b-binding compounds to interfere with binding of the original C3b ligand that guided their discovery. In vitro assays of complement function identified a single complement inhibitory compound, termed cmp-5, and mechanistic studies of the cmp-5 inhibitory mode revealed it acts at the level of C5 activation. This study has led to the identification of a promising new class of C3b-binding small-molecule complement inhibitors and, to our knowledge, provides the first demonstration of cheminformatics-based, complement-directed drug discovery.

  17. Complement expression in the retina is not influenced by short-term pressure elevation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cecilia Q.; Panagis, Lampros; Kamthan, Gautam; Ren, Lizhen; Rozenboym, Anna; Perera, Tarique D.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Danias, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether short-term pressure elevation affects complement gene expression in the retina in vitro and in vivo. Methods Muller cell (TR-MUL5) cultures and organotypic retinal cultures from adult mice and monkeys were subjected to either 24-h or 72-h of pressure at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg above ambient. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to microbead-induced intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation for 7 days. RNA and protein were extracted and used for analysis of expression levels of complement component genes and complement component 1, q subcomponent (C1q) and complement factor H (CFH) immunoblotting. Results mRNA levels of complement genes and C1q protein levels in Muller cell cultures remained the same for all pressure levels after exposure for either 24 or 72 h. In primate and murine organotypic cultures, pressure elevation did not produce changes in complement gene expression or C1q and CFH protein levels at either the 24-h or 72-h time points. Pressure-related glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA expression changes were detected in primate retinal organotypic cultures (analysis of variance [ANOVA]; p<0.05). mRNA expression of several other genes changed as a result of time in culture. Eyes subjected to microbead-induced IOP elevation had no differences in mRNA expression of complement genes and C1q protein levels (ANOVA; p>0.05 for both) with contralateral control and naïve control eyes. Conclusions Short-term elevation of pressure in vitro as well as short-term (1 week) IOP elevation in vivo does not seem to dramatically alter complement system gene expression in the retina. Prolonged expression to elevated pressure may be necessary to affect the complement system expression. PMID:24505213

  18. Mortalin inhibitors sensitize K562 leukemia cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pilzer, David; Saar, Moran; Koya, Keizo; Fishelson, Zvi

    2010-03-15

    Mortalin, the mitochondrial hsp70, is a vital constitutively expressed heat shock protein. Its elevated expression has been correlated with malignant transformation and poor cancer prognosis. Cancer cells exhibit increased resistance to complement-dependent cytotoxicity, partly due to their capacity to eliminate the complement membrane attack complex (MAC) from their cell surface. As we have previously reported, mortalin and the complement membrane attack complexes are released in membrane vesicles from complement attacked cells. As shown here, knock down of mortalin with specific siRNA reduces MAC elimination and enhances cell sensitivity to MAC-induced cell death. Similar results were obtained with MKT-077, a cationic rhodacyanine dye that inhibits mortalin. Treatment of human erythroleukemia K562 and colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with MKT-077 sensitizes them to cell death mediated by MAC but not by streptolysin O. Pre-treatment of cells with MKT-077 also reduces the extent of MAC-mortalin vesiculation following a sublytic complement attack. In the presence of MKT-077, the direct binding of mortalin to complement C9, the major MAC component, is inhibited. The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a known mortalin client protein. The effect of MKT-077 on complement-mediated lysis of HCT116 p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) cells was found to be independent on the presence of p53. Our results also demonstrate that recombinant human mortain inhibits complement-mediated hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes as well as zinc-induced C9 polymerization. We conclude that mortalin supports cancer cell resistance to complement-dependent cytotoxicity and propose consideration of mortalin as a novel target for cancer adjuvant immunotherapy.

  19. Alternative Complement Pathway Deficiency Ameliorates Chronic Smoke-Induced Functional and Morphological Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Casey, Sarah; Williamson, Tucker; Ferrell, W. Drew; Atkinson, Carl; Jones, Bryan W.; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a complex disease involving genetic variants and environmental insults, is among the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Genetic and histologic evidence implicate the complement system in AMD pathogenesis; and smoking is the major environmental risk factor associated with increased disease risk. Although previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure (CE) causes retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects in mice, and smoking leads to complement activation in patients, it is unknown whether complement activation is causative in the development of CE pathology; and if so, which complement pathway is required. Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or clean, filtered air for 6 months. The effects of CE were analyzed in wildtype (WT) mice or mice without a functional complement alternative pathway (AP; CFB−/−) using molecular, histological, electrophysiological, and behavioral outcomes. Results CE in WT mice exhibited a significant reduction in function of both rods and cones as determined by electroretinography and contrast sensitivity measurements, concomitant with a thinning of the nuclear layers as measured by SD-OCT imaging and histology. Gene expression analyses suggested that alterations in both photoreceptors and RPE/choroid might contribute to the observed loss of function, and visualization of complement C3d deposition implies the RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) complex as the target of AP activity. RPE/BrM alterations include an increase in mitochondrial size concomitant with an apical shift in mitochondrial distribution within the RPE and a thickening of BrM. CFB−/− mice were protected from developing these CE-mediated alterations. Conclusions Taken together, these findings provide clear evidence that ocular pathology generated in CE mice is dependent on complement activation and requires the AP. Identifying animal models with RPE/BrM damage and verifying which

  20. Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D expression in H1299 lung cancer cells following benzo[a]pyrene exposure as well as in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chang-Shen; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Lee, Ka-Wo; Chen, Tzu-Fen; Lin, Yuan-Jen; Huang, Jau-Ling

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair genes play critical roles in response to carcinogen-induced and anticancer therapy-induced DNA damage. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), the most carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is classified as a group 1 carcinogen by International Agency for Research on Cancer. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the effects of BaP on DNA repair activity and expression of DNA repair genes in vitro and (2) examine the role of xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D (XPD) mRNA expression in human head and neck cancers. Host cell reactivation assay showed that BaP inhibited nucleotide excision repair in H1299 lung cancer cells. DNA repair through the non-homologous end-joining pathway was not affected by BaP. Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot demonstrated that XPD was downregulated by BaP treatment. BaP exposure did not apparently affect expression of another 11 DNA repair genes. BaP treatment increased the DNA damage marker γ-H2AX and ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, supporting an impairment of DNA repair in BaP-treated cells. XPD expression was also examined by quantitative RT-PCR in 68 head and neck cancers, and a lower XPD mRNA level was found in smokers' cancer specimens. Importantly, reduced XPD expression was correlated with patient 5-year overall survival rate (35 vs. 56%) and was an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio: 2.27). Data demonstrated that XPD downregulation was correlated with BaP exposure and human head and neck cancer survival.

  1. Optical 1's and 2's complement devices using lithium-niobate-based waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Amrindra; Kumar, Santosh; Sharma, Sandeep

    2016-12-01

    Optical 1's and 2's complement devices are proposed with the help of lithium-niobate-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers. It has a powerful capability of switching an optical signal from one port to the other port with the help of an electrical control signal. The paper includes the optical conversion scheme using sets of optical switches. 2's complement is common in computer systems and is used in binary subtraction and logical manipulation. The operation of the circuits is studied theoretically and analyzed through numerical simulations. The truth table of these complement methods is verified with the beam propagation method and MATLAB® simulation results.

  2. Infections of People with Complement Deficiencies and Patients Who Have Undergone Splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Sanjay; Lewis, Lisa A.; Rice, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The complement system comprises several fluid-phase and membrane-associated proteins. Under physiological conditions, activation of the fluid-phase components of complement is maintained under tight control and complement activation occurs primarily on surfaces recognized as “nonself” in an attempt to minimize damage to bystander host cells. Membrane complement components act to limit complement activation on host cells or to facilitate uptake of antigens or microbes “tagged” with complement fragments. While this review focuses on the role of complement in infectious diseases, work over the past couple of decades has defined several important functions of complement distinct from that of combating infections. Activation of complement in the fluid phase can occur through the classical, lectin, or alternative pathway. Deficiencies of components of the classical pathway lead to the development of autoimmune disorders and predispose individuals to recurrent respiratory infections and infections caused by encapsulated organisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. While no individual with complete mannan-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency has been identified, low MBL levels have been linked to predisposition to, or severity of, several diseases. It appears that MBL may play an important role in children, who have a relatively immature adaptive immune response. C3 is the point at which all complement pathways converge, and complete deficiency of C3 invariably leads to severe infections, including those caused by meningococci and pneumococci. Deficiencies of the alternative and terminal complement pathways result in an almost exclusive predisposition to invasive meningococcal disease. The spleen plays an important role in antigen processing and the production of antibodies. Splenic macrophages are critical in clearing opsonized encapsulated bacteria (such as pneumococci, meningococci, and Escherichia coli

  3. Mutations in complement C3 predispose to development of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth C.; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Strain, Lisa; Blouin, Jacques; Brown, Alison L.; Moghal, Nadeem; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Weiss, Robert A.; Lhotta, Karl; Kapur, Gaurav; Mattoo, Tej; Nivet, Hubert; Wong, William; Gie, Sophie; de Ligny, Bruno Hurault; Fischbach, Michel; Gupta, Ritu; Hauhart, Richard; Meunier, Vincent; Loirat, Chantal; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Fridman, Wolf H.; Janssen, Bert J. C.

    2008-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a disease of complement dysregulation. In approximately 50% of patients, mutations have been described in the genes encoding the complement regulators factor H, MCP, and factor I or the activator factor B. We report here mutations in the central component of the complement cascade, C3, in association with aHUS. We describe 9 novel C3 mutations in 14 aHUS patients with a persistently low serum C3 level. We have demonstrated that 5 of these mutations are gain-of-function and 2 are inactivating. This establishes C3 as a susceptibility factor for aHUS. PMID:18796626

  4. Complement-Mediated Death of Ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis Caused by Human Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Cheremnykh, E G; Brusov, O S

    2016-04-01

    Toxicity of human blood serum for ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis is determined by the complement system. When ciliate are dying after being exposed to blood serum, cell membrane permeability for low-molecular-weight compounds significantly increases, probably due to pore formation. Serine protease inhibitors or exposure to physical factors inducing complement inactivation (e.g., heating up to 56°C) completely prevented ciliate death under the effect of human serum. Activation of serum complement upon interaction with Tetrahymena cells occurred by the classical or lectin pathway, while the contribution of the alternative activation pathway was negligible.

  5. State assignment for asynchronous FSMs with the use of the incompatibility and complement graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulisz, Józef

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an application of a novel concept of graph - the Incompatibility and Complement Graph - to state assignment for asynchronous FSMs. A specific feature of the graph is that it contains two kinds of edges: connecting mutually incompatible nodes, and connecting mutually complementing nodes. The graph can be useful in certain class of optimization problems, in which compatibility of bit patterns both in the true, and in the complemented form has to be analyzed. An example of such a problem is covering analysis in state assignment for asynchronous FSMs. The paper presents a simple example explaining the method. Appropriate algorithms for the graph building and coloring are also presented.

  6. A novel anti-inflammatory activity of lysozyme: modulation of serum complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, M O

    1998-01-01

    Lysozyme is an ubiquitous enzyme found in most biological secretions and leukocytes. This study was aimed at investigating its interaction with other inflammatory mediators on mucosa surfaces, particularly the complement system. Lysozyme has been shown in our present study, to inhibit the haemolytic activity of serum complement in a dose-dependent fashion, when tested within the levels present in normal and inflamed breast-milk samples, and other mucosal secretions. This represents a new anti-inflammatory action of lysozyme in relation to the serum complement, and the exact mode of the interaction need further studies. PMID:9883972

  7. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  8. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  9. Synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    O’ Driscoll, Aisling; Sleator, Roy D.

    2013-01-01

    With world wide data predicted to exceed 40 trillion gigabytes by 2020, big data storage is a very real and escalating problem. Herein, we discuss the utility of synthetic DNA as a robust and eco-friendly archival data storage solution of the future. PMID:23514938

  10. Detecting functional interactions in a gene and signaling network by time-resolved somatic complementation analysis.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Wolfgang

    2003-10-01

    Somatic complementation by fusion of two mutant cells and mixing of their cytoplasms occurs when the genetic defect of one fusion partner is cured by the functional gene product provided by the other. We have found that complementation of mutational defects in the network mediating stimulus-induced commitment and sporulation of Physarum polycephalum may reflect time-dependent changes in the signaling state of its molecular building blocks. Network perturbation by fusion of mutant plasmodial cells in different states of activation, and the time-resolved analysis of somatic complementation effects can be used to systematically probe network structure and dynamics. Time-resolved somatic complementation quantitatively detects regulatory interactions between the functional modules of a network, independent of their biochemical composition or subcellular localization, and without being limited to direct physical interactions.

  11. Classical and lectin complement pathway activity in polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; Cats, Elisabeth A; Vlam, Lotte; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan; Herpers, Bjorn; de Jong, Ben A W; Rijkers, Ger; van Strijp, Jos; Notermans, Nicolette C; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Pol, W-Ludo

    2016-01-15

    Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy (IgM-PNP) is a slowly progressive, sensorimotor neuropathy. It is assumed that complement activation contributes to IgM-PNP pathogenesis. We investigated whether innate differences in complement activity of the classical and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways are associated with IgM-PNP or its severity. We measured complement activity using ELISA and determined MBL serumc oncentrations and MBL gene polymorphisms in 83 patients and 83 healthy controls. We did not observe differences between IgM-PNP patients and healthy controls nor associations with different disease severities. Differences in innate complement activity are not likely to explain susceptibility to or severity of IgM-PNP.

  12. Interrelation Between Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation in Models of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana M; Schäfer, Nicole; Kuhn, Laura B; Rohrer, Bärbel; Pauly, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals older than 50-years suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Associated with this multifactorial disease are polymorphisms of complement factor genes and a main environmental risk factor-oxidative stress. Until now the linkage between these risk factors for AMD has not been fully understood. Recent studies, integrating results on oxidative stress, complement activation, epidemiology and ocular pathology suggested the following sequence in AMD-etiology: initially, chronic oxidative stress results in modification of proteins and lipids in the posterior of the eye; these tissue alterations trigger chronic inflammation, involving the complement system; and finally, invasive immune cells facilitate pathology in the retina. Here, we summarize the results for animal studies which aim to elucidate this molecular interplay of oxidative events and tissue-specific complement activation in the eye.

  13. Development of complement therapeutics for inhibition of immune-mediated red cell destruction

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-01-01

    A major objective of my National Blood Foundation (NBF)-funded proposal was to produce recombinant soluble forms of a complement regulatory protein called complement receptor 1 (CR1) that carries the Knops blood group system antigens to perform antibody neutralization studies. By generating these recombinant proteins, we were able to inhibit several Knops antibodies in patient serum samples, thereby demonstrating their usefulness for clinical use. Interestingly, the recombinant CR1 proteins generated through NBF funding were also found to strongly reduce complement-mediated red cell destruction in a mouse hemolytic transfusion model. In this review, I will outline our NBF-funded studies, give an overview of recent advances from our group and others in the development of complement therapeutics, and highlight their potential use in the transfusion medicine setting. PMID:16086799

  14. Activation of immune complement by fly ash particles from coal combustion. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Rothenberg, S.J.; Kanapilly, G.M.; Hanson, R.L.; Scott, B.R.

    1982-06-01

    The interaction of immune complement with fly ash particles from coal combustion was studied in vitro. Fly ash from different coal combustors was incubated for 1 hr with pooled normal dog serum at 37/sup 0/C. The serum supernatants were assayed for complement by a 505 hemolytic (CH/sub 50/) endpoint method. Ash produced by burning one type of coal activated complement with up to 70% of the complement activated at 10 mg ash/ml serum. This activation was concentration dependent and a linear dose-response curve was obtained. Heat treatment and surface area measurements, as well as immunofluorescence studies, suggest that the active component(s) is volatile or heat labile, found on the surface of the particles, and removed by saline or water extraction.

  15. A novel "complement-metabolism-inflammasome axis" as a key regulator of immune cell effector function.

    PubMed

    Arbore, Giuseppina; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that induce and regulate the generation of the key pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in response to infectious microbes and cellular stress. The activation of inflammasomes involves several upstream signals including classic pattern or danger recognition systems such as the TLRs. Recently, however, the activation of complement receptors, such as the anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors and the complement regulator CD46, in conjunction with the sensing of cell metabolic changes, for instance increased amino acid influx and glycolysis (via mTORC1), have emerged as additional critical activators of the inflammasome. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge about complement-mediated inflammasome activation, with a specific focus on a novel "complement - metabolism - NLRP3 inflammasome axis."

  16. A universal method for measuring functional activity of complement in humans, laboratory, domestic, and agricultural animals, amphibians, and birds.

    PubMed

    Kuleshina, O N; Kozlov, L V; Cheremnykh, E G

    2014-06-01

    A new universal method for measuring activity of the serum complement system in humans, laboratory, domestic, agricultural animals, birds and amphibians is based on automated evaluation of the mortality of ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis under the effect of the complement system. In contrast to the hemolytic method, measured activity of the complement shows no erroneously high results caused by reactive lysis in febrile patients. The method can be used for studies of the complement system in humans and animals without species-specific adaptation.

  17. The pivotal role of the complement system in aging and age-related macular degeneration: hypothesis re-visited.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Don H; Radeke, Monte J; Gallo, Natasha B; Chapin, Ethan A; Johnson, Patrick T; Curletti, Christy R; Hancox, Lisa S; Hu, Jane; Ebright, Jessica N; Malek, Goldis; Hauser, Michael A; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Bok, Dean; Hageman, Gregory S; Johnson, Lincoln V

    2010-03-01

    During the past ten years, dramatic advances have been made in unraveling the biological bases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of irreversible blindness in western populations. In that timeframe, two distinct lines of evidence emerged which implicated chronic local inflammation and activation of the complement cascade in AMD pathogenesis. First, a number of complement system proteins, complement activators, and complement regulatory proteins were identified as molecular constituents of drusen, the hallmark extracellular deposits associated with early AMD. Subsequently, genetic studies revealed highly significant statistical associations between AMD and variants of several complement pathway-associated genes including: Complement factor H (CFH), complement factor H-related 1 and 3 (CFHR1 and CFHR3), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), and complement component 3 (C3). In this article, we revisit our original hypothesis that chronic local inflammatory and immune-mediated events at the level of Bruch's membrane play critical roles in drusen biogenesis and, by extension, in the pathobiology of AMD. Secondly, we report the results of a new screening for additional AMD-associated polymorphisms in a battery of 63 complement-related genes. Third, we identify and characterize the local complement system in the RPE-choroid complex - thus adding a new dimension of biological complexity to the role of the complement system in ocular aging and AMD. Finally, we evaluate the most salient, recent evidence that bears directly on the role of complement in AMD pathogenesis and progression. Collectively, these recent findings strongly re-affirm the importance of the complement system in AMD. They lay the groundwork for further studies that may lead to the identification of a transcriptional disease signature of AMD, and hasten the development of new therapeutic approaches that will restore the complement-modulating activity that

  18. Fcγ and Complement Receptors and Complement Proteins in Neutrophil Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Contribution to Pathogenesis and Progression and Modulation by Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoliello-Paschoalato, Adriana Balbina; Marchi, Larissa Fávaro; de Andrade, Micássio Fernandes; Kabeya, Luciana Mariko; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease that affects all structures of the joint and significantly impacts on morbidity and mortality in RA patients. RA is characterized by persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane lining the joint associated with infiltration of immune cells. Eighty to 90% of the leukocytes infiltrating the synovia are neutrophils. The specific role that neutrophils play in the onset of RA is not clear, but recent studies have evidenced that they have an important participation in joint damage and disease progression through the release of proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytokines, and neutrophil extracellular traps, in particular during frustrated phagocytosis of immune complexes (ICs). In addition, the local and systemic activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of RA and other IC-mediated diseases. This review discusses (i) the participation of Fcγ and complement receptors in mediating the effector functions of neutrophils in RA; (ii) the contribution of the complement system and ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms to joint damage in RA; and (iii) the use of plant extracts, dietary compounds, and isolated natural compounds in the treatment of RA, focusing on modulation of the effector functions of neutrophils and the complement system activity and/or activation. PMID:26346244

  19. Regulation of DNA repair in serum-stimulated xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, P.K.; Sirover, M.A.

    1984-10-01

    The regulation of DNA repair during serum stimulation of quiescent cells was examined in normal human cells, in fibroblasts from three xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups (A, C, and D), in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, and in ataxia telangiectasia cells. The regulation of nucleotide excision repair was examined by exposing cells to ultraviolet irradiation at discrete intervals after cell stimulation. Similarly, base excision repair was quantitated after exposure to methylmethane sulfonate. WI-38 normal human diploid fibroblasts, xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, as well as ataxia telangiectasia cells enhanced their capacity for both nucleotide excision repair and for base excision repair prior to their enhancement of DNA synthesis. Further, in each cell strain, the base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase was increased prior to the induction of DNA polymerase using the identical cells to quantitate each activity. In contrast, each of the three xeroderma complementation groups that were examined failed to increase their capacity for nucleotide excision repair above basal levels at any interval examined. This result was observed using either unscheduled DNA synthesis in the presence of 10 mM hydroxyurea or using repair replication in the absence of hydroxyurea to quantitate DNA repair. However, each of the three complementation groups normally regulated the enhancement of base excision repair after methylmethane sulfonate exposure and each induced the uracil DNA glycosylase prior to DNA synthesis. 62 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.