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Sample records for dnak chaperone system

  1. Role of Streptococcus intermedius DnaK chaperone system in stress tolerance and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Tabata, Atsushi; Imaki, Hidenori; Tsuruno, Keigo; Miyazaki, Aya; Sonomoto, Kenji; Whiley, Robert Alan; Nagamune, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a facultatively anaerobic, opportunistic pathogen that causes purulent infections and abscess formation. The DnaK chaperone system has been characterized in several pathogenic bacteria and seems to have important functions in stress resistance and pathogenicity. However, the role of DnaK in S. intermedius remains unclear. Therefore, we constructed a dnaK knockout mutant that exhibited slow growth, thermosensitivity, accumulation of GroEL in the cell, and reduced cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. The level of secretion of a major pathogenic factor, intermedilysin, was not affected by dnaK mutation. We further examined the function and property of the S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system by using Escherichia coli ΔdnaK and ΔrpoH mutant strains. S. intermedius DnaK could not complement the thermosensitivity of E. coli ΔdnaK mutant. However, the intact S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system could complement the thermosensitivity and acid sensitivity of E. coli ΔdnaK mutant. The S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system could regulate the activity and stability of the heat shock transcription factor σ(32) in E. coli, although S. intermedius does not utilize σ(32) for heat shock transcription. The S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system was also able to efficiently eliminate the aggregated proteins from ΔrpoH mutant cells. Overall, our data showed that the S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system has important functions in quality control of cellular proteins but has less participation in the modulation of expression of pathogenic factors.

  2. Mutations in the interdomain linker region of DnaK abolish the chaperone action of the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system.

    PubMed

    Han, W; Christen, P

    2001-05-18

    Hsp70s assist the folding of proteins in an ATP-dependent manner. DnaK, the Hsp70 of Escherichia coli, acts in concert with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE. Amino acid substitutions (D388R and L391S/L392G) in the linker region between the ATPase and substrate-binding domain did not affect the functional domain coupling and oligomerization of DnaK. The intrinsic ATPase activity was enhanced up to 10-fold. However, the ATPase activity of DnaK L391S/L392G, if stimulated by DnaJ plus protein substrate, was five times lower than that of wild-type DnaK and DnaK D388R. This defect correlated with the complete loss of chaperone action in luciferase refolding. Apparently, the conserved leucine residues in the linker mediate the synergistic effects of DnaJ and protein substrate on ATPase activity, a function which might be essential for chaperone action.

  3. The Molecular Chaperone DnaK Is a Source of Mutational Robustness.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, José; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Montagud-Martínez, Roser; Berlanga, Víctor; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Wagner, Andreas; Fares, Mario A

    2016-10-05

    Molecular chaperones, also known as heat-shock proteins, refold misfolded proteins and help other proteins reach their native conformation. Thanks to these abilities, some chaperones, such as the Hsp90 protein or the chaperonin GroEL, can buffer the deleterious phenotypic effects of mutations that alter protein structure and function. Hsp70 chaperones use a chaperoning mechanism different from that of Hsp90 and GroEL, and it is not known whether they can also buffer mutations. Here, we show that they can. To this end, we performed a mutation accumulation experiment in Escherichia coli, followed by whole-genome resequencing. Overexpression of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK helps cells cope with mutational load and completely avoid the extinctions we observe in lineages evolving without chaperone overproduction. Additionally, our sequence data show that DnaK overexpression increases mutational robustness, the tolerance of its clients to nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions. We also show that this elevated mutational buffering translates into differences in evolutionary rates on intermediate and long evolutionary time scales. Specifically, we studied the evolutionary rates of DnaK clients using the genomes of E. coli, Salmonella enterica, and 83 other gamma-proteobacteria. We find that clients that interact strongly with DnaK evolve faster than weakly interacting clients. Our results imply that all three major chaperone classes can buffer mutations and affect protein evolution. They illustrate how an individual protein like a chaperone can have a disproportionate effect on the evolution of a proteome.

  4. Reconstitution of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteostasis network highlights essential cofactor interactions with chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Lupoli, Tania J.; Fay, Allison; Adura, Carolina; Nathan, Carl F.

    2016-01-01

    During host infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encounters several types of stress that impair protein integrity, including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and chemotherapy. The resulting protein aggregates can be resolved or degraded by molecular machinery conserved from bacteria to eukaryotes. Eukaryotic Hsp104/Hsp70 and their bacterial homologs ClpB/DnaK are ATP-powered chaperones that restore toxic protein aggregates to a native folded state. DnaK is essential in Mycobacterium smegmatis, and ClpB is involved in asymmetrically distributing damaged proteins during cell division as a mechanism of survival in Mtb, commending both proteins as potential drug targets. However, their molecular partners in protein reactivation have not been characterized in mycobacteria. Here, we reconstituted the activities of the Mtb ClpB/DnaK bichaperone system with the cofactors DnaJ1, DnaJ2, and GrpE and the small heat shock protein Hsp20. We found that DnaJ1 and DnaJ2 activate the ATPase activity of DnaK differently. A point mutation in the highly conserved HPD motif of the DnaJ proteins abrogates their ability to activate DnaK, although the DnaJ2 mutant still binds to DnaK. The purified Mtb ClpB/DnaK system reactivated a heat-denatured model substrate, but the DnaJ HPD mutants inhibited the reaction. Finally, either DnaJ1 or DnaJ2 is required for mycobacterial viability, as is the DnaK-activating activity of a DnaJ protein. These studies lay the groundwork for strategies to target essential chaperone–protein interactions in Mtb, the leading cause of death from a bacterial infection. PMID:27872278

  5. Heterogeneous binding of the SH3 client protein to the DnaK molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ho; Zhang, Dongyu; Hughes, Christopher; Okuno, Yusuke; Sekhar, Ashok; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) plays a vital role in cellular processes, including protein folding and assembly, and helps prevent aggregation under physiological and stress-related conditions. Although the structural changes undergone by full-length client proteins upon interaction with DnaK (i.e., Escherichia coli Hsp70) are fundamental to understand chaperone-mediated protein folding, these changes are still largely unexplored. Here, we show that multiple conformations of the SRC homology 3 domain (SH3) client protein interact with the ADP-bound form of the DnaK chaperone. Chaperone-bound SH3 is largely unstructured yet distinct from the unfolded state in the absence of DnaK. The bound client protein shares a highly flexible N terminus and multiple slowly interconverting conformations in different parts of the sequence. In all, there is significant structural and dynamical heterogeneity in the DnaK-bound client protein, revealing that proteins may undergo some conformational sampling while chaperone-bound. This result is important because it shows that the surface of the Hsp70 chaperone provides an aggregation-free environment able to support part of the search for the native state. PMID:26195753

  6. Proper Control of Caulobacter crescentus Cell Surface Adhesion Requires the General Protein Chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Daniel S.; Crosson, Sean

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Growth in a surface-attached bacterial community, or biofilm, confers a number of advantages. However, as a biofilm matures, high-density growth imposes stresses on individual cells, and it can become less advantageous for progeny to remain in the community. Thus, bacteria employ a variety of mechanisms to control attachment to and dispersal from surfaces in response to the state of the environment. The freshwater oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus can elaborate a polysaccharide-rich polar organelle, known as the holdfast, which enables permanent surface attachment. Holdfast development is strongly inhibited by the small protein HfiA; mechanisms that control HfiA levels in the cell are not well understood. We have discovered a connection between the essential general protein chaperone, DnaK, and control of C. crescentus holdfast development. C. crescentus mutants partially or completely lacking the C-terminal substrate binding “lid” domain of DnaK exhibit enhanced bulk surface attachment. Partial or complete truncation of the DnaK lid domain increases the probability that any single cell will develop a holdfast by 3- to 10-fold. These results are consistent with the observation that steady-state levels of an HfiA fusion protein are significantly diminished in strains that lack the entire lid domain of DnaK. While dispensable for growth, the lid domain of C. crescentus DnaK is required for proper chaperone function, as evidenced by observed dysregulation of HfiA and holdfast development in strains expressing lidless DnaK mutants. We conclude that DnaK is an important molecular determinant of HfiA stability and surface adhesion control. IMPORTANCE Regulatory control of cell adhesion ensures that bacterial cells can transition between free-living and surface-attached states. We define a role for the essential protein chaperone, DnaK, in the control of Caulobacter crescentus cell adhesion. C. crescentus surface adhesion is mediated by an envelope

  7. Mutant DnaK chaperones cause ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Alix, J H; Guérin, M F

    1993-01-01

    To determine whether the biogenesis of ribosomes in Escherichia coli is the result of the self-assembly of their different constituents or involves the participation of additional factors, we have studied the influence of a chaperone, the product of the gene dnaK, on ribosome assembly in vivo. Using three thermosensitive (ts) mutants carrying the mutations dnaK756-ts, dnaK25-ts, and dnaK103-ts, we have observed the accumulation at nonpermissive temperature (45 degrees C) of ribosomal particles with different sedimentation constants--namely, 45S, 35S, and 25S along with the normal 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. This is the result of a defect not in thermostability but in ribosome assembly at the nonpermissive temperature. These abnormal ribosomal particles are rescued if the mutant cells are returned to 30 degrees C. Thus, the product of the dnaK gene is implicated in ribosome biogenesis at high temperature. PMID:8105482

  8. Effect of heterologous expression of molecular chaperone DnaK from Tetragenococcus halophilus on salinity adaptation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Nakayama, Jiro; Fukuda, Daisuke; Sonezaki, Shino; Watanabe, Maki; Tosukhowong, Amonlaya; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Molecular chaperone DnaK of halophilic Tetragenococcus halophilus JCM5888 was characterized under salinity conditions both in vitro and in vivo. The dnaK gene was cloned into an expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli. The DnaK protein obtained from the recombinant E. coli showed a significantly higher refolding activity of denatured lactate dehydrogenase than that from non-halophilic Lactococcus lactis under NaCl concentrations higher than 1 M. E. coli without the overexpression of DnaK exhibited a growth profile with a prolonged lag phase and suppressed maximum cell density in Luria-Bertani medium containing 5% (0.86 M) NaCl. On the contrary, the overexpression of T. halophilus DnaK greatly shortened this prolonged lag phase with no effect on maximum growth, while that of L. lactis DnaK decreased maximum growth. The amount of protein aggregates was increased by salt stress in the E. coli cells, while this aggregation was greatly suppressed by the overexpression of T, halophilus DnaK. These results suggest that heterologous overexpression of T. halophilus DnaK, via its chaperone activity, promotes salinity adaptation of E. coli.

  9. Glutathionylation of the Bacterial Hsp70 Chaperone DnaK Provides a Link between Oxidative Stress and the Heat Shock Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Jie; Wu, Si; Gong, Weibin; Chen, Chang; Perrett, Sarah

    2016-03-25

    DnaK is the major bacterial Hsp70, participating in DNA replication, protein folding, and the stress response. DnaK cooperates with the Hsp40 co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE. Under non-stress conditions, DnaK binds to the heat shock transcription factor σ(32)and facilitates its degradation. Oxidative stress results in temporary inactivation of DnaK due to depletion of cellular ATP and thiol modifications such as glutathionylation until normal cellular ATP levels and a reducing environment are restored. However, the biological significance of DnaK glutathionylation remains unknown, and the mechanisms by which glutathionylation may regulate the activity of DnaK are also unclear. We investigated the conditions under which Escherichia coli DnaK undergoesS-glutathionylation. We observed glutathionylation of DnaK in lysates of E. coli cells that had been subjected to oxidative stress. We also obtained homogeneously glutathionylated DnaK using purified DnaK in the apo state. We found that glutathionylation of DnaK reversibly changes the secondary structure and tertiary conformation, leading to reduced nucleotide and peptide binding ability. The chaperone activity of DnaK was reversibly down-regulated by glutathionylation, accompanying the structural changes. We found that interaction of DnaK with DnaJ, GrpE, or σ(32)becomes weaker when DnaK is glutathionylated, and the interaction is restored upon deglutathionylation. This study confirms that glutathionylation down-regulates the functions of DnaK under oxidizing conditions, and this down-regulation may facilitate release of σ(32)from its interaction with DnaK, thus triggering the heat shock response. Such a mechanism provides a link between oxidative stress and the heat shock response in bacteria.

  10. Glutathionylation of the Bacterial Hsp70 Chaperone DnaK Provides a Link between Oxidative Stress and the Heat Shock Response*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Jie; Wu, Si; Gong, Weibin; Chen, Chang; Perrett, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    DnaK is the major bacterial Hsp70, participating in DNA replication, protein folding, and the stress response. DnaK cooperates with the Hsp40 co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE. Under non-stress conditions, DnaK binds to the heat shock transcription factor σ32 and facilitates its degradation. Oxidative stress results in temporary inactivation of DnaK due to depletion of cellular ATP and thiol modifications such as glutathionylation until normal cellular ATP levels and a reducing environment are restored. However, the biological significance of DnaK glutathionylation remains unknown, and the mechanisms by which glutathionylation may regulate the activity of DnaK are also unclear. We investigated the conditions under which Escherichia coli DnaK undergoes S-glutathionylation. We observed glutathionylation of DnaK in lysates of E. coli cells that had been subjected to oxidative stress. We also obtained homogeneously glutathionylated DnaK using purified DnaK in the apo state. We found that glutathionylation of DnaK reversibly changes the secondary structure and tertiary conformation, leading to reduced nucleotide and peptide binding ability. The chaperone activity of DnaK was reversibly down-regulated by glutathionylation, accompanying the structural changes. We found that interaction of DnaK with DnaJ, GrpE, or σ32 becomes weaker when DnaK is glutathionylated, and the interaction is restored upon deglutathionylation. This study confirms that glutathionylation down-regulates the functions of DnaK under oxidizing conditions, and this down-regulation may facilitate release of σ32 from its interaction with DnaK, thus triggering the heat shock response. Such a mechanism provides a link between oxidative stress and the heat shock response in bacteria. PMID:26823468

  11. Action of the Hsp70 chaperone system observed with single proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, João M.; Mayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, the binding of non-native protein substrates to the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK is mediated by the co-chaperone DnaJ. DnaJ accelerates ATP hydrolysis on DnaK, by closing the peptide-binding cleft of DnaK. GrpE catalysed nucleotide exchange and ATP re-binding then lead to substrate release from DnaK, allowing folding. Here we refold immunoglobulin 27 (I27) to better understand how DnaJ-DnaK-GrpE chaperones cooperate. When DnaJ is present, I27 is less likely to misfold and more likely to fold, whereas the unfolded state remains unaffected. Thus, the ‘holdase’ DnaJ shows foldase behaviour. Misfolding of I27 is fully abrogated when DnaJ cooperates with DnaK, which stabilizes the unfolded state and increases the probability of folding. Addition of GrpE shifts the unfolded fraction of I27 to pre-chaperone levels. These insights reveal synergistic mechanisms within the evolutionary highly conserved Hsp70 system that prevent substrates from misfolding and promote their productive transition to the native state.

  12. Involvement of residues Asp8, Asn13, Glu145, Asp168, and Thr173 in the chaperone activity of a recombinant DnaK from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min-Guan; Liang, Wan-Chi; Chen, Bo-En; Chou, Wei-Mou; Lin, Long-Liu

    2011-01-01

    Based on the sequence homology, we have modeled the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK), a counterpart of Hsp70, and identified five different amino acids that might be responsible for maintaining ADP-Mg(2+)-Pi in the correct configuration at the ATP-binding cleft of the protein. As compared with wild-type BlDnaK, site-directed mutant proteins D8A, N13D, E145A, D168A, and T173A had a dramatic reduction in their chaperone activities. Complementation test revealed that the mutant proteins lost completely the ability to rescue the temperature-sensitive growth defect of Escherichia colidnaK756-ts. Wild-type BlDnak assisted the refolding of denatured firefly luciferase, whereas a significant decrease in this ability was observed for the mutant proteins. Simultaneous addition of B. licheniformis DnaJ, BlGrpE, and NR-peptide, did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of D8A, E145A, D168A and T173A. Circular dichroism spectra were nearly identical for wild-type and mutant proteins, and they, except D8A, also exhibited a similar sensitivity towards temperature-induced denaturation. These results suggest that the selected residues are critical for the proper function of BlDnaK.

  13. Monitoring conformational heterogeneity of the lid of DnaK substrate-binding domain during its chaperone cycle.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Peter, Joshua Jebakumar; Kumar, Vignesh; Mapa, Koyeli

    2016-08-01

    DnaK or Hsp70 of Escherichia coli is a master regulator of the bacterial proteostasis network. Allosteric communication between the two functional domains of DnaK, the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and the C-terminal substrate- or peptide-binding domain (SBD) regulate its activity. X-ray crystallography and NMR studies have provided snapshots of distinct conformations of Hsp70 proteins in various physiological states; however, the conformational heterogeneity and dynamics of allostery-driven Hsp70 activity remains underexplored. In this work, we employed single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements to capture distinct intradomain conformational states of a region within the DnaK-SBD known as the lid. Our data conclusively demonstrate prominent conformational heterogeneity of the DnaK lid in ADP-bound states; in contrast, the ATP-bound open conformations are homogeneous. Interestingly, a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue, AMP-PNP, imparts heterogeneity to the lid conformations mimicking the ADP-bound state. The cochaperone DnaJ confers ADP-like heterogeneous lid conformations to DnaK, although the presence of the cochaperone accelerates the substrate-binding rate by a hitherto unknown mechanism. Irrespective of the presence of DnaJ, binding of a peptide substrate to the DnaK-SBD leads to prominent lid closure. Lid closure is only partial upon binding to molten globule-like authentic cellular substrates, probably to accommodate non-native substrate proteins of varied structures.

  14. The Hsc66-Hsc20 Chaperone System in Escherichia coli: Chaperone Activity and Interactions with the DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE System

    PubMed Central

    Silberg, Jonathan J.; Hoff, Kevin G.; Vickery, Larry E.

    1998-01-01

    Hsc66, a stress-70 protein, and Hsc20, a J-type accessory protein, comprise a newly described Hsp70-type chaperone system in addition to DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE in Escherichia coli. Because endogenous substrates for the Hsc66-Hsc20 system have not yet been identified, we investigated chaperone-like activities of Hsc66 and Hsc20 by their ability to suppress aggregation of denatured model substrate proteins, such as rhodanese, citrate synthase, and luciferase. Hsc66 suppressed aggregation of rhodanese and citrate synthase, and ATP caused effects consistent with complex destabilization typical of other Hsp70-type chaperones. Differences in the activities of Hsc66 and DnaK, however, suggest that these chaperones have dissimilar substrate specificity profiles. Hsc20, unlike DnaJ, did not exhibit intrinsic chaperone activity and appears to function solely as a regulatory cochaperone protein for Hsc66. Possible interactions between the Hsc66-Hsc20 and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE chaperone systems were also investigated by measuring the effects of cochaperone proteins on Hsp70 ATPase activities. The nucleotide exchange factor GrpE did not stimulate the ATPase activity of Hsc66 and thus appears to function specifically with DnaK. Cross-stimulation by the cochaperones Hsc20 and DnaJ was observed, but the requirement for supraphysiological concentrations makes it unlikely that these interactions occur significantly in vivo. Together these results suggest that Hsc66-Hsc20 and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE comprise separate molecular chaperone systems with distinct, nonoverlapping cellular functions. PMID:9852006

  15. A novel virus-like particle based on hepatitis B core antigen and substrate-binding domain of bacterial molecular chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Jun; Gu, Kai; Xiong, Qi Yan; Shen, Liang; Cao, Rong Yue; Li, Ming Hui; Li, Tai Ming; Wu, Jie; Liu, Jing Jing

    2009-12-09

    Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein has been proved to be an attractive carrier for foreign epitopes, and can display green fluorescent protein (GFP) on its surface. The structure of substrate-binding domain of DnaK [DnaK (394-504 aa), DnaK SBD] is similar to GFP, we therefore reasoned that DnaK SBD might also be tolerated. Electron microscopic observations suggested that the chimeric proteins containing the truncated HBc (HBcDelta) and DnaK SBD could self-assemble into virus-like particle (VLP). Then the accessibility of DnaK SBD and the adjuvanticity of VLP HBcDelta-SBD were demonstrated by two recombinant peptide vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GhM and GhMNR. The latter carries in addition the peptide motif NRLLLTG which is known to bind to DnaK and DnaK SBD. The combination of VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhMNR elicited stronger humoral responses and caused further testicular atrophy than the combinations of VLP HBcDelta and GhMNR or VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhM in Balb/c mice. These findings indicate VLP HBcDelta-SBD might serve as an excellent carrier for GhMNR and some other peptide vaccines.

  16. Priming the immune system of Penaeid shrimp by bacterial HSP70 (DnaK).

    PubMed

    Phuoc, L H; Hu, B; Wille, M; Hien, N T; Phuong, V H; Tinh, N T N; Loc, N H; Sorgeloos, P; Bossier, P

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to test the effect of DnaK on priming immune responses in Penaeid shrimp. Juvenile-specific pathogen-free (SPF) P. vannamei shrimp were injected with 0.05 μg recombinant DnaK. One hour post-DnaK priming, a non-lethal dose of Vibrio campbellii (10(5) CFU shrimp(-1)) was injected. Other treatments include only DnaK or V. campbellii injection or control with blank inocula. The haemolymph of three shrimp from each treatment was collected at 1.5, 6, 9 and 12 h post-DnaK priming (hpp). It was verified that injection with DnaK and V. campbellii challenge affected the transcription of 3 immune genes, transglutaminase-1 (TGase-1), prophenoloxidase-2 (proPO-2) and endogenous HSP70 (lvHSP70). In P. monodon, shrimp were first injected with DnaK at a dose of 10 μg shrimp(-1) and one hour later with 10(6) CFU of V. harveyi (BB120) shrimp(-1). Shrimp injected with DnaK showed a significant increase in proPO expression compared to the control (P < 0.05). Yet a double injection (DnaK and Vibrio) seemed to cause an antagonistic response at the level of expression, which was not equalled at the level of PO activity. Those results suggest that DnaK is able to modulate immune responses in P. vannamei and P. monodon.

  17. Chaperone addiction of toxin–antitoxin systems

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Patricia; Sala, Ambre Julie; Ayala, Sara; Texier, Pauline; Slama, Nawel; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Guillet, Valérie; Mourey, Lionel; Genevaux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems, in which a labile antitoxin binds and inhibits the toxin, can promote adaptation and persistence by modulating bacterial growth in response to stress. Some atypical TA systems, known as tripartite toxin–antitoxin–chaperone (TAC) modules, include a molecular chaperone that facilitates folding and protects the antitoxin from degradation. Here we use a TAC module from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which classical TAs can become ‘chaperone-addicted'. The chaperone specifically binds the antitoxin at a short carboxy-terminal sequence (chaperone addiction sequence, ChAD) that is not present in chaperone-independent antitoxins. In the absence of chaperone, the ChAD sequence destabilizes the antitoxin, thus preventing toxin inhibition. Chaperone–ChAD pairs can be transferred to classical TA systems or to unrelated proteins and render them chaperone-dependent. This mechanism might be used to optimize the expression and folding of heterologous proteins in bacterial hosts for biotechnological or medical purposes. PMID:27827369

  18. Reactivation of Aggregated Proteins by the ClpB/DnaK Bi-chaperone System

    PubMed Central

    Zolkiewski, Michal; Chesnokova, Liudmila S.; Witt, Stephan N.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common problem in protein biochemistry and is linked to many cellular pathologies and human diseases. The molecular chaperone ClpB can resolubilize and reactivate aggregated proteins. This unit describes the procedure for following reactivation of an aggregated enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mediated by ClpB from Escherichia coli in cooperation with another molecular chaperone DnaK. The procedures for purification of these chaperones are also described. PMID:26836408

  19. Protein folding rates and thermodynamic stability are key determinants for interaction with the Hsp70 chaperone system

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, Ashok; Lam, Hon Nam; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The Hsp70 family of molecular chaperones participates in vital cellular processes including the heat shock response and protein homeostasis. E. coli's Hsp70, known as DnaK, works in concert with the DnaJ and GrpE co-chaperones (K/J/E chaperone system), and mediates cotranslational and post-translational protein folding in the cytoplasm. While the role of the K/J/E chaperones is well understood in the presence of large substrates unable to fold independently, it is not known if and how K/J/E modulates the folding of smaller proteins able to fold even in the absence of chaperones. Here, we combine experiments and computation to evaluate the significance of kinetic partitioning as a model to describe the interplay between protein folding and binding to the K/J/E chaperone system. First, we target three nonobligatory substrates, that is, proteins that do not require chaperones to fold. The experimentally observed chaperone association of these client proteins during folding is entirely consistent with predictions from kinetic partitioning. Next, we develop and validate a computational model (CHAMP70) that assumes kinetic partitioning of substrates between folding and interaction with K/J/E. CHAMP70 quantitatively predicts the experimentally measured interaction of RNase HD as it refolds in the presence of various chaperones. CHAMP70 shows that substrates are posed to interact with K/J/E only if they are slow-folding proteins with a folding rate constant kf <50 s−1, and/or thermodynamically unstable proteins with a folding free energy ΔG0UN ≥−2 kcal mol−1. Hence, the K/J/E system is tuned to use specific protein folding rates and thermodynamic stabilities as substrate selection criteria. PMID:22886941

  20. Physical interaction between bacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 chaperones mediates their cooperative action to refold denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Fujita, Kensaku; Ohtaki, Aguru; Watanabe, Satoru; Narumi, Shoichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Suenaga, Emi; Misono, Tomoko S; Kumar, Penmetcha K R; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2014-02-28

    In eukaryotes, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that associates with numerous client proteins. HtpG, a prokaryotic homolog of Hsp90, is essential for thermotolerance in cyanobacteria, and in vitro it suppresses the aggregation of denatured proteins efficiently. Understanding how the non-native client proteins bound to HtpG refold is of central importance to comprehend the essential role of HtpG under stress. Here, we demonstrate by yeast two-hybrid method, immunoprecipitation assays, and surface plasmon resonance techniques that HtpG physically interacts with DnaJ2 and DnaK2. DnaJ2, which belongs to the type II J-protein family, bound DnaK2 or HtpG with submicromolar affinity, and HtpG bound DnaK2 with micromolar affinity. Not only DnaJ2 but also HtpG enhanced the ATP hydrolysis by DnaK2. Although assisted by the DnaK2 chaperone system, HtpG enhanced native refolding of urea-denatured lactate dehydrogenase and heat-denatured glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. HtpG did not substitute for DnaJ2 or GrpE in the DnaK2-assisted refolding of the denatured substrates. The heat-denatured malate dehydrogenase that did not refold by the assistance of the DnaK2 chaperone system alone was trapped by HtpG first and then transferred to DnaK2 where it refolded. Dissociation of substrates from HtpG was either ATP-dependent or -independent depending on the substrate, indicating the presence of two mechanisms of cooperative action between the HtpG and the DnaK2 chaperone system.

  1. Chemical Screens Against A Reconstituted Multi-Protein Complex: Myricetin Blocks DnaJ Regulation of DnaK through an Allosteric Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lyra; Miyata, Yoshinari; Ung, Peter M. U.; Bertelsen, Eric B.; McQuade, Thomas J.; Carlson, Heather A.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY DnaK is a molecular chaperone responsible for multiple aspects of proteostasis. The intrinsically slow ATPase activity of DnaK is stimulated by its co-chaperone, DnaJ, and these proteins often work in concert. To identify inhibitors, we screened plant-derived extracts against a re-constituted mixture of DnaK and DnaJ. This approach resulted in the identification of flavonoids, including myricetin, which inhibited activity by up to 75%. Interestingly, myricetin prevented DnaJ-mediated stimulation of ATPase activity, with minimal impact on either DnaK’s intrinsic turnover rate or its stimulation by another co-chaperone, GrpE. Using NMR, we found that myricetin binds DnaK at an unanticipated site between the IB and IIB subdomains and that it allosterically blocked binding of DnaJ. Together, these results highlight a “gray box” screening approach, which approximates a limited amount of the complexity expected in physiological, multi-protein systems. PMID:21338918

  2. Systems biology of molecular chaperone networks.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Péter; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Kovács, István A; Szalay, Máté S; Soti, Csaba

    2008-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are not only fascinating molecular machines that help the folding, refolding, activation or assembly of other proteins, but also have a number of functions. These functions can be understood only by considering the emergent properties of cellular networks--and that of chaperones as special network constituents. As a notable example for the network-related roles of chaperones they may act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms, and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Why are chaperones special in the context of cellular networks? Chaperones: (1) have weak links, i.e. low affinity, transient interactions with most of their partners; (2) connect hubs, i.e. act as 'masterminds' of the cell being close to several centre proteins with a lot of neighbours; and (3) are in the overlaps of network modules, which confers upon them a special regulatory role. Importantly, chaperones may uncouple or even quarantine modules of protein-protein interaction networks, signalling networks, genetic regulatory networks and membrane organelle networks during stress, which gives an additional chaperone-mediated protection for the cell at the network-level. Moreover, chaperones are essential to rebuild inter-modular contacts after stress by their low affinity, 'quasi-random' sampling of the potential interaction partners in different cellular modules. This opens the way to the chaperone-regulated modular evolution of cellular networks, and helps us to design novel therapeutic and anti-ageing strategies.

  3. Crowding Activates ClpB and Enhances Its Association with DnaK for Efficient Protein Aggregate Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Ianire; Celaya, Garbiñe; Alfonso, Carlos; Moro, Fernando; Rivas, Germán; Muga, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of intracellular protein aggregates after a severe stress is mandatory for cell survival. In bacteria, this activity depends on the collaboration between the DnaK system and ClpB, which in vivo occurs in a highly crowded environment. The reactivation reaction includes two steps: extraction of unfolded monomers from the aggregate and their subsequent refolding into the native conformation. Both steps might be compromised by excluded volume conditions that would favor aggregation of unstable protein folding intermediates. Here, we have investigated whether ClpB and the DnaK system are able to compensate this unproductive effect and efficiently reactivate aggregates of three different substrate proteins under crowding conditions. To this aim, we have compared the association equilibrium, biochemical properties, stability, and chaperone activity of the disaggregase ClpB in the absence and presence of an inert macromolecular crowding agent. Our data show that crowding i), increases three to four orders of magnitude the association constant of the functional hexamer; ii), shifts the conformational equilibrium of the protein monomer toward a compact state; iii), stimulates its ATPase activity; and iv), favors association of the chaperone with substrate proteins and with aggregate-bound DnaK. These effects strongly enhance protein aggregate reactivation by the DnaK-ClpB network, highlighting the importance of volume exclusion in complex processes in which several proteins have to work in a sequential manner. PMID:24806934

  4. Structural identification of DnaK binding sites within bovine and sheep bactenecin Bac7.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Michael; Kieslich, Bjorn; Berthold, Nicole; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Strater, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial resistance against common antibiotics is an increasing health problem. New pharmaceuticals for the treatment of infections caused by resistant pathogens are needed. Small proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) from insects are known to bind intracellularly to the conventional substrate binding cleft of the E. coli Hsp70 chaperone DnaK. Furthermore, bactenecins from mammals, members of the cathelicidin family, also contain potential DnaK binding sites. Crystal structures of bovine and sheep Bac7 in complex with the DnaK substrate binding domain show that the peptides bind in the forward binding mode with a leucine positioned in the central hydrophobic pocket. In most structures, proline and arginine residues preceding leucine occupy the hydrophobic DnaK binding sites -1 and -2. Within bovine Bac7, four potential DnaK binding sites were identified.

  5. Monitoring of dnaK gene expression in Porphyromonas gingivalis by oxygen stress using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Araki, Makoto; Hiratsuka, Koichi; Kiyama-Kishikawa, Michiko; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2004-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe associated with adult periodontitis, expresses numerous potential virulence factors. dnaK, a member of the heat shock protein family, functions as a molecular chaperone and plays a role in microbial pathogenicity. However, little is known regarding its gene expression caused by oxygen stress in P. gingivalis. In the present study, a custom-made DNA microarray was designed and used to monitor dnaK gene expression in P. gingivalis caused by oxygen stress. The results demonstrated that dnaK mRNA was up-regulated in a short time, and the DNA microarray results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. These findings suggest that oxygen stress stimulates gene expression of dnaK and may have a relationship to the aerotolerance activity of this organism as well as its expression of pathogenesis.

  6. Chaperonopathies of senescence and the scrambling of interactions between the chaperoning and the immune systems.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2010-06-01

    Aging entails progressive deterioration of molecules and supramolecular structures, including Hsp chaperones and their complexes, paralleled by functional decline. Recent research has changed our views on Hsp chaperones. They work inside and outside cells in many locations, alone or forming teams, interacting with cells, receptors, and molecules that are not chaperones, in roles that are not typically attributed to chaperones, such as protein folding. Hsp chaperones form a physiological system with a variety of functions and interactions with other systems, for example, the immune system. We propose that chaperone malfunctioning due to structural damage or gene dysregulation during aging has an impact on the immune system, creating the conditions for an overall malfunction of both systems. Pathological chaperones cannot interact with the immune system as normal ones do, and this leads to an overall readjustment of the interactions that is apparent during senescence and is likely to cause many of its manifestations.

  7. Stress response in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: transcriptional profiling of genes for the heat shock protein 70 chaperone system under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Munakata, Takeo; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Satoh, Nori; Wada, Shuichi

    2010-03-01

    The genome of Ciona intestinalis contains eight genes for HSP70 superfamily proteins, 36 genes for J-proteins, a gene for a J-like protein, and three genes for BAG family proteins. To understand the stress responses of genes in the HSP70 chaperone system comprehensively, the transcriptional profiles of these 48 genes under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were studied using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Heat stress treatment increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of six HSP70 superfamily genes, eight J-protein family genes, and two BAG family genes. In the cytoplasmic group of the DnaK subfamily of the HSP70 family, Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like was the only heat-inducible gene and Ci-HSPA2/8 was the only constitutively active gene which showed striking simplicity in comparison with other animals that have been examined genome-wide so far. Analyses of the time course and temperature dependency of the heat stress responses showed that the induction of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like expression rises to a peak after heat stress treatment at 28 degrees C (10 degrees C upshift from control temperature) for 1 h. ER stress treatment with Brefeldin A, a drug that is known to act as ER stress inducer, increased the mRNA levels of four HSP70 superfamily genes and four J-protein family genes. Most stress-inducible genes are conserved between Ciona and vertebrates, as expected from a close evolutionary relationship between them. The present study characterized the stress responses of HSP70 chaperone system genes in Ciona for the first time and provides essential data for comprehensive understanding of the functions of the HSP70 chaperone system.

  8. Chaperone Proteins in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Nervous System after Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ousman, Shalina S; Frederick, Ariana; Lim, Erin-Mai F

    2017-01-01

    Injury to axons of the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is accompanied by the upregulation and downregulation of numerous molecules that are involved in mediating nerve repair, or in augmentation of the original damage. Promoting the functions of beneficial factors while reducing the properties of injurious agents determines whether regeneration and functional recovery ensues. A number of chaperone proteins display reduced or increased expression following CNS and PNS damage (crush, transection, contusion) where their roles have generally been found to be protective. For example, chaperones are involved in mediating survival of damaged neurons, promoting axon regeneration and remyelination and, improving behavioral outcomes. We review here the various chaperone proteins that are involved after nervous system axonal damage, the functions that they impact in the CNS and PNS, and the possible mechanisms by which they act.

  9. Chaperone Proteins in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Nervous System after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ousman, Shalina S.; Frederick, Ariana; Lim, Erin-Mai F.

    2017-01-01

    Injury to axons of the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is accompanied by the upregulation and downregulation of numerous molecules that are involved in mediating nerve repair, or in augmentation of the original damage. Promoting the functions of beneficial factors while reducing the properties of injurious agents determines whether regeneration and functional recovery ensues. A number of chaperone proteins display reduced or increased expression following CNS and PNS damage (crush, transection, contusion) where their roles have generally been found to be protective. For example, chaperones are involved in mediating survival of damaged neurons, promoting axon regeneration and remyelination and, improving behavioral outcomes. We review here the various chaperone proteins that are involved after nervous system axonal damage, the functions that they impact in the CNS and PNS, and the possible mechanisms by which they act. PMID:28270745

  10. Giardia lamblia expresses a proteobacterial-like DnaK homolog.

    PubMed

    Morrison, H G; Roger, A J; Nystul, T G; Gillin, F D; Sogin, M L

    2001-04-01

    We identified a novel gene encoding molecular chaperone HSP70 in the amitochondriate parasite Giardia lamblia. The predicted protein is similar to bacterial DnaK and mitochondrial HSP70s. The gene is transcribed and translated at a constant level during trophozoite growth and encystation. Alignment of the sequence with a data set of cytosolic, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondrial, and DnaK HSP70 homologs indicated that the sequence was extremely divergent and contained insertions unique to giardial HSP70s. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that this sequence was distinct from the cytosolic and ER forms and was most similar to proteobacterial and mitochondrial DnaKs. However, a specific relationship with the alpha proteobacterial and mitochondrial sequences was not strongly supported by phylogenetic analyses of this data set, in contrast to similar analyses of cpn60. These data neither confirm nor reject the possibility that this gene is a relic of secondary mitochondrial loss; they leave open the possibility that it was acquired in a separate endosymbiotic event.

  11. Ingestion of bacteria overproducing DnaK attenuates Vibrio infection of Artemia franciscana larvae.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yeong Yik; Dhaene, Till; Defoirdt, Tom; Boon, Nico; MacRae, Thomas H; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Feeding of bacterially encapsulated heat shock proteins (Hsps) to invertebrates is a novel way to limit Vibrio infection. As an example, ingestion of Escherichia coli overproducing prokaryotic Hsps significantly improves survival of gnotobiotically cultured Artemia larvae upon challenge with pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. The relationship between Hsp accumulation and enhanced resistance to infection may involve DnaK, the prokaryotic equivalent to Hsp70, a major molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells. In support of this proposal, heat-stressed bacterial strains LVS 2 (Bacillus sp.), LVS 3 (Aeromonas hydrophila), LVS 8 (Vibrio sp.), GR 8 (Cytophaga sp.), and GR 10 (Roseobacter sp.) were shown in this work to be more effective than nonheated bacteria in protecting gnotobiotic Artemia larvae against V. campbellii challenge. Immunoprobing of Western blots and quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the amount of DnaK in bacteria and their ability to enhance larval resistance to infection by V. campbellii are correlated. Although the function of DnaK is uncertain, it may improve tolerance to V. campbellii via immune stimulation, a possibility of significance from a fundamental perspective and also because it could be applied in aquaculture, a major method of food production.

  12. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; ...

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  13. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  14. Conformational properties of bacterial DnaK and yeast mitochondrial Hsp70. Role of the divergent C-terminal alpha-helical subdomain.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fernando; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Muga, Arturo

    2005-06-01

    Among the eukaryotic members of the Hsp70 family, mitochondrial Hsp70 shows the highest degree of sequence identity with bacterial DnaK. Although they share a functional mechanism and homologous co-chaperones, they are highly specific and cannot be exchanged between Escherichia coli and yeast mitochondria. To provide a structural basis for this finding, we characterized both proteins, as well as two DnaK/mtHsp70 chimeras constructed by domain swapping, using biochemical and biophysical methods. Here, we show that DnaK and mtHsp70 display different conformational and biochemical properties. Replacing different regions of the DnaK peptide-binding domain with those of mtHsp70 results in chimeric proteins that: (a) are not able to support growth of an E. coli DnaK deletion strain at stress temperatures (e.g. 42 degrees C); (b) show increased accessibility and decreased thermal stability of the peptide-binding pocket; and (c) have reduced activation by bacterial, but not mitochondrial co-chaperones, as compared with DnaK. Importantly, swapping the C-terminal alpha-helical subdomain promotes a conformational change in the chimeras to an mtHsp70-like conformation. Thus, interaction with bacterial co-chaperones correlates well with the conformation that natural and chimeric Hsp70s adopt in solution. Our results support the hypothesis that a specific protein structure might regulate the interaction of Hsp70s with particular components of the cellular machinery, such as Tim44, so that they perform specific functions.

  15. Chaperoning erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Camila O.

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit complexes containing molecular chaperones regulate protein production, stability, and degradation in virtually every cell type. We are beginning to recognize how generalized and tissue-specific chaperones regulate specialized aspects of erythropoiesis. For example, chaperones intersect with erythropoietin signaling pathways to protect erythroid precursors against apoptosis. Molecular chaperones also participate in hemoglobin synthesis, both directly and indirectly. Current knowledge in these areas only scratches the surface of what is to be learned. Improved understanding of how molecular chaperones regulate erythropoietic development and hemoglobin homeostasis should identify biochemical pathways amenable to pharmacologic manipulation in a variety of red blood cell disorders including thalassemia and other anemias associated with hemoglobin instability. PMID:19109556

  16. Roles of silkworm endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in the secretion of recombinant proteins expressed by baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Imai, Saki; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Xu, Jian; Li, Zhiqing; Shirai, Shintaro; Mon, Hiroaki; Morokuma, Daisuke; Lee, Jae Man

    2015-11-01

    Baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) is widely used for production of recombinant eukaryotic proteins in insect larvae or cultured cells. BEVS has advantages over bacterial expression system in producing post-translationally modified secreted proteins. However, for some unknown reason, it is very difficult for insects to secrete sufficiently for certain proteins of interest. To understand the reasons why insect cells fail to secrete some kinds of recombinant proteins, we here employed three mammalian proteins as targets, EPO, HGF, and Wnt3A, with different secretion levels in BEVS and investigated their mRNA transcriptions from the viral genome, subcellular localizations, and interactions with silkworm ER chaperones. Moreover, we observed that no significantly influence on the secretion amounts of all three proteins when depleting or overexpressing most endogenous ER chaperone genes in cultured silkworm cells. However, among all detected ER chaperones, the depletion of BiP severely decreased the recombinant protein secretion in BEVS, indicating the possible central role of Bip in silkworm secretion pathway.

  17. Introduction of a unique tryptophan residue into various positions of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-En; Lin, Min-Guan; Lo, Huei-Fen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Chi, Meng-Chun; Lin, Long-Liu

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis together with biochemical and biophysical techniques were used to probe effects of single-tryptophan-incorporated mutations on a bacterial molecular chaperone, Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK). Specifically, five phenylalanine residues (Phe(120), Phe(174), Phe(186), Phe(378) and Phe(396)) of BlDnaK were individually replaced by single tryptophans, thus creating site-specific probes for the fluorescence analysis of the protein. The steady-state ATPase activity for BlDnaK, F120W, F174W, F186W, F378W, and F396W was determined to be 76.01, 52.82, 25.32, 53.31, 58.84, and 47.53 nmol Pi/min/mg, respectively. Complementation test revealed that the single mutation at codons 120, 186, and 378 of the dnaK gene still allowed an Escherichia coli dnaK756-Ts strain to grow at a stringent temperature of 44°C. Simultaneous addition of co-chaperones and NR-peptide did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of F174W and F396W, and these two proteins were unable to assist the refolding of GdnHCl-denatured luciferase. The heat-induced denaturation of all variants could be fitted adequately to a three-state model, in agreement with the observation for the wild-type protein. By CD spectral analysis, GdnHCl-induced unfolding transition for BlDnaK was 1.51 M corresponding to ΔG(N-U) of 1.69 kcal/mol; however, the transitions for mutant proteins were 1.07-1.55 M equivalent to ΔG(N-U) of 0.94-2.93 kcal/mol. The emission maximum of single-tryptophan-incorporated variants was in the range of 333.2-335.8 nm. Acrylamide quenching analysis showed that the mutant proteins had a dynamic quenching constant of 3.0-4.2 M(-1). Taken together, these results suggest that the molecular properties of BlDnaK have been significantly changed upon the individual replacement of selected phenylalanine residues by tryptophan.

  18. The role of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in diseases caused by misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Young, Jason C

    2014-03-01

    Protein-folding diseases are an ongoing medical challenge. Many diseases within this group are genetically determined, and have no known cure. Among the examples in which the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are well understood are diseases driven by misfolding of transmembrane proteins that normally function as cell-surface ion channels. Wild-type forms are synthesized and integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane system and, upon correct folding, are trafficked by the secretory pathway to the cell surface. Misfolded mutant forms traffic poorly, if at all, and are instead degraded by the ER-associated proteasomal degradation (ERAD) system. Molecular chaperones can assist the folding of the cytosolic domains of these transmembrane proteins; however, these chaperones are also involved in selecting misfolded forms for ERAD. Given this dual role of chaperones, diseases caused by the misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels (referred to here as ion-channel-misfolding diseases) can be regarded as a consequence of insufficiency of the pro-folding chaperone activity and/or overefficiency of the chaperone ERAD role. An attractive idea is that manipulation of the chaperones might allow increased folding and trafficking of the mutant proteins, and thereby partial restoration of function. This Review outlines the roles of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in the best-studied paradigms of ion-channel-misfolding disease--the CFTR chloride channel in cystic fibrosis and the hERG potassium channel in cardiac long QT syndrome type 2. In addition, other ion channels implicated in ion-channel-misfolding diseases are discussed.

  19. Tracking the interplay between bound peptide and the lid domain of DnaK, using molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Itzhaq; Kucherenko, Nataly; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Azem, Abdussalam; Tsfadia, Yossi

    2013-06-17

    Hsp70 chaperones consist of two functional domains: the 44 kDa Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD), that binds and hydrolyses ATP, and the 26 kDa Substrate Binding Domain (SBD), which binds unfolded proteins and reactivates them, utilizing energy obtained from nucleotide hydrolysis. The structure of the SBD of the bacterial Hsp70, DnaK, consists of two sub-domains: A β-sandwich part containing the hydrophobic cavity to which the hepta-peptide NRLLLTG (NR) is bound, and a segment made of 5 α-helices, called the "lid" that caps the top of the β-sandwich domain. In the present study we used the Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK, as a model for Hsp70 proteins, focusing on its SBD domain, examining the changes in the lid conformation. We deliberately decoupled the NBD from the SBD, limiting the study to the structure of the SBD section, with an emphasis on the interaction between the charges of the peptide with the residues located in the lid. Molecular dynamics simulations of the complex revealed significant mobility within the lid structure; as the structure was released from the forces operating during the crystallization process, the two terminal helices established a contact with the positive charge at the tip of the peptide. This contact is manifested only in the presence of electrostatic attraction. The observed internal motions within the lid provide a molecular role for the function of this sub-domain during the reaction cycle of Hsp 70 chaperones.

  20. Immunization of mice with a novel recombinant molecular chaperon confers protection against Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Amir; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Mautner, Josef; Salari, Mohammad Hossein; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2014-11-20

    Brucella spp. are zoonotic Gram-negative intracellular pathogens with the ability to survive and replicate in phagocytes. It has been shown that bacterial proteins expressed abundantly in this niche are stress-related proteins capable of triggering effective immune responses. BMEI1549 is a molecular chaperone designated DnaK that is expressed under stress conditions and helps to prevent formation of protein aggregates. In order to study the potential of DnaK as a prospective Brucella subunit vaccine, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant DnaK from Brucella melitensis was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The dnak gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resulting recombinant protein used as subunit vaccine. DnaK-immunized mice showed a strong lymphocyte proliferative response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Although comparable levels of antigen-specific IgG2a and IgG1 were observed in immunized mice, high amounts of IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-6, no detectable level of IL-4 and very low levels of IL-10 and IL-5 were produced by splenocytes of vaccinated mice suggesting induction of a Th1 dominant immune response by DnaK. Compared to control animals, mice vaccinated with DnaK exhibited a significant degree of protection against subsequent Brucella infection (p<0.001), albeit this protection was less than the protection conferred by Rev.1 (p<0.05). A further increase in protection was observed, when DnaK was combined with recombinant Omp31. Notably, this combination, as opposed to each component alone, induced statistically similar level of protection as induced by Rev.1 suggesting that DnaK could be viewed as a promising candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against brucellosis.

  1. Improved Fab presentation on phage surface with the use of molecular chaperone coplasmid system.

    PubMed

    Loh, Qiuting; Leong, Siew Wen; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-05-15

    The low presentation efficiency of Fab (fragment antigen binding) fragments during phage display is largely due to the complexity of disulphide bond formation. This can result in the presentation of Fab fragments devoid of a light chain during phage display. Here we propose the use of a coplasmid system encoding several molecular chaperones (DsbA, DsbC, FkpA, and SurA) to improve Fab packaging. A comparison was done using the Fab fragment from IgG and IgD. We found that the use of the coplasmid during phage packaging was able to improve the presentation efficiency of the Fab fragment on phage surfaces. A modified version of panning using the coplasmid system was evaluated and was successful at enriching Fab binders. Therefore, the coplasmid system would be an attractive alternative for improved Fab presentation for phage display.

  2. Molecular Chaperones, Cochaperones, and Ubiquitination/Deubiquitination System: Involvement in the Production of High Quality Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process in which mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation events coexist. The need to guarantee the production of qualitatively functional spermatozoa has evolved into several control systems that check spermatogenesis progression/sperm maturation and tag aberrant gametes for degradation. In this review, we will focus on the importance of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways involving molecular chaperones belonging to the superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSPs), their cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system all over the spermatogenetic process. In this respect, we will discuss the conserved role played by the DNAJ protein Msj-1 (mouse sperm cell-specific DNAJ first homologue) and the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubpy (ubiquitin-specific processing protease-y) during the spermiogenesis in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:25045686

  3. Molecular chaperones, cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system: involvement in the production of high quality spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process in which mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation events coexist. The need to guarantee the production of qualitatively functional spermatozoa has evolved into several control systems that check spermatogenesis progression/sperm maturation and tag aberrant gametes for degradation. In this review, we will focus on the importance of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways involving molecular chaperones belonging to the superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSPs), their cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system all over the spermatogenetic process. In this respect, we will discuss the conserved role played by the DNAJ protein Msj-1 (mouse sperm cell-specific DNAJ first homologue) and the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubpy (ubiquitin-specific processing protease-y) during the spermiogenesis in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates.

  4. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  5. NMR characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A.; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2017-01-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologs are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by CD and NMR spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residues 16–41 and 55–76. NMR backbone dynamics data show that the helices in PcrG have semi-rigid flexibility and they tumble as a single entity with similar backbone dynamics. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from 9–76 is involved in binding to PcrV. Thus the PcrG family of T3SS chaperone proteins is essentially partially folded. PMID:26451841

  6. Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 as an Assay System for Screening of Pharmacological Chaperones for Phenylketonuria Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Min; Yang, Yun Gyeong; Kim, Hye-Lim; Park, Young Shik

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed an assay system for missense mutations in human phenylalanine hydroxylases (hPAHs). To demonstrate the reliability of the system, eight mutant proteins (F39L, K42I, L48S, I65T, R252Q, L255V, S349L, and R408W) were expressed in a mutant strain (pah(-)) of Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 disrupted in the indigenous gene encoding PAH. The transformed pah- cells grown in FM minimal medium were measured for growth rate and PAH activity to reveal a positive correlation between them. The protein level of hPAH was also determined by western blotting to show the impact of each mutation on protein stability and catalytic activity. The result was highly compatible with the previous ones obtained from other expression systems, suggesting that Dictyostelium is a dependable alternative to other expression systems. Furthermore, we found that both the protein level and activity of S349L and R408W, which were impaired severely in protein stability, were rescued in HL5 nutrient medium. Although the responsible component(s) remains unidentified, this unexpected finding showed an important advantage of our expression system for studying unstable proteins. As an economic and stable cell-based expression system, our development will contribute to mass-screening of pharmacological chaperones for missense PAH mutations as well as to the in-depth characterization of individual mutations.

  7. A bacteriophage-encoded J-domain protein interacts with the DnaK/Hsp70 chaperone and stabilizes the heat-shock factor σ32 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Perrody, Elsa; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Desplats, Carine; Keppel, France; Schwager, Françoise; Tranier, Samuel; Georgopoulos, Costa; Genevaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The universally conserved J-domain proteins (JDPs) are obligate cochaperone partners of the Hsp70 (DnaK) chaperone. They stimulate Hsp70's ATPase activity, facilitate substrate delivery, and confer specific cellular localization to Hsp70. In this work, we have identified and characterized the first functional JDP protein encoded by a bacteriophage. Specifically, we show that the ORFan gene 057w of the T4-related enterobacteriophage RB43 encodes a bona fide JDP protein, named Rki, which specifically interacts with the Escherichia coli host multifunctional DnaK chaperone. However, in sharp contrast with the three known host JDP cochaperones of DnaK encoded by E. coli, Rki does not act as a generic cochaperone in vivo or in vitro. Expression of Rki alone is highly toxic for wild-type E. coli, but toxicity is abolished in the absence of endogenous DnaK or when the conserved J-domain of Rki is mutated. Further in vivo analyses revealed that Rki is expressed early after infection by RB43 and that deletion of the rki gene significantly impairs RB43 proliferation. Furthermore, we show that mutations in the host dnaK gene efficiently suppress the growth phenotype of the RB43 rki deletion mutant, thus indicating that Rki specifically interferes with DnaK cellular function. Finally, we show that the interaction of Rki with the host DnaK chaperone rapidly results in the stabilization of the heat-shock factor σ(32), which is normally targeted for degradation by DnaK. The mechanism by which the Rki-dependent stabilization of σ(32) facilitates RB43 bacteriophage proliferation is discussed.

  8. Catapult mechanism renders the chaperone action of Hsp70 unidirectional.

    PubMed

    Gisler, S M; Pierpaoli, E V; Christen, P

    1998-06-19

    Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 type promote the folding and membrane translocation of proteins. The interaction of Hsp70s with polypeptides is linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis. We formed complexes of seven different fluorescence-labeled peptides with DnaK, the Hsp70 homolog of Escherichia coli, and determined the rate of peptide release under two different sets of conditions. (1) Upon addition of ATP to nucleotide-free peptide.DnaK complexes, all tested peptides were released with similar rate constants (2.2 s-1 to 6.7 s-1). (2) In the binding equilibrium of peptide and ATP-liganded DnaK, the dissociation followed one or two-step reactions, depending on the amino acid sequence of the peptide. For the monophasic reactions, the dissociation rate constants diverged by four orders of magnitude from 0.0004 s-1 to 5.7 s-1; for the biphasic reactions, the rate constants of the second, slower isomerization step were in the range from 0.3 s-1 to 0.0005 s-1. The release of the different peptides in case (1) is 1.4 to 14,000 times faster than in case (2). Apparently, binding of ATP induces a transient state of the chaperone which ejects target peptides before the final state of ATP-liganded DnaK is reached. This "catapult" mechanism provides the chaperone cycle with a mode of peptide release that does not correspond with the reverse of peptide binding. By allowing the conformation of the outgoing polypeptide to differ from that of the incoming polypeptide, a futile cycle with respect to conformational work exerted on the target protein is obviated.

  9. Cloning, sequencing and analysis of dnaK -dnaJ gene cluster of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Bao, Fangming; Gong, Lei; Shao, Weilan

    2008-12-01

    The DNA fragment of heat shock genes (hrcA-grpE-dnaK-dnaJ) containing complete hrcA-grpE-dnaK operon and the transcription unit of dnaJ was cloned, sequensed and analyzed from Bacillus megaterium RF5. The sequence of hrcA, grpE and dnaJ were first time reported, and their coding products exibit 60%, 63% and 81% of identities to the homologs of B. subtilis. A sigmaA-type promoter of Gram-positive bacteria (PA1) and a terminator were located upstream of the hrcA and downstream of dnaK, and a Controlling inverted repeat of chaperone expression element (CIRCE) was identified between PA1 and hrcA. Another sigmaA-type promoter (PA2) and a terminator were found upstream and downstream of dnaJ, indicating B. megaterium has a transcription unit containing a single gene dnaJ. The structure of dnaJ transcription unit is more similar to that of Listeria monocytogenes than other species of Bacillus. A partial protein-based phylogenetic tree, derived from Gram-positive bacteria using HrcA sequence, indicated a closer phylogenetic relationship between B. megaterium and Geobacillus species than other two Bacillus species.

  10. Molecular cloning of the dnaK locus, and purification and characterization of a DnaK protein from Bacillus brevis HPD31.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, H; Yamakawa, M; Mizukami, M; Takagi, H; Tokunaga, M

    1998-09-08

    Using part of the dnaK gene from Bacillus subtilis as a probe, a 4. 4-kbp SacI-BglII fragment of chromosomal DNA of Bacillus brevis, a protein-hypersecreting bacterium, was cloned. Nucleotide sequencing revealed 3 open reading frames in the order of grpE-dnaK-dnaJ homologues. We purified DnaK protein to homogeneity from B. brevis HPD31 harboring a multi-copy dnaK expression plasmid. Purified DnaK showed ATPase activity which was synergistically stimulated 14-fold by the addition of glutathione S-transferase-DnaJ and glutathione S-transferase-GrpE fusion proteins. DnaK hydrolyzed not only ATP but also CTP, UTP, and GTP at about 40% of the efficiency of ATP. The specific activity of DnaK-ATPase was 7.25x10-3 unit/mg protein (the turnover number against ATP was 0.47 min-1) under our assay conditions. The DnaK dimers dissociated into monomers on addition of ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP and ATPgammaS, but not ADP or AMP. DnaK formed a stable complex with permanently unfolded carboxymethylated alpha-lactalbumin but not with native alpha-lactalbumin, and this complex was dissociated by addition of ATP/Mg. Formation of this complex was inhibited in the presence of inorganic phosphate.

  11. Multilevel interaction of the DnaK/DnaJ(HSP70/HSP40) stress-responsive chaperone machine with the central metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Anglès, Fréderic; Castanié-Cornet, Marie-Pierre; Slama, Nawel; Dinclaux, Mickael; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Portais, Jean-Charles; Létisse, Fabien; Genevaux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Networks of molecular chaperones maintain cellular protein homeostasis by acting at nearly every step in the biogenesis of proteins and protein complexes. Herein, we demonstrate that the major chaperone DnaK/HSP70 of the model bacterium Escherichia coli is critical for the proper functioning of the central metabolism and for the cellular response to carbon nutrition changes, either directly or indirectly via the control of the heat-shock response. We identified carbon sources whose utilization was positively or negatively affected by DnaK and isolated several central metabolism genes (among other genes identified in this work) that compensate for the lack of DnaK and/or DnaK/Trigger Factor chaperone functions in vivo. Using carbon sources with specific entry points coupled to NMR analyses of real-time carbon assimilation, metabolic coproducts production and flux rearrangements, we demonstrate that DnaK significantly impacts the hierarchical order of carbon sources utilization, the excretion of main coproducts and the distribution of metabolic fluxes, thus revealing a multilevel interaction of DnaK with the central metabolism. PMID:28128357

  12. TAC from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a paradigm for stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin systems controlled by SecB-like chaperones.

    PubMed

    Sala, Ambre; Calderon, Virginie; Bordes, Patricia; Genevaux, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial type II toxin-antitoxins (TAs) are two-component systems that modulate growth in response to specific stress conditions, thus promoting adaptation and persistence. The major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis potentially encodes 75 TAs and it has been proposed that persistence induced by active toxins might be relevant for its pathogenesis. In this work, we focus on the newly discovered toxin-antitoxin-chaperone (TAC) system of M. tuberculosis, an atypical stress-responsive TA system tightly controlled by a molecular chaperone that shows similarity to the canonical SecB chaperone involved in Sec-dependent protein export in Gram-negative bacteria. We performed a large-scale genome screening to reconstruct the evolutionary history of TAC systems and found that TAC is not restricted to mycobacteria and seems to have disseminated in diverse taxonomic groups by horizontal gene transfer. Our results suggest that TAC chaperones are evolutionary related to the solitary chaperone SecB and have diverged to become specialized toward their cognate antitoxins.

  13. Molecular chaperones encoded by a reduced nucleus: the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    PubMed

    Archibald, J M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U; Douglas, S

    2001-06-01

    Molecular chaperones mediate the correct folding of nascent or denatured proteins and are found in both the organelles and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Cryptomonad algae are unusual in possessing an extra cytoplasmic compartment (the periplastid space), the result of having engulfed and retained a photosynthetic eukaryote. Within the periplastid space is a diminutive nucleus (the nucleomorph) that encodes mostly genes for its own expression as well as a few needed by the plastid. Two plastid-encoded chaperones (GroEL and DnaK) and a nucleomorph-encoded chaperone (Cpn60) have been reported from the cryptomonad, Guillardia theta. Here we analyse G. theta nucleomorph genes for members of the cytosolic HSP70 and HSP90 families of molecular chaperones, a heat shock transcription factor (HSF), and all eight subunits of the group II chaperonin, CCT. These are presumably all active in the periplastid space, assisting in the maturation of polypeptides required by the cell; we propose a central role for them also in the structure and assembly of a putative relict mitotic apparatus. Curiously, none of the genes for co-chaperones of HSP70, HSP90, or CCT have been detected in the nucleomorph genome; they are either not needed or are encoded in the host nuclear genome and targeted back into the periplastid space. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of HSP70 and HSP90 are also not present. Striking differences in the degree of conservation of the various nucleomorph-encoded molecular chaperones were observed. While the G. theta HSP70 and HSP90 homologs are well conserved, each of the eight CCT subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, and zeta) is remarkably divergent. Such differences are likely evidence for reduced/different functional constraints on the various molecular chaperones functioning in the periplastid space.

  14. Development and characterization of membrane surface display system using molecular chaperon, prsA, of Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June-Hyung; Park, In-Suk; Kim, Byung-Gee . E-mail: byungkim@snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-09

    We report a new membrane surface display system based on molecular chaperon, prsA, of Bacillus subtilis. Clostridium thermocellum cellulase, celA, was fused to C-terminal end of PrsA. Cellulase activity of B. subtilis protoplast, which expressed PrsA-CelA was 15 times higher compared to control strain. More than 85% of total cellulase activity was observed in surface displayed format and less than 15% of total cellulase activity was found in supernatant. Flow cytometric analysis of protoplast of PrsA-CelA fusion expressing bacteria provided another proof of uniform expression of fusion protein onto cytoplasmic membrane of B. subtilis. Without lysozyme treatment, only part of cellulase activity (10%) was observed in whole cell fraction.

  15. Features of dnaK operon genes of the obligate thermophile Bacillus thermoglucosidasius KP1006.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Iwashiro, T; Suzuki, Y

    2000-04-01

    The dnaK gene was cloned from the obligate thermophile Bacillus thermoglucosidasius KP1006, together with the grpE and dnaJ genes in the same operon. The dnaK, grpE and dnaJ genes showed high identity with those of other bacterial strains, particularly with those of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36, despite an extremely low homology for the corresponding total genomic DNA. There were significant differences in the proline content of the DnaK operon proteins which is closely correlated with the thermostability of enzyme proteins. The proline content was higher in the GrpE, DnaK and DnaJ proteins of the thermophilic as opposed to the mesophilic strains. The overexpression of the B. thermoglucosidasius DnaK protein in Escherichia coli MV1184 results in extreme filamentation without inhibition on cell growth. The B. thermoglucosidasius DnaK protein seemed to exclusively disturb septation in E. coli cells which suggests that it interacts with key protein(s) involved in cell septation.

  16. Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein DnaK: Production and Consequences in Terms of Monitoring Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Karine; Lessard, Martin; Piette, Gabriel; Lacroix, Monique; Saucier, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Through use of commercially available DnaK proteins and anti-DnaK monoclonal antibodies, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantify this heat shock protein in Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 subjected to various heating regimens. For a given process lethality (F7010 of 1, 3, and 5 min), the intracellular concentration of DnaK in E. coli varied with the heating temperature (50 or 55°C). In fact, the highest DnaK concentrations were found after treatments at the lower temperature (50°C) applied for a longer time. Residual DnaK after heating was found to be necessary for cell recovery, and additional DnaK was produced during the recovery process. Overall, higher intracellular concentrations of DnaK tended to enhance cell resistance to a subsequent lethal stress. Indeed, E. coli cells that had undergone a sublethal heat shock (105 min at 55°C, F7010 = 3 min) accompanied by a 12-h recovery (containing 76,786 ± 25,230 molecules/cell) resisted better than exponentially growing cells (38,500 ± 6,056 molecules/cell) when later heated to 60°C for 50 min (F7010 = 5 min). Results reported here suggest that using stress protein to determine cell adaptation and survival, rather than cell counts alone, may lead to more efficient heat treatment. PMID:12788720

  17. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  18. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    PubMed

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  19. Topology and dynamics of the 10 kDa C-terminal domain of DnaK in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, E. B.; Zhou, H.; Lowry, D. F.; Flynn, G. C.; Dahlquist, F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hsp70 molecular chaperones contain three distinct structural domains, a 44 kDa N-terminal ATPase domain, a 17 kDa peptide-binding domain, and a 10 kDa C-terminal domain. The ATPase and peptide binding domains are conserved in sequence and are functionally well characterized. The function of the 10 kDa variable C-terminal domain is less well understood. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the C-terminal domain from the Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK, in solution by high-resolution NMR. The domain was shown to be comprised of a rigid structure consisting of four helices and a flexible C-terminal subdomain of approximately 33 amino acids. The mobility of the flexible region is maintained in the context of the full-length protein and does not appear to be modulated by the nucleotide state. The flexibility of this region appears to be a conserved feature of Hsp70 architecture and may have important functional implications. We also developed a method to analyze 15N nuclear spin relaxation data, which allows us to extract amide bond vector directions relative to a unique diffusion axis. The extracted angles and rotational correlation times indicate that the helices form an elongated, bundle-like structure in solution. PMID:10048327

  20. Important role of class I heat shock genes hrcA and dnaK in the heat shock response and the response to pH and NaCl stress of group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Selby, Katja; Lindström, Miia; Somervuo, Panu; Heap, John T; Minton, Nigel P; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    Class I heat shock genes (HSGs) code for molecular chaperones which play a major role in the bacterial response to sudden increases of environmental temperature by assisting protein folding. Quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR gene expression analysis of the food-borne pathogen Clostridium botulinum grown at 37°C showed that the class I HSGs grpE, dnaK, dnaJ, groEL, and groES and their repressor, hrcA, were expressed at constant levels in the exponential and transitional growth phases, whereas strong downregulation of all six genes was observed during stationary phase. After heat shock from 37 to 45°C, all HSGs were transiently upregulated. A mutant with insertionally inactivated hrcA expressed higher levels of class I HSGs during exponential growth than the wild type, followed by upregulation of only groES and groES after heat shock. Inactivation of hrcA or of dnaK encoding a major chaperone resulted in lower maximum growth temperatures than for the wild type and reduced growth rates under optimal conditions compared to the wild type. The dnaK mutant showed growth inhibition under all tested temperature, pH, and NaCl stress conditions. In contrast, the growth of an hrcA mutant was unaffected by mild temperature or acid stress compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that induced class I HSGs support growth under moderately nonoptimal conditions. We show that the expression of class I HSGs plays a major role for survival and growth of C. botulinum under the stressful environmental conditions that may be encountered during food processing or growth in food products, in the mammalian intestine, or in wounds.

  1. Aptamer-Enabled Manipulation of the Hsp70 Chaperone System Suggests a Novel Strategy for Targeted Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Thirunavukarasu, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp70 chaperone system plays an important role in protein quality control by assisting in the folding and clearance of misfolded proteins. However, the mechanism by which it chooses between folding and degradation pathways is not fully understood. In this study, we used an RNA aptamer for Hsp70 to perturb the function of Hsp70 in cell-free systems. We found that the aptamer inhibited both Hsp70-mediated folding and Hsp70-CHIP-mediated ubiquitination/degradation of a misfolded protein substrate. Based on these results, we explored a novel strategy for targeted protein ubiquitination, using an engineered bifunctional aptamer to tether a protein substrate to Hsp70. We demonstrated that increased Hsp70-CHIP-mediated ubiquitination of the tethered protein substrate can be specifically induced by this bifunctional aptamer. This strategy may be useful in selective degradation of disease-causing proteins for therapeutic purposes. In addition, these studies provide insight into the mechanism of Hsp70-mediated protein triage. PMID:26640962

  2. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality.

    PubMed

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro.

  3. Purification of the outer membrane usher protein and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complexes from the P and type 1 pilus systems.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Nadine S; Thanassi, David G

    2013-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of protein secretion by bacteria requires the purification of secretion machinery components and the isolation of complexes between the secretion machinery and substrate proteins. Here, we describe methods for the purification of proteins from the chaperone/usher pathway, which is a conserved secretion pathway dedicated to the assembly of polymeric surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae in gram-negative bacteria. Specifically, we describe the isolation of the PapC and FimD usher proteins from the bacterial outer membrane, and the purification of PapD-PapG and FimC-FimH chaperone--subunit complexes from the periplasm. These Pap and Fim proteins belong to the P and type 1 pilus systems of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, respectively.

  4. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245 gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates. PMID:23441204

  5. The heat-shock DnaK protein is required for plasmid R1 replication and it is dispensable for plasmid ColE1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo-Suárez, R; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Díaz-Orejas, R; Malki, A; Kohiyama, M

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid R1 replication in vitro is inactive in extracts prepared from a dnaK756 strain but is restored to normal levels upon addition of purified DnaK protein. Replication of R1 in extracts of a dnaKwt strain can be specifically inhibited with polyclonal antibodies against DnaK. RepA-dependent replication of R1 in dnaK756 extracts supplemented with DnaKwt protein at maximum concentration is partially inhibited by rifampicin and it is severely inhibited at sub-optimal concentrations of DnaK protein. The copy number of a run-away R1 vector is reduced in a dnaK756 background at 30 degrees C and at 42 degrees C the amplification of the run-away R1 vector is prevented. However a runaway R1 vector containing dnaK gene allows the amplification of the plasmid at high temperature. These data indicate that DnaK is required for both in vitro and in vivo replication of plasmid R1 and show a partial compensation for the low level of DnaK by RNA polymerase. In contrast ColE1 replication is not affected by DnaK as indicated by the fact that ColE1 replicates with the same efficiency in extracts from dnaKwt and dnaK756 strains. Images PMID:8265367

  6. Binding of a Small Molecule at a Protein–Protein Interface Regulates the Chaperone Activity of Hsp70–Hsp40

    PubMed Central

    Wisén, Susanne; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Thompson, Andrea D.; Patury, Srikanth; Ung, Peter; Chang, Lyra; Evans, Christopher G.; Walter, Gladis M.; Wipf, Peter; Carlson, Heather A.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a highly conserved molecular chaperone that plays multiple roles in protein homeostasis. In these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by interactions with co-chaperones, such as Hsp40. The Hsp40 family of co-chaperones binds to Hsp70 through a conserved J-domain, and these factors stimulate ATPase and protein-folding activity. Using chemical screens, we identified a compound, 115-7c, which acts as an artificial co-chaperone for Hsp70. Specifically, the activities of 115-7c mirrored those of a Hsp40; the compound stimulated the ATPase and protein-folding activities of a prokaryotic Hsp70 (DnaK) and partially compensated for a Hsp40 loss-of-function mutation in yeast. Consistent with these observations, NMR and mutagenesis studies indicate that the binding site for 115-7c is adjacent to a region on DnaK that is required for J-domain-mediated stimulation. Interestingly, we found that 115-7c and the Hsp40 do not compete for binding but act in concert. Using this information, we introduced additional steric bulk to 115-7c and converted it into an inhibitor. Thus, these chemical probes either promote or inhibit chaperone functions by regulating Hsp70–Hsp40 complex assembly at a native protein–protein interface. This unexpected mechanism may provide new avenues for exploring how chaperones and co-chaperones cooperate to shape protein homeostasis. PMID:20481474

  7. Trapping and Identification of Cellular Substrates of the Staphylococcus aureus ClpC Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Justin W.; Lei, Mei G.

    2013-01-01

    ClpC is an ATP-dependent Hsp100/Clp chaperone involved in protein quality control in low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Previously, we found that ClpC affected the expression of a large number of genes, including capsule genes in Staphylococcus aureus. Here we constructed a His-tagged ClpC variant (ClpCtrap) with mutations within the Walker B motifs to identify the direct substrates of ClpC by copurification with ClpCtrap followed by gel electrophoresis combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. We identified a total of 103 proteins that are potential substrates of ClpC in strain Newman. The direct protein-protein interaction of ClpC with a subset of the captured proteins was verified in a bacterial two-hybrid system. The captured proteins could be grouped into various functional categories, but most were related to proteins involved in the stress response. Several known ClpC substrates were captured, including ClpP, TrfA/MecA, ClpB, DnaK, DnaJ, GroL, RecA, and CodY, supporting the validity of our approach. Our results also revealed many new ClpC substrates, including AgrA, CcpA, RsbW, MurG, FtsA, SrtA, Rex, Atl, ClfA, and SbcC. Analysis of capsule production showed that three of the captured proteins, which were not previously known to be transcriptional regulators, did affect capsule production. PMID:23913326

  8. Systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for production of the chemical chaperone ectoine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stabilizing and function-preserving effects of ectoines have attracted considerable biotechnological interest up to industrial scale processes for their production. These rely on the release of ectoines from high-salinity-cultivated microbial producer cells upon an osmotic down-shock in rather complex processor configurations. There is growing interest in uncoupling the production of ectoines from the typical conditions required for their synthesis, and instead design strains that naturally release ectoines into the medium without the need for osmotic changes, since the use of high-salinity media in the fermentation process imposes notable constraints on the costs, design, and durability of fermenter systems. Results Here, we used a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain as a cellular chassis to establish a microbial cell factory for the biotechnological production of ectoines. The implementation of a mutant aspartokinase enzyme ensured efficient supply of L-aspartate-beta-semialdehyde, the precursor for ectoine biosynthesis. We further engineered the genome of the basic C. glutamicum strain by integrating a codon-optimized synthetic ectABCD gene cluster under expressional control of the strong and constitutive C. glutamicum tuf promoter. The resulting recombinant strain produced ectoine and excreted it into the medium; however, lysine was still found as a by-product. Subsequent inactivation of the L-lysine exporter prevented the undesired excretion of lysine while ectoine was still exported. Using the streamlined cell factory, a fed-batch process was established that allowed the production of ectoine with an overall productivity of 6.7 g L-1 day-1 under growth conditions that did not rely on the use of high-salinity media. Conclusions The present study describes the construction of a stable microbial cell factory for recombinant production of ectoine. We successfully applied metabolic engineering strategies to optimize its synthetic production in the

  9. Molecular chaperones as rational drug targets for Parkinson's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kalia, S K; Kalia, L V; McLean, P J

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is caused, in part, by the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta of the basal ganglia. The presence of intracellular protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, within the surviving nigral neurons is the defining neuropathological feature of the disease. Accordingly, the identification of specific genes mutated in families with Parkinson's disease and of genetic susceptibility variants for idiopathic Parkinson's disease has implicated abnormalities in proteostasis, or the handling and elimination of misfolded proteins, in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Protein folding and the refolding of misfolded proteins are regulated by a network of interactive molecules, known as the chaperone system, which is composed of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. The chaperone system is intimately associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway which are responsible for elimination of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition to their role in proteostasis, some chaperone molecules are involved in the regulation of cell death pathways. Here we review the role of the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, and the cochaperones Hsp40, BAG family members such as BAG5, CHIP and Hip in modulating neuronal death with a focus on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. We also review current progress in preclinical studies aimed at targetting the chaperone system to prevent neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss potential future chaperone-based therapeutics for the symptomatic treatment and possible disease modification of Parkinson's disease.

  10. Cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics bind to the N-terminal domain of the prokaryotic Hsp90 to inhibit the chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Shun; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Sueoka, Keigo; Osada, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Hitoshi

    2011-04-01

    Chemical arrays were employed to screen ligands for HtpG, the prokaryotic homologue of Hsp (heat-shock protein) 90. We found that colistins and the closely related polymyxin B interact physically with HtpG. They bind to the N-terminal domain of HtpG specifically without affecting its ATPase activity. The interaction caused inhibition of chaperone function of HtpG that suppresses thermal aggregation of substrate proteins. Further studies were performed with one of these cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics, colistin sulfate salt. It inhibited the chaperone function of the N-terminal domain of HtpG. However, it inhibited neither the chaperone function of the middle domain of HtpG nor that of other molecular chaperones such as DnaK, the prokaryotic homologue of Hsp70, and small Hsp. The addition of colistin sulfate salt increased surface hydrophobicity of the N-terminal domain of HtpG and induced oligomerization of HtpG and its N-terminal domain. These structural changes are discussed in relation to the inhibition of the chaperone function.

  11. The PprA-PprB two-component system activates CupE, the first non-archetypal Pseudomonas aeruginosa chaperone-usher pathway system assembling fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Caroline; Bernard, Christophe S; Calderon, Virginie; Yang, Liang; Filloux, Alain; Molin, Søren; Fichant, Gwennaele; Bordi, Christophe; de Bentzmann, Sophie

    2011-03-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has redundant molecular systems that contribute to its pathogenicity. Those assembling fimbrial structures promote complex organized community lifestyle. We characterized a new 5.8 kb genetic locus, cupE, that includes the conserved usher- and chaperone-encoding genes. This locus, widely conserved in different bacterial species, contains four additional genes encoding non-archetypal fimbrial subunits. We first evidenced that the cupE gene cluster was specifically expressed in biofilm conditions and was responsible for fibre assembly containing at least CupE1 protein, at the bacterial cell surface. These fimbriae not only played a significant role in the early stages (microcolony and macrocolony formation) but also in shaping 3D mushrooms during P. aeruginosa biofilm development. Using wide-genome transposon mutagenesis, we identified the PprAB two-component system (TCS) as a regulator of cupE expression, and further demonstrated the involvement of the PprAB TCS in direct CupE fimbrial assembly activation. Thus, this TCS represents a new regulatory element controlling the transition between planktonic and community lifestyles in P. aeruginosa.

  12. Molecular chaperones and photoreceptor function

    PubMed Central

    Kosmaoglou, Maria; Schwarz, Nele; Bett, John S.; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular chaperones facilitate and regulate protein conformational change within cells. This encompasses many fundamental cellular processes: including the correct folding of nascent chains; protein transport and translocation; signal transduction and protein quality control. Chaperones are, therefore, important in several forms of human disease, including neurodegeneration. Within the retina, the highly specialized photoreceptor cell presents a fascinating paradigm to investigate the specialization of molecular chaperone function and reveals unique chaperone requirements essential to photoreceptor function. Mutations in several photoreceptor proteins lead to protein misfolding mediated neurodegeneration. The best characterized of these are mutations in the molecular light sensor, rhodopsin, which cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Rhodopsin biogenesis is likely to require chaperones, while rhodopsin misfolding involves molecular chaperones in quality control and the cellular response to protein aggregation. Furthermore, the specialization of components of the chaperone machinery to photoreceptor specific roles has been revealed by the identification of mutations in molecular chaperones that cause inherited retinal dysfunction and degeneration. These chaperones are involved in several important cellular pathways and further illuminate the essential and diverse roles of molecular chaperones. PMID:18490186

  13. Bacterial proteostasis balances energy and chaperone utilization efficiently.

    PubMed

    Santra, Mantu; Farrell, Daniel W; Dill, Ken A

    2017-03-28

    Chaperones are protein complexes that help to fold and disaggregate a cell's proteins. It is not understood how four major chaperone systems of Escherichia coli work together in proteostasis: the recognition, sorting, folding, and disaggregating of the cell's many different proteins. Here, we model this machine. We combine extensive data on chaperoning, folding, and aggregation rates with expression levels of proteins and chaperones measured at different growth rates. We find that the proteostasis machine recognizes and sorts a client protein based on two biophysical properties of the client's misfolded state (M state): its stability and its kinetic accessibility from its unfolded state (U state). The machine is energy-efficient (the sickest proteins use the most ATP-expensive chaperones), comprehensive (it can handle any type of protein), and economical (the chaperone concentrations are just high enough to keep the whole proteome folded and disaggregated but no higher). The cell needs higher chaperone levels in two situations: fast growth (when protein production rates are high) and very slow growth (to mitigate the effects of protein degradation). This type of model complements experimental knowledge by showing how the various chaperones work together to achieve the broad folding and disaggregation needs of the cell.

  14. Bacterial proteostasis balances energy and chaperone utilization efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Mantu; Farrell, Daniel W.; Dill, Ken A.

    2017-01-01

    Chaperones are protein complexes that help to fold and disaggregate a cell’s proteins. It is not understood how four major chaperone systems of Escherichia coli work together in proteostasis: the recognition, sorting, folding, and disaggregating of the cell’s many different proteins. Here, we model this machine. We combine extensive data on chaperoning, folding, and aggregation rates with expression levels of proteins and chaperones measured at different growth rates. We find that the proteostasis machine recognizes and sorts a client protein based on two biophysical properties of the client’s misfolded state (M state): its stability and its kinetic accessibility from its unfolded state (U state). The machine is energy-efficient (the sickest proteins use the most ATP-expensive chaperones), comprehensive (it can handle any type of protein), and economical (the chaperone concentrations are just high enough to keep the whole proteome folded and disaggregated but no higher). The cell needs higher chaperone levels in two situations: fast growth (when protein production rates are high) and very slow growth (to mitigate the effects of protein degradation). This type of model complements experimental knowledge by showing how the various chaperones work together to achieve the broad folding and disaggregation needs of the cell. PMID:28292901

  15. Molecular chaperones and neuronal proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather L.; Li, Wenwen; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for maintaining the functionality of the proteome. The disruption of proteostasis, due to genetic mutations or an age-related decline, leads to aberrantly folded proteins that typically lose their function. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated protein is also cytotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed an intrinsic protein quality control network, of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Molecular chaperones function to promote efficient folding and target misfolded proteins for refolding or degradation. Increasing molecular chaperone expression can suppress protein aggregation and toxicity in numerous models of neurodegenerative disease; therefore, molecular chaperones are considered exciting therapeutic targets. Furthermore, mutations in several chaperones cause inherited neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the importance of molecular chaperones in neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the advances in understanding their protective mechanisms. PMID:25770416

  16. GroEL and dnaK genes of Escherichia coli are induced by UV irradiation and nalidixic acid in an htpR/sup +/-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, J.H.; Walker, G.C.

    1984-03-01

    Two proteins with molecular weights of 61,000 and 73,000 were found to be induced by UV light in Escherichia coli mutants in which the SOS responses are constitutively expressed. The induction of these proteins by UV light and nalidixic acid was shown to be independent of the recA/sup +/ lexA/sup +/ regulatory system. Analysis of these proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and comparison with the heat-shock proteins of E. coli revealed that the M/sub r/ 61,000 protein comigrated with the groEL gene product, that the M/sub r/ 73,000 protein comigrated with the dnaK gene product, and that other heat-shock proteins were also induced. The induction of groEL and dnaK by UV light and nalidixic acid is controlled by the htpR locus. The results suggest that the regulatory response of E. coli to agents such as UV light and nalidixic acid is more complex than previously thought. 35 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  17. EscC is a chaperone for the Edwardsiella tarda type III secretion system putative translocon components EseB and EseD.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Nan; Tan, Yuen Peng; Sivaraman, J; Mok, Yu-Keung; Mo, Zhao Lan; Leung, Ka Yin

    2007-06-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes disease in both humans and animals. Recently, a type III secretion system (T3SS) has been found to contribute to Ed. tarda pathogenesis. EseB, EseC and EseD were shown to be secreted by the T3SS and to be the major components of the extracellular proteins (ECPs). Based on sequence similarity, they have been proposed to function as the 'translocon' of the T3SS needle structure. In this study, it was shown that EseB, EseC and EseD formed a protein complex after secretion, which is consistent with their possible roles as translocon components. The secretion of EseB and EseD was dependent on EscC (previously named Orf2). EscC has the characteristics of a chaperone; it is a small protein (13 kDa), located next to the translocators in the T3SS gene cluster, and has a coiled-coil structure at the N-terminal region as predicted by coils. An in-frame deletion of escC abolished the secretion of EseB and EseD, and complementation of DeltaescC restored the export of EseB and EseD into the culture supernatant. Further studies showed that EscC is not a secreted protein and is located on the membrane and in the cytoplasm. Mutation of escC did not affect the transcription of eseB but reduced the amount of EseB as measured by using an EseB-LacZ fusion protein in Ed. tarda. Co-purification studies demonstrated that EscC formed complexes with EseB and EseD. The results suggest that EscC functions as a T3SS chaperone for the putative translocon components EseB and EseD in Ed. tarda.

  18. The interplay of Hrd3 and the molecular chaperone system ensures efficient degradation of malfolded secretory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Martin; Sommermeyer, Franziska; Berger, Maren; Kumar Lakshmipathy, Sathish; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus; Jarosch, Ernst; Sommer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway are extracted from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), polyubiquitylated by a protein complex termed the Hmg-CoA reductase degradation ligase (HRD-ligase), and degraded by cytosolic 26S proteasomes. This process is termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). We previously showed that the membrane protein Der1, which is a subunit of the HRD-ligase, is involved in the export of aberrant polypeptides from the ER. Unexpectedly, we also uncovered a close spatial proximity of Der1 and the substrate receptor Hrd3 in the ER lumen. We report here on a mutant Hrd3KR that is selectively defective for ERAD of soluble proteins. Hrd3KR displays subtle structural changes that affect its positioning toward Der1. Furthermore, increased quantities of the ER-resident Hsp70-type chaperone Kar2 and the Hsp40-type cochaperone Scj1 bind to Hrd3KR. Of note, deletion of SCJ1 impairs ERAD of model substrates and causes the accumulation of client proteins at Hrd3. Our data imply a function of Scj1 in the removal of malfolded proteins from the receptor Hrd3, which facilitates their delivery to downstream-acting components like Der1. PMID:25428985

  19. Chaperone activation by unfolding.

    PubMed

    Foit, Linda; George, Jenny S; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2013-04-02

    Conditionally disordered proteins can alternate between highly ordered and less ordered configurations under physiological conditions. Whereas protein function is often associated with the ordered conformation, for some of these conditionally unstructured proteins, the opposite applies: Their activation is associated with their unfolding. An example is the small periplasmic chaperone HdeA, which is critical for the ability of enteric bacterial pathogens like Escherichia coli to survive passage through extremely acidic environments, such as the human stomach. At neutral pH, HdeA is a chaperone-inactive dimer. On a shift to low pH, however, HdeA monomerizes, partially unfolds, and becomes rapidly active in preventing the aggregation of substrate proteins. By mutating two aspartic acid residues predicted to be responsible for the pH-dependent monomerization of HdeA, we have succeeded in isolating an HdeA mutant that is active at neutral pH. We find this HdeA mutant to be substantially destabilized, partially unfolded, and mainly monomeric at near-neutral pH at a concentration at which it prevents aggregation of a substrate protein. These results provide convincing evidence for direct activation of a protein by partial unfolding.

  20. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. PMID:22121495

  1. Synechocystis PCC6803 and PCC6906 dnaK2 expression confers salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis via reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghyun; Ahn, Myung Suk; Park, Young Min; Kim, Suk Weon; Min, Sung Ran; Jeong, Weon Joong; Liu, Jang R

    2014-02-01

    Abiotic stress slows plant growth and development. Because salt stress, particularly from NaCl, acts as an important limiting factor in agricultural productivity, the identification and manipulation of genes related to salt tolerance could improve crop productivity. Prokaryotic, heat shock protein (Hsp), DnaK from the ubiquitous Hsp70 family is upregulated in cells that are under abiotic stress. Synechocystis spp. cyanobacteria encode at least three potential DnaK proteins in their genome. Here, expressions of dnaK1s and dnaK2s from two Synechocystis spp. PCC6803 (Sy6803) and PCC6906 (Sy6906), enhanced salt tolerance in a dnaK-defective Escherichia coli strain. In contrast, dnaK3s in both strains were ineffective, indicating that dnaK3 is functionally different from dnaK1 and dnaK2 in Synechocystis spp. under salt stress. Ectopic expression of dnaK2s from Sy6803 and Sy6906 conferred salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, which exhibited greater root length, chlorophyll content, fresh weight, and survival rate than wild type plants, all in the presence of NaCl. In transgenic plants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation was reduced under NaCl stress and loss of chlorophyll content was reduced under H2O2 stress. Overall results suggest that dnaK2s from Sy6803 and Sy6906 confer salt and oxidative tolerance in transgenic plants by reduction of H2O2 accumulation.

  2. SIRT1 overexpression ameliorates a mouse model of SOD1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis via HSF1/HSP70i chaperone system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dominant mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) cause degeneration of motor neurons in a subset of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The pathogenetic process mediated by misfolded and/or aggregated mutant SOD1 polypeptides is hypothesized to be suppressed by protein refolding. This genetic study is aimed to test whether mutant SOD1-mediated ALS pathology recapitulated in mice could be alleviated by overexpressing a longevity-related deacetylase SIRT1 whose substrates include a transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the master regulator of the chaperone system. Results We established a line of transgenic mice that chronically overexpress SIRT1 in the brain and spinal cord. While inducible HSP70 (HSP70i) was upregulated in the spinal cord of SIRT1 transgenic mice (PrP-Sirt1), no neurological and behavioral alterations were detected. To test hypothetical benefits of SIRT1 overexpression, we crossbred PrP-Sirt1 mice with two lines of ALS model mice: A high expression line that exhibits a severe phenotype (SOD1G93A-H) or a low expression line with a milder phenotype (SOD1G93A-L). The Sirt1 transgene conferred longer lifespan without altering the time of symptomatic onset in SOD1G93A-L. Biochemical analysis of the spinal cord revealed that SIRT1 induced HSP70i expression through deacetylation of HSF1 and that SOD1G93A-L/PrP-Sirt1 double transgenic mice contained less insoluble SOD1 than SOD1G93A-L mice. Parallel experiments showed that Sirt1 transgene could not rescue a more severe phenotype of SOD1G93A-H transgenic mice partly because their HSP70i level had peaked out. Conclusions The genetic supplementation of SIRT1 can ameliorate a mutant SOD1-linked ALS mouse model partly through the activation of the HSF1/HSP70i chaperone system. Future studies shall include testing potential benefits of pharmacological enhancement of the deacetylation activity of SIRT1 after the onset of the symptom. PMID:25167838

  3. Exosome from chaperone-rich cell lysates-loaded dendritic cells produced by CELLine 1000 culture system exhibits potent immune activity.

    PubMed

    Bu, Ning; Wu, Haiqin; Zhang, Guilian; Ma, Xiaoling; Zhao, Ping; Zhai, Nina; Xiang, Li; Cao, Huifang; Yang, Xinli; Liu, Jingjie

    2015-01-02

    Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exosomes can stimulate efficient cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses and anti-tumor immunity. However, the quantity of DC-derived exosomes (DCex) obtained from various culture systems is very low, which is a significant practical issue hampering progress in this research area and needs to be addressed. Gliomas were particularly aggressive, with high morbidity and mortality, indicating that this is a form of incurable highly malignant tumor of the brain with poor prognosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that the CELLine 1000 culture system can dramatically increase the production of DCex. The morphology, phenotype and immune molecules of these DCex were found to be identical to those using traditional methods. Our researches supply a cost-effective, useful method for significantly increasing the quantity of exosomes. In addition, GL261 glioma cells were chosen to separate chaperone-rich cell lysates (CRCL). The results indicate that CRCL-GL261 cell lysates can trigger the most intense expression of immune molecules on DCex or DCs, which has important implications for the research into tumor treatment and diagnosis.

  4. Thermostability of lactate dehydrogenase LDH-A4 isoenzyme: effect of heat shock protein DnaK on the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zietara, M S; Skorkowski, E F

    1995-11-01

    Cells exposed to temperature a few degrees higher than their growth temperature synthesize heat shock proteins (hsp) which may then compose even 20% of total protein content. This paper examined the in vitro protective effect of heat shock protein DnaK (70 kDa) from Escherichia coli against the heat inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme LDH-A4. The LDH-A4 isoenzyme was purified from fish skeletal muscle using the affinity chromatography on Oxamate-agarose. The enzyme was then heated in the absence and the presence of DnaK protein in a water bath at either 51 or 55 degrees C. The LDH activity was determined by measuring the change in absorbency at 340 nm min-1 at 30 degrees C. The addition of DnaK protein to the LDH-A4 isoenzyme before heat treatment can protect enzyme activity against mild thermal inactivation. Incubation of the LDH-A4 isoenzyme at 51 degrees C in the presence of DnaK protein stimulates its activity by about 30%. The presence of 2 mM ATP can raise LDH activity by another 10%. No significant recovery was observed when DnaK protein was added to LDH at 25 degrees C following earlier inactivation. The maximal activities (Vmax) in the presence of DnaK protein are almost twice those without DnaK protein in the case of heat-treated LDH-A4 isoenzyme at 51 degrees C. The observed protection of LDH-A4 activity increased with the increasing DnaK protein concentration in the incubation medium. Results suggested that the presence of DnaK protein can protect LDH-A4 from heat inactivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. ATPase domain and interdomain linker play a key role in aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone Ssc1.

    PubMed

    Blamowska, Marta; Sichting, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2010-02-12

    The co-chaperone Hep1 is required to prevent the aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. We have analyzed the interaction of Hep1 with mitochondrial Hsp70 (Ssc1) and the determinants in Ssc1 that make it prone to aggregation. The ATPase and peptide binding domain (PBD) of Hsp70 proteins are connected by a linker segment that mediates interdomain communication between the domains. We show here that the minimal Hep1 binding entity of Ssc1 consists of the ATPase domain and the interdomain linker. In the absence of Hep1, the ATPase domain with the interdomain linker had the tendency to aggregate, in contrast to the ATPase domain with the mutated linker segment or without linker, and in contrast to the PBD. The closest homolog of Ssc1, bacterial DnaK, and a Ssc1 chimera, in which a segment of the ATPase domain of Ssc1 was replaced by the corresponding segment from DnaK, did not aggregate in Delta hep1 mitochondria. The propensity to aggregate appears to be a specific property of the mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. The ATPase domain in combination with the interdomain linker is crucial for aggregation of Ssc1. In conclusion, our results suggest that interdomain communication makes Ssc1 prone to aggregation. Hep1 counteracts aggregation by binding to this aggregation-prone conformer.

  6. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Colin M; Strømme, Caroline B; Huang, Hongda; Patel, Dinshaw J; Groth, Anja

    2017-03-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availability and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin.

  7. Structural Characterization of the Yersinia pestis Type III Secretion System Needle Protein YscF in Complex with Its Heterodimeric Chaperone YscE/YscG

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Cherry, Scott; Waugh, David S.

    2008-05-03

    The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. Effector proteins are injected through a hollow needle structure composed of the protein YscF. YscG and YscE act as 'chaperones' to prevent premature polymerization of YscF in the cytosol of the bacterium prior to assembly of the needle. Here, we report the crystal structure of the YscEFG protein complex at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Overall, the structure is similar to that of the analogous PscEFG complex from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system, but there are noteworthy differences. The structure confirms that, like PscG, YscG is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family of proteins. YscG binds tightly to the C-terminal half of YscF, implying that it is this region of YscF that controls its polymerization into the needle structure. YscE interacts with the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat motif of YscG but makes very little direct contact with YscF. Its function may be to stabilize the structure of YscG and/or to participate in recruiting the complex to the secretion apparatus. No electron density could be observed for the 49 N-terminal residues of YscF. This and additional evidence suggest that the N-terminus of YscF is disordered in the complex with YscE and YscG. As expected, conserved residues in the C-terminal half of YscF mediate important intra- and intermolecular interactions in the complex. Moreover, the phenotypes of some previously characterized mutations in the C-terminal half of YscF can be rationalized in terms of the structure of the heterotrimeric YscEFG complex.

  8. Masculinisation of the Zebra Finch Song System: Roles of Oestradiol and the Z-chromosome Gene Tubulin-Specific Chaperone Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Beach, L. Q.; Wade, J.

    2015-01-01

    Robust sex differences in brain and behaviour exist in zebra finches. Only males sing, and forebrain song control regions are more developed in males. The factors driving these differences are not clear, although numerous experiments have shown that oestradiol (E2) administered to female hatchlings partially masculinises brain and behaviour. Recent studies suggest that an increased expression of Z-chromosome genes in males (ZZ; females: ZW) might also play a role. The Z-gene tubulin-specific chaperone A (TBCA) exhibits increased expression in the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN) of juvenile males compared to females; TBCA+ cells project to the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). In the present study, we investigated the role of TBCA and tested hypotheses with respect to the interactive or additive effects of E2 and TBCA. We first examined whether E2 in hatchling zebra finches modulates TBCA expression in the LMAN. It affected neither the mRNA, nor protein in either sex. We then unilaterally delivered TBCA small interfering (si)RNA to the LMAN of developing females treated with E2 or vehicle and males treated with the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, or its control. In both sexes, decreasing TBCA in LMAN reduced RA cell number, cell size and volume. It also decreased LMAN volume in females. Fadrozole in males increased LMAN volume and RA cell size. TBCA siRNA delivered to the LMAN also decreased the projection from this brain region to the RA, as indicated by anterograde tract tracing. The results suggest that TBCA is involved in masculinising the song system. However, because no interactions between the siRNA and hormone manipulations were detected, TBCA does not appear to modulate effects of E2 in the zebra finch song circuit. PMID:25702708

  9. Stress and molecular chaperones in disease.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    2000-01-01

    Stress, a common phenomenon in today's society, is suspected of playing a role in the development of disease. Stressors of various types, psychological, physical, and biological, abound. They occur in the working and social environments, in air, soil, water, food, and medicines. Stressors impact on cells directly or indirectly, cause protein denaturation, and elicit a stress response. This is mediated by stress (heat-shock) genes and proteins, among which are those named molecular chaperones because they assist other proteins to achieve and maintain a functional shape (the native configuration), and to recover it when partially lost due to stress. Denatured proteins tend to aggregate and precipitate. The same occurs with abnormal proteins due to mutations, or to failure of post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanisms. These abnormal proteins need the help of molecular chaperones as much as denatured molecules do, especially during stress. A cell with normal antistress mechanisms, including a complete and functional set of chaperones, may be able to withstand stress if its intensity is not beyond that which will cause irreversible protein damage. There is a certain threshold that normal cells have above which they cannot cope with stress. A cell with an abnormal protein that has an intrinsic tendency to misfold and aggregate is more vulnerable to stress than normal counterparts. Furthermore, these abnormal proteins may precipitate even in the absence of stress and cause diseases named proteinopathies. It is possible that stress contributes to the pathogenesis of proteinopathies by promoting protein aggregation, even in cells that possess a normal chaperoning system. Examples of proteinopathies are age-related degenerative disorders with protein deposits in various tissues, most importantly in the brain where the deposits are associated with neuronal degeneration. It is conceivable that stress enhances the progression of these diseases by facilitating

  10. Regulation of the dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is governed by HspR, an autoregulatory repressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bucca, G; Hindle, Z; Smith, C P

    1997-01-01

    The dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor contains four genes (5'-dnaK-grpE-dnaJ-hspR). The fourth gene encodes a novel heat shock protein, HspR, which appears so far to be unique to the high-G+C actinomycete group of bacteria. HspR binds with high specificity to three inverted repeat sequences in the promoter region of the S. coelicolor dnaK operon, strongly suggesting a direct role for HspR in heat shock gene regulation. Here we present genetic and biochemical evidence that HspR is the repressor of the dnaK operon. Disruption of hspR leads to high-level constitutive transcription of the dnaK operon. Parallel transcriptional analyses of groESL1 and groEL2 expression demonstrated that heat shock regulation of the groE genes was essentially unaffected in an hspR null mutant, although the basal (uninduced) level of groEL2 transcription was slightly elevated compared with the wild type. The results of HspR titration experiments, where the dnaK operon promoter region was cloned at ca. 50 copies per chromosome, were consistent with the prediction that HspR functions as a negative autoregulator. His-tagged HspR, overproduced and purified from Escherichia coli, was shown to repress transcription from the dnaK operon promoter in vitro, providing additional evidence for the proposal that HspR directly regulates transcription of the dnaK operon. These studies indicate that there are at least two transcriptional mechanisms for controlling heat shock genes in S. coelicolor--one controlling the dnaK operon and another controlling the groE genes. PMID:9324243

  11. Co-expression of Skp and FkpA chaperones improves cell viability and alters the global expression of stress response genes during scFvD1.3 production

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The overexpression of scFv antibody fragments in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli frequently results in extensive protein misfolding and loss of cell viability. Although protein folding factors such as Skp and FkpA are often exploited to restore the solubility and functionality of recombinant protein products, their exact impact on cellular metabolism during periplasmic antibody fragment expression is not clearly understood. In this study, we expressed the scFvD1.3 antibody fragment in E. coli BL21 and evaluated the overall physiological and global gene expression changes upon Skp or FkpA co-expression. Results The periplasmic expression of scFvD1.3 led to a rapid accumulation of insoluble scFvD1.3 proteins and a decrease in cell viability. The co-expression of Skp and FkpA improved scFvD1.3 solubility and cell viability in a dosage-dependent manner. Through mutagenesis experiments, it was found that only the chaperone activity of FkpA, not the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity, is required for the improvement in cell viability. Global gene expression analysis of the scFvD1.3 cells over the chaperone-expressing cells showed a clear up-regulation of genes involved in heat-shock and misfolded protein stress responses. These included genes of the major HSP70 DnaK chaperone family and key proteases belonging to the Clp and Lon protease systems. Other metabolic gene expression trends include: (1) the differential regulation of several energy metabolic genes, (2) down-regulation of the central metabolic TCA cycle and transport genes, and (3) up-regulation of ribosomal genes. Conclusions The simultaneous activation of multiple stress related and other metabolic genes may constitute the stress response to protein misfolding in the scFvD1.3 cells. These gene expression information could prove to be valuable for the selection and construction of reporter contructs to monitor the misfolded protein stress response during antibody fragment

  12. Chaperone proteins and brain tumors: Potential targets and possible therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are most notable for the proteo- and cyotoprotective capacities they afford during cellular stress. Under conditions of cellular normalcy, chaperones still play integral roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides into functional entities, in assisting in intracellular/intraorganellar transport, in assembly and maintenance of multi-subunit protein complexes, and in aiding and abetting the degradation of senescent proteins. Tumors frequently have relatively enhanced needs for chaperone number and activity because of the stresses of rapid proliferation, increased metabolism, and overall genetic instability. Thus, it may be possible to take advantage of this reliance that tumor cells have on chaperones by pharmacologic and biologic means. Certain chaperones are abundant in the brain, which implies important roles for them. While it is presumed that the requirements of brain tumors for chaperone proteins are similar to those of any other cell type, tumor or otherwise, very little inquiry has been directed at the possibility of using chaperone proteins as therapeutic targets or even as therapeutic agents against central nervous system malignancies. This review highlights some of the research on the functions of chaperone proteins, on what can be done to modify those functions, and on the physiological responses that tumors and organisms can have to chaperone-targeted or chaperone-based therapies. In particular, this review will also underscore areas of research where brain tumors have been part of the field, although in general those instances are few and far between. This relative dearth of research devoted to chaperone protein targets and therapeutics in brain tumors reveals much untrodden turf to explore for potential treatments of these dreadfully refractive diseases. PMID:16053701

  13. Goniothalamin enhances the ATPase activity of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 but inhibits its chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuhei; Ohtaki, Aguru; Jantan, Ibrahim; Yohda, Masafumi; Nakamoto, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that is involved in important cellular pathways such as signal transduction pathways. It is a potential cancer drug target because it plays a critical role for stabilization and activation of oncoproteins. Thus, small molecule compounds that control the Hsp90 function are useful to elucidate potential lead compounds against cancer. We studied effect of a naturally occurring styryl-lactone goniothalamin on the activity of Hsp90. Although many drugs targeting Hsp90 inhibit the ATPase activity of Hsp90, goniothalamin enhanced rather than inhibited the ATPase activity of a cyanobacterial Hsp90 (HtpG) and a yeast Hsp90. It increased both K(m) and k(cat) of the Hsp90s. Domain competition assays and tryptophan fluorescence measurements with various truncated derivatives of HtpG indicated that goniothalamin binds to the N-terminal domain of HtpG. Goniothalamin did not influence on the interaction of HtpG with a non-native protein or the anti-aggregation activity of HtpG significantly. However, it inhibited the activity of HtpG that assists refolding of a non-native protein in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone system. This is the first report to show that a small molecule that binds to the N-terminal domain of Hsp90 activates its ATPase activity, while inhibiting the chaperone function of Hsp90.

  14. Specific Chaperones and Regulatory Domains in Control of Amyloid Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  15. Therapeutic uses of drug-carrier systems for imidazole-containing dipeptide compounds that act as pharmacological chaperones and have significant impact on the treatment of chronic diseases associated with increased oxidative stress and the formation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how the naturally occurring molecules N-acetylcarnosine, L-carnosine, and carcinine, which are chemical or pharmacological chaperones, affect the cells and biomolecules of patients with skin diseases, cosmetic skin lesions, or underlying clinically significant visual impairment such as age-related cataracts, age-related retinal degeneration, and ocular complications of diabetes. We evaluated and characterized the effects of cited pharmacological chaperones on enzyme activity, protein structure in tissues, and other biomarkers of diseases in skin cells and tissues or in ocular tissues (human cataractous and normal lenses) derived from ophthalmic patients or age-matched donors. The samples were used to test imidazole-containing peptidomimetic chemical/pharmacological chaperones in relation to oxidative stress induced by reaction with lipid peroxides or advanced non-enzymatic glycation processes. Chaperone function is characterized by interaction with other proteins, mediating their folding, transport, and interaction with other molecules, lipid peroxidation products, and membranes. Although these therapies remain on hold pending further investigation, we present growing evidence demonstrating the ability of N-acetylcarnosine (lubricant eye drops) or carcinine pharmacological chaperone therapy to act as novel treatments for age-related cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and ocular complications of diabetes. Finally, we examine strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone and transglycating (de-glycation) types of activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human age-related eye diseases, such as cataracts, and advanced glycation tissue protein-engineered systems.

  16. Pharmacological Targeting of the Hsp70 Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Patury, Srikanth; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), acts at multiple steps in a protein’s life cycle, including during the processes of folding, trafficking, remodeling and degradation. To accomplish these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by a host of co-chaperones, which bind to the core chaperone and influence its functions. Genetic studies have strongly linked Hsp70 and its co-chaperones to numerous diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration and microbial pathogenesis, yet the potential of this chaperone as a therapeutic target remains largely underexplored. Here, we review the current state of Hsp70 as a drug target, with a special emphasis on the important challenges and opportunities imposed by its co-chaperones, protein-protein interactions and allostery. PMID:19860737

  17. Polymer hydrogels: Chaperoning vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Herman F.; Leong, Kam W.

    2010-07-01

    A cationic nanosized hydrogel (nanogel) shows controlled antigen delivery in vivo following intranasal administration and hence holds promise for a clinically effective adjuvant-free and needle-free vaccine system.

  18. Rapid discrimination and classification of the Lactobacillus plantarum group based on a partial dnaK sequence and DNA fingerprinting techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Fwu-Ling; Liou, Jong-Shian

    2010-03-01

    The Lactobacillus plantarum group comprises five very closely related species. Some species of this group are considered to be probiotic and widely applied in the food industry. In this study, we compared the use of two different molecular markers, the 16S rRNA and dnaK gene, for discriminating phylogenetic relationships amongst L. plantarum strains using sequencing and DNA fingerprinting. The average sequence similarity for the dnaK gene (89.2%) among five type strains was significantly less than that for the 16S rRNA (99.4%). This result demonstrates that the dnaK gene sequence provided higher resolution than the 16S rRNA and suggests that the dnaK could be used as an additional phylogenetic marker for L. plantarum. Species-specific profiles of the Lactobacillus strains were obtained with RAPD and RFLP methods. Our data indicate that phylogenetic relationships between these strains are easily resolved using sequencing of the dnaK gene or DNA fingerprinting assays.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperones and Their Roles in the Immunogenicity of Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major site of passage for proteins en route to other organelles, to the cell surface, and to the extracellular space. It is also the transport route for peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome into the ER for loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules for eventual antigen presentation at the cell surface. Chaperones within the ER are critical for many of these processes; however, outside the ER certain of those chaperones may play important and direct roles in immune responses. In some cases, particular ER chaperones have been utilized as vaccines against tumors or infectious disease pathogens when purified from tumor tissue or recombinantly generated and loaded with antigen. In other cases, the cell surface location of ER chaperones has implications for immune responses as well as possible tumor resistance. We have produced heat-shock protein/chaperone protein-based cancer vaccines called “chaperone-rich cell lysate” (CRCL) that are conglomerates of chaperones enriched from solid tumors by an isoelectric focusing technique. These preparations have been effective against numerous murine tumors, as well as in a canine with an advanced lung carcinoma treated with autologous CRCL. We also published extensive proteomic analyses of CRCL prepared from human surgically resected tumor samples. Of note, these preparations contained at least 10 ER chaperones and a number of other residents, along with many other chaperones/heat-shock proteins. Gene ontology and network analyses utilizing these proteins essentially recapitulate the antigen presentation pathways and interconnections. In conjunction with our current knowledge of cell surface/extracellular ER chaperones, these data collectively suggest that a systems-level view may provide insight into the potent immune stimulatory activities of CRCL with an emphasis on the roles of ER components in those processes. PMID:25610811

  20. RNA Chaperones Step Out of Hfq's Shadow.

    PubMed

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Glover, J N Mark; Charpentier, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    The stability and function of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) often require a specialized RNA-binding protein called an RNA chaperone. Recent findings show that proteins containing a ProQ/FinO domain constitute a new class of RNA chaperones that could play key roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation throughout bacterial species.

  1. Review: Beta-thalassemia and molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Sumera, Afshan; Radhakrishnan, Ammu; Baba, Abdul Aziz; George, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Thalassemia is known as a diverse single gene disorder, which is prevalent worldwide. The molecular chaperones are set of proteins that help in two important processes while protein synthesis and degradation include folding or unfolding and assembly or disassembly, thereby helping in cell homeostasis. This review recaps current knowledge regarding the role of molecular chaperones in thalassemia, with a focus on beta thalassemia.

  2. Artemin as an efficient molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Shahangian, S Shirin; Rasti, Behnam; Sajedi, Reza H; Khodarahmi, Reza; Taghdir, Majid; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2011-12-01

    Artemin is an abundant thermostable protein in Artemia encysted embryos under stress. It is considered as a stress protein, as its highly regulated expression is associated with stress resistance in this crustacea. In the present study, artemin has been shown to be a potent molecular chaperone with high efficacy. Artemin is capable of inhibiting the chemical aggregation of proteins such as carbonic anhydrase (CA) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at unique molar ratios of chaperone to substrates (1:40 and 1:26 for CA and HRP, respectively). Furthermore, it can also enhance refolding yield of these substrates by nearly 50%. The refolding promotion of CA is checked and verified through a sensitive fluorimetric technique. Based on these experiments, artemin showed higher chaperone activity than other chaperones. The evaluation of artemin surface using ANS showed it to be highly hydrophobic, probably resulting in its high efficacy. These results suggest that artemin can be considered a novel low molecular weight chaperone.

  3. Evolution of the Chaperone/Usher Assembly Pathway: Fimbrial Classification Goes Greek†

    PubMed Central

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Many Proteobacteria use the chaperone/usher pathway to assemble proteinaceous filaments on the bacterial surface. These filaments can curl into fimbrial or nonfimbrial surface structures (e.g., a capsule or spore coat). This article reviews the phylogeny of operons belonging to the chaperone/usher assembly class to explore the utility of establishing a scheme for subdividing them into clades of phylogenetically related gene clusters. Based on usher amino acid sequence comparisons, our analysis shows that the chaperone/usher assembly class is subdivided into six major phylogenetic clades, which we have termed α-, β-, γ-, κ-, π-, and σ-fimbriae. Members of each clade share related operon structures and encode fimbrial subunits with similar protein domains. The proposed classification system offers a simple and convenient method for assigning newly discovered chaperone/usher systems to one of the six major phylogenetic groups. PMID:18063717

  4. Structure of AscE and induced burial regions in AscE and AscG upon formation of the chaperone needle-subunit complex of type III secretion system in Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yih Wan; Yu, Hong Bing; Leung, Ka Yin; Sivaraman, J.; Mok, Yu-Keung

    2008-01-01

    In the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila, the putative needle complex subunit AscF requires both putative chaperones AscE and AscG for formation of a ternary complex to avoid premature assembly. Here we report the crystal structure of AscE at 2.7 Å resolution and the mapping of buried regions of AscE, AscG, and AscF in the AscEG and AscEFG complexes using limited protease digestion. The dimeric AscE is comprised of two helix–turn–helix monomers packed in an antiparallel fashion. The N-terminal 13 residues of AscE are buried only upon binding with AscG, but this region is found to be nonessential for the interaction. AscE functions as a monomer and can be coexpressed with AscG or with both AscG and AscF to form soluble complexes. The AscE binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is identified to be within the N-terminal 61 residues of AscG. The exposed C-terminal substrate-binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is induced to be buried only upon binding to AscF. However, the N-terminal 52 residues of AscF remain exposed even in the ternary AscEFG complex. On the other hand, the 35-residue C-terminal region of AscF in the complex is resistant to protease digestion in the AscEFG complex. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that two C-terminal hydrophobic residues, Ile83 and Leu84, of AscF are essential for chaperone binding. PMID:18662905

  5. Quality control of a cytoplasmic protein complex: chaperone motors and the ubiquitin-proteasome system govern the fate of orphan fatty acid synthase subunit Fas2 of yeast.

    PubMed

    Scazzari, Mario; Amm, Ingo; Wolf, Dieter H

    2015-02-20

    For the assembly of protein complexes in the cell, the presence of stoichiometric amounts of the respective protein subunits is of utmost importance. A surplus of any of the subunits may trigger unspecific and harmful protein interactions and has to be avoided. A stoichiometric amount of subunits must finally be reached via transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational regulation. Synthesis of saturated 16 and 18 carbon fatty acids is carried out by fatty acid synthase: in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 2.6-MDa molecular mass assembly containing six protomers each of two different subunits, Fas1 (β) and Fas2 (α). The (α)6(β)6 complex carries six copies of all eight enzymatic activities required for fatty acid synthesis. The FAS1 and FAS2 genes in yeast are unlinked and map on two different chromosomes. Here we study the fate of the α-subunit of the complex, Fas2, when its partner, the β-subunit Fas1, is absent. Individual subunits of fatty acid synthase are proteolytically degraded when the respective partner is missing. Elimination of Fas2 is achieved by the proteasome. Here we show that a ubiquitin transfer machinery is required for Fas2 elimination. The major ubiquitin ligase targeting the superfluous Fas2 subunit to the proteasome is Ubr1. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc2 and Ubc4 assist the degradation process. The AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1 are crucially involved in the elimination of Fas2.

  6. Discontinuous Occurrence of the hsp70 (dnaK) Gene among Archaea and Sequence Features of HSP70 Suggest a Novel Outlook on Phylogenies Inferred from This Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gribaldo, Simonetta; Lumia, Valentina; Creti, Roberta; Conway de Macario, Everly; Sanangelantoni, Annamaria; Cammarano, Piero

    1999-01-01

    Occurrence of the hsp70 (dnaK) gene was investigated in various members of the domain Archaea comprising both euryarchaeotes and crenarchaeotes and in the hyperthermophilic bacteria Aquifex pyrophilus and Thermotoga maritima representing the deepest offshoots in phylogenetic trees of bacterial 16S rRNA sequences. The gene was not detected in 8 of 10 archaea examined but was found in A. pyrophilus and T. maritima, from which it was cloned and sequenced. Comparative analyses of the HSP70 amino acid sequences encoded in these genes, and others in the databases, showed that (i) in accordance with the vicinities seen in rRNA-based trees, the proteins from A. pyrophilus and T. maritima form a thermophilic cluster with that from the green nonsulfur bacterium Thermomicrobium roseum and are unrelated to their counterparts from gram-positive bacteria, proteobacteria/mitochondria, chlamydiae/spirochetes, deinococci, and cyanobacteria/chloroplasts; (ii) the T. maritima HSP70 clusters with the homologues from the archaea Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Thermoplasma acidophilum, in contrast to the postulated unique kinship between archaea and gram-positive bacteria; and (iii) there are exceptions to the reported association between an insert in HSP70 and gram negativity, or vice versa, absence of insert and gram positivity. Notably, the HSP70 from T. maritima lacks the insert, although T. maritima is phylogenetically unrelated to the gram-positive bacteria. These results, along with the absence of hsp70 (dnaK) in various archaea and its presence in others, suggest that (i) different taxa retained either one or the other of two hsp70 (dnaK) versions (with or without insert), regardless of phylogenetic position; and (ii) archaea are aboriginally devoid of hsp70 (dnaK), and those that have it must have received it from phylogenetically diverse bacteria via lateral gene transfer events that did not involve replacement of an endogenous hsp70 (dnaK) gene. PMID:9882656

  7. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  8. Cooperative Subunit Refolding of a Light-Harvesting Protein through a Self-Chaperone Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Laos, Alistair J; Dean, Jacob C; Toa, Zi S D; Wilk, Krystyna E; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-27

    The fold of a protein is encoded by its amino acid sequence, but how complex multimeric proteins fold and assemble into functional quaternary structures remains unclear. Here we show that two structurally different phycobiliproteins refold and reassemble in a cooperative manner from their unfolded polypeptide subunits, without biological chaperones. Refolding was confirmed by ultrafast broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to probe internal chromophores as a marker of quaternary structure. Our results demonstrate a cooperative, self-chaperone refolding mechanism, whereby the β-subunits independently refold, thereby templating the folding of the α-subunits, which then chaperone the assembly of the native complex, quantitatively returning all coherences. Our results indicate that subunit self-chaperoning is a robust mechanism for heteromeric protein folding and assembly that could also be applied in self-assembled synthetic hierarchical systems.

  9. Dissecting functional similarities of ribosome-associated chaperones from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Thomas; Hundley, Heather A; Pfund, Chris; Wegrzyn, Renee D; Walter, William; Kramer, Günter; Kim, So-Young; Craig, Elizabeth A; Deuerling, Elke

    2005-07-01

    Ribosome-tethered chaperones that interact with nascent polypeptide chains have been identified in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. However, these ribosome-associated chaperones share no sequence similarity: bacterial trigger factors (TF) form an independent protein family while the yeast machinery is Hsp70-based. The absence of any component of the yeast machinery results in slow growth at low temperatures and sensitivity to aminoglycoside protein synthesis inhibitors. After establishing that yeast ribosomal protein Rpl25 is able to recruit TF to ribosomes when expressed in place of its Escherichia coli homologue L23, the ribosomal TF tether, we tested whether such divergent ribosome-associated chaperones are functionally interchangeable. E. coli TF was expressed in yeast cells that lacked the endogenous ribosome-bound machinery. TF associated with yeast ribosomes, cross-linked to yeast nascent polypeptides and partially complemented the aminoglycoside sensitivity, demonstrating that ribosome-associated chaperones from divergent organisms share common functions, despite their lack of sequence similarity.

  10. Chaperone receptors: guiding proteins to intracellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; von Löffelholz, Ottilie; Abell, Ben M

    2012-01-01

    Despite mitochondria and chloroplasts having their own genome, 99% of mitochondrial proteins (Rehling et al., Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 5:519-530, 2004) and more than 95% of chloroplast proteins (Soll, Curr Opin Plant Biol 5:529-535, 2002) are encoded by nuclear DNA, synthesised in the cytosol and imported post-translationally. Protein targeting to these organelles depends on cytosolic targeting factors, which bind to the precursor, and then interact with membrane receptors to deliver the precursor into a translocase. The molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 have been widely implicated in protein targeting to mitochondria and chloroplasts, and receptors capable of recognising these chaperones have been identified at the surface of both these organelles (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007). The role of these chaperone receptors is not fully understood, but they have been shown to increase the efficiency of protein targeting (Young et al., Cell 112:41-50, 2003; Qbadou et al., EMBO J 25:1836-1847, 2006). Whether these receptors contribute to the specificity of targeting is less clear. A class of chaperone receptors bearing tetratricopeptide repeat domains is able to specifically bind the highly conserved C terminus of Hsp70 and/or Hsp90. Interestingly, at least of one these chaperone receptors can be found on each organelle (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007), which suggests a universal role in protein targeting for these chaperone receptors. This review will investigate the role that chaperone receptors play in targeting efficiency and specificity, as well as examining recent in silico approaches to find novel chaperone receptors.

  11. Molecular chaperones: functional mechanisms and nanotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario Fernández-Fernández, M.; Sot, Begoña; María Valpuesta, José

    2016-08-01

    Molecular chaperones are a group of proteins that assist in protein homeostasis. They not only prevent protein misfolding and aggregation, but also target misfolded proteins for degradation. Despite differences in structure, all types of chaperones share a common general feature, a surface that recognizes and interacts with the misfolded protein. This and other, more specialized properties can be adapted for various nanotechnological purposes, by modification of the original biomolecules or by de novo design based on artificial structures.

  12. Gut microbiota imbalance and chaperoning system malfunction are central to ulcerative colitis pathogenesis and can be counteracted with specifically designed probiotics: a working hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Maurizio; Tomasello, Giovanni; Romeo, Marcello; Damiani, Provvidenza; Lo Monte, Attilio I; Lozio, Luciano; Campanella, Claudia; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rappa, Francesca; Zummo, Giovanni; Cocchi, Massimo; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we propose that for further studies of the physiopathology and treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases, an integral view of the conditions, including the triad of microbiota-heat shock proteins (HSPs)-probiotics, ought to be considered. Microbiota is the complex microbial flora that resides in the gut, affecting not only gut functions but also the health status of the whole body. Alteration in the microbiota's composition has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions (e.g., ulcerative colitis, UC), involving both gut and extra-intestinal tissues and organs. Some of these pathologies are also associated with an altered expression of HSPs (chaperones) and this is the reason why they may be considered chaperonopathies. Probiotics, which are live microorganisms able to restore the correct, healthy equilibrium of microbiota composition, can ameliorate symptoms in patients suffering from UC and modulate expression levels of HSPs. However, currently probiotic therapy follows ex-adiuvantibus criteria, i.e., treatments with beneficial effects but whose mechanism of action is unknown, which should be changed so the probiotics needed in each case are predetermined on the basis of the patient's microbiota. Consequently, efforts are necessary to develop diagnostic tools for elucidating levels and distribution of HSPs and the microbiota composition (microbiota fingerprint) of each subject and, thus, guide specific probiotic therapy, tailored to meet the needs of the patient. Microbiota fingerprinting ought to include molecular biology techniques for sequencing highly conserved DNA, e.g., genes encoding 16S RNA, for species identification and, in addition, quantification of each relevant microbe.

  13. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  14. Mammalian Fe-S proteins: definition of a consensus motif recognized by the co-chaperone HSC20

    PubMed Central

    Maio, N.; Rouault, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are inorganic cofactors that are fundamental to several biological processes in all three kingdoms of life. In most organisms, Fe-S clusters are initially assembled on a scaffold protein, ISCU, and subsequently transferred to target proteins or to intermediate carriers by a dedicated chaperone/co-chaperone system. The delivery of assembled Fe-S clusters to recipient proteins is a crucial step in the biogenesis of Fe-S proteins, and, in mammals, it relies on the activity of a multiprotein transfer complex that contains the chaperone HSPA9, the co-chaperone HSC20 and the scaffold ISCU. How the transfer complex efficiently engages recipient Fe-S target proteins involves specific protein interactions that are not fully understood. This mini review focuses on recent insights into the molecular mechanism of amino acid motif recognition and discrimination by the co-chaperone HSC20, which guides Fe-S cluster delivery. PMID:27714045

  15. Conformational dynamics of a membrane protein chaperone enables spatially regulated substrate capture and release

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Kroon, Gerard; McAvoy, Camille Z.; Chi, Chris; Wright, Peter E.; Shan, Shu-ou

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein biogenesis poses enormous challenges to cellular protein homeostasis and requires effective molecular chaperones. Compared with chaperones that promote soluble protein folding, membrane protein chaperones require tight spatiotemporal coordination of their substrate binding and release cycles. Here we define the chaperone cycle for cpSRP43, which protects the largest family of membrane proteins, the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins (LHCPs), during their delivery. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that cpSRP43 samples three distinct conformations. The stromal factor cpSRP54 drives cpSRP43 to the active state, allowing it to tightly bind substrate in the aqueous compartment. Bidentate interactions with the Alb3 translocase drive cpSRP43 to a partially inactive state, triggering selective release of LHCP’s transmembrane domains in a productive unloading complex at the membrane. Our work demonstrates how the intrinsic conformational dynamics of a chaperone enables spatially coordinated substrate capture and release, which may be general to other ATP-independent chaperone systems. PMID:26951662

  16. Supercharging Chaperones: A Meeting Toolkit for Maximizing Learning for Youth and Chaperones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Trip and conference chaperones are a wonderful resource in youth development programs. These well-intended volunteers, many parents of youth participating in the event, want the best experience for the youth but are not necessarily trained in positive youth development. A consequence of this circumstance is that not all chaperones provide the best…

  17. Generalized iterative annealing model for the action of RNA chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of the rugged landscape of RNA molecules their folding is described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism according to which only a small fraction (ϕF) reaches the folded state while the remaining fraction of molecules is kinetically trapped in misfolded intermediates. The transition from the misfolded states to the native state can far exceed biologically relevant time. Thus, RNA folding in vivo is often aided by protein cofactors, called RNA chaperones, that can rescue RNAs from a multitude of misfolded structures. We consider two models, based on chemical kinetics and chemical master equation, for describing assisted folding. In the passive model, applicable for class I substrates, transient interactions of misfolded structures with RNA chaperones alone are sufficient to destabilize the misfolded structures, thus entropically lowering the barrier to folding. For this mechanism to be efficient the intermediate ribonucleoprotein complex between collapsed RNA and protein cofactor should have optimal stability. We also introduce an active model (suitable for stringent substrates with small ϕF), which accounts for the recent experimental findings on the action of CYT-19 on the group I intron ribozyme, showing that RNA chaperones do not discriminate between the misfolded and the native states. In the active model, the RNA chaperone system utilizes chemical energy of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to repeatedly bind and release misfolded and folded RNAs, resulting in substantial increase of yield of the native state. The theory outlined here shows, in accord with experiments, that in the steady state the native state does not form with unit probability.

  18. Progress and potential of non-inhibitory small molecule chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease and its potential implications for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Olive; Patnaik, Samarjit; Marugan, Juan; Sidransky, Ellen; Westbroek, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by pathological mutations GBA1, encodes the lysosome-resident enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which cleaves glucosylceramide into glucose and ceramide. In Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of substrate, primarily in cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. Gaucher disease has broad clinical heterogeneity, and mutations in GBA1 are a risk factor for the development of different synucleinopathies. Insights into the cell biology and biochemistry of glucocerebrosidase have led to new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease including small chemical chaperones. Such chaperones facilitate proper enzyme folding and translocation to lysosomes, thereby preventing premature breakdown of the enzyme in the proteasome. This review discusses recent work developing chemical chaperones as a therapy for Gaucher disease, with implications for the treatment of synucleinopathies. It focuses on the development of non-inhibitory glucocerebrosidase chaperones and their therapeutic advantages over inhibitory chaperones, as well as the challenges involved in identifying and validating chemical chaperones. PMID:27098312

  19. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James CA

    2016-01-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding, where obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone:substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a novel structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed Residual Electron and Anomalous Density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the E. coli chaperone Spy. This study resulted in a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 while bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded and native-like states, and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  20. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; French, Samuel W

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% of the world population or more than 185 million people worldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000 deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is the most common indication for liver transplantation in patients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an enveloped RNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the Flaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cell can be divided into six phases: (1) binding and internalization; (2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3) viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNA genome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) and assembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation) and secretion. Many host factors are involved in the HCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group of host cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerous cellular processes including protein folding, multimeric protein assembly, protein trafficking, and protein degradation. All phases of the viral life cycle require chaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteins with chaperones. This review will present our current knowledge and understanding of the role of chaperones in the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCV infection will provide further insights into viral/host interactions and potential therapeutic targets for both HCV and other viruses. PMID:26783419

  1. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  2. Detection of humoral response using a recombinant heat shock protein 70, DnaK, of Mycoplasma haemofelis in experimentally and naturally hemoplasma-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Barker, Emily N; Helps, Chris R; Heesom, Kate J; Arthur, Christopher J; Peters, Iain R; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Tasker, Séverine

    2010-12-01

    Hemoplasmas is the trivial name given to a group of erythrocyte-parasitizing bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma. Of the feline hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic, while "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" are less pathogenic. Shotgun libraries of fragmented M. haemofelis genomic DNA were constructed, and random colonies were selected for DNA sequencing. In silico-translated amino acid sequences of putative open reading frames were compared to mass spectrometry data from M. haemofelis protein spots identified as being immunogenic by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Three of the spots matched the predicted sequences of a heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) homolog, elongation factor Ts, and a fragment of phosphoglycerate kinase found during library screening. A full-length copy of the M. haemofelis dnaK gene was cloned into Escherichia coli and recombinantly expressed. Recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK was purified and then used in Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the humoral immune response during acute infection in cats experimentally infected with M. haemofelis, "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum," or "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis". The recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK ELISA also was used to screen clinical samples submitted for hemoplasma PCR testing to a commercial laboratory (n = 254). Experimentally infected cats became seropositive following infection, with a greater and earlier antibody response seen in cats inoculated with M. haemofelis than those seen in cats inoculated with "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum" or "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis," by both Western blotting and ELISA. Of the clinical samples, 31.1% had antibodies detected by the ELISA but only 9.8% were positive by PCR for one or more hemoplasmas.

  3. Detection of Humoral Response Using a Recombinant Heat Shock Protein 70, DnaK, of Mycoplasma haemofelis in Experimentally and Naturally Hemoplasma-Infected Cats▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Emily N.; Helps, Chris R.; Heesom, Kate J.; Arthur, Christopher J.; Peters, Iain R.; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Tasker, Séverine

    2010-01-01

    Hemoplasmas is the trivial name given to a group of erythrocyte-parasitizing bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma. Of the feline hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic, while “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum” and “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis” are less pathogenic. Shotgun libraries of fragmented M. haemofelis genomic DNA were constructed, and random colonies were selected for DNA sequencing. In silico-translated amino acid sequences of putative open reading frames were compared to mass spectrometry data from M. haemofelis protein spots identified as being immunogenic by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Three of the spots matched the predicted sequences of a heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) homolog, elongation factor Ts, and a fragment of phosphoglycerate kinase found during library screening. A full-length copy of the M. haemofelis dnaK gene was cloned into Escherichia coli and recombinantly expressed. Recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK was purified and then used in Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the humoral immune response during acute infection in cats experimentally infected with M. haemofelis, “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum,” or “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis”. The recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK ELISA also was used to screen clinical samples submitted for hemoplasma PCR testing to a commercial laboratory (n = 254). Experimentally infected cats became seropositive following infection, with a greater and earlier antibody response seen in cats inoculated with M. haemofelis than those seen in cats inoculated with “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum” or “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis,” by both Western blotting and ELISA. Of the clinical samples, 31.1% had antibodies detected by the ELISA but only 9.8% were positive by PCR for one or more hemoplasmas. PMID:20926695

  4. Yeast prions are useful for studying protein chaperones and protein quality control.

    PubMed

    Masison, Daniel C; Reidy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein chaperones help proteins adopt and maintain native conformations and play vital roles in cellular processes where proteins are partially folded. They comprise a major part of the cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome. Many disorders are caused when proteins misfold despite this protection. Yeast prions are fibrous amyloid aggregates of misfolded proteins. The normal action of chaperones on yeast prions breaks the fibers into pieces, which results in prion replication. Because this process is necessary for propagation of yeast prions, even small differences in activity of many chaperones noticeably affect prion phenotypes. Several other factors involved in protein processing also influence formation, propagation or elimination of prions in yeast. Thus, in much the same way that the dependency of viruses on cellular functions has allowed us to learn much about cell biology, the dependency of yeast prions on chaperones presents a unique and sensitive way to monitor the functions and interactions of many components of the cell's protein quality control system. Our recent work illustrates the utility of this system for identifying and defining chaperone machinery interactions.

  5. Molecular chaperones in lactic acid bacteria: physiological consequences and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Abdullah-Al-Mahin; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2008-10-01

    Recently, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have attracted much attention because of their potential application to probiotics and industrial applications as starters for dairy products or lactic acid fermentation. Additional emphasis is also being paid to them as commensal bacteria in gastrointestinal tract. Since LAB exhibit a stress response, insight into the relationship between stress proteins such as molecular chaperones and stress tolerance or adaptation is increasing gradually along with current research examining these important bacteria. Similar to other bacteria, one of the major stress-response systems in LAB is the expression of molecular chaperones. The recently completed genome sequencing of various LAB strains, combined with the development of advanced molecular techniques, have enabled us to identify molecular chaperones and to understand their regulation systems in response to various stresses. Furthermore, recent biochemical studies provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of LAB chaperone systems. This review highlights the physiological consequences and biochemical properties of molecular chaperones (especially sHsps, Hsp70, and Hsp100) in LAB and their use in biotechnological applications.

  6. Chaperones get in touch: the Hip-Hop connection.

    PubMed

    Frydman, J; Höhfeld, J

    1997-03-01

    Recent findings emphasize that different molecular chaperones cooperate during intracellular protein biogenesis. Mechanistic aspects of chaperone cooperation are now emerging from studies on the regulation of certain signal transduction pathways mediated by Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the eukaryotic cytosol. Efficient cooperation appears to be achieved through a defined regulation of Hsc70 activity by the chaperone cofactors Hip and Hop.

  7. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates.

  8. Phenylalanine hydroxylase misfolding and pharmacological chaperones.

    PubMed

    Underhaug, Jarl; Aubi, Oscar; Martinez, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a loss-of-function inborn error of metabolism. As many other inherited diseases the main pathologic mechanism in PKU is an enhanced tendency of the mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) to misfold and undergo ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Recent alternative approaches with therapeutic potential for PKU aim at correcting the PAH misfolding, and in this respect pharmacological chaperones are the focus of increasing interest. These compounds, which often resemble the natural ligands and show mild competitive inhibition, can rescue the misfolded proteins by stimulating their renaturation in vivo. For PKU, a few studies have proven the stabilization of PKU-mutants in vitro, in cells, and in mice by pharmacological chaperones, which have been found either by using the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor as query structure for shape-focused virtual screening or by high-throughput screening of small compound libraries. Both approaches have revealed a number of compounds, most of which bind at the iron-binding site, competitively with respect to BH(4). Furthermore, PAH shares a number of ligands, such as BH(4), amino acid substrates and inhibitors, with the other aromatic amino acid hydroxylases: the neuronal/neuroendocrine enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the tryptophan hydroxylases (TPHs). Recent results indicate that the PAH-targeted pharmacological chaperones should also be tested on TH and the TPHs, and eventually be derivatized to avoid unwanted interactions with these other enzymes. After derivatization and validation in animal models, the PAH-chaperoning compounds represent novel possibilities in the treatment of PKU.

  9. Ionic contacts at DnaK substrate binding domain involved in the allosteric regulation of lid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Moro, Fernando; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Acebrón, Sergio P; Muga, Arturo

    2006-03-17

    To gain further insight into the interactions involved in the allosteric transition of DnaK we have characterized wild-type (wt) protein and three mutants in which ionic interactions at the interface between the two subdomains of the substrate binding domain, and within the lid subdomain have been disrupted. Our data show that ionic contacts, most likely forming an electrically charged network, between the N-terminal region of helix B and an inner loop of the beta-sandwich are involved in maintaining the position of the lid relative to the beta-subdomain in the ADP state but not in the ATP state of the protein. Disruption of the ionic interactions between the C-terminal region of helix B and the outer loops of the beta-sandwich, known as the latch, does not have the same conformational consequences but results equally in an inactive protein. This indicates that a variety of mechanisms can inactivate this complex allosteric machine. Our results identify the ionic contacts at the subdomain and interdomain interfaces that are part of the hinge region involved in the ATP-induced allosteric displacement of the lid away from the peptide binding site. These interactions also stabilize peptide-Hsp70 complexes at physiological (37 degrees C) and stress (42 degrees C) temperatures, a requirement for productive substrate (re)folding.

  10. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  11. AmyI-1-18, a cationic α-helical antimicrobial octadecapeptide derived from α-amylase in rice, inhibits the translation and folding processes in a protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Fukuda, Shun; Sato, Teppei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    In our previous study, we used a cell-free rapid translation system (RTS), which is an in vitro protein synthesis system based on Escherichia coli lysate, for evaluating the inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis by pyrrhocoricin. In this study, using an RTS, we evaluated the inhibition of GFP synthesis by AmyI-1-18, an antimicrobial octadecapeptide. We found that, similarly to pyrrhocoricin, AmyI-1-18 inhibited GFP synthesis in the RTS in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the blockage of transcription and translation steps in the RTS was individually estimated using RT-PCR after gene expression to determine the mRNA products and using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the amounts of GFP expressed from purified mRNA, respectively. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of GFP synthesis by AmyI-1-18 did not occur at the transcription step but rather at the translation step. Furthermore, we assessed the inhibition of DnaK-mediated refolding of chemically denatured luciferase by AmyI-1-18; AmyI-1-18 inhibited the protein folding activity of the ATP-dependent DnaK/DnaJ molecular chaperone system in a concentration-dependent manner. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that AmyI-1-18 strongly bound to RNA with a KD value of 1.4 × 10(-8) M but not to DNA and that AmyI-1-18 specifically bound to DnaK with a KD value of 4.4 × 10(-6) M. These SPR analysis results supported the results obtained in both the RTS and the molecular chaperone system. These results demonstrated that both RNA and DnaK are most likely the target of AmyI-1-18 in the protein synthesis system.

  12. mTORC1 links protein quality and quantity control by sensing chaperone availability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shu-Bing; Zhang, Xingqian; Sun, Jun; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Patterson, Cam

    2010-08-27

    Balanced protein synthesis and degradation are crucial for proper cellular function. Protein synthesis is tightly coupled to energy status and nutrient levels by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Quality of newly synthesized polypeptides is maintained by the molecular chaperone and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Little is known about how cells integrate information about the quantity and quality of translational products simultaneously. We demonstrate that cells distinguish moderate reductions in protein quality from severe protein misfolding using molecular chaperones to differentially regulate mTORC1 signaling. Moderate reduction of chaperone availability enhances mTORC1 signaling, whereas stress-induced complete depletion of chaperoning capacity suppresses mTORC1 signaling. Molecular chaperones regulate mTORC1 assembly in coordination with nutrient availability. This mechanism enables mTORC1 to rapidly detect and respond to environmental cues while also sensing intracellular protein misfolding. The tight linkage between protein quality and quantity control provides a plausible mechanism coupling protein misfolding with metabolic dyshomeostasis.

  13. Study on the chaperone properties of conserved GTPases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Xue, Jiaying; Sun, Zhe; Qin, Yan; Gong, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    As a large family of hydrolases, GTPases are widespread in cells and play the very important biological function of hydrolyzing GTP into GDP and inorganic phosphate through binding with it. GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, protein synthesis, and protein transportation. Chaperones can facilitate the folding or refolding of nascent peptides and denatured proteins to their native states. However, chaperones do not occur in the native structures in which they can perform their normal biological functions. In the current study, the chaperone activity of the conserved GTPases of Escherichia coli is tested by the chemical denaturation and chaperone-assisted renaturation of citrate synthase and α-glucosidase. The effects of ribosomes and nucleotides on the chaperone activity are also examined. Our data indicate that these conserved GTPases have chaperone properties, and may be ancestral protein folding factors that have appeared before dedicated chaperones.

  14. Emerging novel concept of chaperone therapies for protein misfolding diseases

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach to protein misfolding diseases. Among them we found unstable mutant enzyme proteins in a few lysosomal diseases, resulting in rapid intracellular degradation and loss of function. Active-site binding low molecular competitive inhibitors (chemical chaperones) paradoxically stabilized and enhanced the enzyme activity in somatic cells by correction of the misfolding of enzyme protein. They reached the brain through the blood-brain barrier after oral administration, and corrected pathophysiology of the disease. In addition to these inhibitory chaperones, non-competitive chaperones without inhibitory bioactivity are being developed. Furthermore molecular chaperone therapy utilizing the heat shock protein and other chaperone proteins induced by small molecules has been experimentally tried to handle abnormally accumulated proteins as a new approach particularly to neurodegenerative diseases. These three types of chaperones are promising candidates for various types of diseases, genetic or non-genetic, and neurological or non-neurological, in addition to lysosomal diseases. PMID:24814990

  15. Water-structuring technology with the molecular chaperone proteins: indicated application of the α-crystallin domains and imidazole-containing peptidomimetics in cosmetic skin care systems or dermatological therapeutic drug carrier formulations.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady M; Nikolayeva, Juliana G; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-01-01

    Changes in structural proteins and hydration during aging are responsible for altered skin morphologic and mechanical properties manifested as wrinkling, sagging, loss of elasticity, and apparent dryness. Impairment in protein hydration may add to the ultrastructural, mechanical, and biochemical changes in structural proteins in the aged skin. At Innovative Vision Products, Inc., we have pioneered a molecular chaperone protein-activated therapeutic or cosmetic platform to enable simultaneous analysis of water-binding and structuring characteristics for biology-related or skin aging and skin disease-related pathways. This cutting-edge technology has changed the hydration of proteins in photoaged skin which so that they are more compact and interact with water to limited degree. The mechanisms of skin diseases, aging, and cellular and signaling pathways mediated by targeting with molecular chaperone protein(s) are considered. Skin lesions that are growing, spreading, or pigmented, and those that occur on exposed areas of skin are likely to be treated by these emerging pharmacological chaperones that could have cosmetic or dermatological benefits. Examples of such chaperones are anti-/trans-glycation-imidazole-containing peptidomimetic(s) (natural L-carnosine derivatives and mimetics) combined with the molecular chaperone protein α-crystallin derived from a natural source, brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) cysts, or with recombinant human αA-crystallin. This patented biotechnology represents an efficient tool with which to mitigate the consequences of free radical-induced skin damage. The article is organized to provide in one place all of the relevant technical information, such as high-performance nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance application tools, and to describe the entire process from sample preparation to data analysis, which is moving from biological studies to biotechnology batches of the product. The proposed biotechnology results in

  16. Computational Analysis of Residue Interaction Networks and Coevolutionary Relationships in the Hsp70 Chaperones: A Community-Hopping Model of Allosteric Regulation and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2017-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in the Hsp70 proteins are linked with their regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions. Despite significant progress in structural and functional characterization of the Hsp70 proteins fundamental questions concerning modularity of the allosteric interaction networks and hierarchy of signaling pathways in the Hsp70 chaperones remained largely unexplored and poorly understood. In this work, we proposed an integrated computational strategy that combined atomistic and coarse-grained simulations with coevolutionary analysis and network modeling of the residue interactions. A novel aspect of this work is the incorporation of dynamic residue correlations and coevolutionary residue dependencies in the construction of allosteric interaction networks and signaling pathways. We found that functional sites involved in allosteric regulation of Hsp70 may be characterized by structural stability, proximity to global hinge centers and local structural environment that is enriched by highly coevolving flexible residues. These specific characteristics may be necessary for regulation of allosteric structural transitions and could distinguish regulatory sites from nonfunctional conserved residues. The observed confluence of dynamics correlations and coevolutionary residue couplings with global networking features may determine modular organization of allosteric interactions and dictate localization of key mediating sites. Community analysis of the residue interaction networks revealed that concerted rearrangements of local interacting modules at the inter-domain interface may be responsible for global structural changes and a population shift in the DnaK chaperone. The inter-domain communities in the Hsp70 structures harbor the majority of regulatory residues involved in allosteric signaling, suggesting that these sites could be integral to the network organization and coordination of structural changes. Using a network-based formalism of allostery, we

  17. Structural insights on two hypothetical secretion chaperones from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Fattori, Juliana; Prando, Alessandra; Assis, Leandro H P; Aparicio, Ricardo; Tasic, Ljubica

    2011-06-01

    Several Gram-negative bacterial pathogens have developed type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to deliver virulence proteins directly into eukaryotic cells in a process essential for many diseases. The type III secretion processes require customized chaperones with high specificity for binding partners, thus providing the secretion to occur. Due to the very low sequence similarities among secretion chaperones, annotation and discrimination of a great majority of them is extremely difficult and a task with low scores even if genes are encountered that codify for small (<20 kDa) proteins with low pI and a tendency to dimerise. Concerning about this, herein, we present structural features on two hypothetical T3SSs chaperones belonging to plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and suggest how low resolution models based on Small Angle X-ray Scattering patterns can provide new structural insights that could be very helpful in their analysis and posterior classification.

  18. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.

    2016-01-01

    therapeutic intervention. Pilus biogenesis is a multistep process. This work investigates the oligomeric state of the pilus chaperone in the periplasm, which is important for understanding early assembly events. Our work unambiguously demonstrates that both PapD and FimC chaperones are monomeric in solution. We further demonstrate that the solution behavior of the FimH and PapGII adhesins differ, which may be related to functional differences between the two pilus systems. PMID:27353649

  19. Histone chaperone specificity in Rtt109 activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Jun; Sudhoff, Keely B; Andrews, Andrew J; Stargell, Laurie A; Luger, Karolin

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109 is a histone acetyltransferase that requires a histone chaperone for the acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 56 (H3K56). Rtt109 forms a complex with the chaperone Vps75 in vivo and is implicated in DNA replication and repair. Here we show that both Rtt109 and Vps75 bind histones with high affinity, but only the complex is efficient for catalysis. The C-terminal acidic domain of Vps75 contributes to activation of Rtt109 and is necessary for in vivo functionality of Vps75, but it is not required for interaction with either Rtt109 or histones. We demonstrate that Vps75 is a structural homolog of yeast Nap1 by solving its crystal structure. Nap1 and Vps75 interact with histones and Rtt109 with comparable affinities. However, only Vps75 stimulates Rtt109 enzymatic activity. Our data highlight the functional specificity of Vps75 in Rtt109 activation. PMID:19172749

  20. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Cong; Ju, Wei-na; Jin, Hang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In this review, we

  1. Recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V.; Schinke, Reinhard

    2006-03-01

    The recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism, i.e., ArO +O2→Ar+O3 and ArO2+O→Ar+O3, is studied by means of classical trajectories and a pairwise additive Ar -O3 potential energy surface. The recombination rate coefficient has a strong temperature dependence, which approximately can be described by T-n with n ≈3. It is negligible for temperatures above 700 K or so, but it becomes important for low temperatures. The calculations unambiguously affirm the conclusions of Hippler et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6560 (1990)] and Luther et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7, 2764 (2005)] that the chaperon mechanism makes a sizable contribution to the recombination of O3 at room temperature and below. The dependence of the chaperon recombination rate coefficient on the isotopomer, studied for two different isotope combinations, is only in rough qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The oxygen atom isotope exchange reaction involving ArO and ArO2 van der Waals complexes is also investigated; the weak binding of O or O2 to Ar has only a small effect.

  2. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Zur Regulates the High-Affinity Zinc Uptake System TroCBA and the Putative Metal Chaperone YciC, along with ZinT and ZnuABC, for Survival under Zinc-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chaoprasid, Paweena; Dokpikul, Thanittra; Johnrod, Jaruwan; Sirirakphaisarn, Sirin; Nookabkaew, Sumontha; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a cluster of genes (Atu3178, Atu3179, and Atu3180) encoding an ABC-type transporter, here named troA, troB, and troC, respectively, which is shown here to be a zinc-specific uptake system. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis confirmed that troA, troB, and troC are cotranscribed, with troC as the first gene of the operon. The yciC (Atu3181) gene is transcribed in the opposite orientation to that of the troCBA operon and belongs to a metal-binding GTPase family. Expression of troCBA and yciC was inducible under zinc-limiting conditions and was controlled by the zinc uptake regulator, Zur. Compared to the wild type, the mutant strain lacking troC was hypersensitive to a metal chelator, EDTA, and the phenotype could be rescued by the addition of zinc, while the strain with a single yciC mutation showed no phenotype. However, yciC was important for survival under zinc limitation when either troC or zinT was inactivated. The periplasmic zinc-binding protein, ZinT, could not function when TroC was inactivated, suggesting that ZinT may interact with TroCBA in zinc uptake. Unlike many other bacteria, the ABC-type transporter ZnuABC was not the major zinc uptake system in A. tumefaciens. However, the important role of A. tumefaciens ZnuABC was revealed when TroCBA was impaired. The strain containing double mutations in the znuA and troC genes exhibited a growth defect in minimal medium. A. tumefaciens requires cooperation of zinc uptake systems and zinc chaperones, including TroCBA, ZnuABC, ZinT, and YciC, for survival under a wide range of zinc-limiting conditions. IMPORTANCE Both host and pathogen battle over access to essential metals, including zinc. In low-zinc environments, physiological responses that make it possible to acquire enough zinc are important for bacterial survival and could determine the outcome of host-pathogen interactions. A. tumefaciens was found to operate a novel pathway for zinc uptake in which Zin

  3. Analysis of the potency of various low molecular weight chemical chaperones to prevent protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Upagupta, Chandak; Carlisle, Rachel E; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2017-04-22

    Newly translated proteins must undergo proper folding to ensure their function. To enter a low energy state, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are associated with many degenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent studies have shown the use of low molecular weight chemical chaperones to be an effective method of reducing protein aggregation in various cell types. This study demonstrates a novel non-biased assay to assess the molecular efficacy of these compounds at preventing protein misfolding and/or aggregation. This assay utilizes a thioflavin T fluorescent stain to provide a qualitative and quantitative measure of protein misfolding within cells. The functionality of this method was first assessed in renal proximal tubule epithelial cells treated with various endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducers. Once established in the renal model system, we analyzed the ability of some known chemical chaperones to reduce ER stress. A total of five different compounds were selected: 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), tauroursodeoxycholic acid, trehalose, and glycerol. The dose-dependent effects of these compounds at reducing thapsigargin-induced ER stress was then analyzed, and used to determine their EC50 values. Of the chaperones, 4-PBA and DHA provided the greatest reduction of ER stress and did so at relatively low concentrations. Upon analyzing the efficiency of these compounds and their corresponding structures, it was determined that chaperones with a localized hydrophilic, polar end followed by a long hydrophobic chain, such as 4-PBA and DHA, were most effective at reducing ER stress. This study provides some insight into the use of low molecular weight chemical chaperones and may serve as the first step towards developing new chaperones of greater potency thereby providing potential treatments for diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  4. A molecular mechanism of chaperone-client recognition

    PubMed Central

    He, Lichun; Sharpe, Timothy; Mazur, Adam; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential in aiding client proteins to fold into their native structure and in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. However, mechanistic aspects of chaperone function are still not well understood at the atomic level. We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism underlying client recognition by the adenosine triphosphate-independent chaperone Spy at the atomic level and derive a structural model for the chaperone-client complex. Spy interacts with its partially folded client Im7 by selective recognition of flexible, locally frustrated regions in a dynamic fashion. The interaction with Spy destabilizes a partially folded client but spatially compacts an unfolded client conformational ensemble. By increasing client backbone dynamics, the chaperone facilitates the search for the native structure. A comparison of the interaction of Im7 with two other chaperones suggests that the underlying principle of recognizing frustrated segments is of a fundamental nature. PMID:28138538

  5. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients.

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis Slc1 is a type III secretion chaperone that enhances the translocation of its invasion effector substrate TARP.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Amanda J; Malcolm, Denise S; Pedrosa, António T; Roguska, Katarzyna; Shahbazian, Sevanna; Graham, James E; Hayward, Richard D; Carabeo, Rey A

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperones pilot substrates to the export apparatus in a secretion-competent state, and are consequently central to the translocation of effectors into target cells. Chlamydia trachomatis is a genetically intractable obligate intracellular pathogen that utilizes T3SS effectors to trigger its entry into mammalian cells. The only well-characterized T3SS effector is TARP (translocated actin recruitment protein), but its chaperone is unknown. Here we exploited a known structural signature to screen for putative type III secretion chaperones encoded within the C. trachomatis genome. Using bacterial two-hybrid, co-precipitation, cross-linking and size exclusion chromatography we show that Slc1 (SycE-like chaperone 1; CT043) specifically interacts with a 200-amino-acid residue N-terminal region of TARP (TARP¹⁻²⁰⁰). Slc1 formed homodimers in vitro, as shown in cross-linking and gel filtration experiments. Biochemical analysis of an isolated Slc1-TARP¹⁻²⁰⁰ complex was consistent with a characteristic 2:1 chaperone-effector stoichiometry. Furthermore, Slc1 was co-immunoprecipitated with TARP from C. trachomatis elementary bodies. Also, coexpression of Slc1 specifically enhanced host cell translocation of TARP by a heterologous Yersinia enterocolitica T3SS. Taken together, we propose Slc1 as a chaperone of the C. trachomatis T3SS effector TARP.

  7. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  8. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.

  9. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    DOE PAGES

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components thatmore » form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.« less

  10. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    PubMed

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  11. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    PubMed

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  12. Chaperones rescue luciferase folding by separating its domains.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2014-10-10

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process.

  13. Chaperones Rescue Luciferase Folding by Separating Its Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Zackary N.; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process. PMID:25160632

  14. Toward Instituting a Chaperone Policy in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; Jenkins, Carol; Laney, Tyler; Seidel, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate child, parent and medical provider preferences for chaperones for outpatient encounters and to evaluate the acceptability and frequency of utilization following institution of a chaperone policy. Secondarily, we sought to understand what medical history and examinations teens consider "sensitive." Design: We…

  15. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  16. Chaperones as potential therapeutics for Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Pannuzzo, Giovanna; Avola, Rosanna; Cardile, Venera

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe's disease (KD) is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disorder. It is classified among the lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). It was first described in , but the genetic defect for the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene was not discovered until the beginning of the 1970s, 20 years before the GALC cloning. Recently, in 2011, the crystal structures of the GALC enzyme and the GALC-product complex were obtained. For this, compared with other LSDs, the research on possible therapeutic interventions is much more recent. Thus, it is not surprising that some treatment options are still under preclinical investigation, whereas their relevance for other pathologies of the same group has already been tested in clinical studies. This is specifically the case for pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), a promising strategy for selectively correcting defective protein folding and trafficking and for enhancing enzyme activity by small molecules. These compounds bind directly to a partially folded biosynthetic intermediate, stabilize the protein, and allow completion of the folding process to yield a functional protein. Here, we review the chaperones that have demonstrated potential therapeutics during preclinical studies for KD, underscoring the requirement to invigorate research for KD-addressed PCT that will benefit from recent insights into the molecular understanding of GALC structure, drug design, and development in cellular models. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cold-active DnaK of an Antarctic psychrotroph Shewanella sp. Ac10 supporting the growth of dnaK-null mutant of Escherichia coli at cold temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Galkin, Andrey; Kulakova, Ljudmila; Yoshimura, Tohru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    Shewanella sp. Ac10 is a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from the Antarctica that actively grows at such low temperatures as 0 degrees C. Immunoblot analyses showed that a heat-shock protein DnaK is inducibly formed by the bacterium at 24 degrees C, which is much lower than the temperatures causing heat shock in mesophiles such as Escherichia coli. We found that the Shewanella DnaK (SheDnaK) shows much higher ATPase activity at low temperatures than the DnaK of E. coli (EcoDnaK): a characteristic of a cold-active enzyme. The recombinant SheDnaK gene supported neither the growth of a dnaK-null mutant of E. coli at 43 degrees C nor lambda phage propagation at an even lower temperature, 30 degrees C. However, the recombinant SheDnaK gene enabled the E. coli mutant to grow at 15 degrees C. This is the first report of a DnaK supporting the growth of a dnaK-null mutant at low temperatures.

  18. Regulation of organismal proteostasis by trans-cellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Porter, Robert S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge for metazoans is to ensure that different tissues each expressing distinctive proteomes are, nevertheless, well protected at an organismal level from proteotoxic stress. We have examined this and show that expression of endogenous metastable protein sensors in muscle cells induces a systemic stress response throughout multiple tissues of C. elegans. Suppression of misfolding in muscle cells can be achieved not only by enhanced expression of HSP90 in muscle cells, but as effective by elevated expression of HSP90 in intestine or neuronal cells. This cell-non-autonomous control of HSP90 expression relies upon transcriptional feedback between somatic tissues that is regulated by the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4. This trans-cellular chaperone signaling response maintains organismal proteostasis when challenged by a local tissue imbalance in folding and provides the basis for a novel form of organismal stress sensing surveillance. PMID:23746847

  19. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  20. Cloning Expression Purification Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffractino Studies of a 12R-LOX-chaperone Complex

    SciTech Connect

    G Deb; K Boeshanes; W Idler; B Ahvazi

    2011-12-31

    Lipoxygenases are a family of nonheme iron-containing dioxygenases. An Escherichia coli expression system producing the bacterial chaperones GroES and GroEL was engineered and successfully used to produce large quantities of recombinant human 12R-LOX (LOXR; MW 80.34 kDa; 701 amino-acid residues). The co-overproduction of the two chaperones with 12R-LOX resulted in increased solubility of 12R-LOX and allowed the purification of milligram amounts of active enzyme for structural studies by X-ray diffraction. The lipoxygenase protein was purified on an affinity column and a gel-filtration column with chaperone protein (MW 57.16 kDa). The LOXR-chaperone complex was crystallized with ligand by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.5 M ammonium hydrogen phosphate as precipitant. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 138.97, b = 266.11, c = 152.26 {angstrom}, {beta} = 101.07{sup o}. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (3.1 {angstrom}3 Da{sup -1}), it is estimated that one molecule of LOXR complexed with two molecules of chaperone is present in the asymmetric unit of the crystal lattice. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 4 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  1. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Kilstrup, M; Jacobsen, S; Hammer, K; Vogensen, F K

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during life in excess nutrients, by comparison of prototrophic wild-type strains and auxotrophic domesticated (dairy) strains. In a study of the capacity of domesticated strains to perform directed responses toward various stress conditions, we have analyzed the heat and salt stress response in the established L. lactis subsp. cremoris laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain. After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shock repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase were identified by a combination of Western blotting and direct N-terminal amino acid sequencing of proteins from the gels. Of 400 to 500 visible proteins, 17 were induced more than twofold during heat stress. Two classes of heat stress proteins were identified from their temporal induction pattern. The fast-induced proteins (including DnaK) showed an abruptly increased rate of synthesis during the first 10 min, declining to intermediate levels after 15 min. GroEL and GroES, which also belong to this group, maintained a high rate of synthesis after 15 min. The class of slowly induced proteins exhibited a gradual increase in the rate of synthesis after the onset of stress. Unlike other organisms, all salt stress-induced proteins in L. lactis were also subjected to heat stress induction. DnaK, GroEL, and GroES showed similar temporal patterns of induction during salt stress, resembling the timing during heat stress although at a lower induction level. These data indicate an overlap between the heat shock and salt stress responses in L. lactis. PMID:9143115

  2. Modulation of deregulated chaperone-mediated autophagy by a phosphopeptide

    PubMed Central

    Macri, Christophe; Wang, Fengjuan; Tasset, Inmaculada; Schall, Nicolas; Page, Nicolas; Briand, Jean-Paul; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Muller, Sylviane

    2015-01-01

    The P140 peptide, a 21-mer linear peptide (sequence 131–151) generated from the spliceosomal SNRNP70/U1–70K protein, contains a phosphoserine residue at position 140. It significantly ameliorates clinical manifestations in autoimmune patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and enhances survival in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. Previous studies showed that after P140 treatment, there is an accumulation of autophagy markers sequestosome 1/p62 and MAP1LC3-II in MRL/lpr B cells, consistent with a downregulation of autophagic flux. We now identify chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) as a target of P140 and demonstrate that its inhibitory effect on CMA is likely tied to its ability to alter the composition of HSPA8/HSC70 heterocomplexes. As in the case of HSPA8, expression of the limiting CMA component LAMP2A, which is increased in MRL/lpr B cells, is downregulated after P140 treatment. We also show that P140, but not the unphosphorylated peptide, uses the clathrin-dependent endo-lysosomal pathway to enter into MRL/lpr B lymphocytes and accumulates in the lysosomal lumen where it may directly hamper lysosomal HSPA8 chaperoning functions, and also destabilize LAMP2A in lysosomes as a result of its effect on HSP90AA1. This dual effect may interfere with the endogenous autoantigen processing and loading to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and as a consequence, lead to lower activation of autoreactive T cells. These results shed light on mechanisms by which P140 can modulate lupus disease and exert its tolerogenic activity in patients. The unique selective inhibitory effect of the P140 peptide on CMA may be harnessed in other pathological conditions in which reduction of CMA activity would be desired. PMID:25719862

  3. Antarctic Krill 454 Pyrosequencing Reveals Chaperone and Stress Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Melody S.; Thorne, Michael A. S.; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Meng, Yan; Guan, Le Luo; Peck, Lloyd S.; Moore, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. Methodology/Principal Findings The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp). In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS), providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. Conclusions This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical “stress proteins”, such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of “stress” genes for studies understanding marine

  4. Characterization of the human sigma-1 receptor chaperone domain structure and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interactions.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R

    2013-07-19

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198-206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions.

  5. Differential roles of NF-Y transcription factor in ER chaperone expression and neuronal maintenance in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Tosaki, Asako; Miyazaki, Haruko; Kurosawa, Masaru; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Maity, Sankar N.; Misawa, Hidemi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) contains various types of neurons with different neuronal functions. In contrast to established roles of cell type-specific transcription factors on neuronal specification and maintenance, whether ubiquitous transcription factors have conserved or differential neuronal function remains uncertain. Here, we revealed that inactivation of a ubiquitous factor NF-Y in different sets of neurons resulted in cell type-specific neuropathologies and gene downregulation in mouse CNS. In striatal and cerebellar neurons, NF-Y inactivation led to ubiquitin/p62 pathologies with downregulation of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone Grp94, as we previously observed by NF-Y deletion in cortical neurons. In contrast, NF-Y inactivation in motor neurons induced neuronal loss without obvious protein deposition. Detailed analysis clarified downregulation of another ER chaperone Grp78 in addition to Grp94 in motor neurons, and knockdown of both ER chaperones in motor neurons recapitulated the pathology observed after NF-Y inactivation. Finally, additional downregulation of Grp78 in striatal neurons suppressed ubiquitin accumulation induced by NF-Y inactivation, implying that selective ER chaperone downregulation mediates different neuropathologies. Our data suggest distinct roles of NF-Y in protein homeostasis and neuronal maintenance in the CNS by differential regulation of ER chaperone expression. PMID:27687130

  6. THE PROTEIN TARGETING FACTOR GET3 FUNCTIONS AS AN ATP-INDEPENDENT CHAPERONE UNDER OXIDATIVE STRESS CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Voth, Wilhelm; Schick, Markus; Gates, Stephanie; Li, Sheng; Vilardi, Fabio; Gostimskaya, Irina; Southworth, Daniel R.; Schwappach, Blanche; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Exposure of cells to reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes a rapid and significant drop in intracellular ATP-levels. This energy depletion negatively affects ATP-dependent chaperone systems, making ROS-mediated protein unfolding and aggregation a potentially very challenging problem. Here we show that Get3, a protein involved in ATP-dependent targeting of tail-anchored (TA) proteins under non-stress conditions, turns into an effective ATP-in dependent chaperone when oxidized. Activation of Get3’s chaperone function, which is a fully reversible process, involves disulfide bond formation, metal release and its conversion into distinct, higher oligomeric structures. Mutational studies demonstrate that the chaperone activity of Get3 is functionally distinct from and likely mutually exclusive with its targeting function, and responsible for the oxidative stress sensitive phenotype that has long been noted for yeast cells lacking functional Get3. These results provide convincing evidence that Get3 functions as a redox regulated chaperone, effectively protecting eukaryotic cells against oxidative protein damage. PMID:25242142

  7. Characterization of the Human Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Domain Structure and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198–206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions. PMID:23760505

  8. Transthyretin Amyloidosis: Chaperone Concentration Changes and Increased Proteolysis in the Pathway to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Raquel; Gilberto, Samuel; Gomes, Ricardo A.; Ferreira, António; Mateus, Élia; Barroso, Eduardo; Coelho, Ana V.; Freire, Ana Ponces; Cordeiro, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Transthyretin amyloidosis is a conformational pathology characterized by the extracellular formation of amyloid deposits and the progressive impairment of the peripheral nervous system. Point mutations in this tetrameric plasma protein decrease its stability and are linked to disease onset and progression. Since non-mutated transthyretin also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis and some mutation bearers are asymptomatic throughout their lives, non-genetic factors must also be involved in transthyretin amyloidosis. We discovered, using a differential proteomics approach, that extracellular chaperones such as fibrinogen, clusterin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-anti-trypsin and 2-macroglobulin are overrepresented in transthyretin amyloidosis. Our data shows that a complex network of extracellular chaperones are over represented in human plasma and we speculate that they act synergistically to cope with amyloid prone proteins. Proteostasis may thus be as important as point mutations in transthyretin amyloidosis. PMID:26147092

  9. Histone chaperones: assisting histone traffic and nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The functional organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin uses histones as components of its building block, the nucleosome. Histone chaperones, which are proteins that escort histones throughout their cellular life, are key actors in all facets of histone metabolism; they regulate the supply and dynamics of histones at chromatin for its assembly and disassembly. Histone chaperones can also participate in the distribution of histone variants, thereby defining distinct chromatin landscapes of importance for genome function, stability, and cell identity. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of the known histone chaperones and their histone partners, focusing on histone H3 and its variants. We then place them into an escort network that distributes these histones in various deposition pathways. Through their distinct interfaces, we show how they affect dynamics during DNA replication, DNA damage, and transcription, and how they maintain genome integrity. Finally, we discuss the importance of histone chaperones during development and describe how misregulation of the histone flow can link to disease.

  10. Chaperone-assisted refolding of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Paul, Subhankar; Punam, Shashikala; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2007-11-01

    In vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase, a 69 kDa monomeric Escherichia coli protein, was studied in the presence of glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, ethylene glycol, trehalose, proline and chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Different osmolytes, namely proline, glycerol, trimethylamine-N-oxide and dimethylsulfoxide, also known as chemical chaperones, assist in protein folding through effective inhibition of the aggregation process. In the present study, it was observed that a few chemical chaperones effectively reduced the aggregation process of maltodextrin glucosidase and hence the in vitro refolding was substantially enhanced, with ethylene glycol being the exception. Although, the highest recovery of active maltodextrin glucosidase was achieved through the ATP-mediated GroEL/GroES-assisted refolding of denatured protein, the yield of correctly folded protein from glycerol- or proline-assisted spontaneous refolding process was closer to the chaperonin-assisted refolding. It was also observed that the combined application of chemical chaperones and molecular chaperone was more productive than their individual contribution towards the in vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase. The chemical chaperones, except ethylene glycol, were found to provide different degrees of protection to maltodextrin glucosidase from thermal denaturation, whereas proline caused the highest protection. The observations from the present studies conclusively demonstrate that chemical or molecular chaperones, or the combination of both chaperones, could be used in the efficient refolding of recombinant E. coli maltodextrin glucosidase, which enhances the possibility of identifying or designing suitable small molecules that can act as chemical chaperones in the efficient refolding of various aggregate-prone proteins of commercial and medical importance.

  11. Cloning and characterization of three hypothetical secretion chaperone proteins from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Ljubica; Borin, Paula F L; Khater, Leti Cia; Ramos, Carlos H I

    2007-06-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker in plantations around the world and is of particular significance in Brazil where its incidence has risen exponentially over the past decade. Approximately one third of the predicted Xac open reading frames show no homology, or homology with very low score with that of known sequences. It is believed that Xac utilizes secretion systems to transfer virulence proteins into susceptible eukaryotic cells. This process is assisted by secretion chaperones that maintain virulence proteins partly or completely unfolded during translocation. We have cloned three of these hypothetical secretion chaperones: XAC0419 and XAC1346 from type III secretion system (TTSS) and XACb0033 from type IV secretion system (TFSS). All proteins were cloned in a pET23a vector (Novagen), expressed at 37 degrees C using a BL21(DE3)pLysS Escherichia coli strain and purified by ion exchange and gel-filtration chromatographic methods. Pure proteins were characterized using spectroscopic measurements: circular dichroism, and both static and lifetime emission fluorescence in the case of XACb0033. The analyzed proteins are stable at elevated temperatures (up to 65 degrees C) and exhibit alpha-helix content from approximately 30% (XACb003) to approximately 87% (XAC1346). XACb0033 exhibits lifetimes in the fluorescence experiments that indicate different neighborhoods for its tryptophan residues. These chaperones have the characteristics of TTSS and TFSS: all are small, with a high alpha-helix content, and without ATP-binding or ATP-hydrolyzing activity.

  12. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and maltose binding protein (MBP) captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of the non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone. PMID:27501151

  13. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase and maltose-binding protein captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone.

  14. Copper accumulation and compartmentalization in mouse fibroblast lacking metallothionein and copper chaperone, Atox1

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Suzuki, Kazuo T.; Ogra, Yasumitsu

    2009-06-01

    Copper (Cu) is the active center of some enzymes because of its redox-active property, although that property could have harmful effects. Because of this, cells have strict regulation/detoxification systems for this metal. In this study, multi-disciplinary approaches, such as speciation and elemental imaging of Cu, were applied to reveal the detoxification mechanisms for Cu in cells bearing a defect in Cu-regulating genes. Although Cu concentration in metallothionein (MT)-knockout cells was increased by the knockdown of the Cu chaperone, Atox1, the concentrations of the Cu influx pump, Ctr1, and another Cu chaperone, Ccs, were paradoxically increased; namely, the cells responded to the Cu deficiency despite the fact that cellular Cu concentration was actually increased. Cu imaging showed that the elevated Cu was compartmentalized in cytoplasmic vesicles. Together, the results point to the novel roles of MT and cytoplasmic vesicles in the detoxification of Cu in mammalian cells.

  15. Type III secretion chaperones of Pseudomonas syringae protect effectors from Lon-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana C; Hutcheson, Steven W

    2005-02-01

    The hrp type III secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae translocates effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. Proteolysis of HrpR by Lon has been shown to negatively regulate the hrp TTSS. The inability to bypass Lon-associated effects on the regulatory system by ectopic expression of the known regulators suggested a second site of action for Lon in TTSS-dependent effector secretion. In this study we report that TTSS-dependent effectors are subject to the proteolytic degradation that appears to be rate-limiting to secretion. The half-lives of the effectors AvrPto, AvrRpt2, HopPsyA, HopPsyB1, HopPtoB2, HopPsyV1, HopPtoG and HopPtoM were substantially higher in bacteria lacking Lon. TTSS-dependent secretion of several effectors was enhanced from Lon mutants. A primary role for chaperones appears to be protection of effectors from Lon-associated degradation prior to secretion. When coexpressed with their cognate chaperone, HopPsyB1, HopPsyV1 and HopPtoM were at least 10 times more stable in strains expressing Lon. Distinct Lon-targeting and chaperone-binding domains were identified in HopPtoM. The results imply that Lon is involved at two distinct levels in the regulation of the P. syringae TTSS: regulation of assembly of the secreton and modulation of effector secretion.

  16. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus.

  17. New insights into the roles of molecular chaperones in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

    PubMed

    Nordhues, André; Miller, Stephen M; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used as a model organism for many decades, mainly to study photosynthesis and flagella/cilia. Only recently, Chlamydomonas has received much attention because of its ability to produce hydrogen and nonpolar lipids that have promise as biofuels. The best-studied multicellular cousin of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is Volvox carteri, whose life cycle comprises events that have clear parallels in higher plants and/or animals, making it an excellent system in which to study fundamental developmental processes. Molecular chaperones are proteins that guide other cellular proteins through their life cycle. They assist in de novo folding of nascent chains, mediate assembly and disassembly of protein complexes, facilitate protein transport across membranes, disassemble protein aggregates, fold denatured proteins back to the native state, and transfer unfoldable proteins to proteolytic degradation. Hence, molecular chaperones regulate protein function under all growth conditions and play important roles in many basic cellular and developmental processes. The aim of this chapter is to describe recent advances toward understanding molecular chaperone biology in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

  18. Efficient antibody production in the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta by overexpression of chaperones.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Baba, Satoshi; Ono, Minako; Nonaka, Koichi; Ichikawa, Kimihisa; Yabuta, Masayuki; Ito, Rie; Chiba, Yasunori

    2017-03-26

    A production system for a therapeutic monoclonal antibody was developed using the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta IFO10746. The genetically engineered O. minuta secreted a detectable amount of anti-TRAIL receptor antibody into the culture supernatant, and the secreted antibody was purified by multiple column chromatography steps. In the purification process, both fully and partially assembled antibodies were detected and isolated. The fully assembled antibody from O. minuta showed almost the same biological activity as that derived from mammalian cells despite the distinct glycosylation profile, whereas the partially assembled antibody showed no cytotoxic activity. To increase the production of active antibody in O. minuta, we overexpressed selected chaperone proteins (included protein disulfide isomerase (OmPDI1), thiol oxidase (OmERO1), and immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (OmKAR2)) known to assist in the proper folding (in the endoplasmic reticulum) of proteins destined for secretion. Each of these chaperones enhanced antibody secretion, and together these three factors yielded 16-fold higher antibody accumulation while increasing the ratio of the fully assembled antibody compared to that from the parental strain. Supplementation of a rhodanine-3-acetic acid derivative (R3AD_1c), an inhibitor of O-mannosylation, further increased the secretion of the correctly assembled antibody. These results indicated that the co-overexpression of chaperones is an effective way to produce the correctly assembled antibody in O. minuta.

  19. Elucidating the mechanism of substrate recognition by the bacterial Hsp90 molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Street, Timothy O.; Zeng, Xiaohui; Pellarin, Riccardo; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Sali, Andrej; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Chu, Feixia; Agard, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Hsp90 is a conformationally dynamic molecular chaperone known to promote the folding and activation of a broad array of protein substrates (“clients”). Hsp90 is believed to preferentially interact with partially folded substrates, and it has been hypothesized that the chaperone can significantly alter substrate structure as a mechanism to alter the substrate functional state. However, critically testing the mechanism of substrate recognition and remodeling by Hsp90 has been challenging. Using a partially folded protein as a model system, we find that the bacterial Hsp90 adapts its conformation to the substrate, forming a binding site that spans the middle and C-terminal domains of the chaperone. Crosslinking and NMR measurements indicate that Hsp90 binds to a large partially-folded region of the substrate and significantly alters both its local and long-range structure. These findings implicate Hsp90’s conformational dynamics in its ability to bind and remodel partially folded proteins. Moreover, native-state hydrogen exchange indicates that Hsp90 can also interact with partially folded states only transiently populated from within a thermodynamically stable native state ensemble. These results suggest a general mechanism by which Hsp90 can recognize and remodel native proteins by binding and remodeling partially folded states that are transiently sampled from within the native ensemble. PMID:24726919

  20. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families–molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases–chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  1. Dissecting the Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone network using differential proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vertommen, Didier; Silhavy, Thomas J.; Collet, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    β-barrel proteins, or outer membrane proteins (OMPs), perform many essential functions in Gram-negative bacteria, but questions remain about the mechanism by which they are assembled into the outer membrane (OM). In Escherichia coli, β-barrels are escorted across the periplasm by chaperones, most notably SurA and Skp. However, the contributions of these two chaperones to the assembly of the OM proteome remained unclear. We used differential proteomics to determine how the elimination of Skp and SurA affects the assembly of many OMPs. We have shown that removal of Skp has no impact on the levels of the 63 identified OM proteins. However, depletion of SurA in the skp strain has a marked impact on the OM proteome, diminishing the levels of almost all β-barrel proteins. Our results are consistent with a model in which SurA plays a primary chaperone role in E. coli. Furthermore, they suggest that while no OMPs prefer the Skp chaperone pathway in wild-type cells, most can use Skp efficiently when SurA is absent. Our data, which provide a unique glimpse into the protein content of the non-viable surA skp mutant, clarify the roles of the periplasmic chaperones in E. coli. PMID:22589188

  2. Deletion of the Small RNA Chaperone Protein Hfq down Regulates Genes Related to Virulence and Confers Protection against Wild-Type Brucella Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shuangshuang; Zhong, Zhijun; Ke, Yuehua; Yang, Mingjuan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Ren, Hang; An, Chang; Yuan, Jiuyun; Yu, Jiuxuan; Xu, Jie; Qiu, Yefeng; Shi, Yanchun; Wang, Yufei; Peng, Guangneng; Chen, Zeliang

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic epidemics worldwide. Brucella, the etiological pathogen of brucellosis, has unique virulence characteristics, including the ability to survive within the host cell. Hfq is a bacterial chaperone protein that is involved in the survival of the pathogen under stress conditions. Moreover, hfq affects the expression of a large number of target genes. In the present study, we characterized the expression and regulatory patterns of the target genes of Hfq during brucellosis. The results revealed that hfq expression is highly induced in macrophages at the early infection stage and at the late stage of mouse infection. Several genes related to virulence, including omp25, omp31, vjbR, htrA, gntR, and dnaK, were found to be regulated by hfq during infection in BALB/c mice. Gene expression and cytokine secretion analysis revealed that an hfq-deletion mutant induced different cytokine profiles compared with that induced by 16M. Infection with the hfq-deletion mutant induced protective immune responses against 16M challenge. Together, these results suggest that hfq is induced during infection and its deletion results in significant attenuation which affects the host immune response caused by Brucella infection. By regulating genes related to virulence, hfq promotes the virulence of Brucella. The unique characteristics of the hfq-deletion mutant, including its decreased virulence and the ability to induce protective immune response upon infection, suggest that it represents an attractive candidate for the design of a live attenuated vaccine against Brucella. PMID:26834720

  3. DnaK-facilitated ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli revisited

    PubMed Central

    ALIX, JEAN-HERVÉ; NIERHAUS, KNUD H.

    2003-01-01

    Assembly helpers exist for the formation of ribosomal subunits. Such a function has been suggested for the DnaK system of chaperones (DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE). Here we show that 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits from an Escherichia coli dnaK-null mutant (containing a disrupted dnaK gene) grown at 30°C are physically and functionally identical to wild-type ribosomes. Furthermore, ribosomal components derived from mutant 30S and 50S subunits are fully competent for in vitro reconstitution of active ribosomal subunits. On the other hand, the DnaK chaperone system cannot circumvent the necessary heat-dependent activation step for the in vitro reconstitution of fully active 30S ribosomal subunits. It is therefore questionable whether the requirement for DnaK observed during in vivo ribosome assembly above 37°C implicates a direct or indirect role for DnaK in this process. PMID:12810912

  4. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  5. ER chaperones in neurodegenerative disease: Folding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Huerta, Paula; Bargsted, Leslie; Rivas, Alexis; Matus, Soledad; Vidal, Rene L

    2016-10-01

    Proteins along the secretory pathway are co-translationally translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as unfolded polypeptide chains. Afterwards, they are usually modified with N-linked glycans, correctly folded and stabilized by disulfide bonds. ER chaperones and folding enzymes control these processes. The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER activates a signaling response, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). The hallmark of this response is the coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of ER chaperones and folding enzymes. In order to discuss the importance of the proper folding of certain substrates we will address the role of ER chaperones in normal physiological conditions and examine different aspects of its contribution in neurodegenerative disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress.

  6. The conformational dynamics of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Mapa, Koyeli; Sikor, Martin; Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Waegemann, Karin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Seidel, Claus A M; Neupert, Walter; Lamb, Don C; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2010-04-09

    Heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70) represent a ubiquitous and conserved family of molecular chaperones involved in a plethora of cellular processes. The dynamics of their ATP hydrolysis-driven and cochaperone-regulated conformational cycle are poorly understood. We used fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze, in real time and at single-molecule resolution, the effects of nucleotides and cochaperones on the conformation of Ssc1, a mitochondrial member of the family. We report that the conformation of its ADP state is unexpectedly heterogeneous, in contrast to a uniform ATP state. Substrates are actively involved in determining the conformation of Ssc1. The J protein Mdj1 does not interact transiently with the chaperone, as generally believed, but rather is released slowly upon ATP hydrolysis. Analysis of the major bacterial Hsp70 revealed important differences between highly homologous members of the family, possibly explaining tuning of Hsp70 chaperones to meet specific functions in different organisms and cellular compartments.

  7. Simulation of the opening and closing of Hsp70 chaperones by coarse-grained molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gołaś, Ewa; Maisuradze, Gia G.; Senet, Patrick; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Czaplewski, Cezary; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins 70 (Hsp70s) are key molecular chaperones which assist in the folding and refolding/disaggregation of proteins. Hsp70s, which consist of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD, consisting of NBD-I and NBD-II subdomains) and a substrate-binding domain [SBD, further split into the β-sheet (SBD-β) and α-helical (SBD-α) subdomains], occur in two major conformations having (a) a closed SBD, in which the SBD and NBD domains do not interact, (b) an open SBD, in which SBD-α interacts with NBD-I and SBD-β interacts with the top parts of NBD-I and NBD-II. In the SBD-closed conformation, SBD is bound to a substrate protein, with release occurring after transition to the open conformation. While the transition from the closed to the open conformation is triggered efficiently by binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the NBD, it also occurs, although less frequently, in the absence of ATP. The reverse transition occurs after ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report canonical and multiplexed replica exchange simulations of the conformational dynamics of Hsp70s using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach with the UNRES force field. The simulations were run in the following three modes: (i) with the two halves of the NBD unrestrained relative to each other, (ii) with the two halves of the NBD restrained in an “open” geometry as in the SBD-closed form of DnaK (2KHO), and (iii) the two halves of NBD restrained in a “closed” geometry as in known experimental structures of ATP-bound NBD forms of Hsp70. Open conformations, in which the SBD interacted strongly with the NBD, formed spontaneously during all simulations; the number of transitions was largest in simulations carried out with the “closed” NBD domain, and smallest in those carried out with the “open” NBD domain; this observation is in agreement with the experimentally-observed influence of ATP-binding on the transition of Hsp70’s from the SBD-closed to the SBD-open form. Two kinds of open

  8. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Marquardt, Iris; Donsante, Anthony; Yi, Ling; Hicks, Julia D.; Steinbach, Peter J.; Wilson, Callum; Elpeleg, Orly; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Christodoulou, John; Kaler, Stephen G.; Gärtner, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Copper is a trace metal that readily gains and donates electrons, a property that renders it desirable as an enzyme cofactor but dangerous as a source of free radicals. To regulate cellular copper metabolism, an elaborate system of chaperones and transporters has evolved, although no human copper chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited a homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution of a highly conserved arginine residue at position 163 with tryptophan in domain II of CCS, which interacts directly with SOD1. Biochemical analyses of the patient’s fibroblasts, mammalian cell transfections, immunoprecipitation assays, and Lys7Δ (CCS homolog) yeast complementation support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal copper homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation in a gene coding for a copper chaperone. PMID:22508683

  9. Conformational dynamics of the molecular chaperone Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Krukenberg, Kristin A.; Street, Timothy O.; Lavery, Laura A.; Agard, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is an essential eukaryotic protein that makes up 1–2% of all cytosolic proteins. Hsp90 is vital for the maturation and maintenance of a wide variety of substrate proteins largely involved in signaling and regulatory processes. Many of these substrates have also been implicated in cancer and other diseases making Hsp90 an attractive target for therapeutics. Hsp90 is a highly dynamic and flexible molecule that can adapt its conformation to the wide variety of substrate proteins with which it acts. Large conformational rearrangements are also required for the activation of these client proteins. One driving force for these rearrangements is the intrinsic ATPase activity of Hsp90, as seen with other chaperones. However, unlike other chaperones, studies have shown that the ATPase cycle of Hsp90 is not conformationally deterministic. That is, rather than dictating the conformational state, ATP binding and hydrolysis shifts the equilibrium between a pre-existing set of conformational states in an organism-dependent manner. In vivo Hsp90 functions as part of larger heterocomplexes. The binding partners of Hsp90, co-chaperones, assist in the recruitment and activation of substrates, and many co-chaperones further regulate the conformational dynamics of Hsp90 by shifting the conformational equilibrium towards a particular state. Studies have also suggested alternative mechanisms for the regulation of Hsp90’s conformation. In this review, we discuss the structural and biochemical studies leading to our current understanding of the conformational dynamics of Hsp90 and the role that nucleotide, co-chaperones, post-translational modification and clients play in regulating Hsp90’s conformation. We also discuss the effects of current Hsp90 inhibitors on conformation and the potential for developing small molecules that inhibit Hsp90 by disrupting the conformational dynamics. PMID:21414251

  10. Orchestration of secretory protein folding by ER chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Stevens, Fred; Argon, Yair

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a major compartment of protein biogenesis in the cell, dedicated to production of secretory, membrane and organelle proteins. The secretome has distinct structural and post-translational characteristics, since folding in the ER occurs in an environment that is distinct in terms of its ionic composition, dynamics and requirements for quality contol. The folding machinery in the ER therefore includes chaperones and folding enzymes that introduce, monitor and react to disulfide bonds, glycans, and fluctuations of luminal calcium. We describe the major chaperone networks in the lumen and discuss how they have distinct modes of operation that enable cells to accomplish highly efficient production of the secretome. PMID:23507200

  11. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of SrcA, a Multi-cargo Type III Secretion Chaperone in Salmonella Required for Pathogenic Association with a Host

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Zhang, K; Andres, S; Fnag, Y; Kaniuk, N; Hannemann, M; Brumell, J; Foster, L; Junop, M; Coombes, B

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2) is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2) and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  12. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  13. RNA chaperones buffer deleterious mutations in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Marina; Schneider, Dominique; Warnecke, Tobias; Krisko, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Both proteins and RNAs can misfold into non-functional conformations. Protein chaperones promote native folding of nascent polypeptides and refolding of misfolded species, thereby buffering mutations that compromise protein structure and function. Here, we show that RNA chaperones can also act as mutation buffers that enhance organismal fitness. Using competition assays, we demonstrate that overexpression of select RNA chaperones, including three DEAD box RNA helicases (DBRHs) (CsdA, SrmB, RhlB) and the cold shock protein CspA, improves fitness of two independently evolved Escherichia coli mutator strains that have accumulated deleterious mutations during short- and long-term laboratory evolution. We identify strain-specific mutations that are deleterious and subject to buffering when introduced individually into the ancestral genotype. For DBRHs, we show that buffering requires helicase activity, implicating RNA structural remodelling in the buffering process. Our results suggest that RNA chaperones might play a fundamental role in RNA evolution and evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04745.001 PMID:25806682

  14. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-05-23

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α-ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt carboxy-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α-ring. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit. Here we report that the base subassembly of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high-affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6 and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α-pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3-pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α-pocket in mature proteasomes, it inserts into the α2/α3-pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme.

  15. Pharmacological chaperones for human α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Nathaniel E.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Best, Daniel; Fleet, George W. J.; Garman, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Schindler/Kanzaki disease is an inherited metabolic disease with no current treatment options. This neurologic disease results from a defect in the lysosomal α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGAL) enzyme. In this report, we show evidence that the iminosugar DGJNAc can inhibit, stabilize, and chaperone human α-NAGAL both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that a related iminosugar DGJ (currently in phase III clinical trials for another metabolic disorder, Fabry disease) can also chaperone human α-NAGAL in Schindler/Kanzaki disease. The 1.4- and 1.5-Å crystal structures of human α-NAGAL complexes reveal the different binding modes of iminosugars compared with glycosides. We show how differences in two functional groups result in >9 kcal/mol of additional binding energy and explain the molecular interactions responsible for the unexpectedly high affinity of the pharmacological chaperones. These results open two avenues for treatment of Schindler/Kanzaki disease and elucidate the atomic basis for pharmacological chaperoning in the entire family of lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23045655

  16. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  17. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl AT; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James CA

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These “Super Spy” variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001 PMID:24497545

  18. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nutan; Tyagi, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as "molecular chaperones" within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these "guides" can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus.

  19. New therapeutic approaches for Krabbe disease: The potential of pharmacological chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Spratley, Samantha J.

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in the lysosomal hydrolase β‐galactocerebrosidase (GALC) account for at least 40% of known cases of Krabbe disease (KD). Most of these missense mutations are predicted to disrupt the fold of the enzyme, preventing GALC in sufficient amounts from reaching its site of action in the lysosome. The predominant central nervous system (CNS) pathology and the absence of accumulated primary substrate within the lysosome mean that strategies used to treat other lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are insufficient in KD, highlighting the still unmet clinical requirement for successful KD therapeutics. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is one strategy being explored to overcome defects in GALC caused by missense mutations. In recent studies, several small‐molecule inhibitors have been identified as promising chaperone candidates for GALC. This Review discusses new insights gained from these studies and highlights the importance of characterizing both the chaperone interaction and the underlying mutation to define properly a responsive population and to improve the translation of existing lead molecules into successful KD therapeutics. We also highlight the importance of using multiple complementary methods to monitor PCT effectiveness. Finally, we explore the exciting potential of using combination therapy to ameliorate disease through the use of PCT with existing therapies or with more generalized therapeutics, such as proteasomal inhibition, that have been shown to have synergistic effects in other LSDs. This, alongside advances in CNS delivery of recombinant enzyme and targeted rational drug design, provides a promising outlook for the development of KD therapeutics. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638604

  20. Tubulin-specific Chaperones: Components of a Molecular Machine that Assembles the α/β Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guoling; Cowan, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The tubulin heterodimer consists of one α- and one β-tubulin polypeptide. Neither protein can partition to the native state or assemble into polymerization competent heterodimers without the concerted action of a series of chaperone proteins including five tubulin-specific chaperones termed TBCA-TBCE. TBCA and TBCB bind to and stabilize newly synthesized quasi-native β- and α-tubulin polypeptides following their generation via multiple rounds of ATP-dependent interaction with the cytosolic chaperonin, CCT. There is free exchange β-tubulin between TBCA and TBCD, and of α-tubulin between TBCB and TBCE, resulting in the formation of TBCD/β and TBCE/α, respectively. The latter two complexes interact, forming a supercomplex (TBCD/α/TBCD/β). Discharge of the native α/β heterodimer occurs via interaction of the supercomplex with TBCC, which results in the triggering of TBC-bound β-tubulin-bound (E-site) GTP hydrolysis. This reaction acts as a switch for disassembly of the supercomplex and the release of GDP-bound heterodimer, which becomes polymerization competent following spontaneous E-site exchange with GTP. The tubulin-specific chaperones thus function together as a tubulin assembly machine, marrying the α- and β-tubulin subunits into a tightly associated heterodimer. The existence of this evolutionarily conserved pathway explains why it has never proved possible to isolate α- or β-tubulin as stable independent entities in the absence of their cognate partners, and implies that each exists and is maintained in the heterodimer in a non-minimal energy state. Here we describe methods for the purification of recombinant TBC’s as biologically active proteins following their expression in a variety of host/vector systems. PMID:23973072

  1. Pharmacological chaperones as a potential therapeutic option in methylmalonic aciduria cblB type

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Brasil, Sandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Ruíz-Sala, Pedro; Merinero, Begoña; Banerjee, Ruma; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2013-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene. This encodes the enzyme ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR), which converts reduced cob(I)alamin to an active adenosylcobalamin cofactor. We recently reported the presence of destabilizing pathogenic mutations that retain some residual ATR activity. The aim of the present study was to seek pharmacological chaperones as a tailored therapy for stabilizing the ATR protein. High-throughput ligand screening of over 2000 compounds was performed; six were found to enhance the thermal stability of purified recombinant ATR. Further studies using a well-established bacterial system in which the recombinant ATR protein was expressed in the presence of these six compounds, showed them all to increase the stability of the wild-type ATR and the p.Ile96Thr mutant proteins. Compound V (N-{[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamothioyl]amino}-2-phenylacetamide) significantly increased this stability and did not act as an inhibitor of the purified protein. Importantly, compound V increased the activity of ATR in patient-derived fibroblasts harboring the destabilizing p.Ile96Thr mutation in a hemizygous state to within control range. When cobalamin was coadministrated with compound V, mutant ATR activity further improved. Oral administration of low doses of compound V to C57BL/6J mice for 12 days, led to increase in steady-state levels of ATR protein in liver and brain (disease-relevant organs). These results hold promise for the clinical use of pharmacological chaperones in MMA cblB type patients harboring chaperone-responsive mutations. PMID:23674520

  2. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Dodds, Sherry G.; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica; Sharp, Z. D.; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24 mg/kg (14 ppm) rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome. PMID:25414638

  3. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Jonathan E.; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin–specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end–directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼430 nm·s−1 at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (kcat ∼6 s−1) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (kdet = 6.2 s−1) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  4. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Dodds, Sherry G; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica; Sharp, Z D; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24 mg/kg (14 ppm) rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  5. Liposomes as chaperone mimics with controllable affinity toward heat-denatured formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kozono, Ryohei; Tsubomura, Naoki

    2015-01-20

    Chaperone machinery in living systems can catch denatured enzymes and induce their reactivation. Chaperone mimics are beneficial for applying enzymatic reactions in vitro. In this work, the affinity between liposomes and thermally denatured enzymes was controlled to stabilize the enzyme activity. The model enzyme is formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) which is a homodimer and negatively charged in the phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.2) used. The activity of free CbFDH readily decreased at 58 °C following the first-order kinetics with the half-life t1/2 of 27 min. The turbidity measurements showed that the denatured enzyme molecules formed aggregates. The liposomes composed of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholines (PCs) stabilized the CbFDH activity at 58 °C, as revealed with six different PCs. The PC liposomes were indicated to bind to the aggregate-prone enzyme molecules, allowing reactivation at 25 °C. The cofactor β-reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) also stabilized the enzyme activity. The affinity between liposomes and denatured CbFDH could be modulated by incorporating cationic 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-trimethylammonium propane chloride (DOTAP) in PC membranes. The t1/2 values significantly increased in the presence of liposomes ([lipid] = 1.5 mM) composed of PC and DOTAP at the mole fraction f(D) of 0.1. On the other hand, the DOTAP-rich liposomes (f(D) ≥ 0.7) showed strong affinity toward denatured CbFDH, accelerating its deactivation. The liposomes with low charge density function as chaperone mimics that can efficiently catch the denatured enzymes without interfering with their intramolecular interaction for reactivation.

  6. Hsp70-Hsp40 Chaperone Complex Functions in Controlling Polarized Growth by Repressing Hsf1-Driven Heat Stress-Associated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianhua; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2013-01-01

    How the molecular mechanisms of stress response are integrated at the cellular level remains obscure. Here we show that the cellular polarity machinery in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes dynamic adaptation to thermal stress resulting in a period of decreased Cdc42 activity and altered, monopolar growth. Cells where the heat stress-associated transcription was genetically upregulated exhibit similar growth patterning in the absence of temperature insults. We identify the Ssa2-Mas5/Hsp70-Hsp40 chaperone complex as repressor of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1. Cells lacking this chaperone activity constitutively activate the heat-stress-associated transcriptional program. Interestingly, they also exhibit intermittent monopolar growth within a physiological temperature range and are unable to adapt to heat stress. We propose that by negatively regulating the heat stress-associated transcription, the Ssa2-Mas5 chaperone system could optimize cellular growth under different temperature regiments. PMID:24146635

  7. Crucial HSP70 co–chaperone complex unlocks metazoan protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Nillegoda, Nadinath B.; Kirstein, Janine; Szlachcic, Anna; Berynskyy, Mykhaylo; Stank, Antonia; Stengel, Florian; Arnsburg, Kristin; Gao, Xuechao; Scior, Annika; Aebersold, Ruedi; Guilbride, D. Lys; Wade, Rebecca C.; Morimoto, Richard I.; Mayer, Matthias P.; Bukau, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregates are the hallmark of stressed and ageing cells, and characterize several pathophysiological states1,2. Healthy metazoan cells effectively eliminate intracellular protein aggregates3,4, indicating that efficient disaggregation and/or degradation mechanisms exist. However, metazoans lack the key heat-shock protein disaggregase HSP100 of non-metazoan HSP70-dependent protein disaggregation systems5,6, and the human HSP70 system alone, even with the crucial HSP110 nucleotide exchange factor, has poor disaggregation activity in vitro4,7. This unresolved conundrum is central to protein quality control biology. Here we show that synergic cooperation between complexed J-protein co-chaperones of classes A and B unleashes highly efficient protein disaggregation activity in human and nematode HSP70 systems. Metazoan mixed-class J-protein complexes are transient, involve complementary charged regions conserved in the J-domains and carboxy-terminal domains of each J-protein class, and are flexible with respect to subunit composition. Complex formation allows J-proteins to initiate transient higher order chaperone structures involving HSP70 and interacting nucleotide exchange factors. A network of cooperative class A and B J-protein interactions therefore provides the metazoan HSP70 machinery with powerful, flexible, and finely regulatable disaggregase activity and a further level of regulation crucial for cellular protein quality control. PMID:26245380

  8. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  9. Homology-based modeling of the Erwinia amylovora type III secretion chaperone DspF used to identify amino acids required for virulence and interaction with the effector DspE.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Wedemeyer, William J; Sundin, George W

    2010-09-01

    The structure of DspF, a type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperone required for virulence of the fruit tree pathogen Erwinia amylovora, was modeled based on predicted structural homology to characterized T3SS chaperones. This model guided the selection of 11 amino acid residues that were individually mutated to alanine via site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutant was assessed for its effect on virulence complementation, dimerization and interaction with the N-terminal chaperone-binding site of DspE. Four amino acid residues were identified that did not complement the virulence defect of a dspF knockout mutant, and three of these residues were required for interaction with the N-terminus of DspE. This study supports the significance of the predicted beta-sheet helix-binding groove in DspF chaperone function.

  10. Chaperone-mediated specificity in Ras and Rap signaling.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Strazza, Marianne; Mor, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rap proteins are closely related small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that share similar effector-binding domains but operate in a very different signaling networks; Ras has a dominant role in cell proliferation, while Rap mediates cell adhesion. Ras and Rap proteins are regulated by several shared processes such as post-translational modification, phosphorylation, activation by guanine exchange factors and inhibition by GTPase-activating proteins. Sub-cellular localization and trafficking of these proteins to and from the plasma membrane are additional important regulatory features that impact small GTPases function. Despite its importance, the trafficking mechanisms of Ras and Rap proteins are not completely understood. Chaperone proteins play a critical role in trafficking of GTPases and will be the focus of the discussion in this work. We will review several aspects of chaperone biology focusing on specificity toward particular members of the small GTPase family. Understanding this specificity should provide key insights into drug development targeting individual small GTPases.

  11. Chaperoning osteogenesis: new protein-folding disease paradigms.

    PubMed

    Makareeva, Elena; Aviles, Nydea A; Leikin, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    Recent discoveries of severe bone disorders in patients with deficiencies in several endoplasmic reticulum chaperones are reshaping the discussion of type I collagen folding and related diseases. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in all vertebrates and a crucial structural molecule for bone and other connective tissues. Its misfolding causes bone fragility, skeletal deformity and other tissue failures. Studies of newly discovered bone disorders indicate that collagen folding, chaperones involved in the folding process, cellular responses to misfolding and related bone pathologies might not follow conventional protein folding paradigms. In this review, we examine the features that distinguish collagen folding from that of other proteins and describe the findings that are beginning to reveal how cells manage collagen folding and misfolding. We discuss implications of these studies for general protein folding paradigms, unfolded protein response in cells and protein folding diseases.

  12. Evaluation of Quinazoline analogues as Glucocerebrosidase Inhibitors with Chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Marugan, Juan J.; Zheng, Wei; Motabar, Omid; Southall, Noel; Goldin, Ehud; Westbroek, Wendy; K.Stubblefield, Barbara; Sidransky, Ellen; Aungst, Ronald A.; Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a Lysosomal Storage Disorder (LSD) caused by deficiency in the enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GC). Small molecule chaperones of protein folding and translocation have been proposed as a promising therapeutic approach to this LSD. Most small molecule chaperones described in the literature contain an iminosugar scaffold. Here we present the discovery and evaluation of a new series of GC inhibitors with a quinazoline core. We demonstrate that this series can improve the translocation of GC to the lysosome in patient-derived cells. To optimize this chemical series, systematic synthetic modifications were performed and the SAR was evaluated and compared using three different readouts of compound activity – enzymatic inhibition, enzyme thermostabilization, and lysosomal translocation of GC. PMID:21250698

  13. Co-chaperones of the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Armin; Rieger, Heiko; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the rough endoplasmic reticulum or ER plays a central role in the biogenesis of most extracellular plus many organellar proteins and in cellular calcium homeostasis. Therefore, this organelle comprises molecular chaperones that are involved in import, folding/assembly, export, and degradation of polypeptides in millimolar concentrations. In addition, there are calcium channels/pumps and signal transduction components present in the ER membrane that affect and are affected by these processes. The ER lumenal Hsp70, termed immunoglobulin-heavy chain binding protein or BiP, is the central player in all these activities and involves up to seven different co-chaperones, i.e. ER-membrane integrated as well as ER-lumenal Hsp40s, which are termed ERj or ERdj, and two nucleotide exchange factors.

  14. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    PubMed

    Sablón-Carrazana, Marquiza; Fernández, Isaac; Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are able

  15. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F.; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17–42 and Aβ16–21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are

  16. OprD Repression upon Metal Treatment Requires the RNA Chaperone Hfq in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ducret, Verena; Gonzalez, Manuel R.; Scrignari, Tiziana; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The metal-specific CzcRS two-component system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is involved in the repression of the OprD porin, causing in turn carbapenem antibiotic resistance in the presence of high zinc concentration. It has also been shown that CzcR is able to directly regulate the expression of multiple genes including virulence factors. CzcR is therefore an important regulator connecting (i) metal response, (ii) pathogenicity and (iii) antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. Recent data have suggested that other regulators could negatively control oprD expression in the presence of zinc. Here we show that the RNA chaperone Hfq is a key factor acting independently of CzcR for the repression of oprD upon Zn treatment. Additionally, we found that an Hfq-dependent mechanism is necessary for the localization of CzcR to the oprD promoter, mediating oprD transcriptional repression. Furthermore, in the presence of Cu, CopR, the transcriptional regulator of the CopRS two-component system also requires Hfq for oprD repression. Altogether, these results suggest important roles for this RNA chaperone in the context of environment-sensing and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27706108

  17. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  18. Insights on the structural dynamics of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 molecular chaperone by small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Seraphim, Thiago V; Silva, Kelly P; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Borges, Júlio C

    2017-04-01

    Heat shock protein of 90kDa (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone involved in a plethora of cellular activities which modulate protein homeostasis. During the Hsp90 mechanochemical cycle, it undergoes large conformational changes, oscillating between open and closed states. Although structural and conformational equilibria of prokaryotic and some eukaryotic Hsp90s are known, some protozoa Hsp90 structures and dynamics are poorly understood. In this study, we report the solution structure and conformational dynamics of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 (LbHsp90) investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results indicate that LbHsp90 coexists in open and closed conformations in solution and that the linkers between domains are not randomly distributed. These findings noted interesting features of the LbHsp90 system, opening doors for further conformational studies of other protozoa chaperones.

  19. Histone density is maintained during transcription mediated by the chromatin remodeler RSC and histone chaperone NAP1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kuryan, Benjamin G.; Kim, Jessica; Tran, Nancy Nga H.; Lombardo, Sarah R.; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Workman, Jerry L.; Carey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ATPases and histone chaperones facilitate RNA polymerase II (pol II) elongation on chromatin. In vivo, the coordinated action of these enzymes is necessary to permit pol II passage through a nucleosome while restoring histone density afterward. We have developed a biochemical system recapitulating this basic process. Transcription through a nucleosome in vitro requires the ATPase remodels structure of chromatin (RSC) and the histone chaperone nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1). In the presence of NAP1, RSC generates a hexasome. Despite the propensity of RSC to evict histones, NAP1 reprograms the reaction such that the hexasome is retained on the template during multiple rounds of transcription. This work has implications toward understanding the mechanism of pol II elongation on chromatin. PMID:22308335

  20. Chemical Chaperones Reduce ER Stress and Restore Glucose Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Umut; Yilmaz, Erkan; Özcan, Lale; Furuhashi, Masato; Vaillancourt, Eric; Smith, Ross O.; Görgün, Cem Z.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2006-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key link between obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanistic link can be exploited for therapeutic purposes with orally active chemical chaperones. 4-Phenyl butyric acid and taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid alleviated ER stress in cells and whole animals. Treatment of obese and diabetic mice with these compounds resulted in normalization of hyperglycemia, restoration of systemic insulin sensitivity, resolution of fatty liver disease, and enhancement of insulin action in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues. Our results demonstrate that chemical chaperones enhance the adaptive capacity of the ER and act as potent antidiabetic modalities with potential application in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  1. A histone chaperone, DEK, transcriptionally coactivates a nuclear receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Lim, Jinseon; Fujiki, Ryoji; Ito, Saya; Suzuki, Eriko; Tanabe, Masahiko; Zhao, Yue; Kimura, Shuhei; Fujiyama, Sally; Ueda, Takashi; Umetsu, Daiki; Ito, Takashi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin reorganization is essential for transcriptional control by sequence-specific transcription factors. However, the molecular link between transcriptional control and chromatin reconfiguration remains unclear. By colocalization of the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) on the ecdysone-induced puff in the salivary gland, Drosophila DEK (dDEK) was genetically identified as a coactivator of EcR in both insect cells and intact flies. Biochemical purification and characterization of the complexes containing fly and human DEKs revealed that DEKs serve as histone chaperones via phosphorylation by forming complexes with casein kinase 2. Consistent with the preferential association of the DEK complex with histones enriched in active epigenetic marks, dDEK facilitated H3.3 assembly during puff formation. In some human myeloid leukemia patients, DEK was fused to CAN by chromosomal translocation. This mutation significantly reduced formation of the DEK complex, which is required for histone chaperone activity. Thus, the present study suggests that at least one histone chaperone can be categorized as a type of transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors. PMID:20040570

  2. Dynamic periplasmic chaperone reservoir facilitates biogenesis of outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Shawn M.; Plummer, Ashlee M.; Fleming, Patrick J.; Fleming, Karen G.

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is critical to bacterial physiology because the cellular envelope is vital to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. The process of OMP biogenesis has been studied in vivo, and each of its components has been studied in isolation in vitro. This work integrates parameters and observations from both in vivo and in vitro experiments into a holistic computational model termed “Outer Membrane Protein Biogenesis Model” (OMPBioM). We use OMPBioM to assess OMP biogenesis mathematically in a global manner. Using deterministic and stochastic methods, we are able to simulate OMP biogenesis under varying genetic conditions, each of which successfully replicates experimental observations. We observe that OMPs have a prolonged lifetime in the periplasm where an unfolded OMP makes, on average, hundreds of short-lived interactions with chaperones before folding into its native state. We find that some periplasmic chaperones function primarily as quality-control factors; this function complements the folding catalysis function of other chaperones. Additionally, the effective rate for the β-barrel assembly machinery complex necessary for physiological folding was found to be higher than has currently been observed in vitro. Overall, we find a finely tuned balance between thermodynamic and kinetic parameters maximizes OMP folding flux and minimizes aggregation and unnecessary degradation. In sum, OMPBioM provides a global view of OMP biogenesis that yields unique insights into this essential pathway. PMID:27482090

  3. Methods to study histone chaperone function in nucleosome assembly and chromatin transcription.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Parijat; Sudarshan, Deepthi; Gadad, Shrikanth S; Shandilya, Jayasha; Swaminathan, Venkatesh; Kundu, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    Histone chaperones are histone interacting proteins that are involved in various stages of histone metabolism in the cell such as histone storage, transport, nucleosome assembly and disassembly. Histone assembly and disassembly are essential processes in certain DNA-templated phenomena such as replication, repair and transcription in eukaryotes. Since the first histone chaperone Nucleoplasmin was discovered in Xenopus, a plethora of histone chaperones have been identified, characterized and their functional significance elucidated in the last 35 years or so. Some of the histone chaperone containing complexes such as FACT have been described to play a significant role in nucleosome disassembly during transcription elongation. We have reported earlier that human Nucleophosmin (NPM1), a histone chaperone belonging to the Nucleoplasmin family, is a co-activator of transcription. In this chapter, we describe several methods that are used to study the histone chaperone activity of proteins and their role in transcription.

  4. Oridonin Triggers Chaperon-mediated Proteasomal Degradation of BCR-ABL in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huilin; Weng, Hengyou; Dong, Bowen; Zhao, Panpan; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Lianghu

    2017-01-01

    Inducing degradation of oncoproteins by small molecule compounds has the potential to avoid drug resistance and therefore deserves to be exploited for new therapies. Oridonin is a natural compound with promising antitumor efficacy that can trigger the degradation of oncoproteins; however, the direct cellular targets and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that oridonin depletes BCR-ABL through chaperon-mediated proteasomal degradation in leukemia. Mechanistically, oridonin poses oxidative stress in cancer cells and directly binds to cysteines of HSF1, leading to the activation of this master regulator of the chaperone system. The resulting induction of HSP70 and ubiquitin proteins and the enhanced binding to CHIP E3 ligase hence target BCR-ABL for ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Both wild-type and mutant forms of BCR-ABL can be efficiently degraded by oridonin, supporting its efficacy observed in cultured cells as well as mouse tumor xenograft assays with either imatinib-sensitive or -resistant cells. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism by which oridonin induces rapid degradation of BCR-ABL as well as a novel pharmaceutical activator of HSF1 that represents a promising treatment for leukemia. PMID:28128329

  5. Improvement of the crystallizability and expression of an RNA crystallization chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, P.; Heroux, A.; Ye, J.-D.

    2011-11-01

    Crystallizing RNA has been an imperative and challenging task in the world of RNA research. Assistive methods such as chaperone-assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), employing monoclonal antibody fragments (Fabs) as crystallization chaperones have enabled us to obtain RNA crystal structures by forming crystal contacts and providing initial phasing information. Despite the early successes, the crystallization of large RNA-Fab complex remains a challenge in practice. The possible reason for this difficulty is that the Fab scaffold has not been optimized for crystallization in complex with RNA. Here, we have used the surface entropy reduction (SER) technique for the optimization of {Delta}C209 P4-P6/Fab2 model system. Protruding lysine and glutamate residues were mutated to a set of alanines or serines to construct Fab2SMA or Fab2SMS. Expression with the shake flask approach was optimized to allow large scale production for crystallization. Crystal screening shows that significantly higher crystal-forming ratio was observed for the mutant complexes. As the chosen SER residues are far away from the CDR regions of the Fab, the same set of mutations can now be directly applied to other Fabs binding to a variety of ribozymes and riboswitches to improve the crystallizability of Fab-RNA complex.

  6. Cellular Pathology of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease Involving Chaperones Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Disease-causing mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins may lead to the production of aberrant polypeptides that accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These mutant proteins have detrimental conformational changes or misfolding events, which result in the triggering of the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is a cellular pathway that reduces ER stress by generally inhibiting translation, increasing ER chaperones levels, or inducing cell apoptosis in severe ER stress. This process has been implicated in the cellular pathology of many neurological disorders, including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is a rare pediatric disorder characterized by the failure in the myelination process of the central nervous system (CNS). PMD is caused by mutations in the PLP1 gene, which encodes a major myelin membrane protein. Severe clinical PMD phenotypes appear to be the result of cell toxicity, due to the accumulation of PLP1 mutant proteins and not due to the lack of functional PLP1. Therefore, it is important to clarify the pathological mechanisms by which the PLP1 mutants negatively impact the myelin-generating cells, called oligodendrocytes, to overcome this devastating disease. This review discusses how PLP1 mutant proteins change protein homeostasis in the ER of oligodendrocytes, especially focusing on the reaction of ER chaperones against the accumulation of PLP1 mutant proteins that cause PMD. PMID:28286750

  7. Modulating Molecular Chaperones Improves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Decreases the Inflammatory Transcriptome in Diabetic Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiacheng; Pan, Pan; Anyika, Mercy; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Dobrowsky, Rick T.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that modulating molecular chaperones with KU-32, a novobiocin derivative, ameliorates physiologic and bioenergetic deficits of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Replacing the coumarin core of KU-32 with a meta-fluorinated biphenyl ring system created KU-596, a novobiocin analogue (novologue) that showed neuroprotective activity in a cell-based assay. The current study sought to determine whether KU-596 offers similar therapeutic potential for treating DPN. Administration of 2–20 mg/kg of KU-596 improved diabetes induced hypoalgesia and sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits in a dose-dependent manner. However, the drug could not improve these neuropathic deficits in diabetic heat shock protein 70 knockout (Hsp70 KO) mice. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which KU-596 improved DPN, we performed transcriptomic analysis of sensory neuron RNA obtained from diabetic wild-type and Hsp70 KO mice using RNA sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that diabetes strongly increased inflammatory pathways and that KU-596 therapy effectively reversed these increases independent of Hsp70. In contrast, the effects of KU-596 on decreasing the expression of genes regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were more Hsp70-dependent. These data indicate that modulation of molecular chaperones by novologue therapy offers an effective approach toward correcting nerve dysfunction in DPN but that normalization of inflammatory pathways alone by novologue therapy seems to be insufficient to reverse sensory deficits associated with insensate DPN. PMID:26161583

  8. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone GRP170: From Immunobiology to Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Pezeshki, Abdul Mohammad; Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Subjeck, John R.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 170 (GRP170) is the largest member of glucose-regulated protein family that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). As a component of the ER chaperone network, GRP170 assists in protein folding, assembly, and transportation of secretory or transmembrane proteins. The well documented cytoprotective activity of intracellular GRP170 due to its intrinsic chaperoning property has been shown to provide a survival benefit in cancer cells during tumor progression or metastasis. Accumulating evidence shows that extracellular GRP170 displays a superior capacity in delivering tumor antigens to specialized antigen-presenting cells for cross-presentation, resulting in generation of an anti-tumor immune response dependent on cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. This unique feature of GRP170 provides a molecular basis for using GRP170 as an immunostimulatory adjuvant to develop a recombinant vaccine for therapeutic immunization against cancers. This review summarizes the latest findings in understanding the biological effects of GRP170 on cell functions and tumor progression. The immunomodulating activities of GRP170 during interactions with the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system as well as its therapeutic applications in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed. PMID:25629003

  9. Association of partially folded lens betaB2-crystallins with the alpha-crystallin molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Evans, Paul; Slingsby, Christine; Wallace, B A

    2008-02-01

    Age-related cataract is a result of crystallins, the predominant lens proteins, forming light-scattering aggregates. In the low protein turnover environment of the eye lens, the crystallins are susceptible to modifications that can reduce stability, increasing the probability of unfolding and aggregation events occurring. It is hypothesized that the alpha-crystallin molecular chaperone system recognizes and binds these proteins before they can form the light-scattering centres that result in cataract, thus maintaining the long-term transparency of the lens. In the present study, we investigated the unfolding and aggregation of (wild-type) human and calf betaB2-crystallins and the formation of a complex between alpha-crystallin and betaB2-crystallins under destabilizing conditions. Human and calf betaB2-crystallin unfold through a structurally similar pathway, but the increased stability of the C-terminal domain of human betaB2-crystallin relative to calf betaB2-crystallin results in the increased population of a partially folded intermediate during unfolding. This intermediate is aggregation-prone and prevents constructive refolding of human betaB2-crystallin, while calf betaB2-crystallin can refold with high efficiency. alpha-Crystallin can effectively chaperone both human and calf betaB2-crystallins from thermal aggregation, although chaperone-bound betaB2-crystallins are unable to refold once returned to native conditions. Ordered secondary structure is seen to increase in alpha-crystallin with elevated temperatures up to 60 degrees C; structure is rapidly lost at temperatures of 70 degrees C and above. Our experimental results combined with previously reported observations of alpha-crystallin quaternary structure have led us to propose a structural model of how activated alpha-crystallin chaperones unfolded betaB2-crystallin.

  10. The right place at the right time: chaperoning core histone variants.

    PubMed

    Mattiroli, Francesca; D'Arcy, Sheena; Luger, Karolin

    2015-11-01

    Histone proteins dynamically regulate chromatin structure and epigenetic signaling to maintain cell homeostasis. These processes require controlled spatial and temporal deposition and eviction of histones by their dedicated chaperones. With the evolution of histone variants, a network of functionally specific histone chaperones has emerged. Molecular details of the determinants of chaperone specificity for different histone variants are only slowly being resolved. A complete understanding of these processes is essential to shed light on the genuine biological roles of histone variants, their chaperones, and their impact on chromatin dynamics.

  11. The right place at the right time: chaperoning core histone variants

    PubMed Central

    Mattiroli, Francesca; D’Arcy, Sheena; Luger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Histone proteins dynamically regulate chromatin structure and epigenetic signaling to maintain cell homeostasis. These processes require controlled spatial and temporal deposition and eviction of histones by their dedicated chaperones. With the evolution of histone variants, a network of functionally specific histone chaperones has emerged. Molecular details of the determinants of chaperone specificity for different histone variants are only slowly being resolved. A complete understanding of these processes is essential to shed light on the genuine biological roles of histone variants, their chaperones, and their impact on chromatin dynamics. PMID:26459557

  12. The Hsp90 Co-chaperones Sti1, Aha1, and P23 Regulate Adaptive Responses to Antifungal Azoles

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaokui; Xue, Wei; Yin, Yajing; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Shaojie; Sun, Xianyun

    2016-01-01

    Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is essential for tumor progression in humans and drug resistance in fungi. However, the roles of its many co-chaperones in antifungal resistance are unknown. In this study, by susceptibility test of Neurospora crassa mutants lacking each of 18 Hsp90/Calcineurin system member genes (including 8 Hsp90 co-chaperone genes) to antifungal drugs and other stresses, we demonstrate that the Hsp90 co-chaperones Sti1 (Hop1 in yeast), Aha1, and P23 (Sba1 in yeast) were required for the basal resistance to antifungal azoles and heat stress. Deletion of any of them resulted in hypersensitivity to azoles and heat. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed that the toxic sterols eburicol and 14α-methyl-3,6-diol were significantly accumulated in the sti1 and p23 deletion mutants after ketoconazole treatment, which has been shown before to led to cell membrane stress. At the transcriptional level, Aha1, Sti1, and P23 positively regulate responses to ketoconazole stress by erg11 and erg6, key genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are highly conserved in fungi, and sti1 and p23 deletion also increased the susceptibility to azoles in Fusarium verticillioides. These results indicate that Hsp90-cochaperones Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are critical for the basal azole resistance and could be potential targets for developing new antifungal agents. PMID:27761133

  13. Isolation of a Latimeria menadoensis heat shock protein 70 (Lmhsp70) that has all the features of an inducible gene and encodes a functional molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Modisakeng, Keoagile W; Jiwaji, Meesbah; Pesce, Eva-Rachele; Robert, Jacques; Amemiya, Chris T; Dorrington, Rosemary A; Blatch, Gregory L

    2009-08-01

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the correct folding of other proteins, and heat shock proteins form one of the major classes of molecular chaperones. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been extensively studied, and shown to be critically important for cellular protein homeostasis in almost all prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems studied to date. Since there have been very limited studies conducted on coelacanth chaperones, the main objective of this study was to genetically and biochemically characterize a coelacanth Hsp70. We have successfully isolated an Indonesian coelacanth (L. menadoensis) hsp70 gene, Lmhsp70, and found that it contained an intronless coding region and a potential upstream regulatory region. Lmhsp70 encoded a typical Hsp70 based on conserved structural and functional features, and the predicted upstream regulatory region was found to contain six potential promoter elements, and three potential heat shock elements (HSEs). The intronless nature of the coding region and the presence of HSEs suggested that Lmhsp70 was stress-inducible. Phylogenetic analyses provided further evidence that Lmhsp70 was probably inducible, and that it branched as a clade intermediate between bony fish and tetrapods. Recombinant LmHsp70 was successfully overproduced, purified and found to be functional using ATPase activity assays. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the first time that the coelacanth encodes a functional molecular chaperone system.

  14. Structure of Vps75 and Implications for Histone Chaperone Function

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,Y.; Meeth, K.; Jiang, E.; Luo, c.; Marmostein, R.

    2008-01-01

    The vacuolar protein sorting 75 (Vps75) histone chaperone participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly at both active and inactive genes through the preferential binding to histone H3-H4. Vps75 is also one of two histone chaperones, along with antisilencing factor 1, that promotes histone H3-Lys-56 acetylation by the regulation of Ty1 transposition protein 109 (Rtt109) histone acetyltransferase. Here, we report the x-ray crystal structure of Vps75 and carry out biochemical studies to characterize its interaction with Rtt109. We find that the Vps75 structure forms a homodimeric 'headphone' architecture that includes an extended helical dimerization domain and earmuff domains at opposite ends and sides of the dimerization domain. Despite the similar overall architecture with the yeast nucleosome assembly protein 1 and human SET/TAF-1{beta}/INHAT histone chaperones, Vps75 shows several unique features including the relative disposition of the earmuff domains to the dimerization domain, characteristics of the earmuff domains, and a pronounced cleft at the center of the Vps75 dimer. These differences appear to correlate with the unique function of Vps75 to interact with Rtt109 for histone acetylation. Our biochemical studies reveal that two surfaces on the earmuff domain of Vps75 participate in Rtt109 interaction with a stoichiometry of 2:1, thus leaving the pronounced central cleft of the Vps75 dimer largely accessible for histone binding. Taken together, our data provide a structural framework for understanding how Vps75 mediates both nucleosome assembly and histone acetylation by Rtt109.

  15. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  16. Thanks for asking: Adolescent attitudes and preferences regarding the use of chaperones during physical examinations

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Renee; Katzman, Debra K; Kaufman, Miriam; Goldberg, Eudice; Toulany, Alene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no uniformity as to how and when chaperones should be used for general and intimate (genitalia and/or breasts) physical examinations of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To explore adolescents’ attitudes and preferences regarding the use of medical chaperones during physical examinations. METHODS: The present analysis was a cross-sectional descriptive study performed as part of a quality improvement project in the Adolescent Medicine Clinics at The Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, Ontario) between January 1 and April 30, 2011. Adolescents 13 to 18 years of age completed an anonymous 10-item, self-administered questionnaire regarding their thoughts on chaperones during physical examinations. Demographic and descriptive data were collected. RESULTS: A total of 127 adolescents participated in the present study. The mean (± SD) age was 16.3±1.5 years and the majority (93.7%) were female. More than one-half (61%) of female adolescents had previous experience with an intimate examination; however, a chaperone was present only 36% of the time. Seventy percent of female adolescents wanted the choice of a chaperone for a general examination compared with 61% for an intimate examination. Among female adolescents with past chaperone experience, 78% wanted the choice of a chaperone for subsequent intimate examinations, compared with 55% among those with no previous chaperone experience. Only 21% believed they would ask for a chaperone if one were not offered. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was variation in adolescents’ attitudes and preferences regarding the use of chaperones, many females indicated a desire to discuss the option of a chaperone for all types of examinations. PMID:27429571

  17. Co-expression with the Type 3 Secretion Chaperone CesT from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli Increases Accumulation of Recombinant Tir in Plant Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Miletic, Sean; Gaildry, Typhanie; Chin-Fatt, Adam; Menassa, Rima

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs) are utilized by pathogenic Escherichia coli to infect their hosts and many proteins from these systems are affected by chaperones specific to T3SS-containing bacteria. Toward developing a recombinant vaccine against enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), we expressed recombinant T3SS and related proteins from predominant EHEC serotypes in Nicotiana chloroplasts. Nicotiana benthamiana were transiently transformed to express chloroplast-targeted Tir, NleA, and EspD from the EHEC serotype O157:H7; a fusion of EspA proteins from serotypes O157:H7 and O26:H11; and a fusion of epitopes of Tir (Tir-ep) from serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, O45:H2, and O111:H8. C-terminal GFP reporter fusion constructs were also developed and transiently expressed to confirm subcellular localization and quantify relative expression levels in situ. Recombinant proteins were co-expressed with chaperones specific to each T3SS protein with the goal of increasing their accumulation in the chloroplast. We found that co-expression with the chloroplast-targeted chaperone CesT significantly increases accumulation of recombinant Tir when the latter is either transiently expressed in the nucleus and targeted to the chloroplast of N. benthamiana or stably expressed in transplastomic Nicotiana tabacum. CesT also helped maintain higher levels of Tir:GFP fusion protein over time both in vivo and ex vivo, indicating that the favorable effect of CesT on accumulation of Tir is not specific to a single time point or to fresh material. By contrast, T3SS chaperones CesT, CesAB, CesD, and CesD2 did not increase accumulation of NleA:GFP, EspA:GFP, or EspD:GFP, which suggests dissimilar functioning of these chaperone–substrate combinations. CesT did not increase accumulation of Tir-ep:GFP, which may be due to the absence of the CesT binding domain from this fusion protein. The fusion to GFP improved accumulation of Tir-ep relative to the unfused protein, but not for the other recombinant

  18. Inhibitor versus chaperone behaviour of d-fagomine, DAB and LAB sp(2)-iminosugar conjugates against glycosidases: A structure-activity relationship study in Gaucher fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mena-Barragán, Teresa; García-Moreno, M Isabel; Nanba, Eiji; Higaki, Katsumi; Concia, Alda Lisa; Clapés, Pere; García Fernández, José Manuel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen

    2016-10-04

    A library of sp(2)-iminosugar conjugates derived from the piperidine iminosugar d-fagomine and the enantiomeric pyrrolidine iminosugars DAB and LAB has been generated in only two steps involving direct coupling of the fully unprotected polyhydroxylated heterocycles with isothiocyanates, to give monocyclic thiourea adducts, and further intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of the δ-located primary hydroxyl group by the thiocarbonyl sulphur atom, affording bicyclic isothioureas. These transformations led to a dramatic shift in the inhibitory selectivity from α- to β-glucosidases, with inhibition potencies that depended strongly on the nature of the aglycone-type moiety in the conjugates. Some of the new derivatives behaved as potent inhibitors of human β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the lysosomal enzyme whose dysfunction is responsible for Gaucher disease. Moreover, GCase inhibition was 10-fold weaker at pH 5 as compared to pH 7, which is generally considered as a good property for pharmacological chaperones. Surprisingly, most of the compounds strongly inhibited GCase in wild type fibroblasts at rather low concentrations, showing an unfavourable chaperone/inhibitor balance on disease-associated GCase mutants in cellulo. A structure-activity relationship analysis points to the need for keeping a contiguous triol system in the glycone moiety of the conjugates to elicit a chaperone effect. In any case, the results reported here represent a proof of concept of the utmost importance of implementing diversity-oriented strategies for the identification and optimization of potent and specific glycosidase inhibitors and chaperones.

  19. Structure of the Yersinia pestis type III secretion chaperone SycH in complex with a stable fragment of YscM2

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Jason; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2010-11-16

    Pathogenic Yersinia species use a type III secretion system to inject cytotoxic effector proteins directly into the cytosol of mammalian cells, where they neutralize the innate immune response by interfering with the signal-transduction pathways that control phagocytosis and inflammation. To be exported efficiently, some effectors must transiently associate with cognate cytoplasmic secretion chaperones. SycH is the chaperone for YopH, a potent eukaryotic-like protein tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for virulence. SycH also binds two negative regulators of type III secretion, YscM1 and YscM2, both of which share significant sequence homology with the chaperone-binding domain of YopH. Here, the structure of a complex between SycH and a stable fragment of YscM2 that was designed on the basis of limited proteolysis experiments is presented. The overall fold of SycH is very similar to the structures of other homodimeric secretion chaperones that have been determined to date. YscM2 wraps around SycH in an extended fashion, with some secondary but no tertiary structure, assuming a conformation distinct from the globular fold that it is predicted to adopt in the absence of SycH.

  20. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Chen; Davidov, Geula; Yahalom, Adi; Shaked, Hadassa; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Bitton, Ronit; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Chill, Jordan H; Zarivach, Raz

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  1. Structure of Human J-type Co-chaperone HscB Reveals a Tetracysteine Metal-binding Domain*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Bittova, Lenka; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N.

    2008-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins play indispensable roles in a broad range of biochemical processes. The biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins is a complex process that has become a subject of extensive research. The final step of iron-sulfur protein assembly involves transfer of an iron-sulfur cluster from a cluster-donor to a cluster-acceptor protein. This process is facilitated by a specialized chaperone system, which consists of a molecular chaperone from the Hsc70 family and a co-chaperone of the J-domain family. The 3.0Å crystal structure of a human mitochondrial J-type co-chaperone HscB revealed an L-shaped protein that resembles Escherichia coli HscB. The important difference between the two homologs is the presence of an auxiliary metal-binding domain at the N terminus of human HscB that coordinates a metal via the tetracysteine consensus motif CWXCX9–13FCXXCXXXQ. The domain is found in HscB homologs from animals and plants as well as in magnetotactic bacteria. The metal-binding site of the domain is structurally similar to that of rubredoxin and several zinc finger proteins containing rubredoxin-like knuckles. The normal mode analysis of HscB revealed that this L-shaped protein preferentially undergoes a scissors-like motion that correlates well with the conformational changes of human HscB observed in the crystals. PMID:18713742

  2. Information encoded in non-native states drives substrate-chaperone pairing.

    PubMed

    Mapa, Koyeli; Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik

    2012-09-05

    Many proteins refold in vitro through kinetic folding intermediates that are believed to be by-products of native-state centric evolution. These intermediates are postulated to play only minor roles, if any, in vivo because they lack any information related to translation-associated vectorial folding. We demonstrate that refolding intermediate of a test protein, generated in vitro, is able to find its cognate chaperone, from the whole complement of Escherichia coli soluble chaperones. Cognate chaperone-binding uniquely alters the conformation of non-native substrate. Importantly, precise chaperone targeting of substrates are maintained as long as physiological molar ratios of chaperones remain unaltered. Using a library of different chaperone substrates, we demonstrate that kinetically trapped refolding intermediates contain sufficient structural features for precise targeting to cognate chaperones. We posit that evolution favors sequences that, in addition to coding for a functional native state, encode folding intermediates with higher affinity for cognate chaperones than noncognate ones.

  3. The Periplasmic Chaperone Network of Campylobacter jejuni: Evidence that SalC (Cj1289) and PpiD (Cj0694) Are Involved in Maintaining Outer Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Aidan J.; Zakai, Shadi A. I.; Kelly, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria is a key structure in host–pathogen interactions that contains a plethora of proteins, performing a range of functions including adhesion, nutrient uptake, export of effectors and interaction with innate and adaptive components of the immune system. In addition, the OM can exclude drugs and thus contribute to antimicrobial resistance. The OM of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contains porins, adhesins and other virulence factors that must be specifically localized to this membrane, but the protein sorting mechanisms involved are only partially understood. In particular, chaperones are required to ferry OM proteins across the periplasm after they emerge from the Sec translocation system. The SurA-related chaperone PEB4 (Cj0596) is the only protein with a proven role in OM biogenesis and integrity in C. jejuni. In this work, we have constructed a set of isogenic deletion mutants in genes encoding both known and predicted chaperones (cj0596, cj0694, cj1069, cj1228c, and cj1289) using NCTC 11168H as the parental strain. These mutants were characterized using a range of assays to determine effects on growth, agglutination, biofilm formation, membrane permeability and hydrophobicity. We focused on Cj1289 and Cj0694, which our previous work suggested possessed both chaperone and peptidyl-proyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) domains. Mutants in either cj1289 or cj0694 showed growth defects, increased motility, agglutination and biofilm formation and severe OM permeability defects as measured by a lysozyme accessibility assay, that were comparable to those exhibited by the isogenic peb4 mutant. 2D-gel comparisons showed a general decrease in OM proteins in these mutants. We heterologously overproduced and purified Cj0694 and obtained evidence that this protein was an active PPIase, as judged by its acceleration of the refolding rate of reduced and alkylated ribonuclease T1 and that it also possessed

  4. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  5. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; Salamone, Stéphane; Christensen, Stig H.; Read, Randy J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Jensen, Henrik H.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-03-23

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe a new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease.

  6. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease

    DOE PAGES

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; ...

    2015-03-23

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe amore » new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease.« less

  7. Chaperones in Polyglutamine Aggregation: Beyond the Q-Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, E. F. E.; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Jardim, Laura B.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in at least nine unrelated proteins lead to inherited neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. The expansion size in all diseases correlates with age at onset (AO) of disease and with polyQ protein aggregation, indicating that the expanded polyQ stretch is the main driving force for the disease onset. Interestingly, there is marked interpatient variability in expansion thresholds for a given disease. Between different polyQ diseases the repeat length vs. AO also indicates the existence of modulatory effects on aggregation of the upstream and downstream amino acid sequences flanking the Q expansion. This can be either due to intrinsic modulation of aggregation by the flanking regions, or due to differential interaction with other proteins, such as the components of the cellular protein quality control network. Indeed, several lines of evidence suggest that molecular chaperones have impact on the handling of different polyQ proteins. Here, we review factors differentially influencing polyQ aggregation: the Q-stretch itself, modulatory flanking sequences, interaction partners, cleavage of polyQ-containing proteins, and post-translational modifications, with a special focus on the role of molecular chaperones. By discussing typical examples of how these factors influence aggregation, we provide more insight on the variability of AO between different diseases as well as within the same polyQ disorder, on the molecular level. PMID:28386214

  8. Structural Basis of Pharmacological Chaperoning for Human β-Galactosidase*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hironori; Ohto, Umeharu; Higaki, Katsumi; Mena-Barragán, Teresa; Aguilar-Moncayo, Matilde; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Nanba, Eiji; Garcia Fernandez, Jose M.; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease are autosomal recessive diseases caused by the defect in the lysosomal β-galactosidase (β-Gal), frequently related to misfolding and subsequent endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Pharmacological chaperone (PC) therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach by using small molecule ligands of the mutant enzyme that are able to promote the correct folding and prevent endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and promote trafficking to the lysosome. In this report, we describe the enzymological properties of purified recombinant human β-GalWT and two representative mutations in GM1 gangliosidosis Japanese patients, β-GalR201C and β-GalI51T. We have also evaluated the PC effect of two competitive inhibitors of β-Gal. Moreover, we provide a detailed atomic view of the recognition mechanism of these compounds in comparison with two structurally related analogues. All compounds bind to the active site of β-Gal with the sugar-mimicking moiety making hydrogen bonds to active site residues. Moreover, the binding affinity, the enzyme selectivity, and the PC potential are strongly affected by the mono- or bicyclic structure of the core as well as the orientation, nature, and length of the exocyclic substituent. These results provide understanding on the mechanism of action of β-Gal selective chaperoning by newly developed PC compounds. PMID:24737316

  9. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  10. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand.

  11. Pharmacological chaperone approaches for rescuing GPCR mutants: Current state, challenges, and screening strategies.

    PubMed

    Beerepoot, Pieter; Nazari, Reza; Salahpour, Ali

    2017-03-01

    A substantial number of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) genetic disorders are due to mutations that cause misfolding or dysfunction of the receptor product. Pharmacological chaperoning approaches can rescue such mutant receptors by stabilizing protein conformations that behave similar to the wild type protein. For example, this can be achieved by improving folding efficiency and/or interaction with chaperone proteins. Although efficacy of pharmacological chaperones has been demonstrated in vitro for a variety of GPCRs, translation to clinical use has been limited. In this paper we discuss the history of pharmacological chaperones of GPCR's and other membrane proteins, the challenges in translation to the clinic, and the use of different assays for pharmacological chaperone discovery.

  12. Unfolding the Therapeutic Potential of Chemical Chaperones for Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Theodor; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao; Tuo, Jingsheng

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies suggest that pathological processes involved in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) might induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Growing evidence demonstrates the ability of chemical chaperones to decrease ER stress and ameliorate ER stress-related disease phenotypes, suggesting that the field of chaperone therapy might hold novel treatments for AMD. In this review, we examine the evidence suggesting a role for ER stress in AMD. Furthermore, we discuss the use of chaperone therapy for the treatment of ER stress-associated diseases, including other neurodegenerative diseases and retinopathies. Finally, we examine strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human disease. PMID:18528533

  13. Regulation of Neuronal Survival Factor MEF2D by Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; She, Hua; Gearing, Marla; Colla, Emanuela; Lee, Michael; Shacka, John J.; Mao, Zixu

    2009-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy controls the degradation of selective cytosolic proteins and may protect neurons against degeneration. In a neuronal cell line, we found that chaperone-mediated autophagy regulated the activity of myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a transcription factor required for neuronal survival. MEF2D was observed to continuously shuttle to the cytoplasm, interact with the chaperone Hsc70, and undergo degradation. Inhibition of chaperone-mediated autophagy caused accumulation of inactive MEF2D in the cytoplasm. MEF2D levels were increased in the brains of α-synuclein transgenic mice and patients with Parkinson’s disease. Wild-type α-synuclein and a Parkinson’s disease–associated mutant disrupted the MEF2D-Hsc70 binding and led to neuronal death. Thus, chaperone-mediated autophagy modulates the neuronal survival machinery, and dysregulation of this pathway is associated with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:19119233

  14. Effect of the Surface Charge of Artificial Chaperones on the Refolding of Thermally Denatured Lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fan; Shen, Liangliang; Wang, Jianzu; Qu, Aoting; Yang, Huiru; Zhang, Zhenkun; An, Yingli; Shi, Linqi

    2016-02-17

    Artificial chaperones are of great interest in fighting protein misfolding and aggregation for the protection of protein bioactivity. A comprehensive understanding of the interaction between artificial chaperones and proteins is critical for the effective utilization of these materials in biomedicine. In this work, we fabricated three kinds of artificial chaperones with different surface charges based on mixed-shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), and investigated their protective effect for lysozymes under thermal stress. It was found that MSPMs with different surface charges showed distinct chaperone-like behavior, and the neutral MSPM with PEG shell and PMEO2MA hydrophobic domain at high temperature is superior to the negatively and positively charged one, because of the excessive electrostatic interactions between the protein and charged MSPMs. The results may benefit to optimize this kind of artificial chaperone with enhanced properties and expand their application in the future.

  15. Targeting the molecular chaperone SlyD to inhibit bacterial growth with a small molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Balbach, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential molecules for cell growth, whereby they maintain protein homeostasis. Because of their central cellular function, bacterial chaperones might be potential candidates for drug targets. Antimicrobial resistance is currently one of the greatest threats to human health, with gram-negative bacteria being of major concern. We found that a Cu2+ complex readily crosses the bacterial cell wall and inhibits SlyD, which is a molecular chaperone, cis/trans peptidyl prolyl isomerise (PPIase) and involved in various other metabolic pathways. The Cu2+ complex binds to the active sites of SlyD, which suppresses its PPIase and chaperone activities. Significant cell growth retardation could be observed for pathogenic bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). We anticipate that rational development of drugs targeting molecular chaperones might help in future control of pathogenic bacterial growth, in an era of rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance. PMID:28176839

  16. Cloning, expression and crystallisation of SGT1 co-chaperone protein from Glaciozyma antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nur Athirah; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Beddoe, Travis; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Studies on psycrophiles are now in the limelight of today's post genomic era as they fascinate the research and development industries. The discovery from Glaciozyma antarctica, an extreme cold adapted yeast from Antarctica shows promising future to provide cost effective natural sustainable energy and create wider understanding of the property that permits this organisms to adapt to extreme temperature downshift. In plants and yeast, studies show the interaction between SGT1 and HSP90 are essential for disease resistance and heat stress by activating a number of resistance proteins. Here we report for the first time cloning, expression and crystallization of the recombinant SGT1 protein of G. antarctica (rGa_SGT1), a highly conserved eukaryotic protein that interacts with the molecular chaperones HSP90 (heat shock protein 90) apparently associated in a role of co-chaperone that may play important role in cold adaptation. The sequence analysis of rGa_SGT1 revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of SGT1 protein. In this study, we present the outlines and results of protein structural study of G. antarctica SGT1 protein. We validate this approach by starting with cloning the target insert into Ligation Independent Cloning system proceeded with expression using E. coli system, and crystallisation of the target rGA_SGT1 protein. The work is still on going with the target subunit of the complex proteins yielded crystals. These results, still ongoing, open a platform for better understanding of the uniqueness of this crucial molecular machine function in cold adaptation.

  17. Roles of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in functional regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein co-chaperone sis1

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-02-13

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at their C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activity with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interaction(s) between the J-domain and glycine-rich region controls co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. Yet, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD-binding adaptor proteins. Finally, these interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.

  18. Roles of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in functional regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein co-chaperone sis1

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; ...

    2015-02-13

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at their C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activitymore » with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interaction(s) between the J-domain and glycine-rich region controls co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. Yet, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD-binding adaptor proteins. Finally, these interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.« less

  19. Engineering of chaperone systems and of the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saeed U.

    2008-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells is a successful technology that delivers protein pharmaceuticals for therapies and for diagnosis of human disorders. Cost effective production of protein biopharmaceuticals requires extensive optimization through cell and fermentation process engineering at the upstream and chemical engineering of purification processes at the downstream side of the production process. The majority of protein pharmaceuticals are secreted proteins. Accumulating evidence suggests that the folding and processing of these proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a general rate- and yield limiting step for their production. We will summarize our knowledge of protein folding in the ER and of signal transduction pathways activated by accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER, collectively called the unfolded protein response (UPR). On the basis of this knowledge we will evaluate engineering approaches to increase cell specific productivities through engineering of the ER-resident protein folding machinery and of the UPR. PMID:19003179

  20. Structural analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis homologues of the eukaryotic proteasome assembly chaperone 2 (PAC2).

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Jastrab, Jordan B; Isasa, Marta; Hu, Kuan; Yu, Hongjun; Gygi, Steven P; Darwin, K Heran; Li, Huilin

    2017-02-13

    A previous bioinformatics analysis identified the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) proteins Rv2125 and Rv2714 as orthologs of the eukaryotic proteasome assembly chaperone 2 (PAC2). We set out to investigate whether Rv2125 or Rv2714 could function in proteasome assembly. We solved the crystal structure of Rv2125 at 3.0 Å resolution, which showed an overall fold similar to that of the PAC2 family proteins that include the archaeal PbaB and the yeast Pba1. However, Rv2125 and Rv2714 formed trimers, whereas PbaB forms tetramers and Pba1 dimerizes with Pba2. We also found that purified Rv2125 and Rv2714 could not bind to M. tuberculosis 20S core particles. Finally, proteomic analysis showed that the levels of known proteasome component and substrate proteins were not affected by disruption of Rv2125 in M. tuberculosis Our work suggests that Rv2125 does not participate in bacterial proteasome assembly or function.Importance Although many bacteria do not encode proteasomes, M. tuberculosis not only uses proteasomes, it has also evolved a post-translational modification system called pupylation to deliver proteins to the proteasome. Proteasomes are essential for M. tuberculosis to cause lethal infections in animals, thus determining how proteasomes are assembled may help identify new ways to combat tuberculosis. We solved the structure of a predicted proteasome assembly factor, Rv2125, and isolated a genetic mutant of Rv2125 in M. tuberculosis Our structural, biochemical, and genetic studies indicate that Rv2125 and Rv2714 do not function as proteasome assembly chaperones and are unlikely to have roles in proteasome biology in mycobacteria.

  1. The co-chaperone p23 promotes prostate cancer motility and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Querol Cano, Laia; Lavery, Derek N.; Sin, Soraya; Spanjaard, Emma; Brooke, Greg N.; Tilman, Jessica D.; Abroaf, Ahmed; Gaughan, Luke; Robson, Craig N.; Heer, Rakesh; Mauri, Francesco; de Rooij, Johan; Driouch, Keltouma; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent malignancy at initiation and progression, therefore hormone therapy is the primary line of systemic treatment. Despite initial disease regression, tumours inevitably recur and progress to an advanced castration-resistant state a major feature of which is metastasis to the bone. Up-regulation of AR cofactors and chaperones that overcome low hormone conditions to maintain basal AR activity has been postulated as a mechanism of therapy relapse. p23, an essential component of the apo-AR complex, acts also after ligand binding to increase AR transcriptional activity and target gene expression, partly by increasing chromatin-loaded holo-receptor-complexes. Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated increased p23 expression in advanced prostate cancer. Here, we further characterise p23 roles in AR signalling and show that it modulates cytosolic AR levels in the absence of hormone, confirming a chaperoning function in the aporeceptor complex and suggesting p23 upregulates AR signalling at multiple stages. Moreover, p23 protein levels significantly increased upon treatment with not only androgen but also clinically relevant anti-androgens. This was in contrast to the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG, which did not modulate expression of the cochaperone – important given the HSP90-independent roles we and others have previously described for p23. Further, we demonstrate p23 is implicated in prostate cancer cell motility and in acquisition of invasiveness capacity through the expression of specific genes known to participate in cancer progression. This may drive metastatic processes in vivo since analysis of prostate tumour biopsies revealed that high nuclear p23 significantly correlated with shorter survival times and with development of metastases in patients with lower grade tumours. We propose that increased p23 expression may allow cells to acquire a more aggressive phenotype, contributing to disease progression, and

  2. M1 of Murine Gamma-Herpesvirus 68 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Production

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiaying; Gong, Danyang; Fu, Xudong; Wu, Ting-ting; Wang, Jane; Chang, Jennifer; Zhou, Jingting; Lu, Gang; Wang, Yibin; Sun, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely on host chaperone network to support their infection. In particular, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperones play key roles in synthesizing and processing viral proteins. Influx of a large amount of foreign proteins exhausts the folding capacity in ER and triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). A fully-executed UPR comprises signaling pathways that induce ER folding chaperones, increase protein degradation, block new protein synthesis and may eventually activate apoptosis, presenting both opportunities and threats to the virus. Here, we define a role of the MHV-68M1 gene in differential modulation of UPR pathways to enhance ER chaperone production. Ectopic expression of M1 markedly induces ER chaperone genes and expansion of ER. The M1 protein accumulates in ER during infection and this localization is indispensable for its function, suggesting M1 acts from the ER. We found that M1 protein selectively induces the chaperon-producing pathways (IRE1, ATF6) while, interestingly, sparing the translation-blocking arm (PERK). We identified, for the first time, a viral factor capable of selectively intervening the initiation of ER stress signaling to induce chaperon production. This finding provides a unique opportunity of using viral protein as a tool to define the activation mechanisms of individual UPR pathways. PMID:26615759

  3. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  4. Consequences of the selective blockage of chaperone-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Ashish C.; Kaushik, Susmita; Sovak, Guy; Kiffin, Roberta; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2006-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective pathway for the degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. CMA declines with age because of a decrease in the levels of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) type 2A, a lysosomal receptor for this pathway. We have selectively blocked the expression of LAMP-2A in mouse fibroblasts in culture and analyzed the cellular consequences of reduced CMA activity. CMA-defective cells maintain normal rates of long-lived protein degradation by up-regulating macroautophagy, the major form of autophagy. Constitutive up-regulation of macroautophagy is unable, however, to compensate for all CMA functions. Thus, CMA-defective cells are more sensitive to stressors, suggesting that, although protein turnover is maintained, the selectivity of CMA is necessary as part of the cellular response to stress. Our results also denote the existence of cross-talk among different forms of autophagy. PMID:16585521

  5. Flagellin Polymerisation Control by a Cytosolic Export Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Auvray, Frédéric; Thomas, Joanne; Fraser, Gillian M.; Hughes, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Assembly of the long helical filament of the bacterial flagellum requires polymerisation of ca 20,000 flagellin (FliC) monomeric subunits into the growing structure extending from the cell surface. Here, we show that export of Salmonella flagellin is facilitated specifically by a cytosolic protein, FliS, and that FliS binds to the FliC C-terminal helical domain, which contributes to stabilisation of flagellin subunit interactions during polymerisation. Stable complexes of FliS with flagellin were assembled efficiently in vitro, apparently by FliS homodimers binding to FliC monomers. The data suggest that FliS acts as a substrate-specific chaperone, preventing premature interaction of newly synthesised flagellin subunits in the cytosol. Compatible with this view, FliS was able to prevent in vitro polymerisation of FliC into filaments. PMID:11327763

  6. Cardiomyocyte ryanodine receptor degradation by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pedrozo, Zully; Torrealba, Natalia; Fernández, Carolina; Gatica, Damian; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Sanchez, Gina; Gillette, Thomas G.; Hill, Joseph A.; Donoso, Paulina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Time for primary review: 15 days Aims Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective mechanism for the degradation of soluble cytosolic proteins bearing the sequence KFERQ. These proteins are targeted by chaperones and delivered to lysosomes where they are translocated into the lysosomal lumen and degraded via the lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A). Mutations in LAMP2 that inhibit autophagy result in Danon disease characterized by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) plays a key role in cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction and its dysfunction can lead to cardiac failure. Whether RyR2 is degraded by CMA is unknown. Methods and results To induce CMA, cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with geldanamycin (GA) to promote protein degradation through this pathway. GA increased LAMP-2A levels together with its redistribution and colocalization with Hsc70 in the perinuclear region, changes indicative of CMA activation. The inhibition of lysosomes but not proteasomes prevented the loss of RyR2. The recovery of RyR2 content after incubation with GA by siRNA targeting LAMP-2A suggests that RyR2 is degraded via CMA. In silico analysis also revealed that the RyR2 sequence harbours six KFERQ motifs which are required for the recognition Hsc70 and its degradation via CMA. Our data suggest that presenilins are involved in RyR2 degradation by CMA. Conclusion These findings are consistent with a model in which oxidative damage of the RyR2 targets it for turnover by presenilins and CMA, which could lead to removal of damaged or leaky RyR2 channels. PMID:23404999

  7. Epiplakin attenuates experimental mouse liver injury by chaperoning keratin reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Sandra; Wögenstein, Karl L.; Österreicher, Christoph H.; Guldiken, Nurdan; Chen, Yu; Doler, Carina; Wiche, Gerhard; Boor, Peter; Haybaeck, Johannes; Strnad, Pavel; Fuchs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Epiplakin is a member of the plakin protein family and exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues where it binds to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (Eppk1−/−) mice displayed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, but their keratinocytes showed a faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in the stressed liver remained to be elucidated. Methods Wild-type (WT) and Eppk1−/− mice were subjected to common bile duct ligation (CBDL) or fed with a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-containing diet. The importance of epiplakin during keratin reorganization was assessed in primary hepatocytes. Results Our experiments revealed that epiplakin is expressed in hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and binds to keratin 8 (K8) and K18 via multiple domains. In several liver stress models epiplakin and K8 genes displayed identical expression patterns and transgenic K8 overexpression resulted in elevated hepatic epiplakin levels. After CBDL and DDC treatment, Eppk1−/− mice developed a more pronounced liver injury and their livers contained larger amounts of hepatocellular keratin granules, indicating impaired disease-induced keratin network reorganization. In line with these findings, primary Eppk1−/− hepatocytes showed increased formation of keratin aggregates after treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, a phenotype which was rescued by the chemical chaperone trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). Finally, transfection experiments revealed that Eppk1−/− primary hepatocytes were less able to tolerate forced K8 overexpression and that TMAO treatment rescued this phenotype. Conclusion Our data indicate that epiplakin plays a protective role during experimental liver injuries by chaperoning disease-induced keratin reorganization. PMID:25617501

  8. Effects of ligand binding on the stability of aldo–keto reductases: Implications for stabilizer or destabilizer chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Aurangazeb; Honda, Ryo P.; Kamatari, Yuji O.; Endo, Satoshi; Fukuoka, Mayuko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ligands such as enzyme inhibitors stabilize the native conformation of a protein upon binding to the native state, but some compounds destabilize the native conformation upon binding to the non‐native state. The former ligands are termed “stabilizer chaperones” and the latter ones “destabilizer chaperones.” Because the stabilization effects are essential for the medical chaperone (MC) hypothesis, here we have formulated a thermodynamic system consisting of a ligand and a protein in its native‐ and non‐native state. Using the differential scanning fluorimetry and the circular dichroism varying the urea concentration and temperature, we found that when the coenzyme NADP+ was absent, inhibitors such as isolithocholic acid stabilized the aldo–keto reductase AKR1A1 upon binding, which showed actually the three‐state folding, but destabilized AKR1B10. In contrast, in the presence of NADP+, they destabilized AKR1A1 and stabilized AKR1B10. To explain these phenomena, we decomposed the free energy of stabilization (ΔΔG) into its enthalpy (ΔΔH) and entropy (ΔΔS) components. Then we found that in a relatively unstable protein showing the three‐state folding, native conformation was stabilized by the negative ΔΔH in association with the negative ΔΔS, suggesting that the stabilizer chaperon decreases the conformational fluctuation of the target protein or increase its hydration. However, in other cases, ΔΔG was essentially determined by the delicate balance between ΔΔH and ΔΔS. The proposed thermodynamic formalism is applicable to the system including multiple ligands with allosteric interactions. These findings would promote the development of screening strategies for MCs to regulate the target conformations. PMID:27595938

  9. The Lhs1/GRP170 Chaperones Facilitate the Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Teresa M.; Plavchak, Lindsay; Roy, Ankita; Donnelly, Bridget F.; Kashlan, Ossama B.; Kleyman, Thomas R.; Subramanya, Arohan R.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel, ENaC, plays a critical role in maintaining salt and water homeostasis, and not surprisingly defects in ENaC function are associated with disease. Like many other membrane-spanning proteins, this trimeric protein complex folds and assembles inefficiently in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which results in a substantial percentage of the channel being targeted for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Because the spectrum of factors that facilitates the degradation of ENaC is incomplete, we developed yeast expression systems for each ENaC subunit. We discovered that a conserved Hsp70-like chaperone, Lhs1, is required for maximal turnover of the ENaC α subunit. By expressing Lhs1 ATP binding mutants, we also found that the nucleotide exchange properties of this chaperone are dispensable for ENaC degradation. Consistent with the precipitation of an Lhs1-αENaC complex, Lhs1 holdase activity was instead most likely required to support the ERAD of αENaC. Moreover, a complex containing the mammalian Lhs1 homolog GRP170 and αENaC co-precipitated, and GRP170 also facilitated ENaC degradation in human, HEK293 cells, and in a Xenopus oocyte expression system. In both yeast and higher cell types, the effect of Lhs1 on the ERAD of αENaC was selective for the unglycosylated form of the protein. These data establish the first evidence that Lhs1/Grp170 chaperones can act as mediators of ERAD substrate selection. PMID:23645669

  10. Silencing of natural transformation by an RNA chaperone and a multitarget small RNA

    PubMed Central

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Boughammoura, Aïda; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Allatif, Omran; Peillard-Fiorente, Flora; Edwards, Ross A.; Omar, Ayat R.; MacMillan, Andrew M.; Glover, Mark; Charpentier, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    A highly conserved DNA uptake system allows many bacteria to actively import and integrate exogenous DNA. This process, called natural transformation, represents a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) involved in the acquisition of virulence and antibiotic resistance determinants. Despite evidence of HGT and the high level of conservation of the genes coding the DNA uptake system, most bacterial species appear non-transformable under laboratory conditions. In naturally transformable species, the DNA uptake system is only expressed when bacteria enter a physiological state called competence, which develops under specific conditions. Here, we investigated the mechanism that controls expression of the DNA uptake system in the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. We found that a repressor of this system displays a conserved ProQ/FinO domain and interacts with a newly characterized trans-acting sRNA, RocR. Together, they target mRNAs of the genes coding the DNA uptake system to control natural transformation. This RNA-based silencing represents a previously unknown regulatory means to control this major mechanism of HGT. Importantly, these findings also show that chromosome-encoded ProQ/FinO domain-containing proteins can assist trans-acting sRNAs and that this class of RNA chaperones could play key roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation throughout bacterial species. PMID:27432973

  11. The hydrophobic region of the DmsA twin-arginine leader peptide determines specificity with chaperone DmsD.

    PubMed

    Winstone, Tara M L; Tran, Vy A; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-10-29

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions.

  12. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47: minimal structural requirement and spatial molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Asada, Shinichi; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-02-10

    The unique folding of procollagens in the endoplasmic reticulum is achieved with the assistance of procollagen-specific molecular chaperones. Heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone that plays an essential role in normal procollagen folding, although its molecular function has not yet been clarified. Recent advances in studies on the binding specificity of HSP47 have revealed that Arg residues at Yaa positions in collagenous Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats are critical for its interactions (Koide, T., Takahara, Y., Asada, S., and Nagata, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6178-6182; Tasab, M., Jenkinson, L., and Bulleid, N. J. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 35007-35012). In the present study, we further examined the client recognition mechanism of HSP47 by taking advantage of systems employing engineered collagen model peptides. First, in vitro binding studies using conformationally constrained collagen-like peptides revealed that HSP47 only recognized correctly folded triple helices and that the interaction with the corresponding single-chain polypeptides was negligible. Second, a binding study using heterotrimeric model clients for HSP47 demonstrated a minimal requirement for the number of Arg residues in the triple helix. Finally, a cross-linking study using photoreactive collagenous peptides provided information about the spatial orientation of an HSP47 molecule in the chaperone-collagen complex. The obtained results led to the development of a new model of HSP47-collagen complexes that differs completely from the previously proposed "flying capstan model" (Dafforn, T. R., Della, M., and Miller, A. D. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 49310-49319).

  13. Improved 1, 2, 4-butanetriol production from an engineered Escherichia coli by co-expression of different chaperone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyao; He, Shuying; Zong, Hong; Song, Jian; Chen, Wen; Zhuge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    1, 2, 4-Butanetriol (BT) is a high-value non-natural chemical and has important applications in polymers, medical production and military industry. In the constructed BT biosynthesis pathway from xylose in Escherichia coli, the xylose dehydrogenase (Xdh) and the benzoylformate decarboxylase (MdlC) are heterologous enzymes and the activity of MdlC is the key limiting factor for BT production. In this study, six chaperone protein systems were introduced into the engineered E. coli harboring the recombinant BT pathway. The chaperone GroES-GroEL was beneficial to Xdh activity but had a negative effect on MdlC activity and BT titer. The plasmid pTf16 containing the tig gene (trigger factor) was beneficial to Xdh and MdlC activities and improved the BT titer from 0.42 to 0.56 g/l from 20 g/l xylose. However, co-expression of trigger factor and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced the activity of MdlC and had no effect on the BT production. The plasmid pKJE7 harboring dnaK-dnaJ-grpE showed significant negative effects on these enzyme activities and cell growth, leading to completely restrained the BT production. Similarly, co-expression of DnaKJ-GrpPE and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced Xdh and MdlC activities and decreased the BT titer by 45.2 %. The BT production of the engineered E. coli harboring pTf16 was further improved to the highest level at 1.01 g/l under pH control (pH 7). This work showed the potential application of chaperone proteins in microorganism engineering to get high production of target compounds as an effective and valuable tool.

  14. A method for expression and purification of soluble, active Hsp47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Thomson, C A; Ananthanarayanan, V S

    2001-10-01

    Hsp47 is regarded as a collagen-specific chaperone with several suggested roles in collagen biosynthesis under normal and disease conditions. We describe here a procedure for the expression and purification of Hsp47 in Escherichia coli using the IMPACT expression system (New England Biolabs) where the guest gene is fused to the adduct, intein, with a chitin-binding domain. Use of this system resulted in relatively high levels of soluble Hsp47 compared to other available protocols, especially when the bacterial cells were induced at 14 degrees C instead of 37 degrees C. The cell lysate was passed through a chitin-Sepharose affinity column and Hsp47 was cleaved from intein using beta-mercaptoethanol. Minor degradation products were subsequently removed using a hydroxylapatite column to yield milligram amounts of pure and active protein suitable for structural studies. Gel electrophoretic analysis of the purified protein indicated the presence of a small proportion of trimeric species when non-reducing conditions were used. The ability to form a trimer may be important for its role as a chaperone. The IMPACT system allows for radiolabelling of purified Hsp47 with (35)S for use in binding experiments. Illustrative data on collagen binding by (35)S-Hsp47 are shown.

  15. Histone chaperones FACT and Spt6 prevent histone variants from turning into histone deviants.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Robert, François

    2016-05-01

    Histone variants are specialized histones which replace their canonical counterparts in specific nucleosomes. Together with histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation, they contribute to the epigenome. Histone variants are incorporated at specific locations by the concerted action of histone chaperones and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. Recent studies have shown that the histone chaperone FACT plays key roles in preventing pervasive incorporation of two histone variants: H2A.Z and CenH3/CENP-A. In addition, Spt6, another histone chaperone, was also shown to be important for appropriate H2A.Z localization. FACT and Spt6 are both associated with elongating RNA polymerase II. Based on these two examples, we propose that the establishment and maintenance of histone variant genomic distributions depend on a transcription-coupled epigenome editing (or surveillance) function of histone chaperones.

  16. FGL chaperone-assembled fimbrial polyadhesins: anti-immune armament of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zavialov, Anton; Zav'yalova, Galina; Korpela, Timo; Zav'yalov, Vladimir

    2007-07-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge on the structure, function, assembly, and biomedical applications of the family of adhesive fimbrial organelles assembled on the surface of Gram-negative pathogens via the FGL chaperone/usher pathway. Recent studies revealed the unique structural and functional properties of these organelles, distinguishing them from a related family, FGS chaperone-assembled adhesive pili. The FGL chaperone-assembled organelles consist of linear polymers of one or two types of protein subunits, each possessing one or two independent adhesive sites specific to different host cell receptors. This structural organization enables these fimbrial organelles to function as polyadhesins. Fimbrial polyadhesins may ensure polyvalent fastening of bacteria to the host cells, aggregating their receptors and triggering subversive signals that allow pathogens to evade immune defense. The FGL chaperone-assembled fimbrial polyadhesins are attractive targets for vaccine and drug design.

  17. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J.; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Escherichia coli common pilus chaperone EcpB

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, James A.; Diallo, Mamou; Matthews, Steve J.

    2015-05-20

    In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone–usher pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. Initial attempts at crystallizing the chaperone EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. This is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones. Pili are key cell-surface components that allow the attachment of bacteria to both biological and abiotic solid surfaces, whilst also mediating interactions between themselves. In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone–usher (CU) pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. The chaperone EcpB is involved in the biogenesis of the filament, which is composed of EcpA and EcpD. Initial attempts at crystallizing EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. Diffraction data have been processed to 2.4 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.65, c = 121.14 Å and one monomer in the asymmetric unit. Molecular replacement was unsuccessful, but selenomethionine-substituted protein and heavy-atom derivatives are being prepared for phasing. The three-dimensional structure of EcpB will provide invaluable information on the subtle mechanistic differences in biogenesis between the alternative and classical CU pathways. Furthermore, this is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones, and it

  19. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  20. The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0285 TITLE: The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer ...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1...ADT), is the mainstay of treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer . This therapy is only temporizing, however

  1. Survey of molecular chaperone requirement for the biosynthesis of hamster polyomavirus VP1 protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valaviciute, Monika; Norkiene, Milda; Goda, Karolis; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2016-07-01

    A number of viruses utilize molecular chaperones during various stages of their life cycle. It has been shown that members of the heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperone family assist polyomavirus capsids during infection. However, the molecular chaperones that assist the formation of recombinant capsid viral protein 1 (VP1)-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) in yeast remain unclear. A panel of yeast strains with single chaperone gene deletions were used to evaluate the chaperones required for biosynthesis of recombinant hamster polyomavirus capsid protein VP1. The impact of deletion or mild overexpression of chaperone genes was determined in live cells by flow cytometry using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused with VP1. Targeted genetic analysis demonstrated that VP1-EGFP fusion protein levels were significantly higher in yeast strains in which the SSZ1 or ZUO1 genes encoding ribosome-associated complex components were deleted. The results confirmed the participation of cytosolic Hsp70 chaperones and suggested the potential involvement of the Ydj1 and Caj1 co-chaperones and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in the biosynthesis of VP1 VLPs in yeast. Likewise, the markedly reduced levels of VP1-EGFP in Δhsc82 and Δhsp82 yeast strains indicated that both Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones might assist VP1 VLPs during protein biosynthesis.

  2. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  3. Organismal proteostasis: role of cell-nonautonomous regulation and transcellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Protein quality control is essential in all organisms and regulated by the proteostasis network (PN) and cell stress response pathways that maintain a functional proteome to promote cellular health. In this review, we describe how metazoans employ multiple modes of cell-nonautonomous signaling across tissues to integrate and transmit the heat-shock response (HSR) for balanced expression of molecular chaperones. The HSR and other cell stress responses such as the unfolded protein response (UPR) can function autonomously in single-cell eukaryotes and tissue culture cells; however, within the context of a multicellular animal, the PN is regulated by cell-nonautonomous signaling through specific sensory neurons and by the process of transcellular chaperone signaling. These newly identified forms of stress signaling control the PN between neurons and nonneuronal somatic tissues to achieve balanced tissue expression of chaperones in response to environmental stress and to ensure that metastable aggregation-prone proteins expressed within any single tissue do not generate local proteotoxic risk. Transcellular chaperone signaling leads to the compensatory expression of chaperones in other somatic tissues of the animal, perhaps preventing the spread of proteotoxic damage. Thus, communication between subcellular compartments and across different cells and tissues maintains proteostasis when challenged by acute stress and upon chronic expression of metastable proteins. We propose that transcellular chaperone signaling provides a critical control step for the PN to maintain cellular and organismal health span. PMID:25030693

  4. Amyloid-β oligomers are sequestered by both intracellular and extracellular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Priyanka; Meehan, Sarah; Carver, John A.; Wilson, Mark R.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Klenerman, David

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide into β-sheet rich, fibrillar structures proceeds via a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomeric intermediates that have been associated with neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Of particular interest in this context are the mechanisms by which molecular chaperones, part of the primary biological defenses against protein misfolding, influence Aβ aggregation. We have used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to compare the interactions between distinct aggregation states (monomers, oligomers, amyloid fibrils) of the AD-associated amyloid-β(1-40) peptide, and two molecular chaperones, both of which are upregulated in the brains of patients with AD and have been found colocalized with Aβ in senile plaques. One of the chaperones, αB-crystallin, is primarily found inside cells while the other, clusterin, is predominantly located in the extracellular environment. We find that both chaperones bind to misfolded oligomeric species and form long-lived complexes thereby preventing both their further growth into fibrils and their dissociation. From these studies, we conclude that these chaperones have a common mechanism of action based on sequestering Aβ oligomers. This conclusion suggests that these chaperones, both of which are ATP-independent, are able to inhibit potentially pathogenic Aβ oligomer-associated processes whether they occur in the extracellular or intracellular environment. PMID:23106396

  5. Photoreceptor IFT complexes containing chaperones, guanylyl cyclase 1 and rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Reshma; Li, Mei; Sun, Jun; Baker, Sheila A; Insinna, Christine; Besharse, Joseph C

    2009-06-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) provides a mechanism for the transport of cilium-specific proteins, but the mechanisms for linkage of cargo and IFT proteins have not been identified. Using the sensory outer segments (OS) of photoreceptors, which are derived from sensory cilia, we have identified IFT-cargo complexes containing IFT proteins, kinesin 2 family proteins, two photoreceptor-specific membrane proteins, guanylyl cyclase 1 (GC1, Gucy2e) and rhodopsin (RHO), and the chaperones, mammalian relative of DNAJ, DnajB6 (MRJ), and HSC70 (Hspa8). Analysis of these complexes leads to a model in which MRJ through its binding to IFT88 and GC1 plays a critical role in formation or stabilization of the IFT-cargo complexes. Consistent with the function of MRJ in the activation of HSC70 ATPase activity, Mg-ATP enhances the co-IP of GC1, RHO, and MRJ with IFT proteins. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of MRJ in IMCD3 cells expressing GC1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reduces cilium membrane targeting of GC1-GFP without apparent effect on cilium elongation.

  6. Activation of a bacterial lipase by its chaperone.

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, A H; Buckley, C M; Aamand, J L; Jørgensen, S T; Diderichsen, B; McConnell, D J

    1993-01-01

    The gene lipA of Pseudomonas cepacia DSM 3959 encodes a prelipase from which a signal peptide is cleaved during secretion, producing a mature extracellular lipase. Expression of lipase in several heterologous hosts depends on the presence of another gene, limA, in cis or in trans. Lipase protein has been overproduced in Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the lipase modulator gene limA. Therefore, limA is not required for the transcription of lipA or for the translation of the lipA mRNA. However, no lipase activity is observed in the absence of limA. limA has been overexpressed and encodes a 33-kDa protein, Lim. If lipase protein is denatured in 8 M urea and the urea is removed by dialysis, lipase activity is quantitatively recovered provided Lim protein is present during renaturation. Lip and Lim proteins form a complex precipitable either by an anti-lipase or anti-Lim antibody. The Lim protein has therefore the properties of a chaperone. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685908

  7. A Novel Function of Molecular Chaperone HSP70

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, Marianna; Váraljai, Renáta; Benevolenskaya, Elizaveta; Gartel, Andrei L.

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor FOXM1 is overexpressed in the majority of human cancers, and it is a potential target for anticancer therapy. We identified proteasome inhibitors as the first type of drugs that target FOXM1 in cancer cells. Here we found that HSP90 inhibitor PF-4942847 and heat shock also suppress FOXM1. The common effector, which was induced after treatment with proteasome and HSP90 inhibitors or heat shock, was the molecular chaperone HSP70. We show that HSP70 binds to FOXM1 following proteotoxic stress and that HSP70 inhibits FOXM1 DNA-binding ability. Inhibition of FOXM1 transcriptional autoregulation by HSP70 leads to the suppression of FOXM1 protein expression. In addition, HSP70 suppression elevates FOXM1 expression, and simultaneous inhibition of FOXM1 and HSP70 increases the sensitivity of human cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Overall, we determined the unique and novel mechanism of FOXM1 suppression by proteasome inhibitors. PMID:26559972

  8. Fab Chaperone-Assisted RNA Crystallography (Fab CARC).

    PubMed

    Sherman, Eileen; Archer, Jennifer; Ye, Jing-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Recent discovery of structured RNAs such as ribozymes and riboswitches shows that there is still much to learn about the structure and function of RNAs. Knowledge learned can be employed in both biochemical research and clinical applications. X-ray crystallography gives unparalleled atomic-level structural detail from which functional inferences can be deduced. However, the difficulty in obtaining high-quality crystals and their phasing information make it a very challenging task. RNA crystallography is particularly arduous due to several factors such as RNA's paucity of surface chemical diversity, lability, repetitive anionic backbone, and flexibility, all of which are counterproductive to crystal packing. Here we describe Fab chaperone assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), a systematic technique to increase RNA crystallography success by facilitating crystal packing as well as expediting phase determination through molecular replacement of conserved Fab domains. Major steps described in this chapter include selection of a synthetic Fab library displayed on M13 phage against a structured RNA crystallization target, ELISA for initial choice of binding Fabs, Fab expression followed by protein A affinity then cation exchange chromatography purification, final choice of Fab by binding specificity and affinity as determined by a dot blot assay, and lastly gel filtration purification of a large quantity of chosen Fabs for crystallization.

  9. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Should a Chaperone Accompany Our Therapeutic Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Kevin L.; Li, Chengyuan

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes that is associated with axonal atrophy, demyelination, blunted regenerative potential, and loss of peripheral nerve fibers. The development and progression of DPN is due in large part to hyperglycemia but is also affected by insulin deficiency and dyslipidemia. Although numerous biochemical mechanisms contribute to DPN, increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction seem intimately associated with nerve dysfunction and diminished regenerative capacity. Despite advances in understanding the etiology of DPN, few approved therapies exist for the pharmacological management of painful or insensate DPN. Therefore, identifying novel therapeutic strategies remains paramount. Because DPN does not develop with either temporal or biochemical uniformity, its therapeutic management may benefit from a multifaceted approach that inhibits pathogenic mechanisms, manages inflammation, and increases cytoprotective responses. Finally, exercise has long been recognized as a part of the therapeutic management of diabetes, and exercise can delay and/or prevent the development of painful DPN. This review presents an overview of existing therapies that target both causal and symptomatic features of DPN and discusses the role of up-regulating cytoprotective pathways via modulating molecular chaperones. Overall, it may be unrealistic to expect that a single pharmacologic entity will suffice to ameliorate the multiple symptoms of human DPN. Thus, combinatorial therapies that target causal mechanisms and enhance endogenous reparative capacity may enhance nerve function and improve regeneration in DPN if they converge to decrease oxidative stress, improve mitochondrial bioenergetics, and increase response to trophic factors. PMID:22885705

  10. Bacterial Discrimination by FISH using Molecular Chaperon GroE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Maruyama, A.; Kurusu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    FISH(Fluorescence In Situ hybridization) is a powerful method for the analysis of the phylogenetic classification of microorganism in the environment. In many cases, 16s rRNA sequences of microorganisms are employed as target probe. Here we showed that novel probe was used in FISH in order to discriminate among the bacteria including psychrophile, mesophile, and thermophile. Molecular Chaperon GroE is a best characterized protein based on Escherichia coli and essential for bacterial proliferation. In E. coli, the amount of GroEL protein per cell reaches to about 5% of total cellualr protein at heat-shock response. This response occurred at transcription levels, the amount of groEL mRNA increases at about 10-fold per cell, reaches to 0.4% of total synthesized RNA. Therefore, we considered that groEL gene was employed FISH analysis as a target probe. Moreover, we found that Gly-Gly-Met (GGM) repeats in the carboxy-terminal of GroEL strongly conserved among psychrophile and mesophile, but not thermophile. In this report, we attempted to discriminate among the bacteria including psychrophile, mesophile, and thermophile by FISH using the specific sequence of GroEL as a probe. Furthermore, we proposed the novel phylogenetic trees based on the amino acids sequences of carboxy-terminal of GroEL for bacterial evolution by temperature adaptation.

  11. Pharmacological Chaperoning: A Potential Treatment for PMM2-CDG.

    PubMed

    Yuste-Checa, Patricia; Brasil, Sandra; Gámez, Alejandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Desviat, Lourdes R; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2017-02-01

    The congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) due to phosphomannomutase 2 deficiency (PMM2-CDG), the most common N-glycosylation disorder, is a multisystem disease for which no effective treatment is available. The recent functional characterization of disease-causing mutations described in patients with PMM2-CDG led to the idea of a therapeutic strategy involving pharmacological chaperones (PC) to rescue PMM2 loss-of-function mutations. The present work describes the high-throughput screening, by differential scanning fluorimetry, of 10,000 low-molecular-weight compounds from a commercial library, to search for possible PCs for the enzyme PMM2. This exercise identified eight compounds that increased the thermal stability of PMM2. Of these, four compounds functioned as potential PCs that significantly increased the stability of several destabilizing and oligomerization mutants and also increased PMM activity in a disease model of cells overexpressing PMM2 mutations. Structural analysis revealed one of these compounds to provide an excellent starting point for chemical optimization since it passed tests based on a number of pharmacochemical quality filters. The present results provide the first proof-of-concept of a possible treatment for PMM2-CDG and describe a promising chemical structure as a starting point for the development of new therapeutic agents for this severe orphan disease.

  12. Withaferin A Analogs That Target the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Xu, Ya-ming; Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Lau, Eric C.; Mesa, Celestina; Mason, Damian J.; Brown, Robert V.; Clair, James J. La; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; Zhang, Donna D.; Chapman, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mode of action (MOA) of many natural products can be puzzling with mechanistic clues that seem to lack a common thread. One such puzzle lies in the evaluation of the antitumor properties of the natural product withaferin A (WFA). A variety of seemingly unrelated pathways have been identified to explain its activity, suggesting a lack of selectivity. We now show that WFA acts as an inhibitor of the chaperone, p97, both in vitro and in cell models in addition to inhibiting the proteasome in vitro. Through medicinal chemistry, we have refined the activity of WFA toward p97 and away from the proteasome. Subsequent studies indicated that these WFA analogs retained p97 activity and cytostatic activity in cell models, suggesting that the modes of action reported for WFA could be connected by proteostasis modulation. Through this endeavor, we highlight how the parallel integration of medicinal chemistry with chemical biology offers a potent solution to one of natures’ intriguing molecular puzzles. PMID:26006219

  13. A new perspective in Parkinson's disease, chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Boyu; Zhang, Yun; Yuan, Yuhe; Chen, Naihong

    2011-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons and aggregation of alpha-synuclein. Although the role of alpha-synuclein in the pathology of PD is still unclear, the fact that its aggregation contributes to the loss of dopaminergic neurons has been confirmed. Therefore, controlling the alpha-synuclein protein level may be critical for PD pathogenesis and may provide potential therapeutics. Wild-type alpha-synuclein is physiologically degraded by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), and dysfunction of CMA results in alpha-synuclein aggregation and compensative macroautophagy activation which finally leads to cell death. Therefore, CMA may participate in PD pathogenesis as a very important factor, and up-regulating CMA activity could degrade overloaded alpha-synuclein. In view of potential compensative effects, maintenance of the balance of CMA activity will be another major challenge in the future development of the therapeutic strategy. Herein we review the current knowledge of the role of CMA in PD.

  14. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation.

    PubMed

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-04

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP-used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor's nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  15. Proteins with RNA Chaperone Activity: A World of Diverse Proteins with a Common Task—Impediment of RNA Misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Semrad, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Proteins with RNA chaperone activity are ubiquitous proteins that play important roles in cellular mechanisms. They prevent RNA from misfolding by loosening misfolded structures without ATP consumption. RNA chaperone activity is studied in vitro and in vivo using oligonucleotide- or ribozyme-based assays. Due to their functional as well as structural diversity, a common chaperoning mechanism or universal motif has not yet been identified. A growing database of proteins with RNA chaperone activity has been established based on evaluation of chaperone activity via the described assays. Although the exact mechanism is not yet understood, it is more and more believed that disordered regions within proteins play an important role. This possible mechanism and which proteins were found to possess RNA chaperone activity are discussed here. PMID:21234377

  16. Adenosine diphosphate restricts the protein remodeling activity of the Hsp104 chaperone to Hsp70 assisted disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Chamera, Tomasz; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Hsp104 disaggregase provides thermotolerance in yeast by recovering proteins from aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone. Protein disaggregation involves polypeptide extraction from aggregates and its translocation through the central channel of the Hsp104 hexamer. This process relies on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Considering that Hsp104 is characterized by low affinity towards ATP and is strongly inhibited by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we asked how Hsp104 functions at the physiological levels of adenine nucleotides. We demonstrate that physiological levels of ADP highly limit Hsp104 activity. This inhibition, however, is moderated by the Hsp70 chaperone, which allows efficient disaggregation by supporting Hsp104 binding to aggregates but not to non-aggregated, disordered protein substrates. Our results point to an additional level of Hsp104 regulation by Hsp70, which restricts the potentially toxic protein unfolding activity of Hsp104 to the disaggregation process, providing the yeast protein-recovery system with substrate specificity and efficiency in ATP consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15159.001 PMID:27223323

  17. A cypovirus VP5 displays the RNA chaperone-like activity that destabilizes RNA helices and accelerates strand annealing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Cheng, Zhenyun; Zhang, Songliu; Xiong, Wei; Xia, Hongjie; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Wu, Feige; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Yin, Lei; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-02-01

    For double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses in the family Reoviridae, their inner capsids function as the machinery for viral RNA (vRNA) replication. Unlike other multishelled reoviruses, cypovirus has a single-layered capsid, thereby representing a simplified model for studying vRNA replication of reoviruses. VP5 is one of the three major cypovirus capsid proteins and functions as a clamp protein to stabilize cypovirus capsid. Here, we expressed VP5 from type 5 Helicoverpa armigera cypovirus (HaCPV-5) in a eukaryotic system and determined that this VP5 possesses RNA chaperone-like activity, which destabilizes RNA helices and accelerates strand annealing independent of ATP. Our further characterization of VP5 revealed that its helix-destabilizing activity is RNA specific, lacks directionality and could be inhibited by divalent ions, such as Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+) or Zn(2+), to varying degrees. Furthermore, we found that HaCPV-5 VP5 facilitates the replication initiation of an alternative polymerase (i.e. reverse transcriptase) through a panhandle-structured RNA template, which mimics the 5'-3' cyclization of cypoviral positive-stranded RNA. Given that the replication of negative-stranded vRNA on the positive-stranded vRNA template necessitates the dissociation of the 5'-3' panhandle, the RNA chaperone activity of VP5 may play a direct role in the initiation of reoviral dsRNA synthesis.

  18. Amelioration of glucolipotoxicity-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress by a "chemical chaperone" in human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lenin, Raji; Maria, Mariawilliam Sneha; Agrawal, Madhur; Balasubramanyam, Jayashree; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy

    2012-01-01

    Chronic ER stress is emerging as a trigger that imbalances a number of systemic and arterial-wall factors and promote atherosclerosis. Macrophage apoptosis within advanced atherosclerotic lesions is also known to increase the risk of atherothrombotic disease. We hypothesize that glucolipotoxicity might mediate monocyte activation and apoptosis through ER stress. Therefore, the aims of this study are (a) to investigate whether glucolipotoxicity could impose ER stress and apoptosis in THP-1 human monocytes and (b) to investigate whether 4-Phenyl butyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone could resist the glucolipotoxicity-induced ER stress and apoptosis. Cells subjected to either glucolipotoxicity or tunicamycin exhibited increased ROS generation, gene and protein (PERK, GRP-78, IRE1α, and CHOP) expression of ER stress markers. In addition, these cells showed increased TRPC-6 channel expression and apoptosis as revealed by DNA damage and increased caspase-3 activity. While glucolipotoxicity/tunicamycin increased oxidative stress, ER stress, mRNA expression of TRPC-6, and programmed the THP-1 monocytes towards apoptosis, all these molecular perturbations were resisted by PBA. Since ER stress is one of the underlying causes of monocyte dysfunction in diabetes and atherosclerosis, our study emphasize that chemical chaperones such as PBA could alleviate ER stress and have potential to become novel therapeutics.

  19. Activation of sigma-1 receptor chaperone in the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases and its clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein sigma-1 receptor represents unique chaperone activity in the central nervous system, and it exerts a potent influence on a number of neurotransmitter systems. Several lines of evidence suggest that activation of sigma-1 receptor plays a role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases, as well as in the mechanisms of some therapeutic drugs and neurosteroids. Preclinical studies showed that some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, excitalopram), donepezil, and ifenprodil act as sigma-1 receptor agonists. Furthermore, sigma-1 receptor agonists could improve the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist phencyclidine (PCP)-induced cognitive deficits in mice. A study using positron emission tomography have demonstrated that an oral administration of fluvoxamine or donepezil could bind to sigma-1 receptor in the healthy human brain, suggesting that sigma-1 receptor might be involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of these drugs. Moreover, case reports suggest that sigma-1 receptor agonists, including fluvoxamine, and ifenprodil, may be effective in the treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, delirium in elderly people, and flashbacks in post-traumatic stress disorder. In this review article, the author would like to discuss the clinical implication of sigma-1 receptor agonists, including endogenous neurosteroids, in the neuropsychiatric diseases.

  20. The architecture of functional modules in the Hsp90 co-chaperone Sti1/Hop

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas B; Lagleder, Stephan; Gräwert, Melissa Ann; Röhl, Alina; Hagn, Franz; Wandinger, Sebastian K; Cox, Marc B; Demmer, Oliver; Richter, Klaus; Groll, Michael; Kessler, Horst; Buchner, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Sti1/Hop is a modular protein required for the transfer of client proteins from the Hsp70 to the Hsp90 chaperone system in eukaryotes. It binds Hsp70 and Hsp90 simultaneously via TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains. Sti1/Hop contains three TPR domains (TPR1, TPR2A and TPR2B) and two domains of unknown structure (DP1 and DP2). We show that TPR2A is the high affinity Hsp90-binding site and TPR1 and TPR2B bind Hsp70 with moderate affinity. The DP domains exhibit highly homologous α-helical folds as determined by NMR. These, and especially DP2, are important for client activation in vivo. The core module of Sti1 for Hsp90 inhibition is the TPR2A–TPR2B segment. In the crystal structure, the two TPR domains are connected via a rigid linker orienting their peptide-binding sites in opposite directions and allowing the simultaneous binding of TPR2A to the Hsp90 C-terminal domain and of TPR2B to Hsp70. Both domains also interact with the Hsp90 middle domain. The accessory TPR1–DP1 module may serve as an Hsp70–client delivery system for the TPR2A–TPR2B–DP2 segment, which is required for client activation in vivo. PMID:22227520

  1. Loss of hepatic chaperone-mediated autophagy accelerates proteostasis failure in aging

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jaime L; Villarroya, Joan; Diaz-Carretero, Antonio; Patel, Bindi; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Thi, Mia M; Villarroya, Francesc; Santambrogio, Laura; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), a cellular process that contributes to protein quality control through targeting of a subset of cytosolic proteins to lysosomes for degradation, undergoes a functional decline with age. We have used a mouse model with liver-specific defective CMA to identify changes in proteostasis attributable to reduced CMA activity in this organ with age. We have found that other proteolytic systems compensate for CMA loss in young mice which helps to preserve proteostasis. However, these compensatory responses are not sufficient for protection against proteotoxicity induced by stress (oxidative stress, lipid challenges) or associated with aging. Livers from old mice with CMA blockage exhibit altered protein homeostasis, enhanced susceptibility to oxidative stress and hepatic dysfunction manifested by a diminished ability to metabolize drugs, and a worsening of the metabolic dysregulation identified in young mice. Our study reveals that while the regulatory function of CMA cannot be compensated for in young organisms, its contribution to protein homeostasis can be handled by other proteolytic systems. However, the decline in the compensatory ability identified with age explains the more severe consequences of CMA impairment in older organisms and the contribution of CMA malfunction to the gradual decline in proteostasis and stress resistance observed during aging. PMID:25620427

  2. Gigaxonin controls vimentin organization through a tubulin chaperone-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Don W.; Yamanaka, Koji; Bomont, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    Gigaxonin mutations cause the fatal human neurodegenerative disorder giant axonal neuropathy (GAN). Broad deterioration of the nervous system in GAN patients is accompanied by massive disorganization of intermediate filaments (IFs) both in neurons and many non-neuronal cells. With newly developed antibodies, gigaxonin is now shown to be expressed at extremely low levels throughout the nervous system. In lymphoblast cell lines derived from severe and mild forms of GAN, mutations in gigaxonin are shown to yield highly unstable proteins, thereby permitting a rapid diagnostic test for the spectrum of GAN mutations as an alternative to invasive nerve biopsy or systematic sequencing of the GAN gene. Gigaxonin has been proposed as a substrate adaptor for an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which affects proteasome-dependent degradation of microtubule-related proteins including MAP1B, MAP8 and the tubulin folding chaperone TBCB. We demonstrate that, unlike its counterpart TBCE, TBCB only moderately destabilizes microtubules. Neither TBCB abundance nor microtubule organization or densities are altered in GAN mutant fibroblasts, thus demonstrating that altered TBCB levels are not primary determinants of IF disorganization in GAN. Characteristic GAN mutant-induced ovoid aggregates of vimentin are not produced in normal fibroblasts after disrupting microtubule assembly, either by TBCE overexpression or depolymerizing drugs. Thus, IF disorganization in GAN fibroblasts is independent of TBCB and microtubule loss and must be regulated by a yet unidentified mechanism. PMID:19168853

  3. AR-12 Inhibits Multiple Chaperones Concomitant With Stimulating Autophagosome Formation Collectively Preventing Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Ecroyd, Heath; Tritsch, Sarah R; Bavari, Sina; Reid, St Patrick; Proniuk, Stefan; Zukiwski, Alexander; Jacob, Abraham; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; García, Cybele C; Damonte, Elsa; González-Gallego, Javier; Tuñón, María J; Dent, Paul

    2016-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that AR-12 (OSU-03012) reduces the function and ATPase activities of multiple HSP90 and HSP70 family chaperones. Combined knock down of chaperones or AR-12 treatment acted to reduce the expression of virus receptors and essential glucosidase proteins. Combined knock down of chaperones or AR-12 treatment inactivated mTOR and elevated ATG13 S318 phosphorylation concomitant with inducing an endoplasmic reticulum stress response that in an eIF2α-dependent fashion increased Beclin1 and LC3 expression and autophagosome formation. Over-expression of chaperones prevented the reduction in receptor/glucosidase expression, mTOR inactivation, the ER stress response, and autophagosome formation. AR-12 reduced the reproduction of viruses including Mumps, Influenza, Measles, Junín, Rubella, HIV (wild type and protease resistant), and Ebola, an effect replicated by knock down of multiple chaperone proteins. AR-12-stimulated the co-localization of Influenza, EBV and HIV virus proteins with LC3 in autophagosomes and reduced viral protein association with the chaperones HSP90, HSP70, and GRP78. Knock down of Beclin1 suppressed drug-induced autophagosome formation and reduced the anti-viral protection afforded by AR-12. In an animal model of hemorrhagic fever virus, a transient exposure of animals to low doses of AR-12 doubled animal survival from ∼30% to ∼60% and suppressed liver damage as measured by ATL, GGT and LDH release. Thus through inhibition of chaperone protein functions; reducing the production, stability and processing of viral proteins; and stimulating autophagosome formation/viral protein degradation, AR-12 acts as a broad-specificity anti-viral drug in vitro and in vivo. We argue future patient studies with AR-12 are warranted. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2286-2302, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ribosomal crystallography: peptide bond formation, chaperone assistance and antibiotics activity.

    PubMed

    Yonath, Ada

    2005-08-31

    The peptidyl transferase center (PTC) is located in a protein free environment, thus confirming that the ribosome is a ribozyme. This arched void has dimensions suitable for accommodating the 3' ends of the A-and the P-site tRNAs, and is situated within a universal sizable symmetry-related region that connects all ribosomal functional centers involved in amino-acid polymerization. The linkage between the elaborate PTC architecture and the A-site tRNA position revealed that the A- to P-site passage of the tRNA 3' end is performed by a rotatory motion, which leads to stereochemistry suitable for peptide bond formation and for substrate mediated catalysis, thus suggesting that the PTC evolved by gene-fusion. Adjacent to the PTC is the entrance of the protein exit tunnel, shown to play active roles in sequence-specific gating of nascent chains and in responding to cellular signals. This tunnel also provides a site that may be exploited for local co-translational folding and seems to assist in nascent chain trafficking into the hydrophobic space formed by the first bacterial chaperone, the trigger factor. Many antibiotics target ribosomes. Although the ribosome is highly conserved, subtle sequence and/or conformational variations enable drug selectivity, thus facilitating clinical usage. Comparisons of high-resolution structures of complexes of antibiotics bound to ribosomes from eubacteria resembling pathogens, to an archaeon that shares properties with eukaryotes and to its mutant that allows antibiotics binding, demonstrated the unambiguous difference between mere binding and therapeutical effectiveness. The observed variability in antibiotics inhibitory modes, accompanied by the elucidation of the structural basis to antibiotics mechanism justifies expectations for structural based improved properties of existing compounds as well as for the development of novel drugs.

  5. The expanding proteome of the molecular chaperone HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Rahul S; Clarke, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 maintains the activity and stability of a diverse set of “client” proteins that play key roles in normal and disease biology. Around 20 HSP90 inhibitors that deplete the oncogenic clientele have entered clinical trials for cancer. However, the full extent of the HSP90-dependent proteome, which encompasses not only clients but also proteins modulated by downstream transcriptional responses, is still incompletely characterized and poorly understood. Earlier large-scale efforts to define the HSP90 proteome have been valuable but are incomplete because of limited technical sensitivity. Here, we discuss previous large-scale surveys of proteome perturbations induced by HSP90 inhibitors in light of a significant new study using state-of-the-art stable isotope labeling by amino acids (SILAC) technology combined with more sensitive high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) that extends the catalog of proteomic changes in inhibitor-treated cancer cells. Among wide-ranging changes, major functional responses include downregulation of protein kinase activity and the DNA damage response alongside upregulation of the protein degradation machinery. Despite this improved proteomic coverage, there was surprisingly little overlap with previous studies. This may be due in part to technical issues but is likely also due to the variability of the HSP90 proteome with the inhibitor conditions used, the cancer cell type and the genetic status of client proteins. We suggest future proteomic studies to address these factors, to help distinguish client protein components from indirect transcriptional components and to address other key questions in fundamental and translational HSP90 research. Such studies should also reveal new biomarkers for patient selection and novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22421145

  6. Biologic activities of molecular chaperones and pharmacologic chaperone imidazole-containing dipeptide-based compounds: natural skin care help and the ultimate challenge: implication for adaptive responses in the skin.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady M; Nikolayeva, Juliana G; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2012-03-01

    Accumulation of molecular damage and increased molecular heterogeneity are hallmarks of photoaged skin and pathogenesis of human cutaneous disease. Growing evidence demonstrates the ability of molecular chaperone proteins and of pharmacologic chaperones to decrease the environmental stress and ameliorate the oxidation stress-related and glycation disease phenotypes, suggesting that the field of chaperone therapy might hold novel treatments for skin diseases and aging. In this review, we examine the evidence suggesting a role for molecular chaperone proteins in the skin and their inducer and protecting agents: pharmacologic chaperone imidazole dipeptide-based agents (carcinine and related compounds) in cosmetics and dermatology. Furthermore, we discuss the use of chaperone therapy for the treatment of skin photoaging diseases and other skin pathologies that have a component of increased glycation and/or free radical-induced oxidation in their genesis. We examine biologic activities of molecular and pharmacologic chaperones, including strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human skin disease. This allows the protein to function and traffic to the appropriate location in the skin, thereby increasing protein activity and cellular function and reducing stress on skin cells. The benefits of imidazole dipeptide antioxidants with transglycating activity (such as carcinine) in skin care are that they help protect and repair cell membrane damage and help retain youthful, younger-looking skin. All skin types will benefit from daily, topical application of pharmacologic chaperone antioxidants, anti-irritants, in combination with water-binding protein agents that work to mimic the structure and function of healthy skin. General strategies are presented addressing ground techniques to improve absorption of usually active chaperone proteins and dipeptide compounds, include

  7. Hsp72 chaperone function is dispensable for protection against stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ari M; Steel, Rohan; Anderson, Robin L

    2009-05-01

    In addition to its role as a molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects cells against a wide range of apoptosis inducing stresses. However, it is unclear if these two roles are functionally related or whether Hsp72 inhibits apoptosis by a mechanism independent of chaperone activity. The N-terminal adenosine triphosphatase domain, substrate-binding domain and the C-terminal EEVD regulatory motif of Hsp72 are all essential for chaperone activity. In this study, we show that Hsp72 mutants with a functional substrate-binding domain but lacking chaperone activity retain their ability to protect cells against apoptosis induced by heat and tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, a deletion mutant lacking a functional substrate-binding domain has no protective capacity. The ability of the Hsp72 substrate-binding domain to inhibit apoptosis independent of the regulatory effects of the adenosine triphosphate-binding domain indicates that the inhibition of apoptosis may involve a stable binding interaction with a regulatory substrate rather than Hsp72 chaperone activity.

  8. A Quantitative Characterization of Nucleoplasmin/Histone Complexes Reveals Chaperone Versatility

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rivero, Noelia; Franco, Aitor; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrian; Alonso, Edurne; Muga, Arturo; Prado, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoplasmin (NP) is an abundant histone chaperone in vertebrate oocytes and embryos involved in storing and releasing maternal histones to establish and maintain the zygotic epigenome. NP has been considered a H2A–H2B histone chaperone, and recently it has been shown that it can also interact with H3-H4. However, its interaction with different types of histones has not been quantitatively studied so far. We show here that NP binds H2A–H2B, H3-H4 and linker histones with Kd values in the subnanomolar range, forming different complexes. Post-translational modifications of NP regulate exposure of the polyGlu tract at the disordered distal face of the protein and induce an increase in chaperone affinity for all histones. The relative affinity of NP for H2A–H2B and linker histones and the fact that they interact with the distal face of the chaperone could explain their competition for chaperone binding, a relevant process in NP-mediated sperm chromatin remodelling during fertilization. Our data show that NP binds H3-H4 tetramers in a nucleosomal conformation and dimers, transferring them to DNA to form disomes and tetrasomes. This finding might be relevant to elucidate the role of NP in chromatin disassembly and assembly during replication and transcription. PMID:27558753

  9. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Jose M.; Montalvo, Ana M.; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges) for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis. PMID:26167482

  10. Evolution of a plant-specific copper chaperone family for chloroplast copper homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Stübe, Roland; Argüello, José M.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-12-02

    Metallochaperones traffic copper (Cu+) from its point of entry at the plasma membrane to its destination. In plants, one destination is the chloroplast, which houses plastocyanin, a Cu-dependent electron transfer protein involved in photosynthesis. In this paper, we present a previously unidentified Cu+ chaperone that evolved early in the plant lineage by an alternative-splicing event of the pre-mRNA encoding the chloroplast P-type ATPase in Arabidopsis 1 (PAA1). In several land plants, recent duplication events created a separate chaperone-encoding gene coincident with loss of alternative splicing. The plant-specific Cu+ chaperone delivers Cu+ with specificity for PAA1, which is flipped in the envelope relative to prototypical bacterial ATPases, compatible with a role in Cu+ import into the stroma and consistent with the canonical catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. The ubiquity of the chaperone suggests conservation of this Cu+-delivery mechanism and provides a unique snapshot into the evolution of a Cu+ distribution pathway. Finally, we also provide evidence for an interaction between PAA2, the Cu+-ATPase in thylakoids, and the Cu+-chaperone for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (CCS), uncovering a Cu+ network that has evolved to fine-tune Cu+ distribution.

  11. Evolution of a plant-specific copper chaperone family for chloroplast copper homeostasis

    DOE PAGES

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Stübe, Roland; ...

    2014-12-02

    Metallochaperones traffic copper (Cu+) from its point of entry at the plasma membrane to its destination. In plants, one destination is the chloroplast, which houses plastocyanin, a Cu-dependent electron transfer protein involved in photosynthesis. In this paper, we present a previously unidentified Cu+ chaperone that evolved early in the plant lineage by an alternative-splicing event of the pre-mRNA encoding the chloroplast P-type ATPase in Arabidopsis 1 (PAA1). In several land plants, recent duplication events created a separate chaperone-encoding gene coincident with loss of alternative splicing. The plant-specific Cu+ chaperone delivers Cu+ with specificity for PAA1, which is flipped in themore » envelope relative to prototypical bacterial ATPases, compatible with a role in Cu+ import into the stroma and consistent with the canonical catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. The ubiquity of the chaperone suggests conservation of this Cu+-delivery mechanism and provides a unique snapshot into the evolution of a Cu+ distribution pathway. Finally, we also provide evidence for an interaction between PAA2, the Cu+-ATPase in thylakoids, and the Cu+-chaperone for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (CCS), uncovering a Cu+ network that has evolved to fine-tune Cu+ distribution.« less

  12. Calcyclin Binding Protein/Siah-1 Interacting Protein Is a Hsp90 Binding Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Agnieszka; Bieganowski, Paweł; Prus, Wiktor; Krzemień-Ojak, Łucja; Kądziołka, Beata; Fabczak, Hanna; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone activity is tightly regulated by interaction with many co-chaperones. Since CacyBP/SIP shares some sequence homology with a known Hsp90 co-chaperone, Sgt1, in this work we performed a set of experiments in order to verify whether CacyBP/SIP can interact with Hsp90. By applying the immunoprecipitation assay we have found that CacyBP/SIP binds to Hsp90 and that the middle (M) domain of Hsp90 is responsible for this binding. Furthermore, the proximity ligation assay (PLA) performed on HEp-2 cells has shown that the CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 complexes are mainly localized in the cytoplasm of these cells. Using purified proteins and applying an ELISA we have shown that Hsp90 interacts directly with CacyBP/SIP and that the latter protein does not compete with Sgt1 for the binding to Hsp90. Moreover, inhibitors of Hsp90 do not perturb CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 binding. Luciferase renaturation assay and citrate synthase aggregation assay with the use of recombinant proteins have revealed that CacyBP/SIP exhibits chaperone properties. Also, CacyBP/SIP-3xFLAG expression in HEp-2 cells results in the appearance of more basic Hsp90 forms in 2D electrophoresis, which may indicate that CacyBP/SIP dephosphorylates Hsp90. Altogether, the obtained results suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery. PMID:27249023

  13. Characteristics analysis of the luzA gene encoding chaperone from Photobacterium leiognathi related to bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Lin, B J; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1998-03-27

    Nucleotide sequence of the luzA gene (GenBank accession No. AF039303) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 (NCIMB 2193) has been determined, and the chaperone encoded by the luzA gene was deduced. The LuzA chaperone has a calculated M(r) 26,295 and comprises 230 amino acid residues; the hydrophobic alpha-helix N-terminal 21 amino acid residues MKKTIFALLFMSVFI SYPSFA is the leader peptide, therefore the matured LuzA chaperone has a calculated M(r) 23,871 and comprises 209 amino acid residues only. The periplasmic LuzA chaperone is the protein concerned with the protein folding, assembly and stability. The luzA gene and the related genes are closely linked to the sod gene, that encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase enables to enhance bioluminescence of the lux operon; the gene order of the luzA gene and related genes is -ufo'-luzA-ufoI-ufoII-ter->-R&R'-sod-ufo-- >. In trans complementation bioluminoassays in vivo elicit that the LuzA chaperone might be not directly concerned with bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi in E. coli, but might enable to stabilize the proteins related to bioluminescence. The unidentified ufoII gene closely linked to the luzA gene is able to enhance bioluminescence.

  14. Is Catalytic Activity of Chaperones a Selectable Trait for the Emergence of Heat Shock Response?

    PubMed Central

    Çetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2015-01-01

    Although heat shock response is ubiquitous in bacterial cells, the underlying physical chemistry behind heat shock response remains poorly understood. To study the response of cell populations to heat shock we employ a physics-based ab initio model of living cells where protein biophysics (i.e., folding and protein-protein interactions in crowded cellular environments) and important aspects of proteins homeostasis are coupled with realistic population dynamics simulations. By postulating a genotype-phenotype relationship we define a cell division rate in terms of functional concentrations of proteins and protein complexes, whose Boltzmann stabilities of folding and strengths of their functional interactions are exactly evaluated from their sequence information. We compare and contrast evolutionary dynamics for two models of chaperon action. In the active model, foldase chaperones function as nonequilibrium machines to accelerate the rate of protein folding. In the passive model, holdase chaperones form reversible complexes with proteins in their misfolded conformations to maintain their solubility. We find that only cells expressing foldase chaperones are capable of genuine heat shock response to the increase in the amount of unfolded proteins at elevated temperatures. In response to heat shock, cells’ limited resources are redistributed differently for active and passive models. For the active model, foldase chaperones are overexpressed at the expense of downregulation of high abundance proteins, whereas for the passive model; cells react to heat shock by downregulating their high abundance proteins, as their low abundance proteins are upregulated. PMID:25606691

  15. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes.

    PubMed

    Requena, Jose M; Montalvo, Ana M; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges) for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis.

  16. Recognition and targeting mechanisms by chaperones in flagellum assembly and operation.

    PubMed

    Khanra, Nandish; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G

    2016-08-30

    The flagellum is a complex bacterial nanomachine that requires the proper assembly of several different proteins for its function. Dedicated chaperones are central in preventing aggregation or undesired interactions of flagellar proteins, including their targeting to the export gate. FliT is a key flagellar chaperone that binds to several flagellar proteins in the cytoplasm, including its cognate filament-capping protein FliD. We have determined the solution structure of the FliT chaperone in the free state and in complex with FliD and the flagellar ATPase FliI. FliT adopts a four-helix bundle and uses a hydrophobic surface formed by the first three helices to recognize its substrate proteins. We show that the fourth helix constitutes the binding site for FlhA, a membrane protein at the export gate. In the absence of a substrate protein FliT adopts an autoinhibited structure wherein both the binding sites for substrates and FlhA are occluded. Substrate binding to FliT activates the complex for FlhA binding and thus targeting of the chaperone-substrate complex to the export gate. The activation and targeting mechanisms reported for FliT appear to be shared among the other flagellar chaperones.

  17. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme.

  18. Effect of hesperetin on chaperone activity in selenite-induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Mikako; Tamura, Hiroomi; Takehana, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background. Chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the lens works to prevent protein aggregation and is important to maintain the lens transparency. This study evaluated the effect of hesperetin on lens chaperone activity in selenite-induced cataracts. Methodology. Thirteen-day-old rats were divided into four groups. Animals were given hesperetin (groups G2 and G4) or vehicle (G1 and G3) on Days 0, 1, and 2. Rats in G3 and G4 were administered selenite subcutaneously 4 hours after the first hesperetin injection. On Days 2, 4, and 6, cataract grades were evaluated using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The amount of a-crystallin and chaperone activity in water-soluble fraction were measured after animals sacrificed. Results. G3 on day 4 had developed significant cataract, as an average cataract grading of 4.6 ± 0.2. In contrast, G4 had less severe central opacities and lower stage cataracts than G3, as an average cataract grading of 2.4 ± 0.4. The a-crystallin levels in G3 lenses were lower than in G1, but the same as G4. Additionally, chaperone activity was weaker in G3 lenses than G1, but the same as in G4. Conclusions. Our results suggest that hesperetin can prevent the decreasing lens chaperone activity and a-crystallin water solubility by administered of selenite. PMID:28352791

  19. Functional adaptations of the bacterial chaperone trigger factor to extreme environmental temperatures.

    PubMed

    Godin-Roulling, Amandine; Schmidpeter, Philipp A M; Schmid, Franz X; Feller, Georges

    2015-07-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is the first molecular chaperone interacting cotranslationally with virtually all nascent polypeptides synthesized by the ribosome in bacteria. Thermal adaptation of chaperone function was investigated in TFs from the Antarctic psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, the mesophile Escherichia coli and the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. This series covers nearly all temperatures encountered by bacteria. Although structurally homologous, these TFs display strikingly distinct properties that are related to the bacterial environmental temperature. The hyperthermophilic TF strongly binds model proteins during their folding and protects them from heat-induced misfolding and aggregation. It decreases the folding rate and counteracts the fast folding rate imposed by high temperature. It also functions as a carrier of partially folded proteins for delivery to downstream chaperones ensuring final maturation. By contrast, the psychrophilic TF displays weak chaperone activities, showing that these functions are less important in cold conditions because protein folding, misfolding and aggregation are slowed down at low temperature. It efficiently catalyses prolyl isomerization at low temperature as a result of its increased cellular concentration rather than from an improved activity. Some chaperone properties of the mesophilic TF possibly reflect its function as a cold shock protein in E. coli.

  20. Hsp72 chaperone function is dispensable for protection against stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Ari M.; Steel, Rohan

    2008-01-01

    In addition to its role as a molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects cells against a wide range of apoptosis inducing stresses. However, it is unclear if these two roles are functionally related or whether Hsp72 inhibits apoptosis by a mechanism independent of chaperone activity. The N-terminal adenosine triphosphatase domain, substrate-binding domain and the C-terminal EEVD regulatory motif of Hsp72 are all essential for chaperone activity. In this study, we show that Hsp72 mutants with a functional substrate-binding domain but lacking chaperone activity retain their ability to protect cells against apoptosis induced by heat and tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, a deletion mutant lacking a functional substrate-binding domain has no protective capacity. The ability of the Hsp72 substrate-binding domain to inhibit apoptosis independent of the regulatory effects of the adenosine triphosphate-binding domain indicates that the inhibition of apoptosis may involve a stable binding interaction with a regulatory substrate rather than Hsp72 chaperone activity. PMID:18819021

  1. Engineering and Evolution of Molecular Chaperones and Protein Disaggregases with Enhanced Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Korrie L.; Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved a sophisticated proteostasis network to ensure that proteins acquire and retain their native structure and function. Critical components of this network include molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases, which function to prevent and reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, proteostasis networks have limits, which when exceeded can have fatal consequences as in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A promising strategy is to engineer proteostasis networks to counter challenges presented by specific diseases or specific proteins. Here, we review efforts to enhance the activity of individual molecular chaperones or protein disaggregases via engineering and directed evolution. Remarkably, enhanced global activity or altered substrate specificity of various molecular chaperones, including GroEL, Hsp70, ClpX, and Spy, can be achieved by minor changes in primary sequence and often a single missense mutation. Likewise, small changes in the primary sequence of Hsp104 yield potentiated protein disaggregases that reverse the aggregation and buffer toxicity of various neurodegenerative disease proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43, and FUS. Collectively, these advances have revealed key mechanistic and functional insights into chaperone and disaggregase biology. They also suggest that enhanced chaperones and disaggregases could have important applications in treating human disease as well as in the purification of valuable proteins in the pharmaceutical sector. PMID:27014702

  2. Is catalytic activity of chaperones a selectable trait for the emergence of heat shock response?

    PubMed

    Çetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-01-20

    Although heat shock response is ubiquitous in bacterial cells, the underlying physical chemistry behind heat shock response remains poorly understood. To study the response of cell populations to heat shock we employ a physics-based ab initio model of living cells where protein biophysics (i.e., folding and protein-protein interactions in crowded cellular environments) and important aspects of proteins homeostasis are coupled with realistic population dynamics simulations. By postulating a genotype-phenotype relationship we define a cell division rate in terms of functional concentrations of proteins and protein complexes, whose Boltzmann stabilities of folding and strengths of their functional interactions are exactly evaluated from their sequence information. We compare and contrast evolutionary dynamics for two models of chaperon action. In the active model, foldase chaperones function as nonequilibrium machines to accelerate the rate of protein folding. In the passive model, holdase chaperones form reversible complexes with proteins in their misfolded conformations to maintain their solubility. We find that only cells expressing foldase chaperones are capable of genuine heat shock response to the increase in the amount of unfolded proteins at elevated temperatures. In response to heat shock, cells' limited resources are redistributed differently for active and passive models. For the active model, foldase chaperones are overexpressed at the expense of downregulation of high abundance proteins, whereas for the passive model; cells react to heat shock by downregulating their high abundance proteins, as their low abundance proteins are upregulated.

  3. Direct Metal Transfer Between Periplasmic Proteins Identifies a Bacterial Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Bagai, I.; Rensing, C.; Blackburn, N.; McEvoy, M.M.

    2009-05-11

    Transition metals require exquisite handling within cells to ensure that cells are not harmed by an excess of free metal species. In Gram-negative bacteria, copper is required in only small amounts in the periplasm, not in the cytoplasm, so a key aspect of protection under excess metal conditions is to export copper from the periplasm. Additional protection could be conferred by a periplasmic chaperone to limit the free metal species prior to export. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we have demonstrated that two periplasmic proteins, CusF and CusB, of the Escherichia coli Cu(I)/Ag(I) efflux system undergo a metal-dependent interaction. Through the development of a novel X-ray absorption spectroscopy approach using selenomethionine labeling to distinguish the metal sites of the two proteins, we have demonstrated transfer of Cu(I) occurs between CusF and CusB. The interaction between these proteins is highly specific, as a homologue of CusF with a 51% identical sequence and a similar affinity for metal, did not function in metal transfer. These experiments establish a metallochaperone activity for CusF in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria, serving to protect the periplasm from metal-mediated damage.

  4. CSPα, a Molecular Co-chaperone Essential for Short and Long-Term Synaptic Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ortega, Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Tabares, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine string protein α (CSPα) is a vesicle protein located in the presynaptic terminal of most synapses. CSPα is an essential molecular co-chaperone that facilitates the correct folding of proteins and the assembly of the exocytic machinery. The absence of this protein leads to altered neurotransmitter release and neurodegeneration in multiple model systems, from flies to mice. In humans, CSPα mutations are associated with the development of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by intracellular accumulation of lysosomal material. Here, we review the physiological role of CSPα and the pathology resulting from the homozygous deletion of the gene or its mutations. In addition, we investigate whether long-term moderate reduction of the protein produces motor dysfunction. We found that 1-year-old CSPα heterozygous mice display a reduced ability to sustain motor unit recruitment during repetitive stimulation, which indicates that physiological levels of CSPα are required for normal neuromuscular responses in mice and, likely, in humans. PMID:28239331

  5. Type III chaperones & Co in bacterial plant pathogens: a set of specialized bodyguards mediating effector delivery.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Lonjon, Fabien; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2013-11-22

    Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria possess a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject bacterial proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), into host cells through a specialized syringe structure. T3Es are virulence factors that can suppress plant immunity but they can also conversely be recognized by the plant and trigger specific resistance mechanisms. The T3SS and injected T3Es play a central role in determining the outcome of a host-pathogen interaction. Still little is known in plant pathogens on the assembly of the T3SS and the regulatory mechanisms involved in the temporal control of its biosynthesis and T3E translocation. However, recent insights point out the role of several proteins as prime candidates in the role of regulators of the type III secretion (T3S) process. In this review we report on the most recent advances on the regulation of the T3S by focusing on protein players involved in secretion/translocation regulations, including type III chaperones (T3Cs), type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) proteins and other T3S orchestrators.

  6. The primary transcriptome of Neisseria meningitidis and its interaction with the RNA chaperone Hfq.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Nadja; Bauriedl, Saskia; Barquist, Lars; Li, Lei; Schoen, Christoph; Vogel, Jörg

    2017-03-17

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human commensal that can also cause life-threatening meningitis and septicemia. Despite growing evidence for RNA-based regulation in meningococci, their transcriptome structure and output of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) are incompletely understood. Using dRNA-seq, we have mapped at single-nucleotide resolution the primary transcriptome of N. meningitidis strain 8013. Annotation of 1625 transcriptional start sites defines transcription units for most protein-coding genes but also reveals a paucity of classical σ70-type promoters, suggesting the existence of activators that compensate for the lack of -35 consensus sequences in N. meningitidis. The transcriptome maps also reveal 65 candidate sRNAs, a third of which were validated by northern blot analysis. Immunoprecipitation with the RNA chaperone Hfq drafts an unexpectedly large post-transcriptional regulatory network in this organism, comprising 23 sRNAs and hundreds of potential mRNA targets. Based on this data, using a newly developed gfp reporter system we validate an Hfq-dependent mRNA repression of the putative colonization factor PrpB by the two trans-acting sRNAs RcoF1/2. Our genome-wide RNA compendium will allow for a better understanding of meningococcal transcriptome organization and riboregulation with implications for colonization of the human nasopharynx.

  7. Direct metal transfer between periplasmic proteins identifies a bacterial copper chaperone.

    PubMed

    Bagai, Ireena; Rensing, Christopher; Blackburn, Ninian J; McEvoy, Megan M

    2008-11-04

    Transition metals require exquisite handling within cells to ensure that cells are not harmed by an excess of free metal species. In gram-negative bacteria, copper is required in only small amounts in the periplasm, not in the cytoplasm, so a key aspect of protection under excess metal conditions is to export copper from the periplasm. Additional protection could be conferred by a periplasmic chaperone to limit the free metal species prior to export. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we have demonstrated that two periplasmic proteins, CusF and CusB, of the Escherichia coli Cu(I)/Ag(I) efflux system undergo a metal-dependent interaction. Through the development of a novel X-ray absorption spectroscopy approach using selenomethionine labeling to distinguish the metal sites of the two proteins, we have demonstrated transfer of Cu(I) occurs between CusF and CusB. The interaction between these proteins is highly specific, as a homologue of CusF with a 51% identical sequence and a similar affinity for metal, did not function in metal transfer. These experiments establish a metallochaperone activity for CusF in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria, serving to protect the periplasm from metal-mediated damage.

  8. Overlapping transport and chaperone-binding functions within a bacterial twin-arginine signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Grahl, Sabine; Maillard, Julien; Spronk, Chris A E M; Vuister, Geerten W; Sargent, Frank

    2012-03-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is a protein targeting system present in many prokaryotes. The physiological role of the Tat pathway is the transmembrane translocation of fully-folded proteins, which are targeted by N-terminal signal peptides bearing conserved SRRxFLK 'twin-arginine' amino acid motifs. In Escherichia coli the majority of Tat targeted proteins bind redox cofactors and it is important that only mature, cofactor-loaded precursors are presented for export. Cellular processes have been unearthed that sequence these events, for example the signal peptide of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) is bound by a cytoplasmic chaperone (NapD) that is thought to regulate assembly and export of the enzyme. In this work, genetic, biophysical and structural approaches were taken to dissect the interaction between NapD and the NapA signal peptide. A NapD binding epitope was identified towards the N-terminus of the signal peptide, which overlapped significantly with the twin-arginine targeting motif. NMR spectroscopy revealed that the signal peptide adopted a α-helical conformation when bound by NapD, and substitution of single residues within the NapA signal peptide was sufficient to disrupt the interaction. This work provides an increased level of understanding of signal peptide function on the bacterial Tat pathway.

  9. Global small RNA chaperone Hfq and regulatory small RNAs are important virulence regulators in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Quan; McNally, R Ryan; Sundin, George W

    2013-04-01

    Hfq is a global small RNA (sRNA) chaperone that interacts with Hfq-regulated sRNAs and functions in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this work, we identified Hfq to be a virulence regulator in the Gram-negative fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Deletion of hfq in E. amylovora Ea1189 significantly reduced bacterial virulence in both immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Analysis of virulence determinants in strain Ea1189Δhfq showed that Hfq exerts pleiotropic regulation of amylovoran exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation, motility, and the type III secretion system (T3SS). Further characterization of biofilm regulation by Hfq demonstrated that Hfq limits bacterial attachment to solid surfaces while promoting biofilm maturation. Characterization of T3SS regulation by Hfq revealed that Hfq positively regulates the translocation and secretion of the major type III effector DspE and negatively controls the secretion of the putative translocator HrpK and the type III effector Eop1. Lastly, 10 Hfq-regulated sRNAs were identified using a computational method, and two of these sRNAs, RprA and RyhA, were found to be required for the full virulence of E. amylovora.

  10. Inhibiting the HSP90 chaperone destabilizes macrophage migration inhibitory factor and thereby inhibits breast tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Ramona; Marchenko, Natalia D.; Holembowski, Lena; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter; Pesic, Marina; Zender, Lars; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) often becomes stabilized in human cancer cells. MIF can promote tumor cell survival, and elevated MIF protein correlates with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism facilitating MIF stabilization in tumors is not understood. We show that the tumor-activated HSP90 chaperone complex protects MIF from degradation. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 activity, or siRNA-mediated knockdown of HSP90 or HDAC6, destabilizes MIF in a variety of human cancer cells. The HSP90-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP mediates the ensuing proteasome-dependent MIF degradation. Cancer cells contain constitutive endogenous MIF–HSP90 complexes. siRNA-mediated MIF knockdown inhibits proliferation and triggers apoptosis of cultured human cancer cells, whereas HSP90 inhibitor-induced apoptosis is overridden by ectopic MIF expression. In the ErbB2 transgenic model of human HER2-positive breast cancer, genetic ablation of MIF delays tumor progression and prolongs overall survival of mice. Systemic treatment with the HSP90 inhibitor 17AAG reduces MIF expression and blocks growth of MIF-expressing, but not MIF-deficient, tumors. Together, these findings identify MIF as a novel HSP90 client and suggest that HSP90 inhibitors inhibit ErbB2-driven breast tumor growth at least in part by destabilizing MIF. PMID:22271573

  11. Pincher, a pinocytic chaperone for nerve growth factor/TrkA signaling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yufang; Akmentin, Wendy; Toledo-Aral, Juan Jose; Rosenbaum, Julie; Valdez, Gregorio; Cabot, John B.; Hilbush, Brian S.; Halegoua, Simon

    2002-01-01

    Acentral tenet of nerve growth factor (NGF) action that is poorly understood is its ability to mediate cytoplasmic signaling, through its receptor TrkA, that is initiated at the nerve terminal and conveyed to the soma. We identified an NGF-induced protein that we termed Pincher (pinocytic chaperone) that mediates endocytosis and trafficking of NGF and its receptor TrkA. In PC12 cells, overexpression of Pincher dramatically stimulated NGF-induced endocytosis of TrkA, unexpectedly at sites of clathrin-independent macropinocytosis within cell surface ruffles. Subsequently, a system of Pincher-containing tubules mediated the delivery of NGF/TrkA-containing vesicles to cytoplasmic accumulations. These vesicles selectively and persistently mediated TrkA-erk5 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. A dominant inhibitory mutant form of Pincher inhibited the NGF-induced endocytosis of TrkA, and selectively blocked TrkA-mediated cytoplasmic signaling of erk5, but not erk1/2, kinases. Our results indicate that Pincher mediates pinocytic endocytosis of functionally specialized NGF/TrkA endosomes with persistent signaling potential. PMID:12011113

  12. Restored mutant receptor:Corticoid binding in chaperone complexes by trimethylamine N-oxide

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron L.; Elam, W. Austin; Johnson, Betty H.; Khan, Shagufta H.; Kumar, Raj; Thompson, E. Brad

    2017-01-01

    Without a glucocorticoid (GC) ligand, the transcription factor glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is largely cytoplasmic, with its GC-binding domain held in high affinity conformation by a cluster of chaperones. Binding a GC causes serial dis- and re-associations with chaperones, translocation of the GR to the nucleus, where it binds to DNA sites and associates with coregulatory proteins and basic transcription complexes. Herein, we describe the effects of a potent protective osmolyte, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), on a conditions-dependent “activation-labile” mutant GR (GRact/l), which under GR-activating conditions cannot bind GCs in cells or in cell cytosols. In both cells and cytosols, TMAO restores binding to GRact/l by stabilizing it in complex with chaperones. Cells bathed in much lower concentrations of TMAO than those required in vitro show restoration of GC binding, presumably due to intracellular molecular crowding effects. PMID:28301576

  13. Crystal structure of archaeal homolog of proteasome-assembly chaperone PbaA.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Arunima; Satoh, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masato; Kato, Koichi

    2014-10-24

    Formation of the eukaryotic proteasome is not a spontaneous process but a highly ordered process assisted by several assembly chaperones. In contrast, archaeal proteasome subunits can spontaneously assemble into an active form. Recent bioinformatic analysis identified the proteasome-assembly chaperone-like proteins, PbaA and PbaB, in archaea. Our previous study showed that the PbaB homotetramer functions as a proteasome activator through its tentacle-like C-terminal segments. However, a functional role of the other homolog PbaA has remained elusive. Here we determined the 2.25-Å resolution structure of PbaA, illustrating its disparate tertiary and quaternary structures compared with PbaB. PbaA forms a homopentamer in which the C-terminal segments, with a putative proteasome-activating motif, are packed against the core. These findings offer deeper insights into the molecular evolution relationships between the proteasome-assembly chaperones and the proteasome activators.

  14. Structural Basis for Protein anti-Aggregation Activity of the Trigger Factor Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Saio, Tomohide; Guan, Xiao; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones prevent aggregation and misfolding of proteins but scarcity of structural data has impeded an understanding of the recognition and anti-aggregation mechanisms. Here we report the solution structure, dynamics and energetics of three Trigger Factor (TF) chaperone molecules in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) captured in the unfolded state. Our data show that TF uses multiple sites to bind to several regions of the PhoA substrate protein primarily through hydrophobic contacts. NMR relaxation experiments show that TF interacts with PhoA in a highly dynamic fashion but as the number and length of the PhoA regions engaged by TF increases, a more stable complex gradually emerges. Multivalent binding keeps the substrate protein in an extended, unfolded conformation. The results show how molecular chaperones recognize unfolded polypeptides and how by acting as unfoldases and holdases prevent the aggregation and premature (mis)folding of unfolded proteins. PMID:24812405

  15. Acetylation of αA-crystallin in the human lens: Effects on structure and chaperone function

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Ram H.; Nahomi, Rooban B.; Shanthakumar, Shilpa; Linetsky, Mikhail; Padmanabha, Smitha; Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Wang, Benlian; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Panda, Alok Kumar; Biswas, Ashis

    2011-01-01

    α-Crystallin is a major protein in the human lens that is perceived to help to maintain the transparency of the lens through its chaperone function. In this study, we demonstrate that many lens proteins including αA-crystallin are acetylated in vivo. We found that K70 and K99 in αA-crystallin and, K92 and K166 in αB-crystallin are acetylated in the human lens.To determine the effect of acetylation on the chaperone function and structural changes, αA-crystallin was acetylated using acetic anhydride. The resulting protein showed strong immunoreactivity against a Nε-acetyllysine antibody, which was directly related to the degree of acetylation. When compared to the unmodified protein, the chaperone function of the in vitro acetylated αA-crystallin was higher against three of the four different client proteins tested. Because a lysine (residue 70; K70) in αA-crystallin is acetylated in vivo, we generated a protein with an acetylation mimic, replacing Lys70 with glutamine (K70Q). The K70Q mutant protein showed increased chaperone function against three client proteins compared to the Wt protein but decreased chaperone function against γ-crystallin. The acetylated protein displayed higher surface hydrophobicity and tryptophan fluorescence, had altered secondary and tertiary structures and displayed decreased thermodynamic stability. Together, our data suggest that acetylation of αA-crystallin occurs in the human lens and that it could affect the chaperone function of αA-crystallin. PMID:22120592

  16. Quantification of interaction strengths between chaperones and tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Regina; Soll, Jürgen; Jung, Kirsten; Heermann, Ralf; Schwenkert, Serena

    2013-10-18

    The three tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing docking proteins Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 reside in the chloroplast, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. They are suggested to act during post-translational protein import by association with chaperone-bound preprotein complexes. Here, we performed a detailed biochemical, biophysical, and computational analysis of the interaction between Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 and the five cytosolic chaperones HSP70.1, HSP90.1, HSP90.2, HSP90.3, and HSP90.4. We used surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy in combination with Interaction Map® analysis to distinguish between chaperone oligomerization and docking protein-chaperone interactions and to calculate binding affinities for all tested interactions. Complementary to this, we applied pulldown assays as well as microscale thermophoresis as surface immobilization independent techniques. The data revealed that OM64 prefers HSP70 over HSP90, whereas Toc64 binds all chaperones with comparable affinities. We could further show that AtTPR7 is able to bind HSP90 in addition to HSP70. Moreover, differences between the HSP90 isoforms were detected and revealed a weaker binding for HSP90.1 to AtTPR7 and OM64, showing that slight differences in the amino acid composition or structure of the chaperones influence binding to the tetratricopeptide repeat domain. The combinatory approach of several methods provided a powerful toolkit to determine binding affinities of similar interaction partners in a highly quantitative manner.

  17. Copy-choice recombination by reverse transcriptases: Reshuffling of genetic markers mediated by RNA chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Matteo; Buc, Henri

    2000-01-01

    Copy-choice recombination efficiently reshuffles genetic markers in retroviruses. In vivo, the folding of the genomic RNA is controlled by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). We show that binding of NC onto the acceptor RNA molecule is sufficient to enhance recombination, providing evidence for a mechanism where the structure of the acceptor template determines the template switch. NC as well as another RNA chaperone (StpA) converts recombination into a widespread process no longer restricted to rare hot spots, an effect maximized when both the NC and the reverse transcriptase come from HIV-1. These data suggest that RNA chaperones confer a higher genetic flexibility to retroviruses. PMID:10829081

  18. Quantifying the role of chaperones in protein translocation by computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Assenza, Salvatore; De Los Rios, Paolo; Barducci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp70 plays a central role in the import of cytoplasmic proteins into organelles, driving their translocation by binding them from the organellar interior. Starting from the experimentally-determined structure of the E. coli Hsp70, we computed, by means of molecular simulations, the effective free-energy profile for substrate translocation upon chaperone binding. We then used the resulting free energy to quantitatively characterize the kinetics of the import process, whose comparison with unassisted translocation highlights the essential role played by Hsp70 in importing cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:25988176

  19. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  20. The histone chaperones Nap1 and Vps75 bind histones H3 and H4 in a tetrameric conformation.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew; Ward, Richard; Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; El-Mkami, Hassane; Norman, David George; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2011-02-18

    Histone chaperones physically interact with histones to direct proper assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes regulating diverse nuclear processes such as DNA replication, promoter remodeling, transcription elongation, DNA damage, and histone variant exchange. Currently, the best-characterized chaperone-histone interaction is that between the ubiquitous chaperone Asf1 and a dimer of H3 and H4. Nucleosome assembly proteins (Nap proteins) represent a distinct class of histone chaperone. Using pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) measurements and protein crosslinking, we show that two members of this class, Nap1 and Vps75, bind histones in the tetrameric conformation also observed when they are sequestered within the nucleosome. Furthermore, H3 and H4 trapped in their tetrameric state can be used as substrates in nucleosome assembly and chaperone-mediated lysine acetylation. This alternate mode of histone interaction provides a potential means of maintaining the integrity of the histone tetramer during cycles of nucleosome reassembly.

  1. Gene cloning and soluble expression of Aspergillus niger phytase in E. coli cytosol via chaperone co-expression.

    PubMed

    Ushasree, Mrudula Vasudevan; Vidya, Jalaja; Pandey, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    A phytase gene from Aspergillus niger was isolated and two Escherichia coli expression systems, based on T7 RNA polymerase promoter and tac promoter, were used for its recombinant expression. Co-expression of molecular chaperone, GroES/EL, aided functional cytosolic expression of the phytase in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Untagged and maltose-binding protein-tagged recombinant phytase showed an activity band of ~49 and 92 kDa, respectively, on a zymogram. Heterologously-expressed phytase was fractionated from endogenous E. coli phytase by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. The enzyme had optimum activity at 50 °C and pH 6.5.

  2. A [Cu]rious Ribosomal Profiling Pattern Leads to the Discovery of Ribosomal Frameshifting in the Synthesis of a Copper Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Baranov, Pavel V

    2017-01-19

    In many bacteria, separate genes encode a copper binding chaperone and a copper efflux pump, but in some the chaperone encoding gene has been elusive. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Meydan et al. (2017) report that ribosomes translating the ORF that encodes the copper pump frequently frameshift and terminate to produce the copper chaperone.

  3. Protein aggregation can inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis by chaperone competition

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Anan; Shibata, Yoko; Shah, Bijal; Calamini, Barbara; Lo, Donald C.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Protein conformational diseases exhibit complex pathologies linked to numerous molecular defects. Aggregation of a disease-associated protein causes the misfolding and aggregation of other proteins, but how this interferes with diverse cellular pathways is unclear. Here, we show that aggregation of neurodegenerative disease-related proteins (polyglutamine, huntingtin, ataxin-1, and superoxide dismutase-1) inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in mammalian cells by aggregate-driven sequestration of the major molecular chaperone heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is required to drive multiple steps of CME. CME suppression was also phenocopied by HSC70 RNAi depletion and could be restored by conditionally increasing HSC70 abundance. Aggregation caused dysregulated AMPA receptor internalization and also inhibited CME in primary neurons expressing mutant huntingtin, showing direct relevance of our findings to the pathology in neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that aggregate-associated chaperone competition leads to both gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes as chaperones become functionally depleted from multiple clients, leading to the decline of multiple cellular processes. The inherent properties of chaperones place them at risk, contributing to the complex pathologies of protein conformational diseases. PMID:24706768

  4. Plant Leucine Aminopeptidases Moonlight as Molecular Chaperones to Alleviate Stress-induced Damage*

    PubMed Central

    Scranton, Melissa A.; Yee, Ashley; Park, Sang-Youl; Walling, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are present in animals, plants, and microbes. In plants, there are two classes of LAPs. The neutral LAPs (LAP-N and its orthologs) are constitutively expressed and detected in all plants, whereas the stress-induced acidic LAPs (LAP-A) are expressed only in a subset of the Solanaceae. LAPs have a role in insect defense and act as a regulator of the late branch of wound signaling in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). Although the mechanism of LAP-A action is unknown, it has been presumed that LAP peptidase activity is essential for regulating wound signaling. Here we show that plant LAPs are bifunctional. Using three assays to monitor protein protection from heat-induced damage, it was shown that the tomato LAP-A and LAP-N and the Arabidopsis thaliana LAP1 and LAP2 are molecular chaperones. Assays using LAP-A catalytic site mutants demonstrated that LAP-A chaperone activity was independent of its peptidase activity. Furthermore, disruption of the LAP-A hexameric structure increased chaperone activity. Together, these data identify a new class of molecular chaperones and a new function for the plant LAPs as well as suggesting new mechanisms for LAP action in the defense of solanaceous plants against stress. PMID:22493451

  5. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  6. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  7. Chaperone Activity of Small Heat Shock Proteins Underlies Therapeutic Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis*

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Brownell, Sara E.; Su, Leon; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Dolganov, Gregory; Chopra, Sidharth; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Webster, Jonathan; Ousman, Shalina S.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic activity of αB crystallin, small heat shock protein B5 (HspB5), was shared with other human sHsps, a set of seven human family members, a mutant of HspB5 G120 known to exhibit reduced chaperone activity, and a mycobacterial sHsp were expressed and purified from bacteria. Each of the recombinant proteins was shown to be a functional chaperone, capable of inhibiting aggregation of denatured insulin with varying efficiency. When injected into mice at the peak of disease, they were all effective in reducing the paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional structure activity correlations between chaperone activity and therapeutic function were established when linear regions within HspB5 were examined. A single region, corresponding to residues 73–92 of HspB5, forms amyloid fibrils, exhibited chaperone activity, and was an effective therapeutic for encephalomyelitis. The linkage of the three activities was further established by demonstrating individual substitutions of critical hydrophobic amino acids in the peptide resulted in the loss of all of the functions. PMID:22955287

  8. Chaperone-driven polymer translocation through nanopore: Spatial distribution and binding energy.

    PubMed

    Abdolvahab, Rouhollah Haji

    2017-04-01

    Chaperones are binding proteins working as a driving force in biopolymer translocation. They bind to the biopolymer near the pore and prevent its backsliding. Chaperones may have different spatial distributions. Recently, we showed the importance of their spatial distribution in translocation and its effects on the sequence dependency of the translocation time. Here we focus on homopolymers and exponential distribution. Because of the exponential distribution of chaperones, the energy dependency of the translocation time will change. Here we find a minimum in translocation time versus binding effective energy (EBE) curve. The same trend can be seen in the scaling exponent of time versus polymer length, [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), when plotted against EBE. Interestingly in some special cases, e.g. chaperones of size [Formula: see text] and with an exponential distribution rate of [Formula: see text], the minimum even reaches to an amount of less than 1 ([Formula: see text]). We explain the possibility of this rare result. Moreover, based on a theoretical discussion we show that, by taking into account the velocity dependency of the translocation on polymer length, one can truly predict the value of this minimum.

  9. A conserved co-chaperone is required for virulence in fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Libera; López Díaz, Cristina; Turrà, David; Di Pietro, Antonio; Hampel, Martin; Heimel, Kai; Kahmann, Regine

    2016-02-01

    The maize pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis experiences endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress during plant colonization and relies on the unfolded protein response (UPR) to cope with this stress. We identified the U. maydis co-chaperone, designated Dnj1, as part of this conserved cellular response to ER stress. ∆dnj1 cells are sensitive to the ER stressor tunicamycin and display a severe virulence defect in maize infection assays. A dnj1 mutant allele unable to stimulate the ATPase activity of chaperones phenocopies the null allele. A Dnj1-mCherry fusion protein localizes in the ER and interacts with the luminal chaperone Bip1. The Fusarium oxysporum Dnj1 ortholog contributes to the virulence of this fungal pathogen in tomato plants. Unlike the human ortholog, F. oxysporum Dnj1 partially rescues the virulence defect of the Ustilago dnj1 mutant. By enabling the fungus to restore ER homeostasis and maintain a high secretory activity, Dnj1 contributes to the establishment of a compatible interaction with the host. Dnj1 orthologs are present in many filamentous fungi, but are absent in budding and fission yeasts. We postulate a conserved and essential role during virulence for this class of co-chaperones.

  10. Integrity of N- and C-termini is important for E. coli Hsp31 chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Sastry, M S R; Zhou, Weibin; Baneyx, François

    2009-07-01

    Hsp31 is a stress-inducible molecular chaperone involved in the management of protein misfolding at high temperatures and in the development of acid resistance in starved E. coli. Each subunit of the Hsp31 homodimer consists of two structural domains connected by a flexible linker that sits atop a continuous tract of nonpolar residues adjacent to a hydrophobic bowl defined by the dimerization interface. Previously, we proposed that while the bowl serves as a binding site for partially folded species at physiological temperatures, chaperone function under heat shock conditions requires that folding intermediates further anneal to high-affinity binding sites that become uncovered upon thermally induced motion of the linker. In support of a mechanism requiring that client proteins first bind to the bowl, we show here that fusion of a 20-residue-long hexahistidine tag to the N-termini of Hsp31 abolishes chaperone activity at all temperatures by inducing reversible structural changes that interfere with substrate binding. We further demonstrate that extending the C-termini of Hsp31 with short His tags selectively suppresses chaperone function at high temperatures by interfering with linker movement. The structural and functional sensitivity of Hsp31 to lengthening is consistent with the high degree of conservation of class I Hsp31 orthologs and will serve as a cautionary tale on the implications of affinity tagging.

  11. The story of stolen chaperones: how overexpression of Q/N proteins cures yeast prions.

    PubMed

    Derkatch, Irina L; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-seeding alternate protein conformations. Most yeast prions contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich domains that promote the formation of amyloid-like prion aggregates. Chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, are required to continually break these aggregates into smaller "seeds." Decreasing aggregate size and increasing the number of growing aggregate ends facilitates both aggregate transmission and growth. Our previous work showed that overexpression of 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains facilitates the de novo aggregation of Sup35 into the [PSI(+)] prion, presumably by a cross-seeding mechanism. We now discuss our recent paper, in which we showed that overexpression of most of these same 11 Q/N-rich proteins, including Pin4C and Cyc8, destabilized pre-existing Q/N rich prions. Overexpression of both Pin4C and Cyc8 caused [PSI(+)] aggregates to enlarge. This is incompatible with a previously proposed "capping" model where the overexpressed Q/N-rich protein poisons, or "caps," the growing aggregate ends. Rather the data match what is expected of a reduction in prion severing by chaperones. Indeed, while Pin4C overexpression does not alter chaperone levels, Pin4C aggregates sequester chaperones away from the prion aggregates. Cyc8 overexpression cures [PSI(+)] by inducing an increase in Hsp104 levels, as excess Hsp104 binds to [PSI(+)] aggregates in a way that blocks their shearing.

  12. Histone chaperone activity of Arabidopsis thaliana NRP1 is blocked by cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Rivero-Rodríguez, Francisco; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2016-12-06

    Higher-order plants and mammals use similar mechanisms to repair and tolerate oxidative DNA damage. Most studies on the DNA repair process have focused on yeast and mammals, in which histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome disassembly/reassembly is essential for DNA to be accessible to repair machinery. However, little is known about the specific role and modulation of histone chaperones in the context of DNA damage in plants. Here, the histone chaperone NRP1, which is closely related to human SET/TAF-Iβ, was found to exhibit nucleosome assembly activity in vitro and to accumulate in the chromatin of Arabidopsis thaliana after DNA breaks. In addition, this work establishes that NRP1 binds to cytochrome c, thereby preventing the former from binding to histones. Since NRP1 interacts with cytochrome c at its earmuff domain, that is, its histone-binding domain, cytochrome c thus competes with core histones and hampers the activity of NRP1 as a histone chaperone. Altogether, the results obtained indicate that the underlying molecular mechanisms in nucleosome disassembly/reassembly are highly conserved throughout evolution, as inferred from the similar inhibition of plant NRP1 and human SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c during DNA damage response.

  13. The chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on Gaucher cells and normal mice.

    PubMed

    Luan, Zhuo; Li, Linjing; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Kousaku

    2013-04-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), caused by a defect of acid β-glucosidase (β-Glu), is one of the most common sphingolipidoses. Recently, ambroxol, an FDA-approved drug used to treat airway mucus hypersecretion and hyaline membrane disease in newborns, was identified as a chemical chaperone for GD. In the present study, we investigated the chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on both cultured GD patient cells and normal mice. We found that ambroxol treatment significantly increased N370S, F213I, N188S/G193W and R120W mutant β-Glu activities in GD fibroblasts with low cytotoxicity. Additionally, we measured the β-Glu activity in the tissues of normal mice which received water containing increasing concentrations of ambroxol ad libitum for one week. No serious adverse effect was observed during this experiment. Ambroxol significantly increased the β-Glu activity in the spleen, heart and cerebellum of the mice. This result showed its oral availability and wide distribution and chaperone activity in the tissues, including the brain, and its lack of acute toxicity. These characteristics of ambroxol would make it a potential therapeutic chaperone in the treatment of GD with neurological manifestations.

  14. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  15. Recognition and targeting mechanisms by chaperones in flagellum assembly and operation

    PubMed Central

    Khanra, Nandish; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-01-01

    The flagellum is a complex bacterial nanomachine that requires the proper assembly of several different proteins for its function. Dedicated chaperones are central in preventing aggregation or undesired interactions of flagellar proteins, including their targeting to the export gate. FliT is a key flagellar chaperone that binds to several flagellar proteins in the cytoplasm, including its cognate filament-capping protein FliD. We have determined the solution structure of the FliT chaperone in the free state and in complex with FliD and the flagellar ATPase FliI. FliT adopts a four-helix bundle and uses a hydrophobic surface formed by the first three helices to recognize its substrate proteins. We show that the fourth helix constitutes the binding site for FlhA, a membrane protein at the export gate. In the absence of a substrate protein FliT adopts an autoinhibited structure wherein both the binding sites for substrates and FlhA are occluded. Substrate binding to FliT activates the complex for FlhA binding and thus targeting of the chaperone–substrate complex to the export gate. The activation and targeting mechanisms reported for FliT appear to be shared among the other flagellar chaperones. PMID:27528687

  16. Plant leucine aminopeptidases moonlight as molecular chaperones to alleviate stress-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Melissa A; Yee, Ashley; Park, Sang-Youl; Walling, Linda L

    2012-05-25

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are present in animals, plants, and microbes. In plants, there are two classes of LAPs. The neutral LAPs (LAP-N and its orthologs) are constitutively expressed and detected in all plants, whereas the stress-induced acidic LAPs (LAP-A) are expressed only in a subset of the Solanaceae. LAPs have a role in insect defense and act as a regulator of the late branch of wound signaling in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). Although the mechanism of LAP-A action is unknown, it has been presumed that LAP peptidase activity is essential for regulating wound signaling. Here we show that plant LAPs are bifunctional. Using three assays to monitor protein protection from heat-induced damage, it was shown that the tomato LAP-A and LAP-N and the Arabidopsis thaliana LAP1 and LAP2 are molecular chaperones. Assays using LAP-A catalytic site mutants demonstrated that LAP-A chaperone activity was independent of its peptidase activity. Furthermore, disruption of the LAP-A hexameric structure increased chaperone activity. Together, these data identify a new class of molecular chaperones and a new function for the plant LAPs as well as suggesting new mechanisms for LAP action in the defense of solanaceous plants against stress.

  17. Stimulation of Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer by a Novel Chaperone Synuclein Gamma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH- 04 -1-0569 TITLE: Stimulation of estrogen receptor...Stimulation of estrogen receptor signaling in breast cancer by a novel chaperone 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER synuclein gamma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH- 04 -1...UNIT NUMBER 7 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER North Shore University Hospital

  18. Dynamic control of Hsf1 during heat shock by a chaperone switch and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xu; Krakowiak, Joanna; Patel, Nikit; Beyzavi, Ali; Ezike, Jideofor; Khalil, Ahmad S; Pincus, David

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor (Hsf1) regulates the expression of molecular chaperones to maintain protein homeostasis. Despite its central role in stress resistance, disease and aging, the mechanisms that control Hsf1 activity remain unresolved. Here we show that in budding yeast, Hsf1 basally associates with the chaperone Hsp70 and this association is transiently disrupted by heat shock, providing the first evidence that a chaperone repressor directly regulates Hsf1 activity. We develop and experimentally validate a mathematical model of Hsf1 activation by heat shock in which unfolded proteins compete with Hsf1 for binding to Hsp70. Surprisingly, we find that Hsf1 phosphorylation, previously thought to be required for activation, in fact only positively tunes Hsf1 and does so without affecting Hsp70 binding. Our work reveals two uncoupled forms of regulation - an ON/OFF chaperone switch and a tunable phosphorylation gain - that allow Hsf1 to flexibly integrate signals from the proteostasis network and cell signaling pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18638.001 PMID:27831465

  19. Enhancing functional production of a chaperone-dependent lipase in Escherichia coli using the dual expression cassette plasmid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background The lipase subfamilies I.1 and I.2 show more than 33% homology in the amino acid sequences and most members share another common property that their genes are clustered with the secondary genes whose protein products are required for folding the lipase into an active conformation and secretion into the culture medium. In previous studies, the lipase (LipA) and its chaperone (LipB) from Ralstonia sp. M1 were overexpressed in E. coli and the lipase was successfully refolded in vitro. The purpose of this study was to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA from Ralstonia sp. M1 in the heterologous host E. coli without in vitro refolding process, using two-plasmid co-expression systems and dual expression cassette plasmid systems. Results To produce more active lipase from Ralstonia sp. M1 in E. coli without in vitro refolding process but with the help of overexpression of the chaperone (LipB1 and LipB3 corresponding to 56-aa truncated and 26-aa truncated chaperone LipB), six different expression systems including 2 two-plasmid co-expression systems (E. coli BL21/pELipABa + pELipB1k and BL21/pELipABa + pELipB3k) and 4 dual expression cassette plasmid systems (BL21/pELipAB-LipB1a, BL21/pELipAB-LipB3a, BL21/pELipA-LipB1a, and BL21/pELipA-LipB3a) were constructed. The two-plasmid co-expression systems (E. coli BL21/pELipABa + pELipB1k and BL21/pELipABa + pELipB3k) produced the active lipase at a level of 4 times as high as the single expression cassette plasmid system E. coli BL21/pELipABa did. For the first time, the dual expression cassette plasmid systems BL21/pELipAB-LipB1a and BL21/pELipAB-LipB3a yielded 29- and 19-fold production of the active lipase in comparison with the single expression cassette plasmid system E. coli BL21/pELipABa, respectively. Although the lipase amount was equally expressed in all these expression systems (40% of total cellular protein) and only a small fraction of the overexpressed lipase was folded in vivo

  20. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: emerging links between cardiovascular disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although it is known that the central nervous system (CNS) contributes to this relationship, the detailed mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperone sigma-1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of CVD and depression. Several meta-analysis studies have showed that levels of BDNF in the blood of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are lower than normal controls, indicating that blood BDNF might be a biomarker for depression. Furthermore, blood levels of BDNF in patients with CVD are also lower than normal controls. A recent study using conditional BDNF knock-out mice in animal models of myocardial infarction highlighted the role of CNS-mediated mechanisms in the cardioprotective effects of BDNF. In addition, a recent study shows that decreased levels of sigma-1 receptor in the mouse brain contribute to the association between heart failure and depression. Moreover, sigma-1 receptor agonists, including the endogenous neurosteroid dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine, show potent cardioprotective and antidepressive effects in rodents, via sigma-1 receptor stimulation. Interestingly, agonist activation of sigma-1 receptors increased the secretion of mature BDNF from its precursor proBDNF via chaperone activity in the ER. Given the role of ER stress in the pathophysiology of CVD and MDD, the author will discuss the potential link between sigma-1 receptors and BDNF-TrkB pathway in the pathophysiology of these two diseases. Finally, the author will make a case for potent sigma-1 receptor agonists and TrkB agonists as new potential therapeutic drugs for depressive patients with CVD.

  1. Chaperone roles for TMAO and HSP70 during hyposmotic stress in the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Robyn J; Tunnah, Louise; Barnett, David; Wright, Patricia A; MacCormack, Tyson; Currie, Suzanne

    2015-10-01

    Salinity decreases are experienced by many marine elasmobranchs. To understand how these fishes cope with hyposmotic stress on a cellular level, we used the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) as a model to test whether a reciprocal relationship exists between the cell's two primary protein protection mechanisms, the chemical (e.g., trimethylamine oxide, TMAO) and molecular (e.g., heat shock protein 70, HSP70) chaperone systems. This relationship is interesting given that many elasmobranchs are expected to gain water and lose osmolytes, chemical chaperones, and ions as they osmoconform to new, lowered salinity. Dogfish were cannulated for repeated blood sampling and exposed to 70% seawater (SW) for 48 h. These hyposmotic conditions had no effect on red blood cell (RBC) and white muscle TMAO concentrations, and did not result in HSP70 induction or signs of protein damage (i.e., increased ubiquitin), suggesting that TMAO levels were sufficiently protective in these tissues. However, in the gill, we observed a significant decrease in TMAO concentration and a significant induction of HSP70 as well as signs of protein damage. In the face of this cellular stress response, gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity significantly increased during hyposmotic conditions, as expected. We suggest that this functional preservation in the gill is partly the result of HSP70 induction with lowered salinity. We conclude a reciprocal relationship between TMAO and HSP70 in the gills of dogfish as a result of in vivo hyposmotic stress. When osmotically induced protein damage surpasses the protective capacity of remaining TMAO, HSP70 is induced to preserve tissue and organismal function.

  2. Species-specific activation of Cu/Zn SOD by its CCS copper chaperone in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Julie E.; Li, Cissy X; Odeh, Hana M.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast of important public health relevance. Virulence of C. albicans requires a copper and zinc containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1), but the biology of C. albicans SOD1 is poorly understood. To this end, C. albicans SOD1 activation was examined in baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), a eukaryotic expression system proven fruitful for the study of Cu/Zn SODs from invertebrates, plants and mammals. In spite of the 80% similarity between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans SOD1 molecules, C. albicans SOD1 is not active in S. cerevisiae. The SOD1 appears incapable of productive interactions with the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS1) of baker’s yeast. C. albicans SOD1 contains a proline at position 144 predicted to dictate dependence on CCS1. By mutating this proline, C. albicans SOD1 gained activity in baker’s yeast and this activity was independent of CCS1. We identified a putative CCS1 gene in C. albicans and created heterozygous and homozygous gene deletions at this locus. Loss of CCS1 resulted in loss of SOD1 activity, consistent with its role as a copper chaperone. C. albicans CCS1 also restored activity to C. albicans SOD1 expressed in baker’s yeast. C. albicans CCS1 is well adapted for activating its partner SOD1 from C. albicans, but not SOD1 from S. cerevisiae. In spite of the high degree of homology between the SOD1 and CCS1 molecules in these two fungal species, there exists a specie-specific barrier in CCS-SOD interactions which may reflect the vastly different lifestyles of the pathogenic versus non-infectious yeast. PMID:24043471

  3. Myopathy in Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome links endoplasmic reticulum chaperone dysfunction to nuclear envelope pathology.

    PubMed

    Roos, Andreas; Buchkremer, Stephan; Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Labisch, Thomas; Gatz, Christian; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Brauers, Eva; Nolte, Kay; Schröder, J Michael; Kirschner, Janbernd; Jesse, Christopher Marvin; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Goswami, Anand; Zimmermann, Richard; Zahedi, René Peiman; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) features cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, cataracts, and progressive vacuolar myopathy with peculiar myonuclear alterations. Most MSS patients carry homozygous or compound heterozygous SIL1 mutations. SIL1 is a nucleotide exchange factor for the endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperone BiP which controls a plethora of essential processes in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study we made use of the spontaneous Sil1 mouse mutant woozy to explore pathomechanisms leading to Sil1 deficiency-related skeletal muscle pathology. We found severe, progressive myopathy characterized by alterations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, mitochondrial changes, and prominent myonuclear pathology including nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina alterations. These abnormalities were remarkably similar to the myopathy in human patients with MSS. In particular, the presence of perinuclear membranous structures which have been reported as an ultrastructural hallmark of MSS-related myopathy could be confirmed in woozy muscles. We found that these structures are derived from the nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina and associate with proliferations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In line with impaired function of BiP secondary to loss of its nucleotide exchange factor Sil1, we observed activation of the unfolded protein response and the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation-pathway. Despite initiation of the autophagy-lysosomal system, autophagic clearance was found ineffective which is in agreement with the formation of autophagic vacuoles. This report identifies woozy muscle as a faithful phenocopy of the MSS myopathy. Moreover, we provide a link between two well-established disease mechanisms in skeletal muscle, dysfunction of chaperones and nuclear envelope pathology.

  4. Sequence and domain conservation of the coelacanth Hsp40 and Hsp90 chaperones suggests conservation of function.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Özlem Tastan; Edkins, Adrienne Lesley; Blatch, Gregory Lloyd

    2014-09-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones play an important role in preserving and regulating the active conformational state of cellular proteins. The chaperone complement of the Indonesian Coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis, was elucidated using transcriptomic sequences. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) chaperones, and associated co-chaperones were focused on, and homologous human sequences were used to search the sequence databases. Coelacanth homologs of the cytosolic, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of human Hsp90 were identified, as well as all of the major co-chaperones of the cytosolic isoform. Most of the human Hsp40s were found to have coelacanth homologs, and the data suggested that all of the chaperone machinery for protein folding at the ribosome, protein translocation to cellular compartments such as the ER and protein degradation were conserved. Some interesting similarities and differences were identified when interrogating human, mouse, and zebrafish homologs. For example, DnaJB13 is predicted to be a non-functional Hsp40 in humans, mouse, and zebrafish due to a corrupted histidine-proline-aspartic acid (HPD) motif, while the coelacanth homolog has an intact HPD. These and other comparisons enabled important functional and evolutionary questions to be posed for future experimental studies.

  5. Roles of histone chaperone CIA/Asf1 in nascent DNA elongation during nucleosome replication.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Katsuyuki; Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Tada, Shusuke; Natsume, Ryo; Kundu, Lena Rani; Nozaki, Naohito; Senda, Toshiya; Enomoto, Takemi; Horikoshi, Masami; Seki, Masayuki

    2011-10-01

    The nucleosome, which is composed of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, is a fundamental unit of chromatin and is duplicated during the eukaryotic DNA replication process. The evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone cell cycle gene 1 (CCG1) interacting factor A/anti-silencing function 1 (CIA/Asf1) is involved in histone transfer and nucleosome reassembly during DNA replication. CIA/Asf1 has been reported to split the histone (H3-H4)(2) tetramer into histone H3-H4 dimer(s) in vitro, raising a possibility that, in DNA replication, CIA/Asf1 is involved in nucleosome disassembly and the promotion of semi-conservative histone H3-H4 dimer deposition onto each daughter strand in vivo. Despite numerous studies on the functional roles of CIA/Asf1, its mechanistic role(s) remains elusive because of lack of biochemical analyses. The biochemical studies described here show that a V94R CIA/Asf1 mutant, which lacks histone (H3-H4)(2) tetramer splitting activity, does not form efficiently a quaternary complex with histones H3-H4 and the minichromosome maintenance 2 (Mcm2) subunit of the Mcm2-7 replicative DNA helicase. Interestingly, the mutant enhances nascent DNA strand synthesis in a cell-free chromosomal DNA replication system using Xenopus egg extracts. These results suggest that CIA/Asf1 in the CIA/Asf1-H3-H4-Mcm2 complex, which is considered to be an intermediate in histone transfer during DNA replication, negatively regulates the progression of the replication fork.

  6. Fluorescent-based evaluation of chaperone-mediated autophagy and microautophagy activities in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiro; Seki, Takahiro; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The autophagy-lysosome protein degradation is further classified into macroautophagy (MA), microautophagy (mA), and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). While MA is involved in various functions and disease pathogenesis, little is known about CMA and mA because of the absence of easy methods to assess their activities. We have recently established a method to assess CMA activity using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a CMA substrate, and HaloTag (HT) system. Another group has recently identified a mammalian mA pathway, in which substrates are delivered to late endosomes in an heat shock cognate protein (Hsc)70-dependent manner. Because Hsc70 is also involved in CMA, our method would detect both CMA and mA activities. In this study, we attempted to assess CMA and mA activities separately through the siRNA-mediated knockdown of CMA- and mA-related proteins. Knockdown of LAMP2A, a CMA-related protein, and TSG101, an mA-related protein, significantly but only partially decreased the punctate accumulation of GAPDH-HT in AD293 cells and primary cultured rat cortical neurons. Compounds that activate CMA significantly increased GAPDH-HT puncta in TSG101-knockdown cells, but not in LAMP2A-knockdown cells, suggesting that punctate accumulation of GAPDH-HT under LAMP2A- and TSG101-knockdown represents mA and CMA activities, respectively. We succeeded in establishing the method to separately evaluate CMA and mA activities by fluorescence observation.

  7. Molecular chaperoning function of Ric-8 is to fold nascent heterotrimeric G protein α subunits.

    PubMed

    Chan, Puiyee; Thomas, Celestine J; Sprang, Stephen R; Tall, Gregory G

    2013-03-05

    We have shown that resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (Ric-8) proteins regulate an early step of heterotrimeric G protein α (Gα) subunit biosynthesis. Here, mammalian and plant cell-free translation systems were used to study Ric-8A action during Gα subunit translation and protein folding. Gα translation rates and overall produced protein amounts were equivalent in mock and Ric-8A-immunodepleted rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL). GDP-AlF4(-)-bound Gαi, Gαq, Gα13, and Gαs produced in mock-depleted RRL had characteristic resistance to limited trypsinolysis, showing that these G proteins were folded properly. Gαi, Gαq, and Gα13, but not Gαs produced from Ric-8A-depleted RRL were not protected from trypsinization and therefore not folded correctly. Addition of recombinant Ric-8A to the Ric-8A-depleted RRL enhanced GDP-AlF4(-)-bound Gα subunit trypsin protection. Dramatic results were obtained in wheat germ extract (WGE) that has no endogenous Ric-8 component. WGE-translated Gαq was gel filtered and found to be an aggregate. Ric-8A supplementation of WGE allowed production of Gαq that gel filtered as a ∼100 kDa Ric-8A:Gαq heterodimer. Addition of GTPγS to Ric-8A-supplemented WGE Gαq translation resulted in dissociation of the Ric-8A:Gαq heterodimer and production of functional Gαq-GTPγS monomer. Excess Gβγ supplementation of WGE did not support functional Gαq production. The molecular chaperoning function of Ric-8 is to participate in the folding of nascent G protein α subunits.

  8. Characterization of a periplasmic nitrate reductase in complex with its biosynthetic chaperone.

    PubMed

    Dow, Jennifer M; Grahl, Sabine; Ward, Richard; Evans, Rachael; Byron, Olwyn; Norman, David G; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative bacterium that can use nitrate during anaerobic respiration. The catalytic subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA contains two types of redox cofactor and is exported across the cytoplasmic membrane by the twin-arginine protein transport pathway. NapD is a small cytoplasmic protein that is essential for the activity of the periplasmic nitrate reductase and binds tightly to the twin-arginine signal peptide of NapA. Here we show, using spin labelling and EPR, that the isolated twin-arginine signal peptide of NapA is structured in its unbound form and undergoes a small but significant conformational change upon interaction with NapD. In addition, a complex comprising the full-length NapA protein and NapD could be isolated by engineering an affinity tag onto NapD only. Analytical ultracentrifugation demonstrated that the two proteins in the NapDA complex were present in a 1 : 1 molar ratio, and small angle X-ray scattering analysis of the complex indicated that NapA was at least partially folded when bound by its NapD partner. A NapDA complex could not be isolated in the absence of the NapA Tat signal peptide. Taken together, this work indicates that the NapD chaperone binds primarily at the NapA signal peptide in this system and points towards a role for NapD in the insertion of the molybdenum cofactor.

  9. Advanced drug delivery of N-acetylcarnosine (N-acetyl-beta-alanyl-L-histidine), carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) and L-carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) in targeting peptide compounds as pharmacological chaperones for use in tissue engineering, human disease management and therapy: from in vitro to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2010-11-01

    A pharmacological chaperone is a relatively new concept in the treatment of certain chronic disabling diseases. Cells maintain a complete set of functionally competent proteins normally and in the face of injury or environmental stress with the use of various mechanisms, including systems of proteins called molecular chaperones. Proteins that are denatured by any form of proteotoxic stress are cooperatively recognized by heat shock proteins (HSP) and directed for refolding or degradation. Under non-denaturing conditions HSP have important functions in cell physiology such as in transmembrane protein transport and in enabling assembly and folding of newly synthesized polypeptides. Besides cellular molecular chaperones, which are stress-induced proteins, there have been recently reported chemical, or so-called pharmacological chaperones with demonstrated ability to be effective in preventing misfolding of different disease causing proteins, specifically in the therapeutic management of sight-threatening eye diseases, essentially reducing the severity of several neurodegenerative disorders (such as age-related macular degeneration), cataract and many other protein-misfolding diseases. This work reviews the biological and therapeutic activities protected with the patents of the family of imidazole-containing peptidomimetics Carcinine (β-alanylhistamine), N-acetylcarnosine (N-acetyl-β-alanylhistidine) and Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) which are essential constituents possessing diverse biological and pharmacological chaperone properties in human tissues.

  10. A Toxoplasma gondii class XIV myosin, expressed in Sf9 cells with a parasite co-chaperone, requires two light chains for fast motility.

    PubMed

    Bookwalter, Carol S; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M; Ward, Gary E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-10-31

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors.

  11. Levels of metacaspase1 and chaperones related to protein quality control in alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Alejandro S; Dorce, Jacques; Peng, Yue; French, Barbara A; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; French, Samuel W

    2015-02-01

    Efficient management of misfolded or aggregated proteins in ASH and NASH is crucial for continued hepatic viability. Cellular protein quality control systems play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of ASH and NASH. In a recent study, elevated Mca1 expression counteracted aggregation and accumulation of misfolded proteins and extended the life span of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Hill et al, 2014). Mca1 may also associate with Ssa1 and Hsp104 in disaggregation and fragmentation of aggregated proteins and their subsequent degradation through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. If degradation is not available, protection of the cellular environment from a misfolded protein is accomplished by its sequestration into two distinct inclusion bodies (Kaganovich et al., 2008) called the JUNQ (JUxta Nuclear Quality control compartment) and the IPOD (Insoluble Protein Deposit). Mca1, Hsp104, Hsp40, Ydj1, Ssa1, VCP/p97, and p62 all play important roles in protein quality control systems. This study aims to measure the expression of Mca1 and related chaperones involved in protein quality control in alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) compared with normal control liver biopsies. Mca1, Hsp104, Hsp40, Ydj1, Ssa1, VCP/p97, and p62 expressions were measured in three to six formalin-fixed paraffin embedded ASH and NASH liver biopsies and control normal liver specimens by immunofluorescence staining and quantified by immunofluorescence intensity. Mca1, Hsp104, Ydj1 and p62 were significantly upregulated compared to control (p<0.05) in ASH specimens. Hsp40 and VCP/p97 were also uptrending in ASH. In NASH, the only significant difference was the increased expression of Hsp104 compared to control (p<0.05). Ssa1 levels were uptrending in both ASH and NASH specimens. The upregulation of Mca1, Hsp104, Ydj1 and p62 in ASH may be elicited as a response to the chronic exposure of the hepatocytes to the toxicity of alcohol

  12. Evolutionary silence of the acid chaperone protein HdeB in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Periplasmic chaperones HdeA and HdeB are known to be important for cell survival at low pH (pH<3) in E. coli and Shigella spp. Here we investigated the roles of these two acid chaperones in survival of various enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) following exposure to pH 2.0. Similar to K-12 strains, th...

  13. Prion-Associated Toxicity is Rescued by Elimination of Cotranslational Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, Kathryn M.; True, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    The nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) is a highly conserved but poorly characterized triad of proteins that bind near the ribosome exit tunnel. The NAC is the first cotranslational factor to bind to polypeptides and assist with their proper folding. Surprisingly, we found that deletion of NAC subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae rescues toxicity associated with the strong [PSI+] prion. This counterintuitive finding can be explained by changes in chaperone balance and distribution whereby the folding of the prion protein is improved and the prion is rendered nontoxic. In particular, the ribosome-associated Hsp70 Ssb is redistributed away from Sup35 prion aggregates to the nascent chains, leading to an array of aggregation phenotypes that can mimic both overexpression and deletion of Ssb. This toxicity rescue demonstrates that chaperone modification can block key steps of the prion life cycle and has exciting implications for potential treatment of many human protein conformational disorders. PMID:27828954

  14. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  15. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  16. The Histone Chaperones FACT and Spt6 Restrict H2A.Z from Intragenic Locations

    PubMed Central

    Jeronimo, Célia; Watanabe, Shinya; Kaplan, Craig D.; Peterson, Craig L.; Robert, François

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY H2A.Z is a highly conserved histone variant involved in several key nuclear processes. It is incorporated into promoters by SWR-C-related chromatin remodeling complexes, but whether it is also actively excluded from non-promoter regions is not clear. Here, we provide genomic and biochemical evidence that RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation-associated histone chaperones FACT and Spt6 both contribute to restricting H2A.Z from intragenic regions. In the absence of FACT or Spt6, the lack of efficient nucleosome reassembly coupled to pervasive incorporation of H2A.Z by mislocalized SWR-C alters chromatin composition and contributes to cryptic initiation. Thus, chaperone-mediated H2A.Z confinement is crucial for restricting the chromatin signature of gene promoters, which otherwise may license or promote cryptic transcription. PMID:25959393

  17. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Marcianò, G; Huang, D T

    2016-02-01

    The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  18. Amphiphilic polysaccharide nanoballs: a new building block for nanogel biomedical engineering and artificial chaperones.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2011-01-25

    Enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG), a highly branched (1→4)(1→6)-linked α-glucan, is a new monodisperse spherical hyperbranched nanoparticle (molecular weight, 10(6)-10(7); diameter, 20-30 nm), polysaccharide nanoball. Amphiphilic ESG nanoballs were synthesized by introducing a cholesterol group to enzymatically synthesized glycogen (CHESG). CHESG assembled into a structure containing a few molecules to form cluster nanogels (approximately 35 nm in diameter) in water. The cluster nanogels were dissociated by the addition of cyclodextrin (CD) to form a supramolecular CHESG-CD nanocomplex due to complexation with the cholesterol group and CD. The CHESG nanogel showed high capacity for complexation with proteins, and the CHESG-CD nanocomplex showed high chaperone-like activity for thermal stabilization of enzymes. CHESG has great potential to become a new building block for nanogel biomedical engineering and to act as an artificial chaperone for protein engineering.

  19. Dimeric and trimeric triazole based molecules as a new class of Hsp90 molecular chaperone inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Stefania; Chini, Maria Giovanna; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Vassallo, Antonio; Riccio, Raffaele; Bruno, Ines; Bifulco, Giuseppe

    2013-07-01

    In the last decade Hsp90 inhibitors have emerged as attractive candidates for the development of new potent anticancer therapeutics. In order to identify novel agents able to block the chaperone activity, following a structure-based approach, we used in silico screening to direct the synthesis of potential inhibitors bearing the triazole scaffold, a widespread motif in drug-like molecules. Docking results, performed on a larger collection of dimeric and trimeric triazole derivatives, suggested the synthesis of some molecules showing different calculated binding energies and modes. Surface Plasmon Resonance Binding assay, performed on the synthesized compounds, allow to identify a series of molecules able to potently interact with the target enzyme and to disclose an interesting hit: compound 2b showed to interact with the ATP binding site in the N-terminus domain of Hsp90 and to efficiently inhibit the chaperone activity.

  20. Crystal structure of Escherichia coli YidC, a membrane protein chaperone and insertase.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, Kaoru; Kishimoto, Toshiki; Furukawa, Arata; Mori, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Tsukazaki, Tomoya; Nureki, Osamu

    2014-12-03

    Bacterial YidC, an evolutionally conserved membrane protein, functions as a membrane protein chaperone in cooperation with the Sec translocon and as an independent insertase for membrane proteins. In Gram-negative bacteria, the transmembrane and periplasmic regions of YidC interact with the Sec proteins, forming a multi-protein complex for Sec-dependent membrane protein integration. Here, we report the crystal structure of full-length Escherichia coli YidC. The structure reveals that a hydrophilic groove, formed by five transmembrane helices, is a conserved structural feature of YidC, as compared to the previous YidC structure from Bacillus halodurans, which lacks a periplasmic domain. Structural mapping of the substrate- or Sec protein-contact sites suggested the importance of the groove for the YidC functions as a chaperone and an insertase, and provided structural insight into the multi-protein complex.

  1. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  2. Promiscuous Substrate Recognition in Folding and Assembly Activities of the Trigger Factor Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a molecular chaperone that binds to bacterial ribosomes where it contacts emerging nascent chains, but TF is also abundant free in the cytosol where its activity is less well characterized. In vitro studies show that TF promotes protein refolding. We find here that ribosome-free TF stably associates with and rescues from misfolding a large repertoire of full-length proteins. We identify over 170 members of this cytosolic Escherichia coli TF substrate proteome, including ribosomal protein S7. We analyzed the biochemical properties of a TF:S7 complex from Thermotoga maritima and determined its crystal structure. Thereby, we obtained an atomic-level picture of a promiscuous chaperone in complex with a physiological substrate protein. The structure of the complex reveals the molecular basis of substrate recognition by TF, indicates how TF could accelerate protein folding, and suggests a role for TF in the biogenesis of protein complexes.

  3. Chemical chaperone TUDCA prevents apoptosis and improves survival during polymicrobial sepsis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Doerflinger, Marcel; Glab, Jason; Nedeva, Christina; Jose, Irvin; Lin, Ann; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Allison, Cody; Pellegrini, Marc; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis-induced lymphopenia is a major cause of morbidities in intensive care units and in populations with chronic conditions such as renal failure, diabetes, HIV and alcohol abuse. Currently, other than supportive care and antibiotics, there are no treatments for this condition. We developed an in vitro assay to understand the role of the ER-stress-mediated apoptosis process in lymphocyte death during polymicrobial sepsis, which was reproducible in in vivo mouse models. Modulating ER stress using chemical chaperones significantly reduced the induction of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim both in vitro and in mice. Furthermore, in a ‘two-hit’ pneumonia model in mice, we have been able to demonstrate that administration of the chemical chaperone TUDCA helped to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis by significantly reducing lymphocyte apoptosis and this correlated with four-fold improvement in survival. Our results demonstrate a novel therapeutic opportunity for treating sepsis-induced lymphopenia in humans. PMID:27694827

  4. Dephosphorylation of alpha(s)- and beta-caseins and its effect on chaperone activity: a structural and functional investigation.

    PubMed

    Koudelka, Tomas; Hoffmann, Peter; Carver, John A

    2009-07-08

    Milk casein proteins can act as molecular chaperones: under conditions of stress, such as elevated temperature, molecular chaperones stabilize proteins from unfolding, aggregating, and precipitating. In this study, alpha(s)- and beta-caseins were dephosphorylated using alkaline phosphatase. A structural and functional investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of dephosphorylation on the chaperone activity of alpha(s)- and beta-caseins against two types of protein misfolding, i.e., amorphous aggregation and amyloid fibril assembly. The dephosphorylation of alpha(s)- and beta-caseins resulted in a decrease in the chaperone efficiency against both heat- and reduction-induced amorphously aggregating target proteins. In contrast, dephosphorylation had no effect on the chaperone activity of alpha(s)- and beta-caseins against the amyloid-forming target protein kappa-casein. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopic data indicated that the loss of negative charge associated with dephosphorylation led to an increase in ordered structure of alpha(s)- and beta-caseins. It is concluded that the flexible, dynamic, and relatively unstructured and amphiphatic nature of alpha(s)- and beta-caseins is important in their chaperone action.

  5. Chaperone activities of bovine and camel beta-caseins: Importance of their surface hydrophobicity in protection against alcohol dehydrogenase aggregation.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Yousefi, Reza; Sharifzadeh, Ahmad; Dalgalarrondo, Michèle; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Ehsani, Mohammad Reza; Niasari-Naslaji, Amir; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Haertlé, Thomas; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2008-05-01

    Beta-casein (beta-CN) showing properties of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUP) displays many similarities with molecular chaperones and shows anti-aggregation activity in vitro. Chaperone activities of bovine and camel beta-CN were studied using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) as a substrate. To obtain an adequate relevant information about the chaperone capacities of studied caseins, three different physical parameters including chaperone constant (k(c), microM(-1)), thermal aggregation constant (k(T), degrees C(-1)) and aggregation rate constant (k(t), min(-1)) were measured. Bovine beta-CN displays greater chaperone activity than camel beta-CN. Fluorescence studies of 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) binding demonstrated that bovine beta-CN is doted with larger effective hydrophobic surfaces at all studied temperatures than camel beta-CN. Greater relative hydrophobicity of bovine beta-CN than camel beta-CN may be a factor responsible for stronger interactions of bovine beta-CN with the aggregation-prone pre denatured molecular species of the substrate ADH, which resulted in greater chaperone activity of bovine beta-CN.

  6. Histone H1 chaperone activity of TAF-I is regulated by its subtype-dependent intramolecular interaction.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Kaori; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2017-03-02

    Linker histone H1 is involved in the regulation of gene activity through the maintenance of higher-order chromatin structure. Previously, we have shown that template activating factor-I (TAF-I or protein SET) is involved in linker histone H1 dynamics as a histone H1 chaperone. In human and murine cells, two TAF-I subtypes exist, namely TAF-Iα and TAF-Iβ. TAF-I has a highly acidic amino acid cluster in its C-terminal region and forms homo- or heterodimers through its dimerization domain. Both dimer formation and the C-terminal region of TAF-I are essential for the histone chaperone activity. TAF-Iα exhibits less histone chaperone activity compared with TAF-Iβ even though TAF-Iα and β differ only in their N-terminal regions. However, it is unclear how subtype-specific TAF-I activities are regulated. Here, we have shown that the N-terminal region of TAF-Iα autoinhibits its histone chaperone activity via intramolecular interaction with its C-terminal region. When the interaction between the N- and C-terminal regions of TAF-Iα is disrupted, TAF-Iα shows a histone chaperone activity similar to that of TAF-Iβ. Taken together, these results provide mechanistic insights into the concept that fine tuning of TAF-I histone H1 chaperone activity relies on the subtype compositions of the TAF-I dimer.

  7. Metabolic and Chaperone Gene Loss Marks the Origin of Animals: Evidence for Hsp104 and Hsp78 Chaperones Sharing Mitochondrial Enzymes as Clients

    PubMed Central

    Erives, Albert J.; Fassler, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of animals involved acquisition of an emergent gene repertoire for gastrulation. Whether loss of genes also co-evolved with this developmental reprogramming has not yet been addressed. Here, we identify twenty-four genetic functions that are retained in fungi and choanoflagellates but undetectable in animals. These lost genes encode: (i) sixteen distinct biosynthetic functions; (ii) the two ancestral eukaryotic ClpB disaggregases, Hsp78 and Hsp104, which function in the mitochondria and cytosol, respectively; and (iii) six other assorted functions. We present computational and experimental data that are consistent with a joint function for the differentially localized ClpB disaggregases, and with the possibility of a shared client/chaperone relationship between the mitochondrial Fe/S homoaconitase encoded by the lost LYS4 gene and the two ClpBs. Our analyses lead to the hypothesis that the evolution of gastrulation-based multicellularity in animals led to efficient extraction of nutrients from dietary sources, loss of natural selection for maintenance of energetically expensive biosynthetic pathways, and subsequent loss of their attendant ClpB chaperones. PMID:25710177

  8. Identification of Core Segment of Amyloidal Peptide Mediated by Chaperone Molecules by using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2015-10-05

    We illustrate in this work that pristine assemblies of amyloidal peptides can be obtained by perturbations of reduced scanning bias, and show a broad distribution in peptide length. In contrast, the chaperone-mediated peptide co-assembly presents ordered lamellar structures with a homogeneous distribution in length, which could be attributed to the core segment of the peptide. The efforts are beneficial for gaining insight into the aggregation propensity of peptides and inter-peptide interactions.

  9. Multiscale Modeling of a Conditionally Disordered pH-Sensing Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Law, Sean M.; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    The pH-sensing chaperone HdeA promotes the survival of enteropathogenic bacteria during transit through the harshly acidic environment of the mammalian stomach. At low pH, HdeA transitions from an inactive, folded, dimer to chaperone-active, disordered, monomers to protect against the acid-induced aggregation of periplasmic proteins. Toward achieving a detailed mechanistic understanding of the pH response of HdeA, we develop a multiscale modeling approach to capture its pH-dependent thermodynamics. Our approach combines pKa calculations from all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained modeling, and yields new, atomic-level, insights into HdeA chaperone function that can be directly tested by experiment. “pH triggers” that significantly destabilize the dimer are each located near the N-terminus of a helix, suggesting that their neutralization at low pH destabilizes the helix macrodipole as a mechanism of monomer disordering. Moreover, we observe a non-monotonic change in the pH-dependent stability of HdeA, with maximal stability of the dimer near pH 5. This affect is attributed to the protonation Glu37, which exhibits an anomalously high pKa value and is located within the hydrophobic dimer interface. Finally, the pH-dependent binding pathway of HdeA comprises a partially unfolded, dimeric intermediate that becomes increasingly stable relative to the native dimer at lower pH values and displays key structural features for chaperone-substrate interaction. We anticipate that the insights from our model will help inform ongoing NMR and biochemical investigations. PMID:25584862

  10. Hsp31 Is a Stress Response Chaperone That Intervenes in the Protein Misfolding Process*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chai-jui; Aslam, Kiran; Drendel, Holli M.; Asiago, Josephat M.; Goode, Kourtney M.; Paul, Lake N.; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hazbun, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat shock protein Hsp31 is a stress-inducible homodimeric protein that is involved in diauxic shift reprogramming and has glyoxalase activity. We show that substoichiometric concentrations of Hsp31 can abrogate aggregation of a broad array of substrates in vitro. Hsp31 also modulates the aggregation of α-synuclein (αSyn), a target of the chaperone activity of human DJ-1, an Hsp31 homolog. We demonstrate that Hsp31 is able to suppress the in vitro fibrillization or aggregation of αSyn, citrate synthase and insulin. Chaperone activity was also observed in vivo because constitutive overexpression of Hsp31 reduced the incidence of αSyn cytoplasmic foci, and yeast cells were rescued from αSyn-generated proteotoxicity upon Hsp31 overexpression. Moreover, we showed that Hsp31 protein levels are increased by H2O2, in the diauxic phase of normal growth conditions, and in cells under αSyn-mediated proteotoxic stress. We show that Hsp31 chaperone activity and not the methylglyoxalase activity or the autophagy pathway drives the protective effects. We also demonstrate reduced aggregation of the Sup35 prion domain, PrD-Sup35, as visualized by fluorescent protein fusions. In addition, Hsp31 acts on its substrates prior to the formation of large aggregates because Hsp31 does not mutually localize with prion aggregates, and it prevents the formation of detectable in vitro αSyn fibrils. These studies establish that the protective role of Hsp31 against cellular stress is achieved by chaperone activity that intervenes early in the protein misfolding process and is effective on a wide spectrum of substrate proteins, including αSyn and prion proteins. PMID:26306045

  11. Stretched Extracellular Matrix Proteins Turn Fouling and Are Functionally Rescued by the Chaperones Albumin and Casein

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    While evidence is mounting that cells exploit protein unfolding for mechanochemical signal conversion (mechanotransduction), what mechanisms are in place to deal with the unwanted consequences of exposing hydrophobic residues upon force-induced protein unfolding? Here, we show that mechanical chaperones exist that can transiently bind to hydrophobic residues that are freshly exposed by mechanical force. The stretch-upregulated binding of albumin or casein to fibronectin fibers is reversible and does not inhibit fiber contraction once the tension is released. PMID:19743815

  12. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  13. The conformational bases for the two functionalities of 2-cysteine peroxiredoxins as peroxidase and chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2013-01-01

    2-Cysteine peroxiredoxins (2-CysPrxs) are ubiquitous and highly abundant proteins that serve multiple functions as peroxidases, chaperones, and thiol oxidases and in redox-dependent cell signalling. The chloroplast protein plays a role in seedling development and protection of the photosynthetic apparatus. This study aimed to unequivocally link conformation and function. To this end, a set of non-tagged site-directed mutagenized At2-CysPrx variants was engineered, which mimicked the conformational states and their specific functions: hyperoxidized form (C54D), reduced form (C54S, C176S), oxidized form (C54DC176K), phosphorylated form (T92D), reduced ability for oligomerization by interfering with the dimer–dimer interface (F84R) and a C-terminally truncated form [ΔC (–20 aa)]. These variants were fully or partly fixed in their quaternary structure and function, respectively, and were analysed for their conformational state and peroxidase and chaperone activity, as well as for their sensitivity to hyperoxidation. The presence of a His6-tag strongly influenced the properties of the protein. The ΔC variant became insensitive to hyperoxidation, while T92D and F84R became more sensitive. The C54D variant revealed the highest chaperone activity. The highest peroxidase activity was observed for the F84R and ΔC variants. Efficient interaction with NADP-dependent thioredoxin reductase C depended on the presence of Cys residues and the C-terminal tail. The results suggest that the structural flexibility is important for the switch between peroxidase and chaperone function and that evolution has conserved the functional switch instead of maximizing a single function. These variants are ideal tools for future conformation-specific studies in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23828546

  14. Copper Chaperone Antioxidant Protein1 Is Essential for Copper Homeostasis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Lung-Jiun; Lo, Jing-Chi; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential for plant growth but toxic in excess. Specific molecular mechanisms maintain Cu homeostasis to facilitate its use and avoid the toxicity. Cu chaperones, proteins containing a Cu-binding domain(s), are thought to assist Cu intracellular homeostasis by their Cu-chelating ability. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two Cu chaperones, Antioxidant Protein1 (ATX1) and ATX1-Like Copper Chaperone (CCH), share high sequence homology. Previously, their Cu-binding capabilities were demonstrated and interacting molecules were identified. To understand the physiological functions of these two chaperones, we characterized the phenotype of atx1 and cch mutants and the cchatx1 double mutant in Arabidopsis. The shoot and root growth of atx1 and cchatx1 but not cch was specifically hypersensitive to excess Cu but not excess iron, zinc, or cadmium. The activities of antioxidant enzymes in atx1 and cchatx1 were markedly regulated in response to excess Cu, which confirms the phenotype of Cu hypersensitivity. Interestingly, atx1 and cchatx1 were sensitive to Cu deficiency. Overexpression of ATX1 not only enhanced Cu tolerance and accumulation in excess Cu conditions but also tolerance to Cu deficiency. In addition, the Cu-binding motif MXCXXC of ATX1 was required for these physiological functions. ATX1 was previously proposed to be involved in Cu homeostasis by its Cu-binding activity and interaction with the Cu transporter Heavy metal-transporting P-type ATPase5. In this study, we demonstrate that ATX1 plays an essential role in Cu homeostasis in conferring tolerance to excess Cu and Cu deficiency. The possible mechanism is discussed. PMID:22555879

  15. Structural and Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CupB Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xun; Wang, Rui; Filloux, Alain; Waksman, Gabriel; Meng, Guoyu

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human pathogen, is estimated to be responsible for ∼10% of nosocomial infections worldwide. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa starts from its colonization in the damaged tissue or medical devices (e.g. catheters, prothesis and implanted heart valve etc.) facilitated by several extracellular adhesive factors including fimbrial pili. Several clusters containing fimbrial genes have been previously identified on the P. aeruginosa chromosome and named cup [1]. The assembly of the CupB pili is thought to be coordinated by two chaperones, CupB2 and CupB4. However, due to the lack of structural and biochemical data, their chaperone activities remain speculative. In this study, we report the 2.5 Å crystal structure of P. aeruginosa CupB2. Based on the structure, we further tested the binding specificity of CupB2 and CupB4 towards CupB1 (the presumed major pilus subunit) and CupB6 (the putative adhesin) using limited trypsin digestion and strep-tactin pull-down assay. The structural and biochemical data suggest that CupB2 and CupB4 might play different, but not redundant, roles in CupB secretion. CupB2 is likely to be the chaperone of CupB1, and CupB4 could be the chaperone of CupB4:CupB5:CupB6, in which the interaction of CupB4 and CupB6 might be mediated via CupB5. PMID:21304995

  16. Multiscale modeling of a conditionally disordered pH-sensing chaperone.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Logan S; Law, Sean M; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-04-24

    The pH-sensing chaperone HdeA promotes the survival of enteropathogenic bacteria during transit through the harshly acidic environment of the mammalian stomach. At low pH, HdeA transitions from an inactive, folded, dimer to chaperone-active, disordered, monomers to protect against the acid-induced aggregation of periplasmic proteins. Toward achieving a detailed mechanistic understanding of the pH response of HdeA, we develop a multiscale modeling approach to capture its pH-dependent thermodynamics. Our approach combines pK(a) (logarithmic acid dissociation constant) calculations from all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained modeling and yields new, atomic-level, insights into HdeA chaperone function that can be directly tested by experiment. "pH triggers" that significantly destabilize the dimer are each located near the N-terminus of a helix, suggesting that their neutralization at low pH destabilizes the helix macrodipole as a mechanism of monomer disordering. Moreover, we observe a non-monotonic change in the pH-dependent stability of HdeA, with maximal stability of the dimer near pH5. This affect is attributed to the protonation Glu37, which exhibits an anomalously high pK(a) value and is located within the hydrophobic dimer interface. Finally, the pH-dependent binding pathway of HdeA comprises a partially unfolded, dimeric intermediate that becomes increasingly stable relative to the native dimer at lower pH values and displays key structural features for chaperone-substrate interaction. We anticipate that the insights from our model will help inform ongoing NMR and biochemical investigations.

  17. Co-chaperone regulation of conformational switching in the Hsp90 ATPase cycle.

    PubMed

    Siligardi, Giuliano; Hu, Bin; Panaretou, Barry; Piper, Peter W; Pearl, Laurence H; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2004-12-10

    ATP hydrolysis by the Hsp90 molecular chaperone requires a connected set of conformational switches triggered by ATP binding to the N-terminal domain in the Hsp90 dimer. Central to this is a segment of the structure, which closes like a "lid" over bound ATP, promoting N-terminal dimerization and assembly of a competent active site. Hsp90 mutants that influence these conformational switches have strong effects on ATPase activity. ATPase activity is specifically regulated by Hsp90 co-chaperones, which directly influence the conformational switches. Here we have analyzed the effect of Hsp90 mutations on binding (using isothermal titration calorimetry and difference circular dichroism) and ATPase regulation by the co-chaperones Aha1, Sti1 (Hop), and Sba1 (p23). The ability of Sti1 to bind Hsp90 and arrest its ATPase activity was not affected by any of the mutants screened. Sba1 bound in the presence of AMPPNP to wild-type and ATPase hyperactive mutants with similar affinity but only very weakly to hypoactive mutants despite their wild-type ATP affinity. Unexpectedly, in all cases Sba1 bound to Hsp90 with a 1:2 molar stoichiometry. Aha1 binding to mutants was similar to wild-type, but the -fold activation of their ATPase varied substantially between mutants. Analysis of complex formation with co-chaperone mixtures showed Aha1 and p50cdc37 able to bind Hsp90 simultaneously but without direct interaction. Sba1 and p50cdc37 bound independently to Hsp90-AMPPNP but not together. These data indicated that Sba1 and Aha1 regulate Hsp90 by influencing the conformational state of the "ATP lid" and consequent N-terminal dimerization, whereas Sti1 does not.

  18. Conversion of scFv peptide-binding specificity for crystal chaperone development

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Culver, Jeffrey A.; Drury, Jason E.; Motani, Rakesh S.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2012-02-07

    In spite of advances in protein expression and purification over the last decade, many proteins remain recalcitrant to structure determination by X-ray crystallography. One emerging tactic to obtain high-quality protein crystals for structure determination, particularly in the case of membrane proteins, involves co-crystallization with a protein-specific antibody fragment. Here, we report the development of new recombinant single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) capable of binding a specific epitope that can be introduced into internal loops of client proteins. The previously crystallized hexa-histidine-specific 3D5 scFv antibody was modified in the complementary determining region and by random mutagenesis, in conjunction with phage display, to yield scFvs with new biochemical characteristics and binding specificity. Selected variants include those specific for the hexa-histidine peptide with increased expression, solubility (up to 16.6 mg/ml) and sub-micromolar affinity, and those with new specificity for the EE hexa-peptide (EYMPME) and nanomolar affinity. Complexes of one such chaperone with model proteins harboring either an internal or a terminal EE tag were isolated by gel filtration. The 3.1 {angstrom} resolution structure of this chaperone reveals a binding surface complementary to the EE peptide and a {approx}52 {angstrom} channel in the crystal lattice. Notably, in spite of 85% sequence identity, and nearly identical crystallization conditions, the engineered scFv crystallizes in a different space group than the parent 3D5 scFv, and utilizes two new crystal contacts. These engineered scFvs represent a new class of chaperones that may eliminate the need for de novo identification of candidate chaperones from large antibody libraries.

  19. N. meningitidis 1681 is a member of the FinO family of RNA chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Chaulk, Steven; Lu, Jun; Tan, Kemin; Arthur, David C; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The conjugative transfer of F-like plasmids between bacteria is regulated by the plasmid-encoded RNA chaperone, FinO, which facilitates sense—antisense RNA interactions to regulate plasmid gene expression. FinO was thought to adopt a unique structure, however many putative homologs have been identified in microbial genomes and are considered members of the FinO_conjugation_repressor superfamily. We were interested in determining whether other members were also able to bind RNA and promote duplex formation, suggesting that this motif does indeed identify a putative RNA chaperone. We determined the crystal structure of the N. meningitidis MC58 protein NMB1681. It revealed striking similarity to FinO, with a conserved fold and a large, positively charged surface that could function in RNA interactions. Using assays developed to study FinO-FinP sRNA interactions, NMB1681, like FinO, bound tightly to FinP RNA stem-loops with short 5′ and 3′ single-stranded tails but not to ssRNA. It also was able to catalyze strand exchange between an RNA duplex and a complementary single-strand, and facilitated duplexing between complementary RNA hairpins. Finally, NMB1681 was able to rescue a finO deficiency and repress F plasmid conjugation. This study strongly suggests that NMB1681 is a FinO-like RNA chaperone that likely regulates gene expression through RNA-based mechanisms in N. meningitidis. PMID:21045552

  20. Chemical Chaperones Improve Protein Secretion and Rescue Mutant Factor VIII in Mice with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Milanov, Peter; Abriss, Daniela; Ungerer, Christopher; Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Pepperkok, Rainer; Seifried, Erhard; Tonn, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Inefficient intracellular protein trafficking is a critical issue in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases and in recombinant protein production. Here we investigated the trafficking of factor VIII (FVIII), which is affected in the coagulation disorder hemophilia A. We hypothesized that chemical chaperones may be useful to enhance folding and processing of FVIII in recombinant protein production, and as a therapeutic approach in patients with impaired FVIII secretion. A tagged B-domain-deleted version of human FVIII was expressed in cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary cells to mimic the industrial production of this important protein. Of several chemical chaperones tested, the addition of betaine resulted in increased secretion of FVIII, by increasing solubility of intracellular FVIII aggregates and improving transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Similar results were obtained in experiments monitoring recombinant full-length FVIII. Oral betaine administration also increased FVIII and factor IX (FIX) plasma levels in FVIII or FIX knockout mice following gene transfer. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo applications of betaine were also able to rescue a trafficking-defective FVIII mutant (FVIIIQ305P). We conclude that chemical chaperones such as betaine might represent a useful treatment concept for hemophilia and other diseases caused by deficient intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:22973456

  1. Co-chaperone HSJ1a dually regulates the proteasomal degradation of ataxin-3.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-Chao; Zhou, Chen-Jie; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Zheng, Xue-Ming; Song, Ai-Xin; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Homo sapiens J domain protein (HSJ1) is a J-domain containing co-chaperone that is known to stimulate ATPase activity of HSP70 chaperone, while it also harbors two ubiquitin (Ub)-interacting motifs (UIMs) that may bind with ubiquitinated substrates and potentially function in protein degradation. We studied the effects of HSJ1a on the protein levels of both normal and the disease--related polyQ-expanded forms of ataxin-3 (Atx3) in cells. The results demonstrate that the N-terminal J-domain and the C-terminal UIM domain of HSJ1a exert opposite functions in regulating the protein level of cellular overexpressed Atx3. This dual regulation is dependent on the binding of the J-domain with HSP70, and the UIM domain with polyUb chains. The J-domain down-regulates the protein level of Atx3 through HSP70 mediated proteasomal degradation, while the UIM domain may alleviate this process via maintaining the ubiquitinated Atx3. We propose that co-chaperone HSJ1a orchestrates the balance of substrates in stressed cells in a Yin-Yang manner.

  2. Hsp70 chaperones are non-equilibrium machines that achieve ultra-affinity by energy consumption.

    PubMed

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Barducci, Alessandro

    2014-05-27

    70-kDa Heat shock proteins are ATP-driven molecular chaperones that perform a myriad of essential cellular tasks. Although structural and biochemical studies have shed some light on their functional mechanism, the fundamental issue of the role of energy consumption, due to ATP-hydrolysis, has remained unaddressed. Here we establish a clear connection between the non-equilibrium nature of Hsp70, due to ATP hydrolysis, and the determining feature of its function, namely its high affinity for its substrates. Energy consumption can indeed decrease the dissociation constant of the chaperone-substrate complex by several orders of magnitude with respect to an equilibrium scenario. We find that the biochemical requirements for observing such ultra-affinity coincide with the physiological conditions in the cell. Our results rationalize several experimental observations and pave the way for further analysis of non-equilibrium effects underlying chaperone functions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02218.001.

  3. Procollagen triple helix assembly: an unconventional chaperone-assisted folding paradigm.

    PubMed

    Makareeva, Elena; Leikin, Sergey

    2007-10-10

    Fibers composed of type I collagen triple helices form the organic scaffold of bone and many other tissues, yet the energetically preferred conformation of type I collagen at body temperature is a random coil. In fibers, the triple helix is stabilized by neighbors, but how does it fold? The observations reported here reveal surprising features that may represent a new paradigm for folding of marginally stable proteins. We find that human procollagen triple helix spontaneously folds into its native conformation at 30-34 degrees C but not at higher temperatures, even in an environment emulating Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). ER-like molecular crowding by nonspecific proteins does not affect triple helix folding or aggregation of unfolded chains. Common ER chaperones may prevent aggregation and misfolding of procollagen C-propeptide in their traditional role of binding unfolded polypeptide chains. However, such binding only further destabilizes the triple helix. We argue that folding of the triple helix requires stabilization by preferential binding of chaperones to its folded, native conformation. Based on the triple helix folding temperature measured here and published binding constants, we deduce that HSP47 is likely to do just that. It takes over 20 HSP47 molecules to stabilize a single triple helix at body temperature. The required 50-200 microM concentration of free HSP47 is not unusual for heat-shock chaperones in ER, but it is 100 times higher than used in reported in vitro experiments, which did not reveal such stabilization.

  4. CCT2 Mutations Evoke Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to Chaperone Complex Instability

    PubMed Central

    Minegishi, Yuriko; Sheng, XunLun; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Sergeev, Yuri; Iejima, Daisuke; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Furuno, Masaaki; Zhuang, Wenjun; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Hattori, Seisuke; Iwata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a hereditary early-onset retinal dystrophy that is accompanied by severe macular degeneration. In this study, novel compound heterozygous mutations were identified as LCA-causative in chaperonin-containing TCP-1, subunit 2 (CCT2), a gene that encodes the molecular chaperone protein, CCTβ. The zebrafish mutants of CCTβ are known to exhibit the eye phenotype while its mutation and association with human disease have been unknown. The CCT proteins (CCT α-θ) forms ring complex for its chaperon function. The LCA mutants of CCTβ, T400P and R516H, are biochemically instable and the affinity for the adjacent subunit, CCTγ, was affected distinctly in both mutants. The patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), carrying these CCTβ mutants, were less proliferative than the control iPSCs. Decreased proliferation under Cct2 knockdown in 661W cells was significantly rescued by wild-type CCTβ expression. However, the expression of T400P and R516H didn’t exhibit the significant effect. In mouse retina, both CCTβ and CCTγ are expressed in the retinal ganglion cells and connecting cilium of photoreceptor cells. The Cct2 knockdown decreased its major client protein, transducing β1 (Gβ1). Here we report the novel LCA mutations in CCTβ and the impact of chaperon disability by these mutations in cellular biology. PMID:27645772

  5. Chaperoning G Protein-Coupled Receptors: From Cell Biology to Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that traverse the plasma membrane seven times (hence, are also called 7TM receptors). The polytopic structure of GPCRs makes the folding of GPCRs difficult and complex. Indeed, many wild-type GPCRs are not folded optimally, and defects in folding are the most common cause of genetic diseases due to GPCR mutations. Both general and receptor-specific molecular chaperones aid the folding of GPCRs. Chemical chaperones have been shown to be able to correct the misfolding in mutant GPCRs, proving to be important tools for studying the structure-function relationship of GPCRs. However, their potential therapeutic value is very limited. Pharmacological chaperones (pharmacoperones) are potentially important novel therapeutics for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in GPCR genes that resulted in misfolded mutant proteins. Pharmacoperones also increase cell surface expression of wild-type GPCRs; therefore, they could be used to treat diseases that do not harbor mutations in GPCRs. Recent studies have shown that indeed pharmacoperones work in both experimental animals and patients. High-throughput assays have been developed to identify new pharmacoperones that could be used as therapeutics for a number of endocrine and other genetic diseases. PMID:24661201

  6. Molecular functions of the histone acetyltransferase chaperone complex Rtt109-Vps75

    SciTech Connect

    Berndsen, Christopher E; Tsubota, Toshiaki; Lindner, Scott E; Lee, Susan; Holton, James M; Kaufman, Paul D; Keck, James L; Denu, John M

    2010-01-12

    Histone acetylation and nucleosome remodeling regulate DNA damage repair, replication and transcription. Rtt109, a recently discovered histone acetyltransferase (HAT) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, functions with the histone chaperone Asf1 to acetylate lysine K56 on histone H3 (H3K56), a modification associated with newly synthesized histones. In vitro analysis of Rtt109 revealed that Vps75, a Nap1 family histone chaperone, could also stimulate Rtt109-dependent acetylation of H3K56. However, the molecular function of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex remains elusive. Here we have probed the molecular functions of Vps75 and the Rtt109-Vps75 complex through biochemical, structural and genetic means. We find that Vps75 stimulates the kcat of histone acetylation by {approx}100-fold relative to Rtt109 alone and enhances acetylation of K9 in the H3 histone tail. Consistent with the in vitro evidence, cells lacking Vps75 showed a substantial reduction (60%) in H3K9 acetylation during S phase. X-ray structural, biochemical and genetic analyses of Vps75 indicate a unique, structurally dynamic Nap1-like fold that suggests a potential mechanism of Vps75-dependent activation of Rtt109. Together, these data provide evidence for a multifunctional HAT-chaperone complex that acetylates histone H3 and deposits H3-H4 onto DNA, linking histone modification and nucleosome assembly.

  7. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  8. Nucleolin is a histone chaperone with FACT-like activity and assists remodeling of nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Dimitar; Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Almagro, Sébastien; Menoni, Hervé; Mongélard, Fabien; Hans, Fabienne; Mietton, Flore; Studitsky, Vasily M; Hamiche, Ali; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Remodeling machines play an essential role in the control of gene expression, but how their activity is regulated is not known. Here we report that the nuclear protein nucleolin possesses a histone chaperone activity and that this factor greatly enhances the activity of the chromatin remodeling machineries SWI/SNF and ACF. Interestingly, nucleolin is able to induce the remodeling by SWI/SNF of macroH2A, but not of H2ABbd nucleosomes, which are otherwise resistant to remodeling. This new histone chaperone promotes the destabilization of the histone octamer, helping the dissociation of a H2A–H2B dimer, and stimulates the SWI/SNF-mediated transfer of H2A–H2B dimers. Furthermore, nucleolin facilitates transcription through the nucleosome, which is reminiscent of the activity of the FACT complex. This work defines new functions for histone chaperones in chromatin remodeling and regulation of transcription and explains how nucleolin could act on transcription. PMID:16601700

  9. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  10. Molecular Chaperone Calnexin Regulates the Function of Drosophila Sodium Channel Paralytic

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xi; Chen, Changyan; Yu, Tian-Ming; Ou, Jiayao; Rui, Menglong; Zhai, Yuanfen; He, Yijing; Xue, Lei; Ho, Margaret S.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal activity mediated by voltage-gated channels provides the basis for higher-order behavioral tasks that orchestrate life. Chaperone-mediated regulation, one of the major means to control protein quality and function, is an essential route for controlling channel activity. Here we present evidence that Drosophila ER chaperone Calnexin colocalizes and interacts with the α subunit of sodium channel Paralytic. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that Calnexin interacts with Paralytic protein variants that contain glycosylation sites Asn313, 325, 343, 1463, and 1482. Downregulation of Calnexin expression results in a decrease in Paralytic protein levels, whereas overexpression of the Calnexin C-terminal calcium-binding domain triggers an increase reversely. Genetic analysis using adult climbing, seizure-induced paralysis, and neuromuscular junction indicates that lack of Calnexin expression enhances Paralytic-mediated locomotor deficits, suppresses Paralytic-mediated ghost bouton formation, and regulates minature excitatory junction potentials (mEJP) frequency and latency time. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a need for chaperone-mediated regulation on channel activity during locomotor control, providing the molecular basis for channlopathies such as epilepsy. PMID:28326013

  11. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches. PMID:25881001

  12. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A.

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  13. Analysis of the Histone H3.1 Interactome: A Suitable Chaperone for the Right Event

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Eric I.; Smits, Arne H.; Kang, Young-Hoon; Landry, Sébastien; Escobar, Thelma M.; Nayak, Shruti; Ueberheide, Beatrix M.; Durocher, Daniel; Vermeulen, Michiel; Hurwitz, Jerard; Reinberg, Danny

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite minimal disparity at the sequence level, mammalian H3 variants bind to distinct sets of polypeptides. Though histone H3.1 predominates in cycling cells, our knowledge of the soluble complexes that it forms en route to deposition or following eviction from chromatin remains limited. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the H3.1-binding proteome, with emphasis on its interactions with histone chaperones and components of the replication fork. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed 170 protein interactions, whereas a large-scale biochemical fractionation of H3.1 and associated enzymatic activities uncovered over twenty stable protein complexes in dividing human cells. The sNASP and ASF1 chaperones play pivotal roles in the processing of soluble histones, but do not associate with the active CDC45/MCM2-7/GINS (CMG) replicative helicase. We also find TONSL-MMS22L to function as a H3-H4 histone chaperone. It associates with the regulatory MCM5 subunit of the replicative helicase. PMID:26527279

  14. The crystal structure of the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cpr7 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; Ge, Qiangqiang; Wang, Mingxing; Lv, Hui; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2017-02-09

    The versatility of Hsp90 can be attributed to the variety of co-chaperone proteins that modulate the role of Hsp90 in many cellular processes. As a co-chaperone of Hsp90, Cpr7 is essential for accelerating the cell growth in an Hsp90-containing trimeric complex. Here, we report the crystal structure of Cpr7 at a resolution of 1.8Å. It consists of an N-terminal PPI domain and a C-terminal TPR domain, and exhibits a U-shape conformation. Our studies revealed the aggregation state of Cpr7 in solution and the interaction properties between Cpr7 and the MEEVD sequence from the C-terminus of Hsp90. In addition, the structure and sequence analysis between Cpr7 and homologues revealed the structure basis both for the function differences between Cpr6 and Cpr7 and the functional complements between Cns1 and Cpr7. Our studies facilitate the understanding of Cpr7 and provide decent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 co-chaperone pathway.

  15. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T.

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  16. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-07-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches.

  17. Structure of the Spt16 Middle Domain Reveals Functional Features of the Histone Chaperone FACT*

    PubMed Central

    Kemble, David J.; Whitby, Frank G.; Robinson, Howard; McCullough, Laura L.; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    The histone chaperone FACT is an essential and abundant heterodimer found in all eukaryotes. Here we report a crystal structure of the middle domain of the large subunit of FACT (Spt16-M) to reveal a double pleckstrin homology architecture. This structure was found previously in the Pob3-M domain of the small subunit of FACT and in the related histone chaperone Rtt106, although Spt16-M is distinguished from these structures by the presence of an extended α-helix and a C-terminal addition. Consistent with our finding that the double pleckstrin homology structure is common to these three histone chaperones and reports that Pob3 and Rtt106 double pleckstrin homology domains bind histones H3-H4, we also find that Spt16-M binds H3-H4 with low micromolar affinity. Our structure provides a framework for interpreting a large body of genetic data regarding the physiological functions of FACT, including the identification of potential interaction surfaces for binding histones or other proteins. PMID:23417676

  18. Pharmacological Enhancement of α-Glucosidase by the Allosteric Chaperone N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Caterina; Ferrara, Maria C; Meli, Massimiliano; Acampora, Emma; Avolio, Valeria; Rosa, Margherita; Cobucci-Ponzano, Beatrice; Colombo, Giorgio; Moracci, Marco; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a metabolic myopathy due to the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase (GAA). The only approved treatment for this disorder, enzyme replacement with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA), has shown limited therapeutic efficacy in some PD patients. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), either alone or in combination with enzyme replacement, has been proposed as an alternative therapeutic strategy. However, the chaperones identified so far also are active site-directed molecules and potential inhibitors of target enzymes. We demonstrated that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a novel allosteric chaperone for GAA. NAC improved the stability of rhGAA as a function of pH and temperature without disrupting its catalytic activity. A computational analysis of NAC–GAA interactions confirmed that NAC does not interact with GAA catalytic domain. NAC enhanced the residual activity of mutated GAA in cultured PD fibroblasts and in COS7 cells overexpressing mutated GAA. NAC also enhanced rhGAA efficacy in PD fibroblasts. In cells incubated with NAC and rhGAA, GAA activities were 3.7–8.7-fold higher than those obtained in cells treated with rhGAA alone. In a PD mouse model the combination of NAC and rhGAA resulted in better correction of enzyme activity in liver, heart, diaphragm and gastrocnemia, compared to rhGAA alone. PMID:22990675

  19. Distinct Prion Domain Sequences Ensure Efficient Amyloid Propagation by Promoting Chaperone Binding or Processing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Christine R.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2016-01-01

    Prions are a group of proteins that can adopt a spectrum of metastable conformations in vivo. These alternative states change protein function and are self-replicating and transmissible, creating protein-based elements of inheritance and infectivity. Prion conformational flexibility is encoded in the amino acid composition and sequence of the protein, which dictate its ability not only to form an ordered aggregate known as amyloid but also to maintain and transmit this structure in vivo. But, while we can effectively predict amyloid propensity in vitro, the mechanism by which sequence elements promote prion propagation in vivo remains unclear. In yeast, propagation of the [PSI+] prion, the amyloid form of the Sup35 protein, has been linked to an oligopeptide repeat region of the protein. Here, we demonstrate that this region is composed of separable functional elements, the repeats themselves and a repeat proximal region, which are both required for efficient prion propagation. Changes in the numbers of these elements do not alter the physical properties of Sup35 amyloid, but their presence promotes amyloid fragmentation, and therefore maintenance, by molecular chaperones. Rather than acting redundantly, our observations suggest that these sequence elements make complementary contributions to prion propagation, with the repeat proximal region promoting chaperone binding to and the repeats promoting chaperone processing of Sup35 amyloid. PMID:27814358

  20. Enhanced dispersibility and cellular transmembrane capability of single-wall carbon nanotubes by polycyclic organic compounds as chaperon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lirong; Zhang, Lihua; Xue, Xue; Ge, Guanglu; Liang, Xingjie

    2012-06-01

    The common aggregation of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in solution is the critical obstacle to elucidate their unique physico-chemical characteristics and biological properties. Therefore, it is very important to overcome this barrier through manipulation of the weak interaction of small molecules with nanotube surface limited interface. A highly dispersed SWCNT system was achieved by binding with polycyclic organic compounds (POCs) including rhodamine 123, ethidium bromide, fluorescein isothiocyanate and 1-pyrene butyric acid as chaperons, in cooperation with sodium dodecyl sulfate. POCs were believed to penetrate through the interstices of aggregated SWCNTs and bind with individual SWCNTs to form highly dispersed and stable SWCNT-POC-surfactant conjugates in both water and phosphate buffer-serum solution, confirmed by gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The possible binding interaction includes π-π stacking with side-wall, electrostatic interactions with defect sites and coating surfactants. Compared to pristine SWCNTs, individual SWCNT-POC conjugates had improved transmembrane passage ability through both endocytosis and diffusion pathways, validated by laser scanning confocal microscopy and micro-Raman mapping techniques. For the applications of SWCNTs in drug delivery, in vitro imaging and other research fields, this novel strategy could provide highly dispersed SWCNTs with better efficiency of drug loading and stability.The common aggregation of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in solution is the critical obstacle to elucidate their unique physico-chemical characteristics and biological properties. Therefore, it is very important to overcome this barrier through manipulation of the weak interaction of small molecules with nanotube surface limited interface. A highly dispersed SWCNT system was achieved by binding with polycyclic organic compounds (POCs) including rhodamine 123, ethidium bromide

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of molecular chaperone-like diol dehydratase-reactivating factor in ADP-bound and nucleotide-free forms

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Koichi; Hieda, Naoki; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Shibata, Naoki; Toraya, Tetsuo

    2005-06-01

    The molecular chaperone-like reactivating factor for adenosylcobalamin (coenzyme B{sub 12}) dependent diol dehydratase was crystallized in ADP-bound and nucleotide-free forms. Preliminary X-ray analysis indicated that crystals are orthorhombic and diffract to 2.0 Å. Adenosylcobalamin (coenzyme B{sub 12}) dependent diol dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.28) catalyzes the conversion of 1,2-diols and glycerol to the corresponding aldehydes. It undergoes mechanism-based inactivation by glycerol. The diol dehydratase-reactivating factor (DDR) reactivates the inactivated holoenzymes in the presence of adenosylcobalamin, ATP and Mg{sup 2+} by mediating the release of a damaged cofactor. This molecular chaperone-like factor was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the ADP-bound and nucleotide-free forms by the sandwich-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals of the ADP-bound form belong to the orthorhombic system, with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 83.26, b = 84.60, c = 280.09 Å, and diffract to 2.0 Å. In the absence of nucleotide, DDR crystals were orthorhombic, with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 81.92, b = 85.37, c = 296.99 Å and diffract to 3.0 Å. Crystals of both forms were suitable for structural analysis.

  2. Identification of the flagellar chaperone FlgN in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri by its interaction with hook-associated FlgK.

    PubMed

    Khater, Letícia; Alegria, Marcos C; Borin, Paula F L; Santos, Túlio M; Docena, Cássia; Tasic, Ljubica; Farah, Chuck S; Ramos, Carlos H I

    2007-09-01

    Genome annotation of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), identified flagellar genes in a 15.7 kb gene cluster. However, FlgN, a secretion chaperone for hook-associated proteins FlgK and FlgL, was not identified. We performed extensive screening of the X. axonopodis pv. citri genome with the yeast two-hybrid system to identify a protein with the characteristics of the flagellar chaperone FlgN. We found a candidate (XAC1990) encoded by an operon for components of the flagellum apparatus that interacted with FlgK. In order to further support this finding, Xac FlgK and XAC1990 were cloned, expressed, and purified. The recombinant proteins were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their interaction in vitro confirmed by pull-down assays. We, therefore, conclude that XAC1990 and its homologs in other Xanthomonas species are, in fact, FlgN proteins. These observations extend the sequence diversity covered by this family of proteins.

  3. Membrane fusion catalyzed by a Rab, SNAREs, and SNARE chaperones is accompanied by enhanced permeability to small molecules and by lysis

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, Paola C.; Zick, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The fusion of sealed biological membranes joins their enclosed aqueous compartments while mixing their membrane bilayers. Reconstituted fusion reactions are commonly assayed by lipid mixing, which can result from either true fusion or from lysis and its attendant reannealing of membranes. Fusion is also frequently assayed by the mixing of lumenal aqueous compartments, using probes of low molecular weight. With several probes (biotin, methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-α-d-neuraminic acid, and dithionite), we find that yeast vacuolar SNAREs (SNAP [Soluble NSF attachment protein] Receptors) increase the permeability of membranes to small molecules and that this permeabilization is enhanced by homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex (HOPS) and Sec17p/Sec18p, the vacuolar tethering and SNARE chaperone proteins. We now report the development of a novel assay that allows the parallel assessment of lipid mixing, the mixing of intact lumenal compartments, any lysis that occurs, and the membrane permeation of small molecules. Applying this assay to an all-purified reconstituted system consisting of vacuolar lipids, the four vacuolar SNAREs, the SNARE disassembly chaperones Sec17p and Sec18p, the Rab Ypt7p, and the Rab effector/SM protein complex HOPS, we show that true fusion is accompanied by strongly enhanced membrane permeability to small molecules and a measurable rate of lysis. PMID:21976702

  4. An unexpected role for the yeast nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 as a reductant acting on the molecular chaperone BiP

    PubMed Central

    Siegenthaler, Kevin D; Pareja, Kristeen A; Wang, Jie; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2017-01-01

    Unfavorable redox conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can decrease the capacity for protein secretion, altering vital cell functions. While systems to manage reductive stress are well-established, how cells cope with an overly oxidizing ER remains largely undefined. In previous work (Wang et al., 2014), we demonstrated that the chaperone BiP is a sensor of overly oxidizing ER conditions. We showed that modification of a conserved BiP cysteine during stress beneficially alters BiP chaperone activity to cope with suboptimal folding conditions. How this cysteine is reduced to reestablish 'normal' BiP activity post-oxidative stress has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that BiP's nucleotide exchange factor – Sil1 – can reverse BiP cysteine oxidation. This previously unexpected reductant capacity for yeast Sil1 has potential implications for the human ataxia Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, where it is interesting to speculate that a disruption in ER redox-signaling (due to genetic defects in SIL1) may influence disease pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24141.001 PMID:28257000

  5. Pre-mRNA Processing Factor Prp18 Is a Stimulatory Factor of Influenza Virus RNA Synthesis and Possesses Nucleoprotein Chaperone Activity.

    PubMed

    Minakuchi, M; Sugiyama, K; Kato, Y; Naito, T; Okuwaki, M; Kawaguchi, A; Nagata, K

    2017-02-01

    The genome of influenza virus (viral RNA [vRNA]) is associated with the nucleoprotein (NP) and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and forms helical viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes. The NP-vRNA complex is the biologically active template for RNA synthesis by the viral polymerase. Previously, we identified human pre-mRNA processing factor 18 (Prp18) as a stimulatory factor for viral RNA synthesis using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae replicon system and a single-gene deletion library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (T. Naito, Y. Kiyasu, K. Sugiyama, A. Kimura, R. Nakano, A. Matsukage, and K. Nagata, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 104:18235-18240, 2007, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0705856104). In infected Prp18 knockdown (KD) cells, the synthesis of vRNA, cRNA, and viral mRNAs was reduced. Prp18 was found to stimulate in vitro viral RNA synthesis through its interaction with NP. Analyses using in vitro RNA synthesis reactions revealed that Prp18 dissociates newly synthesized RNA from the template after the early elongation step to stimulate the elongation reaction. We found that Prp18 functions as a chaperone for NP to facilitate the formation of NP-RNA complexes. Based on these results, it is suggested that Prp18 accelerates influenza virus RNA synthesis as an NP chaperone for the processive elongation reaction.

  6. Functional insight from the tetratricopeptide repeat-like motifs of the type III secretion chaperone SicA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Bae-Hoon; Jang, Jung Im; Eom, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Bang, Iel Soo; Park, Yong Keun

    2014-01-01

    SicA functions both as a class II chaperone for SipB and SipC of the type III secretion system (T3SS)-1 and as a transcriptional cofactor for the AraC-type transcription factor InvF in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bioinformatic analysis has predicted that SicA possesses three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like motifs, which are important for protein-protein interactions and serve as multiprotein complex mediators. To investigate whether the TPR-like motifs in SicA are critical for its transcriptional cofactor function, the canonical residues in these motifs were mutated to glutamate (SicAA44E , SicAA78E , and SicAG112E ). None of these mutants except SicAA44E were able to activate the expression of the sipB and sigD genes. SicAA44E still has a capacity to interact with InvF in vitro, and despite its instability in cell, it could activate the sigDE operon. This suggests that TPR motifs are important for the transcriptional cofactor function of the SicA chaperone.

  7. A dual function for chaperones SSB–RAC and the NAC nascent polypeptide–associated complex on ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Koplin, Ansgar; Preissler, Steffen; Ilina, Yulia; Koch, Miriam; Scior, Annika; Erhardt, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The yeast Hsp70/40 system SSB–RAC (stress 70 B–ribosome-associated complex) binds to ribosomes and contacts nascent polypeptides to assist cotranslational folding. In this study, we demonstrate that nascent polypeptide–associated complex (NAC), another ribosome-tethered system, is functionally connected to SSB–RAC and the cytosolic Hsp70 network. Simultaneous deletions of genes encoding NAC and SSB caused conditional loss of cell viability under protein-folding stress conditions. Furthermore, NAC mutations revealed genetic interaction with a deletion of Sse1, a nucleotide exchange factor regulating the cytosolic Hsp70 network. Cells lacking SSB or Sse1 showed protein aggregation, which is enhanced by additional loss of NAC; however, these mutants differ in their potential client repertoire. Aggregation of ribosomal proteins and biogenesis factors accompanied by a pronounced deficiency in ribosomal particles and translating ribosomes only occurs in ssbΔ and nacΔssbΔ cells, suggesting that SSB and NAC control ribosome biogenesis. Thus, SSB–RAC and NAC assist protein folding and likewise have important functions for regulation of ribosome levels. These findings emphasize the concept that ribosome production is coordinated with the protein-folding capacity of ribosome-associated chaperones. PMID:20368618

  8. Structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence of the periplasmic chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, D A; Zavialov, A V; Chernovskaya, T V; Karlyshev, A V; Zav'yalova, G A; Vasiliev, A M; Dudich, I V; Abramov, V M; Zav'yalov, V P; MacIntyre, S

    1999-04-01

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis is a typical representative of a subfamily of specific chaperones involved in assembly of surface adhesins with a very simple structure. One characteristic feature of this Caf1M-like subfamily is possession of an extended, variable sequence (termed FGL) between the F1 and subunit binding G1 beta-strands. In contrast, FGS subfamily members, characterized by PapD, have a short F1-G1 loop and are involved in assembly of complex pili. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence, a mutant Caf1M molecule (dCaf1M), in which the 27 amino acid residues between the F1 and G1 beta-strands had been deleted, was constructed. Expression of the mutated caf1M in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of high levels of dCaf1M. The far-UV circular dichroism spectra of the mutant and wild-type proteins were indistinguishable and exhibited practically the same temperature and pH dependencies. Thus, the FGL sequence of Caf1M clearly does not contribute significantly to the stability of the protein conformation. Preferential cleavage of Caf1M by trypsin at Lys-119 confirmed surface exposure of this part of the FGL sequence in the isolated chaperone and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complex. There was no evidence of surface-localized Caf1 subunit in the presence of the Caf1A outer membrane protein and dCaf1M. In contrast to Caf1M, dCaf1M was not able to form a stable complex with Caf1 nor could it protect the subunit from proteolytic degradation in vivo. This demonstration that the FGL sequence is required for stable chaperone-subunit interaction, but not for folding of a stable chaperone, provides a sound basis for future detailed molecular analyses of the FGL subfamily of chaperones.

  9. Structural and Functional Significance of the FGL Sequence of the Periplasmic Chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, David A. G.; Zavialov, Anton V.; Chernovskaya, Tatiana V.; Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Zav’yalova, Galina A.; Vasiliev, Anatoly M.; Dudich, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.; Zav’yalov, Vladimir P.; MacIntyre, Sheila

    1999-01-01

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis is a typical representative of a subfamily of specific chaperones involved in assembly of surface adhesins with a very simple structure. One characteristic feature of this Caf1M-like subfamily is possession of an extended, variable sequence (termed FGL) between the F1 and subunit binding G1 β-strands. In contrast, FGS subfamily members, characterized by PapD, have a short F1-G1 loop and are involved in assembly of complex pili. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence, a mutant Caf1M molecule (dCaf1M), in which the 27 amino acid residues between the F1 and G1 β-strands had been deleted, was constructed. Expression of the mutated caf1M in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of high levels of dCaf1M. The far-UV circular dichroism spectra of the mutant and wild-type proteins were indistinguishable and exhibited practically the same temperature and pH dependencies. Thus, the FGL sequence of Caf1M clearly does not contribute significantly to the stability of the protein conformation. Preferential cleavage of Caf1M by trypsin at Lys-119 confirmed surface exposure of this part of the FGL sequence in the isolated chaperone and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complex. There was no evidence of surface-localized Caf1 subunit in the presence of the Caf1A outer membrane protein and dCaf1M. In contrast to Caf1M, dCaf1M was not able to form a stable complex with Caf1 nor could it protect the subunit from proteolytic degradation in vivo. This demonstration that the FGL sequence is required for stable chaperone-subunit interaction, but not for folding of a stable chaperone, provides a sound basis for future detailed molecular analyses of the FGL subfamily of chaperones. PMID:10198004

  10. Interaction of new antidepressants with sigma-1 receptor chaperones and their potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-03-15

    The sigma-1 receptor chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may be implicated in the mechanistic action of some antidepressants. The present study was undertaken to examine whether new antidepressant drugs interact with the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. First, we examined the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram), serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran), and mirtazapine, a noradrenaline and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), on [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to rat brain membranes. Then, we examined the effects of these drugs on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The order of potency for drugs at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone was as follows: fluvoxamine>sertraline>fluoxetine>escitalopram>citalopram>paroxetine>duoxetine. Venlafaxine, milnacipran, and mirtazapine showed very weak affinity for this chaperone. Furthermore, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and mirtazapine significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in cell assays, and the effects of all these drugs, excluding mirtazapine, were antagonized by NE-100, a selective antagonist of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. Moreover, the effects of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine on neurite outgrowth were also antagonized by sertraline, indicating that sertraline may be an antagonist at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. The effect of mirtazapine on neurite outgrowth was antagonized by the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These findings suggest that activation at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may be involved in the action of some SSRIs, such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast, mirtazapine independently potentiated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, indicating that this beneficial effect may mediate its pharmacological effect.

  11. Molecular Chaperone Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Effects of Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Frautschy, Sally

    2014-01-01

    The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of misfolding, while others are selectively tagged for removal by heat shock proteins and degraded by either the proteasome or phagosomes. These systems are compromised in different neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, developing novel targets and classes of therapeutic drugs, which can reduce aggregates and maintain proteostasis in the brains of neurodegenerative models, is vital. Natural products that can modulate heat shock proteins/proteosomal pathway are considered promising for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Here we discuss the current knowledge on the role of HSPs in protein misfolding diseases and knowledge gained from animal models of Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, and Huntington's diseases. Further, we discuss the emerging treatment regimens for these diseases using natural products, like curcumin, which can augment expression or function of heat shock proteins in the cell. PMID:25386560

  12. Molecular chaperone dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases and effects of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Panchanan; Manna, Jayeeta; Veleri, Shobi; Frautschy, Sally

    2014-01-01

    The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of misfolding, while others are selectively tagged for removal by heat shock proteins and degraded by either the proteasome or phagosomes. These systems are compromised in different neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, developing novel targets and classes of therapeutic drugs, which can reduce aggregates and maintain proteostasis in the brains of neurodegenerative models, is vital. Natural products that can modulate heat shock proteins/proteosomal pathway are considered promising for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Here we discuss the current knowledge on the role of HSPs in protein misfolding diseases and knowledge gained from animal models of Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, and Huntington's diseases. Further, we discuss the emerging treatment regimens for these diseases using natural products, like curcumin, which can augment expression or function of heat shock proteins in the cell.

  13. Reversible Interactions of Proteins with Mixed Shell Polymeric Micelles: Tuning the Surface Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Balance toward Efficient Artificial Chaperones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzu; Song, Yiqing; Sun, Pingchuan; An, Yingli; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2016-03-22

    Molecular chaperones can elegantly fine-tune its hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance to assist a broad spectrum of nascent polypeptide chains to fold properly. Such precious property is difficult to be achieved by chaperone mimicking materials due to limited control of their surface characteristics that dictate interactions with unfolded protein intermediates. Mixed shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), which consist of two kinds of dissimilar polymeric chains in the micellar shell, offer a convenient way to fine-tune surface properties of polymeric nanoparticles. In the current work, we have fabricated ca. 30 kinds of MSPMs with finely tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties. We investigated the respective roles of thermosensitive and hydrophilic polymeric chains in the thermodenaturation protection of proteins down to the molecular structure. Although the three kinds of thermosensitive polymers investigated herein can form collapsed hydrophobic domains on the micellar surface, we found distinct capability to capture and release unfolded protein intermediates, due to their respective affinity for proteins. Meanwhile, in terms of the hydrophilic polymeric chains in the micellar shell, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) excels in assisting unfolded protein intermediates to refold properly via interacting with the refolding intermediates, resulting in enhanced chaperone efficiency. However, another hydrophilic polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) severely deteriorates the chaperone efficiency of MSPMs, due to its protein-resistant properties. Judicious combination of thermosensitive and hydrophilic chains in the micellar shell lead to MSPM-based artificial chaperones with optimal efficacy.

  14. Ubinuclein-1 confers histone H3.3-specific-binding by the HIRA histone chaperone complex

    PubMed Central

    Daniel Ricketts, M; Frederick, Brian; Hoff, Henry; Tang, Yong; Schultz, David C.; Singh Rai, Taranjit; Grazia Vizioli, Maria; Adams, Peter D.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Histone chaperones bind specific histones to mediate their storage, eviction or deposition from/or into chromatin. The HIRA histone chaperone complex, composed of HIRA, ubinuclein-1 (UBN1) and CABIN1, cooperates with the histone chaperone ASF1a to mediate H3.3-specific binding and chromatin deposition. Here we demonstrate that the conserved UBN1 Hpc2-related domain (HRD) is a novel H3.3-specific-binding domain. Biochemical and biophysical studies show the UBN1-HRD preferentially binds H3.3/H4 over H3.1/H4. X-ray crystallographic and mutational studies reveal that conserved residues within the UBN1-HRD and H3.3 G90 as key determinants of UBN1–H3.3-binding specificity. Comparison of the structure with the unrelated H3.3-specific chaperone DAXX reveals nearly identical points of contact between the chaperone and histone in the proximity of H3.3 G90, although the mechanism for H3.3 G90 recognition appears to be distinct. This study points to UBN1 as the determinant of H3.3-specific binding and deposition by the HIRA complex. PMID:26159857

  15. Human protein-disulfide isomerase is a redox-regulated chaperone activated by oxidation of domain a'.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-06

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb'xa'c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a', and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b'xa'. The structure of the reduced bb'xa' reveals for the first time that domain a' packs tightly with both domain b' and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a' releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI.

  16. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  17. Parkinson disease-linked GBA mutation effects reversed by molecular chaperones in human cell and fly models.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Beavan, Michelle; Gegg, Matthew E; Chau, Kai-Yin; Whitworth, Alexander J; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2016-08-19

    GBA gene mutations are the greatest cause of Parkinson disease (PD). GBA encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase) but the mechanisms by which loss of GCase contributes to PD remain unclear. Inhibition of autophagy and the generation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are both implicated. Mutant GCase can unfold in the ER and be degraded via the unfolded protein response, activating ER stress and reducing lysosomal GCase. Small molecule chaperones that cross the blood brain barrier help mutant GCase refold and traffic correctly to lysosomes are putative treatments for PD. We treated fibroblast cells from PD patients with heterozygous GBA mutations and Drosophila expressing human wild-type, N370S and L444P GBA with the molecular chaperones ambroxol and isofagomine. Both chaperones increased GCase levels and activity, but also GBA mRNA, in control and mutant GBA fibroblasts. Expression of mutated GBA in Drosophila resulted in dopaminergic neuronal loss, a progressive locomotor defect, abnormal aggregates in the ER and increased levels of the ER stress reporter Xbp1-EGFP. Treatment with both chaperones lowered ER stress and prevented the loss of motor function, providing proof of principle that small molecule chaperones can reverse mutant GBA-mediated ER stress in vivo and might prove effective for treating PD.

  18. Parkinson disease-linked GBA mutation effects reversed by molecular chaperones in human cell and fly models

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Beavan, Michelle; Gegg, Matthew E.; Chau, Kai-Yin; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Schapira, Anthony H. V.

    2016-01-01

    GBA gene mutations are the greatest cause of Parkinson disease (PD). GBA encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase) but the mechanisms by which loss of GCase contributes to PD remain unclear. Inhibition of autophagy and the generation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are both implicated. Mutant GCase can unfold in the ER and be degraded via the unfolded protein response, activating ER stress and reducing lysosomal GCase. Small molecule chaperones that cross the blood brain barrier help mutant GCase refold and traffic correctly to lysosomes are putative treatments for PD. We treated fibroblast cells from PD patients with heterozygous GBA mutations and Drosophila expressing human wild-type, N370S and L444P GBA with the molecular chaperones ambroxol and isofagomine. Both chaperones increased GCase levels and activity, but also GBA mRNA, in control and mutant GBA fibroblasts. Expression of mutated GBA in Drosophila resulted in dopaminergic neuronal loss, a progressive locomotor defect, abnormal aggregates in the ER and increased levels of the ER stress reporter Xbp1-EGFP. Treatment with both chaperones lowered ER stress and prevented the loss of motor function, providing proof of principle that small molecule chaperones can reverse mutant GBA-mediated ER stress in vivo and might prove effective for treating PD. PMID:27539639

  19. Essential control of mitochondrial morphology and function by chaperone-mediated autophagy through degradation of PARK7

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Cai, Zhibiao; Tao, Kai; Zeng, Weijun; Lu, Fangfang; Yang, Ruixin; Feng, Dayun; Gao, Guodong; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a selective degradation system, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival under stress conditions. Increasing evidence points to an important role for the dysfunction of CMA in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). However, the mechanisms by which CMA regulates neuronal survival under stress and its role in neurodegenerative diseases are not fully understood. PARK7/DJ-1 is an autosomal recessive familial PD gene. PARK7 plays a critical role in antioxidative response and its dysfunction leads to mitochondrial defects. In the current study, we showed that CMA mediated the lysosome-dependent degradation of PARK7. Importantly, CMA preferentially removed the oxidatively damaged nonfunctional PARK7 protein. Furthermore, CMA protected cells from mitochondrial toxin MPP+-induced changes in mitochondrial morphology and function, and increased cell viability. These protective effects were lost under PARK7-deficiency conditions. Conversely, overexpression of PARK7 significantly attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death exacerbated by blocking CMA under oxidative stress. Thus, our findings reveal a mechanism by which CMA protects mitochondrial function by degrading nonfunctional PARK7 and maintaining its homeostasis, and dysregulation of this pathway may contribute to the neuronal stress and death in PD pathogenesis. PMID:27171370

  20. Hsp90-Dependent Activation of Protein Kinases Is Regulated by Chaperone-Targeted Dephosphorylation of Cdc37

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cara K.; Mollapour, Mehdi; Smith, Jennifer R.; Truman, Andrew; Hu, Bin; Good, Valerie M.; Panaretou, Barry; Neckers, Len; Clarke, Paul A.; Workman, Paul; Piper, Peter W.; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Activation of protein kinase clients by the Hsp90 system is mediated by the cochaperone protein Cdc37. Cdc37 requires phosphorylation at Ser13, but little is known about the regulation of this essential posttranslational modification. We show that Ser13 of uncomplexed Cdc37 is phosphorylated in vivo, as well as in binary complex with a kinase (C-K), or in ternary complex with Hsp90 and kinase (H-C-K). Whereas pSer13-Cdc37 in the H-C-K complex is resistant to nonspecific phosphatases, it is efficiently dephosphorylated by the chaperone-targeted protein phosphatase 5 (PP5/Ppt1), which does not affect isolated Cdc37. We show that Cdc37 and PP5/Ppt1 associate in Hsp90 complexes in yeast and in human tumor cells, and that PP5/Ppt1 regulates phosphorylation of Ser13-Cdc37 in vivo, directly affecting activation of protein kinase clients by Hsp90-Cdc37. These data reveal a cyclic regulatory mechanism for Cdc37, in which its constitutive phosphorylation is reversed by targeted dephosphorylation in Hsp90 complexes. PMID:18922470

  1. The Molecular Chaperone Hsp70 Activates Protein Phosphatase 5 (PP5) by Binding the Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Connarn, Jamie N.; Assimon, Victoria A.; Reed, Rebecca A.; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development. PMID:24327656

  2. Impairment of chaperone-mediated autophagy leads to selective lysosomal degradation defects in the lysosomal storage disease cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Gennaro; Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Rocca, Celine J; Monfregola, Jlenia; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Cherqui, Stephanie; Catz, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite accumulation in lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) results in impaired cell function and multi-systemic disease. Although substrate reduction and lysosomal overload-decreasing therapies can ameliorate disease progression, the significance of lysosomal overload-independent mechanisms in the development of cellular dysfunction is unknown for most LSDs. Here, we identify a mechanism of impaired chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cystinosis, a LSD caused by defects in the cystine transporter cystinosin (CTNS) and characterized by cystine lysosomal accumulation. We show that, different from other LSDs, autophagosome number is increased, but macroautophagic flux is not impaired in cystinosis while mTOR activity is not affected. Conversely, the expression and localization of the CMA receptor LAMP2A are abnormal in CTNS-deficient cells and degradation of the CMA substrate GAPDH is defective in Ctns−/− mice. Importantly, cysteamine treatment, despite decreasing lysosomal overload, did not correct defective CMA in Ctns−/− mice or LAMP2A mislocalization in cystinotic cells, which was rescued by CTNS expression instead, suggesting that cystinosin is important for CMA activity. In conclusion, CMA impairment contributes to cell malfunction in cystinosis, highlighting the need for treatments complementary to current therapies that are based on decreasing lysosomal overload. PMID:25586965

  3. InvB is a type III secretion-associated chaperone for the Salmonella enterica effector protein SopE.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ho; Galán, Jorge E

    2003-12-01

    SopE is a bacteriophage-encoded effector protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that is translocated into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells by a type III secretion system (TTSS) (W.-D. Hardt, H. Urlaub, and J. E. Galán, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:2574-2579, 1998; M. W. Wood, R. Rosqvist, P. B. Mullan, M. H. Edwards, and E. E. Galyov, Mol. Microbiol. 22:327-338, 1996). In this study, we provide evidence that an unlinked gene carried within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), invB (K. Eichelberg, C. Ginocchio, and J. E. Galán, J. Bacteriol. 176:4501-4510, 1994), is required for the secretion of SopE through the SPI-1 TTSS. Furthermore, far-Western blotting analysis shows that SopE directly interacts with InvB through a domain located at its amino terminus. We conclude that InvB is the TTSS-associated chaperone for SopE.

  4. The Ydj1 molecular chaperone facilitates formation of active p60v-src in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, B; Caplan, A J; Boschelli, F

    1996-01-01

    Molecular chaperones have been implicated in the formation of active p60v-src tyrosine kinase. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of p60v-src causes cell death, a phenomenon that requires functional Hsp90. We show here that mutations in a member of a second class of chaperones, the yeast dnaJ homologue YDJ1, suppress the lethality caused by p60v-src. One p60v-src-resistant ydj1 mutant, ydj1-39, which has two point mutations in the highly conserved "J" domain, has reduced levels of v-src mRNA and protein. However, a ydj1 null mutant produces normal quantities of active p60v-src, indicating that Ydj1p facilitates, but is not essential for, the formation of active p60v-src. We also report p60v-src-resistance in a previously identified temperature-sensitive ydj1 mutant, ydj1-151. In this mutant, the level of p60v-src remains unaltered, but the protein is much less active in vivo. In addition, p60v-src immunoprecipitates from the ydj1-151 strain contained Hsp90 and Hsp70 in greater amounts than in wild-type strains. Ydj1 protein was also detected in p60v-src immunoprecipitates from both wild-type and ydj1-151 strains. These results indicate that Ydj1p participates in the formation of active p60v-src via molecular chaperone complexes. Images PMID:8741842

  5. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  6. Choline Kinase Alpha as an Androgen Receptor Chaperone and Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Asim, Mohammad; Massie, Charles E.; Orafidiya, Folake; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Warren, Anne Y.; Esmaeili, Mohsen; Selth, Luke A.; Zecchini, Heather I.; Luko, Katarina; Qureshi, Arham; Baridi, Ajoeb; Menon, Suraj; Madhu, Basetti; Escriu, Carlos; Lyons, Scott; Vowler, Sarah L.; Zecchini, Vincent R.; Shaw, Greg; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Russell, Roslin; Mohammed, Hisham; Stefanos, Niki; Lynch, Andy G.; Grigorenko, Elena; D’Santos, Clive; Taylor, Chris; Lamb, Alastair; Sriranjan, Rouchelle; Yang, Jiali; Stark, Rory; Dehm, Scott M.; Rennie, Paul S.; Carroll, Jason S.; Griffiths, John R.; Tavaré, Simon; Mills, Ian G.; McEwan, Iain J.; Baniahmad, Aria; Tilley, Wayne D.; Neal, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR) is a major drug target in prostate cancer (PCa). We profiled the AR-regulated kinome to identify clinically relevant and druggable effectors of AR signaling. Methods: Using genome-wide approaches, we interrogated all AR regulated kinases. Among these, choline kinase alpha (CHKA) expression was evaluated in benign (n = 195), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (n = 153) and prostate cancer (PCa) lesions (n = 359). We interrogated how CHKA regulates AR signaling using biochemical assays and investigated androgen regulation of CHKA expression in men with PCa, both untreated (n = 20) and treated with an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor degarelix (n = 27). We studied the effect of CHKA inhibition on the PCa transcriptome using RNA sequencing and tested the effect of CHKA inhibition on cell growth, clonogenic survival and invasion. Tumor xenografts (n = 6 per group) were generated in mice using genetically engineered prostate cancer cells with inducible CHKA knockdown. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests, Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier methods. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: CHKA expression was shown to be androgen regulated in cell lines, xenografts, and human tissue (log fold change from 6.75 to 6.59, P = .002) and was positively associated with tumor stage. CHKA binds directly to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR, enhancing its stability. As such, CHKA is the first kinase identified as an AR chaperone. Inhibition of CHKA repressed the AR transcriptional program including pathways enriched for regulation of protein folding, decreased AR protein levels, and inhibited the growth of PCa cell lines, human PCa explants, and tumor xenografts. Conclusions: CHKA can act as an AR chaperone, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence for kinases as molecular chaperones, making CHKA both a marker of tumor progression and a potential therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:26657335

  7. Functional Analysis of the Hsp93/ClpC Chaperone at the Chloroplast Envelope.

    PubMed

    Flores-Pérez, Úrsula; Bédard, Jocelyn; Tanabe, Noriaki; Lymperopoulos, Panagiotis; Clarke, Adrian K; Jarvis, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp100-type chaperone Hsp93/ClpC has crucial roles in chloroplast biogenesis. In addition to its role in proteolysis in the stroma, biochemical and genetic evidence led to the hypothesis that this chaperone collaborates with the inner envelope TIC complex to power preprotein import. Recently, it was suggested that Hsp93, working together with the Clp proteolytic core, can confer a protein quality control mechanism at the envelope. Thus, the role of envelope-localized Hsp93, and the mechanism by which it participates in protein import, remain unclear. To analyze the function of Hsp93 in protein import independently of its ClpP association, we created a mutant of Hsp93 affecting its ClpP-binding motif (PBM) (Hsp93[P-]), which is essential for the chaperone's interaction with the Clp proteolytic core. The Hsp93[P-] construct was ineffective at complementing the pale-yellow phenotype of hsp93 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, indicating that the PBM is essential for Hsp93 function. As expected, the PBM mutation negatively affected the degradation activity of the stromal Clp protease. The mutation also disrupted association of Hsp93 with the Clp proteolytic core at the envelope, without affecting the envelope localization of Hsp93 itself or its association with the TIC machinery, which we demonstrate to be mediated by a direct interaction with Tic110. Nonetheless, Hsp93[P-] expression did not detectably improve the protein import efficiency of hsp93 mutant chloroplasts. Thus, our results do not support the proposed function of Hsp93 in protein import propulsion, but are more consistent with the notion of Hsp93 performing a quality control role at the point of import.

  8. HSP33 in eukaryotes - an evolutionary tale of a chaperone adapted to photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2015-06-01

    HSP33 was originally identified in bacteria as a redox-sensitive chaperone that protects unfolded proteins from aggregation. Here, we describe a eukaryote ortholog of HSP33 from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which appears to play a protective role under light-induced oxidizing conditions. The algal HSP33 exhibits chaperone activity, as shown by citrate synthase aggregation assays. Studies from the Jakob laboratory established that activation of the bacterial HSP33 upon its oxidation initiates by the release of pre-bound Zn from the well conserved Zn-binding motif Cys-X-Cys-Xn -Cys-X-X-Cys, and is followed by significant structural changes (Reichmann et al., ). Unlike the bacterial protein, the HSP33 from C. reinhardtii had lost the first cysteine residue of its center, diminishing Zn-binding activity under all conditions. As a result, the algal protein can be easily activated by minor structural changes in response to oxidation and/or excess heat. An attempt to restore the missing first cysteine did not have a major effect on Zn-binding and on the mode of activation. Replacement of all remaining cysteines abolished completely any residual Zn binding, although the chaperone activation was maintained. A phylogenetic analysis of the algal HSP33 showed that it clusters with the cyanobacterial protein, in line with its biochemical localization to the chloroplast. Indeed, expression of the algal HSP33 increases in response to light-induced oxidative stress, which is experienced routinely by photosynthetic organisms. Despite the fact that no ortholog could be found in higher eukaryotes, its abundance in all algal species examined could have a biotechnological relevance.

  9. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a matrix scavenger chaperone.

    PubMed

    Chlenski, Alexandre; Guerrero, Lisa J; Salwen, Helen R; Yang, Qiwei; Tian, Yufeng; Morales La Madrid, Andres; Mirzoeva, Salida; Bouyer, Patrice G; Xu, David; Walker, Matthew; Cohn, Susan L

    2011-01-01

    Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) is one of the major non-structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in remodeling tissues. The functional significance of SPARC is emphasized by its origin in the first multicellular organisms and its high degree of evolutionary conservation. Although SPARC has been shown to act as a critical modulator of ECM remodeling with profound effects on tissue physiology and architecture, no plausible molecular mechanism of its action has been proposed. In the present study, we demonstrate that SPARC mediates the disassembly and degradation of ECM networks by functioning as a matricellular chaperone. While it has low affinity to its targets inside the cells where the Ca(2+) concentrations are low, high extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+) activate binding to multiple ECM proteins, including collagens. We demonstrated that in vitro, this leads to the inhibition of collagen I fibrillogenesis and disassembly of pre-formed collagen I fibrils by SPARC at high Ca(2+) concentrations. In cell culture, exogenous SPARC was internalized by the fibroblast cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pulse-chase assay further revealed that internalized SPARC is quickly released outside the cell, demonstrating that SPARC shuttles between the cell and ECM. Fluorescently labeled collagen I, fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminin were co-internalized with SPARC by fibroblasts, and semi-quantitative Western blot showed that SPARC mediates internalization of collagen I. Using a novel 3-dimensional model of fluorescent ECM networks pre-deposited by live fibroblasts, we demonstrated that degradation of ECM depends on the chaperone activity of SPARC. These results indicate that SPARC may represent a new class of scavenger chaperones, which mediate ECM degradation, remodeling and repair by disassembling ECM networks and shuttling ECM proteins into the cell. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide insight into the

  10. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles. PMID:28076420

  11. Coffee enhances the expression of chaperones and antioxidant proteins in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Federico; Li Volti, Giovanni; Vitaglione, Paola; Morisco, Filomena; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Zappalà, Agata; Palmigiano, Angelo; Garozzo, Domenico; Caporaso, Nicola; D'Argenio, Giuseppe; Galvano, Fabio

    2014-06-01

    Coffee consumption is inversely related to the degree of liver injury in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Molecular mediators contributing to coffee's beneficial effects in NAFLD remain to be elucidated. In this study, we administrated decaffeinated espresso coffee or vehicle to rats fed an high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks and examined the effects of coffee on liver injury by using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) proteomic analysis combined with mass spectrometry. Rats fed an HFD and water developed panacinar steatosis, lobular inflammation, and mild fibrosis, whereas rats fed an HFD and coffee exhibited only mild steatosis. Coffee consumption increased liver expression of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperones glucose-related protein 78 and protein disulfide-isomerase A3; similarly, coffee drinking enhanced the expression of the mitochondrial chaperones heat stress protein 70 and DJ-1. Furthermore, in agreement with reduced hepatic levels of 8-isoprostanes and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, proteomic analysis showed that coffee consumption induces the expression of master regulators of redox status (i.e., peroxiredoxin 1, glutathione S-transferase α2, and D-dopachrome tautomerase). Last, proteomics revealed an association of coffee intake with decreased expression of electron transfer flavoprotein subunit α, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, involved in de novo lipogenesis. In this study, we were able to identify by proteomic analysis the stress proteins mediating the antioxidant effects of coffee; moreover, we establish for the first time the contribution of specific coffee-induced endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones ensuring correct protein folding and degradation in the liver.

  12. The G Protein α Chaperone Ric-8 as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Papasergi, Makaía M.; Patel, Bharti R.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase (Ric-8)A and Ric-8B are essential genes that encode positive regulators of heterotrimeric G protein α subunits. Controversy persists surrounding the precise way(s) that Ric-8 proteins affect G protein biology and signaling. Ric-8 proteins chaperone nucleotide-free Gα-subunit states during biosynthetic protein folding prior to G protein heterotrimer assembly. In organisms spanning the evolutionary window of Ric-8 expression, experimental perturbation of Ric-8 genes results in reduced functional abundances of G proteins because G protein α subunits are misfolded and degraded rapidly. Ric-8 proteins also act as Gα-subunit guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) in vitro. However, Ric-8 GEF activity could strictly be an in vitro phenomenon stemming from the ability of Ric-8 to induce partial Gα unfolding, thereby enhancing GDP release. Ric-8 GEF activity clearly differs from the GEF activity of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). G protein βγ is inhibitory to Ric-8 action but obligate for receptors. It remains an open question whether Ric-8 has dual functions in cells and regulates G proteins as both a molecular chaperone and GEF. Clearly, Ric-8 has a profound influence on heterotrimeric G protein function. For this reason, we propose that Ric-8 proteins are as yet untested therapeutic targets in which pharmacological inhibition of the Ric-8/Gα protein–protein interface could serve to attenuate the effects of disease-causing G proteins (constitutively active mutants) and/or GPCR signaling. This minireview will chronicle the understanding of Ric-8 function, provide a comparative discussion of the Ric-8 molecular chaperoning and GEF activities, and support the case for why Ric-8 proteins should be considered potential targets for development of new therapies. PMID:25319541

  13. Peptide-chaperone-directed transdermal protein delivery requires energy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Renquan; Jin, Peipei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Changli; Chen, Chuanjun; Ding, Weiping; Wen, Longping

    2014-11-03

    The biologically inspired transdermal enhanced peptide TD1 has been discovered to specifically facilitate transdermal delivery of biological macromolecules. However, the biological behavior of TD1 has not been fully defined. In this study, we find that energy is required for the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery through rat and human skins. Our results show that the permeation activity of TD1-hEGF, a fusion protein composed of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and the TD1 sequence connected with a glycine-serine linker (GGGGS), can be inhibited by the energy inhibitor, rotenone or oligomycin. In addition, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the essential energetic molecule in organic systems, can effectively facilitate the TD1 directed permeation of the protein-based drug into the skin in a dose-dependent fashion. Our results here demonstrate a novel energy-dependent permeation process during the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery that could be valuable for the future development of promising new transdermal drugs.

  14. Effects of pH and Iminosugar Pharmacological Chaperones on Lysosomal Glycosidase Structure and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Raquel L.; D’aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.

    2009-06-05

    Human lysosomal enzymes acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase) and acid-{alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-Gal A) hydrolyze the sphingolipids glucosyl- and globotriaosylceramide, respectively, and mutations in these enzymes lead to the lipid metabolism disorders Gaucher and Fabry disease, respectively. We have investigated the structure and stability of GCase and {alpha}-Gal A in a neutral-pH environment reflective of the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic-pH environment reflective of the lysosome. These details are important for the development of pharmacological chaperone therapy for Gaucher and Fabry disease, in which small molecules bind mutant enzymes in the ER to enable the mutant enzyme to meet quality control requirements for lysosomal trafficking. We report crystal structures of apo GCase at pH 4.5, at pH 5.5, and in complex with the pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) at pH 7.5. We also present thermostability analysis of GCase at pH 7.4 and 5.2 using differential scanning calorimetry. We compare our results with analogous experiments using {alpha}-Gal A and the chaperone 1-deoxygalactonijirimycin (DGJ), including the first structure of {alpha}-Gal A with DGJ. Both GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are more stable at lysosomal pH with and without their respective iminosugars bound, and notably, the stability of the GCase-IFG complex is pH sensitive. We show that the conformations of the active site loops in GCase are sensitive to ligand binding but not pH, whereas analogous galactose- or DGJ-dependent conformational changes in {alpha}-Gal A are not seen. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from {alpha}-Gal A unfolding indicate two-state, van't Hoff unfolding in the absence of the iminosugar at neutral and lysosomal pH, and non-two-state unfolding in the presence of DGJ. Taken together, these results provide insight into how GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are thermodynamically stabilized by iminosugars and suggest strategies for the development of new pharmacological

  15. The Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP1 Promotes Neoplastic Growth by Inhibiting Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sciacovelli, Marco; Guzzo, Giulia; Morello, Virginia; Frezza, Christian; Zheng, Liang; Nannini, Nazarena; Calabrese, Fiorella; Laudiero, Gabriella; Esposito, Franca; Landriscina, Matteo; Defilippi, Paola; Bernardi, Paolo; Rasola, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Summary We report that the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1, which is induced in most tumor types, is required for neoplastic growth and confers transforming potential to noncancerous cells. TRAP1 binds to and inhibits succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), the complex II of the respiratory chain. The respiratory downregulation elicited by TRAP1 interaction with SDH promotes tumorigenesis by priming the succinate-dependent stabilization of the proneoplastic transcription factor HIF1α independently of hypoxic conditions. These findings provide a mechanistic clue to explain the switch to aerobic glycolysis of tumors and identify TRAP1 as a promising antineoplastic target. PMID:23747254

  16. Molecular Chaperones and the Assembly of the Prion Ure2p in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Savistchenko, Jimmy; Krzewska, Joanna; Fay, Nicolas; Melki, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The protein Ure2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses prion properties at the origin of the [URE3] trait. In vivo, a high molecular weight form of inactive Ure2p is associated to [URE3]. The faithful and continued propagation of [URE3]is dependent on the expression levels of molecular chaperones from the Hsp100, -70, and -40 families; however, so far, their role is not fully documented. Here we investigate the effects of molecular chaperones from the Hsp40, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp100 families and the chaperonin CCT/Tric on the assembly of full-length Ure2p. We show that Hsp104p greatly stimulates Ure2p aggregation, whereas Ssa1p, Ydj1p, Sis1p, and Hsp82p inhibit aggregation to different extents. The nature of the high molecular weight Ure2p species that forms in the presence of the different molecular chaperones and their nucleotide dependence is described. We show that Hsp104p favors the aggregation of Ure2p into non-fibrillar high molecular weight particles, whereas Ssa1p, Ydj1p, Sis1p, and Hsp82p sequester Ure2p in spherical oligomers. Using fluorescently labeled full-length Ure2p and Ure2p-(94–354) and fluorescence polarization, we show that Ssa1p binding to Ure2p is ATP-dependent, whereas that of Hsp104p is not. We also show that Ssa1p preferentially interacts with the N-terminal domain of Ure2p that is critical for prion propagation, whereas Ydj1p preferentially interacts with the C-terminal domain of the protein, and we discuss the significance of this observation. Finally, the affinities of Ssa1p, Ydj1p, and Hsp104p for Ure2p are determined. Our in vitro observations bring new insight into the mechanism by which molecular chaperones influence the propagation of [URE3]. PMID:18400756

  17. Membrane chaperoning by members of the PspA/IM30 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Thurotte, Adrien; Brüser, Thomas; Mascher, Thorsten; Schneider, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT PspA, IM30 (Vipp1) and LiaH, which all belong to the PspA/IM30 protein family, form high molecular weight oligomeric structures. For all proteins membrane binding and protection of the membrane structure and integrity has been shown or postulated. Here we discuss the possible membrane chaperoning activity of PspA, IM30 and LiaH and propose that larger oligomeric structures bind to stressed membrane regions, followed by oligomer disassembly and membrane stabilization by protein monomers or smaller/different oligomeric scaffolds.

  18. Ric-3 chaperone-mediated stable cell-surface expression of the neuronal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Vallés, Ana Sofía; Roccamo, Ana M; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Studies of the α7-type neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR), one of the receptor forms involved in many physiologically relevant processes in the central nervous system, have been hampered by the inability of this homomeric protein to assemble in most heterologous expression systems. In a recent study, it was shown that the chaperone Ric-3 is necessary for the maturation and functional expression of α7-type AChRs1. The current work aims at obtaining and characterizing a cell line with high functional expression of the human α7 AChR. Methods: Ric-3 cDNA was incorporated into SHE-P1-hα7 cells expressing the α7-type AChR. Functional studies were undertaken using single-channel patch-clamp recordings. Equilibrium and kinetic [125I]α-bungarotoxin binding assays, as well as fluorescence microscopy using fluorescent α-bungarotoxin, anti-α7 antibody, and GFP-α7 were performed on the new clone. Results: The human α7-type AChR was stably expressed in a new cell line, which we coined SHE-P1-hα7-Ric-3, by co-expression of the chaperone Ric-3. Cell-surface AChRs exhibited [125I]αBTX saturable binding with an apparent KD of about 55 nmol/L. Fluorescence microscopy revealed dispersed and micro-clustered AChR aggregates at the surface of SHE-P1-hα7-Ric-3 cells. Larger micron-sized clusters were observed in the absence of receptor-clustering proteins or upon aggregation with anti-α7 antibodies. In contrast, chaperone-less SHE-P1-hα7 cells expressed only intracellular α7 AChRs and failed to produce detectable single-channel currents. Conclusion: The production of a stable and functional cell line of neuroepithelial lineage with robust cell-surface expression of neuronal α7-type AChR, as reported here, constitutes an important advance in the study of homomeric receptors in mammalian cells. PMID:19498422

  19. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  20. The early-onset torsion dystonia-associated protein, torsinA, displays molecular chaperone activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Alexander J.; Churchill, Perry F.; Caldwell, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    TorsinA is a member of the AAA+ ATPase family of proteins and, notably, is the only known ATPase localized to the ER lumen. It has been suggested to act as a molecular chaperone, while a mutant form associated with early-onset torsion dystonia, a dominantly inherited movement disorder, appears to result in a net loss of function in vivo. Thus far, no studies have examined the chaperone activity of torsinA in vitro. Here we expressed and purified both wild-type (WT) and mutant torsinA fusion proteins in bacteria and examined their ability to function as molecular chaperones by monitoring suppression of luciferase and citrate synthase (CS) aggregation. We also assessed their ability to hold proteins in an intermediate state for refolding. As measured by light scattering and SDS-PAGE, both WT and mutant torsinA effectively, and similarly, suppressed protein aggregation compared to controls. This function was not further enhanced by the presence of ATP. Further, we found that while neither form of torsinA could protect CS from heat-induced inactivation, they were both able to reactivate luciferase when ATP and rabbit reticulocyte lysate were added. This suggests that torsinA holds luciferase in an intermediate state, which can then be refolded in the presence of other chaperones. These data provide conclusive evidence that torsinA acts as a molecular chaperone in vitro and suggests that early-onset torsion dystonia is likely not a consequence of a loss in torsinA chaperone activity but might be an outcome of insufficient torsinA localization at the ER to manage protein folding or trafficking. PMID:20169475

  1. Acid-denatured Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Mares, Rosa E; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Ramos, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been widely used in several molecular and cellular biology applications, since it is remarkably stable in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, native GFP is resistant to the most common chemical denaturants; however, a low fluorescence signal has been observed after acid-induced denaturation. Furthermore, this acid-denatured GFP has been used as substrate in studies of the folding activity of some bacterial chaperones and other chaperone-like molecules. Protein disulfide isomerase enzymes, a family of eukaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds in nascent polypeptides, play a key role in protein folding and it could display chaperone activity. However, contrasting results have been reported using different proteins as model substrates. Here, we report the further application of GFP as a model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) enzymes. Since refolding of acid-denatured GFP can be easily and directly monitored, a simple micro-assay was used to study the effect of the molecular participants in protein refolding assisted by PDI. Additionally, the effect of a well-known inhibitor of PDI chaperone activity was also analyzed. Because of the diversity their functional activities, PDI enzymes are potentially interesting drug targets. Since PDI may be implicated in the protection of cells against ER stress, including cancer cells, inhibitors of PDI might be able to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy; furthermore, it has been demonstrated that blocking the reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds of proteins associated with the cell surface markedly reduces the infectivity of the human immunodeficiency virus. Although several high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to test PDI reductase activity have been described, we report here a novel and simple micro-assay to test the chaperone activity of PDI enzymes, which is amenable for HTS of PDI

  2. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjie; Wang, Peipei; Wang, Guang-Chuan; Yang, Jie; Sun,