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Sample records for dnak chaperone system

  1. Role of Streptococcus intermedius DnaK chaperone system in stress tolerance and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Tabata, Atsushi; Imaki, Hidenori; Tsuruno, Keigo; Miyazaki, Aya; Sonomoto, Kenji; Whiley, Robert Alan; Nagamune, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a facultatively anaerobic, opportunistic pathogen that causes purulent infections and abscess formation. The DnaK chaperone system has been characterized in several pathogenic bacteria and seems to have important functions in stress resistance and pathogenicity. However, the role of DnaK in S. intermedius remains unclear. Therefore, we constructed a dnaK knockout mutant that exhibited slow growth, thermosensitivity, accumulation of GroEL in the cell, and reduced cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. The level of secretion of a major pathogenic factor, intermedilysin, was not affected by dnaK mutation. We further examined the function and property of the S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system by using Escherichia coli ΔdnaK and ΔrpoH mutant strains. S. intermedius DnaK could not complement the thermosensitivity of E. coli ΔdnaK mutant. However, the intact S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system could complement the thermosensitivity and acid sensitivity of E. coli ΔdnaK mutant. The S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system could regulate the activity and stability of the heat shock transcription factor σ(32) in E. coli, although S. intermedius does not utilize σ(32) for heat shock transcription. The S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system was also able to efficiently eliminate the aggregated proteins from ΔrpoH mutant cells. Overall, our data showed that the S. intermedius DnaK chaperone system has important functions in quality control of cellular proteins but has less participation in the modulation of expression of pathogenic factors.

  2. Identification and characterization of a Hsp70 (DnaK) chaperone system from Meiothermus ruber.

    PubMed

    Pleckaityte, M; Mistiniene, E; Michailoviene, V; Zvirblis, G

    2003-04-01

    We have cloned the genes encoding the chaperones of Meiothermus ruber, Hsp70 (Mru.Hsp70), Hsp40 (Mru.Hsp40) and Hsp22 (Mru.Hsp22). The genes hsp70, hsp22 and hsp40 of M. ruber are organized into an operon. The amino acid sequences of the three M. ruber chaperones show strong similarity with the heat shock proteins of Thermus thermophilus. Both Mru.Hsp40 and its homolog from T. thermophilus lack a cysteine-rich region. However, recombinant Mru.Hsp70 and Mru.Hsp40 associate in an ATP-dependent manner, and assemble into a complex in the absence of other proteins, unlike their counterparts from T. thermophilus, which require DafA for assembly. The analysis revealed that Mru.Hsp70 and Mru.Hsp40 assemble as monomers into the complex, although their homologs from T. thermophilus enter the complex as trimers. The Mru.Hsp70 and Mru.Hsp40 complex increases the spontaneous rate of refolding of denatured mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase by tenfold.

  3. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Céline; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2012-11-26

    In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer) domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants). Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  4. Mutations in the interdomain linker region of DnaK abolish the chaperone action of the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system.

    PubMed

    Han, W; Christen, P

    2001-05-18

    Hsp70s assist the folding of proteins in an ATP-dependent manner. DnaK, the Hsp70 of Escherichia coli, acts in concert with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE. Amino acid substitutions (D388R and L391S/L392G) in the linker region between the ATPase and substrate-binding domain did not affect the functional domain coupling and oligomerization of DnaK. The intrinsic ATPase activity was enhanced up to 10-fold. However, the ATPase activity of DnaK L391S/L392G, if stimulated by DnaJ plus protein substrate, was five times lower than that of wild-type DnaK and DnaK D388R. This defect correlated with the complete loss of chaperone action in luciferase refolding. Apparently, the conserved leucine residues in the linker mediate the synergistic effects of DnaJ and protein substrate on ATPase activity, a function which might be essential for chaperone action.

  5. The Molecular Chaperone DnaK Is a Source of Mutational Robustness.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, José; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Montagud-Martínez, Roser; Berlanga, Víctor; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Wagner, Andreas; Fares, Mario A

    2016-10-05

    Molecular chaperones, also known as heat-shock proteins, refold misfolded proteins and help other proteins reach their native conformation. Thanks to these abilities, some chaperones, such as the Hsp90 protein or the chaperonin GroEL, can buffer the deleterious phenotypic effects of mutations that alter protein structure and function. Hsp70 chaperones use a chaperoning mechanism different from that of Hsp90 and GroEL, and it is not known whether they can also buffer mutations. Here, we show that they can. To this end, we performed a mutation accumulation experiment in Escherichia coli, followed by whole-genome resequencing. Overexpression of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK helps cells cope with mutational load and completely avoid the extinctions we observe in lineages evolving without chaperone overproduction. Additionally, our sequence data show that DnaK overexpression increases mutational robustness, the tolerance of its clients to nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions. We also show that this elevated mutational buffering translates into differences in evolutionary rates on intermediate and long evolutionary time scales. Specifically, we studied the evolutionary rates of DnaK clients using the genomes of E. coli, Salmonella enterica, and 83 other gamma-proteobacteria. We find that clients that interact strongly with DnaK evolve faster than weakly interacting clients. Our results imply that all three major chaperone classes can buffer mutations and affect protein evolution. They illustrate how an individual protein like a chaperone can have a disproportionate effect on the evolution of a proteome.

  6. Reconstitution of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteostasis network highlights essential cofactor interactions with chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Lupoli, Tania J.; Fay, Allison; Adura, Carolina; Nathan, Carl F.

    2016-01-01

    During host infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encounters several types of stress that impair protein integrity, including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and chemotherapy. The resulting protein aggregates can be resolved or degraded by molecular machinery conserved from bacteria to eukaryotes. Eukaryotic Hsp104/Hsp70 and their bacterial homologs ClpB/DnaK are ATP-powered chaperones that restore toxic protein aggregates to a native folded state. DnaK is essential in Mycobacterium smegmatis, and ClpB is involved in asymmetrically distributing damaged proteins during cell division as a mechanism of survival in Mtb, commending both proteins as potential drug targets. However, their molecular partners in protein reactivation have not been characterized in mycobacteria. Here, we reconstituted the activities of the Mtb ClpB/DnaK bichaperone system with the cofactors DnaJ1, DnaJ2, and GrpE and the small heat shock protein Hsp20. We found that DnaJ1 and DnaJ2 activate the ATPase activity of DnaK differently. A point mutation in the highly conserved HPD motif of the DnaJ proteins abrogates their ability to activate DnaK, although the DnaJ2 mutant still binds to DnaK. The purified Mtb ClpB/DnaK system reactivated a heat-denatured model substrate, but the DnaJ HPD mutants inhibited the reaction. Finally, either DnaJ1 or DnaJ2 is required for mycobacterial viability, as is the DnaK-activating activity of a DnaJ protein. These studies lay the groundwork for strategies to target essential chaperone–protein interactions in Mtb, the leading cause of death from a bacterial infection. PMID:27872278

  7. DnaK plays a pivotal role in Tat targeting of CueO and functions beside SlyD as a general Tat signal binding chaperone.

    PubMed

    Graubner, Wenke; Schierhorn, Angelika; Brüser, Thomas

    2007-03-09

    The Tat (twin-arginine translocation) system from Escherichia coli transports folded proteins with N-terminal twin-arginine signal peptides across the cytoplasmic membrane. The influence of general chaperones on Tat substrate targeting has not been clarified so far. Here we show that the chaperones SlyD and DnaK bind to a broad range of different Tat signal sequences in vitro and in vivo. Initially, SlyD and GroEL were purified from DnaK-deficient extracts by their affinity to various Tat signal sequences. Of these, only SlyD bound Tat signal sequences also in the presence of DnaK. SlyD and DnaK also co-purified with Tat substrate precursors, demonstrating the binding to Tat signal sequences in vivo. Deletion of dnaK completely abolished Tat-dependent translocation of CueO, but not of DmsA, YcdB, or HiPIP, indicating that DnaK has an essential role specifically for CueO. DnaK was not required for stability of the CueO precursor and thus served in some essential step after folding. A CueO signal sequence fusion to HiPIP was Tat-dependently transported without the need of DnaK, indicating that the mature domain of CueO is responsible for the DnaK dependence. The overall results suggest that SlyD and DnaK are in the set of chaperones that can serve as general Tat signal-binding proteins. DnaK has additional functions that are indispensable for the targeting of CueO.

  8. E. coli chaperones DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy inhibit bacterial functional amyloid assembly.

    PubMed

    Evans, Margery L; Schmidt, Jens C; Ilbert, Marianne; Doyle, Shannon M; Quan, Shu; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula; Wickner, Sue; Chapman, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation is an ordered aggregation process, where β-sheet rich polymers are assembled from unstructured or partially folded monomers. We examined how two Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones, DnaK and Hsp33, and a more recently characterized periplasmic chaperone, Spy, modulate the aggregation of a functional amyloid protein, CsgA. We found that DnaK, the Hsp70 homologue in E. coli, and Hsp33, a redox-regulated holdase, potently inhibited CsgA amyloidogenesis. The Hsp33 anti-amyloidogenesis activity was oxidation dependent, as oxidized Hsp33 was significantly more efficient than reduced Hsp33 at preventing CsgA aggregation. When soluble CsgA was seeded with preformed amyloid fibers, neither Hsp33 nor DnaK were able to efficiently prevent soluble CsgA from adopting the amyloid conformation. Moreover, both DnaK and Hsp33 increased the time that CsgA was reactive with the amyloid oligomer conformation-specific A11 antibody. Since CsgA must also pass through the periplasm during secretion, we assessed the ability of the periplasmic chaperone Spy to inhibit CsgA polymerization. Like DnaK and Hsp33, Spy also inhibited CsgA polymerization in vitro. Overexpression of Spy resulted in increased chaperone activity in periplasmic extracts and in reduced curli biogenesis in vivo. We propose that DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy exert their effects during the nucleation stages of CsgA fibrillation. Thus, both housekeeping and stress induced cytosolic and periplasmic chaperones may be involved in discouraging premature CsgA interactions during curli biogenesis.

  9. E. coli chaperones DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy inhibit bacterial functional amyloid assembly

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Margery L; Schmidt, Jens C; Ilbert, Marianne; Doyle, Shannon M; Quan, Shu; Bardwell, James CA; Jakob, Ursula; Wickner, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation is an ordered aggregation process, where β-sheet rich polymers are assembled from unstructured or partially folded monomers. We examined how two Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones, DnaK and Hsp33, and a more recently characterized periplasmic chaperone, Spy, modulate the aggregation of a functional amyloid protein, CsgA. We found that DnaK, the Hsp70 homolog in E. coli, and Hsp33, a redox-regulated holdase, potently inhibited CsgA amyloidogenesis. The Hsp33 anti-amyloidogenesis activity was oxidation dependent, as oxidized Hsp33 was significantly more efficient than reduced Hsp33 at preventing CsgA aggregation. When soluble CsgA was seeded with preformed amyloid fibers, neither Hsp33 nor DnaK were able to efficiently prevent soluble CsgA from adopting the amyloid conformation. Moreover, both DnaK and Hsp33 increased the time that CsgA was reactive with the amyloid oligomer conformation-specific A11 antibody. Since CsgA must also pass through the periplasm during secretion, we assessed the ability of the periplasmic chaperone Spy to inhibit CsgA polymerization. Like DnaK and Hsp33, Spy also inhibited CsgA polymerization in vitro. Overexpression of Spy resulted in increased chaperone activity in periplasmic extracts and in reduced curli biogenesis in vivo. We propose that DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy exert their effects during the nucleation stages of CsgA fibrillation. Thus, both housekeeping and stress induced cytosolic and periplasmic chaperones may be involved in discouraging premature CsgA interactions during curli biogenesis. PMID:22156728

  10. Heterogeneous binding of the SH3 client protein to the DnaK molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ho; Zhang, Dongyu; Hughes, Christopher; Okuno, Yusuke; Sekhar, Ashok; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) plays a vital role in cellular processes, including protein folding and assembly, and helps prevent aggregation under physiological and stress-related conditions. Although the structural changes undergone by full-length client proteins upon interaction with DnaK (i.e., Escherichia coli Hsp70) are fundamental to understand chaperone-mediated protein folding, these changes are still largely unexplored. Here, we show that multiple conformations of the SRC homology 3 domain (SH3) client protein interact with the ADP-bound form of the DnaK chaperone. Chaperone-bound SH3 is largely unstructured yet distinct from the unfolded state in the absence of DnaK. The bound client protein shares a highly flexible N terminus and multiple slowly interconverting conformations in different parts of the sequence. In all, there is significant structural and dynamical heterogeneity in the DnaK-bound client protein, revealing that proteins may undergo some conformational sampling while chaperone-bound. This result is important because it shows that the surface of the Hsp70 chaperone provides an aggregation-free environment able to support part of the search for the native state. PMID:26195753

  11. Molecular chaperones DnaK and DnaJ share predicted binding sites on most proteins in the E. coli proteome.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sharan R; Gillies, Anne T; Chang, Lyra; Thompson, Andrea D; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2012-09-01

    In Escherichia coli, the molecular chaperones DnaK and DnaJ cooperate to assist the folding of newly synthesized or unfolded polypeptides. DnaK and DnaJ bind to hydrophobic motifs in these proteins and they also bind to each other. Together, this system is thought to be sufficiently versatile to act on the entire proteome, which creates interesting challenges in understanding the interactions between DnaK, DnaJ and their thousands of potential substrates. To address this question, we computationally predicted the number and frequency of DnaK- and DnaJ-binding motifs in the E. coli proteome, guided by free energy-based binding consensus motifs. This analysis revealed that nearly every protein is predicted to contain multiple DnaK- and DnaJ-binding sites, with the DnaJ sites occurring approximately twice as often. Further, we found that an overwhelming majority of the DnaK sites partially or completely overlapped with the DnaJ-binding motifs. It is well known that high concentrations of DnaJ inhibit DnaK-DnaJ-mediated refolding. The observed overlapping binding sites suggest that this phenomenon may be explained by an important balance in the relative stoichiometry of DnaK and DnaJ. To test this idea, we measured the chaperone-assisted folding of two denatured substrates and found that the distribution of predicted DnaK- and DnaJ-binding sites was indeed a good predictor of the optimal stoichiometry required for folding. These studies provide insight into how DnaK and DnaJ might cooperate to maintain global protein homeostasis.

  12. Proper Control of Caulobacter crescentus Cell Surface Adhesion Requires the General Protein Chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Daniel S.; Crosson, Sean

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Growth in a surface-attached bacterial community, or biofilm, confers a number of advantages. However, as a biofilm matures, high-density growth imposes stresses on individual cells, and it can become less advantageous for progeny to remain in the community. Thus, bacteria employ a variety of mechanisms to control attachment to and dispersal from surfaces in response to the state of the environment. The freshwater oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus can elaborate a polysaccharide-rich polar organelle, known as the holdfast, which enables permanent surface attachment. Holdfast development is strongly inhibited by the small protein HfiA; mechanisms that control HfiA levels in the cell are not well understood. We have discovered a connection between the essential general protein chaperone, DnaK, and control of C. crescentus holdfast development. C. crescentus mutants partially or completely lacking the C-terminal substrate binding “lid” domain of DnaK exhibit enhanced bulk surface attachment. Partial or complete truncation of the DnaK lid domain increases the probability that any single cell will develop a holdfast by 3- to 10-fold. These results are consistent with the observation that steady-state levels of an HfiA fusion protein are significantly diminished in strains that lack the entire lid domain of DnaK. While dispensable for growth, the lid domain of C. crescentus DnaK is required for proper chaperone function, as evidenced by observed dysregulation of HfiA and holdfast development in strains expressing lidless DnaK mutants. We conclude that DnaK is an important molecular determinant of HfiA stability and surface adhesion control. IMPORTANCE Regulatory control of cell adhesion ensures that bacterial cells can transition between free-living and surface-attached states. We define a role for the essential protein chaperone, DnaK, in the control of Caulobacter crescentus cell adhesion. C. crescentus surface adhesion is mediated by an envelope

  13. Polypeptide flux through bacterial Hsp70: DnaK cooperates with trigger factor in chaperoning nascent chains.

    PubMed

    Teter, S A; Houry, W A; Ang, D; Tradler, T; Rockabrand, D; Fischer, G; Blum, P; Georgopoulos, C; Hartl, F U

    1999-06-11

    A role for DnaK, the major E. coli Hsp70, in chaperoning de novo protein folding has remained elusive. Here we show that under nonstress conditions DnaK transiently associates with a wide variety of nascent and newly synthesized polypeptides, with a preference for chains larger than 30 kDa. Deletion of the nonessential gene encoding trigger factor, a ribosome-associated chaperone, results in a doubling of the fraction of nascent polypeptides interacting with DnaK. Combined deletion of the trigger factor and DnaK genes is lethal under normal growth conditions. These findings indicate important, partially overlapping functions of DnaK and trigger factor in de novo protein folding and explain why the loss of either chaperone can be tolerated by E. coli.

  14. Mutant DnaK chaperones cause ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Alix, J H; Guérin, M F

    1993-01-01

    To determine whether the biogenesis of ribosomes in Escherichia coli is the result of the self-assembly of their different constituents or involves the participation of additional factors, we have studied the influence of a chaperone, the product of the gene dnaK, on ribosome assembly in vivo. Using three thermosensitive (ts) mutants carrying the mutations dnaK756-ts, dnaK25-ts, and dnaK103-ts, we have observed the accumulation at nonpermissive temperature (45 degrees C) of ribosomal particles with different sedimentation constants--namely, 45S, 35S, and 25S along with the normal 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. This is the result of a defect not in thermostability but in ribosome assembly at the nonpermissive temperature. These abnormal ribosomal particles are rescued if the mutant cells are returned to 30 degrees C. Thus, the product of the dnaK gene is implicated in ribosome biogenesis at high temperature. PMID:8105482

  15. Effect of heterologous expression of molecular chaperone DnaK from Tetragenococcus halophilus on salinity adaptation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Nakayama, Jiro; Fukuda, Daisuke; Sonezaki, Shino; Watanabe, Maki; Tosukhowong, Amonlaya; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Molecular chaperone DnaK of halophilic Tetragenococcus halophilus JCM5888 was characterized under salinity conditions both in vitro and in vivo. The dnaK gene was cloned into an expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli. The DnaK protein obtained from the recombinant E. coli showed a significantly higher refolding activity of denatured lactate dehydrogenase than that from non-halophilic Lactococcus lactis under NaCl concentrations higher than 1 M. E. coli without the overexpression of DnaK exhibited a growth profile with a prolonged lag phase and suppressed maximum cell density in Luria-Bertani medium containing 5% (0.86 M) NaCl. On the contrary, the overexpression of T. halophilus DnaK greatly shortened this prolonged lag phase with no effect on maximum growth, while that of L. lactis DnaK decreased maximum growth. The amount of protein aggregates was increased by salt stress in the E. coli cells, while this aggregation was greatly suppressed by the overexpression of T, halophilus DnaK. These results suggest that heterologous overexpression of T. halophilus DnaK, via its chaperone activity, promotes salinity adaptation of E. coli.

  16. The molecular chaperone DnaK is not recruited to translating ribosomes that lack trigger factor.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gisela; Ramachandiran, Vasanthi; Horowitz, Paul M; Hardesty, Boyd

    2002-07-01

    The molecular chaperone DnaK and trigger factor (TF), a ribosome-associated protein with folding activity, have been implicated in assisting nascent polypeptides to acquire a three-dimensional structure on Escherichia coli ribosomes. We asked whether ribosomes that lack trigger factor would recruit DnaK for synthesis and folding of nascent peptides. For these analyses, translating ribosomes with a homogeneous population of nascent peptides were isolated. Truncated forms of rhodanese and E. coli translation initiation factor 3 (IF3) were generated with tandem rare arginine codons in the coding sequence. These codons cause strong translational pausing during coupled transcription/translation in E. coli extracts, generating nascent polypeptides on ribosomes. Protein synthesis in the TF(-) extract was initiated with biotin-Met-tRNA(f). Ribosomes with nascent polypeptides were isolated by interaction of the N-terminal biotin with streptavidin on magnetobeads. These translating ribosomes that lack TF contain the molecular chaperone DnaK in considerably less than stoichiometric amounts.

  17. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Jha, Jyoti K; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid-the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae Chr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that promotes initiation by reducing

  18. Glutathionylation of the Bacterial Hsp70 Chaperone DnaK Provides a Link between Oxidative Stress and the Heat Shock Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Jie; Wu, Si; Gong, Weibin; Chen, Chang; Perrett, Sarah

    2016-03-25

    DnaK is the major bacterial Hsp70, participating in DNA replication, protein folding, and the stress response. DnaK cooperates with the Hsp40 co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE. Under non-stress conditions, DnaK binds to the heat shock transcription factor σ(32)and facilitates its degradation. Oxidative stress results in temporary inactivation of DnaK due to depletion of cellular ATP and thiol modifications such as glutathionylation until normal cellular ATP levels and a reducing environment are restored. However, the biological significance of DnaK glutathionylation remains unknown, and the mechanisms by which glutathionylation may regulate the activity of DnaK are also unclear. We investigated the conditions under which Escherichia coli DnaK undergoesS-glutathionylation. We observed glutathionylation of DnaK in lysates of E. coli cells that had been subjected to oxidative stress. We also obtained homogeneously glutathionylated DnaK using purified DnaK in the apo state. We found that glutathionylation of DnaK reversibly changes the secondary structure and tertiary conformation, leading to reduced nucleotide and peptide binding ability. The chaperone activity of DnaK was reversibly down-regulated by glutathionylation, accompanying the structural changes. We found that interaction of DnaK with DnaJ, GrpE, or σ(32)becomes weaker when DnaK is glutathionylated, and the interaction is restored upon deglutathionylation. This study confirms that glutathionylation down-regulates the functions of DnaK under oxidizing conditions, and this down-regulation may facilitate release of σ(32)from its interaction with DnaK, thus triggering the heat shock response. Such a mechanism provides a link between oxidative stress and the heat shock response in bacteria. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Glutathionylation of the Bacterial Hsp70 Chaperone DnaK Provides a Link between Oxidative Stress and the Heat Shock Response*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Jie; Wu, Si; Gong, Weibin; Chen, Chang; Perrett, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    DnaK is the major bacterial Hsp70, participating in DNA replication, protein folding, and the stress response. DnaK cooperates with the Hsp40 co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE. Under non-stress conditions, DnaK binds to the heat shock transcription factor σ32 and facilitates its degradation. Oxidative stress results in temporary inactivation of DnaK due to depletion of cellular ATP and thiol modifications such as glutathionylation until normal cellular ATP levels and a reducing environment are restored. However, the biological significance of DnaK glutathionylation remains unknown, and the mechanisms by which glutathionylation may regulate the activity of DnaK are also unclear. We investigated the conditions under which Escherichia coli DnaK undergoes S-glutathionylation. We observed glutathionylation of DnaK in lysates of E. coli cells that had been subjected to oxidative stress. We also obtained homogeneously glutathionylated DnaK using purified DnaK in the apo state. We found that glutathionylation of DnaK reversibly changes the secondary structure and tertiary conformation, leading to reduced nucleotide and peptide binding ability. The chaperone activity of DnaK was reversibly down-regulated by glutathionylation, accompanying the structural changes. We found that interaction of DnaK with DnaJ, GrpE, or σ32 becomes weaker when DnaK is glutathionylated, and the interaction is restored upon deglutathionylation. This study confirms that glutathionylation down-regulates the functions of DnaK under oxidizing conditions, and this down-regulation may facilitate release of σ32 from its interaction with DnaK, thus triggering the heat shock response. Such a mechanism provides a link between oxidative stress and the heat shock response in bacteria. PMID:26823468

  20. High affinity binding of hydrophobic and autoantigenic regions of proinsulin to the 70 kDa chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chaperones facilitate proper folding of peptides and bind to misfolded proteins as occurring during periods of cell stress. Complexes of peptides with chaperones induce peptide-directed immunity. Here we analyzed the interaction of (pre)proinsulin with the best characterized chaperone of the hsp70 family, bacterial DnaK. Results Of a set of overlapping 13-mer peptides of human preproinsulin high affinity binding to DnaK was found for the signal peptide and one further region in each proinsulin domain (A- and B-chain, C-peptide). Among the latter, peptides covering most of the B-chain region B11-23 exhibited strongest binding, which was in the range of known high-affinity DnaK ligands, dissociation equilibrium constant (K'd) of 2.2 ± 0.4 μM. The B-chain region B11-23 is located at the interface between two insulin molecules and not accessible in insulin oligomers. Indeed, native insulin oligomers showed very low DnaK affinity (K'd 67.8 ± 20.8 μM) whereas a proinsulin molecule modified to prevent oligomerization showed good binding affinity (K'd 11.3 ± 7.8 μM). Conclusions Intact insulin only weakly interacts with the hsp70 chaperone DnaK whereas monomeric proinsulin and peptides from 3 distinct proinsulin regions show substantial chaperone binding. Strongest binding was seen for the B-chain peptide B 11-23. Interestingly, peptide B11-23 represents a dominant autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. PMID:21059249

  1. Conserved, disordered C terminus of DnaK enhances cellular survival upon stress and DnaK in vitro chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Smock, Robert G; Blackburn, Mandy E; Gierasch, Lila M

    2011-09-09

    The 70-kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) function as molecular chaperones through the allosteric coupling of their nucleotide- and substrate-binding domains, the structures of which are highly conserved. In contrast, the roles of the poorly structured, variable length C-terminal regions present on Hsp70s remain unclear. In many eukaryotic Hsp70s, the extreme C-terminal EEVD tetrapeptide sequence associates with co-chaperones via binding to tetratricopeptide repeat domains. It is not known whether this is the only function for this region in eukaryotic Hsp70s and what roles this region performs in Hsp70s that do not form complexes with tetratricopeptide repeat domains. We compared C-terminal sequences of 730 Hsp70 family members and identified a novel conservation pattern in a diverse subset of 165 bacterial and organellar Hsp70s. Mutation of conserved C-terminal sequence in DnaK, the predominant Hsp70 in Escherichia coli, results in significant impairment of its protein refolding activity in vitro without affecting interdomain allostery, interaction with co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, or the binding of a peptide substrate, defying classical explanations for the chaperoning mechanism of Hsp70. Moreover, mutation of specific conserved sites within the DnaK C terminus reduces the capacity of the cell to withstand stresses on protein folding caused by elevated temperature or the absence of other chaperones. These features of the C-terminal region support a model in which it acts as a disordered tether linked to a conserved, weak substrate-binding motif and that this enhances chaperone function by transiently interacting with folding clients.

  2. A Genome-Scale Proteomic Screen Identifies a Role for DnaK in Chaperoning of Polar Autotransporters in Shigella▿

    PubMed Central

    Janakiraman, Anuradha; Fixen, Kathryn R.; Gray, Andrew N.; Niki, Hironori; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2009-01-01

    Autotransporters are outer membrane proteins that are widely distributed among gram-negative bacteria. Like other autotransporters, the Shigella autotransporter IcsA, which is required for actin assembly during infection, is secreted at the bacterial pole. In the bacterial cytoplasm, IcsA localizes to poles and potential cell division sites independent of the cell division protein FtsZ. To identify bacterial proteins involved in the targeting of IcsA to the pole in the bacterial cytoplasm, we screened a genome-scale library of Escherichia coli proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for those that displayed a localization pattern similar to that of IcsA-GFP in cells that lack functional FtsZ using a strain carrying a temperature-sensitive ftsZ allele. For each protein that mimicked the localization of IcsA-GFP, we tested whether IcsA localization was dependent on the presence of the protein. Although these approaches did not identify a polar receptor for IcsA, the cytoplasmic chaperone DnaK both mimicked IcsA localization at elevated temperatures as a GFP fusion and was required for the localization of IcsA to the pole in the cytoplasm of E. coli. DnaK was also required for IcsA secretion at the pole in Shigella flexneri. The localization of DnaK-GFP to poles and potential cell division sites was dependent on elevated growth temperature and independent of the presence of IcsA or functional FtsZ; native DnaK was found to be enhanced at midcell and the poles. A second Shigella autotransporter, SepA, also required DnaK for secretion, consistent with a role of DnaK more generally in the chaperoning of autotransporter proteins in the bacterial cytoplasm. PMID:19684128

  3. Hsp33 Controls Elongation Factor-Tu Stability and Allows Escherichia coli Growth in the Absence of the Major DnaK and Trigger Factor Chaperones*

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Nicolas; Castanié-Cornet, Marie-Pierre; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Koningstein, Gregory; Georgopoulos, Costa; Luirink, Joen; Genevaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular de novo protein folding is assisted by cellular networks of molecular chaperones. In Escherichia coli, cooperation between the chaperones trigger factor (TF) and DnaK is central to this process. Accordingly, the simultaneous deletion of both chaperone-encoding genes leads to severe growth and protein folding defects. Herein, we took advantage of such defective phenotypes to further elucidate the interactions of chaperone networks in vivo. We show that disruption of the TF/DnaK chaperone pathway is efficiently rescued by overexpression of the redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33. Consistent with this observation, the deletion of hslO, the Hsp33 structural gene, is no longer tolerated in the absence of the TF/DnaK pathway. However, in contrast with other chaperones like GroEL or SecB, suppression by Hsp33 was not attributed to its potential overlapping general chaperone function(s). Instead, we show that overexpressed Hsp33 specifically binds to elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu) and targets it for degradation by the protease Lon. This synergistic action of Hsp33 and Lon was responsible for the rescue of bacterial growth in the absence of TF and DnaK, by presumably restoring the coupling between translation and the downstream folding capacity of the cell. In support of this hypothesis, we show that overexpression of the stress-responsive toxin HipA, which inhibits EF-Tu, also rescues bacterial growth and protein folding in the absence of TF and DnaK. The relevance for such a convergence of networks of chaperones and proteases acting directly on EF-Tu to modulate the intracellular rate of protein synthesis in response to protein aggregation is discussed. PMID:23148222

  4. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-08-18

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily.

  5. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R.; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E.; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  6. Action of the Hsp70 chaperone system observed with single proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, João M.; Mayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, the binding of non-native protein substrates to the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK is mediated by the co-chaperone DnaJ. DnaJ accelerates ATP hydrolysis on DnaK, by closing the peptide-binding cleft of DnaK. GrpE catalysed nucleotide exchange and ATP re-binding then lead to substrate release from DnaK, allowing folding. Here we refold immunoglobulin 27 (I27) to better understand how DnaJ-DnaK-GrpE chaperones cooperate. When DnaJ is present, I27 is less likely to misfold and more likely to fold, whereas the unfolded state remains unaffected. Thus, the ‘holdase’ DnaJ shows foldase behaviour. Misfolding of I27 is fully abrogated when DnaJ cooperates with DnaK, which stabilizes the unfolded state and increases the probability of folding. Addition of GrpE shifts the unfolded fraction of I27 to pre-chaperone levels. These insights reveal synergistic mechanisms within the evolutionary highly conserved Hsp70 system that prevent substrates from misfolding and promote their productive transition to the native state.

  7. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  8. Involvement of residues Asp8, Asn13, Glu145, Asp168, and Thr173 in the chaperone activity of a recombinant DnaK from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min-Guan; Liang, Wan-Chi; Chen, Bo-En; Chou, Wei-Mou; Lin, Long-Liu

    2011-01-01

    Based on the sequence homology, we have modeled the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK), a counterpart of Hsp70, and identified five different amino acids that might be responsible for maintaining ADP-Mg(2+)-Pi in the correct configuration at the ATP-binding cleft of the protein. As compared with wild-type BlDnaK, site-directed mutant proteins D8A, N13D, E145A, D168A, and T173A had a dramatic reduction in their chaperone activities. Complementation test revealed that the mutant proteins lost completely the ability to rescue the temperature-sensitive growth defect of Escherichia colidnaK756-ts. Wild-type BlDnak assisted the refolding of denatured firefly luciferase, whereas a significant decrease in this ability was observed for the mutant proteins. Simultaneous addition of B. licheniformis DnaJ, BlGrpE, and NR-peptide, did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of D8A, E145A, D168A and T173A. Circular dichroism spectra were nearly identical for wild-type and mutant proteins, and they, except D8A, also exhibited a similar sensitivity towards temperature-induced denaturation. These results suggest that the selected residues are critical for the proper function of BlDnaK.

  9. Substrate Interaction Networks of the Escherichia coli Chaperones: Trigger Factor, DnaK and GroEL.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Vaibhav; Houry, Walid A

    2015-01-01

    In the dense cellular environment, protein misfolding and inter-molecular protein aggregation compete with protein folding. Chaperones associate with proteins to prevent misfolding and to assist in folding to the native state. In Escherichia coli, the chaperones trigger factor, DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE, and GroEL/ES are the major chaperones responsible for insuring proper de novo protein folding. With multitudes of proteins produced by the bacterium, the chaperones have to be selective for their substrates. Yet, chaperone selectivity cannot be too specific. Recent biochemical and high-throughput studies have provided important insights highlighting the strategies used by chaperones in maintaining proteostasis in the cell. Here, we discuss the substrate networks and cooperation among these protein folding chaperones.

  10. Monitoring conformational heterogeneity of the lid of DnaK substrate-binding domain during its chaperone cycle.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Peter, Joshua Jebakumar; Kumar, Vignesh; Mapa, Koyeli

    2016-08-01

    DnaK or Hsp70 of Escherichia coli is a master regulator of the bacterial proteostasis network. Allosteric communication between the two functional domains of DnaK, the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and the C-terminal substrate- or peptide-binding domain (SBD) regulate its activity. X-ray crystallography and NMR studies have provided snapshots of distinct conformations of Hsp70 proteins in various physiological states; however, the conformational heterogeneity and dynamics of allostery-driven Hsp70 activity remains underexplored. In this work, we employed single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements to capture distinct intradomain conformational states of a region within the DnaK-SBD known as the lid. Our data conclusively demonstrate prominent conformational heterogeneity of the DnaK lid in ADP-bound states; in contrast, the ATP-bound open conformations are homogeneous. Interestingly, a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue, AMP-PNP, imparts heterogeneity to the lid conformations mimicking the ADP-bound state. The cochaperone DnaJ confers ADP-like heterogeneous lid conformations to DnaK, although the presence of the cochaperone accelerates the substrate-binding rate by a hitherto unknown mechanism. Irrespective of the presence of DnaJ, binding of a peptide substrate to the DnaK-SBD leads to prominent lid closure. Lid closure is only partial upon binding to molten globule-like authentic cellular substrates, probably to accommodate non-native substrate proteins of varied structures.

  11. Global analysis of chaperone effects using a reconstituted cell-free translation system.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Tatsuya; Kanamori, Takashi; Ueda, Takuya; Taguchi, Hideki

    2012-06-05

    Protein folding is often hampered by protein aggregation, which can be prevented by a variety of chaperones in the cell. A dataset that evaluates which chaperones are effective for aggregation-prone proteins would provide an invaluable resource not only for understanding the roles of chaperones, but also for broader applications in protein science and engineering. Therefore, we comprehensively evaluated the effects of the major Escherichia coli chaperones, trigger factor, DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE, and GroEL/GroES, on ∼800 aggregation-prone cytosolic E. coli proteins, using a reconstituted chaperone-free translation system. Statistical analyses revealed the robustness and the intriguing properties of chaperones. The DnaK and GroEL systems drastically increased the solubilities of hundreds of proteins with weak biases, whereas trigger factor had only a marginal effect on solubility. The combined addition of the chaperones was effective for a subset of proteins that were not rescued by any single chaperone system, supporting the synergistic effect of these chaperones. The resource, which is accessible via a public database, can be used to investigate the properties of proteins of interest in terms of their solubilities and chaperone effects.

  12. The Hsc66-Hsc20 Chaperone System in Escherichia coli: Chaperone Activity and Interactions with the DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE System

    PubMed Central

    Silberg, Jonathan J.; Hoff, Kevin G.; Vickery, Larry E.

    1998-01-01

    Hsc66, a stress-70 protein, and Hsc20, a J-type accessory protein, comprise a newly described Hsp70-type chaperone system in addition to DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE in Escherichia coli. Because endogenous substrates for the Hsc66-Hsc20 system have not yet been identified, we investigated chaperone-like activities of Hsc66 and Hsc20 by their ability to suppress aggregation of denatured model substrate proteins, such as rhodanese, citrate synthase, and luciferase. Hsc66 suppressed aggregation of rhodanese and citrate synthase, and ATP caused effects consistent with complex destabilization typical of other Hsp70-type chaperones. Differences in the activities of Hsc66 and DnaK, however, suggest that these chaperones have dissimilar substrate specificity profiles. Hsc20, unlike DnaJ, did not exhibit intrinsic chaperone activity and appears to function solely as a regulatory cochaperone protein for Hsc66. Possible interactions between the Hsc66-Hsc20 and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE chaperone systems were also investigated by measuring the effects of cochaperone proteins on Hsp70 ATPase activities. The nucleotide exchange factor GrpE did not stimulate the ATPase activity of Hsc66 and thus appears to function specifically with DnaK. Cross-stimulation by the cochaperones Hsc20 and DnaJ was observed, but the requirement for supraphysiological concentrations makes it unlikely that these interactions occur significantly in vivo. Together these results suggest that Hsc66-Hsc20 and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE comprise separate molecular chaperone systems with distinct, nonoverlapping cellular functions. PMID:9852006

  13. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed

    Docter, Brianne E; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-06-02

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. A novel virus-like particle based on hepatitis B core antigen and substrate-binding domain of bacterial molecular chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Jun; Gu, Kai; Xiong, Qi Yan; Shen, Liang; Cao, Rong Yue; Li, Ming Hui; Li, Tai Ming; Wu, Jie; Liu, Jing Jing

    2009-12-09

    Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein has been proved to be an attractive carrier for foreign epitopes, and can display green fluorescent protein (GFP) on its surface. The structure of substrate-binding domain of DnaK [DnaK (394-504 aa), DnaK SBD] is similar to GFP, we therefore reasoned that DnaK SBD might also be tolerated. Electron microscopic observations suggested that the chimeric proteins containing the truncated HBc (HBcDelta) and DnaK SBD could self-assemble into virus-like particle (VLP). Then the accessibility of DnaK SBD and the adjuvanticity of VLP HBcDelta-SBD were demonstrated by two recombinant peptide vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GhM and GhMNR. The latter carries in addition the peptide motif NRLLLTG which is known to bind to DnaK and DnaK SBD. The combination of VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhMNR elicited stronger humoral responses and caused further testicular atrophy than the combinations of VLP HBcDelta and GhMNR or VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhM in Balb/c mice. These findings indicate VLP HBcDelta-SBD might serve as an excellent carrier for GhMNR and some other peptide vaccines.

  15. Priming the immune system of Penaeid shrimp by bacterial HSP70 (DnaK).

    PubMed

    Phuoc, L H; Hu, B; Wille, M; Hien, N T; Phuong, V H; Tinh, N T N; Loc, N H; Sorgeloos, P; Bossier, P

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to test the effect of DnaK on priming immune responses in Penaeid shrimp. Juvenile-specific pathogen-free (SPF) P. vannamei shrimp were injected with 0.05 μg recombinant DnaK. One hour post-DnaK priming, a non-lethal dose of Vibrio campbellii (10(5) CFU shrimp(-1)) was injected. Other treatments include only DnaK or V. campbellii injection or control with blank inocula. The haemolymph of three shrimp from each treatment was collected at 1.5, 6, 9 and 12 h post-DnaK priming (hpp). It was verified that injection with DnaK and V. campbellii challenge affected the transcription of 3 immune genes, transglutaminase-1 (TGase-1), prophenoloxidase-2 (proPO-2) and endogenous HSP70 (lvHSP70). In P. monodon, shrimp were first injected with DnaK at a dose of 10 μg shrimp(-1) and one hour later with 10(6) CFU of V. harveyi (BB120) shrimp(-1). Shrimp injected with DnaK showed a significant increase in proPO expression compared to the control (P < 0.05). Yet a double injection (DnaK and Vibrio) seemed to cause an antagonistic response at the level of expression, which was not equalled at the level of PO activity. Those results suggest that DnaK is able to modulate immune responses in P. vannamei and P. monodon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Chaperone addiction of toxin–antitoxin systems

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Patricia; Sala, Ambre Julie; Ayala, Sara; Texier, Pauline; Slama, Nawel; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Guillet, Valérie; Mourey, Lionel; Genevaux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems, in which a labile antitoxin binds and inhibits the toxin, can promote adaptation and persistence by modulating bacterial growth in response to stress. Some atypical TA systems, known as tripartite toxin–antitoxin–chaperone (TAC) modules, include a molecular chaperone that facilitates folding and protects the antitoxin from degradation. Here we use a TAC module from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which classical TAs can become ‘chaperone-addicted'. The chaperone specifically binds the antitoxin at a short carboxy-terminal sequence (chaperone addiction sequence, ChAD) that is not present in chaperone-independent antitoxins. In the absence of chaperone, the ChAD sequence destabilizes the antitoxin, thus preventing toxin inhibition. Chaperone–ChAD pairs can be transferred to classical TA systems or to unrelated proteins and render them chaperone-dependent. This mechanism might be used to optimize the expression and folding of heterologous proteins in bacterial hosts for biotechnological or medical purposes. PMID:27827369

  17. A Periplasmic Complex of the Nitrite Reductase NirS, the Chaperone DnaK, and the Flagellum Protein FliC Is Essential for Flagellum Assembly and Motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Molinari, Gabriella; Rohde, Manfred; Dammeyer, Thorben; Wissing, Josef; Jänsch, Lothar; Arias, Sagrario; Jahn, Martina; Schobert, Max; Timmis, Kenneth N; Jahn, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitously occurring environmental bacterium and opportunistic pathogen responsible for various acute and chronic infections. Obviously, anaerobic energy generation via denitrification contributes to its ecological success. To investigate the structural basis for the interconnection of the denitrification machinery to other essential cellular processes, we have sought to identify the protein interaction partners of the denitrification enzyme nitrite reductase NirS in the periplasm. We employed NirS as an affinity-purifiable bait to identify interacting proteins in vivo. Results obtained revealed that both the flagellar structural protein FliC and the protein chaperone DnaK form a complex with NirS in the periplasm. The interacting domains of NirS and FliC were tentatively identified. The NirS-interacting stretch of amino acids lies within its cytochrome c domain. Motility assays and ultrastructure analyses revealed that a nirS mutant was defective in the formation of flagella and correspondingly in swimming motility. In contrast, the fliC mutant revealed an intact denitrification pathway. However, deletion of the nirF gene, coding for a heme d1 biosynthetic enzyme, which leads to catalytically inactive NirS, did not abolish swimming ability. This pointed to a structural function for the NirS protein. FliC and NirS were found colocalized with DnaK at the cell surface of P. aeruginosa. A function of the detected periplasmic NirS-DnaK-FliC complex in flagellum formation and motility was concluded and discussed. Physiological functions in Gram-negative bacteria are connected with the cellular compartment of the periplasm and its membranes. Central enzymatic steps of anaerobic energy generation and the motility mediated by flagellar activity use these cellular structures in addition to multiple other processes. Almost nothing is known about the protein network functionally connecting these processes in the periplasm. Here, we demonstrate

  18. Reactivation of Aggregated Proteins by the ClpB/DnaK Bi-chaperone System

    PubMed Central

    Zolkiewski, Michal; Chesnokova, Liudmila S.; Witt, Stephan N.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common problem in protein biochemistry and is linked to many cellular pathologies and human diseases. The molecular chaperone ClpB can resolubilize and reactivate aggregated proteins. This unit describes the procedure for following reactivation of an aggregated enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mediated by ClpB from Escherichia coli in cooperation with another molecular chaperone DnaK. The procedures for purification of these chaperones are also described. PMID:26836408

  19. Protein folding rates and thermodynamic stability are key determinants for interaction with the Hsp70 chaperone system

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, Ashok; Lam, Hon Nam; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The Hsp70 family of molecular chaperones participates in vital cellular processes including the heat shock response and protein homeostasis. E. coli's Hsp70, known as DnaK, works in concert with the DnaJ and GrpE co-chaperones (K/J/E chaperone system), and mediates cotranslational and post-translational protein folding in the cytoplasm. While the role of the K/J/E chaperones is well understood in the presence of large substrates unable to fold independently, it is not known if and how K/J/E modulates the folding of smaller proteins able to fold even in the absence of chaperones. Here, we combine experiments and computation to evaluate the significance of kinetic partitioning as a model to describe the interplay between protein folding and binding to the K/J/E chaperone system. First, we target three nonobligatory substrates, that is, proteins that do not require chaperones to fold. The experimentally observed chaperone association of these client proteins during folding is entirely consistent with predictions from kinetic partitioning. Next, we develop and validate a computational model (CHAMP70) that assumes kinetic partitioning of substrates between folding and interaction with K/J/E. CHAMP70 quantitatively predicts the experimentally measured interaction of RNase HD as it refolds in the presence of various chaperones. CHAMP70 shows that substrates are posed to interact with K/J/E only if they are slow-folding proteins with a folding rate constant kf <50 s−1, and/or thermodynamically unstable proteins with a folding free energy ΔG0UN ≥−2 kcal mol−1. Hence, the K/J/E system is tuned to use specific protein folding rates and thermodynamic stabilities as substrate selection criteria. PMID:22886941

  20. Physical interaction between bacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 chaperones mediates their cooperative action to refold denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Fujita, Kensaku; Ohtaki, Aguru; Watanabe, Satoru; Narumi, Shoichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Suenaga, Emi; Misono, Tomoko S; Kumar, Penmetcha K R; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2014-02-28

    In eukaryotes, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that associates with numerous client proteins. HtpG, a prokaryotic homolog of Hsp90, is essential for thermotolerance in cyanobacteria, and in vitro it suppresses the aggregation of denatured proteins efficiently. Understanding how the non-native client proteins bound to HtpG refold is of central importance to comprehend the essential role of HtpG under stress. Here, we demonstrate by yeast two-hybrid method, immunoprecipitation assays, and surface plasmon resonance techniques that HtpG physically interacts with DnaJ2 and DnaK2. DnaJ2, which belongs to the type II J-protein family, bound DnaK2 or HtpG with submicromolar affinity, and HtpG bound DnaK2 with micromolar affinity. Not only DnaJ2 but also HtpG enhanced the ATP hydrolysis by DnaK2. Although assisted by the DnaK2 chaperone system, HtpG enhanced native refolding of urea-denatured lactate dehydrogenase and heat-denatured glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. HtpG did not substitute for DnaJ2 or GrpE in the DnaK2-assisted refolding of the denatured substrates. The heat-denatured malate dehydrogenase that did not refold by the assistance of the DnaK2 chaperone system alone was trapped by HtpG first and then transferred to DnaK2 where it refolded. Dissociation of substrates from HtpG was either ATP-dependent or -independent depending on the substrate, indicating the presence of two mechanisms of cooperative action between the HtpG and the DnaK2 chaperone system.

  1. Chemical Screens Against A Reconstituted Multi-Protein Complex: Myricetin Blocks DnaJ Regulation of DnaK through an Allosteric Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lyra; Miyata, Yoshinari; Ung, Peter M. U.; Bertelsen, Eric B.; McQuade, Thomas J.; Carlson, Heather A.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY DnaK is a molecular chaperone responsible for multiple aspects of proteostasis. The intrinsically slow ATPase activity of DnaK is stimulated by its co-chaperone, DnaJ, and these proteins often work in concert. To identify inhibitors, we screened plant-derived extracts against a re-constituted mixture of DnaK and DnaJ. This approach resulted in the identification of flavonoids, including myricetin, which inhibited activity by up to 75%. Interestingly, myricetin prevented DnaJ-mediated stimulation of ATPase activity, with minimal impact on either DnaK’s intrinsic turnover rate or its stimulation by another co-chaperone, GrpE. Using NMR, we found that myricetin binds DnaK at an unanticipated site between the IB and IIB subdomains and that it allosterically blocked binding of DnaJ. Together, these results highlight a “gray box” screening approach, which approximates a limited amount of the complexity expected in physiological, multi-protein systems. PMID:21338918

  2. In vivo analysis of the overlapping functions of DnaK and trigger factor.

    PubMed

    Genevaux, Pierre; Keppel, France; Schwager, Françoise; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S; Hartl, F Ulrich; Georgopoulos, Costa

    2004-02-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a ribosome-bound protein that combines catalysis of peptidyl-prolyl isomerization and chaperone-like activities in Escherichia coli. TF was shown to cooperate with the DnaK (Hsp70) chaperone machinery in the folding of newly synthesized proteins, and the double deletion of the corresponding genes (tig and dnaK) exhibited synthetic lethality. We used a detailed genetic approach to characterize various aspects of this functional cooperation in vivo. Surprisingly, we showed that under specific growth conditions, one can delete both dnaK and tig, indicating that bacterial survival can be maintained in the absence of these two major cytosolic chaperones. The strain lacking both DnaK and TF exhibits a very narrow temperature range of growth and a high level of aggregated proteins when compared to either of the single mutants. We found that, in the absence of DnaK, both the N-terminal ribosome-binding domain and the C-terminal domain of unknown function are essential for TF chaperone activity. In contrast, the central PPIase domain is dispensable. Taken together, our data indicate that under certain conditions, folding of newly synthesized proteins in E. coli is not totally dependent on an interaction with either TF and/or DnaK, and suggest that additional chaperones may be involved in this essential process.

  3. Systems biology of molecular chaperone networks.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Péter; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Kovács, István A; Szalay, Máté S; Soti, Csaba

    2008-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are not only fascinating molecular machines that help the folding, refolding, activation or assembly of other proteins, but also have a number of functions. These functions can be understood only by considering the emergent properties of cellular networks--and that of chaperones as special network constituents. As a notable example for the network-related roles of chaperones they may act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms, and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Why are chaperones special in the context of cellular networks? Chaperones: (1) have weak links, i.e. low affinity, transient interactions with most of their partners; (2) connect hubs, i.e. act as 'masterminds' of the cell being close to several centre proteins with a lot of neighbours; and (3) are in the overlaps of network modules, which confers upon them a special regulatory role. Importantly, chaperones may uncouple or even quarantine modules of protein-protein interaction networks, signalling networks, genetic regulatory networks and membrane organelle networks during stress, which gives an additional chaperone-mediated protection for the cell at the network-level. Moreover, chaperones are essential to rebuild inter-modular contacts after stress by their low affinity, 'quasi-random' sampling of the potential interaction partners in different cellular modules. This opens the way to the chaperone-regulated modular evolution of cellular networks, and helps us to design novel therapeutic and anti-ageing strategies.

  4. Crowding Activates ClpB and Enhances Its Association with DnaK for Efficient Protein Aggregate Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Ianire; Celaya, Garbiñe; Alfonso, Carlos; Moro, Fernando; Rivas, Germán; Muga, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of intracellular protein aggregates after a severe stress is mandatory for cell survival. In bacteria, this activity depends on the collaboration between the DnaK system and ClpB, which in vivo occurs in a highly crowded environment. The reactivation reaction includes two steps: extraction of unfolded monomers from the aggregate and their subsequent refolding into the native conformation. Both steps might be compromised by excluded volume conditions that would favor aggregation of unstable protein folding intermediates. Here, we have investigated whether ClpB and the DnaK system are able to compensate this unproductive effect and efficiently reactivate aggregates of three different substrate proteins under crowding conditions. To this aim, we have compared the association equilibrium, biochemical properties, stability, and chaperone activity of the disaggregase ClpB in the absence and presence of an inert macromolecular crowding agent. Our data show that crowding i), increases three to four orders of magnitude the association constant of the functional hexamer; ii), shifts the conformational equilibrium of the protein monomer toward a compact state; iii), stimulates its ATPase activity; and iv), favors association of the chaperone with substrate proteins and with aggregate-bound DnaK. These effects strongly enhance protein aggregate reactivation by the DnaK-ClpB network, highlighting the importance of volume exclusion in complex processes in which several proteins have to work in a sequential manner. PMID:24806934

  5. Structural identification of DnaK binding sites within bovine and sheep bactenecin Bac7.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Michael; Kieslich, Bjorn; Berthold, Nicole; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Strater, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial resistance against common antibiotics is an increasing health problem. New pharmaceuticals for the treatment of infections caused by resistant pathogens are needed. Small proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) from insects are known to bind intracellularly to the conventional substrate binding cleft of the E. coli Hsp70 chaperone DnaK. Furthermore, bactenecins from mammals, members of the cathelicidin family, also contain potential DnaK binding sites. Crystal structures of bovine and sheep Bac7 in complex with the DnaK substrate binding domain show that the peptides bind in the forward binding mode with a leucine positioned in the central hydrophobic pocket. In most structures, proline and arginine residues preceding leucine occupy the hydrophobic DnaK binding sites -1 and -2. Within bovine Bac7, four potential DnaK binding sites were identified.

  6. Integration of two ancestral chaperone systems into one: the evolution of eukaryotic molecular chaperones in light of eukaryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bogumil, David; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Landan, Giddy; McInerney, James O; Dagan, Tal

    2014-02-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are mosaics of genes acquired from their prokaryotic ancestors, the eubacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to the mitochondrion and its archaebacterial host. Genomic footprints of the prokaryotic merger at the origin of eukaryotes are still discernable in eukaryotic genomes, where gene expression and function correlate with their prokaryotic ancestry. Molecular chaperones are essential in all domains of life as they assist the functional folding of their substrate proteins and protect the cell against the cytotoxic effects of protein misfolding. Eubacteria and archaebacteria code for slightly different chaperones, comprising distinct protein folding pathways. Here we study the evolution of the eukaryotic protein folding pathways following the endosymbiosis event. A phylogenetic analysis of all 64 chaperones encoded in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome revealed 25 chaperones of eubacterial ancestry, 11 of archaebacterial ancestry, 10 of ambiguous prokaryotic ancestry, and 18 that may represent eukaryotic innovations. Several chaperone families (e.g., Hsp90 and Prefoldin) trace their ancestry to only one prokaryote group, while others, such as Hsp40 and Hsp70, are of mixed ancestry, with members contributed from both prokaryotic ancestors. Analysis of the yeast chaperone-substrate interaction network revealed no preference for interaction between chaperones and substrates of the same origin. Our results suggest that the archaebacterial and eubacterial protein folding pathways have been reorganized and integrated into the present eukaryotic pathway. The highly integrated chaperone system of yeast is a manifestation of the central role of chaperone-mediated folding in maintaining cellular fitness. Most likely, both archaebacterial and eubacterial chaperone systems were essential at the very early stages of eukaryogenesis, and the retention of both may have offered new opportunities for expanding the scope of chaperone-mediated folding.

  7. Monitoring of dnaK gene expression in Porphyromonas gingivalis by oxygen stress using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Araki, Makoto; Hiratsuka, Koichi; Kiyama-Kishikawa, Michiko; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2004-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe associated with adult periodontitis, expresses numerous potential virulence factors. dnaK, a member of the heat shock protein family, functions as a molecular chaperone and plays a role in microbial pathogenicity. However, little is known regarding its gene expression caused by oxygen stress in P. gingivalis. In the present study, a custom-made DNA microarray was designed and used to monitor dnaK gene expression in P. gingivalis caused by oxygen stress. The results demonstrated that dnaK mRNA was up-regulated in a short time, and the DNA microarray results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. These findings suggest that oxygen stress stimulates gene expression of dnaK and may have a relationship to the aerotolerance activity of this organism as well as its expression of pathogenesis.

  8. 5S rRNA-assisted DnaK refolding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Kyung; Choi, Seong Il; Seong, Baik L

    2010-01-08

    Although accumulating evidence has revealed that most proteins can fold without the assistance of molecular chaperones, little attention has been paid to other types of chaperoning macromolecules. A variety of proteins interact with diverse RNA molecules in vivo, suggesting a potential role of RNAs for folding of their interacting proteins. Here we show that the in vitro refolding of a representative molecular chaperone, DnaK, an Escherichia coli homolog of Hsp70, could be assisted by its interacting 5S rRNA. The folding enhancement occurred in RNA concentration and its size dependent manner whereas neither the RNA with the reverse sequence of 5S rRNA nor the RNase pretreated 5S rRNA stimulated the folding in vitro. Based on our results, we propose that 5S rRNA could exert the chaperoning activity on DnaK during the folding process. The results suggest an interesting possibility that the folding of RNA-interacting proteins could be assisted by their cognate RNA ligands. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chaperonopathies of senescence and the scrambling of interactions between the chaperoning and the immune systems.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2010-06-01

    Aging entails progressive deterioration of molecules and supramolecular structures, including Hsp chaperones and their complexes, paralleled by functional decline. Recent research has changed our views on Hsp chaperones. They work inside and outside cells in many locations, alone or forming teams, interacting with cells, receptors, and molecules that are not chaperones, in roles that are not typically attributed to chaperones, such as protein folding. Hsp chaperones form a physiological system with a variety of functions and interactions with other systems, for example, the immune system. We propose that chaperone malfunctioning due to structural damage or gene dysregulation during aging has an impact on the immune system, creating the conditions for an overall malfunction of both systems. Pathological chaperones cannot interact with the immune system as normal ones do, and this leads to an overall readjustment of the interactions that is apparent during senescence and is likely to cause many of its manifestations.

  10. Stress response in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: transcriptional profiling of genes for the heat shock protein 70 chaperone system under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Munakata, Takeo; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Satoh, Nori; Wada, Shuichi

    2010-03-01

    The genome of Ciona intestinalis contains eight genes for HSP70 superfamily proteins, 36 genes for J-proteins, a gene for a J-like protein, and three genes for BAG family proteins. To understand the stress responses of genes in the HSP70 chaperone system comprehensively, the transcriptional profiles of these 48 genes under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were studied using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Heat stress treatment increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of six HSP70 superfamily genes, eight J-protein family genes, and two BAG family genes. In the cytoplasmic group of the DnaK subfamily of the HSP70 family, Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like was the only heat-inducible gene and Ci-HSPA2/8 was the only constitutively active gene which showed striking simplicity in comparison with other animals that have been examined genome-wide so far. Analyses of the time course and temperature dependency of the heat stress responses showed that the induction of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like expression rises to a peak after heat stress treatment at 28 degrees C (10 degrees C upshift from control temperature) for 1 h. ER stress treatment with Brefeldin A, a drug that is known to act as ER stress inducer, increased the mRNA levels of four HSP70 superfamily genes and four J-protein family genes. Most stress-inducible genes are conserved between Ciona and vertebrates, as expected from a close evolutionary relationship between them. The present study characterized the stress responses of HSP70 chaperone system genes in Ciona for the first time and provides essential data for comprehensive understanding of the functions of the HSP70 chaperone system.

  11. Systems Analysis of Chaperone Networks in the Malarial Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Tatu, Utpal

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones participate in the maintenance of cellular protein homeostasis, cell growth and differentiation, signal transduction, and development. Although a vast body of information is available regarding individual chaperones, few studies have attempted a systems level analysis of chaperone function. In this paper, we have constructed a chaperone interaction network for the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. P. falciparum is responsible for several million deaths every year, and understanding the biology of the parasite is a top priority. The parasite regularly experiences heat shock as part of its life cycle, and chaperones have often been implicated in parasite survival and growth. To better understand the participation of chaperones in cellular processes, we created a parasite chaperone network by combining experimental interactome data with in silico analysis. We used interolog mapping to predict protein–protein interactions for parasite chaperones based on the interactions of corresponding human chaperones. This data was then combined with information derived from existing high-throughput yeast two-hybrid assays. Analysis of the network reveals the broad range of functions regulated by chaperones. The network predicts involvement of chaperones in chromatin remodeling, protein trafficking, and cytoadherence. Importantly, it allows us to make predictions regarding the functions of hypothetical proteins based on their interactions. It allows us to make specific predictions about Hsp70–Hsp40 interactions in the parasite and assign functions to members of the Hsp90 and Hsp100 families. Analysis of the network provides a rational basis for the anti-malarial activity of geldanamycin, a well-known Hsp90 inhibitor. Finally, analysis of the network provides a theoretical basis for further experiments designed toward understanding the involvement of this important class of molecules in parasite biology. PMID:17941702

  12. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN), an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27491084

  13. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Brehme, Marc; Voisine, Cindy

    2016-08-01

    Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN), an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Chaperone Proteins in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Nervous System after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ousman, Shalina S.; Frederick, Ariana; Lim, Erin-Mai F.

    2017-01-01

    Injury to axons of the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is accompanied by the upregulation and downregulation of numerous molecules that are involved in mediating nerve repair, or in augmentation of the original damage. Promoting the functions of beneficial factors while reducing the properties of injurious agents determines whether regeneration and functional recovery ensues. A number of chaperone proteins display reduced or increased expression following CNS and PNS damage (crush, transection, contusion) where their roles have generally been found to be protective. For example, chaperones are involved in mediating survival of damaged neurons, promoting axon regeneration and remyelination and, improving behavioral outcomes. We review here the various chaperone proteins that are involved after nervous system axonal damage, the functions that they impact in the CNS and PNS, and the possible mechanisms by which they act. PMID:28270745

  15. Chaperone Proteins in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Nervous System after Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ousman, Shalina S; Frederick, Ariana; Lim, Erin-Mai F

    2017-01-01

    Injury to axons of the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is accompanied by the upregulation and downregulation of numerous molecules that are involved in mediating nerve repair, or in augmentation of the original damage. Promoting the functions of beneficial factors while reducing the properties of injurious agents determines whether regeneration and functional recovery ensues. A number of chaperone proteins display reduced or increased expression following CNS and PNS damage (crush, transection, contusion) where their roles have generally been found to be protective. For example, chaperones are involved in mediating survival of damaged neurons, promoting axon regeneration and remyelination and, improving behavioral outcomes. We review here the various chaperone proteins that are involved after nervous system axonal damage, the functions that they impact in the CNS and PNS, and the possible mechanisms by which they act.

  16. Contributions of chaperone/usher systems to cell binding, biofilm formation and Yersinia pestis virulence

    PubMed Central

    Felek, Suleyman; Jeong, Jenny J.; Runco, Lisa M.; Murray, Susan; Thanassi, David G.; Krukonis, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    Yersinia pestis genome sequencing projects have revealed six intact uncharacterized chaperone/usher systems with the potential to play roles in plague pathogenesis. We cloned each locus and expressed them in the Δfim Escherichia coli strain AAEC185 to test the assembled Y. pestis surface structures for various activities. Expression of each chaperone/usher locus gave rise to specific novel fibrillar structures on the surface of E. coli. One locus, y0561-0563, was able to mediate attachment to human epithelial cells (HEp-2) and human macrophages (THP-1) but not mouse macrophages (RAW264.7), while several loci were able to facilitate E. coli biofilm formation. When each chaperone/usher locus was deleted in Y. pestis, only deletion of the previously described pH 6 antigen (Psa) chaperone/usher system resulted in decreased adhesion and biofilm formation. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed low expression levels for each novel chaperone/usher system in vitro as well as in mouse tissues following intravenous infection. However, a Y. pestis mutant in the chaperone/usher locus y1858-1862 was attenuated for virulence in mice via the intravenous route of infection, suggesting that expression of this locus is, at some stage, sufficient to affect the outcome of a plague infection. qRT-PCR experiments also indicated that expression of the chaperone/usher-dependent capsule locus, caf1, was influenced by oxygen availability and that the well-described chaperone/usher-dependent pilus, Psa, was strongly induced in minimal medium even at 28 °C rather than 37 °C, a temperature previously believed to be required for Psa expression. These data indicate several potential roles for the novel chaperone/usher systems of Y. pestis in pathogenesis and infection-related functions such as cell adhesion and biofilm formation. PMID:21088108

  17. Low temperature of GroEL/ES overproduction permits growth of Escherichia coli cells lacking trigger factor DnaK.

    PubMed

    Vorderwülbecke, S; Kramer, G; Merz, F; Kurz, T A; Rauch, T; Zachmann-Brand, B; Bukau, B; Deuerling, E

    2005-06-13

    Escherichia coli trigger factor (TF) and DnaK cooperate in the folding of newly synthesized proteins. The combined deletion of the TF-encoding tig gene and the dnaK gene causes protein aggregation and synthetic lethality at 30 degrees C. Here we show that the synthetic lethality of deltatigdeltadnaK52 cells is abrogated either by growth below 30 degrees C or by overproduction of GroEL/GroES. At 23 degrees C deltatigdeltadnaK52 cells were viable and showed only minor protein aggregation. Overproduction of GroEL/GroES, but not of other chaperones, restored growth of deltatigdeltadnaK52 cells at 30 degrees C and suppressed protein aggregation including proteins >/= 60 kDa, which normally require TF and DnaK for folding. GroEL/GroES thus influences the folding of proteins previously identified as DnaK/TF substrates.

  18. Stress response in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: transcriptional profiling of genes for the heat shock protein 70 chaperone system under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Munakata, Takeo; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Satoh, Nori

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Ciona intestinalis contains eight genes for HSP70 superfamily proteins, 36 genes for J-proteins, a gene for a J-like protein, and three genes for BAG family proteins. To understand the stress responses of genes in the HSP70 chaperone system comprehensively, the transcriptional profiles of these 48 genes under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were studied using real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Heat stress treatment increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of six HSP70 superfamily genes, eight J-protein family genes, and two BAG family genes. In the cytoplasmic group of the DnaK subfamily of the HSP70 family, Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like was the only heat-inducible gene and Ci-HSPA2/8 was the only constitutively active gene which showed striking simplicity in comparison with other animals that have been examined genome-wide so far. Analyses of the time course and temperature dependency of the heat stress responses showed that the induction of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like expression rises to a peak after heat stress treatment at 28°C (10°C upshift from control temperature) for 1 h. ER stress treatment with Brefeldin A, a drug that is known to act as ER stress inducer, increased the mRNA levels of four HSP70 superfamily genes and four J-protein family genes. Most stress-inducible genes are conserved between Ciona and vertebrates, as expected from a close evolutionary relationship between them. The present study characterized the stress responses of HSP70 chaperone system genes in Ciona for the first time and provides essential data for comprehensive understanding of the functions of the HSP70 chaperone system. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12192-009-0133-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19629754

  19. Identification and NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of DnaK and groEL homologues in moderate eubacterial halophiles.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, M; Matsuoka, K; Tokunaga, H

    1997-08-01

    We have identified 2 DnaK and 3 GroEL homologues from moderately halophilic Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Planococcus species by partial purification using an ATP-agarose column and by the analysis and similarity search of these NH2-terminal amino acid sequences. Although these bacteria required 1 to 2M NaCl for growth, these DnaK and GroEL homologues did not require high salt to bind to the ATP column, thus suggesting that these chaperones did not require high salts for their biochemically activities.

  20. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  1. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; ...

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  2. The Salmonella Type III Secretion System Virulence Effector Forms a New Hexameric Chaperone Assembly for Export of Effector/Chaperone Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Burkinshaw, Brianne J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase. PMID:25488302

  3. Ingestion of bacteria overproducing DnaK attenuates Vibrio infection of Artemia franciscana larvae

    PubMed Central

    Dhaene, Till; Defoirdt, Tom; Boon, Nico; MacRae, Thomas H.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Feeding of bacterially encapsulated heat shock proteins (Hsps) to invertebrates is a novel way to limit Vibrio infection. As an example, ingestion of Escherichia coli overproducing prokaryotic Hsps significantly improves survival of gnotobiotically cultured Artemia larvae upon challenge with pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. The relationship between Hsp accumulation and enhanced resistance to infection may involve DnaK, the prokaryotic equivalent to Hsp70, a major molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells. In support of this proposal, heat-stressed bacterial strains LVS 2 (Bacillus sp.), LVS 3 (Aeromonas hydrophila), LVS 8 (Vibrio sp.), GR 8 (Cytophaga sp.), and GR 10 (Roseobacter sp.) were shown in this work to be more effective than nonheated bacteria in protecting gnotobiotic Artemia larvae against V. campbellii challenge. Immunoprobing of Western blots and quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the amount of DnaK in bacteria and their ability to enhance larval resistance to infection by V. campbellii are correlated. Although the function of DnaK is uncertain, it may improve tolerance to V. campbellii via immune stimulation, a possibility of significance from a fundamental perspective and also because it could be applied in aquaculture, a major method of food production. PMID:19373565

  4. Giardia lamblia expresses a proteobacterial-like DnaK homolog.

    PubMed

    Morrison, H G; Roger, A J; Nystul, T G; Gillin, F D; Sogin, M L

    2001-04-01

    We identified a novel gene encoding molecular chaperone HSP70 in the amitochondriate parasite Giardia lamblia. The predicted protein is similar to bacterial DnaK and mitochondrial HSP70s. The gene is transcribed and translated at a constant level during trophozoite growth and encystation. Alignment of the sequence with a data set of cytosolic, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondrial, and DnaK HSP70 homologs indicated that the sequence was extremely divergent and contained insertions unique to giardial HSP70s. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that this sequence was distinct from the cytosolic and ER forms and was most similar to proteobacterial and mitochondrial DnaKs. However, a specific relationship with the alpha proteobacterial and mitochondrial sequences was not strongly supported by phylogenetic analyses of this data set, in contrast to similar analyses of cpn60. These data neither confirm nor reject the possibility that this gene is a relic of secondary mitochondrial loss; they leave open the possibility that it was acquired in a separate endosymbiotic event.

  5. Ingestion of bacteria overproducing DnaK attenuates Vibrio infection of Artemia franciscana larvae.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yeong Yik; Dhaene, Till; Defoirdt, Tom; Boon, Nico; MacRae, Thomas H; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Feeding of bacterially encapsulated heat shock proteins (Hsps) to invertebrates is a novel way to limit Vibrio infection. As an example, ingestion of Escherichia coli overproducing prokaryotic Hsps significantly improves survival of gnotobiotically cultured Artemia larvae upon challenge with pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. The relationship between Hsp accumulation and enhanced resistance to infection may involve DnaK, the prokaryotic equivalent to Hsp70, a major molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells. In support of this proposal, heat-stressed bacterial strains LVS 2 (Bacillus sp.), LVS 3 (Aeromonas hydrophila), LVS 8 (Vibrio sp.), GR 8 (Cytophaga sp.), and GR 10 (Roseobacter sp.) were shown in this work to be more effective than nonheated bacteria in protecting gnotobiotic Artemia larvae against V. campbellii challenge. Immunoprobing of Western blots and quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the amount of DnaK in bacteria and their ability to enhance larval resistance to infection by V. campbellii are correlated. Although the function of DnaK is uncertain, it may improve tolerance to V. campbellii via immune stimulation, a possibility of significance from a fundamental perspective and also because it could be applied in aquaculture, a major method of food production.

  6. Chaperone-assisted Excisive Recombination, a Solitary Role for DnaJ (Hsp40) Chaperone in Lysogeny Escape*

    PubMed Central

    Champ, Stéphanie; Puvirajesinghe, Tania M.; Perrody, Elsa; Menouni, Rachid; Genevaux, Pierre; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophage lytic development is intrinsically related to the stress response in particular at the DNA replication and virion maturation steps. Alternatively, temperate phages become lysogenic and integrate their genome into the host chromosome. Under stressful conditions, the prophage resumes a lytic development program, and the phage DNA is excised before being replicated. The KplE1 defective prophage of Escherichia coli K12 constitutes a model system because it is fully competent for integrative as well as excisive recombination and presents an atypical recombination module, which is conserved in various phage genomes. In this work, we identified the host-encoded stress-responsive molecular chaperone DnaJ (Hsp40) as an active participant in KplE1 prophage excision. We first show that the recombination directionality factor TorI of KplE1 specifically interacts with DnaJ. In addition, we found that DnaJ dramatically enhances both TorI binding to its DNA target and excisive recombination in vitro. Remarkably, such stimulatory effect by DnaJ was performed independently of its DnaK chaperone partner and did not require a functional DnaJ J-domain. Taken together, our results underline a novel and unsuspected functional interaction between the generic host stress-regulated chaperone and temperate bacteriophage lysogenic development. PMID:21908845

  7. Low temperature or GroEL/ES overproduction permits growth of Escherichia coli cells lacking trigger factor and DnaK.

    PubMed

    Vorderwülbecke, S; Kramer, G; Merz, F; Kurz, T A; Rauch, T; Zachmann-Brand, B; Bukau, B; Deuerling, E

    2004-02-13

    Escherichia coli trigger factor (TF) and DnaK cooperate in the folding of newly synthesized proteins. The combined deletion of the TF-encoding tig gene and the dnaK gene causes protein aggregation and synthetic lethality at 30 degrees C. Here we show that the synthetic lethality of DeltatigDeltadnaK52 cells is abrogated either by growth below 30 degrees C or by overproduction of GroEL/GroES. At 23 degrees C DeltatigDeltadnaK52 cells were viable and showed only minor protein aggregation. Overproduction of GroEL/GroES, but not of other chaperones, restored growth of DeltatigDeltadnaK52 cells at 30 degrees C and suppressed protein aggregation including proteins >/=60 kDa, which normally require TF and DnaK for folding. GroEL/GroES thus influences the folding of proteins previously identified as DnaK/TF substrates.

  8. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-05

    Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may transition between

  9. Conformational properties of bacterial DnaK and yeast mitochondrial Hsp70. Role of the divergent C-terminal alpha-helical subdomain.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fernando; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Muga, Arturo

    2005-06-01

    Among the eukaryotic members of the Hsp70 family, mitochondrial Hsp70 shows the highest degree of sequence identity with bacterial DnaK. Although they share a functional mechanism and homologous co-chaperones, they are highly specific and cannot be exchanged between Escherichia coli and yeast mitochondria. To provide a structural basis for this finding, we characterized both proteins, as well as two DnaK/mtHsp70 chimeras constructed by domain swapping, using biochemical and biophysical methods. Here, we show that DnaK and mtHsp70 display different conformational and biochemical properties. Replacing different regions of the DnaK peptide-binding domain with those of mtHsp70 results in chimeric proteins that: (a) are not able to support growth of an E. coli DnaK deletion strain at stress temperatures (e.g. 42 degrees C); (b) show increased accessibility and decreased thermal stability of the peptide-binding pocket; and (c) have reduced activation by bacterial, but not mitochondrial co-chaperones, as compared with DnaK. Importantly, swapping the C-terminal alpha-helical subdomain promotes a conformational change in the chimeras to an mtHsp70-like conformation. Thus, interaction with bacterial co-chaperones correlates well with the conformation that natural and chimeric Hsp70s adopt in solution. Our results support the hypothesis that a specific protein structure might regulate the interaction of Hsp70s with particular components of the cellular machinery, such as Tim44, so that they perform specific functions.

  10. Structural Basis of Chaperone Recognition of Type III Secretion System Minor Translocator Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Job, Viviana; Matteï, Pierre-Jean; Lemaire, David; Attree, Ina; Dessen, Andréa

    2010-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a complex nanomachine employed by many Gram-negative pathogens, including the nosocomial agent Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to inject toxins directly into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. A key component of all T3SS is the translocon, a proteinaceous channel that is inserted into the target membrane, which allows passage of toxins into target cells. In most bacterial species, two distinct membrane proteins (the “translocators”) are involved in translocon formation, whereas in the bacterial cytoplasm, however, they remain associated to a common chaperone. To date, the strategy employed by a single chaperone to recognize two distinct translocators is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a complex between the Pseudomonas translocator chaperone PcrH and a short region from the minor translocator PopD. PcrH displays a 7-helical tetratricopeptide repeat fold that harbors the PopD peptide within its concave region, originally believed to be involved in recognition of the major translocator, PopB. Point mutations introduced into the PcrH-interacting region of PopD impede translocator-chaperone recognition in vitro and lead to impairment of bacterial cytotoxicity toward macrophages in vivo. These results indicate that T3SS translocator chaperones form binary complexes with their partner molecules, and the stability of their interaction regions must be strictly maintained to guarantee bacterial infectivity. The PcrH-PopD complex displays homologs among a number of pathogenic strains and could represent a novel, potential target for antibiotic development. PMID:20385547

  11. Structural basis of chaperone recognition of type III secretion system minor translocator proteins.

    PubMed

    Job, Viviana; Matteï, Pierre-Jean; Lemaire, David; Attree, Ina; Dessen, Andréa

    2010-07-23

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a complex nanomachine employed by many Gram-negative pathogens, including the nosocomial agent Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to inject toxins directly into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. A key component of all T3SS is the translocon, a proteinaceous channel that is inserted into the target membrane, which allows passage of toxins into target cells. In most bacterial species, two distinct membrane proteins (the "translocators") are involved in translocon formation, whereas in the bacterial cytoplasm, however, they remain associated to a common chaperone. To date, the strategy employed by a single chaperone to recognize two distinct translocators is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a complex between the Pseudomonas translocator chaperone PcrH and a short region from the minor translocator PopD. PcrH displays a 7-helical tetratricopeptide repeat fold that harbors the PopD peptide within its concave region, originally believed to be involved in recognition of the major translocator, PopB. Point mutations introduced into the PcrH-interacting region of PopD impede translocator-chaperone recognition in vitro and lead to impairment of bacterial cytotoxicity toward macrophages in vivo. These results indicate that T3SS translocator chaperones form binary complexes with their partner molecules, and the stability of their interaction regions must be strictly maintained to guarantee bacterial infectivity. The PcrH-PopD complex displays homologs among a number of pathogenic strains and could represent a novel, potential target for antibiotic development.

  12. Chaperoning erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Camila O.

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit complexes containing molecular chaperones regulate protein production, stability, and degradation in virtually every cell type. We are beginning to recognize how generalized and tissue-specific chaperones regulate specialized aspects of erythropoiesis. For example, chaperones intersect with erythropoietin signaling pathways to protect erythroid precursors against apoptosis. Molecular chaperones also participate in hemoglobin synthesis, both directly and indirectly. Current knowledge in these areas only scratches the surface of what is to be learned. Improved understanding of how molecular chaperones regulate erythropoietic development and hemoglobin homeostasis should identify biochemical pathways amenable to pharmacologic manipulation in a variety of red blood cell disorders including thalassemia and other anemias associated with hemoglobin instability. PMID:19109556

  13. Loss of the oxidative stress sensor NPGPx compromises GRP78 chaperone activity and induces systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pei-Chi; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Su, Mei-I; Jiang, Xianzhi; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Lo, Wen-Ting; Weng, Jui-Yun; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Wang, Ju-Ming; Chen, Phang-lang; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2012-12-14

    NPGPx is a member of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) family; however, it lacks GPx enzymatic activity due to the absence of a critical selenocysteine residue, rendering its function an enigma. Here, we show that NPGPx is a newly identified stress sensor that transmits oxidative stress signals by forming the disulfide bond between its Cys57 and Cys86 residues. This oxidized form of NPGPx binds to glucose-regulated protein (GRP)78 and forms covalent bonding intermediates between Cys86 of NPGPx and Cys41/Cys420 of GRP78. Subsequently, the formation of the disulfide bond between Cys41 and Cys420 of GRP78 enhances its chaperone activity. NPGPx-deficient cells display increased reactive oxygen species, accumulated misfolded proteins, and impaired GRP78 chaperone activity. Complete loss of NPGPx in animals causes systemic oxidative stress, increases carcinogenesis, and shortens life span. These results suggest that NPGPx is essential for releasing excessive ER stress by enhancing GRP78 chaperone activity to maintain physiological homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in diseases caused by misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Young, Jason C

    2014-03-01

    Protein-folding diseases are an ongoing medical challenge. Many diseases within this group are genetically determined, and have no known cure. Among the examples in which the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are well understood are diseases driven by misfolding of transmembrane proteins that normally function as cell-surface ion channels. Wild-type forms are synthesized and integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane system and, upon correct folding, are trafficked by the secretory pathway to the cell surface. Misfolded mutant forms traffic poorly, if at all, and are instead degraded by the ER-associated proteasomal degradation (ERAD) system. Molecular chaperones can assist the folding of the cytosolic domains of these transmembrane proteins; however, these chaperones are also involved in selecting misfolded forms for ERAD. Given this dual role of chaperones, diseases caused by the misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels (referred to here as ion-channel-misfolding diseases) can be regarded as a consequence of insufficiency of the pro-folding chaperone activity and/or overefficiency of the chaperone ERAD role. An attractive idea is that manipulation of the chaperones might allow increased folding and trafficking of the mutant proteins, and thereby partial restoration of function. This Review outlines the roles of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in the best-studied paradigms of ion-channel-misfolding disease--the CFTR chloride channel in cystic fibrosis and the hERG potassium channel in cardiac long QT syndrome type 2. In addition, other ion channels implicated in ion-channel-misfolding diseases are discussed.

  15. Introduction of a unique tryptophan residue into various positions of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-En; Lin, Min-Guan; Lo, Huei-Fen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Chi, Meng-Chun; Lin, Long-Liu

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis together with biochemical and biophysical techniques were used to probe effects of single-tryptophan-incorporated mutations on a bacterial molecular chaperone, Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK). Specifically, five phenylalanine residues (Phe(120), Phe(174), Phe(186), Phe(378) and Phe(396)) of BlDnaK were individually replaced by single tryptophans, thus creating site-specific probes for the fluorescence analysis of the protein. The steady-state ATPase activity for BlDnaK, F120W, F174W, F186W, F378W, and F396W was determined to be 76.01, 52.82, 25.32, 53.31, 58.84, and 47.53 nmol Pi/min/mg, respectively. Complementation test revealed that the single mutation at codons 120, 186, and 378 of the dnaK gene still allowed an Escherichia coli dnaK756-Ts strain to grow at a stringent temperature of 44°C. Simultaneous addition of co-chaperones and NR-peptide did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of F174W and F396W, and these two proteins were unable to assist the refolding of GdnHCl-denatured luciferase. The heat-induced denaturation of all variants could be fitted adequately to a three-state model, in agreement with the observation for the wild-type protein. By CD spectral analysis, GdnHCl-induced unfolding transition for BlDnaK was 1.51 M corresponding to ΔG(N-U) of 1.69 kcal/mol; however, the transitions for mutant proteins were 1.07-1.55 M equivalent to ΔG(N-U) of 0.94-2.93 kcal/mol. The emission maximum of single-tryptophan-incorporated variants was in the range of 333.2-335.8 nm. Acrylamide quenching analysis showed that the mutant proteins had a dynamic quenching constant of 3.0-4.2 M(-1). Taken together, these results suggest that the molecular properties of BlDnaK have been significantly changed upon the individual replacement of selected phenylalanine residues by tryptophan.

  16. Tracking the interplay between bound peptide and the lid domain of DnaK, using molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Itzhaq; Kucherenko, Nataly; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Azem, Abdussalam; Tsfadia, Yossi

    2013-06-17

    Hsp70 chaperones consist of two functional domains: the 44 kDa Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD), that binds and hydrolyses ATP, and the 26 kDa Substrate Binding Domain (SBD), which binds unfolded proteins and reactivates them, utilizing energy obtained from nucleotide hydrolysis. The structure of the SBD of the bacterial Hsp70, DnaK, consists of two sub-domains: A β-sandwich part containing the hydrophobic cavity to which the hepta-peptide NRLLLTG (NR) is bound, and a segment made of 5 α-helices, called the "lid" that caps the top of the β-sandwich domain. In the present study we used the Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK, as a model for Hsp70 proteins, focusing on its SBD domain, examining the changes in the lid conformation. We deliberately decoupled the NBD from the SBD, limiting the study to the structure of the SBD section, with an emphasis on the interaction between the charges of the peptide with the residues located in the lid. Molecular dynamics simulations of the complex revealed significant mobility within the lid structure; as the structure was released from the forces operating during the crystallization process, the two terminal helices established a contact with the positive charge at the tip of the peptide. This contact is manifested only in the presence of electrostatic attraction. The observed internal motions within the lid provide a molecular role for the function of this sub-domain during the reaction cycle of Hsp 70 chaperones.

  17. Immunization of mice with a novel recombinant molecular chaperon confers protection against Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Amir; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Mautner, Josef; Salari, Mohammad Hossein; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2014-11-20

    Brucella spp. are zoonotic Gram-negative intracellular pathogens with the ability to survive and replicate in phagocytes. It has been shown that bacterial proteins expressed abundantly in this niche are stress-related proteins capable of triggering effective immune responses. BMEI1549 is a molecular chaperone designated DnaK that is expressed under stress conditions and helps to prevent formation of protein aggregates. In order to study the potential of DnaK as a prospective Brucella subunit vaccine, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant DnaK from Brucella melitensis was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The dnak gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resulting recombinant protein used as subunit vaccine. DnaK-immunized mice showed a strong lymphocyte proliferative response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Although comparable levels of antigen-specific IgG2a and IgG1 were observed in immunized mice, high amounts of IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-6, no detectable level of IL-4 and very low levels of IL-10 and IL-5 were produced by splenocytes of vaccinated mice suggesting induction of a Th1 dominant immune response by DnaK. Compared to control animals, mice vaccinated with DnaK exhibited a significant degree of protection against subsequent Brucella infection (p<0.001), albeit this protection was less than the protection conferred by Rev.1 (p<0.05). A further increase in protection was observed, when DnaK was combined with recombinant Omp31. Notably, this combination, as opposed to each component alone, induced statistically similar level of protection as induced by Rev.1 suggesting that DnaK could be viewed as a promising candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against brucellosis.

  18. Myosin chaperones.

    PubMed

    Hellerschmied, Doris; Clausen, Tim

    2014-04-01

    The folding and assembly of myosin motor proteins is essential for most movement processes at the cellular, but also at the organism level. Importantly, myosins, which represent a very diverse family of proteins, require the activity of general and specialized folding factors to develop their full motor function. The activities of the myosin-specific UCS (UNC-45/Cro1/She4) chaperones range from assisting acto-myosin dependent transport processes to scaffolding multi-subunit chaperone complexes, which are required to assemble myofilaments. Recent structure-function studies revealed the structural organization of TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat)-containing and TPR-less UCS chaperones. The observed structural differences seem to reflect the specialized and remarkably versatile working mechanisms of myosin-directed chaperones, as will be discussed in this review. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved Fab presentation on phage surface with the use of molecular chaperone coplasmid system.

    PubMed

    Loh, Qiuting; Leong, Siew Wen; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-05-15

    The low presentation efficiency of Fab (fragment antigen binding) fragments during phage display is largely due to the complexity of disulphide bond formation. This can result in the presentation of Fab fragments devoid of a light chain during phage display. Here we propose the use of a coplasmid system encoding several molecular chaperones (DsbA, DsbC, FkpA, and SurA) to improve Fab packaging. A comparison was done using the Fab fragment from IgG and IgD. We found that the use of the coplasmid during phage packaging was able to improve the presentation efficiency of the Fab fragment on phage surfaces. A modified version of panning using the coplasmid system was evaluated and was successful at enriching Fab binders. Therefore, the coplasmid system would be an attractive alternative for improved Fab presentation for phage display.

  20. Molecular chaperones, cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system: involvement in the production of high quality spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process in which mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation events coexist. The need to guarantee the production of qualitatively functional spermatozoa has evolved into several control systems that check spermatogenesis progression/sperm maturation and tag aberrant gametes for degradation. In this review, we will focus on the importance of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways involving molecular chaperones belonging to the superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSPs), their cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system all over the spermatogenetic process. In this respect, we will discuss the conserved role played by the DNAJ protein Msj-1 (mouse sperm cell-specific DNAJ first homologue) and the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubpy (ubiquitin-specific processing protease-y) during the spermiogenesis in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates.

  1. Molecular Chaperones, Cochaperones, and Ubiquitination/Deubiquitination System: Involvement in the Production of High Quality Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process in which mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation events coexist. The need to guarantee the production of qualitatively functional spermatozoa has evolved into several control systems that check spermatogenesis progression/sperm maturation and tag aberrant gametes for degradation. In this review, we will focus on the importance of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways involving molecular chaperones belonging to the superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSPs), their cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system all over the spermatogenetic process. In this respect, we will discuss the conserved role played by the DNAJ protein Msj-1 (mouse sperm cell-specific DNAJ first homologue) and the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubpy (ubiquitin-specific processing protease-y) during the spermiogenesis in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:25045686

  2. Structure and function of the molecular chaperone Trigger Factor.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Anja; Bukau, Bernd; Kramer, Günter

    2010-06-01

    Newly synthesized proteins often require the assistance of molecular chaperones to efficiently fold into functional three-dimensional structures. At first, ribosome-associated chaperones guide the initial folding steps and protect growing polypeptide chains from misfolding and aggregation. After that folding into the native structure may occur spontaneously or require support by additional chaperones which do not bind to the ribosome such as DnaK and GroEL. Here we review the current knowledge on the best-characterized ribosome-associated chaperone at present, the Escherichia coli Trigger Factor. We describe recent progress on structural and dynamic aspects of Trigger Factor's interactions with the ribosome and substrates and discuss how these interactions affect co-translational protein folding. In addition, we discuss the newly proposed ribosome-independent function of Trigger Factor as assembly factor of multi-subunit protein complexes. Finally, we cover the functional cooperation between Trigger Factor, DnaK and GroEL in folding of cytosolic proteins and the interplay between Trigger Factor and other ribosome-associated factors acting in enzymatic processing and translocation of nascent polypeptide chains.

  3. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  4. NMR characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A.; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2017-01-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologs are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by CD and NMR spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residues 16–41 and 55–76. NMR backbone dynamics data show that the helices in PcrG have semi-rigid flexibility and they tumble as a single entity with similar backbone dynamics. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from 9–76 is involved in binding to PcrV. Thus the PcrG family of T3SS chaperone proteins is essentially partially folded. PMID:26451841

  5. Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 as an Assay System for Screening of Pharmacological Chaperones for Phenylketonuria Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Min; Yang, Yun Gyeong; Kim, Hye-Lim; Park, Young Shik

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed an assay system for missense mutations in human phenylalanine hydroxylases (hPAHs). To demonstrate the reliability of the system, eight mutant proteins (F39L, K42I, L48S, I65T, R252Q, L255V, S349L, and R408W) were expressed in a mutant strain (pah(-)) of Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 disrupted in the indigenous gene encoding PAH. The transformed pah- cells grown in FM minimal medium were measured for growth rate and PAH activity to reveal a positive correlation between them. The protein level of hPAH was also determined by western blotting to show the impact of each mutation on protein stability and catalytic activity. The result was highly compatible with the previous ones obtained from other expression systems, suggesting that Dictyostelium is a dependable alternative to other expression systems. Furthermore, we found that both the protein level and activity of S349L and R408W, which were impaired severely in protein stability, were rescued in HL5 nutrient medium. Although the responsible component(s) remains unidentified, this unexpected finding showed an important advantage of our expression system for studying unstable proteins. As an economic and stable cell-based expression system, our development will contribute to mass-screening of pharmacological chaperones for missense PAH mutations as well as to the in-depth characterization of individual mutations.

  6. A bacteriophage-encoded J-domain protein interacts with the DnaK/Hsp70 chaperone and stabilizes the heat-shock factor σ32 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Perrody, Elsa; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Desplats, Carine; Keppel, France; Schwager, Françoise; Tranier, Samuel; Georgopoulos, Costa; Genevaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The universally conserved J-domain proteins (JDPs) are obligate cochaperone partners of the Hsp70 (DnaK) chaperone. They stimulate Hsp70's ATPase activity, facilitate substrate delivery, and confer specific cellular localization to Hsp70. In this work, we have identified and characterized the first functional JDP protein encoded by a bacteriophage. Specifically, we show that the ORFan gene 057w of the T4-related enterobacteriophage RB43 encodes a bona fide JDP protein, named Rki, which specifically interacts with the Escherichia coli host multifunctional DnaK chaperone. However, in sharp contrast with the three known host JDP cochaperones of DnaK encoded by E. coli, Rki does not act as a generic cochaperone in vivo or in vitro. Expression of Rki alone is highly toxic for wild-type E. coli, but toxicity is abolished in the absence of endogenous DnaK or when the conserved J-domain of Rki is mutated. Further in vivo analyses revealed that Rki is expressed early after infection by RB43 and that deletion of the rki gene significantly impairs RB43 proliferation. Furthermore, we show that mutations in the host dnaK gene efficiently suppress the growth phenotype of the RB43 rki deletion mutant, thus indicating that Rki specifically interferes with DnaK cellular function. Finally, we show that the interaction of Rki with the host DnaK chaperone rapidly results in the stabilization of the heat-shock factor σ(32), which is normally targeted for degradation by DnaK. The mechanism by which the Rki-dependent stabilization of σ(32) facilitates RB43 bacteriophage proliferation is discussed.

  7. A Bacteriophage-Encoded J-Domain Protein Interacts with the DnaK/Hsp70 Chaperone and Stabilizes the Heat-Shock Factor σ32 of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Perrody, Elsa; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Desplats, Carine; Keppel, France; Schwager, Françoise; Tranier, Samuel; Georgopoulos, Costa; Genevaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The universally conserved J-domain proteins (JDPs) are obligate cochaperone partners of the Hsp70 (DnaK) chaperone. They stimulate Hsp70's ATPase activity, facilitate substrate delivery, and confer specific cellular localization to Hsp70. In this work, we have identified and characterized the first functional JDP protein encoded by a bacteriophage. Specifically, we show that the ORFan gene 057w of the T4-related enterobacteriophage RB43 encodes a bona fide JDP protein, named Rki, which specifically interacts with the Escherichia coli host multifunctional DnaK chaperone. However, in sharp contrast with the three known host JDP cochaperones of DnaK encoded by E. coli, Rki does not act as a generic cochaperone in vivo or in vitro. Expression of Rki alone is highly toxic for wild-type E. coli, but toxicity is abolished in the absence of endogenous DnaK or when the conserved J-domain of Rki is mutated. Further in vivo analyses revealed that Rki is expressed early after infection by RB43 and that deletion of the rki gene significantly impairs RB43 proliferation. Furthermore, we show that mutations in the host dnaK gene efficiently suppress the growth phenotype of the RB43 rki deletion mutant, thus indicating that Rki specifically interferes with DnaK cellular function. Finally, we show that the interaction of Rki with the host DnaK chaperone rapidly results in the stabilization of the heat-shock factor σ32, which is normally targeted for degradation by DnaK. The mechanism by which the Rki-dependent stabilization of σ32 facilitates RB43 bacteriophage proliferation is discussed. PMID:23133404

  8. Catapult mechanism renders the chaperone action of Hsp70 unidirectional.

    PubMed

    Gisler, S M; Pierpaoli, E V; Christen, P

    1998-06-19

    Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 type promote the folding and membrane translocation of proteins. The interaction of Hsp70s with polypeptides is linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis. We formed complexes of seven different fluorescence-labeled peptides with DnaK, the Hsp70 homolog of Escherichia coli, and determined the rate of peptide release under two different sets of conditions. (1) Upon addition of ATP to nucleotide-free peptide.DnaK complexes, all tested peptides were released with similar rate constants (2.2 s-1 to 6.7 s-1). (2) In the binding equilibrium of peptide and ATP-liganded DnaK, the dissociation followed one or two-step reactions, depending on the amino acid sequence of the peptide. For the monophasic reactions, the dissociation rate constants diverged by four orders of magnitude from 0.0004 s-1 to 5.7 s-1; for the biphasic reactions, the rate constants of the second, slower isomerization step were in the range from 0.3 s-1 to 0.0005 s-1. The release of the different peptides in case (1) is 1.4 to 14,000 times faster than in case (2). Apparently, binding of ATP induces a transient state of the chaperone which ejects target peptides before the final state of ATP-liganded DnaK is reached. This "catapult" mechanism provides the chaperone cycle with a mode of peptide release that does not correspond with the reverse of peptide binding. By allowing the conformation of the outgoing polypeptide to differ from that of the incoming polypeptide, a futile cycle with respect to conformational work exerted on the target protein is obviated.

  9. Cloning, sequencing and analysis of dnaK -dnaJ gene cluster of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Bao, Fangming; Gong, Lei; Shao, Weilan

    2008-12-01

    The DNA fragment of heat shock genes (hrcA-grpE-dnaK-dnaJ) containing complete hrcA-grpE-dnaK operon and the transcription unit of dnaJ was cloned, sequensed and analyzed from Bacillus megaterium RF5. The sequence of hrcA, grpE and dnaJ were first time reported, and their coding products exibit 60%, 63% and 81% of identities to the homologs of B. subtilis. A sigmaA-type promoter of Gram-positive bacteria (PA1) and a terminator were located upstream of the hrcA and downstream of dnaK, and a Controlling inverted repeat of chaperone expression element (CIRCE) was identified between PA1 and hrcA. Another sigmaA-type promoter (PA2) and a terminator were found upstream and downstream of dnaJ, indicating B. megaterium has a transcription unit containing a single gene dnaJ. The structure of dnaJ transcription unit is more similar to that of Listeria monocytogenes than other species of Bacillus. A partial protein-based phylogenetic tree, derived from Gram-positive bacteria using HrcA sequence, indicated a closer phylogenetic relationship between B. megaterium and Geobacillus species than other two Bacillus species.

  10. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis type VII secretion system chaperone EspG5 in complex with PE25–PPE41 dimer

    PubMed Central

    Korotkova, Natalia; Freire, Diana; Phan, Trang H.; Ummels, Roy; Creekmore, Christopher C.; Evans, Timothy J.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Bitter, Wilbert; Parret, Annabel H. A.; Houben, Edith N. G.; Korotkov, Konstantin V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The growth or virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli depends on homologous type VII secretion systems, ESX-1, ESX-3 and ESX-5, which export a number of protein effectors across membranes to the bacterial surface and environment. PE and PPE proteins represent two large families of highly polymorphic proteins that are secreted by these ESX systems. Recently, it was shown that these proteins require system-specific cytoplasmic chaperones for secretion. Here, we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis ESX-5-secreted PE25–PPE41 heterodimer in complex with the cytoplasmic chaperone EspG5. EspG5 represents a novel fold that is unrelated to previously characterized secretion chaperones. Functional analysis of the EspG5-binding region uncovered a hydrophobic patch on PPE41 that promotes dimer aggregation, and the chaperone effectively abolishes this process. We show that PPE41 contains a characteristic chaperone-binding sequence, the hh motif, which is highly conserved among ESX-1-, ESX-3- and ESX-5-specific PPE proteins. Disrupting the interaction between EspG5 and three different PPE target proteins by introducing different point mutations generally affected protein secretion. We further demonstrate that the EspG5 chaperone plays an important role in the ESX secretion mechanism by keeping aggregation-prone PE–PPE proteins in their soluble state. PMID:25155747

  11. Gene expression and biochemical characterization of Azotobacter vinelandii cyclophilins and Protein Interaction Studies of the cytoplasmic isoform with dnaK and lpxH.

    PubMed

    Dimou, Maria; Venieraki, Anastasia; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Kouri, Evangelia D; Tampakaki, Anastasia; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    The soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii possesses two cyclophilins, comprising putative cytoplasmic and periplasmic isoforms, designated as AvPPIB and AvPPIA, respectively. Both recombinant cyclophilins have been purified and their peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity against Suc-Ala-Xaa-Pro-Phe-pNA synthetic peptides has been characterized. The substrate specificity of both cyclophilins is typical for bacterial cyclophilins, with Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA being the most rapidly catalyzed substrate. The cytoplasmic cyclophilin also displays a chaperone function in the citrate synthase thermal aggregation assay. Using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that AvppiB is expressed under various physiological and growth conditions, mainly upregulated by acetate and downregulated by the stationary growth state, while AvppiA shows a tendency for downregulation under the tested conditions. Further, we identified chaperone protein dnaK and UDP-2, 3-diacylglucosamine hydrolase lpxH as probable interacting partners of AvPPIB and we demonstrate their physical interaction by coexpression studies. An increase in AvPPIB PPIase activity in the presence of AvdnaK and a decrease in the presence of AvlpxH further confirms each interaction. However, the PPIase activity does not seem to be essential for those interactions since AvPPIB active site mutants still interact with dnaK and lpxH, while their minor PPIase activity cannot be modulated by the interaction. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Cloning and Expression of the dnaK Gene of Campylobacter jejuni and Antigenicity of Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Thies, Frank L.; Karch, Helge; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Giegerich, Gerhard

    1999-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of infectious diarrhea throughout the world. In addition, there is growing evidence that Guillain-Barré syndrome, an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the peripheral nervous system, is frequently preceded by C. jejuni infection. In the present study, the hrcA-grpE-dnaK gene cluster of C. jejuni was cloned and sequenced. The dnaK gene consists of an open reading frame of 1,869 bp and encodes a protein with a high degree of homology to other bacterial 70-kDa heat shock proteins (HSPs). The overall percentages of identity to the HSP70 proteins of Helicobacter pylori, Borrelia burgdorferi, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Bacillus subtilis were calculated to be 78.1, 60.5, 57.2, and 53.8%, respectively. Regions similar to the Escherichia coli ς70 promoter consensus sequence and to a cis-acting regulatory element (CIRCE) are located upstream of the hrcA gene. Following heat shock, a rapid increase of dnaK mRNA was detectable, which reached its maximum after 20 to 30 min. A 6-His-tagged recombinant DnaK protein (rCjDnaK-His) was generated in E. coli, after cloning of the dnaK coding region into pET-22b(+), and purified by affinity and gel filtration chromatography. Antibody responses to rCjDnaK-His were significantly elevated, compared to those of healthy individuals, in about one-third of the serum specimens obtained from C. jejuni enteritis patients. PMID:10024560

  13. Molecular cloning of the dnaK locus, and purification and characterization of a DnaK protein from Bacillus brevis HPD31.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, H; Yamakawa, M; Mizukami, M; Takagi, H; Tokunaga, M

    1998-09-08

    Using part of the dnaK gene from Bacillus subtilis as a probe, a 4. 4-kbp SacI-BglII fragment of chromosomal DNA of Bacillus brevis, a protein-hypersecreting bacterium, was cloned. Nucleotide sequencing revealed 3 open reading frames in the order of grpE-dnaK-dnaJ homologues. We purified DnaK protein to homogeneity from B. brevis HPD31 harboring a multi-copy dnaK expression plasmid. Purified DnaK showed ATPase activity which was synergistically stimulated 14-fold by the addition of glutathione S-transferase-DnaJ and glutathione S-transferase-GrpE fusion proteins. DnaK hydrolyzed not only ATP but also CTP, UTP, and GTP at about 40% of the efficiency of ATP. The specific activity of DnaK-ATPase was 7.25x10-3 unit/mg protein (the turnover number against ATP was 0.47 min-1) under our assay conditions. The DnaK dimers dissociated into monomers on addition of ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP and ATPgammaS, but not ADP or AMP. DnaK formed a stable complex with permanently unfolded carboxymethylated alpha-lactalbumin but not with native alpha-lactalbumin, and this complex was dissociated by addition of ATP/Mg. Formation of this complex was inhibited in the presence of inorganic phosphate.

  14. Multilevel interaction of the DnaK/DnaJ(HSP70/HSP40) stress-responsive chaperone machine with the central metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Anglès, Fréderic; Castanié-Cornet, Marie-Pierre; Slama, Nawel; Dinclaux, Mickael; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Portais, Jean-Charles; Létisse, Fabien; Genevaux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Networks of molecular chaperones maintain cellular protein homeostasis by acting at nearly every step in the biogenesis of proteins and protein complexes. Herein, we demonstrate that the major chaperone DnaK/HSP70 of the model bacterium Escherichia coli is critical for the proper functioning of the central metabolism and for the cellular response to carbon nutrition changes, either directly or indirectly via the control of the heat-shock response. We identified carbon sources whose utilization was positively or negatively affected by DnaK and isolated several central metabolism genes (among other genes identified in this work) that compensate for the lack of DnaK and/or DnaK/Trigger Factor chaperone functions in vivo. Using carbon sources with specific entry points coupled to NMR analyses of real-time carbon assimilation, metabolic coproducts production and flux rearrangements, we demonstrate that DnaK significantly impacts the hierarchical order of carbon sources utilization, the excretion of main coproducts and the distribution of metabolic fluxes, thus revealing a multilevel interaction of DnaK with the central metabolism. PMID:28128357

  15. Molecular Chaperones and Co-Chaperones in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dimant, Hemi; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; McLean, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by the pathological accumulation of proteins, including the ubiquitous presynaptic protein α-synuclein. Alterations in the metabolism of α-synuclein have clearly been linked to neurodegeneration, and early steps in the pathological sequence of this protein include the formation of oligomers, fibrils, and small aggregates. Targeting these early steps of oligomerization is one of the main therapeutic approaches in the quest to develop disease-modifying agents. Molecular chaperones, molecules that can mediate the proper folding and refolding of client proteins, are vital to cell function and survival and thus have been explored as potential therapeutic agents. Important to Parkinson disease, chaperones are capable of preventing α-synuclein misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregate formation as shown in vitro and in Parkinson disease animal models. Furthermore, chaperones and associated co-chaperones are closely linked to pathways of protein degradation, like the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy, and are thus able to remove irreversibly misfolded proteins. In this review, we summarize the role of molecular chaperones in Parkinson disease models and discuss the importance of preserving protein homeostasis to prevent neurodegeneration. We also review the growing number of exciting studies that have targeted molecular chaperone function as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:22829394

  16. Molecular chaperones and co-chaperones in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Dimant, Hemi; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; McLean, Pamela J

    2012-12-01

    Parkinson disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by the pathological accumulation of proteins, including the ubiquitous presynaptic protein α-synuclein. Alterations in the metabolism of α-synuclein have clearly been linked to neurodegeneration, and early steps in the pathological sequence of this protein include the formation of oligomers, fibrils, and small aggregates. Targeting these early steps of oligomerization is one of the main therapeutic approaches in the quest to develop disease-modifying agents. Molecular chaperones, molecules that can mediate the proper folding and refolding of client proteins, are vital to cell function and survival and thus have been explored as potential therapeutic agents. Important to Parkinson disease, chaperones are capable of preventing α-synuclein misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregate formation as shown in vitro and in Parkinson disease animal models. Furthermore, chaperones and associated co-chaperones are closely linked to pathways of protein degradation, like the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy, and are thus able to remove irreversibly misfolded proteins. In this review, we summarize the role of molecular chaperones in Parkinson disease models and discuss the importance of preserving protein homeostasis to prevent neurodegeneration. We also review the growing number of exciting studies that have targeted molecular chaperone function as a novel therapeutic approach.

  17. TAC from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a paradigm for stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin systems controlled by SecB-like chaperones.

    PubMed

    Sala, Ambre; Calderon, Virginie; Bordes, Patricia; Genevaux, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial type II toxin-antitoxins (TAs) are two-component systems that modulate growth in response to specific stress conditions, thus promoting adaptation and persistence. The major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis potentially encodes 75 TAs and it has been proposed that persistence induced by active toxins might be relevant for its pathogenesis. In this work, we focus on the newly discovered toxin-antitoxin-chaperone (TAC) system of M. tuberculosis, an atypical stress-responsive TA system tightly controlled by a molecular chaperone that shows similarity to the canonical SecB chaperone involved in Sec-dependent protein export in Gram-negative bacteria. We performed a large-scale genome screening to reconstruct the evolutionary history of TAC systems and found that TAC is not restricted to mycobacteria and seems to have disseminated in diverse taxonomic groups by horizontal gene transfer. Our results suggest that TAC chaperones are evolutionary related to the solitary chaperone SecB and have diverged to become specialized toward their cognate antitoxins.

  18. Chaperones in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Susmita; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cells continuously turn over proteins through cycles of synthesis and degradation in order to maintain a functional proteome and to exert a tight control in the levels of regulatory proteins. Selective degradation of proteins was initially thought to be an exclusive function of the ubiquitin-proteasome system however, over the years, the contribution of lysosomes to this selective degradation, through the process of autophagy, has become consolidated. In this context, molecular chaperones, classically associated with protein folding, unfolding and assembling, have been revealed as important modulators of selectivity during the autophagic process. Here, we review this relatively new role of chaperones in mediating selective autophagy and comment on how alterations of this function can lead to human pathologies associated to proteotoxicity. PMID:23059540

  19. Molecular chaperones and selection against mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tomala, Katarzyna; Korona, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    Background Molecular chaperones help to restore the native states of proteins after their destabilization by external stress. It has been proposed that another function of chaperones is to maintain the activity of proteins destabilized by mutation, weakening the selection against suboptimal protein variants. This would allow for the accumulation of genetic variation which could then be exposed during environmental perturbation and facilitate rapid adaptation. Results We focus on studies describing interactions of chaperones with mutated polypeptides. There are some examples that chaperones can alleviate the deleterious effects of mutations through increased assistance of destabilized proteins. These experiments are restricted to bacteria and typically involve overexpression of chaperones. In eukaryotes, it was found that the malfunctioning of chaperones aggravated phenotypic aberrations associated with mutations. This effect could not be linked to chaperone-mediated stabilization of mutated proteins. More likely, the insufficient activity of chaperones inflicted a deregulation of multiple cellular systems, including those responsible for signaling and therefore important in development. As to why the assistance of mutated proteins by chaperones seems difficult to demonstrate, we note that chaperone-assisted folding can often co-exist with chaperone-assisted degradation. There is growing evidence that some chaperones, including those dependent on Hsp90, can detect potentially functional but excessively unstable proteins and direct them towards degradation instead of folding. This implies that at least some mutations are exposed rather than masked by the activity of molecular chaperones. Conclusion It is at present impossible to determine whether molecular chaperones are mostly helpers or examiners of mutated proteins because experiments showing either of these roles are very few. Depending on whether assistance or disposal prevails, molecular chaperones could speed

  20. Molecular chaperones and selection against mutations.

    PubMed

    Tomala, Katarzyna; Korona, Ryszard

    2008-02-26

    Molecular chaperones help to restore the native states of proteins after their destabilization by external stress. It has been proposed that another function of chaperones is to maintain the activity of proteins destabilized by mutation, weakening the selection against suboptimal protein variants. This would allow for the accumulation of genetic variation which could then be exposed during environmental perturbation and facilitate rapid adaptation. We focus on studies describing interactions of chaperones with mutated polypeptides. There are some examples that chaperones can alleviate the deleterious effects of mutations through increased assistance of destabilized proteins. These experiments are restricted to bacteria and typically involve overexpression of chaperones. In eukaryotes, it was found that the malfunctioning of chaperones aggravated phenotypic aberrations associated with mutations. This effect could not be linked to chaperone-mediated stabilization of mutated proteins. More likely, the insufficient activity of chaperones inflicted a deregulation of multiple cellular systems, including those responsible for signaling and therefore important in development. As to why the assistance of mutated proteins by chaperones seems difficult to demonstrate, we note that chaperone-assisted folding can often co-exist with chaperone-assisted degradation. There is growing evidence that some chaperones, including those dependent on Hsp90, can detect potentially functional but excessively unstable proteins and direct them towards degradation instead of folding. This implies that at least some mutations are exposed rather than masked by the activity of molecular chaperones. It is at present impossible to determine whether molecular chaperones are mostly helpers or examiners of mutated proteins because experiments showing either of these roles are very few. Depending on whether assistance or disposal prevails, molecular chaperones could speed up or slow down evolution of

  1. DnaK from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis is a surface-exposed human plasminogen receptor upregulated in response to bile salts.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Fiori, Jessica; Biagi, Elena; Turroni, Silvia; Orrico, Catia; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2010-06-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis lives in the gastrointestinal tract of most mammals, including humans. Recently, for the probiotic strain B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07, a dose-dependent plasminogen-binding activity was demonstrated and five putative plasminogen-binding proteins were identified. Here we investigated the role of surface DnaK as a B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 plasminogen receptor. DnaK was visualized on the bacterial cell surface by transmission electron microscopy. The His-tagged recombinant DnaK protein showed a high affinity for human plasminogen, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. The capability to tolerate physiological concentrations of bile salts is a crucial feature for an intestinal symbiont micro-organism. By proteome analysis we demonstrated that the long-term exposure of B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 to bile salts results in the upregulation of important surface plasminogen receptors such as DnaK and enolase. Moreover, adaptation of B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 to physiological concentrations of bile salts significantly increased its capacity to interact with the host plasminogen system. By enhancing the bacterial capacity to interact with the host plasminogen, the gut bile environment may facilitate the colonization of the human host by B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07.

  2. Molecular chaperones encoded by a reduced nucleus: the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    PubMed

    Archibald, J M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U; Douglas, S

    2001-06-01

    Molecular chaperones mediate the correct folding of nascent or denatured proteins and are found in both the organelles and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Cryptomonad algae are unusual in possessing an extra cytoplasmic compartment (the periplastid space), the result of having engulfed and retained a photosynthetic eukaryote. Within the periplastid space is a diminutive nucleus (the nucleomorph) that encodes mostly genes for its own expression as well as a few needed by the plastid. Two plastid-encoded chaperones (GroEL and DnaK) and a nucleomorph-encoded chaperone (Cpn60) have been reported from the cryptomonad, Guillardia theta. Here we analyse G. theta nucleomorph genes for members of the cytosolic HSP70 and HSP90 families of molecular chaperones, a heat shock transcription factor (HSF), and all eight subunits of the group II chaperonin, CCT. These are presumably all active in the periplastid space, assisting in the maturation of polypeptides required by the cell; we propose a central role for them also in the structure and assembly of a putative relict mitotic apparatus. Curiously, none of the genes for co-chaperones of HSP70, HSP90, or CCT have been detected in the nucleomorph genome; they are either not needed or are encoded in the host nuclear genome and targeted back into the periplastid space. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of HSP70 and HSP90 are also not present. Striking differences in the degree of conservation of the various nucleomorph-encoded molecular chaperones were observed. While the G. theta HSP70 and HSP90 homologs are well conserved, each of the eight CCT subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, and zeta) is remarkably divergent. Such differences are likely evidence for reduced/different functional constraints on the various molecular chaperones functioning in the periplastid space.

  3. Molecular chaperones: multiple functions, pathologies, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2007-01-01

    Cell stressors are ubiquitous and frequent, challenging cells often, which leads to the stress response with activation of anti-stress mechanisms. These mechanisms involve a variety of molecules, including molecular chaperones also known as heat-shock proteins (Hsp). The chaperones treated in this article are proteins that assist other proteins to fold, refold, travel to their place of residence (cytosol, organelle, membrane, extracellular space), and translocate across membranes. Molecular chaperones participate in a variety of physiological processes and are widespread in organisms, tissues, and cells. It follows that chaperone failure will have an impact, possibly serious, on one or more cellular function, which may lead to disease. Chaperones must recognize and interact with proteins in need of assistance or client polypeptides (e.g., nascent at the ribosome, or partially denatured by stressors), and have to interact with other chaperones because the chaperoning mechanism involves teams of chaperone molecules, i.e., multimolecular assemblies or chaperone machines. Consequently, chaperone molecules have structural domains with distinctive functions: bind the client polypeptide, interact with other chaperone molecules to build a machine, and interact with other complexes that integrate the chaperoning network. Also, various chaperones have ATP-binding and ATPase sites because the chaperoning process requires as, a rule, energy from ATP hydrolysis. Alterations in any one of these domains due to a mutation or an aberrant post-translational modification can disrupt the chaperoning process and cause diseases termed chaperonopathies. This article presents the pathologic concept of chaperonopathy with examples, and discusses the potential of using chaperones (genes or proteins) in treatment (chaperonotherapy). In addition, emerging topics within the field of study of chaperones (chaperonology) are highlighted, e.g., genomics (chaperonomics), systems biology

  4. Cytosolic Hsp70 and co-chaperones constitute a novel system for tRNA import into the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Akira; Kajita, Takuya; Mochizuki, Makoto; Endo, Toshiya; Yoshihisa, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    tRNAs are unique among various RNAs in that they shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and their localization is regulated by nutrient conditions. Although nuclear export of tRNAs has been well documented, the import machinery is poorly understood. Here, we identified Ssa2p, a major cytoplasmic Hsp70 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a tRNA-binding protein whose deletion compromises nuclear accumulation of tRNAs upon nutrient starvation. Ssa2p recognizes several structural features of tRNAs through its nucleotide-binding domain, but prefers loosely-folded tRNAs, suggesting that Ssa2p has a chaperone-like activity for RNAs. Ssa2p also binds Nup116, one of the yeast nucleoporins. Sis1p and Ydj1p, cytoplasmic co-chaperones for Ssa proteins, were also found to contribute to the tRNA import. These results unveil a novel function of the Ssa2p system as a tRNA carrier for nuclear import by a novel mode of substrate recognition. Such Ssa2p-mediated tRNA import likely contributes to quality control of cytosolic tRNAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04659.001 PMID:25853343

  5. Development and characterization of membrane surface display system using molecular chaperon, prsA, of Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June-Hyung; Park, In-Suk; Kim, Byung-Gee . E-mail: byungkim@snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-09

    We report a new membrane surface display system based on molecular chaperon, prsA, of Bacillus subtilis. Clostridium thermocellum cellulase, celA, was fused to C-terminal end of PrsA. Cellulase activity of B. subtilis protoplast, which expressed PrsA-CelA was 15 times higher compared to control strain. More than 85% of total cellulase activity was observed in surface displayed format and less than 15% of total cellulase activity was found in supernatant. Flow cytometric analysis of protoplast of PrsA-CelA fusion expressing bacteria provided another proof of uniform expression of fusion protein onto cytoplasmic membrane of B. subtilis. Without lysozyme treatment, only part of cellulase activity (10%) was observed in whole cell fraction.

  6. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    PubMed

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  7. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  8. Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein DnaK: Production and Consequences in Terms of Monitoring Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Karine; Lessard, Martin; Piette, Gabriel; Lacroix, Monique; Saucier, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Through use of commercially available DnaK proteins and anti-DnaK monoclonal antibodies, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantify this heat shock protein in Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 subjected to various heating regimens. For a given process lethality (F7010 of 1, 3, and 5 min), the intracellular concentration of DnaK in E. coli varied with the heating temperature (50 or 55°C). In fact, the highest DnaK concentrations were found after treatments at the lower temperature (50°C) applied for a longer time. Residual DnaK after heating was found to be necessary for cell recovery, and additional DnaK was produced during the recovery process. Overall, higher intracellular concentrations of DnaK tended to enhance cell resistance to a subsequent lethal stress. Indeed, E. coli cells that had undergone a sublethal heat shock (105 min at 55°C, F7010 = 3 min) accompanied by a 12-h recovery (containing 76,786 ± 25,230 molecules/cell) resisted better than exponentially growing cells (38,500 ± 6,056 molecules/cell) when later heated to 60°C for 50 min (F7010 = 5 min). Results reported here suggest that using stress protein to determine cell adaptation and survival, rather than cell counts alone, may lead to more efficient heat treatment. PMID:12788720

  9. Features of dnaK operon genes of the obligate thermophile Bacillus thermoglucosidasius KP1006.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Iwashiro, T; Suzuki, Y

    2000-04-01

    The dnaK gene was cloned from the obligate thermophile Bacillus thermoglucosidasius KP1006, together with the grpE and dnaJ genes in the same operon. The dnaK, grpE and dnaJ genes showed high identity with those of other bacterial strains, particularly with those of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36, despite an extremely low homology for the corresponding total genomic DNA. There were significant differences in the proline content of the DnaK operon proteins which is closely correlated with the thermostability of enzyme proteins. The proline content was higher in the GrpE, DnaK and DnaJ proteins of the thermophilic as opposed to the mesophilic strains. The overexpression of the B. thermoglucosidasius DnaK protein in Escherichia coli MV1184 results in extreme filamentation without inhibition on cell growth. The B. thermoglucosidasius DnaK protein seemed to exclusively disturb septation in E. coli cells which suggests that it interacts with key protein(s) involved in cell septation.

  10. Topology and dynamics of the 10 kDa C-terminal domain of DnaK in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, E. B.; Zhou, H.; Lowry, D. F.; Flynn, G. C.; Dahlquist, F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hsp70 molecular chaperones contain three distinct structural domains, a 44 kDa N-terminal ATPase domain, a 17 kDa peptide-binding domain, and a 10 kDa C-terminal domain. The ATPase and peptide binding domains are conserved in sequence and are functionally well characterized. The function of the 10 kDa variable C-terminal domain is less well understood. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the C-terminal domain from the Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK, in solution by high-resolution NMR. The domain was shown to be comprised of a rigid structure consisting of four helices and a flexible C-terminal subdomain of approximately 33 amino acids. The mobility of the flexible region is maintained in the context of the full-length protein and does not appear to be modulated by the nucleotide state. The flexibility of this region appears to be a conserved feature of Hsp70 architecture and may have important functional implications. We also developed a method to analyze 15N nuclear spin relaxation data, which allows us to extract amide bond vector directions relative to a unique diffusion axis. The extracted angles and rotational correlation times indicate that the helices form an elongated, bundle-like structure in solution. PMID:10048327

  11. Important role of class I heat shock genes hrcA and dnaK in the heat shock response and the response to pH and NaCl stress of group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Selby, Katja; Lindström, Miia; Somervuo, Panu; Heap, John T; Minton, Nigel P; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    Class I heat shock genes (HSGs) code for molecular chaperones which play a major role in the bacterial response to sudden increases of environmental temperature by assisting protein folding. Quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR gene expression analysis of the food-borne pathogen Clostridium botulinum grown at 37°C showed that the class I HSGs grpE, dnaK, dnaJ, groEL, and groES and their repressor, hrcA, were expressed at constant levels in the exponential and transitional growth phases, whereas strong downregulation of all six genes was observed during stationary phase. After heat shock from 37 to 45°C, all HSGs were transiently upregulated. A mutant with insertionally inactivated hrcA expressed higher levels of class I HSGs during exponential growth than the wild type, followed by upregulation of only groES and groES after heat shock. Inactivation of hrcA or of dnaK encoding a major chaperone resulted in lower maximum growth temperatures than for the wild type and reduced growth rates under optimal conditions compared to the wild type. The dnaK mutant showed growth inhibition under all tested temperature, pH, and NaCl stress conditions. In contrast, the growth of an hrcA mutant was unaffected by mild temperature or acid stress compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that induced class I HSGs support growth under moderately nonoptimal conditions. We show that the expression of class I HSGs plays a major role for survival and growth of C. botulinum under the stressful environmental conditions that may be encountered during food processing or growth in food products, in the mammalian intestine, or in wounds.

  12. Aptamer-Enabled Manipulation of the Hsp70 Chaperone System Suggests a Novel Strategy for Targeted Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Thirunavukarasu, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp70 chaperone system plays an important role in protein quality control by assisting in the folding and clearance of misfolded proteins. However, the mechanism by which it chooses between folding and degradation pathways is not fully understood. In this study, we used an RNA aptamer for Hsp70 to perturb the function of Hsp70 in cell-free systems. We found that the aptamer inhibited both Hsp70-mediated folding and Hsp70-CHIP-mediated ubiquitination/degradation of a misfolded protein substrate. Based on these results, we explored a novel strategy for targeted protein ubiquitination, using an engineered bifunctional aptamer to tether a protein substrate to Hsp70. We demonstrated that increased Hsp70-CHIP-mediated ubiquitination of the tethered protein substrate can be specifically induced by this bifunctional aptamer. This strategy may be useful in selective degradation of disease-causing proteins for therapeutic purposes. In addition, these studies provide insight into the mechanism of Hsp70-mediated protein triage. PMID:26640962

  13. Forces Driving Chaperone Action

    PubMed Central

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client’s affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  14. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality.

    PubMed

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro.

  15. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Norais, Cédric; Servant, Pascale; Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-02-18

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates.

  16. Purification of the outer membrane usher protein and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complexes from the P and type 1 pilus systems.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Nadine S; Thanassi, David G

    2013-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of protein secretion by bacteria requires the purification of secretion machinery components and the isolation of complexes between the secretion machinery and substrate proteins. Here, we describe methods for the purification of proteins from the chaperone/usher pathway, which is a conserved secretion pathway dedicated to the assembly of polymeric surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae in gram-negative bacteria. Specifically, we describe the isolation of the PapC and FimD usher proteins from the bacterial outer membrane, and the purification of PapD-PapG and FimC-FimH chaperone--subunit complexes from the periplasm. These Pap and Fim proteins belong to the P and type 1 pilus systems of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, respectively.

  17. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245 gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates. PMID:23441204

  18. Emerging roles of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones in selective autophagy: focus on BAG proteins.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, Martin; Carra, Serena; Behl, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Macroautophagy is a catabolic process by which the cell degrades cytoplasmic components through the lysosomal machinery. While initially acknowledged as a rather unspecific bulk degradation process, growing lines of evidence indicate the selectivity of macroautophagy pathways in the removal of misfolded or aggregated proteins. How such substrates are recognized and specifically targeted to the macroautophagy machinery has become a hotspot of investigation, and recent evidence suggests that here molecular chaperones and co-chaperones play a central role. One emerging pathway is mediated by the co-chaperone protein Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG 3) which seems to utilize the specificity of molecular chaperones (heat-shock proteins) towards non-native proteins as basis for targeted macroautophagic degradation. In this short review, we focus on the molecular interplay between the macroautophagy system and molecular chaperones and highlight the relevance of the pathway mediated by BAG3 to aging and age-associated protein-misfolding diseases.

  19. Structure of AcrH-AopB Chaperone-Translocator Complex Reveals a Role for Membrane Hairpins in Type III Secretion System Translocon Assembly.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Sang; Jobichen, Chacko; Tan, Kang Wei; Tan, Yih Wan; Chan, Siew Leong; Ramesh, Karthik; Yuan, Yongming; Hong, Yunhan; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Leung, Ka Yin; Sivaraman, J; Mok, Yu Keung

    2015-11-03

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are adopted by pathogenic bacteria for the transport of effector proteins into host cells through the translocon pore composed of major and minor translocator proteins. Both translocators require a dedicated chaperone for solubility. Despite tremendous efforts in the past, structural information regarding the chaperone-translocator complex and the topology of the translocon pore have remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the major translocator, AopB, from Aeromonas hydrophila AH-1 in complex with its chaperone, AcrH. Overall, the structure revealed unique interactions between the various interfaces of AopB and AcrH, with the N-terminal "molecular anchor" of AopB crossing into the "N-terminal arm" of AcrH. AopB adopts a novel fold, and its transmembrane regions form two pairs of helical hairpins. From these structural studies and associated cellular assays, we deduced the topology of the assembled T3SS translocon; both termini remain extracellular after membrane insertion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantification of Anti-Aggregation Activity of Chaperones: A Test-System Based on Dithiothreitol-Induced Aggregation of Bovine Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Borzova, Vera A.; Markossian, Kira A.; Kara, Dmitriy A.; Chebotareva, Natalia A.; Makeeva, Valentina F.; Poliansky, Nikolay B.; Muranov, Konstantin O.; Kurganov, Boris I.

    2013-01-01

    The methodology for quantification of the anti-aggregation activity of protein and chemical chaperones has been elaborated. The applicability of this methodology was demonstrated using a test-system based on dithiothreitol-induced aggregation of bovine serum albumin at 45°C as an example. Methods for calculating the initial rate of bovine serum albumin aggregation (vagg) have been discussed. The comparison of the dependences of vagg on concentrations of intact and cross-linked α-crystallin allowed us to make a conclusion that a non-linear character of the dependence of vagg on concentration of intact α-crystallin was due to the dynamic mobility of the quaternary structure of α-crystallin and polydispersity of the α-crystallin–target protein complexes. To characterize the anti-aggregation activity of the chemical chaperones (arginine, arginine ethyl ester, arginine amide and proline), the semi-saturation concentration [L]0.5 was used. Among the chemical chaperones studied, arginine ethyl ester and arginine amide reveal the highest anti-aggregation activity ([L]0.5 = 53 and 58 mM, respectively). PMID:24058554

  1. The LcrG Tip Chaperone Protein of the Yersinia pestis Type III Secretion System Is Partially Folded.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; de Azevedo Souza, Clarice; Plano, Gregory V; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-09-25

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential in the pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. A small protein, LcrG, functions as a chaperone to the tip protein LcrV, and the LcrG-LcrV interaction is important in regulating protein secretion through the T3SS. The atomic structure of the LcrG family is currently unknown. However, because of its predicted helical propensity, many have suggested that the LcrG family forms a coiled-coil structure. Here, we show by NMR and CD spectroscopy that LcrG lacks a tertiary structure and it consists of three partially folded α-helices spanning residues 7-38, 41-46, and 58-73. NMR titrations of LcrG with LcrV show that the entire length of a truncated LcrG (residues 7-73) is involved in binding to LcrV. However, there is regional variation in how LcrG binds to LcrV. The C-terminal region of a truncated LcrG (residues 52-73) shows tight binding interaction with LcrV while the N-terminal region (residues 7-51) shows weaker interaction with LcrV. This suggests that there are at least two binding events when LcrG binds to LcrV. Biological assays and mutagenesis indicate that the C-terminal region of LcrG (residues 52-73) is important in blocking protein secretion through the T3SS. Our results reveal structural and mechanistic insights into the atomic conformation of LcrG and how it binds to LcrV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Membrane and Chaperone Recognition by the Major Translocator Protein PopB of the Type III Secretion System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Discola, Karen F.; Förster, Andreas; Boulay, François; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Attree, Ina; Dessen, Andréa; Job, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system is a widespread apparatus used by pathogenic bacteria to inject effectors directly into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. A key component of this highly conserved system is the translocon, a pore formed in the host membrane that is essential for toxins to bypass this last physical barrier. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the translocon is composed of PopB and PopD, both of which before secretion are stabilized within the bacterial cytoplasm by a common chaperone, PcrH. In this work we characterize PopB, the major translocator, in both membrane-associated and PcrH-bound forms. By combining sucrose gradient centrifugation experiments, limited proteolysis, one-dimensional NMR, and β-lactamase reporter assays on eukaryotic cells, we show that PopB is stably inserted into bilayers with its flexible N-terminal domain and C-terminal tail exposed to the outside. In addition, we also report the crystal structure of the complex between PcrH and an N-terminal region of PopB (residues 51–59), which reveals that PopB lies within the concave face of PcrH, employing mostly backbone residues for contact. PcrH is thus the first chaperone whose structure has been solved in complex with both type III secretion systems translocators, revealing that both molecules employ the same surface for binding and excluding the possibility of formation of a ternary complex. The characterization of the major type III secretion system translocon component in both membrane-bound and chaperone-bound forms is a key step for the eventual development of antibacterials that block translocon assembly. PMID:24297169

  3. Systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for production of the chemical chaperone ectoine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stabilizing and function-preserving effects of ectoines have attracted considerable biotechnological interest up to industrial scale processes for their production. These rely on the release of ectoines from high-salinity-cultivated microbial producer cells upon an osmotic down-shock in rather complex processor configurations. There is growing interest in uncoupling the production of ectoines from the typical conditions required for their synthesis, and instead design strains that naturally release ectoines into the medium without the need for osmotic changes, since the use of high-salinity media in the fermentation process imposes notable constraints on the costs, design, and durability of fermenter systems. Results Here, we used a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain as a cellular chassis to establish a microbial cell factory for the biotechnological production of ectoines. The implementation of a mutant aspartokinase enzyme ensured efficient supply of L-aspartate-beta-semialdehyde, the precursor for ectoine biosynthesis. We further engineered the genome of the basic C. glutamicum strain by integrating a codon-optimized synthetic ectABCD gene cluster under expressional control of the strong and constitutive C. glutamicum tuf promoter. The resulting recombinant strain produced ectoine and excreted it into the medium; however, lysine was still found as a by-product. Subsequent inactivation of the L-lysine exporter prevented the undesired excretion of lysine while ectoine was still exported. Using the streamlined cell factory, a fed-batch process was established that allowed the production of ectoine with an overall productivity of 6.7 g L-1 day-1 under growth conditions that did not rely on the use of high-salinity media. Conclusions The present study describes the construction of a stable microbial cell factory for recombinant production of ectoine. We successfully applied metabolic engineering strategies to optimize its synthetic production in the

  4. Binding of a Small Molecule at a Protein–Protein Interface Regulates the Chaperone Activity of Hsp70–Hsp40

    PubMed Central

    Wisén, Susanne; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Thompson, Andrea D.; Patury, Srikanth; Ung, Peter; Chang, Lyra; Evans, Christopher G.; Walter, Gladis M.; Wipf, Peter; Carlson, Heather A.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a highly conserved molecular chaperone that plays multiple roles in protein homeostasis. In these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by interactions with co-chaperones, such as Hsp40. The Hsp40 family of co-chaperones binds to Hsp70 through a conserved J-domain, and these factors stimulate ATPase and protein-folding activity. Using chemical screens, we identified a compound, 115-7c, which acts as an artificial co-chaperone for Hsp70. Specifically, the activities of 115-7c mirrored those of a Hsp40; the compound stimulated the ATPase and protein-folding activities of a prokaryotic Hsp70 (DnaK) and partially compensated for a Hsp40 loss-of-function mutation in yeast. Consistent with these observations, NMR and mutagenesis studies indicate that the binding site for 115-7c is adjacent to a region on DnaK that is required for J-domain-mediated stimulation. Interestingly, we found that 115-7c and the Hsp40 do not compete for binding but act in concert. Using this information, we introduced additional steric bulk to 115-7c and converted it into an inhibitor. Thus, these chemical probes either promote or inhibit chaperone functions by regulating Hsp70–Hsp40 complex assembly at a native protein–protein interface. This unexpected mechanism may provide new avenues for exploring how chaperones and co-chaperones cooperate to shape protein homeostasis. PMID:20481474

  5. Viral interaction with molecular chaperones: role in regulating viral infection.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Allen; Wong, Jerry; Luo, Honglin

    2010-07-01

    As essential effectors in protein quality control, molecular chaperones serve as the primary checkpoint to assist proper protein folding and prevent misfolded proteins from denaturation and aggregation. In addition, chaperones can function to direct terminally misfolded proteins to the proteolytic system for degradation. Viruses rely on host cell machineries for productive infection. Like for many other processes, various viruses have been shown to evolve mechanisms to utilize or subvert the host protein quality control machinery to support the completion of their life cycle. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that some viruses encode for their own chaperone-like proteins to enhance their infectivity. This review summarizes the current understanding of the interplay between molecular chaperones and viral proteins, highlights the chaperone activities of a number of viral proteins, and discusses potential antiviral therapeutic strategies targeting the virus-chaperone interactions.

  6. Identification of protein-protein interactions between the TatB and TatC subunits of the twin-arginine translocase system and respiratory enzyme specific chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kuzniatsova, Lalita; Winstone, Tara M L; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-04-01

    The Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway serves for translocation of fully folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane in bacterial and chloroplast thylakoid membranes. The Escherichia coli Tat system consists of three core components: TatA, TatB, and TatC. The TatB and TatC subunits form the receptor complex for Tat dependent proteins. The TatB protein is composed of a single transmembrane helix and cytoplasmic domain. The structure of TatC revealed six transmembrane helices. Redox Enzyme Maturation Proteins (REMPs) are system specific chaperones, which play roles in the maturation of Tat dependent respiratory enzymes. Here we applied the in vivo bacterial two-hybrid technique to investigate interaction of REMPs with the TatBC proteins, finding that all but the formate dehydrogenase REMP dock to TatB or TatC. We focused on the NarJ subfamily, where DmsD--the REMP for dimethyl sulfoxide reductase in E. coli--was previously shown to interact with TatB and TatC. We found that these REMPs interact with TatC cytoplasmic loops 1, 2 and 4, with the exception of NarJ, that only interacts with 1 and 4. An in vitro isothermal titration calorimetry study was applied to confirm the evidence of interactions between TatC fragments and DmsD chaperone. Using a peptide overlapping array, it was shown that the different NarJ subfamily REMPs interact with different regions of the TatB cytoplasmic domains. The results demonstrate a role of REMP chaperones in targeting respiratory enzymes to the Tat system. The data suggests that the different REMPs may have different mechanisms for this task. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  7. Trapping and Identification of Cellular Substrates of the Staphylococcus aureus ClpC Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Justin W.; Lei, Mei G.

    2013-01-01

    ClpC is an ATP-dependent Hsp100/Clp chaperone involved in protein quality control in low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Previously, we found that ClpC affected the expression of a large number of genes, including capsule genes in Staphylococcus aureus. Here we constructed a His-tagged ClpC variant (ClpCtrap) with mutations within the Walker B motifs to identify the direct substrates of ClpC by copurification with ClpCtrap followed by gel electrophoresis combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. We identified a total of 103 proteins that are potential substrates of ClpC in strain Newman. The direct protein-protein interaction of ClpC with a subset of the captured proteins was verified in a bacterial two-hybrid system. The captured proteins could be grouped into various functional categories, but most were related to proteins involved in the stress response. Several known ClpC substrates were captured, including ClpP, TrfA/MecA, ClpB, DnaK, DnaJ, GroL, RecA, and CodY, supporting the validity of our approach. Our results also revealed many new ClpC substrates, including AgrA, CcpA, RsbW, MurG, FtsA, SrtA, Rex, Atl, ClfA, and SbcC. Analysis of capsule production showed that three of the captured proteins, which were not previously known to be transcriptional regulators, did affect capsule production. PMID:23913326

  8. Molecular chaperones as rational drug targets for Parkinson's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kalia, S K; Kalia, L V; McLean, P J

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is caused, in part, by the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta of the basal ganglia. The presence of intracellular protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, within the surviving nigral neurons is the defining neuropathological feature of the disease. Accordingly, the identification of specific genes mutated in families with Parkinson's disease and of genetic susceptibility variants for idiopathic Parkinson's disease has implicated abnormalities in proteostasis, or the handling and elimination of misfolded proteins, in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Protein folding and the refolding of misfolded proteins are regulated by a network of interactive molecules, known as the chaperone system, which is composed of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. The chaperone system is intimately associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway which are responsible for elimination of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition to their role in proteostasis, some chaperone molecules are involved in the regulation of cell death pathways. Here we review the role of the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, and the cochaperones Hsp40, BAG family members such as BAG5, CHIP and Hip in modulating neuronal death with a focus on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. We also review current progress in preclinical studies aimed at targetting the chaperone system to prevent neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss potential future chaperone-based therapeutics for the symptomatic treatment and possible disease modification of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics bind to the N-terminal domain of the prokaryotic Hsp90 to inhibit the chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Shun; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Sueoka, Keigo; Osada, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Hitoshi

    2011-04-01

    Chemical arrays were employed to screen ligands for HtpG, the prokaryotic homologue of Hsp (heat-shock protein) 90. We found that colistins and the closely related polymyxin B interact physically with HtpG. They bind to the N-terminal domain of HtpG specifically without affecting its ATPase activity. The interaction caused inhibition of chaperone function of HtpG that suppresses thermal aggregation of substrate proteins. Further studies were performed with one of these cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics, colistin sulfate salt. It inhibited the chaperone function of the N-terminal domain of HtpG. However, it inhibited neither the chaperone function of the middle domain of HtpG nor that of other molecular chaperones such as DnaK, the prokaryotic homologue of Hsp70, and small Hsp. The addition of colistin sulfate salt increased surface hydrophobicity of the N-terminal domain of HtpG and induced oligomerization of HtpG and its N-terminal domain. These structural changes are discussed in relation to the inhibition of the chaperone function.

  10. The PprA-PprB two-component system activates CupE, the first non-archetypal Pseudomonas aeruginosa chaperone-usher pathway system assembling fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Caroline; Bernard, Christophe S; Calderon, Virginie; Yang, Liang; Filloux, Alain; Molin, Søren; Fichant, Gwennaele; Bordi, Christophe; de Bentzmann, Sophie

    2011-03-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has redundant molecular systems that contribute to its pathogenicity. Those assembling fimbrial structures promote complex organized community lifestyle. We characterized a new 5.8 kb genetic locus, cupE, that includes the conserved usher- and chaperone-encoding genes. This locus, widely conserved in different bacterial species, contains four additional genes encoding non-archetypal fimbrial subunits. We first evidenced that the cupE gene cluster was specifically expressed in biofilm conditions and was responsible for fibre assembly containing at least CupE1 protein, at the bacterial cell surface. These fimbriae not only played a significant role in the early stages (microcolony and macrocolony formation) but also in shaping 3D mushrooms during P. aeruginosa biofilm development. Using wide-genome transposon mutagenesis, we identified the PprAB two-component system (TCS) as a regulator of cupE expression, and further demonstrated the involvement of the PprAB TCS in direct CupE fimbrial assembly activation. Thus, this TCS represents a new regulatory element controlling the transition between planktonic and community lifestyles in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Rehosting of Bacterial Chaperones for High-Quality Protein Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Noad, Rob; Unzueta, Ugutz; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Roy, Polly; Villaverde, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Coproduction of DnaK/DnaJ in Escherichia coli enhances solubility but promotes proteolytic degradation of their substrates, minimizing the yield of unstable polypeptides. Higher eukaryotes have orthologs of DnaK/DnaJ but lack the linked bacterial proteolytic system. By coexpression of DnaK and DnaJ in insect cells with inherently misfolding-prone recombinant proteins, we demonstrate simultaneous improvement of soluble protein yield and quality and proteolytic stability. Thus, undesired side effects of bacterial folding modulators can be avoided by appropriate rehosting in heterologous cell expression systems. PMID:19820142

  12. Molecular chaperones and photoreceptor function

    PubMed Central

    Kosmaoglou, Maria; Schwarz, Nele; Bett, John S.; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular chaperones facilitate and regulate protein conformational change within cells. This encompasses many fundamental cellular processes: including the correct folding of nascent chains; protein transport and translocation; signal transduction and protein quality control. Chaperones are, therefore, important in several forms of human disease, including neurodegeneration. Within the retina, the highly specialized photoreceptor cell presents a fascinating paradigm to investigate the specialization of molecular chaperone function and reveals unique chaperone requirements essential to photoreceptor function. Mutations in several photoreceptor proteins lead to protein misfolding mediated neurodegeneration. The best characterized of these are mutations in the molecular light sensor, rhodopsin, which cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Rhodopsin biogenesis is likely to require chaperones, while rhodopsin misfolding involves molecular chaperones in quality control and the cellular response to protein aggregation. Furthermore, the specialization of components of the chaperone machinery to photoreceptor specific roles has been revealed by the identification of mutations in molecular chaperones that cause inherited retinal dysfunction and degeneration. These chaperones are involved in several important cellular pathways and further illuminate the essential and diverse roles of molecular chaperones. PMID:18490186

  13. Bacterial proteostasis balances energy and chaperone utilization efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Mantu; Farrell, Daniel W.; Dill, Ken A.

    2017-01-01

    Chaperones are protein complexes that help to fold and disaggregate a cell’s proteins. It is not understood how four major chaperone systems of Escherichia coli work together in proteostasis: the recognition, sorting, folding, and disaggregating of the cell’s many different proteins. Here, we model this machine. We combine extensive data on chaperoning, folding, and aggregation rates with expression levels of proteins and chaperones measured at different growth rates. We find that the proteostasis machine recognizes and sorts a client protein based on two biophysical properties of the client’s misfolded state (M state): its stability and its kinetic accessibility from its unfolded state (U state). The machine is energy-efficient (the sickest proteins use the most ATP-expensive chaperones), comprehensive (it can handle any type of protein), and economical (the chaperone concentrations are just high enough to keep the whole proteome folded and disaggregated but no higher). The cell needs higher chaperone levels in two situations: fast growth (when protein production rates are high) and very slow growth (to mitigate the effects of protein degradation). This type of model complements experimental knowledge by showing how the various chaperones work together to achieve the broad folding and disaggregation needs of the cell. PMID:28292901

  14. Bacterial proteostasis balances energy and chaperone utilization efficiently.

    PubMed

    Santra, Mantu; Farrell, Daniel W; Dill, Ken A

    2017-03-28

    Chaperones are protein complexes that help to fold and disaggregate a cell's proteins. It is not understood how four major chaperone systems of Escherichia coli work together in proteostasis: the recognition, sorting, folding, and disaggregating of the cell's many different proteins. Here, we model this machine. We combine extensive data on chaperoning, folding, and aggregation rates with expression levels of proteins and chaperones measured at different growth rates. We find that the proteostasis machine recognizes and sorts a client protein based on two biophysical properties of the client's misfolded state (M state): its stability and its kinetic accessibility from its unfolded state (U state). The machine is energy-efficient (the sickest proteins use the most ATP-expensive chaperones), comprehensive (it can handle any type of protein), and economical (the chaperone concentrations are just high enough to keep the whole proteome folded and disaggregated but no higher). The cell needs higher chaperone levels in two situations: fast growth (when protein production rates are high) and very slow growth (to mitigate the effects of protein degradation). This type of model complements experimental knowledge by showing how the various chaperones work together to achieve the broad folding and disaggregation needs of the cell.

  15. Molecular chaperones and neuronal proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heather L; Li, Wenwen; Cheetham, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for maintaining the functionality of the proteome. The disruption of proteostasis, due to genetic mutations or an age-related decline, leads to aberrantly folded proteins that typically lose their function. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated protein is also cytotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed an intrinsic protein quality control network, of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Molecular chaperones function to promote efficient folding and target misfolded proteins for refolding or degradation. Increasing molecular chaperone expression can suppress protein aggregation and toxicity in numerous models of neurodegenerative disease; therefore, molecular chaperones are considered exciting therapeutic targets. Furthermore, mutations in several chaperones cause inherited neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the importance of molecular chaperones in neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the advances in understanding their protective mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular chaperones and neuronal proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather L.; Li, Wenwen; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for maintaining the functionality of the proteome. The disruption of proteostasis, due to genetic mutations or an age-related decline, leads to aberrantly folded proteins that typically lose their function. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated protein is also cytotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed an intrinsic protein quality control network, of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Molecular chaperones function to promote efficient folding and target misfolded proteins for refolding or degradation. Increasing molecular chaperone expression can suppress protein aggregation and toxicity in numerous models of neurodegenerative disease; therefore, molecular chaperones are considered exciting therapeutic targets. Furthermore, mutations in several chaperones cause inherited neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the importance of molecular chaperones in neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the advances in understanding their protective mechanisms. PMID:25770416

  17. Cyanobacterial heat-shock response: role and regulation of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Hema; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Cyanobacteria constitute a morphologically diverse group of oxygenic photoautotrophic microbes which range from unicellular to multicellular, and non-nitrogen-fixing to nitrogen-fixing types. Sustained long-term exposure to changing environmental conditions, during their three billion years of evolution, has presumably led to their adaptation to diverse ecological niches. The ability to maintain protein conformational homeostasis (folding-misfolding-refolding or aggregation-degradation) by molecular chaperones holds the key to the stress adaptability of cyanobacteria. Although cyanobacteria possess several genes encoding DnaK and DnaJ family proteins, these are not the most abundant heat-shock proteins (Hsps), as is the case in other bacteria. Instead, the Hsp60 family of proteins, comprising two phylogenetically conserved proteins, and small Hsps are more abundant during heat stress. The contribution of the Hsp100 (ClpB) family of proteins and of small Hsps in the unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechocystis and Synechococcus) as well as that of Hsp60 proteins in the filamentous cyanobacteria (Anabaena) to thermotolerance has been elucidated. The regulation of chaperone genes by several cis-elements and trans-acting factors has also been well documented. Recent studies have demonstrated novel transcriptional and translational (mRNA secondary structure) regulatory mechanisms in unicellular cyanobacteria. This article provides an insight into the heat-shock response: its organization, and ecophysiological regulation and role of molecular chaperones, in unicellular and filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial strains.

  18. Schizosaccharomyces pombe disaggregation machinery chaperones support Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth and prion propagation.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Michael; Sharma, Ruchika; Masison, Daniel C

    2013-05-01

    Hsp100 chaperones protect microorganisms and plants from environmental stress by cooperating with Hsp70 and its nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) and Hsp40 cochaperones to resolubilize proteins from aggregates. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 (Sc-Hsp104)-based disaggregation machinery also is essential for replication of amyloid-based prions. Escherichia coli ClpB can substitute for Hsp104 to propagate [PSI(+)] prions in yeast, but only if E. coli DnaK and GrpE (Hsp70 and NEF) are coexpressed. Here, we tested if the reported inability of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hsp104 (Sp-Hsp104) to support [PSI(+)] propagation was due to similar species-specific chaperone requirements and find that Sp-Hsp104 alone supported propagation of three different yeast prions. Sp-Hsp70 and Sp-Fes1p (NEF) likewise functioned in place of their Sa. cerevisiae counterparts. Thus, chaperones of these long-diverged species possess conserved activities that function in processes essential for both cell growth and prion propagation, suggesting Sc. pombe can propagate its own prions. We show that curing by Hsp104 overexpression and inactivation can be distinguished and confirm the observation that, unlike Sc-Hsp104, Sp-Hsp104 cannot cure yeast of [PSI(+)] when it is overexpressed. These results are consistent with a view that mechanisms underlying prion replication and elimination are distinct.

  19. GroEL and dnaK genes of Escherichia coli are induced by UV irradiation and nalidixic acid in an htpR/sup +/-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, J.H.; Walker, G.C.

    1984-03-01

    Two proteins with molecular weights of 61,000 and 73,000 were found to be induced by UV light in Escherichia coli mutants in which the SOS responses are constitutively expressed. The induction of these proteins by UV light and nalidixic acid was shown to be independent of the recA/sup +/ lexA/sup +/ regulatory system. Analysis of these proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and comparison with the heat-shock proteins of E. coli revealed that the M/sub r/ 61,000 protein comigrated with the groEL gene product, that the M/sub r/ 73,000 protein comigrated with the dnaK gene product, and that other heat-shock proteins were also induced. The induction of groEL and dnaK by UV light and nalidixic acid is controlled by the htpR locus. The results suggest that the regulatory response of E. coli to agents such as UV light and nalidixic acid is more complex than previously thought. 35 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  20. EscC is a chaperone for the Edwardsiella tarda type III secretion system putative translocon components EseB and EseD.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Nan; Tan, Yuen Peng; Sivaraman, J; Mok, Yu-Keung; Mo, Zhao Lan; Leung, Ka Yin

    2007-06-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes disease in both humans and animals. Recently, a type III secretion system (T3SS) has been found to contribute to Ed. tarda pathogenesis. EseB, EseC and EseD were shown to be secreted by the T3SS and to be the major components of the extracellular proteins (ECPs). Based on sequence similarity, they have been proposed to function as the 'translocon' of the T3SS needle structure. In this study, it was shown that EseB, EseC and EseD formed a protein complex after secretion, which is consistent with their possible roles as translocon components. The secretion of EseB and EseD was dependent on EscC (previously named Orf2). EscC has the characteristics of a chaperone; it is a small protein (13 kDa), located next to the translocators in the T3SS gene cluster, and has a coiled-coil structure at the N-terminal region as predicted by coils. An in-frame deletion of escC abolished the secretion of EseB and EseD, and complementation of DeltaescC restored the export of EseB and EseD into the culture supernatant. Further studies showed that EscC is not a secreted protein and is located on the membrane and in the cytoplasm. Mutation of escC did not affect the transcription of eseB but reduced the amount of EseB as measured by using an EseB-LacZ fusion protein in Ed. tarda. Co-purification studies demonstrated that EscC formed complexes with EseB and EseD. The results suggest that EscC functions as a T3SS chaperone for the putative translocon components EseB and EseD in Ed. tarda.

  1. An interdomain sector mediating allostery in Hsp70 molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Smock, Robert G; Rivoire, Olivier; Russ, William P; Swain, Joanna F; Leibler, Stanislas; Ranganathan, Rama; Gierasch, Lila M

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric coupling between protein domains is fundamental to many cellular processes. For example, Hsp70 molecular chaperones use ATP binding by their actin-like N-terminal ATPase domain to control substrate interactions in their C-terminal substrate-binding domain, a reaction that is critical for protein folding in cells. Here, we generalize the statistical coupling analysis to simultaneously evaluate co-evolution between protein residues and functional divergence between sequences in protein sub-families. Applying this method in the Hsp70/110 protein family, we identify a sparse but structurally contiguous group of co-evolving residues called a ‘sector', which is an attribute of the allosteric Hsp70 sub-family that links the functional sites of the two domains across a specific interdomain interface. Mutagenesis of Escherichia coli DnaK supports the conclusion that this interdomain sector underlies the allosteric coupling in this protein family. The identification of the Hsp70 sector provides a basis for further experiments to understand the mechanism of allostery and introduces the idea that cooperativity between interacting proteins or protein domains can be mediated by shared sectors. PMID:20865007

  2. The interplay of Hrd3 and the molecular chaperone system ensures efficient degradation of malfolded secretory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Martin; Sommermeyer, Franziska; Berger, Maren; Kumar Lakshmipathy, Sathish; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus; Jarosch, Ernst; Sommer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway are extracted from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), polyubiquitylated by a protein complex termed the Hmg-CoA reductase degradation ligase (HRD-ligase), and degraded by cytosolic 26S proteasomes. This process is termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). We previously showed that the membrane protein Der1, which is a subunit of the HRD-ligase, is involved in the export of aberrant polypeptides from the ER. Unexpectedly, we also uncovered a close spatial proximity of Der1 and the substrate receptor Hrd3 in the ER lumen. We report here on a mutant Hrd3KR that is selectively defective for ERAD of soluble proteins. Hrd3KR displays subtle structural changes that affect its positioning toward Der1. Furthermore, increased quantities of the ER-resident Hsp70-type chaperone Kar2 and the Hsp40-type cochaperone Scj1 bind to Hrd3KR. Of note, deletion of SCJ1 impairs ERAD of model substrates and causes the accumulation of client proteins at Hrd3. Our data imply a function of Scj1 in the removal of malfolded proteins from the receptor Hrd3, which facilitates their delivery to downstream-acting components like Der1. PMID:25428985

  3. Pea Chaperones under Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaiev, Oleksandr

    2008-06-01

    Etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings were subjected to altered g-forces by centrifugation (3-14g). By using semiquantitative RT-PCR, we studied transcripts of pea genes coding for chaperones that are representatives of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) family. Four members from the different classes of sHsps: cytosolic Hsp17.7 and Hsp18.1 (class I and class II accordingly), chloroplast Hsp21 (class III) and endoplasmic reticulum Hsp22.7 (class IV) were investigated. We conclude that exposure to 3, 7, 10 and 14g for 1h did not affect the level of sHsp transcripts.

  4. The redox switch that regulates molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Conway, Myra E; Lee, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Modification of reactive cysteine residues plays an integral role in redox-regulated reactions. Oxidation of thiolate anions to sulphenic acid can result in disulphide bond formation, or overoxidation to sulphonic acid, representing reversible and irreversible endpoints of cysteine oxidation, respectively. The antioxidant systems of the cell, including the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems, aim to prevent these higher and irreversible oxidation states. This is important as these redox transitions have numerous roles in regulating the structure/function relationship of proteins. Proteins with redox-active switches as described for peroxiredoxin (Prx) and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) can undergo dynamic structural rearrangement resulting in a gain of function. For Prx, transition from cysteine sulphenic acid to sulphinic acid is described as an adaptive response during increased cellular stress causing Prx to form higher molecular weight aggregates, switching its role from antioxidant to molecular chaperone. Evidence in support of PDI as a redox-regulated chaperone is also gaining impetus, where oxidation of the redox-active CXXC regions causes a structural change, exposing its hydrophobic region, facilitating polypeptide folding. In this review, we will focus on these two chaperones that are directly regulated through thiol-disulphide exchange and detail how these redox-induced switches allow for dual activity. Moreover, we will introduce a new role for a metabolic protein, the branched-chain aminotransferase, and discuss how it shares common mechanistic features with these well-documented chaperones. Together, the physiological importance of the redox regulation of these proteins under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be discussed to illustrate the impact and importance of correct folding and chaperone-mediated activity.

  5. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. PMID:22121495

  6. Chaperone activation by unfolding.

    PubMed

    Foit, Linda; George, Jenny S; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2013-04-02

    Conditionally disordered proteins can alternate between highly ordered and less ordered configurations under physiological conditions. Whereas protein function is often associated with the ordered conformation, for some of these conditionally unstructured proteins, the opposite applies: Their activation is associated with their unfolding. An example is the small periplasmic chaperone HdeA, which is critical for the ability of enteric bacterial pathogens like Escherichia coli to survive passage through extremely acidic environments, such as the human stomach. At neutral pH, HdeA is a chaperone-inactive dimer. On a shift to low pH, however, HdeA monomerizes, partially unfolds, and becomes rapidly active in preventing the aggregation of substrate proteins. By mutating two aspartic acid residues predicted to be responsible for the pH-dependent monomerization of HdeA, we have succeeded in isolating an HdeA mutant that is active at neutral pH. We find this HdeA mutant to be substantially destabilized, partially unfolded, and mainly monomeric at near-neutral pH at a concentration at which it prevents aggregation of a substrate protein. These results provide convincing evidence for direct activation of a protein by partial unfolding.

  7. Molecular Chaperones in Pathogen Virulence: Emerging New Targets for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Neckers, Len; Tatu, Utpal

    2009-01-01

    Summary Infectious organisms have to cope with demanding and rapidly changing environments during establishment in the host. This is particularly relevant for pathogens which utilize different hosts to complete their life cycle. In addition to homeotic environmental challenges, other stressful factors, such as oxidative bursts, are often triggered in response to infection. It is not surprising that many successful pathogens have developed robust chaperone systems to conquer the stressful environments in the host. In addition to discussing ingenious ways by which pathogens have utilized chaperones, the potential of exploiting pathogen chaperones as drug targets is also discussed. PMID:19064253

  8. SIRT1 overexpression ameliorates a mouse model of SOD1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis via HSF1/HSP70i chaperone system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dominant mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) cause degeneration of motor neurons in a subset of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The pathogenetic process mediated by misfolded and/or aggregated mutant SOD1 polypeptides is hypothesized to be suppressed by protein refolding. This genetic study is aimed to test whether mutant SOD1-mediated ALS pathology recapitulated in mice could be alleviated by overexpressing a longevity-related deacetylase SIRT1 whose substrates include a transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the master regulator of the chaperone system. Results We established a line of transgenic mice that chronically overexpress SIRT1 in the brain and spinal cord. While inducible HSP70 (HSP70i) was upregulated in the spinal cord of SIRT1 transgenic mice (PrP-Sirt1), no neurological and behavioral alterations were detected. To test hypothetical benefits of SIRT1 overexpression, we crossbred PrP-Sirt1 mice with two lines of ALS model mice: A high expression line that exhibits a severe phenotype (SOD1G93A-H) or a low expression line with a milder phenotype (SOD1G93A-L). The Sirt1 transgene conferred longer lifespan without altering the time of symptomatic onset in SOD1G93A-L. Biochemical analysis of the spinal cord revealed that SIRT1 induced HSP70i expression through deacetylation of HSF1 and that SOD1G93A-L/PrP-Sirt1 double transgenic mice contained less insoluble SOD1 than SOD1G93A-L mice. Parallel experiments showed that Sirt1 transgene could not rescue a more severe phenotype of SOD1G93A-H transgenic mice partly because their HSP70i level had peaked out. Conclusions The genetic supplementation of SIRT1 can ameliorate a mutant SOD1-linked ALS mouse model partly through the activation of the HSF1/HSP70i chaperone system. Future studies shall include testing potential benefits of pharmacological enhancement of the deacetylation activity of SIRT1 after the onset of the symptom. PMID:25167838

  9. Synechocystis PCC6803 and PCC6906 dnaK2 expression confers salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis via reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghyun; Ahn, Myung Suk; Park, Young Min; Kim, Suk Weon; Min, Sung Ran; Jeong, Weon Joong; Liu, Jang R

    2014-02-01

    Abiotic stress slows plant growth and development. Because salt stress, particularly from NaCl, acts as an important limiting factor in agricultural productivity, the identification and manipulation of genes related to salt tolerance could improve crop productivity. Prokaryotic, heat shock protein (Hsp), DnaK from the ubiquitous Hsp70 family is upregulated in cells that are under abiotic stress. Synechocystis spp. cyanobacteria encode at least three potential DnaK proteins in their genome. Here, expressions of dnaK1s and dnaK2s from two Synechocystis spp. PCC6803 (Sy6803) and PCC6906 (Sy6906), enhanced salt tolerance in a dnaK-defective Escherichia coli strain. In contrast, dnaK3s in both strains were ineffective, indicating that dnaK3 is functionally different from dnaK1 and dnaK2 in Synechocystis spp. under salt stress. Ectopic expression of dnaK2s from Sy6803 and Sy6906 conferred salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, which exhibited greater root length, chlorophyll content, fresh weight, and survival rate than wild type plants, all in the presence of NaCl. In transgenic plants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation was reduced under NaCl stress and loss of chlorophyll content was reduced under H2O2 stress. Overall results suggest that dnaK2s from Sy6803 and Sy6906 confer salt and oxidative tolerance in transgenic plants by reduction of H2O2 accumulation.

  10. Exosome from chaperone-rich cell lysates-loaded dendritic cells produced by CELLine 1000 culture system exhibits potent immune activity.

    PubMed

    Bu, Ning; Wu, Haiqin; Zhang, Guilian; Ma, Xiaoling; Zhao, Ping; Zhai, Nina; Xiang, Li; Cao, Huifang; Yang, Xinli; Liu, Jingjie

    2015-01-02

    Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exosomes can stimulate efficient cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses and anti-tumor immunity. However, the quantity of DC-derived exosomes (DCex) obtained from various culture systems is very low, which is a significant practical issue hampering progress in this research area and needs to be addressed. Gliomas were particularly aggressive, with high morbidity and mortality, indicating that this is a form of incurable highly malignant tumor of the brain with poor prognosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that the CELLine 1000 culture system can dramatically increase the production of DCex. The morphology, phenotype and immune molecules of these DCex were found to be identical to those using traditional methods. Our researches supply a cost-effective, useful method for significantly increasing the quantity of exosomes. In addition, GL261 glioma cells were chosen to separate chaperone-rich cell lysates (CRCL). The results indicate that CRCL-GL261 cell lysates can trigger the most intense expression of immune molecules on DCex or DCs, which has important implications for the research into tumor treatment and diagnosis.

  11. Protein Quality Control by Molecular Chaperones in Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2017-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) requires the timely degradation of misfolded proteins and their aggregates by protein quality control (PQC), of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Compared with other cell types, PQC in neurons is particularly challenging because they have a unique cellular structure with long extensions. Making it worse, neurons are postmitotic, i.e., cannot dilute toxic substances by division, and, thus, are highly sensitive to misfolded proteins, especially as they age. Failure in PQC is often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease (HD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion disease. In fact, many neurodegenerative diseases are considered to be protein misfolding disorders. To prevent the accumulation of disease-causing aggregates, neurons utilize a repertoire of chaperones that recognize misfolded proteins through exposed hydrophobic surfaces and assist their refolding. If such an effort fails, chaperones can facilitate the degradation of terminally misfolded proteins through either the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS) or the autophagy-lysosome system (hereafter autophagy). If soluble, the substrates associated with chaperones, such as Hsp70, are ubiquitinated by Ub ligases and degraded through the proteasome complex. Some misfolded proteins carrying the KFERQ motif are recognized by the chaperone Hsc70 and delivered to the lysosomal lumen through a process called, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Aggregation-prone misfolded proteins that remain unprocessed are directed to macroautophagy in which cargoes are collected by adaptors, such as p62/SQSTM-1/Sequestosome-1, and delivered to the autophagosome for lysosomal degradation. The aggregates that have survived all these refolding/degradative processes can still be directly dissolved, i.e., disaggregated by chaperones. Studies have shown that molecular chaperones alleviate the pathogenic symptoms by

  12. Protein Quality Control by Molecular Chaperones in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, Aaron; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2017-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) requires the timely degradation of misfolded proteins and their aggregates by protein quality control (PQC), of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Compared with other cell types, PQC in neurons is particularly challenging because they have a unique cellular structure with long extensions. Making it worse, neurons are postmitotic, i.e., cannot dilute toxic substances by division, and, thus, are highly sensitive to misfolded proteins, especially as they age. Failure in PQC is often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease (HD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion disease. In fact, many neurodegenerative diseases are considered to be protein misfolding disorders. To prevent the accumulation of disease-causing aggregates, neurons utilize a repertoire of chaperones that recognize misfolded proteins through exposed hydrophobic surfaces and assist their refolding. If such an effort fails, chaperones can facilitate the degradation of terminally misfolded proteins through either the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS) or the autophagy-lysosome system (hereafter autophagy). If soluble, the substrates associated with chaperones, such as Hsp70, are ubiquitinated by Ub ligases and degraded through the proteasome complex. Some misfolded proteins carrying the KFERQ motif are recognized by the chaperone Hsc70 and delivered to the lysosomal lumen through a process called, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Aggregation-prone misfolded proteins that remain unprocessed are directed to macroautophagy in which cargoes are collected by adaptors, such as p62/SQSTM-1/Sequestosome-1, and delivered to the autophagosome for lysosomal degradation. The aggregates that have survived all these refolding/degradative processes can still be directly dissolved, i.e., disaggregated by chaperones. Studies have shown that molecular chaperones alleviate the pathogenic symptoms by

  13. Induction of DnaK and GroEL heat shock proteins by fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mizushima, T; Matsuo, M; Sekimizu, K

    1997-01-01

    Various fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and sparfloxacin) induce DnaK and GroEL heat shock proteins in Escherichia coli. The induction is transient, consistent with the kinetics of cellular DNA relaxation. The concentrations of fluoroquinolones required for induction are similar to those required for DNA relaxation and much higher than those required for cell death. PMID:8980780

  14. Molecular chaperones in Parkinson's disease--present and future.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Wahlster, Lara; McLean, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease, like many other neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by the progressive accumulation of pathogenic protein species and the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies. The cascade by which the small synaptic protein α-synuclein misfolds to form distinctive protein aggregates, termed Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, has been the subject of intensive research for more than a decade. Genetic and pathological studies in Parkinson's disease patients as well as experimental studies in disease models have clearly established altered protein metabolism as a key element in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Alterations in protein metabolism include misfolding and aggregation, post-translational modification and dysfunctional degradation of cytotoxic protein species. Protein folding and re-folding are both mediated by a highly conserved network of molecules, called molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. In addition to the regulatory role in protein folding, molecular chaperone function is intimately associated with pathways of protein degradation, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, to effectively remove irreversibly misfolded proteins. Because of the central role of molecular chaperones in maintaining protein homeostasis, we herein review our current knowledge on the involvement of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones in Parkinson's disease. We further discuss the capacity of molecular chaperones to prevent or modulate neurodegeneration, an important concept for future neuroprotective strategies and summarize the current progress in preclinical studies in models of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Finally we include a discussion on the future potential of using molecular chaperones as a disease modifying therapy.

  15. ATPase domain and interdomain linker play a key role in aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone Ssc1.

    PubMed

    Blamowska, Marta; Sichting, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2010-02-12

    The co-chaperone Hep1 is required to prevent the aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. We have analyzed the interaction of Hep1 with mitochondrial Hsp70 (Ssc1) and the determinants in Ssc1 that make it prone to aggregation. The ATPase and peptide binding domain (PBD) of Hsp70 proteins are connected by a linker segment that mediates interdomain communication between the domains. We show here that the minimal Hep1 binding entity of Ssc1 consists of the ATPase domain and the interdomain linker. In the absence of Hep1, the ATPase domain with the interdomain linker had the tendency to aggregate, in contrast to the ATPase domain with the mutated linker segment or without linker, and in contrast to the PBD. The closest homolog of Ssc1, bacterial DnaK, and a Ssc1 chimera, in which a segment of the ATPase domain of Ssc1 was replaced by the corresponding segment from DnaK, did not aggregate in Delta hep1 mitochondria. The propensity to aggregate appears to be a specific property of the mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. The ATPase domain in combination with the interdomain linker is crucial for aggregation of Ssc1. In conclusion, our results suggest that interdomain communication makes Ssc1 prone to aggregation. Hep1 counteracts aggregation by binding to this aggregation-prone conformer.

  16. ATPase Domain and Interdomain Linker Play a Key Role in Aggregation of Mitochondrial Hsp70 Chaperone Ssc1*

    PubMed Central

    Blamowska, Marta; Sichting, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The co-chaperone Hep1 is required to prevent the aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. We have analyzed the interaction of Hep1 with mitochondrial Hsp70 (Ssc1) and the determinants in Ssc1 that make it prone to aggregation. The ATPase and peptide binding domain (PBD) of Hsp70 proteins are connected by a linker segment that mediates interdomain communication between the domains. We show here that the minimal Hep1 binding entity of Ssc1 consists of the ATPase domain and the interdomain linker. In the absence of Hep1, the ATPase domain with the interdomain linker had the tendency to aggregate, in contrast to the ATPase domain with the mutated linker segment or without linker, and in contrast to the PBD. The closest homolog of Ssc1, bacterial DnaK, and a Ssc1 chimera, in which a segment of the ATPase domain of Ssc1 was replaced by the corresponding segment from DnaK, did not aggregate in Δhep1 mitochondria. The propensity to aggregate appears to be a specific property of the mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. The ATPase domain in combination with the interdomain linker is crucial for aggregation of Ssc1. In conclusion, our results suggest that interdomain communication makes Ssc1 prone to aggregation. Hep1 counteracts aggregation by binding to this aggregation-prone conformer. PMID:20007714

  17. Chaperoning roles of macromolecules interacting with proteins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Il; Lim, Keo-Heun; Seong, Baik L

    2011-01-01

    The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  18. Thermostability of lactate dehydrogenase LDH-A4 isoenzyme: effect of heat shock protein DnaK on the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zietara, M S; Skorkowski, E F

    1995-11-01

    Cells exposed to temperature a few degrees higher than their growth temperature synthesize heat shock proteins (hsp) which may then compose even 20% of total protein content. This paper examined the in vitro protective effect of heat shock protein DnaK (70 kDa) from Escherichia coli against the heat inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme LDH-A4. The LDH-A4 isoenzyme was purified from fish skeletal muscle using the affinity chromatography on Oxamate-agarose. The enzyme was then heated in the absence and the presence of DnaK protein in a water bath at either 51 or 55 degrees C. The LDH activity was determined by measuring the change in absorbency at 340 nm min-1 at 30 degrees C. The addition of DnaK protein to the LDH-A4 isoenzyme before heat treatment can protect enzyme activity against mild thermal inactivation. Incubation of the LDH-A4 isoenzyme at 51 degrees C in the presence of DnaK protein stimulates its activity by about 30%. The presence of 2 mM ATP can raise LDH activity by another 10%. No significant recovery was observed when DnaK protein was added to LDH at 25 degrees C following earlier inactivation. The maximal activities (Vmax) in the presence of DnaK protein are almost twice those without DnaK protein in the case of heat-treated LDH-A4 isoenzyme at 51 degrees C. The observed protection of LDH-A4 activity increased with the increasing DnaK protein concentration in the incubation medium. Results suggested that the presence of DnaK protein can protect LDH-A4 from heat inactivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Structural Characterization of the Yersinia pestis Type III Secretion System Needle Protein YscF in Complex with Its Heterodimeric Chaperone YscE/YscG

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Cherry, Scott; Waugh, David S.

    2008-05-03

    The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. Effector proteins are injected through a hollow needle structure composed of the protein YscF. YscG and YscE act as 'chaperones' to prevent premature polymerization of YscF in the cytosol of the bacterium prior to assembly of the needle. Here, we report the crystal structure of the YscEFG protein complex at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Overall, the structure is similar to that of the analogous PscEFG complex from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system, but there are noteworthy differences. The structure confirms that, like PscG, YscG is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family of proteins. YscG binds tightly to the C-terminal half of YscF, implying that it is this region of YscF that controls its polymerization into the needle structure. YscE interacts with the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat motif of YscG but makes very little direct contact with YscF. Its function may be to stabilize the structure of YscG and/or to participate in recruiting the complex to the secretion apparatus. No electron density could be observed for the 49 N-terminal residues of YscF. This and additional evidence suggest that the N-terminus of YscF is disordered in the complex with YscE and YscG. As expected, conserved residues in the C-terminal half of YscF mediate important intra- and intermolecular interactions in the complex. Moreover, the phenotypes of some previously characterized mutations in the C-terminal half of YscF can be rationalized in terms of the structure of the heterotrimeric YscEFG complex.

  20. Effect of molecular chaperones on aberrant protein oligomers in vitro: super-versus sub-stoichiometric chaperone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Sara; Penco, Amanda; Mannini, Benedetta; Cascella, Roberta; Wilson, Mark R; Ecroyd, Heath; Li, Xinyi; Buxbaum, Joel N; Dobson, Christopher M; Cecchi, Cristina; Relini, Annalisa; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Living systems protect themselves from aberrant proteins by a network of chaperones. We have tested in vitro the effects of different concentrations, ranging from 0 to 16 μm, of two molecular chaperones, namely αB-crystallin and clusterin, and an engineered monomeric variant of transthyretin (M-TTR), on the morphology and cytotoxicity of preformed toxic oligomers of HypF-N, which represent a useful model of misfolded protein aggregates. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and static light scattering analysis, all were found to bind HypF-N oligomers and increase the size of the aggregates, to an extent that correlates with chaperone concentration. SDS-PAGE profiles have shown that the large aggregates were predominantly composed of the HypF-N protein. ANS fluorescence measurements show that the chaperone-induced clustering of HypF-N oligomers does not change the overall solvent exposure of hydrophobic residues on the surface of the oligomers. αB-crystallin, clusterin and M-TTR can diminish the cytotoxic effects of the HypF-N oligomers at all chaperone concentration, as demonstrated by MTT reduction and Ca2+ influx measurements. The observation that the protective effect is primarily at all concentrations of chaperones, both when the increase in HypF-N aggregate size is minimal and large, emphasizes the efficiency and versatility of these protein molecules.

  1. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Colin M; Strømme, Caroline B; Huang, Hongda; Patel, Dinshaw J; Groth, Anja

    2017-03-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availability and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin.

  2. Regulatory chaperone complexes in neurodegenerative diseases: a perspective on therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Carman, Aaron; Kishinevsky, Sarah; Koren, John; Luo, Wenjie; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding, protein degradation, and protein stability are regulated by the molecular chaperones. Under pathogenic conditions, aberrant proteins can be dysfunctional, unregulated, or pathogenically mutated. These aberrant proteins are triaged by the chaperone network for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. These species, called chaperone client proteins, include the pathogenic factors of numerous neurodegenerative disorders, including tau in Alzheimer's disease, α-synuclein and LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease, SOD-1, TDP-43 and FUS in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and polyQ-expanded proteins such as huntingtin in Huntington's disease. In depth study of two molecular chaperones, Hsp90 and Hsc70, has led to a greater understanding of aberrant client fate and how retarding the chaperone system can promote clearance of these pathogenic clients. Here we discuss how chaperone interactions and small molecule inhibitors can regulate the burden of aberrant client signaling in these neurological disorders.

  3. Expanding role of molecular chaperones in regulating α-synuclein misfolding; implications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Priya, Smriti

    2017-02-01

    Protein misfolding under stressful environmental conditions cause several cellular problems owing to the disturbed cellular protein homeostasis, which may further lead to neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Amyloid lateral sclerosis and Huntington disease (HD). The presence of cellular defense mechanisms like molecular chaperones and proteasomal degradation systems prevent protein misfolding and aggregation. Molecular chaperones plays primary role in preventing protein misfolding by mediating proper native folding, unfolding and refolding of the polypeptides along with vast number of cellular functions. In past few years, the understanding of molecular chaperone mechanisms has been expanded enormously although implementation to prevent protein aggregation diseases is still deficient. We in this review evaluated major classes of molecular chaperones and their mechanisms relevant for preventing protein aggregation, specific case of α-synuclein aggregation. We also evaluate the molecular chaperone function as a novel therapeutic approach and the chaperone inhibitors or activators as small molecular drug targets.

  4. Efficient Production of Active Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase in Escherichia coli by Coexpression of Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Nicholas M.; Saika, Azusa; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Sangiambut, Smith; Tsuge, Takeharu; Summers, David K.

    2013-01-01

    The type I polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Cupriavidus necator was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli with simultaneous overexpression of chaperone proteins. Compared to expression of synthase alone (14.55 mg liter−1), coexpression with chaperones resulted in the production of larger total quantities of enzyme, including a larger proportion in the soluble fraction. The largest increase was seen when the GroEL/GroES system was coexpressed, resulting in approximately 6-fold-greater enzyme yields (82.37 mg liter−1) than in the absence of coexpressed chaperones. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was unaffected by coexpression with chaperones. Therefore, the increase in yield was attributed to an enhanced soluble fraction of synthase. Chaperones were also coexpressed with a polyhydroxyalkanoate production operon, resulting in the production of polymers with generally reduced molecular weights. This suggests a potential use for chaperones to control the physical properties of the polymer. PMID:23335776

  5. Masculinisation of the Zebra Finch Song System: Roles of Oestradiol and the Z-chromosome Gene Tubulin-Specific Chaperone Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Beach, L. Q.; Wade, J.

    2015-01-01

    Robust sex differences in brain and behaviour exist in zebra finches. Only males sing, and forebrain song control regions are more developed in males. The factors driving these differences are not clear, although numerous experiments have shown that oestradiol (E2) administered to female hatchlings partially masculinises brain and behaviour. Recent studies suggest that an increased expression of Z-chromosome genes in males (ZZ; females: ZW) might also play a role. The Z-gene tubulin-specific chaperone A (TBCA) exhibits increased expression in the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN) of juvenile males compared to females; TBCA+ cells project to the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). In the present study, we investigated the role of TBCA and tested hypotheses with respect to the interactive or additive effects of E2 and TBCA. We first examined whether E2 in hatchling zebra finches modulates TBCA expression in the LMAN. It affected neither the mRNA, nor protein in either sex. We then unilaterally delivered TBCA small interfering (si)RNA to the LMAN of developing females treated with E2 or vehicle and males treated with the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, or its control. In both sexes, decreasing TBCA in LMAN reduced RA cell number, cell size and volume. It also decreased LMAN volume in females. Fadrozole in males increased LMAN volume and RA cell size. TBCA siRNA delivered to the LMAN also decreased the projection from this brain region to the RA, as indicated by anterograde tract tracing. The results suggest that TBCA is involved in masculinising the song system. However, because no interactions between the siRNA and hormone manipulations were detected, TBCA does not appear to modulate effects of E2 in the zebra finch song circuit. PMID:25702708

  6. The HSP90 chaperone machinery.

    PubMed

    Schopf, Florian H; Biebl, Maximilian M; Buchner, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone machinery is a key regulator of proteostasis under both physiological and stress conditions in eukaryotic cells. As HSP90 has several hundred protein substrates (or 'clients'), it is involved in many cellular processes beyond protein folding, which include DNA repair, development, the immune response and neurodegenerative disease. A large number of co-chaperones interact with HSP90 and regulate the ATPase-associated conformational changes of the HSP90 dimer that occur during the processing of clients. Recent progress has allowed the interactions of clients with HSP90 and its co-chaperones to be defined. Owing to the importance of HSP90 in the regulation of many cellular proteins, it has become a promising drug target for the treatment of several diseases, which include cancer and diseases associated with protein misfolding.

  7. Conditional disorder in chaperone action

    PubMed Central

    Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Protein disorder remains an intrinsically fuzzy concept. Its role in protein function is difficult to conceptualize and its experimental study is challenging. Although a wide variety of roles for protein disorder have been proposed, establishing that disorder is functionally important, particularly in vivo, is not a trivial task. Several molecular chaperones have now been identified as conditionally disordered proteins; fully folded and chaperone-inactive under non-stress conditions, they adopt a partially disordered conformation upon exposure to distinct stress-conditions. This disorder appears to be vital for their ability to bind multiple aggregation-sensitive client proteins and to protect cells against the stressors. The study of these conditionally disordered chaperones should prove useful in understanding the functional role for protein disorder in molecular recognition. PMID:23018052

  8. Stress and molecular chaperones in disease.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    2000-01-01

    Stress, a common phenomenon in today's society, is suspected of playing a role in the development of disease. Stressors of various types, psychological, physical, and biological, abound. They occur in the working and social environments, in air, soil, water, food, and medicines. Stressors impact on cells directly or indirectly, cause protein denaturation, and elicit a stress response. This is mediated by stress (heat-shock) genes and proteins, among which are those named molecular chaperones because they assist other proteins to achieve and maintain a functional shape (the native configuration), and to recover it when partially lost due to stress. Denatured proteins tend to aggregate and precipitate. The same occurs with abnormal proteins due to mutations, or to failure of post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanisms. These abnormal proteins need the help of molecular chaperones as much as denatured molecules do, especially during stress. A cell with normal antistress mechanisms, including a complete and functional set of chaperones, may be able to withstand stress if its intensity is not beyond that which will cause irreversible protein damage. There is a certain threshold that normal cells have above which they cannot cope with stress. A cell with an abnormal protein that has an intrinsic tendency to misfold and aggregate is more vulnerable to stress than normal counterparts. Furthermore, these abnormal proteins may precipitate even in the absence of stress and cause diseases named proteinopathies. It is possible that stress contributes to the pathogenesis of proteinopathies by promoting protein aggregation, even in cells that possess a normal chaperoning system. Examples of proteinopathies are age-related degenerative disorders with protein deposits in various tissues, most importantly in the brain where the deposits are associated with neuronal degeneration. It is conceivable that stress enhances the progression of these diseases by facilitating

  9. Co-expression of Skp and FkpA chaperones improves cell viability and alters the global expression of stress response genes during scFvD1.3 production

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The overexpression of scFv antibody fragments in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli frequently results in extensive protein misfolding and loss of cell viability. Although protein folding factors such as Skp and FkpA are often exploited to restore the solubility and functionality of recombinant protein products, their exact impact on cellular metabolism during periplasmic antibody fragment expression is not clearly understood. In this study, we expressed the scFvD1.3 antibody fragment in E. coli BL21 and evaluated the overall physiological and global gene expression changes upon Skp or FkpA co-expression. Results The periplasmic expression of scFvD1.3 led to a rapid accumulation of insoluble scFvD1.3 proteins and a decrease in cell viability. The co-expression of Skp and FkpA improved scFvD1.3 solubility and cell viability in a dosage-dependent manner. Through mutagenesis experiments, it was found that only the chaperone activity of FkpA, not the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity, is required for the improvement in cell viability. Global gene expression analysis of the scFvD1.3 cells over the chaperone-expressing cells showed a clear up-regulation of genes involved in heat-shock and misfolded protein stress responses. These included genes of the major HSP70 DnaK chaperone family and key proteases belonging to the Clp and Lon protease systems. Other metabolic gene expression trends include: (1) the differential regulation of several energy metabolic genes, (2) down-regulation of the central metabolic TCA cycle and transport genes, and (3) up-regulation of ribosomal genes. Conclusions The simultaneous activation of multiple stress related and other metabolic genes may constitute the stress response to protein misfolding in the scFvD1.3 cells. These gene expression information could prove to be valuable for the selection and construction of reporter contructs to monitor the misfolded protein stress response during antibody fragment

  10. The role of HSP70 and its co-chaperones in protein misfolding, aggregation and disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Emma J; Cheetham, Michael E; Chapple, J Paul; van der Spuy, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones are essential in health and disease as they are key facilitators of protein folding, quality control and function. In particular, the HSP70 molecular chaperone networks have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases caused by aberrant protein folding. The pathogenesis of these disorders usually includes the formation of deposits of misfolded, aggregated protein. HSP70 and its co-chaperones have been recognised as potent modulators of inclusion formation and cell survival in cellular and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. In has become evident that the HSP70 chaperone machine functions not only in folding, but also in proteasome mediated degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins. Thus, there has been a great deal of interest in the potential manipulation of molecular chaperones as a therapeutic approach for many neurodegenerations. Furthermore, mutations in several HSP70 co-chaperones and putative co-chaperones have been identified as causing inherited neurodegenerative and cardiac disorders, directly linking the HSP70 chaperone system to human disease.

  11. Regulation of the dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is governed by HspR, an autoregulatory repressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bucca, G; Hindle, Z; Smith, C P

    1997-01-01

    The dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor contains four genes (5'-dnaK-grpE-dnaJ-hspR). The fourth gene encodes a novel heat shock protein, HspR, which appears so far to be unique to the high-G+C actinomycete group of bacteria. HspR binds with high specificity to three inverted repeat sequences in the promoter region of the S. coelicolor dnaK operon, strongly suggesting a direct role for HspR in heat shock gene regulation. Here we present genetic and biochemical evidence that HspR is the repressor of the dnaK operon. Disruption of hspR leads to high-level constitutive transcription of the dnaK operon. Parallel transcriptional analyses of groESL1 and groEL2 expression demonstrated that heat shock regulation of the groE genes was essentially unaffected in an hspR null mutant, although the basal (uninduced) level of groEL2 transcription was slightly elevated compared with the wild type. The results of HspR titration experiments, where the dnaK operon promoter region was cloned at ca. 50 copies per chromosome, were consistent with the prediction that HspR functions as a negative autoregulator. His-tagged HspR, overproduced and purified from Escherichia coli, was shown to repress transcription from the dnaK operon promoter in vitro, providing additional evidence for the proposal that HspR directly regulates transcription of the dnaK operon. These studies indicate that there are at least two transcriptional mechanisms for controlling heat shock genes in S. coelicolor--one controlling the dnaK operon and another controlling the groE genes. PMID:9324243

  12. Heterogeneous expression of DnaK gene from Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris improves the resistance of Escherichia coli against heat and acid stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xixi; Jiao, Lingxia; Feng, Xin; Ran, Junjian; Liang, Xinhong; Zhao, Ruixiang

    2017-12-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, an acidophilic and thermophilic bacteria, is an important microbial resource for stress resistance genes screening. In this study, DnaK gene from A. acidoterrestris was subcloned to construct the recombinant plasmid pET28a-DnaK. The successful construction of the plasmid was verified by double-enzyme digestion and sequencing analysis. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 and isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was used to induce recombinant E. coli to express DnaK gene. A 70 kD fusion protein was identified by SDS-PAGE, which suggested that DnaK gene from A. acidoterrestris was successfully expressed. The recombinant and wild BL21 were treated with high temperatures of 54, 56 and 58 °C at pH values of 5.0-7.0 to compare the effects of heterogeneous expression of the DnaK gene from A. acidoterrestris on the stress resistance. The experimental results showed that survival rate of recombinant BL21-DnaK has been improved considerably under heat and acid stresses in contrast with the wild BL21, and D-values of recombinant BL21 were 14.7-72% higher than that of wild BL21, which demonstrated that heterogeneous expression of DnaK gene from A. acidoterrestris could significantly enhance the resistance of host bacteria E. coli against heat and acid stresses.

  13. Chaperone proteins and brain tumors: Potential targets and possible therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are most notable for the proteo- and cyotoprotective capacities they afford during cellular stress. Under conditions of cellular normalcy, chaperones still play integral roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides into functional entities, in assisting in intracellular/intraorganellar transport, in assembly and maintenance of multi-subunit protein complexes, and in aiding and abetting the degradation of senescent proteins. Tumors frequently have relatively enhanced needs for chaperone number and activity because of the stresses of rapid proliferation, increased metabolism, and overall genetic instability. Thus, it may be possible to take advantage of this reliance that tumor cells have on chaperones by pharmacologic and biologic means. Certain chaperones are abundant in the brain, which implies important roles for them. While it is presumed that the requirements of brain tumors for chaperone proteins are similar to those of any other cell type, tumor or otherwise, very little inquiry has been directed at the possibility of using chaperone proteins as therapeutic targets or even as therapeutic agents against central nervous system malignancies. This review highlights some of the research on the functions of chaperone proteins, on what can be done to modify those functions, and on the physiological responses that tumors and organisms can have to chaperone-targeted or chaperone-based therapies. In particular, this review will also underscore areas of research where brain tumors have been part of the field, although in general those instances are few and far between. This relative dearth of research devoted to chaperone protein targets and therapeutics in brain tumors reveals much untrodden turf to explore for potential treatments of these dreadfully refractive diseases. PMID:16053701

  14. A Role of Metastable Regions and Their Connectivity in the Inactivation of a Redox-Regulated Chaperone and Its Inter-Chaperone Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Rimon, Oded; Suss, Ohad; Goldenberg, Mor; Fassler, Rosi; Yogev, Ohad; Amartely, Hadar; Propper, Guy; Friedler, Assaf; Reichmann, Dana

    2017-04-10

    A recently discovered group of conditionally disordered chaperones share a very unique feature; they need to lose structure to become active as chaperones. This activation mechanism makes these chaperones particularly suited to respond to protein-unfolding stress conditions, such as oxidative unfolding. However, the role of this disorder in stress-related activation, chaperone function, and the crosstalk with other chaperone systems is not yet clear. Here, we focus on one of the members of the conditionally disordered chaperones, a thiol-redox switch of the bacterial proteostasis system, Hsp33. By modifying the Hsp33's sequence, we reveal that the metastable region has evolved to abolish redox-dependent chaperone activity, rather than enhance binding affinity for client proteins. The intrinsically disordered region of Hsp33 serves as an anchor for the reduced, inactive state of Hsp33, and it dramatically affects the crosstalk with the synergetic chaperone system, DnaK/J. Using mass spectrometry, we describe the role that the metastable region plays in determining client specificity during normal and oxidative stress conditions in the cell. Innovation and Conclusion: We uncover a new role of protein plasticity in Hsp33's inactivation, client specificity, crosstalk with the synergistic chaperone system DnaK/J, and oxidative stress-specific interactions in bacteria. Our results also suggest that Hsp33 might serve as a member of the house-keeping proteostasis machinery, tasked with maintaining a "healthy" proteome during normal conditions, and that this function does not depend on the metastable linker region. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  15. Goniothalamin enhances the ATPase activity of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 but inhibits its chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuhei; Ohtaki, Aguru; Jantan, Ibrahim; Yohda, Masafumi; Nakamoto, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that is involved in important cellular pathways such as signal transduction pathways. It is a potential cancer drug target because it plays a critical role for stabilization and activation of oncoproteins. Thus, small molecule compounds that control the Hsp90 function are useful to elucidate potential lead compounds against cancer. We studied effect of a naturally occurring styryl-lactone goniothalamin on the activity of Hsp90. Although many drugs targeting Hsp90 inhibit the ATPase activity of Hsp90, goniothalamin enhanced rather than inhibited the ATPase activity of a cyanobacterial Hsp90 (HtpG) and a yeast Hsp90. It increased both K(m) and k(cat) of the Hsp90s. Domain competition assays and tryptophan fluorescence measurements with various truncated derivatives of HtpG indicated that goniothalamin binds to the N-terminal domain of HtpG. Goniothalamin did not influence on the interaction of HtpG with a non-native protein or the anti-aggregation activity of HtpG significantly. However, it inhibited the activity of HtpG that assists refolding of a non-native protein in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone system. This is the first report to show that a small molecule that binds to the N-terminal domain of Hsp90 activates its ATPase activity, while inhibiting the chaperone function of Hsp90.

  16. Specific Chaperones and Regulatory Domains in Control of Amyloid Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  17. Therapeutic uses of drug-carrier systems for imidazole-containing dipeptide compounds that act as pharmacological chaperones and have significant impact on the treatment of chronic diseases associated with increased oxidative stress and the formation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how the naturally occurring molecules N-acetylcarnosine, L-carnosine, and carcinine, which are chemical or pharmacological chaperones, affect the cells and biomolecules of patients with skin diseases, cosmetic skin lesions, or underlying clinically significant visual impairment such as age-related cataracts, age-related retinal degeneration, and ocular complications of diabetes. We evaluated and characterized the effects of cited pharmacological chaperones on enzyme activity, protein structure in tissues, and other biomarkers of diseases in skin cells and tissues or in ocular tissues (human cataractous and normal lenses) derived from ophthalmic patients or age-matched donors. The samples were used to test imidazole-containing peptidomimetic chemical/pharmacological chaperones in relation to oxidative stress induced by reaction with lipid peroxides or advanced non-enzymatic glycation processes. Chaperone function is characterized by interaction with other proteins, mediating their folding, transport, and interaction with other molecules, lipid peroxidation products, and membranes. Although these therapies remain on hold pending further investigation, we present growing evidence demonstrating the ability of N-acetylcarnosine (lubricant eye drops) or carcinine pharmacological chaperone therapy to act as novel treatments for age-related cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and ocular complications of diabetes. Finally, we examine strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone and transglycating (de-glycation) types of activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human age-related eye diseases, such as cataracts, and advanced glycation tissue protein-engineered systems.

  18. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C T; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-03-24

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  19. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  20. A family of cyclophilin-like molecular chaperones in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Marín-Menéndez, Alejandro; Monaghan, Paul; Bell, Angus

    2012-07-01

    The cyclophilins are a large family of proteins implicated in folding, transport and regulation of other proteins and are potential drug targets in cancer and in some viral and parasitic infections. The functionality of cyclophilins appears to depend on peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (foldase) and/or molecular chaperone activities. In this study we assessed the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and chaperone activities of 8 members of the Plasmodium falciparum cyclophilin family, all produced recombinantly using a common host/vector system. While only two of these proteins had isomerase activity, all of them displayed chaperone function as judged by the ability to prevent the thermal aggregation of model substrates. We suggest that the cyclophilins constitute a family of molecular chaperones in malarial parasites that complement the functions of other chaperones such as the heat-shock proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation. PMID:27009901

  2. Molecular chaperones and protein folding as therapeutic targets in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Saidi, Laiq-Jan; Wahlster, Lara

    2013-12-05

    Changes in protein metabolism are key to disease onset and progression in many neurodegenerative diseases. As a prime example, in Parkinson's disease, folding, post-translational modification and recycling of the synaptic protein α-synuclein are clearly altered, leading to a progressive accumulation of pathogenic protein species and the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies. Altered protein folding is one of the first steps of an increasingly understood cascade in which α-synuclein forms complex oligomers and finally distinct protein aggregates, termed Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. In neurons, an elaborated network of chaperone and co-chaperone proteins is instrumental in mediating protein folding and re-folding. In addition to their direct influence on client proteins, chaperones interact with protein degradation pathways such as the ubiquitin-proteasome-system or autophagy in order to ensure the effective removal of irreversibly misfolded and potentially pathogenic proteins. Because of the vital role of proper protein folding for protein homeostasis, a growing number of studies have evaluated the contribution of chaperone proteins to neurodegeneration. We herein review our current understanding of the involvement of chaperones, co-chaperones and chaperone-mediated autophagy in synucleinopathies with a focus on the Hsp90 and Hsp70 chaperone system. We discuss genetic and pathological studies in Parkinson's disease as well as experimental studies in models of synucleinopathies that explore molecular chaperones and protein degradation pathways as a novel therapeutic target. To this end, we examine the capacity of chaperones to prevent or modulate neurodegeneration and summarize the current progress in models of Parkinson's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Structural Insights into the Chaperone Activity of the 40-kDa Heat Shock Protein DnaJ

    PubMed Central

    Cuéllar, Jorge; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Muga, Arturo; Valpuesta, José María; Moro, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Hsp40 chaperones bind and transfer substrate proteins to Hsp70s and regulate their ATPase activity. The interaction of Hsp40s with native proteins modifies their structure and function. A good model for this function is DnaJ, the bacterial Hsp40 that interacts with RepE, the repressor/activator of plasmid F replication, and together with DnaK regulates its function. We characterize here the structure of the DnaJ-RepE complex by electron microscopy, the first described structure of a complex between an Hsp40 and a client protein. The comparison of the complexes of DnaJ with two RepE mutants reveals an intrinsic plasticity of the DnaJ dimer that allows the chaperone to adapt to different substrates. We also show that DnaJ induces conformational changes in dimeric RepE, which increase the intermonomeric distance and remodel both RepE domains enhancing its affinity for DNA. PMID:23580641

  4. Pharmacological Targeting of the Hsp70 Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Patury, Srikanth; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), acts at multiple steps in a protein’s life cycle, including during the processes of folding, trafficking, remodeling and degradation. To accomplish these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by a host of co-chaperones, which bind to the core chaperone and influence its functions. Genetic studies have strongly linked Hsp70 and its co-chaperones to numerous diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration and microbial pathogenesis, yet the potential of this chaperone as a therapeutic target remains largely underexplored. Here, we review the current state of Hsp70 as a drug target, with a special emphasis on the important challenges and opportunities imposed by its co-chaperones, protein-protein interactions and allostery. PMID:19860737

  5. Polymer hydrogels: Chaperoning vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Herman F.; Leong, Kam W.

    2010-07-01

    A cationic nanosized hydrogel (nanogel) shows controlled antigen delivery in vivo following intranasal administration and hence holds promise for a clinically effective adjuvant-free and needle-free vaccine system.

  6. Rapid discrimination and classification of the Lactobacillus plantarum group based on a partial dnaK sequence and DNA fingerprinting techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Fwu-Ling; Liou, Jong-Shian

    2010-03-01

    The Lactobacillus plantarum group comprises five very closely related species. Some species of this group are considered to be probiotic and widely applied in the food industry. In this study, we compared the use of two different molecular markers, the 16S rRNA and dnaK gene, for discriminating phylogenetic relationships amongst L. plantarum strains using sequencing and DNA fingerprinting. The average sequence similarity for the dnaK gene (89.2%) among five type strains was significantly less than that for the 16S rRNA (99.4%). This result demonstrates that the dnaK gene sequence provided higher resolution than the 16S rRNA and suggests that the dnaK could be used as an additional phylogenetic marker for L. plantarum. Species-specific profiles of the Lactobacillus strains were obtained with RAPD and RFLP methods. Our data indicate that phylogenetic relationships between these strains are easily resolved using sequencing of the dnaK gene or DNA fingerprinting assays.

  7. Classification of chemical chaperones based on their effect on protein folding landscapes.

    PubMed

    Dandage, Rohan; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Saxena, Kanika; Dalal, Vijit; Das, Aritri; Chakraborty, Kausik

    2015-03-20

    Various small molecules present in biological systems can assist protein folding in vitro and are known as chemical chaperones. De novo design of chemical chaperones with higher activity than currently known examples is desirable to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation in multiple contexts. However, this development has been hindered by limited knowledge of their activities. It is thought that chemical chaperones are typically poor solvents for a protein backbone and hence facilitate native structure formation. However, it is unknown if different chemical chaperones can act differently to modulate folding energy landscapes. Using a model slow folding protein, double-mutant Maltose-binding protein (DM-MBP), we show that a canonical chemical chaperone, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), accelerates refolding by decreasing the flexibility of the refolding intermediate (RI). Among a number of small molecules that chaperone DM-MBP folding, proline and serine stabilize the transition state (TS) enthalpically, while trehalose behaves like TMAO and increases the rate of barrier crossing through nonenthalpic processes. We propose a two-group classification of chemical chaperones based upon their thermodynamic effect on RI and TS, which is also supported by single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies. Interestingly, for a different test protein, the molecular mechanisms of the two groups of chaperones are not conserved. This provides a glimpse into the complexity of chemical chaperoning activity of osmolytes. Future work would allow us to engineer synergism between the two classes to design more efficient chemical chaperones to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation problems.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperones and Their Roles in the Immunogenicity of Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major site of passage for proteins en route to other organelles, to the cell surface, and to the extracellular space. It is also the transport route for peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome into the ER for loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules for eventual antigen presentation at the cell surface. Chaperones within the ER are critical for many of these processes; however, outside the ER certain of those chaperones may play important and direct roles in immune responses. In some cases, particular ER chaperones have been utilized as vaccines against tumors or infectious disease pathogens when purified from tumor tissue or recombinantly generated and loaded with antigen. In other cases, the cell surface location of ER chaperones has implications for immune responses as well as possible tumor resistance. We have produced heat-shock protein/chaperone protein-based cancer vaccines called “chaperone-rich cell lysate” (CRCL) that are conglomerates of chaperones enriched from solid tumors by an isoelectric focusing technique. These preparations have been effective against numerous murine tumors, as well as in a canine with an advanced lung carcinoma treated with autologous CRCL. We also published extensive proteomic analyses of CRCL prepared from human surgically resected tumor samples. Of note, these preparations contained at least 10 ER chaperones and a number of other residents, along with many other chaperones/heat-shock proteins. Gene ontology and network analyses utilizing these proteins essentially recapitulate the antigen presentation pathways and interconnections. In conjunction with our current knowledge of cell surface/extracellular ER chaperones, these data collectively suggest that a systems-level view may provide insight into the potent immune stimulatory activities of CRCL with an emphasis on the roles of ER components in those processes. PMID:25610811

  9. Molecular Chaperones as Rational Drug Targets for Parkinson’s Disease Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, S.K.; Kalia, L.V.; McLean, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is caused, in part, by the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta of the basal ganglia. The presence of intracellular protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, within the surviving nigral neurons is the defining neuropathological feature of the disease. Accordingly, the identification of specific genes mutated in families with Parkinson’s disease and of genetic susceptibility variants for idiopathic Parkinson’s disease has implicated abnormalities in proteostasis, or the handling and elimination of misfolded proteins, in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Protein folding and the refolding of misfolded proteins are regulated by a network of interactive molecules, known as the chaperone system, which is composed of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. The chaperone system is intimately associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway which are responsible for elimination of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition to their role in proteostasis, some chaperone molecules are involved in the regulation of cell death pathways. Here we review the role of the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, and the co-chaperones Hsp40, BAG family members such as BAG5, CHIP and Hip in modulating neuronal death with a focus on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. We also review current progress in preclinical studies aimed at targetting the chaperone system to prevent neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss potential future chaperone-based therapeutics for the symptomatic treatment and possible disease modification of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:20942788

  10. The neurodegenerative-disease-related protein sacsin is a molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John F; Siller, Efrain; Barral, José M

    2011-08-26

    Various human neurodegenerative disorders are associated with processes that involve misfolding of polypeptide chains. These so-called protein misfolding disorders include Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and an increasing number of inherited syndromes that affect neurons involved in motor control circuits throughout the central nervous system. The reasons behind the particular susceptibility of neurons to misfolded proteins are currently not known. The main function of a class of proteins known as molecular chaperones is to prevent protein misfolding and aggregation. Although neuronal cells contain the major known classes of molecular chaperones, central-nervous-system-specific chaperones that maintain the neuronal proteome free from misfolded proteins are not well defined. In this study, we assign a novel molecular chaperone activity to the protein sacsin responsible for autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, a degenerative disorder of the cerebellum and spinal cord. Using purified components, we demonstrate that a region of sacsin that contains a segment with homology to the molecular chaperone Hsp90 is able to enhance the refolding efficiency of the model client protein firefly luciferase. We show that this region of sacsin is highly capable of maintaining client polypeptides in soluble folding-competent states. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sacsin can efficiently cooperate with members of the Hsp70 chaperone family to increase the yields of correctly folded client proteins. Thus, we have identified a novel chaperone directly involved in a human neurodegenerative disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chaperones and chaperone-substrate complexes: Dynamic playgrounds for NMR spectroscopists.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Björn M; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The majority of proteins depend on a well-defined three-dimensional structure to obtain their functionality. In the cellular environment, the process of protein folding is guided by molecular chaperones to avoid misfolding, aggregation, and the generation of toxic species. To this end, living cells contain complex networks of molecular chaperones, which interact with substrate polypeptides by a multitude of different functionalities: transport them towards a target location, help them fold, unfold misfolded species, resolve aggregates, or deliver them towards a proteolysis machinery. Despite the availability of high-resolution crystal structures of many important chaperones in their substrate-free apo forms, structural information about how substrates are bound by chaperones and how they are protected from misfolding and aggregation is very sparse. This lack of information arises from the highly dynamic nature of chaperone-substrate complexes, which so far has largely hindered their crystallization. This highly dynamic nature makes chaperone-substrate complexes good targets for NMR spectroscopy. Here, we review the results achieved by NMR spectroscopy to understand chaperone function in general and details of chaperone-substrate interactions in particular. We assess the information content and applicability of different NMR techniques for the characterization of chaperones and chaperone-substrate complexes. Finally, we highlight three recent studies, which have provided structural descriptions of chaperone-substrate complexes at atomic resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. RNA Chaperones Step Out of Hfq's Shadow.

    PubMed

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Glover, J N Mark; Charpentier, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    The stability and function of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) often require a specialized RNA-binding protein called an RNA chaperone. Recent findings show that proteins containing a ProQ/FinO domain constitute a new class of RNA chaperones that could play key roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation throughout bacterial species.

  13. Artemin as an efficient molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Shahangian, S Shirin; Rasti, Behnam; Sajedi, Reza H; Khodarahmi, Reza; Taghdir, Majid; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2011-12-01

    Artemin is an abundant thermostable protein in Artemia encysted embryos under stress. It is considered as a stress protein, as its highly regulated expression is associated with stress resistance in this crustacea. In the present study, artemin has been shown to be a potent molecular chaperone with high efficacy. Artemin is capable of inhibiting the chemical aggregation of proteins such as carbonic anhydrase (CA) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at unique molar ratios of chaperone to substrates (1:40 and 1:26 for CA and HRP, respectively). Furthermore, it can also enhance refolding yield of these substrates by nearly 50%. The refolding promotion of CA is checked and verified through a sensitive fluorimetric technique. Based on these experiments, artemin showed higher chaperone activity than other chaperones. The evaluation of artemin surface using ANS showed it to be highly hydrophobic, probably resulting in its high efficacy. These results suggest that artemin can be considered a novel low molecular weight chaperone.

  14. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  15. Molecular chaperones: guardians of the proteome in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Wilson; Lee, Sukyeong; Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Tsai, Francis T F

    2015-01-01

    Proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure in order to gain functional activity, or must they? An ever-increasing number of intrinsically disordered proteins and amyloid-forming polypeptides challenge this dogma. While molecular chaperones and proteases are traditionally associated with protein quality control inside the cell, it is now apparent that molecular chaperones not only promote protein folding in the "forward" direction by facilitating folding and preventing misfolding and aggregation, but also facilitate protein unfolding and even disaggregation resulting in the recovery of functional protein from aggregates. Here, we review our current understanding of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones that harness the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to fuel their chaperone functions. An emerging theme is that most of these chaperones do not work alone, but instead function together with other chaperone systems to maintain the proteome. Hence, molecular chaperones are the major component of the proteostasis network that guards and protects the proteome from damage. Furthermore, while a decline of this network is detrimental to cell and organismal health, a controlled perturbation of the proteostasis network may offer new therapeutic avenues against human diseases.

  16. RRNA and dnaK relationships of Bradyrhizobium sp. nodule bacteria from four papilionoid legume trees in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew A

    2004-05-01

    Enzyme electrophoresis and sequencing of rRNA and dnaK genes revealed high genetic diversity among root nodule bacteria from the Costa Rican trees Andira inermis, Dalbergia retusa, Platymiscium pinnatum (Papilionoideae tribe Dalbergieae) and Lonchocarpus atropurpureus (Papilionoideae tribe Millettieae). A total of 21 distinct multilocus genotypes [ETs (electrophoretic types)] was found among the 36 isolates analyzed, and no ETs were shared in common by isolates from different legume hosts. However, three of the ETs from D. retusa were identical to Bradyrhizobium sp. isolates detected in prior studies of several other legume genera in both Costa Rica and Panama. Nearly full-length 16S rRNA sequences and partial 23S rRNA sequences confirmed that two isolates from D. retusa were highly similar or identical to Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from the legumes Erythrina and Clitoria (Papilionoideae tribe Phaseoleae) in Panama. rRNA sequences for five isolates from L. atropurpureus, P. pinnatum and A. inermis were not closely related to any currently known strains from Central America or elsewhere, but had affinities to the reference strains Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 (three isolates) or to B. elkanii USDA 76 (two isolates). A phylogenetic tree for 21 Bradyrhizobium strains based on 603 bp of the dnaK gene showed several significant conflicts with the rRNA tree, suggesting that genealogical relationships may have been altered by lateral gene transfer events.

  17. Structure of AscE and induced burial regions in AscE and AscG upon formation of the chaperone needle-subunit complex of type III secretion system in Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yih Wan; Yu, Hong Bing; Leung, Ka Yin; Sivaraman, J.; Mok, Yu-Keung

    2008-01-01

    In the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila, the putative needle complex subunit AscF requires both putative chaperones AscE and AscG for formation of a ternary complex to avoid premature assembly. Here we report the crystal structure of AscE at 2.7 Å resolution and the mapping of buried regions of AscE, AscG, and AscF in the AscEG and AscEFG complexes using limited protease digestion. The dimeric AscE is comprised of two helix–turn–helix monomers packed in an antiparallel fashion. The N-terminal 13 residues of AscE are buried only upon binding with AscG, but this region is found to be nonessential for the interaction. AscE functions as a monomer and can be coexpressed with AscG or with both AscG and AscF to form soluble complexes. The AscE binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is identified to be within the N-terminal 61 residues of AscG. The exposed C-terminal substrate-binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is induced to be buried only upon binding to AscF. However, the N-terminal 52 residues of AscF remain exposed even in the ternary AscEFG complex. On the other hand, the 35-residue C-terminal region of AscF in the complex is resistant to protease digestion in the AscEFG complex. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that two C-terminal hydrophobic residues, Ile83 and Leu84, of AscF are essential for chaperone binding. PMID:18662905

  18. Evolution of the Chaperone/Usher Assembly Pathway: Fimbrial Classification Goes Greek†

    PubMed Central

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Many Proteobacteria use the chaperone/usher pathway to assemble proteinaceous filaments on the bacterial surface. These filaments can curl into fimbrial or nonfimbrial surface structures (e.g., a capsule or spore coat). This article reviews the phylogeny of operons belonging to the chaperone/usher assembly class to explore the utility of establishing a scheme for subdividing them into clades of phylogenetically related gene clusters. Based on usher amino acid sequence comparisons, our analysis shows that the chaperone/usher assembly class is subdivided into six major phylogenetic clades, which we have termed α-, β-, γ-, κ-, π-, and σ-fimbriae. Members of each clade share related operon structures and encode fimbrial subunits with similar protein domains. The proposed classification system offers a simple and convenient method for assigning newly discovered chaperone/usher systems to one of the six major phylogenetic groups. PMID:18063717

  19. Localization of the chaperone binding site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis derived from models of the multi-oligomeric chaperone complex suggests that partially denatured proteins bind in a central cavity in the aggregate. To test this hypothesis, the molecular chaperone, alpha crystallin, was bound to partially denatured forms of gamma crystallin, and the binding site was visualized by immunogold localization. In an alternative approach, gold particles were directly complexed with gamma crystallin, followed by binding to the alpha crystallin aggregate. In both cases, binding was localized to the central region of the aggregate, confirming for the first time that partially denatured proteins do indeed bind to a central region of the molecular chaperone aggregate.

  20. Activity of levofloxacin alone and in combination with a DnaK inhibitor against gram-negative rods, including levofloxacin-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-02-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of > or =4 microg/ml).

  1. Cooperative Subunit Refolding of a Light-Harvesting Protein through a Self-Chaperone Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Laos, Alistair J; Dean, Jacob C; Toa, Zi S D; Wilk, Krystyna E; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-27

    The fold of a protein is encoded by its amino acid sequence, but how complex multimeric proteins fold and assemble into functional quaternary structures remains unclear. Here we show that two structurally different phycobiliproteins refold and reassemble in a cooperative manner from their unfolded polypeptide subunits, without biological chaperones. Refolding was confirmed by ultrafast broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to probe internal chromophores as a marker of quaternary structure. Our results demonstrate a cooperative, self-chaperone refolding mechanism, whereby the β-subunits independently refold, thereby templating the folding of the α-subunits, which then chaperone the assembly of the native complex, quantitatively returning all coherences. Our results indicate that subunit self-chaperoning is a robust mechanism for heteromeric protein folding and assembly that could also be applied in self-assembled synthetic hierarchical systems.

  2. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  3. Rab-αGDI activity is regulated by a Hsp90 chaperone complex

    PubMed Central

    Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Meerlo, Timo; Matteson, Jeanne; Plutner, Helen; Balch, William E.

    2002-01-01

    The Rab-specific αGDP-dissociation inhibitor (αGDI) regulates the recycling of Rab GTPases. We have now identified a novel αGDI complex from synaptic membranes that contains three chaperone components: Hsp90, Hsc70 and cysteine string protein (CSP). We find that the αGDI–chaperone complex is dissociated in response to Ca2+-induced neurotransmitter release, that chaperone complex dissociation is sensitive to the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) and that GA inhibits the ability of αGDI to recycle Rab3A during neurotransmitter release. We propose that αGDI interacts with a specialized membrane-associated Rab recycling Hsp90 chaperone system on the vesicle membrane to coordinate the Ca2+-dependent events triggering Rab-GTP hydrolysis with retrieval of Rab-GDP to the cytosol. PMID:12426384

  4. Rab-alphaGDI activity is regulated by a Hsp90 chaperone complex.

    PubMed

    Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Meerlo, Timo; Matteson, Jeanne; Plutner, Helen; Balch, William E

    2002-11-15

    The Rab-specific alphaGDP-dissociation inhibitor (alphaGDI) regulates the recycling of Rab GTPases. We have now identified a novel alphaGDI complex from synaptic membranes that contains three chaperone components: Hsp90, Hsc70 and cysteine string protein (CSP). We find that the alphaGDI-chaperone complex is dissociated in response to Ca(2+)-induced neurotransmitter release, that chaperone complex dissociation is sensitive to the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) and that GA inhibits the ability of alphaGDI to recycle Rab3A during neurotransmitter release. We propose that alphaGDI interacts with a specialized membrane-associated Rab recycling Hsp90 chaperone system on the vesicle membrane to coordinate the Ca(2+)-dependent events triggering Rab-GTP hydrolysis with retrieval of Rab-GDP to the cytosol.

  5. Dissecting functional similarities of ribosome-associated chaperones from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Thomas; Hundley, Heather A; Pfund, Chris; Wegrzyn, Renee D; Walter, William; Kramer, Günter; Kim, So-Young; Craig, Elizabeth A; Deuerling, Elke

    2005-07-01

    Ribosome-tethered chaperones that interact with nascent polypeptide chains have been identified in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. However, these ribosome-associated chaperones share no sequence similarity: bacterial trigger factors (TF) form an independent protein family while the yeast machinery is Hsp70-based. The absence of any component of the yeast machinery results in slow growth at low temperatures and sensitivity to aminoglycoside protein synthesis inhibitors. After establishing that yeast ribosomal protein Rpl25 is able to recruit TF to ribosomes when expressed in place of its Escherichia coli homologue L23, the ribosomal TF tether, we tested whether such divergent ribosome-associated chaperones are functionally interchangeable. E. coli TF was expressed in yeast cells that lacked the endogenous ribosome-bound machinery. TF associated with yeast ribosomes, cross-linked to yeast nascent polypeptides and partially complemented the aminoglycoside sensitivity, demonstrating that ribosome-associated chaperones from divergent organisms share common functions, despite their lack of sequence similarity.

  6. Quality control of a cytoplasmic protein complex: chaperone motors and the ubiquitin-proteasome system govern the fate of orphan fatty acid synthase subunit Fas2 of yeast.

    PubMed

    Scazzari, Mario; Amm, Ingo; Wolf, Dieter H

    2015-02-20

    For the assembly of protein complexes in the cell, the presence of stoichiometric amounts of the respective protein subunits is of utmost importance. A surplus of any of the subunits may trigger unspecific and harmful protein interactions and has to be avoided. A stoichiometric amount of subunits must finally be reached via transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational regulation. Synthesis of saturated 16 and 18 carbon fatty acids is carried out by fatty acid synthase: in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 2.6-MDa molecular mass assembly containing six protomers each of two different subunits, Fas1 (β) and Fas2 (α). The (α)6(β)6 complex carries six copies of all eight enzymatic activities required for fatty acid synthesis. The FAS1 and FAS2 genes in yeast are unlinked and map on two different chromosomes. Here we study the fate of the α-subunit of the complex, Fas2, when its partner, the β-subunit Fas1, is absent. Individual subunits of fatty acid synthase are proteolytically degraded when the respective partner is missing. Elimination of Fas2 is achieved by the proteasome. Here we show that a ubiquitin transfer machinery is required for Fas2 elimination. The major ubiquitin ligase targeting the superfluous Fas2 subunit to the proteasome is Ubr1. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc2 and Ubc4 assist the degradation process. The AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1 are crucially involved in the elimination of Fas2. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The RavA-ViaA Chaperone-Like System Interacts with and Modulates the Activity of the Fumarate Reductase Respiratory Complex.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keith S; Bhandari, Vaibhav; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Houry, Walid A

    2017-01-20

    Regulatory ATPase variant A (RavA) is a MoxR AAA+ protein that functions together with a partner protein that we termed VWA interacting with AAA+ ATPase (ViaA) containing a von Willebrand Factor A domain. However, the functional role of RavA-ViaA in the cell is not yet well established. Here, we show that RavA-ViaA are functionally associated with anaerobic respiration in Escherichia coli through interactions with the fumarate reductase (Frd) electron transport complex. Expression analysis of ravA and viaA genes showed that both proteins are co-expressed with multiple anaerobic respiratory genes, many of which are regulated by the anaerobic transcriptional regulator Fnr. Consistently, the expression of both ravA and viaA was found to be dependent on Fnr in cells grown under oxygen-limiting condition. ViaA was found to physically interact with FrdA, the flavin-containing subunit of the Frd complex. Both RavA and the Fe-S-containing subunit of the Frd complex, FrdB, regulate this interaction. Importantly, Frd activity was observed to increase in the absence of RavA and ViaA. This indicates that RavA and ViaA modulate the activity of the Frd complex, signifying a potential regulatory chaperone-like function for RavA-ViaA during bacterial anaerobic respiration with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gut microbiota imbalance and chaperoning system malfunction are central to ulcerative colitis pathogenesis and can be counteracted with specifically designed probiotics: a working hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Maurizio; Tomasello, Giovanni; Romeo, Marcello; Damiani, Provvidenza; Lo Monte, Attilio I; Lozio, Luciano; Campanella, Claudia; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rappa, Francesca; Zummo, Giovanni; Cocchi, Massimo; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we propose that for further studies of the physiopathology and treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases, an integral view of the conditions, including the triad of microbiota-heat shock proteins (HSPs)-probiotics, ought to be considered. Microbiota is the complex microbial flora that resides in the gut, affecting not only gut functions but also the health status of the whole body. Alteration in the microbiota's composition has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions (e.g., ulcerative colitis, UC), involving both gut and extra-intestinal tissues and organs. Some of these pathologies are also associated with an altered expression of HSPs (chaperones) and this is the reason why they may be considered chaperonopathies. Probiotics, which are live microorganisms able to restore the correct, healthy equilibrium of microbiota composition, can ameliorate symptoms in patients suffering from UC and modulate expression levels of HSPs. However, currently probiotic therapy follows ex-adiuvantibus criteria, i.e., treatments with beneficial effects but whose mechanism of action is unknown, which should be changed so the probiotics needed in each case are predetermined on the basis of the patient's microbiota. Consequently, efforts are necessary to develop diagnostic tools for elucidating levels and distribution of HSPs and the microbiota composition (microbiota fingerprint) of each subject and, thus, guide specific probiotic therapy, tailored to meet the needs of the patient. Microbiota fingerprinting ought to include molecular biology techniques for sequencing highly conserved DNA, e.g., genes encoding 16S RNA, for species identification and, in addition, quantification of each relevant microbe.

  9. Discontinuous Occurrence of the hsp70 (dnaK) Gene among Archaea and Sequence Features of HSP70 Suggest a Novel Outlook on Phylogenies Inferred from This Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gribaldo, Simonetta; Lumia, Valentina; Creti, Roberta; Conway de Macario, Everly; Sanangelantoni, Annamaria; Cammarano, Piero

    1999-01-01

    Occurrence of the hsp70 (dnaK) gene was investigated in various members of the domain Archaea comprising both euryarchaeotes and crenarchaeotes and in the hyperthermophilic bacteria Aquifex pyrophilus and Thermotoga maritima representing the deepest offshoots in phylogenetic trees of bacterial 16S rRNA sequences. The gene was not detected in 8 of 10 archaea examined but was found in A. pyrophilus and T. maritima, from which it was cloned and sequenced. Comparative analyses of the HSP70 amino acid sequences encoded in these genes, and others in the databases, showed that (i) in accordance with the vicinities seen in rRNA-based trees, the proteins from A. pyrophilus and T. maritima form a thermophilic cluster with that from the green nonsulfur bacterium Thermomicrobium roseum and are unrelated to their counterparts from gram-positive bacteria, proteobacteria/mitochondria, chlamydiae/spirochetes, deinococci, and cyanobacteria/chloroplasts; (ii) the T. maritima HSP70 clusters with the homologues from the archaea Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Thermoplasma acidophilum, in contrast to the postulated unique kinship between archaea and gram-positive bacteria; and (iii) there are exceptions to the reported association between an insert in HSP70 and gram negativity, or vice versa, absence of insert and gram positivity. Notably, the HSP70 from T. maritima lacks the insert, although T. maritima is phylogenetically unrelated to the gram-positive bacteria. These results, along with the absence of hsp70 (dnaK) in various archaea and its presence in others, suggest that (i) different taxa retained either one or the other of two hsp70 (dnaK) versions (with or without insert), regardless of phylogenetic position; and (ii) archaea are aboriginally devoid of hsp70 (dnaK), and those that have it must have received it from phylogenetically diverse bacteria via lateral gene transfer events that did not involve replacement of an endogenous hsp70 (dnaK) gene. PMID:9882656

  10. Review: Beta-thalassemia and molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Sumera, Afshan; Radhakrishnan, Ammu; Baba, Abdul Aziz; George, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Thalassemia is known as a diverse single gene disorder, which is prevalent worldwide. The molecular chaperones are set of proteins that help in two important processes while protein synthesis and degradation include folding or unfolding and assembly or disassembly, thereby helping in cell homeostasis. This review recaps current knowledge regarding the role of molecular chaperones in thalassemia, with a focus on beta thalassemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural mechanisms of chaperone mediated protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The ClpB/Hsp104 and Hsp70 classes of molecular chaperones use ATP hydrolysis to dissociate protein aggregates and complexes, and to move proteins through membranes. ClpB/Hsp104 are members of the AAA+ family of proteins which form ring-shaped hexamers. Loops lining the pore in the ring engage substrate proteins as extended polypeptides. Interdomain rotations and conformational changes in these loops coupled to ATP hydrolysis unfold and pull proteins through the pore. This provides a mechanism that progressively disrupts local secondary and tertiary structure in substrates, allowing these chaperones to dissociate stable aggregates such as β-sheet rich prions or coiled coil SNARE complexes. While the ClpB/Hsp104 mechanism appears to embody a true power-stroke in which an ATP powered conformational change in one protein is directly coupled to movement or structural change in another, the mechanism of force generation by Hsp70s is distinct and less well understood. Both active power-stroke and purely passive mechanisms in which Hsp70 captures spontaneous fluctuations in a substrate have been proposed, while a third proposed mechanism—entropic pulling—may be able to generate forces larger than seen in ATP-driven molecular motors without the conformational coupling required for a power-stroke. The disaggregase activity of these chaperones is required for thermotolerance, but unrestrained protein complex/aggregate dissociation is potentially detrimental. Disaggregating chaperones are strongly auto-repressed, and are regulated by co-chaperones which recruit them to protein substrates and activate the disaggregases via mechanisms involving either sequential transfer of substrate from one chaperone to another and/or simultaneous interaction of substrate with multiple chaperones. By effectively subjecting substrates to multiple levels of selection by multiple chaperones, this may insure that these potent disaggregases are only activated in the appropriate context. PMID

  12. Molecular chaperones: functional mechanisms and nanotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario Fernández-Fernández, M.; Sot, Begoña; María Valpuesta, José

    2016-08-01

    Molecular chaperones are a group of proteins that assist in protein homeostasis. They not only prevent protein misfolding and aggregation, but also target misfolded proteins for degradation. Despite differences in structure, all types of chaperones share a common general feature, a surface that recognizes and interacts with the misfolded protein. This and other, more specialized properties can be adapted for various nanotechnological purposes, by modification of the original biomolecules or by de novo design based on artificial structures.

  13. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  14. Mammalian Fe-S proteins: definition of a consensus motif recognized by the co-chaperone HSC20

    PubMed Central

    Maio, N.; Rouault, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are inorganic cofactors that are fundamental to several biological processes in all three kingdoms of life. In most organisms, Fe-S clusters are initially assembled on a scaffold protein, ISCU, and subsequently transferred to target proteins or to intermediate carriers by a dedicated chaperone/co-chaperone system. The delivery of assembled Fe-S clusters to recipient proteins is a crucial step in the biogenesis of Fe-S proteins, and, in mammals, it relies on the activity of a multiprotein transfer complex that contains the chaperone HSPA9, the co-chaperone HSC20 and the scaffold ISCU. How the transfer complex efficiently engages recipient Fe-S target proteins involves specific protein interactions that are not fully understood. This mini review focuses on recent insights into the molecular mechanism of amino acid motif recognition and discrimination by the co-chaperone HSC20, which guides Fe-S cluster delivery. PMID:27714045

  15. Molecular Chaperones in Parkinson’s Disease – Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Wahlster, Lara; McLean, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease, like many other neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by the progressive accumulation of pathogenic protein species and the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies. The cascade by which the small synaptic protein α-synuclein misfolds to form distinctive protein aggregates, termed Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, has been the subject of intensive research for more than a decade. Genetic and pathological studies in Parkinson’s disease patients as well as experimental studies in disease models have clearly established altered protein metabolism as a key element in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Alterations in protein metabolism include misfolding and aggregation, post-translational modification and dysfunctional degradation of cytotoxic protein species. Protein folding and re-folding are both mediated by a highly conserved network of molecules, called molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. In addition to the regulatory role in protein folding, molecular chaperone function is intimately associated with pathways of protein degradation, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, to effectively remove irreversibly misfolded proteins. Because of the central role of molecular chaperones in maintaining protein homeostasis, we herein review our current knowledge on the involvement of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones in Parkinson’s disease. We further discuss the capacity of molecular chaperones to prevent or modulate neurodegeneration, an important concept for future neuroprotective strategies and summarize the current progress in preclinical studies in models of Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Finally we include a discussion on the future potential of using molecular chaperones as a disease modifying therapy. PMID:22279517

  16. Structural insights into the chaperone activity of the 40-kDa heat shock protein DnaJ: binding and remodeling of a native substrate.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Jorge; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Muga, Arturo; Valpuesta, José María; Moro, Fernando

    2013-05-24

    Hsp40 chaperones bind and transfer substrate proteins to Hsp70s and regulate their ATPase activity. The interaction of Hsp40s with native proteins modifies their structure and function. A good model for this function is DnaJ, the bacterial Hsp40 that interacts with RepE, the repressor/activator of plasmid F replication, and together with DnaK regulates its function. We characterize here the structure of the DnaJ-RepE complex by electron microscopy, the first described structure of a complex between an Hsp40 and a client protein. The comparison of the complexes of DnaJ with two RepE mutants reveals an intrinsic plasticity of the DnaJ dimer that allows the chaperone to adapt to different substrates. We also show that DnaJ induces conformational changes in dimeric RepE, which increase the intermonomeric distance and remodel both RepE domains enhancing its affinity for DNA.

  17. Alleviation of deleterious effects of protein mutation through inactivation of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Tomala, Katarzyna; Korona, Ryszard

    2008-11-01

    Molecular chaperones recognize and bind destabilized proteins. This can be especially important for proteins whose stability is reduced by mutations. We focused our study on a major chaperone system, RAC-Ssb, which assists folding of newly synthesized polypeptides in the yeast cytosol. A sensitive phenotypic assay, the red color of Ade2 mutants, was used to screen for variants with metabolic activity dependent on RAC-Ssb. None of the Ade2 mutants were found to exhibit lower metabolic activity after inactivation of RAC-Ssb. In order to explicitly test the relationship between protein instability and activity of chaperones, a series of temperature sensitive Ade2 mutants were tested in the presence or absence of RAC-Ssb. The growth of Ade2(ts) mutants at elevated temperatures was enhanced if chaperones were missing. Similar pattern was found for thermally sensitive mutants of several other genes. Because RAC-Ssb normally supports the folding of proteins, it appears paradoxical that catabolic activity of mutants is reduced when these chaperones are present. We suggest that under non-stressful conditions, molecular chaperones are tuned to support folding of native proteins, but not that of mutated ones.

  18. Keep your heart in shape: molecular chaperone networks for treating heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tarone, Guido; Brancaccio, Mara

    2014-06-01

    Despite major advances in the treatment of cardiac diseases, there is still a great need for drugs capable of counteracting the deterioration of cardiac muscle function in congestive heart failure. The role of misfolded protein accumulation as a causal event in the physiopathology of common cardiac diseases is an important emerging concept. Indeed, diverse stress conditions, including mechanical stretching and oxidative stress, can induce misfolded protein accumulation, causing cardiomyocyte death. Cells react to these stress conditions by activating molecular chaperones, a class of proteins that represents an endogenous salvage machinery, essential for rescuing physiological cell functions and sustaining cell survival. Chaperones, also known as heat shock proteins (Hsps), prevent accumulation of damaged proteins by promoting either their refolding or degradation via the proteasome or the autophagosome systems. In addition, molecular chaperones play a key role in intracellular signalling by controlling conformational changes required for activation/deactivation of signalling proteins, and their assembly in specific signalosome complexes. The key role of molecular chaperones in heart function is highlighted by the fact that a number of genetic mutations in chaperone proteins result in different forms of cardiomyopathies. Moreover, a considerable amount of experimental evidence indicates that increasing expression of chaperone proteins leads to an important cardio-protective role in ischaemia/reperfusion injury, heart failure, and arrhythmia, implicating these molecules as potential innovative therapeutic agents. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Conformational dynamics of a membrane protein chaperone enables spatially regulated substrate capture and release

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Kroon, Gerard; McAvoy, Camille Z.; Chi, Chris; Wright, Peter E.; Shan, Shu-ou

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein biogenesis poses enormous challenges to cellular protein homeostasis and requires effective molecular chaperones. Compared with chaperones that promote soluble protein folding, membrane protein chaperones require tight spatiotemporal coordination of their substrate binding and release cycles. Here we define the chaperone cycle for cpSRP43, which protects the largest family of membrane proteins, the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins (LHCPs), during their delivery. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that cpSRP43 samples three distinct conformations. The stromal factor cpSRP54 drives cpSRP43 to the active state, allowing it to tightly bind substrate in the aqueous compartment. Bidentate interactions with the Alb3 translocase drive cpSRP43 to a partially inactive state, triggering selective release of LHCP’s transmembrane domains in a productive unloading complex at the membrane. Our work demonstrates how the intrinsic conformational dynamics of a chaperone enables spatially coordinated substrate capture and release, which may be general to other ATP-independent chaperone systems. PMID:26951662

  20. The many roles of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones in tumour biology.

    PubMed

    Durech, M; Vojtesek, B; Muller, P

    2012-01-01

    Molecular chaperones (heat-shock proteins, Hsps) are proteins that maintain intracellular homeostasis through folding and stabilisation of the conformation of other proteins. Molecular chaperones are critical for survival of cells that undergo cellular stress due to their ability to guard the proteome against misfolded proteins and aggregation. In addition to their canonical role in basic cellular homeostasis and protection against external stress, several molecular chaperones play a fundamental role in malignant cell transformation. The level of molecular chaperones is increased in many solid tumours and haematological malignancies. The increased activity of Hsps in cancer cells reflects the ability of chaperones to compensate for stress caused by hypoxia, increased protein turnover and the presence of numerous mutated and potentially unstable proteins. In addition, chaperones allow tumour cells to tolerate genetic alterations by stabilising tertiary structure of mutated unstable proteins - typically oncoproteins that would otherwise be lethal. From this perspective, chaperones mediate the phenotypic expression of oncogenic mutations and contribute to all the hallmarks of cancer cells. Due to their indispensable roles for cancer cells, chaperones became an attractive group of targets for novel cancer therapies affecting several essential oncogenic pathways simultaneously.

  1. Supercharging Chaperones: A Meeting Toolkit for Maximizing Learning for Youth and Chaperones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Trip and conference chaperones are a wonderful resource in youth development programs. These well-intended volunteers, many parents of youth participating in the event, want the best experience for the youth but are not necessarily trained in positive youth development. A consequence of this circumstance is that not all chaperones provide the best…

  2. Supercharging Chaperones: A Meeting Toolkit for Maximizing Learning for Youth and Chaperones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Trip and conference chaperones are a wonderful resource in youth development programs. These well-intended volunteers, many parents of youth participating in the event, want the best experience for the youth but are not necessarily trained in positive youth development. A consequence of this circumstance is that not all chaperones provide the best…

  3. Generalized iterative annealing model for the action of RNA chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of the rugged landscape of RNA molecules their folding is described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism according to which only a small fraction (ϕF) reaches the folded state while the remaining fraction of molecules is kinetically trapped in misfolded intermediates. The transition from the misfolded states to the native state can far exceed biologically relevant time. Thus, RNA folding in vivo is often aided by protein cofactors, called RNA chaperones, that can rescue RNAs from a multitude of misfolded structures. We consider two models, based on chemical kinetics and chemical master equation, for describing assisted folding. In the passive model, applicable for class I substrates, transient interactions of misfolded structures with RNA chaperones alone are sufficient to destabilize the misfolded structures, thus entropically lowering the barrier to folding. For this mechanism to be efficient the intermediate ribonucleoprotein complex between collapsed RNA and protein cofactor should have optimal stability. We also introduce an active model (suitable for stringent substrates with small ϕF), which accounts for the recent experimental findings on the action of CYT-19 on the group I intron ribozyme, showing that RNA chaperones do not discriminate between the misfolded and the native states. In the active model, the RNA chaperone system utilizes chemical energy of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to repeatedly bind and release misfolded and folded RNAs, resulting in substantial increase of yield of the native state. The theory outlined here shows, in accord with experiments, that in the steady state the native state does not form with unit probability.

  4. Getting Folded: Chaperone proteins in muscle development, maintenance and disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel A.; Carland, Carmen R.; Guo, Yiming; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2014-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are critical for protein folding and stability, and hence are necessary for normal cellular organization and function. Recent studies have begun to interrogate the role of this specialized class of proteins in muscle biology. During development, chaperone-mediated folding of client proteins enables their integration into nascent sarcomeres. In addition to assisting with muscle differentiation, chaperones play a key role in maintenance of muscle tissues. Further, disruption of the chaperone network can result in neuromuscular disease. In this review, we discuss how chaperones are involved in myofibrillogenesis, sarcomere maintenance and muscle disorders. We also consider the possibilities of therapeutically targeting chaperones to treat muscle disease. PMID:25125177

  5. Progress and potential of non-inhibitory small molecule chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease and its potential implications for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Olive; Patnaik, Samarjit; Marugan, Juan; Sidransky, Ellen; Westbroek, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by pathological mutations GBA1, encodes the lysosome-resident enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which cleaves glucosylceramide into glucose and ceramide. In Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of substrate, primarily in cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. Gaucher disease has broad clinical heterogeneity, and mutations in GBA1 are a risk factor for the development of different synucleinopathies. Insights into the cell biology and biochemistry of glucocerebrosidase have led to new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease including small chemical chaperones. Such chaperones facilitate proper enzyme folding and translocation to lysosomes, thereby preventing premature breakdown of the enzyme in the proteasome. This review discusses recent work developing chemical chaperones as a therapy for Gaucher disease, with implications for the treatment of synucleinopathies. It focuses on the development of non-inhibitory glucocerebrosidase chaperones and their therapeutic advantages over inhibitory chaperones, as well as the challenges involved in identifying and validating chemical chaperones. PMID:27098312

  6. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James CA

    2016-01-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding, where obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone:substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a novel structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed Residual Electron and Anomalous Density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the E. coli chaperone Spy. This study resulted in a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 while bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded and native-like states, and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  7. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; French, Samuel W

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% of the world population or more than 185 million people worldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000 deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is the most common indication for liver transplantation in patients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an enveloped RNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the Flaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cell can be divided into six phases: (1) binding and internalization; (2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3) viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNA genome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) and assembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation) and secretion. Many host factors are involved in the HCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group of host cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerous cellular processes including protein folding, multimeric protein assembly, protein trafficking, and protein degradation. All phases of the viral life cycle require chaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteins with chaperones. This review will present our current knowledge and understanding of the role of chaperones in the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCV infection will provide further insights into viral/host interactions and potential therapeutic targets for both HCV and other viruses. PMID:26783419

  8. Molecular chaperones: toward new therapeutic tools.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Mauro B; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Crespo-López, Maria Elena

    2011-07-01

    Molecular chaperones (or heat shock proteins) are evolutionarily conserved and essential proteins that play a key role in cell survival through cytoprotective mechanisms. Despite their possible clinical applications, the understanding of these structures is still quite limited. The aim of the present study is to review the literature to understand the physiological importance, implication in various diseases (especially in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases), possible applicability, and future prospects of heat shock proteins. The cytoprotective mechanisms of molecular chaperones can be co-opted by oncogenic processes favoring tumor growth, invasion, evasion of apoptosis, and metastasis, thus making inhibitors to these molecules possible therapeutic options for cancer patients. However, there is also evidence showing that upregulation of heat shock proteins can have an antineoplastic effect through immunomodulatory activity. This is why chaperones have already been investigated for conventional chemotherapy under specific conditions, yielding interesting results. The induction of heat shock protein activity is also of potential benefit in many other diseases where structural and functional preservation of proteins may enhance cell survival, including neurodegeneration, trauma, stroke, and cardiovascular disease. In addition, the immune properties of chaperones can potentially be exploited for such diseases as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and other chronic inflammatory conditions. Thus, continuing efforts to clarify the role of chaperones may guide the development of new therapeutic modalities capable of minimizing the impact of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes as well as obtaining better results in neurological conditions currently lacking alternative treatments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Blamowska, Marta; Neupert, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Chaperones mediate protein folding and prevent deleterious protein aggregation in the cell. However, little is known about the biogenesis of chaperones themselves. In this study, we report on the biogenesis of the yeast mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) chaperone, which is essential for the functionality of mitochondria. We show in vivo and in organello that mtHsp70 rapidly folds after its import into mitochondria, with its ATPase domain and peptide-binding domain (PBD) adopting their structures independently of each other. Importantly, folding of the ATPase domain but not of the PBD was severely affected in the absence of the Hsp70 escort protein, Hep1. We reconstituted the folding of mtHsp70, demonstrating that Hep1 and ATP/ADP were required and sufficient for its de novo folding. Our data show that Hep1 bound to a folding intermediate of mtHsp70. Binding of an adenine nucleotide triggered release of Hep1 and folding of the intermediate into native mtHsp70. Thus, Hep1 acts as a specialized chaperone mediating the de novo folding of an Hsp70 chaperone. PMID:23007651

  10. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  11. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lackie, Rachel E.; Maciejewski, Andrzej; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Marques-Lopes, Jose; Choy, Wing-Yiu; Duennwald, Martin L.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide—either soluble (oligomers) or insoluble (plaques) and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degradation, mostly by the proteasome. They form an important line of defense against misfolded proteins and are part of the cellular quality control system. The heat shock protein (Hsp) family, particularly Hsp70 and Hsp90, plays a major part in this process and it is well-known to regulate protein misfolding in a variety of diseases, including tau levels and toxicity in AD. However, the role of Hsp90 in regulating protein misfolding is not yet fully understood. For example, knockdown of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Aβ misfolding leads to increased toxicity. On the other hand, the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in AD mouse models reduces Aβ toxicity, and normalizes synaptic function. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1), an intracellular co-chaperone, mediates the transfer of clients from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Importantly, STI1 has been shown to regulate aggregation of amyloid-like proteins in yeast. In addition to its intracellular function, STI1 can be secreted by diverse cell types, including astrocytes and microglia and function as a neurotrophic ligand by triggering signaling via the cellular prion protein (PrPC). Extracellular STI1 can prevent Aβ toxic signaling by (i) interfering with Aβ binding to PrPC and (ii) triggering pro-survival signaling cascades. Interestingly, decreased levels of STI1 in C. elegans can also increase toxicity in an amyloid model. In this review, we will discuss the role of intracellular and extracellular STI1 and the

  12. Chaperones of F[subscript 1]-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, Anthony; Brunzelle, Joseph; Pribyl, Thomas; Xu, Xingjue; Gatti, Domenico L.; Ackerman, Sharon H.

    2009-09-25

    Mitochondrial F{sub 1}-ATPase contains a hexamer of alternating {alpha} and {beta} subunits. The assembly of this structure requires two specialized chaperones, Atp11p and Atp12p, that bind transiently to {beta} and {alpha}. In the absence of Atp11p and Atp12p, the hexamer is not formed, and {alpha} and {beta} precipitate as large insoluble aggregates. An early model for the mechanism of chaperone-mediated F{sub 1} assembly (Wang, Z. G., Sheluho, D., Gatti, D. L., and Ackerman, S. H. (2000) EMBO J. 19, 1486--1493) hypothesized that the chaperones themselves look very much like the {alpha} and {beta} subunits, and proposed an exchange of Atp11p for {alpha} and of Atp12p for {beta}; the driving force for the exchange was expected to be a higher affinity of {alpha} and {beta} for each other than for the respective chaperone partners. One important feature of this model was the prediction that as long as Atp11p is bound to {beta} and Atp12p is bound to {alpha}, the two F{sub 1} subunits cannot interact at either the catalytic site or the noncatalytic site interface. Here we present the structures of Atp11p from Candida glabrata and Atp12p from Paracoccus denitrificans, and we show that some features of the Wang model are correct, namely that binding of the chaperones to {alpha} and {beta} prevents further interactions between these F1 subunits. However, Atp11p and Atp12p do not resemble {alpha} or {beta}, and it is instead the F{sub 1} {gamma} subunit that initiates the release of the chaperones from {alpha} and {beta} and their further assembly into the mature complex.

  13. Detection of humoral response using a recombinant heat shock protein 70, DnaK, of Mycoplasma haemofelis in experimentally and naturally hemoplasma-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Barker, Emily N; Helps, Chris R; Heesom, Kate J; Arthur, Christopher J; Peters, Iain R; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Tasker, Séverine

    2010-12-01

    Hemoplasmas is the trivial name given to a group of erythrocyte-parasitizing bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma. Of the feline hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic, while "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" are less pathogenic. Shotgun libraries of fragmented M. haemofelis genomic DNA were constructed, and random colonies were selected for DNA sequencing. In silico-translated amino acid sequences of putative open reading frames were compared to mass spectrometry data from M. haemofelis protein spots identified as being immunogenic by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Three of the spots matched the predicted sequences of a heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) homolog, elongation factor Ts, and a fragment of phosphoglycerate kinase found during library screening. A full-length copy of the M. haemofelis dnaK gene was cloned into Escherichia coli and recombinantly expressed. Recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK was purified and then used in Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the humoral immune response during acute infection in cats experimentally infected with M. haemofelis, "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum," or "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis". The recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK ELISA also was used to screen clinical samples submitted for hemoplasma PCR testing to a commercial laboratory (n = 254). Experimentally infected cats became seropositive following infection, with a greater and earlier antibody response seen in cats inoculated with M. haemofelis than those seen in cats inoculated with "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum" or "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis," by both Western blotting and ELISA. Of the clinical samples, 31.1% had antibodies detected by the ELISA but only 9.8% were positive by PCR for one or more hemoplasmas.

  14. Activity of Levofloxacin Alone and in Combination with a DnaK Inhibitor against Gram-Negative Rods, Including Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml). PMID:19015359

  15. Detection of Humoral Response Using a Recombinant Heat Shock Protein 70, DnaK, of Mycoplasma haemofelis in Experimentally and Naturally Hemoplasma-Infected Cats▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Emily N.; Helps, Chris R.; Heesom, Kate J.; Arthur, Christopher J.; Peters, Iain R.; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Tasker, Séverine

    2010-01-01

    Hemoplasmas is the trivial name given to a group of erythrocyte-parasitizing bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma. Of the feline hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic, while “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum” and “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis” are less pathogenic. Shotgun libraries of fragmented M. haemofelis genomic DNA were constructed, and random colonies were selected for DNA sequencing. In silico-translated amino acid sequences of putative open reading frames were compared to mass spectrometry data from M. haemofelis protein spots identified as being immunogenic by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Three of the spots matched the predicted sequences of a heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) homolog, elongation factor Ts, and a fragment of phosphoglycerate kinase found during library screening. A full-length copy of the M. haemofelis dnaK gene was cloned into Escherichia coli and recombinantly expressed. Recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK was purified and then used in Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the humoral immune response during acute infection in cats experimentally infected with M. haemofelis, “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum,” or “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis”. The recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK ELISA also was used to screen clinical samples submitted for hemoplasma PCR testing to a commercial laboratory (n = 254). Experimentally infected cats became seropositive following infection, with a greater and earlier antibody response seen in cats inoculated with M. haemofelis than those seen in cats inoculated with “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum” or “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis,” by both Western blotting and ELISA. Of the clinical samples, 31.1% had antibodies detected by the ELISA but only 9.8% were positive by PCR for one or more hemoplasmas. PMID:20926695

  16. Yeast prions are useful for studying protein chaperones and protein quality control.

    PubMed

    Masison, Daniel C; Reidy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein chaperones help proteins adopt and maintain native conformations and play vital roles in cellular processes where proteins are partially folded. They comprise a major part of the cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome. Many disorders are caused when proteins misfold despite this protection. Yeast prions are fibrous amyloid aggregates of misfolded proteins. The normal action of chaperones on yeast prions breaks the fibers into pieces, which results in prion replication. Because this process is necessary for propagation of yeast prions, even small differences in activity of many chaperones noticeably affect prion phenotypes. Several other factors involved in protein processing also influence formation, propagation or elimination of prions in yeast. Thus, in much the same way that the dependency of viruses on cellular functions has allowed us to learn much about cell biology, the dependency of yeast prions on chaperones presents a unique and sensitive way to monitor the functions and interactions of many components of the cell's protein quality control system. Our recent work illustrates the utility of this system for identifying and defining chaperone machinery interactions.

  17. Molecular chaperones in lactic acid bacteria: physiological consequences and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Abdullah-Al-Mahin; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2008-10-01

    Recently, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have attracted much attention because of their potential application to probiotics and industrial applications as starters for dairy products or lactic acid fermentation. Additional emphasis is also being paid to them as commensal bacteria in gastrointestinal tract. Since LAB exhibit a stress response, insight into the relationship between stress proteins such as molecular chaperones and stress tolerance or adaptation is increasing gradually along with current research examining these important bacteria. Similar to other bacteria, one of the major stress-response systems in LAB is the expression of molecular chaperones. The recently completed genome sequencing of various LAB strains, combined with the development of advanced molecular techniques, have enabled us to identify molecular chaperones and to understand their regulation systems in response to various stresses. Furthermore, recent biochemical studies provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of LAB chaperone systems. This review highlights the physiological consequences and biochemical properties of molecular chaperones (especially sHsps, Hsp70, and Hsp100) in LAB and their use in biotechnological applications.

  18. Differential capacity of chaperone-rich lysates in cross-presenting human endogenous and exogenous melanoma differentiation antigens.

    PubMed

    Bleifuss, Elke; Bendz, Henriette; Sirch, Birgit; Thompson, Sylvia; Brandl, Anna; Milani, Valeria; Graner, Michael W; Drexler, Ingo; Kuppner, Maria; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Noessner, Elfriede; Issels, Rolf-Dieter

    2008-12-01

    The goal of immune-based tumor therapies is the activation of immune cells reactive against a broad spectrum of tumor-expressed antigens. Vaccines based on chaperone proteins appear promising as these proteins naturally exist as complexes with various protein fragments including those derived from tumor-associated antigens. Multi-chaperone systems are expected to have highest polyvalency as different chaperones can carry distinct sets of antigenic fragments. A free-solution isoelectric focusing (FS-IEF) technique was established to generate chaperone-rich cell lysates (CRCL). Results from murine systems support the contention that CRCL induce superior anti-tumor responses than single chaperone vaccines. We established an in vitro model for human melanoma to evaluate the capacity of CRCL to transfer endogenously expressed tumor antigens to the cross-presentation pathway of dendritic cells (DC) for antigen-specific T cell stimulation. CRCL prepared from human melanoma lines contained the four major chaperone proteins Hsp/Hsc70, Hsp90, Grp94/gp96 and calreticulin. The chaperones within the melanoma cell-derived CRCL were functionally active in that they enhanced cross-presentation of exogenous peptides mixed into the CRCL preparation. Superior activity was observed for Hsp70-rich CRCL obtained from heat-stressed melanoma cells. Despite the presence of active chaperones, melanoma cell-derived CRCL failed to transfer endogenously expressed melanoma-associated antigens to DC for cross-presentation and cytotoxic T cell (CTL) recognition, even after increasing intracellular protein levels of tumor antigen or chaperones. These findings reveal limitations of the CRCL approach regarding cross-presentation of endogenously expressed melanoma-associated antigens. Yet, CRCL may be utilized as vehicles to enhance the delivery of exogenous antigens for DC-mediated cross-presentation and T cell stimulation.

  19. Chaperones get in touch: the Hip-Hop connection.

    PubMed

    Frydman, J; Höhfeld, J

    1997-03-01

    Recent findings emphasize that different molecular chaperones cooperate during intracellular protein biogenesis. Mechanistic aspects of chaperone cooperation are now emerging from studies on the regulation of certain signal transduction pathways mediated by Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the eukaryotic cytosol. Efficient cooperation appears to be achieved through a defined regulation of Hsc70 activity by the chaperone cofactors Hip and Hop.

  20. Chaperone-substrate interactions monitored via a robust TEM-1 β-lactamase fragment complementation assay.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; He, Wei; Li, Tianpeng; Yang, Cuiting; Zhuang, Yingping; Quan, Shu

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the application of the TEM-1 β-lactamase protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) in detecting weak and unstable protein-protein interactions as typically observed during chaperone-assisted protein folding in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. The TEM-1 β-lactamase PCA system effectively captured the interactions of three pairs of chaperones and substrates. Moreover, the strength of the interactions can be quantitatively analyzed by comparing different levels of penicillin resistance, and the assay can be performed under 0.5% butanol, a stress condition thought to be physiologically relevant. The β-lactamase PCA system faithfully reports chaperone-substrate interactions in the bacterial cell envelope, and therefore this system has the potential to map the complex protein homeostasis network under a fluctuating environment.

  1. AmyI-1-18, a cationic α-helical antimicrobial octadecapeptide derived from α-amylase in rice, inhibits the translation and folding processes in a protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Fukuda, Shun; Sato, Teppei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    In our previous study, we used a cell-free rapid translation system (RTS), which is an in vitro protein synthesis system based on Escherichia coli lysate, for evaluating the inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis by pyrrhocoricin. In this study, using an RTS, we evaluated the inhibition of GFP synthesis by AmyI-1-18, an antimicrobial octadecapeptide. We found that, similarly to pyrrhocoricin, AmyI-1-18 inhibited GFP synthesis in the RTS in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the blockage of transcription and translation steps in the RTS was individually estimated using RT-PCR after gene expression to determine the mRNA products and using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the amounts of GFP expressed from purified mRNA, respectively. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of GFP synthesis by AmyI-1-18 did not occur at the transcription step but rather at the translation step. Furthermore, we assessed the inhibition of DnaK-mediated refolding of chemically denatured luciferase by AmyI-1-18; AmyI-1-18 inhibited the protein folding activity of the ATP-dependent DnaK/DnaJ molecular chaperone system in a concentration-dependent manner. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that AmyI-1-18 strongly bound to RNA with a KD value of 1.4 × 10(-8) M but not to DNA and that AmyI-1-18 specifically bound to DnaK with a KD value of 4.4 × 10(-6) M. These SPR analysis results supported the results obtained in both the RTS and the molecular chaperone system. These results demonstrated that both RNA and DnaK are most likely the target of AmyI-1-18 in the protein synthesis system. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-05-30

    We present that challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone–substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperone Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone.

  3. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates.

  4. Chaperones and cardiac misfolding protein diseases.

    PubMed

    Christians, Elisabeth S; Mustafi, Soumyajit B; Benjamin, Ivor J

    2014-05-01

    Cardiomyocytes are best known for their spontaneous beating activity, large cell size, and low regenerative capacity during adulthood. The mechanical activity of cardiomyocytes depends on a sophisticated contractile apparatus comprised of sarcomeres whose rhythmic contraction relies on Ca(2+) transients with a high level of energy consumption. Hence the proper folding and assembly of the sarcomeric and other accessory proteins involved in those diverse functions (i.e., structural, mechanical, energy exchange and production) is critical for muscle mechanics. Chaperone proteins assist other polypeptides to reach their proper conformation, activity and/or location. Consequently, chaperone-like functions are important for the healthy heart but assume greater relevance during cardiac diseases when such chaperone proteins are recruited: 1) to protect cardiac cells against adverse effects during the pathological transition, and 2) to mitigate certain pathogenic mechanisms per se. Protein misfolding is observed as a consequence of inappropriate intracellular environment with acquired conditions (e.g., ischemia/reperfusion and redox imbalance) or because of mutations, which can modify primary to quaternary protein structures. In this review, we discuss the importance of cardiac chaperones while emphasizing the genetic origin (modification of gene/protein sequence) of cardiac protein misfolding and their consequences on the cardiomyocytes leading to organ dysfunction and failure.

  5. Phenylalanine hydroxylase misfolding and pharmacological chaperones.

    PubMed

    Underhaug, Jarl; Aubi, Oscar; Martinez, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a loss-of-function inborn error of metabolism. As many other inherited diseases the main pathologic mechanism in PKU is an enhanced tendency of the mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) to misfold and undergo ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Recent alternative approaches with therapeutic potential for PKU aim at correcting the PAH misfolding, and in this respect pharmacological chaperones are the focus of increasing interest. These compounds, which often resemble the natural ligands and show mild competitive inhibition, can rescue the misfolded proteins by stimulating their renaturation in vivo. For PKU, a few studies have proven the stabilization of PKU-mutants in vitro, in cells, and in mice by pharmacological chaperones, which have been found either by using the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor as query structure for shape-focused virtual screening or by high-throughput screening of small compound libraries. Both approaches have revealed a number of compounds, most of which bind at the iron-binding site, competitively with respect to BH(4). Furthermore, PAH shares a number of ligands, such as BH(4), amino acid substrates and inhibitors, with the other aromatic amino acid hydroxylases: the neuronal/neuroendocrine enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the tryptophan hydroxylases (TPHs). Recent results indicate that the PAH-targeted pharmacological chaperones should also be tested on TH and the TPHs, and eventually be derivatized to avoid unwanted interactions with these other enzymes. After derivatization and validation in animal models, the PAH-chaperoning compounds represent novel possibilities in the treatment of PKU.

  6. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Regulation of molecular chaperones through post-translational modifications: decrypting the chaperone code.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Philippe; Coulombe, Benoit

    2013-05-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated cofactors form a group of highly specialized proteins that orchestrate the folding and unfolding of other proteins and the assembly and disassembly of protein complexes. Chaperones are found in all cell types and organisms, and their activity must be tightly regulated to maintain normal cell function. Indeed, deregulation of protein folding and protein complex assembly is the cause of various human diseases. Here, we present the results of an extensive review of the literature revealing that the post-translational modification (PTM) of chaperones has been selected during evolution as an efficient mean to regulate the activity and specificity of these key proteins. Because the addition and reciprocal removal of chemical groups can be triggered very rapidly, this mechanism provides an efficient switch to precisely regulate the activity of chaperones on specific substrates. The large number of PTMs detected in chaperones suggests that a combinatory code is at play to regulate function, activity, localization, and substrate specificity for this group of biologically important proteins. This review surveys the core information currently available as a starting point toward the more ambitious endeavor of deciphering the "chaperone code". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Soft nanotube hydrogels functioning as artificial chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2012-06-26

    Self-assembly of rationally designed asymmetric amphiphilic monomers in water produced nanotube hydrogels in the presence of chemically denatured proteins (green fluorescent protein, carbonic anhydrase, and citrate synthase) at room temperature, which were able to encapsulate the proteins in the one-dimensional channel of the nanotube consisting of a monolayer membrane. Decreasing the concentrations of the denaturants induced refolding of part of the encapsulated proteins in the nanotube channel. Changing the pH dramatically reduced electrostatic attraction between the inner surface mainly covered with amino groups of the nanotube channel and the encapsulated proteins. As a result, the refolded proteins were smoothly released into the bulk solution without specific additive agents. This recovery procedure also transformed the encapsulated proteins from an intermediately refolding state to a completely refolded state. Thus, the nanotube hydrogels assisted the refolding of the denatured proteins and acted as artificial chaperones. Introduction of hydrophobic sites such as a benzyloxycarbony group and a tert-butoxycarbonyl group onto the inner surface of the nanotube channels remarkably enhanced the encapsulation and refolding efficiencies based on the hydrophobic interactions between the groups and the surface-exposed hydrophobic amino acid residues of the intermediates in the refolding process. Refolding was strongly dependent on the inner diameters of the nanotube channels. Supramolecular nanotechnology allowed us to not only precisely control the diameters of the nanotube channels but also functionalize their surfaces, enabling us to fine-tune the biocompatibility. Hence, these nanotube hydrogel systems should be widely applicable to various target proteins of different molecular weights, charges, and conformations.

  9. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  10. Inhibitors of the AAA+ chaperone p97.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J

    2015-02-12

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology.

  11. Ionic contacts at DnaK substrate binding domain involved in the allosteric regulation of lid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Moro, Fernando; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Acebrón, Sergio P; Muga, Arturo

    2006-03-17

    To gain further insight into the interactions involved in the allosteric transition of DnaK we have characterized wild-type (wt) protein and three mutants in which ionic interactions at the interface between the two subdomains of the substrate binding domain, and within the lid subdomain have been disrupted. Our data show that ionic contacts, most likely forming an electrically charged network, between the N-terminal region of helix B and an inner loop of the beta-sandwich are involved in maintaining the position of the lid relative to the beta-subdomain in the ADP state but not in the ATP state of the protein. Disruption of the ionic interactions between the C-terminal region of helix B and the outer loops of the beta-sandwich, known as the latch, does not have the same conformational consequences but results equally in an inactive protein. This indicates that a variety of mechanisms can inactivate this complex allosteric machine. Our results identify the ionic contacts at the subdomain and interdomain interfaces that are part of the hinge region involved in the ATP-induced allosteric displacement of the lid away from the peptide binding site. These interactions also stabilize peptide-Hsp70 complexes at physiological (37 degrees C) and stress (42 degrees C) temperatures, a requirement for productive substrate (re)folding.

  12. Water-structuring technology with the molecular chaperone proteins: indicated application of the α-crystallin domains and imidazole-containing peptidomimetics in cosmetic skin care systems or dermatological therapeutic drug carrier formulations.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady M; Nikolayeva, Juliana G; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-01-01

    Changes in structural proteins and hydration during aging are responsible for altered skin morphologic and mechanical properties manifested as wrinkling, sagging, loss of elasticity, and apparent dryness. Impairment in protein hydration may add to the ultrastructural, mechanical, and biochemical changes in structural proteins in the aged skin. At Innovative Vision Products, Inc., we have pioneered a molecular chaperone protein-activated therapeutic or cosmetic platform to enable simultaneous analysis of water-binding and structuring characteristics for biology-related or skin aging and skin disease-related pathways. This cutting-edge technology has changed the hydration of proteins in photoaged skin which so that they are more compact and interact with water to limited degree. The mechanisms of skin diseases, aging, and cellular and signaling pathways mediated by targeting with molecular chaperone protein(s) are considered. Skin lesions that are growing, spreading, or pigmented, and those that occur on exposed areas of skin are likely to be treated by these emerging pharmacological chaperones that could have cosmetic or dermatological benefits. Examples of such chaperones are anti-/trans-glycation-imidazole-containing peptidomimetic(s) (natural L-carnosine derivatives and mimetics) combined with the molecular chaperone protein α-crystallin derived from a natural source, brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) cysts, or with recombinant human αA-crystallin. This patented biotechnology represents an efficient tool with which to mitigate the consequences of free radical-induced skin damage. The article is organized to provide in one place all of the relevant technical information, such as high-performance nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance application tools, and to describe the entire process from sample preparation to data analysis, which is moving from biological studies to biotechnology batches of the product. The proposed biotechnology results in

  13. mTORC1 links protein quality and quantity control by sensing chaperone availability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shu-Bing; Zhang, Xingqian; Sun, Jun; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Patterson, Cam

    2010-08-27

    Balanced protein synthesis and degradation are crucial for proper cellular function. Protein synthesis is tightly coupled to energy status and nutrient levels by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Quality of newly synthesized polypeptides is maintained by the molecular chaperone and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Little is known about how cells integrate information about the quantity and quality of translational products simultaneously. We demonstrate that cells distinguish moderate reductions in protein quality from severe protein misfolding using molecular chaperones to differentially regulate mTORC1 signaling. Moderate reduction of chaperone availability enhances mTORC1 signaling, whereas stress-induced complete depletion of chaperoning capacity suppresses mTORC1 signaling. Molecular chaperones regulate mTORC1 assembly in coordination with nutrient availability. This mechanism enables mTORC1 to rapidly detect and respond to environmental cues while also sensing intracellular protein misfolding. The tight linkage between protein quality and quantity control provides a plausible mechanism coupling protein misfolding with metabolic dyshomeostasis.

  14. Emerging novel concept of chaperone therapies for protein misfolding diseases

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach to protein misfolding diseases. Among them we found unstable mutant enzyme proteins in a few lysosomal diseases, resulting in rapid intracellular degradation and loss of function. Active-site binding low molecular competitive inhibitors (chemical chaperones) paradoxically stabilized and enhanced the enzyme activity in somatic cells by correction of the misfolding of enzyme protein. They reached the brain through the blood-brain barrier after oral administration, and corrected pathophysiology of the disease. In addition to these inhibitory chaperones, non-competitive chaperones without inhibitory bioactivity are being developed. Furthermore molecular chaperone therapy utilizing the heat shock protein and other chaperone proteins induced by small molecules has been experimentally tried to handle abnormally accumulated proteins as a new approach particularly to neurodegenerative diseases. These three types of chaperones are promising candidates for various types of diseases, genetic or non-genetic, and neurological or non-neurological, in addition to lysosomal diseases. PMID:24814990

  15. Study on the chaperone properties of conserved GTPases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Xue, Jiaying; Sun, Zhe; Qin, Yan; Gong, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    As a large family of hydrolases, GTPases are widespread in cells and play the very important biological function of hydrolyzing GTP into GDP and inorganic phosphate through binding with it. GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, protein synthesis, and protein transportation. Chaperones can facilitate the folding or refolding of nascent peptides and denatured proteins to their native states. However, chaperones do not occur in the native structures in which they can perform their normal biological functions. In the current study, the chaperone activity of the conserved GTPases of Escherichia coli is tested by the chemical denaturation and chaperone-assisted renaturation of citrate synthase and α-glucosidase. The effects of ribosomes and nucleotides on the chaperone activity are also examined. Our data indicate that these conserved GTPases have chaperone properties, and may be ancestral protein folding factors that have appeared before dedicated chaperones.

  16. Emerging novel concept of chaperone therapies for protein misfolding diseases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach to protein misfolding diseases. Among them we found unstable mutant enzyme proteins in a few lysosomal diseases, resulting in rapid intracellular degradation and loss of function. Active-site binding low molecular competitive inhibitors (chemical chaperones) paradoxically stabilized and enhanced the enzyme activity in somatic cells by correction of the misfolding of enzyme protein. They reached the brain through the blood-brain barrier after oral administration, and corrected pathophysiology of the disease. In addition to these inhibitory chaperones, non-competitive chaperones without inhibitory bioactivity are being developed. Furthermore molecular chaperone therapy utilizing the heat shock protein and other chaperone proteins induced by small molecules has been experimentally tried to handle abnormally accumulated proteins as a new approach particularly to neurodegenerative diseases. These three types of chaperones are promising candidates for various types of diseases, genetic or non-genetic, and neurological or non-neurological, in addition to lysosomal diseases.

  17. Computational Analysis of Residue Interaction Networks and Coevolutionary Relationships in the Hsp70 Chaperones: A Community-Hopping Model of Allosteric Regulation and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2017-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in the Hsp70 proteins are linked with their regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions. Despite significant progress in structural and functional characterization of the Hsp70 proteins fundamental questions concerning modularity of the allosteric interaction networks and hierarchy of signaling pathways in the Hsp70 chaperones remained largely unexplored and poorly understood. In this work, we proposed an integrated computational strategy that combined atomistic and coarse-grained simulations with coevolutionary analysis and network modeling of the residue interactions. A novel aspect of this work is the incorporation of dynamic residue correlations and coevolutionary residue dependencies in the construction of allosteric interaction networks and signaling pathways. We found that functional sites involved in allosteric regulation of Hsp70 may be characterized by structural stability, proximity to global hinge centers and local structural environment that is enriched by highly coevolving flexible residues. These specific characteristics may be necessary for regulation of allosteric structural transitions and could distinguish regulatory sites from nonfunctional conserved residues. The observed confluence of dynamics correlations and coevolutionary residue couplings with global networking features may determine modular organization of allosteric interactions and dictate localization of key mediating sites. Community analysis of the residue interaction networks revealed that concerted rearrangements of local interacting modules at the inter-domain interface may be responsible for global structural changes and a population shift in the DnaK chaperone. The inter-domain communities in the Hsp70 structures harbor the majority of regulatory residues involved in allosteric signaling, suggesting that these sites could be integral to the network organization and coordination of structural changes. Using a network-based formalism of allostery, we

  18. Structural insights on two hypothetical secretion chaperones from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Fattori, Juliana; Prando, Alessandra; Assis, Leandro H P; Aparicio, Ricardo; Tasic, Ljubica

    2011-06-01

    Several Gram-negative bacterial pathogens have developed type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to deliver virulence proteins directly into eukaryotic cells in a process essential for many diseases. The type III secretion processes require customized chaperones with high specificity for binding partners, thus providing the secretion to occur. Due to the very low sequence similarities among secretion chaperones, annotation and discrimination of a great majority of them is extremely difficult and a task with low scores even if genes are encountered that codify for small (<20 kDa) proteins with low pI and a tendency to dimerise. Concerning about this, herein, we present structural features on two hypothetical T3SSs chaperones belonging to plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and suggest how low resolution models based on Small Angle X-ray Scattering patterns can provide new structural insights that could be very helpful in their analysis and posterior classification.

  19. Management of cytoskeleton architecture by molecular chaperones and immunophilins.

    PubMed

    Quintá, Héctor R; Galigniana, Natalia M; Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2011-12-01

    Cytoskeletal structure is continually remodeled to accommodate normal cell growth and to respond to pathophysiological cues. As a consequence, several cytoskeleton-interacting proteins become involved in a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and division, cell movement, vesicle transportation, cellular organelle location and function, localization and distribution of membrane receptors, and cell-cell communication. Molecular chaperones and immunophilins are counted among the most important proteins that interact closely with the cytoskeleton network, in particular with microtubules and microtubule-associated factors. In several situations, heat-shock proteins and immunophilins work together as a functionally active heterocomplex, although both types of proteins also show independent actions. In circumstances where homeostasis is affected by environmental stresses or due to genetic alterations, chaperone proteins help to stabilize the system. Molecular chaperones facilitate the assembly, disassembly and/or folding/refolding of cytoskeletal proteins, so they prevent aberrant protein aggregation. Nonetheless, the roles of heat-shock proteins and immunophilins are not only limited to solve abnormal situations, but they also have an active participation during the normal differentiation process of the cell and are key factors for many structural and functional rearrangements during this course of action. Cytoskeleton modifications leading to altered localization of nuclear factors may result in loss- or gain-of-function of such factors, which affects the cell cycle and cell development. Therefore, cytoskeletal components are attractive therapeutic targets, particularly microtubules, to prevent pathological situations such as rapidly dividing tumor cells or to favor the process of cell differentiation in other cases. In this review we will address some classical and novel aspects of key regulatory functions of heat-shock proteins and immunophilins as

  20. Management of cytoskeleton architecture by molecular chaperones and immunophilins

    PubMed Central

    Quintá, Héctor R.; Galigniana, Natalia M.; Erlejman, Alejandra G.; Lagadari, Mariana; Pilipuk, Graciela Piwien; Galigniana, Mario D.

    2011-01-01

    Cytoskeletal structure is continually remodeled to accommodate normal cell growth and to respond to pathophysiological cues. As a consequence, several cytoskeleton-interacting proteins become involved in a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and division, cell movement, vesicle transportation, cellular organelle location and function, localization and distribution of membrane receptors, and cell-cell communication. Molecular chaperones and immunophilins are counted among the most important proteins that interact closely with the cytoskeleton network, in particular with microtubules and microtubule-associated factors. In several situations, heat-shock proteins and immunophilins work together as a functionally active heterocomplex, although both types of proteins also show independent actions. In circumstances where homeostasis is affected by environmental stresses or due to genetic alterations, chaperone proteins help to stabilize the system. Molecular chaperones facilitate the assembly, disassembly and/or folding/refolding of cytoskeletal proteins, so they prevent aberrant protein aggregation. Nonetheless, the roles of heat-shock proteins and immunophilins are not limited to solve abnormal situations, but they also have an active participation during the normal differentiation process of the cell and are key factors for many structural and functional rearrangements during this course of action. Cytoskeleton modifications leading to altered localization of nuclear factors may result in loss- or gain-of-function of such factors, which affects the cell cycle and cell development. Therefore, cytoskeletal components are attractive therapeutic targets, particularly microtubules, to prevent pathological situations such as rapidly dividing tumour cells or to favor the process of cell differentiation in other cases. In this review we will address some classical and novel aspects of key regulatory functions of heat-shock proteins and immunophilins as

  1. A thermodynamic assay to test pharmacological chaperones for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Giuseppina; Citro, Valentina; Correra, Antonella; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria

    2014-03-01

    The majority of the disease-causing mutations affect protein stability, but not functional sites and are amenable, in principle, to be treated with pharmacological chaperones. These drugs enhance the thermodynamic stability of their targets. Fabry disease, a disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal alpha-galactosidase, represents an excellent model system to develop experimental protocols to test the efficiency of such drugs. The stability of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase under different conditions was studied by urea-induced unfolding followed by limited proteolysis and Western blotting. We measured the concentration of urea needed to obtain half-maximal unfolding because this parameter represents an objective indicator of protein stability. Urea-induced unfolding is a versatile technique that can be adapted to cell extracts containing tiny amounts of wild-type or mutant proteins. It allows testing of protein stability as a function of pH, in the presence or in the absence of drugs. Results are not influenced by the method used to express the protein in transfected cells. Scarce and dispersed populations pose a problem for the clinical trial of drugs for rare diseases. This is particularly true for pharmacological chaperones that must be tested on each mutation associated with a given disease. Diverse in vitro tests are needed. We used a method based on chemically induced unfolding as a tool to assess whether a particular Fabry mutation is responsive to pharmacological chaperones, but, by no means is our protocol limited to this disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J; Werneburg, Glenn T; Thanassi, David G; Li, Huilin

    2016-09-01

    intervention. Pilus biogenesis is a multistep process. This work investigates the oligomeric state of the pilus chaperone in the periplasm, which is important for understanding early assembly events. Our work unambiguously demonstrates that both PapD and FimC chaperones are monomeric in solution. We further demonstrate that the solution behavior of the FimH and PapGII adhesins differ, which may be related to functional differences between the two pilus systems. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.

    2016-01-01

    therapeutic intervention. Pilus biogenesis is a multistep process. This work investigates the oligomeric state of the pilus chaperone in the periplasm, which is important for understanding early assembly events. Our work unambiguously demonstrates that both PapD and FimC chaperones are monomeric in solution. We further demonstrate that the solution behavior of the FimH and PapGII adhesins differ, which may be related to functional differences between the two pilus systems. PMID:27353649

  4. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.; Li, Huilin; Christie, P. J.

    2016-06-27

    tract and establish infection. Studying pilus assembly is important for understanding mechanisms of protein secretion, as well as for identifying points for therapeutic intervention. Pilus biogenesis is a multistep process. This work investigates the oligomeric state of the pilus chaperone in the periplasm, which is important for understanding early assembly events. Our work unambiguously demonstrates that both PapD and FimC chaperones are monomeric in solution. We further demonstrate that the solution behavior of the FimH and PapGII adhesins differ, which may be related to functional differences between the two pilus systems.

  5. Interaction of the disordered Yersinia effector protein YopE with its cognate chaperone SycE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Lee, Michael S; Wallqvist, Anders

    2009-12-01

    We describe an efficient approach to model the binding interaction of the disordered effector protein to its cognate chaperone in the type III secretion system (T3SS). Starting from de novo models, we generated ensembles of unfolded conformations of the Yersinia effector YopE using REMD simulations and docked them to the chaperone SycE using a multistep protein docking strategy. The predicted YopE/SycE complex was in good agreement with the experimental structure. The ability of our computational protocol to mimic the structural transition upon chaperone binding opens up the possibility of studying the underlying specificity of chaperone/effector interactions and devising strategies for interfering with T3SS transport.

  6. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Zur Regulates the High-Affinity Zinc Uptake System TroCBA and the Putative Metal Chaperone YciC, along with ZinT and ZnuABC, for Survival under Zinc-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chaoprasid, Paweena; Dokpikul, Thanittra; Johnrod, Jaruwan; Sirirakphaisarn, Sirin; Nookabkaew, Sumontha; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a cluster of genes (Atu3178, Atu3179, and Atu3180) encoding an ABC-type transporter, here named troA, troB, and troC, respectively, which is shown here to be a zinc-specific uptake system. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis confirmed that troA, troB, and troC are cotranscribed, with troC as the first gene of the operon. The yciC (Atu3181) gene is transcribed in the opposite orientation to that of the troCBA operon and belongs to a metal-binding GTPase family. Expression of troCBA and yciC was inducible under zinc-limiting conditions and was controlled by the zinc uptake regulator, Zur. Compared to the wild type, the mutant strain lacking troC was hypersensitive to a metal chelator, EDTA, and the phenotype could be rescued by the addition of zinc, while the strain with a single yciC mutation showed no phenotype. However, yciC was important for survival under zinc limitation when either troC or zinT was inactivated. The periplasmic zinc-binding protein, ZinT, could not function when TroC was inactivated, suggesting that ZinT may interact with TroCBA in zinc uptake. Unlike many other bacteria, the ABC-type transporter ZnuABC was not the major zinc uptake system in A. tumefaciens. However, the important role of A. tumefaciens ZnuABC was revealed when TroCBA was impaired. The strain containing double mutations in the znuA and troC genes exhibited a growth defect in minimal medium. A. tumefaciens requires cooperation of zinc uptake systems and zinc chaperones, including TroCBA, ZnuABC, ZinT, and YciC, for survival under a wide range of zinc-limiting conditions. IMPORTANCE Both host and pathogen battle over access to essential metals, including zinc. In low-zinc environments, physiological responses that make it possible to acquire enough zinc are important for bacterial survival and could determine the outcome of host-pathogen interactions. A. tumefaciens was found to operate a novel pathway for zinc uptake in which Zin

  7. Histone chaperone specificity in Rtt109 activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Jun; Sudhoff, Keely B; Andrews, Andrew J; Stargell, Laurie A; Luger, Karolin

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109 is a histone acetyltransferase that requires a histone chaperone for the acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 56 (H3K56). Rtt109 forms a complex with the chaperone Vps75 in vivo and is implicated in DNA replication and repair. Here we show that both Rtt109 and Vps75 bind histones with high affinity, but only the complex is efficient for catalysis. The C-terminal acidic domain of Vps75 contributes to activation of Rtt109 and is necessary for in vivo functionality of Vps75, but it is not required for interaction with either Rtt109 or histones. We demonstrate that Vps75 is a structural homolog of yeast Nap1 by solving its crystal structure. Nap1 and Vps75 interact with histones and Rtt109 with comparable affinities. However, only Vps75 stimulates Rtt109 enzymatic activity. Our data highlight the functional specificity of Vps75 in Rtt109 activation. PMID:19172749

  8. A Solvent-Exposed Patch in Chaperone-Bound YopE Is Required for Translocation by the Type III Secretion System▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Loren; Mukerjea, Romila; Birtalan, Sara; Friedberg, Devorah; Ghosh, Partho

    2010-01-01

    Most effector proteins of bacterial type III secretion (T3S) systems require chaperone proteins for translocation into host cells. Such effectors are bound by chaperones in a conserved and characteristic manner, with the chaperone-binding (Cb) region of the effector wound around the chaperone in a highly extended conformation. This conformation has been suggested to serve as a translocation signal in promoting the association between the chaperone-effector complex and a bacterial component required for translocation. We sought to test a prediction of this model by identifying a potential association site for the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis chaperone-effector pair SycE-YopE. We identified a set of residues in the YopE Cb region that are required for translocation but are dispensable for expression, SycE binding, secretion into the extrabacterial milieu, and stability in mammalian cells. These residues form a solvent-exposed patch on the surface of the chaperone-bound Cb region, and thus their effect on translocation is consistent with the structure of the chaperone-bound Cb region serving as a signal for translocation. PMID:20382763

  9. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hua, Cong; Ju, Wei-Na; Jin, Hang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In this review, we

  10. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Cong; Ju, Wei-na; Jin, Hang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In this review, we

  11. Analysis of the potency of various low molecular weight chemical chaperones to prevent protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Upagupta, Chandak; Carlisle, Rachel E; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2017-04-22

    Newly translated proteins must undergo proper folding to ensure their function. To enter a low energy state, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are associated with many degenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent studies have shown the use of low molecular weight chemical chaperones to be an effective method of reducing protein aggregation in various cell types. This study demonstrates a novel non-biased assay to assess the molecular efficacy of these compounds at preventing protein misfolding and/or aggregation. This assay utilizes a thioflavin T fluorescent stain to provide a qualitative and quantitative measure of protein misfolding within cells. The functionality of this method was first assessed in renal proximal tubule epithelial cells treated with various endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducers. Once established in the renal model system, we analyzed the ability of some known chemical chaperones to reduce ER stress. A total of five different compounds were selected: 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), tauroursodeoxycholic acid, trehalose, and glycerol. The dose-dependent effects of these compounds at reducing thapsigargin-induced ER stress was then analyzed, and used to determine their EC50 values. Of the chaperones, 4-PBA and DHA provided the greatest reduction of ER stress and did so at relatively low concentrations. Upon analyzing the efficiency of these compounds and their corresponding structures, it was determined that chaperones with a localized hydrophilic, polar end followed by a long hydrophobic chain, such as 4-PBA and DHA, were most effective at reducing ER stress. This study provides some insight into the use of low molecular weight chemical chaperones and may serve as the first step towards developing new chaperones of greater potency thereby providing potential treatments for diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  12. The Effect of Chemical Chaperones on the Assembly and Stability of HIV-1 Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Chemical chaperones are small organic molecules which accumulate in a broad range of organisms in various tissues under different stress conditions and assist in the maintenance of a correct proteostasis under denaturating environments. The effect of chemical chaperones on protein folding and aggregation has been extensively studied and is generally considered to be mediated through non-specific interactions. However, the precise mechanism of action remains elusive. Protein self-assembly is a key event in both native and pathological states, ranging from microtubules and actin filaments formation to toxic amyloids appearance in degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Another pathological event, in which protein assembly cascade is a fundamental process, is the formation of virus particles. In the late stage of the virus life cycle, capsid proteins self-assemble into highly-ordered cores, which encapsulate the viral genome, consequently protect genome integrity and mediate infectivity. In this study, we examined the effect of different groups of chemical chaperones on viral capsid assembly in vitro, focusing on HIV-1 capsid protein as a system model. We found that while polyols and sugars markedly inhibited capsid assembly, methylamines dramatically enhanced the assembly rate. Moreover, chemical chaperones that inhibited capsid core formation, also stabilized capsid structure under thermal denaturation. Correspondingly, trimethylamine N-oxide, which facilitated formation of high-order assemblies, clearly destabilized capsid structure under similar conditions. In contrast to the prevailing hypothesis suggesting that chemical chaperones affect proteins through preferential exclusion, the observed dual effects imply that different chaperones modify capsid assembly and stability through different mechanisms. Furthermore, our results indicate a correlation between the folding state of capsid to its tendency to assemble into highly

  13. The effect of chemical chaperones on the assembly and stability of HIV-1 capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Chemical chaperones are small organic molecules which accumulate in a broad range of organisms in various tissues under different stress conditions and assist in the maintenance of a correct proteostasis under denaturating environments. The effect of chemical chaperones on protein folding and aggregation has been extensively studied and is generally considered to be mediated through non-specific interactions. However, the precise mechanism of action remains elusive. Protein self-assembly is a key event in both native and pathological states, ranging from microtubules and actin filaments formation to toxic amyloids appearance in degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Another pathological event, in which protein assembly cascade is a fundamental process, is the formation of virus particles. In the late stage of the virus life cycle, capsid proteins self-assemble into highly-ordered cores, which encapsulate the viral genome, consequently protect genome integrity and mediate infectivity. In this study, we examined the effect of different groups of chemical chaperones on viral capsid assembly in vitro, focusing on HIV-1 capsid protein as a system model. We found that while polyols and sugars markedly inhibited capsid assembly, methylamines dramatically enhanced the assembly rate. Moreover, chemical chaperones that inhibited capsid core formation, also stabilized capsid structure under thermal denaturation. Correspondingly, trimethylamine N-oxide, which facilitated formation of high-order assemblies, clearly destabilized capsid structure under similar conditions. In contrast to the prevailing hypothesis suggesting that chemical chaperones affect proteins through preferential exclusion, the observed dual effects imply that different chaperones modify capsid assembly and stability through different mechanisms. Furthermore, our results indicate a correlation between the folding state of capsid to its tendency to assemble into highly

  14. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; ...

    2016-05-30

    We present that challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone–substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperonemore » Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone.« less

  15. Recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V.; Schinke, Reinhard

    2006-03-01

    The recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism, i.e., ArO +O2→Ar+O3 and ArO2+O→Ar+O3, is studied by means of classical trajectories and a pairwise additive Ar -O3 potential energy surface. The recombination rate coefficient has a strong temperature dependence, which approximately can be described by T-n with n ≈3. It is negligible for temperatures above 700 K or so, but it becomes important for low temperatures. The calculations unambiguously affirm the conclusions of Hippler et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6560 (1990)] and Luther et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7, 2764 (2005)] that the chaperon mechanism makes a sizable contribution to the recombination of O3 at room temperature and below. The dependence of the chaperon recombination rate coefficient on the isotopomer, studied for two different isotope combinations, is only in rough qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The oxygen atom isotope exchange reaction involving ArO and ArO2 van der Waals complexes is also investigated; the weak binding of O or O2 to Ar has only a small effect.

  16. A review of multi-domain and flexible molecular chaperones studies by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Borges, Júlio C; Seraphim, Thiago V; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Barbosa, Leandro R S

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsic flexibility is closely related to protein function, and a plethora of important regulatory proteins have been found to be flexible, multi-domain or even intrinsically disordered. On the one hand, understanding such systems depends on how these proteins behave in solution. On the other, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a technique that fulfills the requirements to study protein structure and dynamics relatively quickly with few experimental limitations. Molecular chaperones from Hsp70 and Hsp90 families are multi-domain proteins containing flexible and/or disordered regions that play central roles in cellular proteostasis. Here, we review the structure and function of these proteins by SAXS. Our general approach includes the use of SAXS data to determine size and shape parameters, as well as protein shape reconstruction and their validation by using accessory biophysical tools. Some remarkable examples are presented that exemplify the potential of the SAXS technique. Protein structure can be determined in solution even at limiting protein concentrations (for example, human mortalin, a mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone). The protein organization, flexibility and function (for example, the J-protein co-chaperones), oligomeric status, domain organization, and flexibility (for the Hsp90 chaperone and the Hip and Hep1 co-chaperones) may also be determined. Lastly, the shape, structural conservation, and protein dynamics (for the Hsp90 chaperone and both p23 and Aha1 co-chaperones) may be studied by SAXS. We believe this review will enhance the application of the SAXS technique to the study of the molecular chaperones.

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis Slc1 is a type III secretion chaperone that enhances the translocation of its invasion effector substrate TARP.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Amanda J; Malcolm, Denise S; Pedrosa, António T; Roguska, Katarzyna; Shahbazian, Sevanna; Graham, James E; Hayward, Richard D; Carabeo, Rey A

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperones pilot substrates to the export apparatus in a secretion-competent state, and are consequently central to the translocation of effectors into target cells. Chlamydia trachomatis is a genetically intractable obligate intracellular pathogen that utilizes T3SS effectors to trigger its entry into mammalian cells. The only well-characterized T3SS effector is TARP (translocated actin recruitment protein), but its chaperone is unknown. Here we exploited a known structural signature to screen for putative type III secretion chaperones encoded within the C. trachomatis genome. Using bacterial two-hybrid, co-precipitation, cross-linking and size exclusion chromatography we show that Slc1 (SycE-like chaperone 1; CT043) specifically interacts with a 200-amino-acid residue N-terminal region of TARP (TARP¹⁻²⁰⁰). Slc1 formed homodimers in vitro, as shown in cross-linking and gel filtration experiments. Biochemical analysis of an isolated Slc1-TARP¹⁻²⁰⁰ complex was consistent with a characteristic 2:1 chaperone-effector stoichiometry. Furthermore, Slc1 was co-immunoprecipitated with TARP from C. trachomatis elementary bodies. Also, coexpression of Slc1 specifically enhanced host cell translocation of TARP by a heterologous Yersinia enterocolitica T3SS. Taken together, we propose Slc1 as a chaperone of the C. trachomatis T3SS effector TARP.

  18. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A molecular mechanism of chaperone-client recognition

    PubMed Central

    He, Lichun; Sharpe, Timothy; Mazur, Adam; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential in aiding client proteins to fold into their native structure and in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. However, mechanistic aspects of chaperone function are still not well understood at the atomic level. We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism underlying client recognition by the adenosine triphosphate-independent chaperone Spy at the atomic level and derive a structural model for the chaperone-client complex. Spy interacts with its partially folded client Im7 by selective recognition of flexible, locally frustrated regions in a dynamic fashion. The interaction with Spy destabilizes a partially folded client but spatially compacts an unfolded client conformational ensemble. By increasing client backbone dynamics, the chaperone facilitates the search for the native structure. A comparison of the interaction of Im7 with two other chaperones suggests that the underlying principle of recognizing frustrated segments is of a fundamental nature. PMID:28138538

  20. Substrate specificity in the context of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Bose, Dipayan; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2017-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are one of the key players in protein biology and as such their structure and mechanism of action have been extensively studied. However the substrate specificity of molecular chaperones has not been well investigated. This review aims to summarize what is known about the substrate specificity and substrate recognition motifs of chaperones so as to better understand what substrate specificity means in the context of molecular chaperones. Available literature shows that the majority of chaperones have broad substrate range and recognize non-native conformations of proteins depending on recognition of hydrophobic and/or charged patches. Based on these recognition motifs chaperones can select for early, mid or late folding intermediates. Another major contributor to chaperone specificity are the co-chaperones they interact with as well as the sub-cellular location they are expressed in and the inducability of their expression. Some chaperones which have only one or a few known substrates are reported. In their case the mode of recognition seems to be specific structural complementarity between chaperone and substrate. It can be concluded that the vast majority of chaperones do not show a high degree of specificity but recognize elements that signal non-native protein conformation and their substrate range is modulated by the context they function in. However a few chaperones are known that display exquisite specificity of their substrate e.g. mammalian heat shock protein 47 collagen interaction. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(9):647-659, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Molecular chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins for ubiquitin-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Ellgaard, Lars; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2012-02-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins presents a considerable threat to the health of individual cells and has been linked to severe diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Considering that, in nature, cells often are exposed to stress conditions that may lead to aberrant protein conformational changes, it becomes clear that they must have an efficient quality control apparatus to refold or destroy misfolded proteins. In general, cells rely on molecular chaperones to seize and refold misfolded proteins. If the native state is unattainable, misfolded proteins are targeted for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The specificity of this proteolysis is generally provided by E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases, hundreds of which are encoded in the human genome. However, rather than binding the misfolded proteins directly, most E3s depend on molecular chaperones to recognize the misfolded protein substrate. Thus, by delegating substrate recognition to chaperones, E3s deftly utilize a pre-existing cellular system for selectively targeting misfolded proteins. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the interplay between molecular chaperones and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  2. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  3. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during type three secretion.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Tara L; Spiller, Benjamin W

    2014-11-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ∼20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.

  4. A Gatekeeper Chaperone Complex Directs Translocator Secretion during Type Three Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ∼20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors. PMID:25375170

  5. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    DOE PAGES

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components thatmore » form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.« less

  6. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.

  7. Heat shock proteome analysis of wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 and a spontaneous mutant lacking GroEL1, a dispensable chaperone.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Carlos; González-Lavado, Eva; Brand, Sven; Tauch, Andreas; Martín, Juan F

    2005-02-01

    Proteome analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 showed that levels of several proteins increased drastically in response to heat shock. These proteins were identified as DnaK, GroEL1, GroEL2, ClpB, GrpE, and PoxB, and their heat response was in agreement with previous transcriptomic results. A major heat-induced protein was absent in the proteome of strain 13032B of C. glutamicum, used for genome sequencing in Germany, compared with the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain. The missing protein was identified as GroEL1 by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight peptide mass fingerprinting, and the mutation was found to be due to an insertion sequence, IsCg1, that was integrated at position 327 downstream of the translation start codon of the groEL1 gene, resulting in a truncated transcript of this gene, as shown by Northern analysis. The GroEL1 chaperone is, therefore, dispensable in C. glutamicum. On the other hand, GroEL2 appears to be essential for growth. Based on these results, the role of the duplicate groEL1 and groEL2 genes is analyzed.

  8. Heat Shock Proteome Analysis of Wild-Type Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 and a Spontaneous Mutant Lacking GroEL1, a Dispensable Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Carlos; González-Lavado, Eva; Brand, Sven; Tauch, Andreas; Martín, Juan F.

    2005-01-01

    Proteome analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 showed that levels of several proteins increased drastically in response to heat shock. These proteins were identified as DnaK, GroEL1, GroEL2, ClpB, GrpE, and PoxB, and their heat response was in agreement with previous transcriptomic results. A major heat-induced protein was absent in the proteome of strain 13032B of C. glutamicum, used for genome sequencing in Germany, compared with the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain. The missing protein was identified as GroEL1 by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight peptide mass fingerprinting, and the mutation was found to be due to an insertion sequence, IsCg1, that was integrated at position 327 downstream of the translation start codon of the groEL1 gene, resulting in a truncated transcript of this gene, as shown by Northern analysis. The GroEL1 chaperone is, therefore, dispensable in C. glutamicum. On the other hand, GroEL2 appears to be essential for growth. Based on these results, the role of the duplicate groEL1 and groEL2 genes is analyzed. PMID:15659666

  9. Cooperative Macromolecular Disassembly via the Heat Shock Chaperone Hsc70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalla, Jason; Krantz, Kelly; Austin, Robert; Rye, Hays

    2008-03-01

    Many essential cellular functions depend on the assembly and disassembly of macromolecular complexes. A general class of protein known as molecular chaperones regulates several of these processes. How can complex protein structure be quickly and efficiently disassembled by the action of a small number of these proteins? One such example is that of clathrin: a ubiquitous coat protein that stabilizes vesicular trafficking by forming a scaffold onto the membrane surface. This scaffold must be removed before the vesicle can deliver its cargo. We report on the cooperative disassembly of yeast-derived GFP-labeled clathrin baskets via its interaction with Hsc70. We exploit the highest signal-to-noise light bursts from single fluorescent baskets transiting a confocal excitation spot to recursively determine the brightness and size distribution of the baskets during the uncoating process. This minimal uncoating system demonstrates the ability of a surprisingly simple protein system to facilitate rapid structural changes through cooperative action.

  10. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    PubMed

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  11. Peroxisomal Proteostasis Involves a Lon Family Protein That Functions as Protease and Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Bartoszewska, Magdalena; Williams, Chris; Kikhney, Alexey; Opaliński, Łukasz; van Roermund, Carlo W. T.; de Boer, Rinse; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are subject to continuous quality control for optimal proteostasis. The knowledge of peroxisome quality control systems is still in its infancy. Here we show that peroxisomes contain a member of the Lon family of proteases (Pln). We show that Pln is a heptameric protein and acts as an ATP-fueled protease and chaperone. Hence, Pln is the first chaperone identified in fungal peroxisomes. In cells of a PLN deletion strain peroxisomes contain protein aggregates, a major component of which is catalase-peroxidase. We show that this enzyme is sensitive to oxidative damage. The oxidatively damaged, but not the native protein, is a substrate of the Pln protease. Cells of the pln strain contain enhanced levels of catalase-peroxidase protein but reduced catalase-peroxidase enzyme activities. Together with the observation that Pln has chaperone activity in vitro, our data suggest that catalase-peroxidase aggregates accumulate in peroxisomes of pln cells due to the combined absence of Pln protease and chaperone activities. PMID:22733816

  12. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    PubMed

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  13. Specificity of Lipoprotein Chaperones for the Characteristic Lipidated Structural Motifs of their Cognate Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mejuch, Tom; van Hattum, Hilde; Triola, Gemma; Jaiswal, Mamta; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein-binding chaperones mediate intracellular transport of lipidated proteins and determine their proper localisation and functioning. Understanding of the exact structural parameters that determine recognition and transport by different chaperones is of major interest. We have synthesised several lipid-modified peptides, representative of different lipoprotein classes, and have investigated their binding to the relevant chaperones PDEδ, UNC119a, UNC119b, and galectins-1 and -3. Our results demonstrate that PDEδ recognises S-isoprenylated C-terminal peptidic structures but not N-myristoylated peptides. In contrast, UNC119 proteins bind only mono-N-myristoylated, but do not recognise doubly lipidated and S-isoprenylated peptides at the C terminus. For galectins-1 and -3, neither binding to N-acylated, nor to C-terminally prenylated peptides could be determined. These results shed light on the specificity of the chaperone-mediated cellular lipoprotein transport systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Diverse functional manifestations of intrinsic structural disorder in molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Denes; Tompa, Peter

    2012-10-01

    IDPs (intrinsically disordered proteins) represent a unique class of proteins which show diverse molecular mechanisms in key biological functions. The aim of the present mini-review is to summarize IDP chaperones that have increasingly been studied in the last few years, by focusing on the role of intrinsic disorder in their molecular mechanism. Disordered regions in both globular and disordered chaperones are often involved directly in chaperone action, either by modulating activity or through direct involvement in substrate identification and binding. They might also be responsible for the subcellular localization of the protein. In outlining the state of the art, we survey known IDP chaperones discussing the following points: (i) globular chaperones that have an experimentally proven functional disordered region(s), (ii) chaperones that are completely disordered along their entire length, and (iii) the possible mechanisms of action of disordered chaperones. Through all of these details, we chart out how far the field has progressed, only to emphasize the long road ahead before the chaperone function can be firmly established as part of the physiological mechanistic arsenal of the emerging group of IDPs.

  15. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  16. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin functions as crucial chaperone reservoir in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Filipa; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Tânia; Tse, Eric; Koldewey, Philipp; Southworth, Daniel R.; Tomás, Ana M.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic eukaryotic 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins have been widely reported to act as dual-function proteins, either detoxifying reactive oxygen species or acting as chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. Several stimuli, including peroxide-mediated sulfinic acid formation at the active site cysteine, have been proposed to trigger the chaperone activity. However, the mechanism underlying this activation and the extent to which the chaperone function is crucial under physiological conditions in vivo remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that in the vector-borne protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx) exerts intrinsic ATP-independent chaperone activity, protecting a wide variety of different proteins against heat stress-mediated unfolding in vitro and in vivo. Activation of the chaperone function appears to be induced by temperature-mediated restructuring of the reduced decamers, promoting binding of unfolding client proteins in the center of Prx’s ringlike structure. Client proteins are maintained in a folding-competent conformation until restoration of nonstress conditions, upon which they are released and transferred to ATP-dependent chaperones for refolding. Interference with client binding impairs parasite infectivity, providing compelling evidence for the in vivo importance of Prx’s chaperone function. Our results suggest that reduced Prx provides a mitochondrial chaperone reservoir, which allows L. infantum to deal successfully with protein unfolding conditions during the transition from insect to the mammalian hosts and to generate viable parasites capable of perpetuating infection. PMID:25646478

  17. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin functions as crucial chaperone reservoir in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Filipa; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Tânia; Tse, Eric; Koldewey, Philipp; Southworth, Daniel R; Tomás, Ana M; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-02-17

    Cytosolic eukaryotic 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins have been widely reported to act as dual-function proteins, either detoxifying reactive oxygen species or acting as chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. Several stimuli, including peroxide-mediated sulfinic acid formation at the active site cysteine, have been proposed to trigger the chaperone activity. However, the mechanism underlying this activation and the extent to which the chaperone function is crucial under physiological conditions in vivo remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that in the vector-borne protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx) exerts intrinsic ATP-independent chaperone activity, protecting a wide variety of different proteins against heat stress-mediated unfolding in vitro and in vivo. Activation of the chaperone function appears to be induced by temperature-mediated restructuring of the reduced decamers, promoting binding of unfolding client proteins in the center of Prx's ringlike structure. Client proteins are maintained in a folding-competent conformation until restoration of nonstress conditions, upon which they are released and transferred to ATP-dependent chaperones for refolding. Interference with client binding impairs parasite infectivity, providing compelling evidence for the in vivo importance of Prx's chaperone function. Our results suggest that reduced Prx provides a mitochondrial chaperone reservoir, which allows L. infantum to deal successfully with protein unfolding conditions during the transition from insect to the mammalian hosts and to generate viable parasites capable of perpetuating infection.

  18. Chaperones rescue luciferase folding by separating its domains.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2014-10-10

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process.

  19. Chaperones Rescue Luciferase Folding by Separating Its Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Zackary N.; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process. PMID:25160632

  20. Toward Instituting a Chaperone Policy in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; Jenkins, Carol; Laney, Tyler; Seidel, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate child, parent and medical provider preferences for chaperones for outpatient encounters and to evaluate the acceptability and frequency of utilization following institution of a chaperone policy. Secondarily, we sought to understand what medical history and examinations teens consider "sensitive." Design: We…

  1. Toward Instituting a Chaperone Policy in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; Jenkins, Carol; Laney, Tyler; Seidel, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate child, parent and medical provider preferences for chaperones for outpatient encounters and to evaluate the acceptability and frequency of utilization following institution of a chaperone policy. Secondarily, we sought to understand what medical history and examinations teens consider "sensitive." Design: We…

  2. Dimerization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa translocator chaperone PcrH is required for stability, not function.

    PubMed

    Tomalka, Amanda G; Zmina, Stephanie E; Stopford, Charles M; Rietsch, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Type III secretion systems rely on hydrophobic translocator proteins that form a pore in the host cell membrane to deliver effector proteins into targeted host cells. These translocator proteins are stabilized in the cytoplasm and targeted for export with the help of specific chaperone proteins. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the chaperone of the pore-forming translocator proteins is PcrH. Although all translocator chaperones dimerize, the location of the dimerization interface is in dispute. Moreover, it has been reported that interfering with dimerization interferes with chaperone function. However, binding of P. aeruginosa chaperone PcrH to its cognate secretion substrate, PopD, results in dissociation of the PcrH dimer in vitro, arguing that dimerization of PcrH is likely not important for substrate binding or targeting translocators for export. We demonstrate that PcrH dimerization occurs in vivo in P. aeruginosa and used a genetic screen to identify a dimerization mutant of PcrH. The mutant protein is fully functional in that it can both stabilize PopB and PopD in the cytoplasm and promote their export via the type III secretion system. The location of the mutation suggests that the dimerization interface of PcrH mirrors that of the Yersinia homolog SycD and not the dimerization interface that had previously been reported for PcrH based on crystallographic evidence. Finally, we present data that the dimerization mutant of PcrH is less stable than the wild-type protein in P. aeruginosa, suggesting that the function of dimerization is stabilization of PcrH in the absence of its cognate cargo.

  3. Dimerization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Translocator Chaperone PcrH Is Required for Stability, Not Function

    PubMed Central

    Tomalka, Amanda G.; Zmina, Stephanie E.; Stopford, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Type III secretion systems rely on hydrophobic translocator proteins that form a pore in the host cell membrane to deliver effector proteins into targeted host cells. These translocator proteins are stabilized in the cytoplasm and targeted for export with the help of specific chaperone proteins. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the chaperone of the pore-forming translocator proteins is PcrH. Although all translocator chaperones dimerize, the location of the dimerization interface is in dispute. Moreover, it has been reported that interfering with dimerization interferes with chaperone function. However, binding of P. aeruginosa chaperone PcrH to its cognate secretion substrate, PopD, results in dissociation of the PcrH dimer in vitro, arguing that dimerization of PcrH is likely not important for substrate binding or targeting translocators for export. We demonstrate that PcrH dimerization occurs in vivo in P. aeruginosa and used a genetic screen to identify a dimerization mutant of PcrH. The mutant protein is fully functional in that it can both stabilize PopB and PopD in the cytoplasm and promote their export via the type III secretion system. The location of the mutation suggests that the dimerization interface of PcrH mirrors that of the Yersinia homolog SycD and not the dimerization interface that had previously been reported for PcrH based on crystallographic evidence. Finally, we present data that the dimerization mutant of PcrH is less stable than the wild-type protein in P. aeruginosa, suggesting that the function of dimerization is stabilization of PcrH in the absence of its cognate cargo. PMID:23974025

  4. High-throughput screening identifies small molecule inhibitors of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in a number of cellular processes, including cell cycle, growth, and survival, apoptosis, stress responses, angiogenesis, and oncogenesis. Among the characterized HSPs, the molecular chaperone HSP90 has emerged as an exciting molecular target for cancer therapy since its discovery as the target protein of the antibiotic geldanamycin. The stress-inducible HSP70, which is upregulated in many cancers, contributing to tumor cell survival and resistance to therapy, has important roles as a housekeeper in the cell, assisting in the correct folding, trafficking, and degradation of many proteins. 2-Phenylethynesulfonamide (PES) physically interacts with HSP70 and disrupts the association between HSP70 and several of its cofactors and client proteins, leading to cancer cell death that is selectively mediated through caspase-independent mechanisms involving increased protein aggregation, impairment of lysosomal functions, and inhibition of autophagy. Mammalian HSP60 has several functions in the cell, including apoptosis, an immune-regulatory function, and cell spreading. HSP60 is a mitochondrial protein that is essential for the folding and assembly of newly imported proteins in the mitochondria. Epolactaene/ETB covalently binds to HSP60, inhibiting its chaperone activity. Molecular chaperone inhibitors are significantly valuable not only as tools to reveal the unknown cellular functions of molecular chaperones, but also as lead compounds for drug discovery. Thus, high-throughput screening systems are necessary for the discovery of more effective inhibitors. Here, we describe the methodology for 4 characteristic types of high-throughput screening systems for inhibitors of molecular chaperones, mainly HSP90 and HSP70: the colorimetric method, the fluorescence polarization method, the chemical array method, and the AlphaScreen® method.

  5. Regulation of organismal proteostasis by trans-cellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Porter, Robert S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge for metazoans is to ensure that different tissues each expressing distinctive proteomes are, nevertheless, well protected at an organismal level from proteotoxic stress. We have examined this and show that expression of endogenous metastable protein sensors in muscle cells induces a systemic stress response throughout multiple tissues of C. elegans. Suppression of misfolding in muscle cells can be achieved not only by enhanced expression of HSP90 in muscle cells, but as effective by elevated expression of HSP90 in intestine or neuronal cells. This cell-non-autonomous control of HSP90 expression relies upon transcriptional feedback between somatic tissues that is regulated by the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4. This trans-cellular chaperone signaling response maintains organismal proteostasis when challenged by a local tissue imbalance in folding and provides the basis for a novel form of organismal stress sensing surveillance. PMID:23746847

  6. Disaggregases, molecular chaperones that resolubilize protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mokry, David Z; Abrahão, Josielle; Ramos, Carlos H I

    2015-08-01

    The process of folding is a seminal event in the life of a protein, as it is essential for proper protein function and therefore cell physiology. Inappropriate folding, or misfolding, can not only lead to loss of function, but also to the formation of protein aggregates, an insoluble association of polypeptides that harm cell physiology, either by themselves or in the process of formation. Several biological processes have evolved to prevent and eliminate the existence of non-functional and amyloidogenic aggregates, as they are associated with several human pathologies. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins are specialized in controlling the quality of the proteins in the cell, specifically by aiding proper folding, and dissolution and clearance of already formed protein aggregates. The latter is a function of disaggregases, mainly represented by the ClpB/Hsp104 subfamily of molecular chaperones, that are ubiquitous in all organisms but, surprisingly, have no orthologs in the cytosol of metazoan cells. This review aims to describe the characteristics of disaggregases and to discuss the function of yeast Hsp104, a disaggregase that is also involved in prion propagation and inheritance.

  7. Chaperones as potential therapeutics for Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Pannuzzo, Giovanna; Avola, Rosanna; Cardile, Venera

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe's disease (KD) is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disorder. It is classified among the lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). It was first described in , but the genetic defect for the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene was not discovered until the beginning of the 1970s, 20 years before the GALC cloning. Recently, in 2011, the crystal structures of the GALC enzyme and the GALC-product complex were obtained. For this, compared with other LSDs, the research on possible therapeutic interventions is much more recent. Thus, it is not surprising that some treatment options are still under preclinical investigation, whereas their relevance for other pathologies of the same group has already been tested in clinical studies. This is specifically the case for pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), a promising strategy for selectively correcting defective protein folding and trafficking and for enhancing enzyme activity by small molecules. These compounds bind directly to a partially folded biosynthetic intermediate, stabilize the protein, and allow completion of the folding process to yield a functional protein. Here, we review the chaperones that have demonstrated potential therapeutics during preclinical studies for KD, underscoring the requirement to invigorate research for KD-addressed PCT that will benefit from recent insights into the molecular understanding of GALC structure, drug design, and development in cellular models. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cold-active DnaK of an Antarctic psychrotroph Shewanella sp. Ac10 supporting the growth of dnaK-null mutant of Escherichia coli at cold temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Galkin, Andrey; Kulakova, Ljudmila; Yoshimura, Tohru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    Shewanella sp. Ac10 is a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from the Antarctica that actively grows at such low temperatures as 0 degrees C. Immunoblot analyses showed that a heat-shock protein DnaK is inducibly formed by the bacterium at 24 degrees C, which is much lower than the temperatures causing heat shock in mesophiles such as Escherichia coli. We found that the Shewanella DnaK (SheDnaK) shows much higher ATPase activity at low temperatures than the DnaK of E. coli (EcoDnaK): a characteristic of a cold-active enzyme. The recombinant SheDnaK gene supported neither the growth of a dnaK-null mutant of E. coli at 43 degrees C nor lambda phage propagation at an even lower temperature, 30 degrees C. However, the recombinant SheDnaK gene enabled the E. coli mutant to grow at 15 degrees C. This is the first report of a DnaK supporting the growth of a dnaK-null mutant at low temperatures.

  9. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  10. Quantitative analysis of chaperone network throughput in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Brownridge, Philip; Lawless, Craig; Payapilly, Aishwarya B; Lanthaler, Karin; Holman, Stephen W; Harman, Victoria M; Grant, Christopher M; Beynon, Robert J; Hubbard, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The network of molecular chaperones mediates the folding and translocation of the many proteins encoded in the genome of eukaryotic organisms, as well as a response to stress. It has been particularly well characterised in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where 63 known chaperones have been annotated and recent affinity purification and MS/MS experiments have helped characterise the attendant network of chaperone targets to a high degree. In this study, we apply our QconCAT methodology to directly quantify the set of yeast chaperones in absolute terms (copies per cell) via SRM MS. Firstly, we compare these to existing quantitative estimates of these yeast proteins, highlighting differences between approaches. Secondly, we cast the results into the context of the chaperone target network and show a distinct relationship between abundance of individual chaperones and their targets. This allows us to characterise the ‘throughput’ of protein molecules passing through individual chaperones and their groups on a proteome-wide scale in an unstressed model eukaryote for the first time. The results demonstrate specialisations of the chaperone classes, which display different overall workloads, efficiencies and preference for the sub-cellular localisation of their targets. The novel integration of the interactome data with quantification supports re-estimates of the level of protein throughout going through molecular chaperones. Additionally, although chaperones target fewer than 40% of annotated proteins we show that they mediate the folding of the majority of protein molecules (∼62% of the total protein flux in the cell), highlighting their importance. PMID:23420633

  11. Moonlighting chaperone-like activity of the universal regulatory 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2017-05-01

    The ubiquitous eukaryotic 14-3-3 proteins coordinate multiple cellular processes due to their well-known regulatory function, which is based on specific recognition of phosphorylated motifs in their partners. In this context, 14-3-3 proteins have been called 'chaperones'. Although in the classical meaning this is not fully correct, recent studies have revealed that they can indeed be an integral part of the protein quality control system, as they (a) display ATP-independent anti-aggregation ('holdase') activity, similar to that of the unrelated small heat shock proteins, (b) assist in clearing misfolded proteins by directing them to proteasomes or aggresomes, (c) cooperate with classical chaperones for substrate refolding, and also (d) are associated with neurodegenerative disorders by affecting aggregation of tau, prion protein, α-synuclein, huntingtin, etc. Importantly, these activities are usually independent of substrate phosphorylation and therefore should be considered as distinct, 'moonlighting' functions of 14-3-3 proteins that mimic and complement the functions of dedicated molecular chaperones. Although the precise mechanism of this activity is still unknown, it has been shown that it is not dependent on the unstructured C-terminal region or the amphipathic phosphopeptide-binding groove. However, since disassembly of 14-3-3 dimers significantly increases their chaperone-like activity, the dimer interface, located in the N terminus, possessing a high disorder propensity and pronounced hydrophobicity, is likely to be involved. Various factors affecting the oligomeric status of 14-3-3 proteins can thus regulate the balance between regulatory phosphomotif binding and genuine chaperone-like activity. Understanding the latter mode of 14-3-3 functioning is fundamental to defining the underlying molecular mechanisms for a range of human disorders. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Improvement of chaperone activity of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin using electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Hyun; An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Jae Taek; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The peroxiredoxin protein expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaPrx) is a typical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin that has dual functions as both a thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase and molecular chaperone. As the function of PaPrx is regulated by its structural status, in the present study, we examined the effects of electron beam radiation on the structural modifications of PaPrx, as well as changes to PaPrx peroxidase and chaperone functions. It was found that the chaperone activity of PaPrx was increased approximately 3- to 4-fold at 2 kGy when compared to non-irradiated PaPrx, while its peroxidase activity decreased. This corresponded to a shift from the low molecular weight PaPrx species that acts as a peroxidase to the high molecular weight complex that functions as a chaperone, as detected using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also investigated the influence of the electron beam on physical protein properties such as hydrophobicity and secondary structure. The exposure of the PaPrx hydrophobic domains in response to irradiation reached a peak at 2 kGy and then decreased in a dose-dependent manner at higher doses. In addition, the exposure of β-sheet and random coil elements on the surface of PaPrx was significantly increased following irradiation with an electron beam, whereas exposure of α-helix and turn elements was decreased. These results suggest that irradiated PaPrx may be a potential candidate for use in bio-engineering systems and various industrial applications, due to its enhanced chaperone activity.

  13. Cloning Expression Purification Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffractino Studies of a 12R-LOX-chaperone Complex

    SciTech Connect

    G Deb; K Boeshanes; W Idler; B Ahvazi

    2011-12-31

    Lipoxygenases are a family of nonheme iron-containing dioxygenases. An Escherichia coli expression system producing the bacterial chaperones GroES and GroEL was engineered and successfully used to produce large quantities of recombinant human 12R-LOX (LOXR; MW 80.34 kDa; 701 amino-acid residues). The co-overproduction of the two chaperones with 12R-LOX resulted in increased solubility of 12R-LOX and allowed the purification of milligram amounts of active enzyme for structural studies by X-ray diffraction. The lipoxygenase protein was purified on an affinity column and a gel-filtration column with chaperone protein (MW 57.16 kDa). The LOXR-chaperone complex was crystallized with ligand by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.5 M ammonium hydrogen phosphate as precipitant. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 138.97, b = 266.11, c = 152.26 {angstrom}, {beta} = 101.07{sup o}. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (3.1 {angstrom}3 Da{sup -1}), it is estimated that one molecule of LOXR complexed with two molecules of chaperone is present in the asymmetric unit of the crystal lattice. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 4 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  14. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Kilstrup, M; Jacobsen, S; Hammer, K; Vogensen, F K

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during life in excess nutrients, by comparison of prototrophic wild-type strains and auxotrophic domesticated (dairy) strains. In a study of the capacity of domesticated strains to perform directed responses toward various stress conditions, we have analyzed the heat and salt stress response in the established L. lactis subsp. cremoris laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain. After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shock repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase were identified by a combination of Western blotting and direct N-terminal amino acid sequencing of proteins from the gels. Of 400 to 500 visible proteins, 17 were induced more than twofold during heat stress. Two classes of heat stress proteins were identified from their temporal induction pattern. The fast-induced proteins (including DnaK) showed an abruptly increased rate of synthesis during the first 10 min, declining to intermediate levels after 15 min. GroEL and GroES, which also belong to this group, maintained a high rate of synthesis after 15 min. The class of slowly induced proteins exhibited a gradual increase in the rate of synthesis after the onset of stress. Unlike other organisms, all salt stress-induced proteins in L. lactis were also subjected to heat stress induction. DnaK, GroEL, and GroES showed similar temporal patterns of induction during salt stress, resembling the timing during heat stress although at a lower induction level. These data indicate an overlap between the heat shock and salt stress responses in L. lactis. PMID:9143115

  15. Antarctic Krill 454 Pyrosequencing Reveals Chaperone and Stress Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Melody S.; Thorne, Michael A. S.; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Meng, Yan; Guan, Le Luo; Peck, Lloyd S.; Moore, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. Methodology/Principal Findings The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp). In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS), providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. Conclusions This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical “stress proteins”, such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of “stress” genes for studies understanding marine

  16. Antarctic krill 454 pyrosequencing reveals chaperone and stress transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Clark, Melody S; Thorne, Michael A S; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Meng, Yan; Guan, Le Luo; Peck, Lloyd S; Moore, Stephen

    2011-01-06

    The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp). In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS), providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical "stress proteins", such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of "stress" genes for studies understanding marine ectotherms' capacities to cope with environmental change.

  17. Eukaryotic Hsp70 chaperones in the intermembrane space of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bionda, Tihana; Gross, Lucia E; Becker, Thomas; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G; Leisegang, Matthias S; Karas, Michael; Schleiff, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Multiple eukaryotic Hsp70 typically localized in the cytoplasm are also distributed to the intermembrane space of chloroplasts and might thereby represent the missing link in energizing protein translocation. Protein translocation into organelles is a central cellular process that is tightly regulated. It depends on signals within the preprotein and on molecular machines catalyzing the process. Molecular chaperones participate in transport and translocation of preproteins into organelles to control folding and to provide energy for the individual steps. While most of the processes are explored and the components are identified, the transfer of preproteins into and across the intermembrane space of chloroplasts is not yet understood. The existence of an energy source in this compartment is discussed, because the required transit peptide length for successful translocation into chloroplasts is shorter than that found for mitochondria where energy is provided exclusively by matrix chaperones. Furthermore, a cytosolic-type Hsp70 homologue was proposed as component of the chloroplast translocon in the intermembrane space energizing the initial translocation. The molecular identity of such intermembrane space localized Hsp70 remained unknown, which led to a controversy concerning its existence. We identified multiple cytosolic Hsp70s by mass spectrometry on isolated, thermolysin-treated Medicago sativa chloroplasts. The localization of these Hsp70s of M. sativa or Arabidopsis thaliana in the intermembrane space was confirmed by a self-assembly GFP-based in vivo system. The localization of cytosolic Hsp70s in the stroma of chloroplasts or different mitochondrial compartments could not be observed. Similarly, we could not identify any cytosolic Hsp90 in the intermembrane space of chloroplast. With respect to our results we discuss the possible targeting and function of the Hsp70 found in the intermembrane space.

  18. Modulation of deregulated chaperone-mediated autophagy by a phosphopeptide.

    PubMed

    Macri, Christophe; Wang, Fengjuan; Tasset, Inmaculada; Schall, Nicolas; Page, Nicolas; Briand, Jean-Paul; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Muller, Sylviane

    2015-01-01

    The P140 peptide, a 21-mer linear peptide (sequence 131-151) generated from the spliceosomal SNRNP70/U1-70K protein, contains a phosphoserine residue at position 140. It significantly ameliorates clinical manifestations in autoimmune patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and enhances survival in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. Previous studies showed that after P140 treatment, there is an accumulation of autophagy markers sequestosome 1/p62 and MAP1LC3-II in MRL/lpr B cells, consistent with a downregulation of autophagic flux. We now identify chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) as a target of P140 and demonstrate that its inhibitory effect on CMA is likely tied to its ability to alter the composition of HSPA8/HSC70 heterocomplexes. As in the case of HSPA8, expression of the limiting CMA component LAMP2A, which is increased in MRL/lpr B cells, is downregulated after P140 treatment. We also show that P140, but not the unphosphorylated peptide, uses the clathrin-dependent endo-lysosomal pathway to enter into MRL/lpr B lymphocytes and accumulates in the lysosomal lumen where it may directly hamper lysosomal HSPA8 chaperoning functions, and also destabilize LAMP2A in lysosomes as a result of its effect on HSP90AA1. This dual effect may interfere with the endogenous autoantigen processing and loading to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and as a consequence, lead to lower activation of autoreactive T cells. These results shed light on mechanisms by which P140 can modulate lupus disease and exert its tolerogenic activity in patients. The unique selective inhibitory effect of the P140 peptide on CMA may be harnessed in other pathological conditions in which reduction of CMA activity would be desired.

  19. Modulation of deregulated chaperone-mediated autophagy by a phosphopeptide

    PubMed Central

    Macri, Christophe; Wang, Fengjuan; Tasset, Inmaculada; Schall, Nicolas; Page, Nicolas; Briand, Jean-Paul; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Muller, Sylviane

    2015-01-01

    The P140 peptide, a 21-mer linear peptide (sequence 131–151) generated from the spliceosomal SNRNP70/U1–70K protein, contains a phosphoserine residue at position 140. It significantly ameliorates clinical manifestations in autoimmune patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and enhances survival in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. Previous studies showed that after P140 treatment, there is an accumulation of autophagy markers sequestosome 1/p62 and MAP1LC3-II in MRL/lpr B cells, consistent with a downregulation of autophagic flux. We now identify chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) as a target of P140 and demonstrate that its inhibitory effect on CMA is likely tied to its ability to alter the composition of HSPA8/HSC70 heterocomplexes. As in the case of HSPA8, expression of the limiting CMA component LAMP2A, which is increased in MRL/lpr B cells, is downregulated after P140 treatment. We also show that P140, but not the unphosphorylated peptide, uses the clathrin-dependent endo-lysosomal pathway to enter into MRL/lpr B lymphocytes and accumulates in the lysosomal lumen where it may directly hamper lysosomal HSPA8 chaperoning functions, and also destabilize LAMP2A in lysosomes as a result of its effect on HSP90AA1. This dual effect may interfere with the endogenous autoantigen processing and loading to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and as a consequence, lead to lower activation of autoreactive T cells. These results shed light on mechanisms by which P140 can modulate lupus disease and exert its tolerogenic activity in patients. The unique selective inhibitory effect of the P140 peptide on CMA may be harnessed in other pathological conditions in which reduction of CMA activity would be desired. PMID:25719862

  20. UCS proteins: chaperones for myosin and co-chaperones for Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weiming; Odunuga, Odutayo O

    2015-01-01

    The UCS (UNC-45/CRO1/She4p) family of proteins has emerged as chaperones that are specific for the folding, assembly and function of myosin. These proteins participate in various important myosin-dependent cellular processes that include myofibril organization and muscle functions, cell differentiation, cardiac and skeletal muscle development, cytokinesis and endocytosis. Mutations in the genes that code for UCS proteins cause serious defects in these actomyosin-based processes. Homologs of UCS proteins can be broadly divided into (1) animal UCS proteins, generally known as UNC-45 proteins, which contain an N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain in addition to the canonical UCS domain, and (2) fungal UCS proteins, which lack the TPR domain. Structurally, except for TPR domain, both sub-classes of UCS proteins comprise of several irregular armadillo (ARM) repeats that are divided into two-domain architecture: a combined central-neck domain and a C-terminal UCS domain. Structural analyses suggest that UNC-45 proteins form elongated oligomers that serve as scaffolds to recruit Hsp90 and/or Hsp70 to form a multi-protein chaperoning complex that assists myosin heads to fold and simultaneously organize them into myofibrils. Similarly, fungal UCS proteins may dimerize to promote folding of non-muscle myosins as well as determine their step size along actin filaments. These findings confirm UCS proteins as a new class of myosin-specific chaperones and co-chaperones for Hsp90. This chapter reviews the implications of the outcome of studies on these proteins in cellular processes such as muscle formation, and disease states such as myopathies and cancer.

  1. Characterization of the human sigma-1 receptor chaperone domain structure and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interactions.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R

    2013-07-19

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198-206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions.

  2. THE PROTEIN TARGETING FACTOR GET3 FUNCTIONS AS AN ATP-INDEPENDENT CHAPERONE UNDER OXIDATIVE STRESS CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Voth, Wilhelm; Schick, Markus; Gates, Stephanie; Li, Sheng; Vilardi, Fabio; Gostimskaya, Irina; Southworth, Daniel R.; Schwappach, Blanche; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Exposure of cells to reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes a rapid and significant drop in intracellular ATP-levels. This energy depletion negatively affects ATP-dependent chaperone systems, making ROS-mediated protein unfolding and aggregation a potentially very challenging problem. Here we show that Get3, a protein involved in ATP-dependent targeting of tail-anchored (TA) proteins under non-stress conditions, turns into an effective ATP-in dependent chaperone when oxidized. Activation of Get3’s chaperone function, which is a fully reversible process, involves disulfide bond formation, metal release and its conversion into distinct, higher oligomeric structures. Mutational studies demonstrate that the chaperone activity of Get3 is functionally distinct from and likely mutually exclusive with its targeting function, and responsible for the oxidative stress sensitive phenotype that has long been noted for yeast cells lacking functional Get3. These results provide convincing evidence that Get3 functions as a redox regulated chaperone, effectively protecting eukaryotic cells against oxidative protein damage. PMID:25242142

  3. Differential roles of NF-Y transcription factor in ER chaperone expression and neuronal maintenance in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Tosaki, Asako; Miyazaki, Haruko; Kurosawa, Masaru; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Maity, Sankar N.; Misawa, Hidemi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) contains various types of neurons with different neuronal functions. In contrast to established roles of cell type-specific transcription factors on neuronal specification and maintenance, whether ubiquitous transcription factors have conserved or differential neuronal function remains uncertain. Here, we revealed that inactivation of a ubiquitous factor NF-Y in different sets of neurons resulted in cell type-specific neuropathologies and gene downregulation in mouse CNS. In striatal and cerebellar neurons, NF-Y inactivation led to ubiquitin/p62 pathologies with downregulation of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone Grp94, as we previously observed by NF-Y deletion in cortical neurons. In contrast, NF-Y inactivation in motor neurons induced neuronal loss without obvious protein deposition. Detailed analysis clarified downregulation of another ER chaperone Grp78 in addition to Grp94 in motor neurons, and knockdown of both ER chaperones in motor neurons recapitulated the pathology observed after NF-Y inactivation. Finally, additional downregulation of Grp78 in striatal neurons suppressed ubiquitin accumulation induced by NF-Y inactivation, implying that selective ER chaperone downregulation mediates different neuropathologies. Our data suggest distinct roles of NF-Y in protein homeostasis and neuronal maintenance in the CNS by differential regulation of ER chaperone expression. PMID:27687130

  4. Characterization of the Human Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Domain Structure and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198–206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions. PMID:23760505

  5. Applying chaperones to protein-misfolding disorders: molecular chaperones against α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Ali; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Ladjimi, Moncef

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of a protein called α-synuclein (α-syn) into inclusions known as lewy bodies (LB) within neurons. This accumulation is also due to insufficient formation and activity of dopamine produced in certain neurons within the substantia nigra. Lewy bodies are the pathological hallmark of the idiopathic disorder and the cascade that allows α-synuclein to misfold, aggregate and form these inclusions has been the subject of intensive research. Targeting these early steps of oligomerization is one of the main therapeutic approaches in order to develop neurodegenerative-modifying agents. Because the folding and refolding of alpha synuclein is the key point of this cascade, we are interested in this review to summarize the role of some molecular chaperones proteins such as Hsp70, Hsp90 and small heat shock proteins (sHsp) and Hsp 104. Hsp70 and its co-chaperone, Hsp70 and small heat shock proteins can prevent neurodegeneration by preventing α-syn misfolding, oligomerization and aggregation in vitro and in Parkinson disease animal models. Hsp104 is able to resolve disordered protein aggregates and cross beta amyloid conformers. Together, these chaperones have a complementary effect and can be a target for therapeutic intervention in PD. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. [Structure and function of histone chaperone FACT].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, M T; Maluchenko, N V; Valieva, M E; Gerasimova, N S; Kulaeva, O I; Georgiev, P G; Studitsky, V M

    2015-01-01

    FACT is heterodimer protein complex and histone chaperone that plays an important role in maintaining and modifying chromatin structure during various DNA-dependent processes. FACT is involved in nucleosome assembly de novo and in the preservation and recovery of the nucleosome structure during and after transcription, replication and repair of DNA. During transcript elongation FACT reduces the height of the nucleosome barrier and supports survival of the nucleosomes during and after passage of RNA polymerase II. In this process FACT interacts with histone H2A-H2B dimer in nucleosomes, thus facilitating uncoiling of nucleosomal DNA from the octamer of histones; it also facilitates subsequent recovery of the canonical structure of the nucleosome after transcription. FACT also plays an important role in transformation of human cells and in maintaining the viability of the tumor cells.

  7. Genetic mapping and biochemical characterization of suppressor mutations sukA and sukB for a dnaK7(Ts) mutation of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Itikawa, H; Mishina, Y; Wada, M; Fujita, H

    1992-02-01

    Temperature-resistant pseudorevertants were isolated from a dnaK7(Ts) mutant of Escherichia coli K-12. Two of these pseudorevertants were shown to carry suppressor mutations, sukA and sukB, respectively. Genetic mapping by conjugation and P1-transduction revealed that these suppressor mutations were located at two distinct sites between 76 and 77 min close to the suhA and rpoH genes. Labeled cellular proteins were extracted from suppressor mutants grown at various temperatures and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis. Autoradiograms of the gels indicated that these suppressor mutations each resulted in increased synthesis of the heat shock protein Lon (an ATP-dependent protease, La) at both permissive and nonpermissive temperatures.

  8. Histone chaperones: assisting histone traffic and nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The functional organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin uses histones as components of its building block, the nucleosome. Histone chaperones, which are proteins that escort histones throughout their cellular life, are key actors in all facets of histone metabolism; they regulate the supply and dynamics of histones at chromatin for its assembly and disassembly. Histone chaperones can also participate in the distribution of histone variants, thereby defining distinct chromatin landscapes of importance for genome function, stability, and cell identity. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of the known histone chaperones and their histone partners, focusing on histone H3 and its variants. We then place them into an escort network that distributes these histones in various deposition pathways. Through their distinct interfaces, we show how they affect dynamics during DNA replication, DNA damage, and transcription, and how they maintain genome integrity. Finally, we discuss the importance of histone chaperones during development and describe how misregulation of the histone flow can link to disease.

  9. Cloning and characterization of three hypothetical secretion chaperone proteins from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Ljubica; Borin, Paula F L; Khater, Leti Cia; Ramos, Carlos H I

    2007-06-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker in plantations around the world and is of particular significance in Brazil where its incidence has risen exponentially over the past decade. Approximately one third of the predicted Xac open reading frames show no homology, or homology with very low score with that of known sequences. It is believed that Xac utilizes secretion systems to transfer virulence proteins into susceptible eukaryotic cells. This process is assisted by secretion chaperones that maintain virulence proteins partly or completely unfolded during translocation. We have cloned three of these hypothetical secretion chaperones: XAC0419 and XAC1346 from type III secretion system (TTSS) and XACb0033 from type IV secretion system (TFSS). All proteins were cloned in a pET23a vector (Novagen), expressed at 37 degrees C using a BL21(DE3)pLysS Escherichia coli strain and purified by ion exchange and gel-filtration chromatographic methods. Pure proteins were characterized using spectroscopic measurements: circular dichroism, and both static and lifetime emission fluorescence in the case of XACb0033. The analyzed proteins are stable at elevated temperatures (up to 65 degrees C) and exhibit alpha-helix content from approximately 30% (XACb003) to approximately 87% (XAC1346). XACb0033 exhibits lifetimes in the fluorescence experiments that indicate different neighborhoods for its tryptophan residues. These chaperones have the characteristics of TTSS and TFSS: all are small, with a high alpha-helix content, and without ATP-binding or ATP-hydrolyzing activity.

  10. Chaperone-assisted refolding of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Paul, Subhankar; Punam, Shashikala; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2007-11-01

    In vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase, a 69 kDa monomeric Escherichia coli protein, was studied in the presence of glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, ethylene glycol, trehalose, proline and chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Different osmolytes, namely proline, glycerol, trimethylamine-N-oxide and dimethylsulfoxide, also known as chemical chaperones, assist in protein folding through effective inhibition of the aggregation process. In the present study, it was observed that a few chemical chaperones effectively reduced the aggregation process of maltodextrin glucosidase and hence the in vitro refolding was substantially enhanced, with ethylene glycol being the exception. Although, the highest recovery of active maltodextrin glucosidase was achieved through the ATP-mediated GroEL/GroES-assisted refolding of denatured protein, the yield of correctly folded protein from glycerol- or proline-assisted spontaneous refolding process was closer to the chaperonin-assisted refolding. It was also observed that the combined application of chemical chaperones and molecular chaperone was more productive than their individual contribution towards the in vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase. The chemical chaperones, except ethylene glycol, were found to provide different degrees of protection to maltodextrin glucosidase from thermal denaturation, whereas proline caused the highest protection. The observations from the present studies conclusively demonstrate that chemical or molecular chaperones, or the combination of both chaperones, could be used in the efficient refolding of recombinant E. coli maltodextrin glucosidase, which enhances the possibility of identifying or designing suitable small molecules that can act as chemical chaperones in the efficient refolding of various aggregate-prone proteins of commercial and medical importance.

  11. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G

    2016-09-08

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase and maltose-binding protein captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone.

  12. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and maltose binding protein (MBP) captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of the non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone. PMID:27501151

  13. Small molecule pharmacological chaperones: From thermodynamic stabilization to pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ejima, Daisuke; Kita, Yoshiko; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2006-11-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid to so-called amyloid diseases, in which the proteins responsible for the cell death and resultant diseases undergo conformational changes and aggregate in vivo, although whether aggregate formation is the cause or the result of the cell death is controversial. Recently, an increasing attention is given to protein folding diseases tightly associated with mutations. These mutations result in temperature-dependent misfolding and hence inactivation of the proteins, leading to loss of function, at physiological temperature; at low so-called permissive temperatures, the mutant proteins correctly fold and acquire functional structure. Alternatively, activation can be induced by use of osmolytes, which restores the folding of the mutant proteins and hence are called chemical chaperones. The osmolytes are compatible with macromolecular function and do stabilize the native protein structure. However, chemical chaperones require high concentrations for effective folding of mutant proteins and hence are too toxic in in-vivo applications. This limitation can be overcome by pharmacological chaperones, whose functions are similar to the chemical chaperones, but occur at much lower concentrations, i.e., physiologically acceptable concentrations. Although the research and clinical importance of pharmacological chaperones has been emphasized, the initial and central concept of osmolytes is largely ignored. Here we attempt to bridge the concept of osmolytes to applications of pharmacological chaperones.

  14. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase and maltose-binding protein captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone.

  15. Type III secretion chaperones of Pseudomonas syringae protect effectors from Lon-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana C; Hutcheson, Steven W

    2005-02-01

    The hrp type III secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae translocates effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. Proteolysis of HrpR by Lon has been shown to negatively regulate the hrp TTSS. The inability to bypass Lon-associated effects on the regulatory system by ectopic expression of the known regulators suggested a second site of action for Lon in TTSS-dependent effector secretion. In this study we report that TTSS-dependent effectors are subject to the proteolytic degradation that appears to be rate-limiting to secretion. The half-lives of the effectors AvrPto, AvrRpt2, HopPsyA, HopPsyB1, HopPtoB2, HopPsyV1, HopPtoG and HopPtoM were substantially higher in bacteria lacking Lon. TTSS-dependent secretion of several effectors was enhanced from Lon mutants. A primary role for chaperones appears to be protection of effectors from Lon-associated degradation prior to secretion. When coexpressed with their cognate chaperone, HopPsyB1, HopPsyV1 and HopPtoM were at least 10 times more stable in strains expressing Lon. Distinct Lon-targeting and chaperone-binding domains were identified in HopPtoM. The results imply that Lon is involved at two distinct levels in the regulation of the P. syringae TTSS: regulation of assembly of the secreton and modulation of effector secretion.

  16. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus.

  17. A BAG3 chaperone complex maintains cardiomyocyte function during proteotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Luke M.; Perez-Bermejo, Juan A.; Truong, Annie; Ribeiro, Alexandre J.S.; Yoo, Jennie C.; Jensen, Christina L.; Mandegar, Mohammad A.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Kaake, Robyn M.; So, Po-Lin; Srivastava, Deepak; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular chaperones regulate quality control in the human proteome, pathways that have been implicated in many diseases, including heart failure. Mutations in the BAG3 gene, which encodes a co-chaperone protein, have been associated with heart failure due to both inherited and sporadic dilated cardiomyopathy. Familial BAG3 mutations are autosomal dominant and frequently cause truncation of the coding sequence, suggesting a heterozygous loss-of-function mechanism. However, heterozygous knockout of the murine BAG3 gene did not cause a detectable phenotype. To model BAG3 cardiomyopathy in a human system, we generated an isogenic series of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with loss-of-function mutations in BAG3. Heterozygous BAG3 mutations reduced protein expression, disrupted myofibril structure, and compromised contractile function in iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs). BAG3-deficient iPS-CMs were particularly sensitive to further myofibril disruption and contractile dysfunction upon exposure to proteasome inhibitors known to cause cardiotoxicity. We performed affinity tagging of the endogenous BAG3 protein and mass spectrometry proteomics to further define the cardioprotective chaperone complex that BAG3 coordinates in the human heart. Our results establish a model for evaluating protein quality control pathways in human cardiomyocytes and their potential as therapeutic targets and susceptibility factors for cardiac drug toxicity. PMID:28724793

  18. New insights into the roles of molecular chaperones in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

    PubMed

    Nordhues, André; Miller, Stephen M; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used as a model organism for many decades, mainly to study photosynthesis and flagella/cilia. Only recently, Chlamydomonas has received much attention because of its ability to produce hydrogen and nonpolar lipids that have promise as biofuels. The best-studied multicellular cousin of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is Volvox carteri, whose life cycle comprises events that have clear parallels in higher plants and/or animals, making it an excellent system in which to study fundamental developmental processes. Molecular chaperones are proteins that guide other cellular proteins through their life cycle. They assist in de novo folding of nascent chains, mediate assembly and disassembly of protein complexes, facilitate protein transport across membranes, disassemble protein aggregates, fold denatured proteins back to the native state, and transfer unfoldable proteins to proteolytic degradation. Hence, molecular chaperones regulate protein function under all growth conditions and play important roles in many basic cellular and developmental processes. The aim of this chapter is to describe recent advances toward understanding molecular chaperone biology in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

  19. Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (hop): beyond interactions with chaperones and prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Baindur-Hudson, Swati; Edkins, Adrienne L; Blatch, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop), also known as stress-inducible protein 1 (STI1), has received considerable attention for diverse cellular functions in both healthy and diseased states. There is extensive evidence that intracellular Hop is a co-chaperone of the major chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, playing an important role in the productive folding of Hsp90 client proteins. Consequently, Hop is implicated in a number of key signalling pathways, including aberrant pathways leading to cancer. However, Hop is also secreted and it is now well established that Hop also serves as a receptor for the prion protein, PrP(C). The intracellular and extracellular forms of Hop most likely represent two different isoforms, although the molecular determinants of these divergent functions are yet to be identified. There is also a growing body of research that reports the involvement of Hop in cellular activities that appear independent of either chaperones or PrP(C). While Hop has been shown to have various cellular functions, its biological function remains elusive. However, recent knockout studies in mammals suggest that Hop has an important role in embryonic development. This review provides a critical overview of the latest molecular, cellular and biological research on Hop, critically evaluating its function in healthy systems and how this function is adapted in diseases states.

  20. Efficient antibody production in the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta by overexpression of chaperones.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Baba, Satoshi; Ono, Minako; Nonaka, Koichi; Ichikawa, Kimihisa; Yabuta, Masayuki; Ito, Rie; Chiba, Yasunori

    2017-08-01

    A production system for a therapeutic monoclonal antibody was developed using the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta IFO10746. The genetically engineered O. minuta secreted a detectable amount of anti-TRAIL receptor antibody into the culture supernatant, and the secreted antibody was purified by multiple column chromatography steps. In the purification process, both fully and partially assembled antibodies were detected and isolated. The fully assembled antibody from O. minuta showed almost the same biological activity as that derived from mammalian cells despite the distinct glycosylation profile, whereas the partially assembled antibody showed no cytotoxic activity. To increase the production of active antibody in O. minuta, we overexpressed selected chaperone proteins (included protein disulfide isomerase (OmPDI1), thiol oxidase (OmERO1), and immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (OmKAR2)) known to assist in the proper folding (in the endoplasmic reticulum) of proteins destined for secretion. Each of these chaperones enhanced antibody secretion, and together these three factors yielded 16-fold higher antibody accumulation while increasing the ratio of the fully assembled antibody compared to that from the parental strain. Supplementation of a rhodanine-3-acetic acid derivative (R3AD_1c), an inhibitor of O-mannosylation, further increased the secretion of the correctly assembled antibody. These results indicated that the co-overexpression of chaperones is an effective way to produce the correctly assembled antibody in O. minuta. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. DnaK-facilitated ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli revisited

    PubMed Central

    ALIX, JEAN-HERVÉ; NIERHAUS, KNUD H.

    2003-01-01

    Assembly helpers exist for the formation of ribosomal subunits. Such a function has been suggested for the DnaK system of chaperones (DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE). Here we show that 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits from an Escherichia coli dnaK-null mutant (containing a disrupted dnaK gene) grown at 30°C are physically and functionally identical to wild-type ribosomes. Furthermore, ribosomal components derived from mutant 30S and 50S subunits are fully competent for in vitro reconstitution of active ribosomal subunits. On the other hand, the DnaK chaperone system cannot circumvent the necessary heat-dependent activation step for the in vitro reconstitution of fully active 30S ribosomal subunits. It is therefore questionable whether the requirement for DnaK observed during in vivo ribosome assembly above 37°C implicates a direct or indirect role for DnaK in this process. PMID:12810912

  2. Dissecting the Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone network using differential proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vertommen, Didier; Silhavy, Thomas J.; Collet, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    β-barrel proteins, or outer membrane proteins (OMPs), perform many essential functions in Gram-negative bacteria, but questions remain about the mechanism by which they are assembled into the outer membrane (OM). In Escherichia coli, β-barrels are escorted across the periplasm by chaperones, most notably SurA and Skp. However, the contributions of these two chaperones to the assembly of the OM proteome remained unclear. We used differential proteomics to determine how the elimination of Skp and SurA affects the assembly of many OMPs. We have shown that removal of Skp has no impact on the levels of the 63 identified OM proteins. However, depletion of SurA in the skp strain has a marked impact on the OM proteome, diminishing the levels of almost all β-barrel proteins. Our results are consistent with a model in which SurA plays a primary chaperone role in E. coli. Furthermore, they suggest that while no OMPs prefer the Skp chaperone pathway in wild-type cells, most can use Skp efficiently when SurA is absent. Our data, which provide a unique glimpse into the protein content of the non-viable surA skp mutant, clarify the roles of the periplasmic chaperones in E. coli. PMID:22589188

  3. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families-molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases-chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function.

  4. Behavioral Defects in Chaperone-Deficient Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Juhi; Karmegam, Rajalakshmi V.; Masilamoni, J. Gunasingh; Terry, Alvin V.; Cashikar, Anil G.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular chaperones protect cells from the deleterious effects of protein misfolding and aggregation. Neurotoxicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates and their deposition in senile plaques are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We observed that the overall content of αB-crystallin, a small heat shock protein molecular chaperone, decreased in AD model mice in an age-dependent manner. We hypothesized that αB-crystallin protects cells against Aβ toxicity. To test this, we crossed αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient (CRYAB-/-HSPB2-/-) mice with AD model transgenic mice expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein. Transgenic and non-transgenic mice in chaperone-sufficient or deficient backgrounds were examined for representative behavioral paradigms for locomotion and memory network functions: (i) spatial orientation and locomotion was monitored by open field test; (ii) sequential organization and associative learning was monitored by fear conditioning; and (iii) evoked behavioral response was tested by hot plate method. Interestingly, αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient transgenic mice were severely impaired in locomotion compared to each genetic model separately. Our results highlight a synergistic effect of combining chaperone deficiency in a transgenic mouse model for AD underscoring an important role for chaperones in protein misfolding diseases. PMID:21379584

  5. Role of molecular chaperones in biogenesis of the protein kinome.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Atin K; Theodoraki, Maria A; Nillegoda, Nadinath B; Caplan, Avrom J

    2011-01-01

    Molecular chaperones promote polypeptide folding in cells by protecting newly made and otherwise misfolded proteins against aggregation or degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The roles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc37 and Ydj1 molecular chaperones are described in this chapter. We focus on biogenesis of protein kinases that require several different molecular chaperones for their proper folding. Specific among these is Cdc37, which binds directly to its kinase clients either during or shortly after translation and protects them against rapid proteasomal degradation. Ydj1 has a similar role, but is less specific for protein kinases in its role as a molecular chaperone. The method that we describe uses pulse chase and immunoprecipitation to analyze the fate of newly made proteins. Two kinetically distinct pathways of degradation can be discerned using this methodology that is dependent on the presence of an Hsp90 inhibitor or occurs in mutants of the molecular chaperones under study. The first is "zero-point" degradation that occurs either during or immediately after translation. The second is a slower pathway, where the half-life of kinase is approximately 20 min after translation.

  6. Behavioral defects in chaperone-deficient Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Juhi; Karmegam, Rajalakshmi V; Masilamoni, J Gunasingh; Terry, Alvin V; Cashikar, Anil G

    2011-02-17

    Molecular chaperones protect cells from the deleterious effects of protein misfolding and aggregation. Neurotoxicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates and their deposition in senile plaques are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We observed that the overall content of αB-crystallin, a small heat shock protein molecular chaperone, decreased in AD model mice in an age-dependent manner. We hypothesized that αB-crystallin protects cells against Aβ toxicity. To test this, we crossed αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient (CRYAB⁻/⁻HSPB2⁻/⁻) mice with AD model transgenic mice expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein. Transgenic and non-transgenic mice in chaperone-sufficient or deficient backgrounds were examined for representative behavioral paradigms for locomotion and memory network functions: (i) spatial orientation and locomotion was monitored by open field test; (ii) sequential organization and associative learning was monitored by fear conditioning; and (iii) evoked behavioral response was tested by hot plate method. Interestingly, αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient transgenic mice were severely impaired in locomotion compared to each genetic model separately. Our results highlight a synergistic effect of combining chaperone deficiency in a transgenic mouse model for AD underscoring an important role for chaperones in protein misfolding diseases.

  7. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families–molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases–chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  8. Regulation of GPCR Anterograde Trafficking by Molecular Chaperones and Motifs.

    PubMed

    Young, Brent; Wertman, Jaime; Dupré, Denis J

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) make up a superfamily of integral membrane proteins that respond to a wide variety of extracellular stimuli, giving them an important role in cell function and survival. They have also proven to be valuable targets in the fight against various diseases. As such, GPCR signal regulation has received considerable attention over the last few decades. With the amplitude of signaling being determined in large part by receptor density at the plasma membrane, several endogenous mechanisms for modulating GPCR expression at the cell surface have come to light. It has been shown that cell surface expression is determined by both exocytic and endocytic processes. However, the body of knowledge surrounding GPCR trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, commonly known as anterograde trafficking, has considerable room for growth. We focus here on the current paradigms of anterograde GPCR trafficking. We will discuss the regulatory role of both the general and "nonclassical private" chaperone systems in GPCR trafficking as well as conserved motifs that serve as modulators of GPCR export from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Together, these topics summarize some of the known mechanisms by which the cell regulates anterograde GPCR trafficking. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation of the opening and closing of Hsp70 chaperones by coarse-grained molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gołaś, Ewa; Maisuradze, Gia G.; Senet, Patrick; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Czaplewski, Cezary; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins 70 (Hsp70s) are key molecular chaperones which assist in the folding and refolding/disaggregation of proteins. Hsp70s, which consist of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD, consisting of NBD-I and NBD-II subdomains) and a substrate-binding domain [SBD, further split into the β-sheet (SBD-β) and α-helical (SBD-α) subdomains], occur in two major conformations having (a) a closed SBD, in which the SBD and NBD domains do not interact, (b) an open SBD, in which SBD-α interacts with NBD-I and SBD-β interacts with the top parts of NBD-I and NBD-II. In the SBD-closed conformation, SBD is bound to a substrate protein, with release occurring after transition to the open conformation. While the transition from the closed to the open conformation is triggered efficiently by binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the NBD, it also occurs, although less frequently, in the absence of ATP. The reverse transition occurs after ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report canonical and multiplexed replica exchange simulations of the conformational dynamics of Hsp70s using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach with the UNRES force field. The simulations were run in the following three modes: (i) with the two halves of the NBD unrestrained relative to each other, (ii) with the two halves of the NBD restrained in an “open” geometry as in the SBD-closed form of DnaK (2KHO), and (iii) the two halves of NBD restrained in a “closed” geometry as in known experimental structures of ATP-bound NBD forms of Hsp70. Open conformations, in which the SBD interacted strongly with the NBD, formed spontaneously during all simulations; the number of transitions was largest in simulations carried out with the “closed” NBD domain, and smallest in those carried out with the “open” NBD domain; this observation is in agreement with the experimentally-observed influence of ATP-binding on the transition of Hsp70’s from the SBD-closed to the SBD-open form. Two kinds of open

  10. Structure of Human J-type Co-chaperone HscB Reveals a Tetracysteine Metal-binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Bittova, Lenka; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-11-24

    Iron-sulfur proteins play indispensable roles in a broad range of biochemical processes. The biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins is a complex process that has become a subject of extensive research. The final step of iron-sulfur protein assembly involves transfer of an iron-sulfur cluster from a cluster-donor to a cluster-acceptor protein. This process is facilitated by a specialized chaperone system, which consists of a molecular chaperone from the Hsc70 family and a co-chaperone of the J-domain family. The 3.0 A crystal structure of a human mitochondrial J-type co-chaperone HscB revealed an L-shaped protein that resembles Escherichia coli HscB. The important difference between the two homologs is the presence of an auxiliary metal-binding domain at the N terminus of human HscB that coordinates a metal via the tetracysteine consensus motif CWXCX(9-13)FCXXCXXXQ. The domain is found in HscB homologs from animals and plants as well as in magnetotactic bacteria. The metal-binding site of the domain is structurally similar to that of rubredoxin and several zinc finger proteins containing rubredoxin-like knuckles. The normal mode analysis of HscB revealed that this L-shaped protein preferentially undergoes a scissors-like motion that correlates well with the conformational changes of human HscB observed in the crystals.

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Marquardt, Iris; Donsante, Anthony; Yi, Ling; Hicks, Julia D.; Steinbach, Peter J.; Wilson, Callum; Elpeleg, Orly; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Christodoulou, John; Kaler, Stephen G.; Gärtner, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Copper is a trace metal that readily gains and donates electrons, a property that renders it desirable as an enzyme cofactor but dangerous as a source of free radicals. To regulate cellular copper metabolism, an elaborate system of chaperones and transporters has evolved, although no human copper chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited a homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution of a highly conserved arginine residue at position 163 with tryptophan in domain II of CCS, which interacts directly with SOD1. Biochemical analyses of the patient’s fibroblasts, mammalian cell transfections, immunoprecipitation assays, and Lys7Δ (CCS homolog) yeast complementation support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal copper homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation in a gene coding for a copper chaperone. PMID:22508683

  12. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Marquardt, Iris; Donsante, Anthony; Yi, Ling; Hicks, Julia D; Steinbach, Peter J; Wilson, Callum; Elpeleg, Orly; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Christodoulou, John; Kaler, Stephen G; Gärtner, Jutta

    2012-08-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace metal that readily gains and donates electrons, a property that renders it desirable as an enzyme cofactor but dangerous as a source of free radicals. To regulate cellular Cu metabolism, an elaborate system of chaperones and transporters has evolved, although no human Cu chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution of a highly conserved arginine residue at position 163, with tryptophan in domain II of CCS, which interacts directly with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Biochemical analyses of the patient's fibroblasts, mammalian cell transfections, immunoprecipitation assays, and Lys7Δ (CCS homolog) yeast complementation support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result, this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal Cu homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation in a gene coding for a Cu chaperone. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. ER chaperones in neurodegenerative disease: Folding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Huerta, Paula; Bargsted, Leslie; Rivas, Alexis; Matus, Soledad; Vidal, Rene L

    2016-10-01

    Proteins along the secretory pathway are co-translationally translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as unfolded polypeptide chains. Afterwards, they are usually modified with N-linked glycans, correctly folded and stabilized by disulfide bonds. ER chaperones and folding enzymes control these processes. The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER activates a signaling response, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). The hallmark of this response is the coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of ER chaperones and folding enzymes. In order to discuss the importance of the proper folding of certain substrates we will address the role of ER chaperones in normal physiological conditions and examine different aspects of its contribution in neurodegenerative disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress.

  14. Escorts Take the Lead: Molecular Chaperones as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dumaine; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2011-01-01

    The functional and physiological diversity of transmembrane receptors results from factors that influence the pharmacology, signaling, and trafficking of these receptors. Receptor mutations and other modifications may lead to misfolding, intracellular retention, and ineffective signaling of transmembrane receptors. The importance of such mutations is highlighted by the fact that various diseases have been linked to mutations that lead to ineffective signaling of these receptors, resulting from the retention of receptors in intracellular compartments. Studies focused on understanding the regulation of trafficking and cell surface expression of newly synthesized receptors have highlighted molecular chaperones as key regulators of receptor maturation and sorting. In this chapter, we discuss the functions of molecular chaperones in the regulation of seven-transmembrane-containing G-protein-coupled receptor function and trafficking and explore ways in which chaperones can serve as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:20691961

  15. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  16. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone.

  17. Protein folding occurs while bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy

    PubMed Central

    Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist the folding of many proteins in the cell. While the most well studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote protein folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small, ATP-independent chaperone, Spy. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, Immunity protein 7 (Im7), eliminating its potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while remaining bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones can assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while continuously bound to a chaperone. PMID:26619265

  18. Conformational dynamics of the molecular chaperone Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Krukenberg, Kristin A.; Street, Timothy O.; Lavery, Laura A.; Agard, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is an essential eukaryotic protein that makes up 1–2% of all cytosolic proteins. Hsp90 is vital for the maturation and maintenance of a wide variety of substrate proteins largely involved in signaling and regulatory processes. Many of these substrates have also been implicated in cancer and other diseases making Hsp90 an attractive target for therapeutics. Hsp90 is a highly dynamic and flexible molecule that can adapt its conformation to the wide variety of substrate proteins with which it acts. Large conformational rearrangements are also required for the activation of these client proteins. One driving force for these rearrangements is the intrinsic ATPase activity of Hsp90, as seen with other chaperones. However, unlike other chaperones, studies have shown that the ATPase cycle of Hsp90 is not conformationally deterministic. That is, rather than dictating the conformational state, ATP binding and hydrolysis shifts the equilibrium between a pre-existing set of conformational states in an organism-dependent manner. In vivo Hsp90 functions as part of larger heterocomplexes. The binding partners of Hsp90, co-chaperones, assist in the recruitment and activation of substrates, and many co-chaperones further regulate the conformational dynamics of Hsp90 by shifting the conformational equilibrium towards a particular state. Studies have also suggested alternative mechanisms for the regulation of Hsp90’s conformation. In this review, we discuss the structural and biochemical studies leading to our current understanding of the conformational dynamics of Hsp90 and the role that nucleotide, co-chaperones, post-translational modification and clients play in regulating Hsp90’s conformation. We also discuss the effects of current Hsp90 inhibitors on conformation and the potential for developing small molecules that inhibit Hsp90 by disrupting the conformational dynamics. PMID:21414251

  19. Chaperone-Assisted Soluble Expression of a Humanized Anti-EGFR ScFv Antibody in E. Coli

    PubMed Central

    Veisi, Kamal; Farajnia, Safar; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Khoram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Samadi, Nasser; Ahdi Khosroshahi, Shiva; Zarei Jaliani, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Formation of inclusion bodies is a considerable obstacle threatening the advantages of E. coli expression system to serve as the most common and easiest system in recombinant protein production. To solve this problem, several strategies have been proposed among which application of molecular chaperones is of remarkable consideration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of molecular chaperones on soluble expression of aggregation-prone humanized single chain antibody. Methods: To increase the solubility of a humanized single chain antibody (hscFv), different chaperone plasmids including PG-tf2 (GroES- GroEL- tig), ptf16 (tig) and pGro7 (GroES- GroEL) were co-expressed in BL21 cells containing pET-22b- hscFv construct. The solubility of recombinant hscFv was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. After purification of soluble hscFv by Ni-NTA column, the biological activity and cytotoxicity of the recombinant protein were tested by ELISA and MTT assay, respectively. Results: SDS-PAGE analysis of the hscFv revealed that chaperone utility remarkably increased (up to 50%) the solubility of the protein. ELISA test and MTT assay analyses also confirmed the biological activity of the gained hscFv in reaction with A431 cells (OD value: 2.6) and inhibition of their proliferation, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that co-expression of chaperones with hscFv leads to remarkable increase in the solubility of the recombinant hscFv, which could be of great consideration for large scale production of recombinant single chain antibodies. PMID:26793607

  20. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of SrcA, a Multi-cargo Type III Secretion Chaperone in Salmonella Required for Pathogenic Association with a Host

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Zhang, K; Andres, S; Fnag, Y; Kaniuk, N; Hannemann, M; Brumell, J; Foster, L; Junop, M; Coombes, B

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2) is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2) and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  1. Orchestration of secretory protein folding by ER chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Stevens, Fred; Argon, Yair

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a major compartment of protein biogenesis in the cell, dedicated to production of secretory, membrane and organelle proteins. The secretome has distinct structural and post-translational characteristics, since folding in the ER occurs in an environment that is distinct in terms of its ionic composition, dynamics and requirements for quality contol. The folding machinery in the ER therefore includes chaperones and folding enzymes that introduce, monitor and react to disulfide bonds, glycans, and fluctuations of luminal calcium. We describe the major chaperone networks in the lumen and discuss how they have distinct modes of operation that enable cells to accomplish highly efficient production of the secretome. PMID:23507200

  2. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  3. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action.

    PubMed

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl At; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James Ca

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These "Super Spy" variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001.

  4. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl AT; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James CA

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These “Super Spy” variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001 PMID:24497545

  5. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  6. Molecular chaperones and proteostasis regulation during redox imbalance☆

    PubMed Central

    Niforou, Katerina; Cheimonidou, Christina; Trougakos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals originate from both exogenous environmental sources and as by-products of the respiratory chain and cellular oxygen metabolism. Sustained accumulation of free radicals, beyond a physiological level, induces oxidative stress that is harmful for the cellular homeodynamics as it promotes the oxidative damage and stochastic modification of all cellular biomolecules including proteins. In relation to proteome stability and maintenance, the increased concentration of oxidants disrupts the functionality of cellular protein machines resulting eventually in proteotoxic stress and the deregulation of the proteostasis (homeostasis of the proteome) network (PN). PN curates the proteome in the various cellular compartments and the extracellular milieu by modulating protein synthesis and protein machines assembly, protein recycling and stress responses, as well as refolding or degradation of damaged proteins. Molecular chaperones are key players of the PN since they facilitate folding of nascent polypeptides, as well as holding, folding, and/or degradation of unfolded, misfolded, or non-native proteins. Therefore, the expression and the activity of the molecular chaperones are tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational level at organismal states of increased oxidative and, consequently, proteotoxic stress, including ageing and various age-related diseases (e.g. degenerative diseases and cancer). In the current review we present a synopsis of the various classes of intra- and extracellular chaperones, the effects of oxidants on cellular homeodynamics and diseases and the redox regulation of chaperones. PMID:24563850

  7. Molecular chaperones and proteostasis regulation during redox imbalance.

    PubMed

    Niforou, Katerina; Cheimonidou, Christina; Trougakos, Ioannis P

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals originate from both exogenous environmental sources and as by-products of the respiratory chain and cellular oxygen metabolism. Sustained accumulation of free radicals, beyond a physiological level, induces oxidative stress that is harmful for the cellular homeodynamics as it promotes the oxidative damage and stochastic modification of all cellular biomolecules including proteins. In relation to proteome stability and maintenance, the increased concentration of oxidants disrupts the functionality of cellular protein machines resulting eventually in proteotoxic stress and the deregulation of the proteostasis (homeostasis of the proteome) network (PN). PN curates the proteome in the various cellular compartments and the extracellular milieu by modulating protein synthesis and protein machines assembly, protein recycling and stress responses, as well as refolding or degradation of damaged proteins. Molecular chaperones are key players of the PN since they facilitate folding of nascent polypeptides, as well as holding, folding, and/or degradation of unfolded, misfolded, or non-native proteins. Therefore, the expression and the activity of the molecular chaperones are tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational level at organismal states of increased oxidative and, consequently, proteotoxic stress, including ageing and various age-related diseases (e.g. degenerative diseases and cancer). In the current review we present a synopsis of the various classes of intra- and extracellular chaperones, the effects of oxidants on cellular homeodynamics and diseases and the redox regulation of chaperones.

  8. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  9. Challenging muscle homeostasis uncovers novel chaperone interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Anna; Dror, Shiran; Pokrzywa, Wojciech; Bar-Lavan, Yael; Karady, Ido; Hoppe, Thorsten; Ben-Zvi, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Proteome stability is central to cellular function and the lifespan of an organism. This is apparent in muscle cells, where incorrect folding and assembly of the sarcomere contributes to disease and aging. Apart from the myosin-assembly factor UNC-45, the complete network of chaperones involved in assembly and maintenance of muscle tissue is currently unknown. To identify additional factors required for sarcomere quality control, we performed genetic screens based on suppressed or synthetic motility defects in Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition to ethyl methyl sulfonate-based mutagenesis, we employed RNAi-mediated knockdown of candidate chaperones in unc-45 temperature-sensitive mutants and screened for impaired movement at permissive conditions. This approach confirmed the cooperation between UNC-45 and Hsp90. Moreover, the screens identified three novel co-chaperones, CeHop (STI-1), CeAha1 (C01G10.8) and Cep23 (ZC395.10), required for muscle integrity. The specific identification of Hsp90 and Hsp90 co-chaperones highlights the physiological role of Hsp90 in myosin folding. Our work thus provides a clear example of how a combination of mild perturbations to the proteostasis network can uncover specific quality control modules. PMID:25988162

  10. Pharmacological chaperones for human α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Nathaniel E.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Best, Daniel; Fleet, George W. J.; Garman, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Schindler/Kanzaki disease is an inherited metabolic disease with no current treatment options. This neurologic disease results from a defect in the lysosomal α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGAL) enzyme. In this report, we show evidence that the iminosugar DGJNAc can inhibit, stabilize, and chaperone human α-NAGAL both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that a related iminosugar DGJ (currently in phase III clinical trials for another metabolic disorder, Fabry disease) can also chaperone human α-NAGAL in Schindler/Kanzaki disease. The 1.4- and 1.5-Å crystal structures of human α-NAGAL complexes reveal the different binding modes of iminosugars compared with glycosides. We show how differences in two functional groups result in >9 kcal/mol of additional binding energy and explain the molecular interactions responsible for the unexpectedly high affinity of the pharmacological chaperones. These results open two avenues for treatment of Schindler/Kanzaki disease and elucidate the atomic basis for pharmacological chaperoning in the entire family of lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23045655

  11. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-05-23

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α-ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt carboxy-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α-ring. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit. Here we report that the base subassembly of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high-affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6 and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α-pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3-pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α-pocket in mature proteasomes, it inserts into the α2/α3-pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme.

  12. Protein-misfolding diseases and chaperone-based therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Tapan K; Paul, Subhankar

    2006-04-01

    A large number of neurodegenerative diseases in humans result from protein misfolding and aggregation. Protein misfolding is believed to be the primary cause of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, cystic fibrosis, Gaucher's disease and many other degenerative and neurodegenerative disorders. Cellular molecular chaperones, which are ubiquitous, stress-induced proteins, and newly found chemical and pharmacological chaperones have been found to be effective in preventing misfolding of different disease-causing proteins, essentially reducing the severity of several neurodegenerative disorders and many other protein-misfolding diseases. In this review, we discuss the probable mechanisms of several protein-misfolding diseases in humans, as well as therapeutic approaches for countering them. The role of molecular, chemical and pharmacological chaperones in suppressing the effect of protein misfolding-induced consequences in humans is explained in detail. Functional aspects of the different types of chaperones suggest their uses as potential therapeutic agents against different types of degenerative diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. RNA chaperones buffer deleterious mutations in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Marina; Schneider, Dominique; Warnecke, Tobias; Krisko, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Both proteins and RNAs can misfold into non-functional conformations. Protein chaperones promote native folding of nascent polypeptides and refolding of misfolded species, thereby buffering mutations that compromise protein structure and function. Here, we show that RNA chaperones can also act as mutation buffers that enhance organismal fitness. Using competition assays, we demonstrate that overexpression of select RNA chaperones, including three DEAD box RNA helicases (DBRHs) (CsdA, SrmB, RhlB) and the cold shock protein CspA, improves fitness of two independently evolved Escherichia coli mutator strains that have accumulated deleterious mutations during short- and long-term laboratory evolution. We identify strain-specific mutations that are deleterious and subject to buffering when introduced individually into the ancestral genotype. For DBRHs, we show that buffering requires helicase activity, implicating RNA structural remodelling in the buffering process. Our results suggest that RNA chaperones might play a fundamental role in RNA evolution and evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04745.001 PMID:25806682

  14. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nutan; Tyagi, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as "molecular chaperones" within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these "guides" can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus.

  15. Chemical Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Alleviates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai Ying; Sanada, Shoji; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Liao, Yulin; Okuda, Keiji; Yamato, Masaki; Tsuchida, Shota; Araki, Ryo; Asano, Yoshihiro; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; French, Brent A; Sakata, Yasushi; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Minamino, Tetsuo

    2016-03-04

    Doxorubicin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for cancer, but its use is often limited by cardiotoxicity. Doxorubicin causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dilation in cardiomyocytes, and we have demonstrated that ER stress plays important roles in the pathophysiology of heart failure. We evaluated the role of ER stress in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and examined whether the chemical ER chaperone could prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction. We confirmed that doxorubicin caused ER dilation in mouse hearts, indicating that doxorubicin may affect ER function. Doxorubicin activated an ER transmembrane stress sensor, activating transcription factor 6, in cultured cardiomyocytes and mouse hearts. However, doxorubicin suppressed the expression of genes downstream of activating transcription factor 6, including X-box binding protein 1. The decreased levels of X-box binding protein 1 resulted in a failure to induce the expression of the ER chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 which plays a major role in adaptive responses to ER stress. In addition, doxorubicin activated caspase-12, an ER membrane-resident apoptotic molecule, which can lead to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction. Cardiac-specific overexpression of glucose-regulated protein 78 by adeno-associated virus 9 or the administration of the chemical ER chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate attenuated caspase-12 cleavage, and alleviated cardiac apoptosis and dysfunction induced by doxorubicin. Doxorubicin activated the ER stress-initiated apoptotic response without inducing the ER chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78, further augmenting ER stress in mouse hearts. Cardiac-specific overexpression of glucose-regulated protein 78 or the administration of the chemical ER chaperone alleviated the cardiac dysfunction induced by doxorubicin and may facilitate the safe use of doxorubicin for cancer treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. An overview on molecular chaperones enhancing solubility of expressed recombinant proteins with correct folding.

    PubMed

    Mamipour, Mina; Yousefi, Mohammadreza; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    The majority of research topics declared that most of the recombinant proteins have been expressed by Escherichia coli in basic investigations. But the majority of high expressed proteins formed as inactive recombinant proteins that are called inclusion body. To overcome this problem, several methods have been used including suitable promoter, environmental factors, ladder tag to secretion of proteins into the periplasm, gene protein optimization, chemical chaperones and molecular chaperones sets. Co-expression of the interest protein with molecular chaperones is one of the common methods The chaperones are a group of proteins, which are involved in making correct folding of recombinant proteins. Chaperones are divided two groups including; cytoplasmic and periplasmic chaperones. Moreover, periplasmic chaperones and proteases can be manipulated to increase the yields of secreted proteins. In this article, we attempted to review cytoplasmic chaperones such as Hsp families and periplasmic chaperones including; generic chaperones, specialized chaperones, PPIases, and proteins involved in disulfide bond formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystal structure of the Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion chaperone SycD in complex with a peptide of the minor translocator YopD

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Type III secretion systems are used by Gram-negative bacteria as “macromolecular syringes” to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. Two hydrophobic proteins called translocators form the necessary pore in the host cell membrane. Both translocators depend on binding to a single chaperone in the bacterial cytoplasm to ensure their stability and efficient transport through the secretion needle. It was suggested that the conserved chaperones bind the more divergent translocators via a hexapeptide motif that is found in both translocators and conserved between species. Results We crystallized a synthetic decapeptide from the Yersinia enterocolitica minor type III secretion translocator YopD bound to its cognate chaperone SycD and determined the complex structure at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure of peptide-bound SycD is almost identical to that of apo SycD with an all helical fold consisting of three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) and an additional C-terminal helix. Peptide-bound SycD formed a kinked head-to-head dimer that had previously been observed for the apo form of SycD. The homodimer interface comprises both helices of the first tetratricopeptide repeat. The YopD peptide bound in extended conformation into a mainly hydrophobic groove on the concave side of SycD. TPRs 1 and 2 of SycD form three hydrophobic pockets that accommodated the conserved hydrophobic residues at position 1, 3 and 6 of the translocator hexapeptide sequence. Two tyrosines that are highly conserved among translocator chaperones contribute to the hydrophobic patches but also form hydrogen bonds to the peptide backbone. Conclusions The interaction between SycD and YopD is very similar to the binding of the Pseudomonas minor translocator PopD to its chaperone PcrH and the Shigella major translocator IpaB to its chaperone IpgC. This confirms the prediction made by Kolbe and co-workers that a hexapeptide with hydrophobic residues at three positions is a conserved

  18. Crystal structure of the Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion chaperone SycD in complex with a peptide of the minor translocator YopD.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Madeleine; Niemann, Hartmut H

    2012-06-18

    Type III secretion systems are used by Gram-negative bacteria as "macromolecular syringes" to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. Two hydrophobic proteins called translocators form the necessary pore in the host cell membrane. Both translocators depend on binding to a single chaperone in the bacterial cytoplasm to ensure their stability and efficient transport through the secretion needle. It was suggested that the conserved chaperones bind the more divergent translocators via a hexapeptide motif that is found in both translocators and conserved between species. We crystallized a synthetic decapeptide from the Yersinia enterocolitica minor type III secretion translocator YopD bound to its cognate chaperone SycD and determined the complex structure at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure of peptide-bound SycD is almost identical to that of apo SycD with an all helical fold consisting of three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) and an additional C-terminal helix. Peptide-bound SycD formed a kinked head-to-head dimer that had previously been observed for the apo form of SycD. The homodimer interface comprises both helices of the first tetratricopeptide repeat. The YopD peptide bound in extended conformation into a mainly hydrophobic groove on the concave side of SycD. TPRs 1 and 2 of SycD form three hydrophobic pockets that accommodated the conserved hydrophobic residues at position 1, 3 and 6 of the translocator hexapeptide sequence. Two tyrosines that are highly conserved among translocator chaperones contribute to the hydrophobic patches but also form hydrogen bonds to the peptide backbone. The interaction between SycD and YopD is very similar to the binding of the Pseudomonas minor translocator PopD to its chaperone PcrH and the Shigella major translocator IpaB to its chaperone IpgC. This confirms the prediction made by Kolbe and co-workers that a hexapeptide with hydrophobic residues at three positions is a conserved chaperone binding motif. Because the

  19. Scc1 (CP0432) and Scc4 (CP0033) function as a type III secretion chaperone for CopN of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Silva-Herzog, Eugenia; Joseph, Sabrina S; Avery, Ann K; Coba, Jose A; Wolf, Katerina; Fields, Kenneth A; Plano, Gregory V

    2011-07-01

    The Chlamydia pneumoniae CopN protein is a member of the YopN/TyeA/InvE/MxiC family of secreted proteins that function to regulate the secretion of type III secretion system (T3SS) translocator and effector proteins. In this study, the Scc1 (CP0432) and Scc4 (CP0033) proteins of C. pneumoniae AR-39 were demonstrated to function together as a type III secretion chaperone that binds to an N-terminal region of CopN. The Scc1/Scc4 chaperone promoted the efficient secretion of CopN via a heterologous T3SS, whereas, the Scc3 chaperone, which binds to a C-terminal region of CopN, reduced CopN secretion.

  20. Hsp70-Hsp40 Chaperone Complex Functions in Controlling Polarized Growth by Repressing Hsf1-Driven Heat Stress-Associated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianhua; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2013-01-01

    How the molecular mechanisms of stress response are integrated at the cellular level remains obscure. Here we show that the cellular polarity machinery in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes dynamic adaptation to thermal stress resulting in a period of decreased Cdc42 activity and altered, monopolar growth. Cells where the heat stress-associated transcription was genetically upregulated exhibit similar growth patterning in the absence of temperature insults. We identify the Ssa2-Mas5/Hsp70-Hsp40 chaperone complex as repressor of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1. Cells lacking this chaperone activity constitutively activate the heat-stress-associated transcriptional program. Interestingly, they also exhibit intermittent monopolar growth within a physiological temperature range and are unable to adapt to heat stress. We propose that by negatively regulating the heat stress-associated transcription, the Ssa2-Mas5 chaperone system could optimize cellular growth under different temperature regiments. PMID:24146635

  1. Hsp70 and Hsp40 chaperones do not modulate retinal phenotype in SCA7 mice.

    PubMed

    Helmlinger, Dominique; Bonnet, Jacques; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Trottier, Yvon; Devys, Didier

    2004-12-31

    Nine neurodegenerative diseases, including spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), are caused by the expansion of polyglutamine stretches in the respective disease-causing proteins. A hallmark of these diseases is the aggregation of expanded polyglutamine-containing proteins in nuclear inclusions that also accumulate molecular chaperones and components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Manipulation of HSP70 and HSP40 chaperone levels has been shown to suppress aggregates in cellular models, prevent neuronal death in Drosophila, and improve to some extent neurological symptoms in mouse models. An important issue in mammals is the relative expression levels of toxic and putative rescuing proteins. Furthermore, overexpression of both HSP70 and its co-factor HSP40/HDJ2 has never been investigated in mice. We decided to address this question in a SCA7 transgenic mouse model that progressively develops retinopathy, similar to SCA7 patients. To co-express HSP70 and HDJ2 with the polyglutamine protein, in the same cell type, at comparable levels and with the same time course, we generated transgenic mice that express the heat shock proteins specifically in rod photoreceptors. While co-expression of HSP70 with its co-factor HDJ2 efficiently suppressed mutant ataxin-7 aggregation in transfected cells, they did not prevent either neuronal toxicity or aggregate formation in SCA7 mice. Furthermore, nuclear inclusions in SCA7 mice were composed of a cleaved mutant ataxin-7 fragment, whereas they contained the full-length protein in transfected cells. We propose that differences in the aggregation process might account for the different effects of chaperone overexpression in cellular and animal models of polyglutamine diseases.

  2. Targeting HSF1 disrupts HSP90 chaperone function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Abdulraheem; Kambhampati, Suman; Shi, Huidong; Dandawate, Prasad; Padhye, Subhash; Saluja, Ashok K.; McGuirk, Joseph; Rao, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    CLL is a disease characterized by chromosomal deletions, acquired copy number changes and aneuploidy. Recent studies have shown that overexpression of Heat Shock Factor (HSF) 1 in aneuploid tumor cells can overcome deficiencies in heat shock protein (HSP) 90-mediated protein folding and restore protein homeostasis. Interestingly, several independent studies have demonstrated that HSF1 expression and activity also affects the chaperoning of HSP90 kinase clients, although the mechanism underlying this observation is unclear. Here, we determined how HSF1 regulates HSP90 function using CLL as a model system. We report that HSF1 is overexpressed in CLL and treatment with triptolide (a small molecule inhibitor of HSF1) induces apoptosis in cultured and primary CLL B-cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of HSF1 or its inhibition with triptolide results in the reduced association of HSP90 with its kinase co-chaperone cell division cycle 37 (CDC37), leading to the partial depletion of HSP90 client kinases, Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK), c-RAF and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Treatment with triptolide or HSF1 knockdown disrupts the cytosolic complex between HSF1, p97, HSP90 and the HSP90 deacetylase- Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). Consequently, HSF1 inhibition results in HSP90 acetylation and abrogation of its chaperone function. Finally, tail vein injection of Mec-1 cells into Rag2−/−IL2Rγc−/− mice followed by treatment with minnelide (a pro-drug of triptolide), reduced leukemia, increased survival and attenuated HSP90-dependent survival signaling in vivo. In conclusion, our study provides a strong rationale to target HSF1 and test the activity of minnelide against human CLL. PMID:26397138

  3. Tah1 helix-swap dimerization prevents mixed Hsp90 co-chaperone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Pal, Mohinder; Roe, S. Mark; Pearl, Laurence H. Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2015-05-01

    A helix swap involving the fifth helix between two adjacently bound Tah1 molecules restores the normal binding environment of the conserved MEEVD peptide of Hsp90. Dimerization also explains how other monomeric TPR-domain proteins are excluded from forming inappropriate mixed co-chaperone complexes with Hsp90 and Tah1. Specific co-chaperone adaptors facilitate the recruitment of client proteins to the Hsp90 system. Tah1 binds the C-terminal conserved MEEVD motif of Hsp90, thus linking an eclectic set of client proteins to the R2TP complex for their assembly and regulation by Hsp90. Rather than the normal complement of seven α-helices seen in other tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, Tah1 unusually consists of the first five only. Consequently, the methionine of the MEEVD peptide remains exposed to solvent when bound by Tah1. In solution Tah1 appears to be predominantly monomeric, and recent structures have failed to explain how Tah1 appears to prevent the formation of mixed TPR domain-containing complexes such as Cpr6–(Hsp90){sub 2}–Tah1. To understand this further, the crystal structure of Tah1 in complex with the MEEVD peptide of Hsp90 was determined, which shows a helix swap involving the fifth α-helix between two adjacently bound Tah1 molecules. Dimerization of Tah1 restores the normal binding environment of the bound Hsp90 methionine residue by reconstituting a TPR binding site similar to that in seven-helix-containing TPR domain proteins. Dimerization also explains how other monomeric TPR-domain proteins are excluded from forming inappropriate mixed co-chaperone complexes.

  4. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Jonathan E.; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin–specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end–directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼430 nm·s−1 at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (kcat ∼6 s−1) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (kdet = 6.2 s−1) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  5. Liposomes as chaperone mimics with controllable affinity toward heat-denatured formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kozono, Ryohei; Tsubomura, Naoki

    2015-01-20

    Chaperone machinery in living systems can catch denatured enzymes and induce their reactivation. Chaperone mimics are beneficial for applying enzymatic reactions in vitro. In this work, the affinity between liposomes and thermally denatured enzymes was controlled to stabilize the enzyme activity. The model enzyme is formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) which is a homodimer and negatively charged in the phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.2) used. The activity of free CbFDH readily decreased at 58 °C following the first-order kinetics with the half-life t1/2 of 27 min. The turbidity measurements showed that the denatured enzyme molecules formed aggregates. The liposomes composed of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholines (PCs) stabilized the CbFDH activity at 58 °C, as revealed with six different PCs. The PC liposomes were indicated to bind to the aggregate-prone enzyme molecules, allowing reactivation at 25 °C. The cofactor β-reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) also stabilized the enzyme activity. The affinity between liposomes and denatured CbFDH could be modulated by incorporating cationic 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-trimethylammonium propane chloride (DOTAP) in PC membranes. The t1/2 values significantly increased in the presence of liposomes ([lipid] = 1.5 mM) composed of PC and DOTAP at the mole fraction f(D) of 0.1. On the other hand, the DOTAP-rich liposomes (f(D) ≥ 0.7) showed strong affinity toward denatured CbFDH, accelerating its deactivation. The liposomes with low charge density function as chaperone mimics that can efficiently catch the denatured enzymes without interfering with their intramolecular interaction for reactivation.

  6. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Dodds, Sherry G; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica; Sharp, Z D; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24 mg/kg (14 ppm) rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  7. Pharmacological chaperones as a potential therapeutic option in methylmalonic aciduria cblB type

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Brasil, Sandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Ruíz-Sala, Pedro; Merinero, Begoña; Banerjee, Ruma; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2013-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene. This encodes the enzyme ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR), which converts reduced cob(I)alamin to an active adenosylcobalamin cofactor. We recently reported the presence of destabilizing pathogenic mutations that retain some residual ATR activity. The aim of the present study was to seek pharmacological chaperones as a tailored therapy for stabilizing the ATR protein. High-throughput ligand screening of over 2000 compounds was performed; six were found to enhance the thermal stability of purified recombinant ATR. Further studies using a well-established bacterial system in which the recombinant ATR protein was expressed in the presence of these six compounds, showed them all to increase the stability of the wild-type ATR and the p.Ile96Thr mutant proteins. Compound V (N-{[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamothioyl]amino}-2-phenylacetamide) significantly increased this stability and did not act as an inhibitor of the purified protein. Importantly, compound V increased the activity of ATR in patient-derived fibroblasts harboring the destabilizing p.Ile96Thr mutation in a hemizygous state to within control range. When cobalamin was coadministrated with compound V, mutant ATR activity further improved. Oral administration of low doses of compound V to C57BL/6J mice for 12 days, led to increase in steady-state levels of ATR protein in liver and brain (disease-relevant organs). These results hold promise for the clinical use of pharmacological chaperones in MMA cblB type patients harboring chaperone-responsive mutations. PMID:23674520

  8. New therapeutic approaches for Krabbe disease: The potential of pharmacological chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Spratley, Samantha J.

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in the lysosomal hydrolase β‐galactocerebrosidase (GALC) account for at least 40% of known cases of Krabbe disease (KD). Most of these missense mutations are predicted to disrupt the fold of the enzyme, preventing GALC in sufficient amounts from reaching its site of action in the lysosome. The predominant central nervous system (CNS) pathology and the absence of accumulated primary substrate within the lysosome mean that strategies used to treat other lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are insufficient in KD, highlighting the still unmet clinical requirement for successful KD therapeutics. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is one strategy being explored to overcome defects in GALC caused by missense mutations. In recent studies, several small‐molecule inhibitors have been identified as promising chaperone candidates for GALC. This Review discusses new insights gained from these studies and highlights the importance of characterizing both the chaperone interaction and the underlying mutation to define properly a responsive population and to improve the translation of existing lead molecules into successful KD therapeutics. We also highlight the importance of using multiple complementary methods to monitor PCT effectiveness. Finally, we explore the exciting potential of using combination therapy to ameliorate disease through the use of PCT with existing therapies or with more generalized therapeutics, such as proteasomal inhibition, that have been shown to have synergistic effects in other LSDs. This, alongside advances in CNS delivery of recombinant enzyme and targeted rational drug design, provides a promising outlook for the development of KD therapeutics. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638604

  9. Tubulin-specific Chaperones: Components of a Molecular Machine that Assembles the α/β Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guoling; Cowan, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The tubulin heterodimer consists of one α- and one β-tubulin polypeptide. Neither protein can partition to the native state or assemble into polymerization competent heterodimers without the concerted action of a series of chaperone proteins including five tubulin-specific chaperones termed TBCA-TBCE. TBCA and TBCB bind to and stabilize newly synthesized quasi-native β- and α-tubulin polypeptides following their generation via multiple rounds of ATP-dependent interaction with the cytosolic chaperonin, CCT. There is free exchange β-tubulin between TBCA and TBCD, and of α-tubulin between TBCB and TBCE, resulting in the formation of TBCD/β and TBCE/α, respectively. The latter two complexes interact, forming a supercomplex (TBCD/α/TBCD/β). Discharge of the native α/β heterodimer occurs via interaction of the supercomplex with TBCC, which results in the triggering of TBC-bound β-tubulin-bound (E-site) GTP hydrolysis. This reaction acts as a switch for disassembly of the supercomplex and the release of GDP-bound heterodimer, which becomes polymerization competent following spontaneous E-site exchange with GTP. The tubulin-specific chaperones thus function together as a tubulin assembly machine, marrying the α- and β-tubulin subunits into a tightly associated heterodimer. The existence of this evolutionarily conserved pathway explains why it has never proved possible to isolate α- or β-tubulin as stable independent entities in the absence of their cognate partners, and implies that each exists and is maintained in the heterodimer in a non-minimal energy state. Here we describe methods for the purification of recombinant TBC’s as biologically active proteins following their expression in a variety of host/vector systems. PMID:23973072

  10. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Dodds, Sherry G.; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica; Sharp, Z. D.; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24 mg/kg (14 ppm) rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome. PMID:25414638

  11. Crucial HSP70 co–chaperone complex unlocks metazoan protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Nillegoda, Nadinath B.; Kirstein, Janine; Szlachcic, Anna; Berynskyy, Mykhaylo; Stank, Antonia; Stengel, Florian; Arnsburg, Kristin; Gao, Xuechao; Scior, Annika; Aebersold, Ruedi; Guilbride, D. Lys; Wade, Rebecca C.; Morimoto, Richard I.; Mayer, Matthias P.; Bukau, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregates are the hallmark of stressed and ageing cells, and characterize several pathophysiological states1,2. Healthy metazoan cells effectively eliminate intracellular protein aggregates3,4, indicating that efficient disaggregation and/or degradation mechanisms exist. However, metazoans lack the key heat-shock protein disaggregase HSP100 of non-metazoan HSP70-dependent protein disaggregation systems5,6, and the human HSP70 system alone, even with the crucial HSP110 nucleotide exchange factor, has poor disaggregation activity in vitro4,7. This unresolved conundrum is central to protein quality control biology. Here we show that synergic cooperation between complexed J-protein co-chaperones of classes A and B unleashes highly efficient protein disaggregation activity in human and nematode HSP70 systems. Metazoan mixed-class J-protein complexes are transient, involve complementary charged regions conserved in the J-domains and carboxy-terminal domains of each J-protein class, and are flexible with respect to subunit composition. Complex formation allows J-proteins to initiate transient higher order chaperone structures involving HSP70 and interacting nucleotide exchange factors. A network of cooperative class A and B J-protein interactions therefore provides the metazoan HSP70 machinery with powerful, flexible, and finely regulatable disaggregase activity and a further level of regulation crucial for cellular protein quality control. PMID:26245380

  12. A Chaperone-Assisted Degradation Pathway Targets Kinetochore Proteins to Ensure Genome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Jakopec, Visnja; Poulsen, Esben G.; Nielsen, Sofie Vincents; Roguev, Assen; Krogan, Nevan; Gordon, Colin; Fleig, Ursula; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Cells are regularly exposed to stress conditions that may lead to protein misfolding. To cope with this challenge, molecular chaperones selectively target structurally perturbed proteins for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In mammals the co-chaperone BAG-1 plays an important role in this system. BAG-1 has two orthologues, Bag101 and Bag102, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that both Bag101 and Bag102 interact with 26S proteasomes and Hsp70. By epistasis mapping we identify a mutant in the conserved kinetochore component Spc7 (Spc105/Blinkin) as a target for a quality control system that also involves, Hsp70, Bag102, the 26S proteasome, Ubc4 and the ubiquitin-ligases Ubr11 and San1. Accordingly, chromosome missegregation of spc7 mutant strains is alleviated by mutation of components in this pathway. In addition, we isolated a dominant negative version of the deubiquitylating enzyme, Ubp3, as a suppressor of the spc7-23 phenotype, suggesting that the proteasome-associated Ubp3 is required for this degradation system. Finally, our data suggest that the identified pathway is also involved in quality control of other kinetochore components and therefore likely to be a common degradation mechanism to ensure nuclear protein homeostasis and genome integrity. PMID:24497846

  13. Homology-based modeling of the Erwinia amylovora type III secretion chaperone DspF used to identify amino acids required for virulence and interaction with the effector DspE.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Wedemeyer, William J; Sundin, George W

    2010-09-01

    The structure of DspF, a type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperone required for virulence of the fruit tree pathogen Erwinia amylovora, was modeled based on predicted structural homology to characterized T3SS chaperones. This model guided the selection of 11 amino acid residues that were individually mutated to alanine via site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutant was assessed for its effect on virulence complementation, dimerization and interaction with the N-terminal chaperone-binding site of DspE. Four amino acid residues were identified that did not complement the virulence defect of a dspF knockout mutant, and three of these residues were required for interaction with the N-terminus of DspE. This study supports the significance of the predicted beta-sheet helix-binding groove in DspF chaperone function.

  14. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  15. The Hsp90 co-chaperone Sgt1 governs Candida albicans morphogenesis and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Rebecca S; Zaas, Aimee K; Betancourt-Quiroz, Marisol; Perfect, John R; Cowen, Leah E

    2012-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 orchestrates regulatory circuitry governing fungal morphogenesis, biofilm development, drug resistance, and virulence. Hsp90 functions in concert with co-chaperones to regulate stability and activation of client proteins, many of which are signal transducers. Here, we characterize the first Hsp90 co-chaperone in the leading human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans. We demonstrate that Sgt1 physically interacts with Hsp90, and that it governs C. albicans morphogenesis and drug resistance. Genetic depletion of Sgt1 phenocopies depletion of Hsp90, inducing yeast to filament morphogenesis and invasive growth. Sgt1 governs these traits by bridging two morphogenetic regulators: Hsp90 and the adenylyl cyclase of the cAMP-PKA signaling cascade, Cyr1. Sgt1 physically interacts with Cyr1, and depletion of either Sgt1 or Hsp90 activates cAMP-PKA signaling, revealing the elusive link between Hsp90 and the PKA signaling cascade. Sgt1 also mediates tolerance and resistance to the two most widely deployed classes of antifungal drugs, azoles and echinocandins. Depletion of Sgt1 abrogates basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azoles, which target the cell membrane. Depletion of Sgt1 also abrogates tolerance and resistance to echinocandins, which target the cell wall, and renders echinocandins fungicidal. Though Sgt1 and Hsp90 have a conserved impact on drug resistance, the underlying mechanisms are distinct. Depletion of Hsp90 destabilizes the client protein calcineurin, thereby blocking crucial responses to drug-induced stress; in contrast, depletion of Sgt1 does not destabilize calcineurin, but blocks calcineurin activation in response to drug-induced stress. Sgt1 influences not only morphogenesis and drug resistance, but also virulence, as genetic depletion of C. albicans Sgt1 leads to reduced kidney fungal burden in a murine model of systemic infection. Thus, our characterization of the first Hsp90 co-chaperone in a fungal pathogen establishes

  16. Co-expression with the Type 3 Secretion Chaperone CesT from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli Increases Accumulation of Recombinant Tir in Plant Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Miletic, Sean; Gaildry, Typhanie; Chin-Fatt, Adam; Menassa, Rima

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs) are utilized by pathogenic Escherichia coli to infect their hosts and many proteins from these systems are affected by chaperones specific to T3SS-containing bacteria. Toward developing a recombinant vaccine against enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), we expressed recombinant T3SS and related proteins from predominant EHEC serotypes in Nicotiana chloroplasts. Nicotiana benthamiana were transiently transformed to express chloroplast-targeted Tir, NleA, and EspD from the EHEC serotype O157:H7; a fusion of EspA proteins from serotypes O157:H7 and O26:H11; and a fusion of epitopes of Tir (Tir-ep) from serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, O45:H2, and O111:H8. C-terminal GFP reporter fusion constructs were also developed and transiently expressed to confirm subcellular localization and quantify relative expression levels in situ. Recombinant proteins were co-expressed with chaperones specific to each T3SS protein with the goal of increasing their accumulation in the chloroplast. We found that co-expression with the chloroplast-targeted chaperone CesT significantly increases accumulation of recombinant Tir when the latter is either transiently expressed in the nucleus and targeted to the chloroplast of N. benthamiana or stably expressed in transplastomic Nicotiana tabacum. CesT also helped maintain higher levels of Tir:GFP fusion protein over time both in vivo and ex vivo, indicating that the favorable effect of CesT on accumulation of Tir is not specific to a single time point or to fresh material. By contrast, T3SS chaperones CesT, CesAB, CesD, and CesD2 did not increase accumulation of NleA:GFP, EspA:GFP, or EspD:GFP, which suggests dissimilar functioning of these chaperone-substrate combinations. CesT did not increase accumulation of Tir-ep:GFP, which may be due to the absence of the CesT binding domain from this fusion protein. The fusion to GFP improved accumulation of Tir-ep relative to the unfused protein, but not for the other recombinant

  17. Analytical method for determining relative chaperone activity using an ovalbumin-conjugated column.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Makoto; Kato, Yuki; Imagawa, Ayami; Totani, Kiichiro

    2015-01-02

    Investigating the relative efficiencies of molecular chaperones is important for understanding protein biosynthesis inside a cell. We developed an analytical method for estimating relative chaperone activity under physiological, multi-chaperone conditions using a protein-conjugated column. A chaperone mixture was subjected to chromatography on a column conjugated with denatured ovalbumin, and the elution positions of target chaperones were compared using western blotting to determine the relative affinity of each chaperone for the denatured protein. Because molecular chaperones should be eluted according to their strength of association with the denatured ovalbumin in the column, the elution position must accord with the chaperone activity and can be used as an indicator of relative chaperone activity. We found that the column procedure was effective in an assay of a mixture of calreticulin and BiP, the molecular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum; the assay showed that calreticulin associated with denatured ovalbumin more strongly than BiP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. OprD Repression upon Metal Treatment Requires the RNA Chaperone Hfq in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ducret, Verena; Gonzalez, Manuel R.; Scrignari, Tiziana; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The metal-specific CzcRS two-component system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is involved in the repression of the OprD porin, causing in turn carbapenem antibiotic resistance in the presence of high zinc concentration. It has also been shown that CzcR is able to directly regulate the expression of multiple genes including virulence factors. CzcR is therefore an important regulator connecting (i) metal response, (ii) pathogenicity and (iii) antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. Recent data have suggested that other regulators could negatively control oprD expression in the presence of zinc. Here we show that the RNA chaperone Hfq is a key factor acting independently of CzcR for the repression of oprD upon Zn treatment. Additionally, we found that an Hfq-dependent mechanism is necessary for the localization of CzcR to the oprD promoter, mediating oprD transcriptional repression. Furthermore, in the presence of Cu, CopR, the transcriptional regulator of the CopRS two-component system also requires Hfq for oprD repression. Altogether, these results suggest important roles for this RNA chaperone in the context of environment-sensing and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27706108

  19. Targeting ligand-operated chaperone sigma-1 receptors in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Teruo, Hayashi; Shang-Yi, Tsai; Tomohisa, Mori; Michiko, Fujimoto; Tsung-Ping, Su

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Current conventional therapeutic drugs for the treatment of psychiatric or neurodegenerative disorders have certain limitations of use. Psychotherapeutic drugs such as typical and atypical antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors, aim to normalize the hyper- or hypo-neurotransmission of monoaminergic systems. Despite their great contribution to the outcomes of psychiatric patients, these agents often exert severe side effects and require chronic treatments to promote amelioration of symptoms. Furthermore, drugs available for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are severely limited. Areas covered This review discusses recent evidence that has shed light on sigma-1 receptor ligands, which may serve as a new class of antidepressants or neuroprotective agents. Sigma-1 receptors are novel ligand-operated molecular chaperones regulating a variety of signal transduction, ER stress, cellular redox, cellular survival, and synaptogenesis. Selective sigma-1 receptor ligands exert rapid antidepressant-like, anxiolytic, antinociceptive and robust neuroprotective actions in preclinical studies. The review also looks at recent studies which suggest that reactive oxygen species might play a crucial role as signal integrators at the downstream of Sig-1Rs Expert opinion The significant advances in sigma receptor research in the last decade have begun to elucidate the intracellular signal cascades upstream and downstream of sigma-1 receptors. The novel ligand-operated properties of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may enable a variety of interventions by which stress-related cellular systems are pharmacologically controlled. PMID:21375464

  20. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    PubMed

    Sablón-Carrazana, Marquiza; Fernández, Isaac; Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are able

  1. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F.; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17–42 and Aβ16–21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are

  2. The use of chaperones in general practice: Is this just a 'Western' concept?

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Oliver; Jones, Kay

    2015-10-01

    The literature about medical chaperones in primary care is limited to a handful of English-speaking countries. It remains largely unknown to what extent chaperones are offered (and used) outside the published literature. The current study aimed to explore the attitudes and experiences of a group of general practitioners (GPs; family doctors) attending an international primary care conference regarding their use of medical chaperones. Ninety international GPs completed a validated questionnaire, providing information on their current practice, availability and preferred choice of chaperone. Participants expressed their opinion on the importance of, and facilitators and barriers for chaperone use. Although most participants had knowledge of the term 'medical chaperone' (75%), those with a qualification from Europe (other than the UK) were less likely to offer a chaperone. Two-thirds of all participants would consider offering a chaperone and were more likely to work in the public sector (p = .04; Cramér's V = 0.27). A practice nurse was most commonly used as chaperone. Chaperone users ranked the 'medico-legal protection of doctors', 'doctors' professional practice' and 'protection of patients' as the most important factors for using a chaperone. Non-users reported 'personal choice of the doctor', 'confidentiality' and 'impact on the doctor-patient relationship' as the main areas influencing their decision not to use a chaperone. International doctors hold different views about the use (or not) of chaperones within their clinical practice and its effect on the doctor-patient consultation. Further research is needed to tease out the reasons for this. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Chaperone-mediated specificity in Ras and Rap signaling.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Strazza, Marianne; Mor, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rap proteins are closely related small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that share similar effector-binding domains but operate in a very different signaling networks; Ras has a dominant role in cell proliferation, while Rap mediates cell adhesion. Ras and Rap proteins are regulated by several shared processes such as post-translational modification, phosphorylation, activation by guanine exchange factors and inhibition by GTPase-activating proteins. Sub-cellular localization and trafficking of these proteins to and from the plasma membrane are additional important regulatory features that impact small GTPases function. Despite its importance, the trafficking mechanisms of Ras and Rap proteins are not completely understood. Chaperone proteins play a critical role in trafficking of GTPases and will be the focus of the discussion in this work. We will review several aspects of chaperone biology focusing on specificity toward particular members of the small GTPase family. Understanding this specificity should provide key insights into drug development targeting individual small GTPases.

  4. Pharmacological chaperones stabilize retromer to limit APP processing.

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, Vincent J; Berman, Diego E; Simoes, Sabrina; Vetanovetz, Chris; Awal, Mehraj R; Patel, Vivek M; Schneider, Remy T; Petsko, Gregory A; Ringe, Dagmar; Small, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Retromer is a multiprotein complex that trafficks cargo out of endosomes. The neuronal retromer traffics the amyloid-precursor protein (APP) away from endosomes, a site where APP is cleaved into pathogenic fragments in Alzheimer's disease. Here we determined whether pharmacological chaperones can enhance retromer stability and function. First, we relied on the crystal structures of retromer proteins to help identify the 'weak link' of the complex and to complete an in silico screen of small molecules predicted to enhance retromer stability. Among the hits, an in vitro assay identified one molecule that stabilized retromer against thermal denaturation. Second, we turned to cultured hippocampal neurons, showing that this small molecule increases the levels of retromer proteins, shifts APP away from the endosome, and decreases the pathogenic processing of APP. These findings show that pharmacological chaperones can enhance the function of a multiprotein complex and may have potential therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Evaluation of Quinazoline analogues as Glucocerebrosidase Inhibitors with Chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Marugan, Juan J.; Zheng, Wei; Motabar, Omid; Southall, Noel; Goldin, Ehud; Westbroek, Wendy; K.Stubblefield, Barbara; Sidransky, Ellen; Aungst, Ronald A.; Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a Lysosomal Storage Disorder (LSD) caused by deficiency in the enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GC). Small molecule chaperones of protein folding and translocation have been proposed as a promising therapeutic approach to this LSD. Most small molecule chaperones described in the literature contain an iminosugar scaffold. Here we present the discovery and evaluation of a new series of GC inhibitors with a quinazoline core. We demonstrate that this series can improve the translocation of GC to the lysosome in patient-derived cells. To optimize this chemical series, systematic synthetic modifications were performed and the SAR was evaluated and compared using three different readouts of compound activity – enzymatic inhibition, enzyme thermostabilization, and lysosomal translocation of GC. PMID:21250698

  6. Co-chaperones of the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Armin; Rieger, Heiko; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the rough endoplasmic reticulum or ER plays a central role in the biogenesis of most extracellular plus many organellar proteins and in cellular calcium homeostasis. Therefore, this organelle comprises molecular chaperones that are involved in import, folding/assembly, export, and degradation of polypeptides in millimolar concentrations. In addition, there are calcium channels/pumps and signal transduction components present in the ER membrane that affect and are affected by these processes. The ER lumenal Hsp70, termed immunoglobulin-heavy chain binding protein or BiP, is the central player in all these activities and involves up to seven different co-chaperones, i.e. ER-membrane integrated as well as ER-lumenal Hsp40s, which are termed ERj or ERdj, and two nucleotide exchange factors.

  7. The histone shuffle: histone chaperones in an energetic dance

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandrima; Tyler, Jessica K.; Churchill, Mair E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Our genetic information is tightly packaged into a rather ingenious nucleoprotein complex called chromatin in a manner that enables it to be rapidly accessed during genomic processes. Formation of the nucleosome, which is the fundamental unit of chromatin, occurs via a stepwise process that is reversed to enable the disassembly of nucleosomes. Histone chaperone proteins have prominent roles in facilitating these processes as well as in replacing old histones with new canonical histones or histone variants during the process of histone exchange. Recent structural, biophysical and biochemical studies have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms whereby histone chaperones promote chromatin assembly, disassembly and histone exchange to facilitate DNA replication, repair and transcription. PMID:20444609

  8. Histone density is maintained during transcription mediated by the chromatin remodeler RSC and histone chaperone NAP1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kuryan, Benjamin G.; Kim, Jessica; Tran, Nancy Nga H.; Lombardo, Sarah R.; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Workman, Jerry L.; Carey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ATPases and histone chaperones facilitate RNA polymerase II (pol II) elongation on chromatin. In vivo, the coordinated action of these enzymes is necessary to permit pol II passage through a nucleosome while restoring histone density afterward. We have developed a biochemical system recapitulating this basic process. Transcription through a nucleosome in vitro requires the ATPase remodels structure of chromatin (RSC) and the histone chaperone nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1). In the presence of NAP1, RSC generates a hexasome. Despite the propensity of RSC to evict histones, NAP1 reprograms the reaction such that the hexasome is retained on the template during multiple rounds of transcription. This work has implications toward understanding the mechanism of pol II elongation on chromatin. PMID:22308335

  9. Insights on the structural dynamics of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 molecular chaperone by small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Seraphim, Thiago V; Silva, Kelly P; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Borges, Júlio C

    2017-04-01

    Heat shock protein of 90kDa (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone involved in a plethora of cellular activities which modulate protein homeostasis. During the Hsp90 mechanochemical cycle, it undergoes large conformational changes, oscillating between open and closed states. Although structural and conformational equilibria of prokaryotic and some eukaryotic Hsp90s are known, some protozoa Hsp90 structures and dynamics are poorly understood. In this study, we report the solution structure and conformational dynamics of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 (LbHsp90) investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results indicate that LbHsp90 coexists in open and closed conformations in solution and that the linkers between domains are not randomly distributed. These findings noted interesting features of the LbHsp90 system, opening doors for further conformational studies of other protozoa chaperones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemical Chaperones Reduce ER Stress and Restore Glucose Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Umut; Yilmaz, Erkan; Özcan, Lale; Furuhashi, Masato; Vaillancourt, Eric; Smith, Ross O.; Görgün, Cem Z.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2006-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key link between obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanistic link can be exploited for therapeutic purposes with orally active chemical chaperones. 4-Phenyl butyric acid and taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid alleviated ER stress in cells and whole animals. Treatment of obese and diabetic mice with these compounds resulted in normalization of hyperglycemia, restoration of systemic insulin sensitivity, resolution of fatty liver disease, and enhancement of insulin action in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues. Our results demonstrate that chemical chaperones enhance the adaptive capacity of the ER and act as potent antidiabetic modalities with potential application in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Pharmacological Chaperoning: A Primer on Mechanism and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Katelyn G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately forty percent of diseases are attributable to protein misfolding, including those for which genetic mutation produces misfolding mutants. Intriguingly, many of these mutants are not terminally misfolded since native-like folding, and subsequent trafficking to functional locations, can be induced by target-specific, small molecules variably termed pharmacological chaperones, pharmacoperones, or pharmacochaperones (PCs). PC targets include enzymes, receptors, transporters, and ion channels, revealing the breadth of proteins that can be engaged by ligand-assisted folding. The purpose of this review is to provide an integrated primer of the diverse mechanisms and pharmacology of PCs. In this regard, we examine the structural mechanisms that underlie PC rescue of misfolding mutants, including the ability of PCs to act as surrogates for defective intramolecular interactions and, at the intermolecular level, overcome oligomerization deficiencies and dominant negative effects, as well as influence the subunit stoichiometry of heteropentameric receptors. Not surprisingly, PC-mediated structural correction of misfolding mutants normalizes interactions with molecular chaperones that participate in protein quality control and forward-trafficking. A variety of small molecules have proven to be efficacious PCs and the advantages and disadvantages of employing orthostatic antagonists, active-site inhibitors, orthostatic agonists, and allosteric modulator PCs is considered. Also examined is the possibility that several therapeutic agents may have unrecognized activity as PCs, and this chaperoning activity may mediate/contribute to therapeutic action and/or account for adverse effects. Lastly, we explore evidence that pharmacological chaperoning exploits intrinsic ligand-assisted folding mechanisms. Given the widespread applicability of PC rescue of mutants associated with protein folding disorders, both in vitro and in vivo, the therapeutic potential of PCs is vast

  12. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  13. Blocking the chaperone kinome pathway: Mechanistic insights into a novel dual inhibition approach for supra-additive suppression of malignant tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Abhinav; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Agrawal, Vibhuti; Pratik, Piyush; Bhasme, Divya; Bisaria, Virendra S.; Sundar, Durai

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Withaferin A and 17-DMAG synergistically inhibit the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone pair. {yields} Binding of WA to Cdc37 cleft suppresses its kinase binding activity. {yields} 17-DMAG binding to the association complex results in H-bonds with 60% clustering. {yields} The ligands' bound complex was found structurally and thermodynamically stable. -- Abstract: The chaperone Hsp90 is involved in regulating the stability and activation state of more than 200 'client' proteins and takes part in the cancer diseased states. The major clientele-protein kinases depend on Hsp90 for their proper folding and functioning. Cdc37, a kinase targeting co-chaperone of Hsp90, mediates the interactions between Hsp90 and protein kinases. Targeting of Cdc37 has the prospect of delivering predominantly kinase-selective molecular responses as compared to the current pharmacologic Hsp90 inhibitors. The present work reports a bio-computational study carried out with the aim of exploring the dual inhibition of Hsp90/Cdc37 chaperone/co-chaperone association complex by the naturally occurring drug candidates withaferin A and 17-DMAG along with their possible modes of action. Our molecular docking studies reveal that withaferin A in combination with 17-DMAG can act as potent chaperone system inhibitors. The structural and thermodynamic stability of the ligands' bound complex was also observed from molecular dynamics simulations in water. Our results suggest a novel tumor suppressive action mechanism of herbal ligands which can be looked forward for further clinical investigations for possible anticancer drug formulations.

  14. The Hsp70 chaperone Ssq1p is dispensable for iron-sulfur cluster formation on the scaffold protein Isu1p.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Rafal; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Schilke, Brenda; Craig, Elizabeth A; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2006-03-24

    The specialized yeast mitochondrial chaperone system, composed of the Hsp70 Ssq1p, its co-chaperone J-protein Jac1p, and the nucleotide release factor Mge1p, perform a critical function in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins. Using a spectroscopic assay, we have analyzed the potential role of the chaperones in Fe/S cluster assembly on the scaffold protein Isu1p in vitro in the presence of the cysteine desulfurase Nfs1p. In the absence of chaperones, the kinetics of Fe/S cluster formation on Isu1p were compatible with a chemical reconstitution pathway with Nfs1p functioning as a sulfide donor. Addition of Ssq1p improved the rates of Fe/S cluster assembly 3-fold. However, this stimulatory effect of Ssq1p required neither ATP nor Jac1p and could be fully attributed to the activation of the Nfs1p desulfurase activity by Ssq1p. Furthermore, chaperone-stimulated Fe/S cluster assembly did not involve the specific interaction between Isu1p and Ssq1p, since the effect was observed with Isu1p mutant proteins defective in this interaction, suggesting that nonspecific binding of Ssq1p to Nfs1p helped to prevent its unfolding. Consistent with this idea, these Isu1p mutants were capable of binding an Fe/S cluster in vivo but failed to restore the growth and Fe/S cluster assembly defects of a Isu1p/Isu2p-deficient yeast strain. Taken together, these data suggest that Ssq1p/Jac1p/Mge1p are not important for Fe/S cluster synthesis on Isu1p. Hence, consistent with previous in vivo data, these chaperones likely function in steps subsequent to the de novo synthesis of the Fe/S cluster on Isu1p.

  15. The conformational dynamics of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Mapa, Koyeli; Sikor, Martin; Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Waegemann, Karin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Seidel, Claus A M; Neupert, Walter; Lamb, Don C; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2010-04-09

    Heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70) represent a ubiquitous and conserved family of molecular chaperones involved in a plethora of cellular processes. The dynamics of their ATP hydrolysis-driven and cochaperone-regulated conformational cycle are poorly understood. We used fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze, in real time and at single-molecule resolution, the effects of nucleotides and cochaperones on the conformation of Ssc1, a mitochondrial member of the family. We report that the conformation of its ADP state is unexpectedly heterogeneous, in contrast to a uniform ATP state. Substrates are actively involved in determining the conformation of Ssc1. The J protein Mdj1 does not interact transiently with the chaperone, as generally believed, but rather is released slowly upon ATP hydrolysis. Analysis of the major bacterial Hsp70 revealed important differences between highly homologous members of the family, possibly explaining tuning of Hsp70 chaperones to meet specific functions in different organisms and cellular compartments. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural Basis for the Histone Chaperone Activity of Asf1

    PubMed Central

    English, Christine M.; Adkins, Melissa W.; Carson, Joshua J.; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Asf1 is a highly conserved chaperone of histones H3/H4 that assembles or disassembles chromatin during transcription, replication, and repair. The structure of the globular domain of Asf1 bound to H3/H4 determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.7 Å shows how Asf1 binds the H3/H4 heterodimer, enveloping the C-terminus of histone H3 and physically blocking formation of the H3/H4 heterotetramer. Unexpectedly, the C-terminus of histone H4 that forms a mini-beta sheet with histone H2A in the nucleosome, undergoes a major conformational change upon binding to Asf1 and adds a beta strand to the Asf1 beta-sheet sandwich. Interactions with both H3 and H4 were required for Asf1 histone chaperone function in vivo and in vitro. The Asf1-H3/H4 structure suggests a “strand-capture” mechanism whereby the H4 tail acts as a lever to facilitate chromatin disassembly / assembly that may be used ubiquitously by histone chaperones. PMID:17081973

  17. Dynamic periplasmic chaperone reservoir facilitates biogenesis of outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Shawn M.; Plummer, Ashlee M.; Fleming, Patrick J.; Fleming, Karen G.

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is critical to bacterial physiology because the cellular envelope is vital to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. The process of OMP biogenesis has been studied in vivo, and each of its components has been studied in isolation in vitro. This work integrates parameters and observations from both in vivo and in vitro experiments into a holistic computational model termed “Outer Membrane Protein Biogenesis Model” (OMPBioM). We use OMPBioM to assess OMP biogenesis mathematically in a global manner. Using deterministic and stochastic methods, we are able to simulate OMP biogenesis under varying genetic conditions, each of which successfully replicates experimental observations. We observe that OMPs have a prolonged lifetime in the periplasm where an unfolded OMP makes, on average, hundreds of short-lived interactions with chaperones before folding into its native state. We find that some periplasmic chaperones function primarily as quality-control factors; this function complements the folding catalysis function of other chaperones. Additionally, the effective rate for the β-barrel assembly machinery complex necessary for physiological folding was found to be higher than has currently been observed in vitro. Overall, we find a finely tuned balance between thermodynamic and kinetic parameters maximizes OMP folding flux and minimizes aggregation and unnecessary degradation. In sum, OMPBioM provides a global view of OMP biogenesis that yields unique insights into this essential pathway. PMID:27482090

  18. A histone chaperone, DEK, transcriptionally coactivates a nuclear receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Lim, Jinseon; Fujiki, Ryoji; Ito, Saya; Suzuki, Eriko; Tanabe, Masahiko; Zhao, Yue; Kimura, Shuhei; Fujiyama, Sally; Ueda, Takashi; Umetsu, Daiki; Ito, Takashi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin reorganization is essential for transcriptional control by sequence-specific transcription factors. However, the molecular link between transcriptional control and chromatin reconfiguration remains unclear. By colocalization of the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) on the ecdysone-induced puff in the salivary gland, Drosophila DEK (dDEK) was genetically identified as a coactivator of EcR in both insect cells and intact flies. Biochemical purification and characterization of the complexes containing fly and human DEKs revealed that DEKs serve as histone chaperones via phosphorylation by forming complexes with casein kinase 2. Consistent with the preferential association of the DEK complex with histones enriched in active epigenetic marks, dDEK facilitated H3.3 assembly during puff formation. In some human myeloid leukemia patients, DEK was fused to CAN by chromosomal translocation. This mutation significantly reduced formation of the DEK complex, which is required for histone chaperone activity. Thus, the present study suggests that at least one histone chaperone can be categorized as a type of transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors. PMID:20040570

  19. Cellular Pathology of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease Involving Chaperones Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Disease-causing mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins may lead to the production of aberrant polypeptides that accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These mutant proteins have detrimental conformational changes or misfolding events, which result in the triggering of the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is a cellular pathway that reduces ER stress by generally inhibiting translation, increasing ER chaperones levels, or inducing cell apoptosis in severe ER stress. This process has been implicated in the cellular pathology of many neurological disorders, including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is a rare pediatric disorder characterized by the failure in the myelination process of the central nervous system (CNS). PMD is caused by mutations in the PLP1 gene, which encodes a major myelin membrane protein. Severe clinical PMD phenotypes appear to be the result of cell toxicity, due to the accumulation of PLP1 mutant proteins and not due to the lack of functional PLP1. Therefore, it is important to clarify the pathological mechanisms by which the PLP1 mutants negatively impact the myelin-generating cells, called oligodendrocytes, to overcome this devastating disease. This review discusses how PLP1 mutant proteins change protein homeostasis in the ER of oligodendrocytes, especially focusing on the reaction of ER chaperones against the accumulation of PLP1 mutant proteins that cause PMD. PMID:28286750

  20. Functional expression of hepassocin in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion partner and molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Zhao, Jiaojiao; Wang, Yan; Sun, Honglou; Jiang, Yi; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2013-12-01

    Human hepassocin (HPS) is a hepatic growth factor which can accelerate hepatocyte proliferation in vivo and protect against liver injury. Previous reports have shown that HPS expressed in Escherichia coli resulted in inclusion bodies or low yield. In this study, the application of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion technology in combined with four different chaperone teams on the soluble expression of recombinant HPS protein were explored and analyzed. The soluble expression of HPS was improved significantly by SUMO fusion and co-expression with trigger factor (Tf) chaperone, which was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The fusion protein was purified to 90% purity by metal chelate chromatography with a yield of 98 mg per liter fermentation culture. Finally, about 19 mg HPS was obtained from 1l of fermentation culture with no less than 96% purity following purification of the SUMO protease cleavage and re-purified by the Ni-NTA resin chromatography, which was the highest yield of HPS reported so far with less time and effort. The recombinant HPS significantly stimulated the proliferation of human hepatic cell line L02 cells. The present work provides an effective system for soluble expression of functional HPS, which will facilitate the clinical developments of recombinant protein drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oridonin Triggers Chaperon-mediated Proteasomal Degradation of BCR-ABL in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huilin; Weng, Hengyou; Dong, Bowen; Zhao, Panpan; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Lianghu

    2017-01-01

    Inducing degradation of oncoproteins by small molecule compounds has the potential to avoid drug resistance and therefore deserves to be exploited for new therapies. Oridonin is a natural compound with promising antitumor efficacy that can trigger the degradation of oncoproteins; however, the direct cellular targets and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that oridonin depletes BCR-ABL through chaperon-mediated proteasomal degradation in leukemia. Mechanistically, oridonin poses oxidative stress in cancer cells and directly binds to cysteines of HSF1, leading to the activation of this master regulator of the chaperone system. The resulting induction of HSP70 and ubiquitin proteins and the enhanced binding to CHIP E3 ligase hence target BCR-ABL for ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Both wild-type and mutant forms of BCR-ABL can be efficiently degraded by oridonin, supporting its efficacy observed in cultured cells as well as mouse tumor xenograft assays with either imatinib-sensitive or -resistant cells. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism by which oridonin induces rapid degradation of BCR-ABL as well as a novel pharmaceutical activator of HSF1 that represents a promising treatment for leukemia. PMID:28128329

  2. Molecular chaperones and regulation of tau quality control: strategies for drug discovery in tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Yoshinari; Koren, John; Kiray, Janine; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2011-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that accumulates in at least 15 different neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively referred to as tauopathies. In these diseases, tau is often hyperphosphorylated and found in aggregates, including paired helical filaments, neurofibrillary tangles and other abnormal oligomers. Tau aggregates are associated with neuron loss and cognitive decline, which suggests that this protein can somehow evade normal quality control allowing it to aberrantly accumulate and become proteotoxic. Consistent with this idea, recent studies have shown that molecular chaperones, such as heat shock protein 70 and heat shock protein 90, counteract tau accumulation and neurodegeneration in disease models. These molecular chaperones are major components of the protein quality control systems and they are specifically involved in the decision to retain or degrade many proteins, including tau and its modified variants. Thus, one potential way to treat tauopathies might be to either accelerate interactions of abnormal tau with these quality control factors or tip the balance of triage towards tau degradation. In this review, we summarize recent findings and suggest models for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21882945

  3. Improvement of the crystallizability and expression of an RNA crystallization chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, P.; Heroux, A.; Ye, J.-D.

    2011-11-01

    Crystallizing RNA has been an imperative and challenging task in the world of RNA research. Assistive methods such as chaperone-assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), employing monoclonal antibody fragments (Fabs) as crystallization chaperones have enabled us to obtain RNA crystal structures by forming crystal contacts and providing initial phasing information. Despite the early successes, the crystallization of large RNA-Fab complex remains a challenge in practice. The possible reason for this difficulty is that the Fab scaffold has not been optimized for crystallization in complex with RNA. Here, we have used the surface entropy reduction (SER) technique for the optimization of {Delta}C209 P4-P6/Fab2 model system. Protruding lysine and glutamate residues were mutated to a set of alanines or serines to construct Fab2SMA or Fab2SMS. Expression with the shake flask approach was optimized to allow large scale production for crystallization. Crystal screening shows that significantly higher crystal-forming ratio was observed for the mutant complexes. As the chosen SER residues are far away from the CDR regions of the Fab, the same set of mutations can now be directly applied to other Fabs binding to a variety of ribozymes and riboswitches to improve the crystallizability of Fab-RNA complex.

  4. Modulating Molecular Chaperones Improves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Decreases the Inflammatory Transcriptome in Diabetic Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiacheng; Pan, Pan; Anyika, Mercy; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Dobrowsky, Rick T.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that modulating molecular chaperones with KU-32, a novobiocin derivative, ameliorates physiologic and bioenergetic deficits of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Replacing the coumarin core of KU-32 with a meta-fluorinated biphenyl ring system created KU-596, a novobiocin analogue (novologue) that showed neuroprotective activity in a cell-based assay. The current study sought to determine whether KU-596 offers similar therapeutic potential for treating DPN. Administration of 2–20 mg/kg of KU-596 improved diabetes induced hypoalgesia and sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits in a dose-dependent manner. However, the drug could not improve these neuropathic deficits in diabetic heat shock protein 70 knockout (Hsp70 KO) mice. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which KU-596 improved DPN, we performed transcriptomic analysis of sensory neuron RNA obtained from diabetic wild-type and Hsp70 KO mice using RNA sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that diabetes strongly increased inflammatory pathways and that KU-596 therapy effectively reversed these increases independent of Hsp70. In contrast, the effects of KU-596 on decreasing the expression of genes regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were more Hsp70-dependent. These data indicate that modulation of molecular chaperones by novologue therapy offers an effective approach toward correcting nerve dysfunction in DPN but that normalization of inflammatory pathways alone by novologue therapy seems to be insufficient to reverse sensory deficits associated with insensate DPN. PMID:26161583

  5. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone GRP170: From Immunobiology to Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Pezeshki, Abdul Mohammad; Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Subjeck, John R.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 170 (GRP170) is the largest member of glucose-regulated protein family that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). As a component of the ER chaperone network, GRP170 assists in protein folding, assembly, and transportation of secretory or transmembrane proteins. The well documented cytoprotective activity of intracellular GRP170 due to its intrinsic chaperoning property has been shown to provide a survival benefit in cancer cells during tumor progression or metastasis. Accumulating evidence shows that extracellular GRP170 displays a superior capacity in delivering tumor antigens to specialized antigen-presenting cells for cross-presentation, resulting in generation of an anti-tumor immune response dependent on cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. This unique feature of GRP170 provides a molecular basis for using GRP170 as an immunostimulatory adjuvant to develop a recombinant vaccine for therapeutic immunization against cancers. This review summarizes the latest findings in understanding the biological effects of GRP170 on cell functions and tumor progression. The immunomodulating activities of GRP170 during interactions with the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system as well as its therapeutic applications in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed. PMID:25629003

  6. Methods to study histone chaperone function in nucleosome assembly and chromatin transcription.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Parijat; Sudarshan, Deepthi; Gadad, Shrikanth S; Shandilya, Jayasha; Swaminathan, Venkatesh; Kundu, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    Histone chaperones are histone interacting proteins that are involved in various stages of histone metabolism in the cell such as histone storage, transport, nucleosome assembly and disassembly. Histone assembly and disassembly are essential processes in certain DNA-templated phenomena such as replication, repair and transcription in eukaryotes. Since the first histone chaperone Nucleoplasmin was discovered in Xenopus, a plethora of histone chaperones have been identified, characterized and their functional significance elucidated in the last 35 years or so. Some of the histone chaperone containing complexes such as FACT have been described to play a significant role in nucleosome disassembly during transcription elongation. We have reported earlier that human Nucleophosmin (NPM1), a histone chaperone belonging to the Nucleoplasmin family, is a co-activator of transcription. In this chapter, we describe several methods that are used to study the histone chaperone activity of proteins and their role in transcription.

  7. The SycN/YscB chaperone-binding domain of YopN is required for the calcium-dependent regulation of Yop secretion by Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sabrina S.; Plano, Gregory V.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous Gram-negative bacterial pathogens employ type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The activation of the type III secretion (T3S) process is tightly controlled in all T3SSs. In Yersinia pestis, the secretion of effector proteins, termed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops), is regulated by the activity of the YopN/SycN/YscB/TyeA complex. YopN is a secreted protein that interacts with the SycN/YscB chaperone via an N-terminal chaperone-binding domain (CBD) and with TyeA via a C-terminal TyeA-binding domain (TBD). Efficient YopN secretion is dependent upon its N-terminal secretion signal (SS), CBD, and the SycN/YscB chaperone. In this study, we investigate the role of the YopN CBD in the regulation of Yop secretion. Analysis of YopE/YopN hybrid proteins in which the YopN SS or SS and CBD were replaced with the analogous regions of YopE indicated that the YopN CBD or SycN/YscB chaperone play a role in the regulation of Yop secretion that is independent of their established roles in YopN secretion. To further analyze the role of the YopN CBD in the regulation of Yop secretion a series of tetra-alanine substitution mutants were generated throughout the YopN CBD. A number of these mutants exhibited a defect in the regulation of Yop secretion but showed no defect in YopN secretion or in the interaction of YopN with the SycN/YscB chaperone. Finally, conditions were established that enabled YopN and TyeA to regulate Yop secretion in the absence of the SycN/YscB chaperone. Importantly, a number of the YopN CBD mutants maintained their defect in the regulation of Yop secretion even under the established SycN/YscB chaperone-independent conditions. These studies establish a role for the CBD region of YopN in the regulation of Yop secretion that is independent from its role in YopN secretion or in the binding of the SycN/YscB chaperone. PMID:23355975

  8. The SycN/YscB chaperone-binding domain of YopN is required for the calcium-dependent regulation of Yop secretion by Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sabrina S; Plano, Gregory V

    2013-01-01

    Numerous Gram-negative bacterial pathogens employ type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The activation of the type III secretion (T3S) process is tightly controlled in all T3SSs. In Yersinia pestis, the secretion of effector proteins, termed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops), is regulated by the activity of the YopN/SycN/YscB/TyeA complex. YopN is a secreted protein that interacts with the SycN/YscB chaperone via an N-terminal chaperone-binding domain (CBD) and with TyeA via a C-terminal TyeA-binding domain (TBD). Efficient YopN secretion is dependent upon its N-terminal secretion signal (SS), CBD, and the SycN/YscB chaperone. In this study, we investigate the role of the YopN CBD in the regulation of Yop secretion. Analysis of YopE/YopN hybrid proteins in which the YopN SS or SS and CBD were replaced with the analogous regions of YopE indicated that the YopN CBD or SycN/YscB chaperone play a role in the regulation of Yop secretion that is independent of their established roles in YopN secretion. To further analyze the role of the YopN CBD in the regulation of Yop secretion a series of tetra-alanine substitution mutants were generated throughout the YopN CBD. A number of these mutants exhibited a defect in the regulation of Yop secretion but showed no defect in YopN secretion or in the interaction of YopN with the SycN/YscB chaperone. Finally, conditions were established that enabled YopN and TyeA to regulate Yop secretion in the absence of the SycN/YscB chaperone. Importantly, a number of the YopN CBD mutants maintained their defect in the regulation of Yop secretion even under the established SycN/YscB chaperone-independent conditions. These studies establish a role for the CBD region of YopN in the regulation of Yop secretion that is independent from its role in YopN secretion or in the binding of the SycN/YscB chaperone.

  9. Chaperones in maturation of molybdoenzymes: Why specific is better than general?

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Olivier N; Bouillet, Sophie; Méjean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Genest, Olivier

    2017-03-04

    Molybdoenzymes play essential functions in living organisms and, as a result, in various geochemical cycles. It is thus crucial to understand how these complex proteins become highly efficient enzymes able to perform a wide range of catalytic activities. It has been established that specific chaperones are involved during their maturation process. Here, we raise the question of the involvement of general chaperones acting in concert with dedicated chaperones or not.

  10. Chaperons expressions and search for new gravity-related genes in the embryos of crabs and amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, O.; Kashiwagi, A.; Saigusa, M.

    Molecular mechanism of influence of gravity on living system is a subject of controversy for many years. Influence of gravity directly or indirectly affects to wide variety of biological processes, including biological clocks and general patterns in development of vertebrates and invertebrates. cDNA subtraction method was used for detection of the genes related to the hatching of the embryos semi-terrestrial crab Chiromantes haematocheir. Timing of the hatching of the embryos is highly synchronized with Moon phase and tides. While no new genes were found, we found that expression of chaperon hsp-90 increase in the embryos within two days before hatching, while expression of other stress proteins doesn't show any significant difference. Another model we used -- is a development of amphibian embryos. In order to clarify the effect of high gravity environment on development of Xenopus laevis, embryos on several developmental stages were subjected to the short-time high-gravity pulses (3G, 5G, and 9G). Analysis of stress-protein expression level and cDNA subtraction among high-gravity stressed embryos and control group revealed some changes in level of RNA expression of stress-proteins in experimental group. At the same time, we found two new genes expressed exclusively in the embryos under high gravity stress. The expression of the genes dramatically increased within several hours after the gravity stress, while the expression of the typical chaperons showed just slight difference. The genes expression pattern and its comparison with previously reported chaperons let us assume the presence physiological mechanism of specific gravity-stress response using previously unreported, special type of chaperons.

  11. Association of partially folded lens betaB2-crystallins with the alpha-crystallin molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Evans, Paul; Slingsby, Christine; Wallace, B A

    2008-02-01

    Age-related cataract is a result of crystallins, the predominant lens proteins, forming light-scattering aggregates. In the low protein turnover environment of the eye lens, the crystallins are susceptible to modifications that can reduce stability, increasing the probability of unfolding and aggregation events occurring. It is hypothesized that the alpha-crystallin molecular chaperone system recognizes and binds these proteins before they can form the light-scattering centres that result in cataract, thus maintaining the long-term transparency of the lens. In the present study, we investigated the unfolding and aggregation of (wild-type) human and calf betaB2-crystallins and the formation of a complex between alpha-crystallin and betaB2-crystallins under destabilizing conditions. Human and calf betaB2-crystallin unfold through a structurally similar pathway, but the increased stability of the C-terminal domain of human betaB2-crystallin relative to calf betaB2-crystallin results in the increased population of a partially folded intermediate during unfolding. This intermediate is aggregation-prone and prevents constructive refolding of human betaB2-crystallin, while calf betaB2-crystallin can refold with high efficiency. alpha-Crystallin can effectively chaperone both human and calf betaB2-crystallins from thermal aggregation, although chaperone-bound betaB2-crystallins are unable to refold once returned to native conditions. Ordered secondary structure is seen to increase in alpha-crystallin with elevated temperatures up to 60 degrees C; structure is rapidly lost at temperatures of 70 degrees C and above. Our experimental results combined with previously reported observations of alpha-crystallin quaternary structure have led us to propose a structural model of how activated alpha-crystallin chaperones unfolded betaB2-crystallin.

  12. Hsp90 and p23 Molecular Chaperones Control Chromatin Architecture by Maintaining the Functional Pool of the RSC Chromatin Remodeler.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Gvozdenov, Zlata; Adkins, Nicholas L; Zhang, Yang; Lynch-Day, Melinda; Watanabe, Shinya; Peterson, Craig L; Freeman, Brian C

    2016-12-01

    Molecular chaperones govern protein homeostasis, being allied to the beginning (folding) and ending (degradation) of the protein life cycle. Yet, the Hsp90 system primarily associates with native factors, including fully assembled complexes. The significance of these connections is poorly understood. To delineate why Hsp90 and its cochaperone p23 interact with a mature structure, we focused on the RSC chromatin remodeler. Both Hsp90 and p23 triggered the release of RSC from DNA or a nucleosome. Although Hsp90 only freed bound RSC, p23 enhanced nucleosome remodeling prior to discharging the complex. In vivo, RSC mobility and remodeling function were chaperone dependent. Our results suggest Hsp90 and p23 contribute to proteostasis by chaperoning mature factors through energetically unfavorable events, thereby maintaining the cellular pool of active native proteins. In the case of RSC, p23 and Hsp90 promote a dynamic action, allowing a limited number of remodelers to effectively maintain chromatin in a pliable state. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Regulation of SR protein phosphorylation and alternative splicing by modulating kinetic interactions of SRPK1 with molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Ding, Jian-Hua; Adams, Joseph A.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation is essential for the SR family of splicing factors/regulators to function in constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing; yet both hypo- and hyperphosphorylation of SR proteins are known to inhibit splicing, indicating that SR protein phosphorylation must be tightly regulated in the cell. However, little is known how SR protein phosphorylation might be regulated during development or in response to specific signaling events. Here, we report that SRPK1, a ubiquitously expressed SR protein-specific kinase, directly binds to the cochaperones Hsp40/DNAjc8 and Aha1, which mediate dynamic interactions of the kinase with the major molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 in mammalian cells. Inhibition of the Hsp90 ATPase activity induces dissociation of SRPK1 from the chaperone complexes, which can also be triggered by a stress signal (osmotic shock), resulting in translocation of the kinase from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, differential phosphorylation of SR proteins, and alteration of splice site selection. These findings connect the SRPK to the molecular chaperone system that has been implicated in numerous signal transduction pathways and provide mechanistic insights into complex regulation of SR protein phosphorylation and alternative splicing in response to developmental cues and cellular signaling. PMID:19240134

  14. The Hsp90 Co-chaperones Sti1, Aha1, and P23 Regulate Adaptive Responses to Antifungal Azoles

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaokui; Xue, Wei; Yin, Yajing; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Shaojie; Sun, Xianyun

    2016-01-01

    Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is essential for tumor progression in humans and drug resistance in fungi. However, the roles of its many co-chaperones in antifungal resistance are unknown. In this study, by susceptibility test of Neurospora crassa mutants lacking each of 18 Hsp90/Calcineurin system member genes (including 8 Hsp90 co-chaperone genes) to antifungal drugs and other stresses, we demonstrate that the Hsp90 co-chaperones Sti1 (Hop1 in yeast), Aha1, and P23 (Sba1 in yeast) were required for the basal resistance to antifungal azoles and heat stress. Deletion of any of them resulted in hypersensitivity to azoles and heat. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed that the toxic sterols eburicol and 14α-methyl-3,6-diol were significantly accumulated in the sti1 and p23 deletion mutants after ketoconazole treatment, which has been shown before to led to cell membrane stress. At the transcriptional level, Aha1, Sti1, and P23 positively regulate responses to ketoconazole stress by erg11 and erg6, key genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are highly conserved in fungi, and sti1 and p23 deletion also increased the susceptibility to azoles in Fusarium verticillioides. These results indicate that Hsp90-cochaperones Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are critical for the basal azole resistance and could be potential targets for developing new antifungal agents. PMID:27761133

  15. Post-translational modifications of Hsp90 and their contributions to chaperone regulation

    PubMed Central

    Mollapour, Mehdi; Neckers, Len

    2011-01-01

    Molecular chaperones, as the name suggests, are involved in folding, maintenance, intracellular transport, and degradation of proteins as well as in facilitating cell signaling. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential eukaryotic molecular chaperone that carries out these processes in normal and cancer cells. Hsp90 function in vivo is coupled to its ability to hydrolyze ATP and this can be regulated by co-chaperones and post-translational modifications. In this review, we explore the varied roles of known post-translational modifications of cytosolic and nuclear Hsp90 (phosphorylation, acetylation, S-nitrosylation, oxidation and ubiquitination) in fine-tuning chaperone function in eukaryotes. PMID:21856339

  16. The Activities and Function of Molecular Chaperones in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Teresa M.; Wright, Christine M.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    Most proteins in the secretory pathway are translated, folded, and subjected to quality control at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These processes must be flexible enough to process diverse protein conformations, yet specific enough to recognize when a protein should be degraded. Molecular chaperones are responsible for this decision making process. ER associated chaperones assist in polypeptide translocation, protein folding, and ER associated degradation (ERAD). Nevertheless, we are only beginning to understand how chaperones function, how they are recruited to specific substrates and assist in folding/degradation, and how unique chaperone classes make quality control “decisions.” PMID:17964199

  17. The right place at the right time: chaperoning core histone variants.

    PubMed

    Mattiroli, Francesca; D'Arcy, Sheena; Luger, Karolin

    2015-11-01

    Histone proteins dynamically regulate chromatin structure and epigenetic signaling to maintain cell homeostasis. These processes require controlled spatial and temporal deposition and eviction of histones by their dedicated chaperones. With the evolution of histone variants, a network of functionally specific histone chaperones has emerged. Molecular details of the determinants of chaperone specificity for different histone variants are only slowly being resolved. A complete understanding of these processes is essential to shed light on the genuine biological roles of histone variants, their chaperones, and their impact on chromatin dynamics.

  18. The right place at the right time: chaperoning core histone variants

    PubMed Central

    Mattiroli, Francesca; D’Arcy, Sheena; Luger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Histone proteins dynamically regulate chromatin structure and epigenetic signaling to maintain cell homeostasis. These processes require controlled spatial and temporal deposition and eviction of histones by their dedicated chaperones. With the evolution of histone variants, a network of functionally specific histone chaperones has emerged. Molecular details of the determinants of chaperone specificity for different histone variants are only slowly being resolved. A complete understanding of these processes is essential to shed light on the genuine biological roles of histone variants, their chaperones, and their impact on chromatin dynamics. PMID:26459557

  19. Isolation of a Latimeria menadoensis heat shock protein 70 (Lmhsp70) that has all the features of an inducible gene and encodes a functional molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Modisakeng, Keoagile W; Jiwaji, Meesbah; Pesce, Eva-Rachele; Robert, Jacques; Amemiya, Chris T; Dorrington, Rosemary A; Blatch, Gregory L

    2009-08-01

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the correct folding of other proteins, and heat shock proteins form one of the major classes of molecular chaperones. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been extensively studied, and shown to be critically important for cellular protein homeostasis in almost all prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems studied to date. Since there have been very limited studies conducted on coelacanth chaperones, the main objective of this study was to genetically and biochemically characterize a coelacanth Hsp70. We have successfully isolated an Indonesian coelacanth (L. menadoensis) hsp70 gene, Lmhsp70, and found that it contained an intronless coding region and a potential upstream regulatory region. Lmhsp70 encoded a typical Hsp70 based on conserved structural and functional features, and the predicted upstream regulatory region was found to contain six potential promoter elements, and three potential heat shock elements (HSEs). The intronless nature of the coding region and the presence of HSEs suggested that Lmhsp70 was stress-inducible. Phylogenetic analyses provided further evidence that Lmhsp70 was probably inducible, and that it branched as a clade intermediate between bony fish and tetrapods. Recombinant LmHsp70 was successfully overproduced, purified and found to be functional using ATPase activity assays. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the first time that the coelacanth encodes a functional molecular chaperone system.

  20. Substrate Discrimination by ClpB and Hsp104

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Danielle M.; Miot, Marika; Hoskins, Joel R.; Wickner, Sue; Doyle, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    ClpB of E. coli and yeast Hsp104 are homologous molecular chaperones and members of the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) superfamily of ATPases. They are required for thermotolerance and function in disaggregation and reactivation of aggregated proteins that form during severe stress conditions. ClpB and Hsp104 collaborate with the DnaK or Hsp70 chaperone system, respectively, to dissolve protein aggregates both in vivo and in vitro. In yeast, the propagation of prions depends upon Hsp104. Since protein aggregation and amyloid formation are associated with many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, understanding how disaggregases function is important. In this study, we have explored the innate substrate preferences of ClpB and Hsp104 in the absence of the DnaK and Hsp70 chaperone system. The results suggest that substrate specificity is determined by nucleotide binding domain-1. PMID:28611991

  1. Thanks for asking: Adolescent attitudes and preferences regarding the use of chaperones during physical examinations

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Renee; Katzman, Debra K; Kaufman, Miriam; Goldberg, Eudice; Toulany, Alene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no uniformity as to how and when chaperones should be used for general and intimate (genitalia and/or breasts) physical examinations of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To explore adolescents’ attitudes and preferences regarding the use of medical chaperones during physical examinations. METHODS: The present analysis was a cross-sectional descriptive study performed as part of a quality improvement project in the Adolescent Medicine Clinics at The Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, Ontario) between January 1 and April 30, 2011. Adolescents 13 to 18 years of age completed an anonymous 10-item, self-administered questionnaire regarding their thoughts on chaperones during physical examinations. Demographic and descriptive data were collected. RESULTS: A total of 127 adolescents participated in the present study. The mean (± SD) age was 16.3±1.5 years and the majority (93.7%) were female. More than one-half (61%) of female adolescents had previous experience with an intimate examination; however, a chaperone was present only 36% of the time. Seventy percent of female adolescents wanted the choice of a chaperone for a general examination compared with 61% for an intimate examination. Among female adolescents with past chaperone experience, 78% wanted the choice of a chaperone for subsequent intimate examinations, compared with 55% among those with no previous chaperone experience. Only 21% believed they would ask for a chaperone if one were not offered. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was variation in adolescents’ attitudes and preferences regarding the use of chaperones, many females indicated a desire to discuss the option of a chaperone for all types of examinations. PMID:27429571

  2. Co-expression with the Type 3 Secretion Chaperone CesT from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli Increases Accumulation of Recombinant Tir in Plant Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Miletic, Sean; Gaildry, Typhanie; Chin-Fatt, Adam; Menassa, Rima

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs) are utilized by pathogenic Escherichia coli to infect their hosts and many proteins from these systems are affected by chaperones specific to T3SS-containing bacteria. Toward developing a recombinant vaccine against enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), we expressed recombinant T3SS and related proteins from predominant EHEC serotypes in Nicotiana chloroplasts. Nicotiana benthamiana were transiently transformed to express chloroplast-targeted Tir, NleA, and EspD from the EHEC serotype O157:H7; a fusion of EspA proteins from serotypes O157:H7 and O26:H11; and a fusion of epitopes of Tir (Tir-ep) from serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, O45:H2, and O111:H8. C-terminal GFP reporter fusion constructs were also developed and transiently expressed to confirm subcellular localization and quantify relative expression levels in situ. Recombinant proteins were co-expressed with chaperones specific to each T3SS protein with the goal of increasing their accumulation in the chloroplast. We found that co-expression with the chloroplast-targeted chaperone CesT significantly increases accumulation of recombinant Tir when the latter is either transiently expressed in the nucleus and targeted to the chloroplast of N. benthamiana or stably expressed in transplastomic Nicotiana tabacum. CesT also helped maintain higher levels of Tir:GFP fusion protein over time both in vivo and ex vivo, indicating that the favorable effect of CesT on accumulation of Tir is not specific to a single time point or to fresh material. By contrast, T3SS chaperones CesT, CesAB, CesD, and CesD2 did not increase accumulation of NleA:GFP, EspA:GFP, or EspD:GFP, which suggests dissimilar functioning of these chaperone–substrate combinations. CesT did not increase accumulation of Tir-ep:GFP, which may be due to the absence of the CesT binding domain from this fusion protein. The fusion to GFP improved accumulation of Tir-ep relative to the unfused protein, but not for the other recombinant

  3. Structure of Vps75 and Implications for Histone Chaperone Function

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,Y.; Meeth, K.; Jiang, E.; Luo, c.; Marmostein, R.

    2008-01-01

    The vacuolar protein sorting 75 (Vps75) histone chaperone participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly at both active and inactive genes through the preferential binding to histone H3-H4. Vps75 is also one of two histone chaperones, along with antisilencing factor 1, that promotes histone H3-Lys-56 acetylation by the regulation of Ty1 transposition protein 109 (Rtt109) histone acetyltransferase. Here, we report the x-ray crystal structure of Vps75 and carry out biochemical studies to characterize its interaction with Rtt109. We find that the Vps75 structure forms a homodimeric 'headphone' architecture that includes an extended helical dimerization domain and earmuff domains at opposite ends and sides of the dimerization domain. Despite the similar overall architecture with the yeast nucleosome assembly protein 1 and human SET/TAF-1{beta}/INHAT histone chaperones, Vps75 shows several unique features including the relative disposition of the earmuff domains to the dimerization domain, characteristics of the earmuff domains, and a pronounced cleft at the center of the Vps75 dimer. These differences appear to correlate with the unique function of Vps75 to interact with Rtt109 for histone acetylation. Our biochemical studies reveal that two surfaces on the earmuff domain of Vps75 participate in Rtt109 interaction with a stoichiometry of 2:1, thus leaving the pronounced central cleft of the Vps75 dimer largely accessible for histone binding. Taken together, our data provide a structural framework for understanding how Vps75 mediates both nucleosome assembly and histone acetylation by Rtt109.

  4. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  5. COMPARTMENTALIZED CANCER DRUG DISCOVERY TARGETING MITOCHONDRIAL Hsp90 CHAPERONES

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byoung Heon; Altieri, Dario C.

    2009-01-01

    There is a plethora of attractive drug targets in cancer, but their therapeutic exploitation proved more difficult than expected, and only rarely truly successful. One possibility not often considered in drug discovery is that cancer signaling pathways are not randomly arranged in cells, but orchestrated in specialized subcellular compartments. The identification of Heat Shock Protein-90 (Hsp90) chaperones in mitochondria of tumors, but not most normal tissues, provides an example of a compartmentalized network of cell survival, opening fresh prospects for novel, subcellularly-targeted cancer drug discovery. PMID:19648961

  6. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Chen; Davidov, Geula; Yahalom, Adi; Shaked, Hadassa; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Bitton, Ronit; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Chill, Jordan H; Zarivach, Raz

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  7. Structure of the Yersinia pestis type III secretion chaperone SycH in complex with a stable fragment of YscM2

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Jason; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2010-11-16

    Pathogenic Yersinia species use a type III secretion system to inject cytotoxic effector proteins directly into the cytosol of mammalian cells, where they neutralize the innate immune response by interfering with the signal-transduction pathways that control phagocytosis and inflammation. To be exported efficiently, some effectors must transiently associate with cognate cytoplasmic secretion chaperones. SycH is the chaperone for YopH, a potent eukaryotic-like protein tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for virulence. SycH also binds two negative regulators of type III secretion, YscM1 and YscM2, both of which share significant sequence homology with the chaperone-binding domain of YopH. Here, the structure of a complex between SycH and a stable fragment of YscM2 that was designed on the basis of limited proteolysis experiments is presented. The overall fold of SycH is very similar to the structures of other homodimeric secretion chaperones that have been determined to date. YscM2 wraps around SycH in an extended fashion, with some secondary but no tertiary structure, assuming a conformation distinct from the globular fold that it is predicted to adopt in the absence of SycH.

  8. Inhibitor versus chaperone behaviour of d-fagomine, DAB and LAB sp(2)-iminosugar conjugates against glycosidases: A structure-activity relationship study in Gaucher fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mena-Barragán, Teresa; García-Moreno, M Isabel; Nanba, Eiji; Higaki, Katsumi; Concia, Alda Lisa; Clapés, Pere; García Fernández, José Manuel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen

    2016-10-04

    A library of sp(2)-iminosugar conjugates derived from the piperidine iminosugar d-fagomine and the enantiomeric pyrrolidine iminosugars DAB and LAB has been generated in only two steps involving direct coupling of the fully unprotected polyhydroxylated heterocycles with isothiocyanates, to give monocyclic thiourea adducts, and further intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of the δ-located primary hydroxyl group by the thiocarbonyl sulphur atom, affording bicyclic isothioureas. These transformations led to a dramatic shift in the inhibitory selectivity from α- to β-glucosidases, with inhibition potencies that depended strongly on the nature of the aglycone-type moiety in the conjugates. Some of the new derivatives behaved as potent inhibitors of human β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the lysosomal enzyme whose dysfunction is responsible for Gaucher disease. Moreover, GCase inhibition was 10-fold weaker at pH 5 as compared to pH 7, which is generally considered as a good property for pharmacological chaperones. Surprisingly, most of the compounds strongly inhibited GCase in wild type fibroblasts at rather low concentrations, showing an unfavourable chaperone/inhibitor balance on disease-associated GCase mutants in cellulo. A structure-activity relationship analysis points to the need for keeping a contiguous triol system in the glycone moiety of the conjugates to elicit a chaperone effect. In any case, the results reported here represent a proof of concept of the utmost importance of implementing diversity-oriented strategies for the identification and optimization of potent and specific glycosidase inhibitors and chaperones.

  9. Structure of Human J-type Co-chaperone HscB Reveals a Tetracysteine Metal-binding Domain*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Bittova, Lenka; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N.

    2008-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins play indispensable roles in a broad range of biochemical processes. The biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins is a complex process that has become a subject of extensive research. The final step of iron-sulfur protein assembly involves transfer of an iron-sulfur cluster from a cluster-donor to a cluster-acceptor protein. This process is facilitated by a specialized chaperone system, which consists of a molecular chaperone from the Hsc70 family and a co-chaperone of the J-domain family. The 3.0Å crystal structure of a human mitochondrial J-type co-chaperone HscB revealed an L-shaped protein that resembles Escherichia coli HscB. The important difference between the two homologs is the presence of an auxiliary metal-binding domain at the N terminus of human HscB that coordinates a metal via the tetracysteine consensus motif CWXCX9–13FCXXCXXXQ. The domain is found in HscB homologs from animals and plants as well as in magnetotactic bacteria. The metal-binding site of the domain is structurally similar to that of rubredoxin and several zinc finger proteins containing rubredoxin-like knuckles. The normal mode analysis of HscB revealed that this L-shaped protein preferentially undergoes a scissors-like motion that correlates well with the conformational changes of human HscB observed in the crystals. PMID:18713742

  10. The Periplasmic Chaperone Network of Campylobacter jejuni: Evidence that SalC (Cj1289) and PpiD (Cj0694) Are Involved in Maintaining Outer Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Aidan J.; Zakai, Shadi A. I.; Kelly, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria is a key structure in host–pathogen interactions that contains a plethora of proteins, performing a range of functions including adhesion, nutrient uptake, export of effectors and interaction with innate and adaptive components of the immune system. In addition, the OM can exclude drugs and thus contribute to antimicrobial resistance. The OM of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contains porins, adhesins and other virulence factors that must be specifically localized to this membrane, but the protein sorting mechanisms involved are only partially understood. In particular, chaperones are required to ferry OM proteins across the periplasm after they emerge from the Sec translocation system. The SurA-related chaperone PEB4 (Cj0596) is the only protein with a proven role in OM biogenesis and integrity in C. jejuni. In this work, we have constructed a set of isogenic deletion mutants in genes encoding both known and predicted chaperones (cj0596, cj0694, cj1069, cj1228c, and cj1289) using NCTC 11168H as the parental strain. These mutants were characterized using a range of assays to determine effects on growth, agglutination, biofilm formation, membrane permeability and hydrophobicity. We focused on Cj1289 and Cj0694, which our previous work suggested possessed both chaperone and peptidyl-proyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) domains. Mutants in either cj1289 or cj0694 showed growth defects, increased motility, agglutination and biofilm formation and severe OM permeability defects as measured by a lysozyme accessibility assay, that were comparable to those exhibited by the isogenic peb4 mutant. 2D-gel comparisons showed a general decrease in OM proteins in these mutants. We heterologously overproduced and purified Cj0694 and obtained evidence that this protein was an active PPIase, as judged by its acceleration of the refolding rate of reduced and alkylated ribonuclease T1 and that it also possessed

  11. Information encoded in non-native states drives substrate-chaperone pairing.

    PubMed

    Mapa, Koyeli; Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik

    2012-09-05

    Many proteins refold in vitro through kinetic folding intermediates that are believed to be by-products of native-state centric evolution. These intermediates are postulated to play only minor roles, if any, in vivo because they lack any information related to translation-associated vectorial folding. We demonstrate that refolding intermediate of a test protein, generated in vitro, is able to find its cognate chaperone, from the whole complement of Escherichia coli soluble chaperones. Cognate chaperone-binding uniquely alters the conformation of non-native substrate. Importantly, precise chaperone targeting of substrates are maintained as long as physiological molar ratios of chaperones remain unaltered. Using a library of different chaperone substrates, we demonstrate that kinetically trapped refolding intermediates contain sufficient structural features for precise targeting to cognate chaperones. We posit that evolution favors sequences that, in addition to coding for a functional native state, encode folding intermediates with higher affinity for cognate chaperones than noncognate ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting Molecular Chaperones for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis: Is It a Viable Approach?

    PubMed

    Heard, Ashley; Thompson, Jake; Carver, Jessica; Bakey, Michelle; Wang, X Robert

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is largely caused by protein misfolding and the loss of function of a plasma membrane anion channel known as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The most common CF-causing mutation, F508del, leads to severe conformational defect in CFTR. The cellular chaperone machinery plays an important role in CFTR biogenesis and quality control. Multiple attempts have been made to improve the cell surface functional expression of the mutant CFTR by modulating the expression of components of the cellular chaperone machinery. The efficacy of such an approach has been low largely due to the severe intrinsic folding defects of the F508del CFTR. Moreover, the impact of chaperone perturbation on the chaperone machinery itself and on other physiologically important proteins might lead to potentially severe side effects. Approaches aimed at disrupting chaperone-CFTR interactions show greater efficacy, and are compatible with small-molecule drug discovery and gene therapy. Combination between chaperone modulators and F508del correctors might further enhance potency and specificity. As molecular chaperones play important roles in regulating inflammation and immunity, they can be potential targets for controlling airway infection and inflammation in patients. If such effects can be synergized with chaperone-mediated regulation of CFTR biogenesis and quality control, more efficacious therapeutics will be developed to combat CF lung disease.

  13. Chaperone-like properties of tobacco plastid thioredoxins f and m

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Barrio, Ruth; Fernández-San Millán, Alicia; Carballeda, Jon; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Seguí-Simarro, José M.; Farran, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous disulphide reductases that play important roles in the redox regulation of many cellular processes. However, some redox-independent functions, such as chaperone activity, have also been attributed to Trxs in recent years. The focus of our study is on the putative chaperone function of the well-described plastid Trxs f and m. To that end, the cDNA of both Trxs, designated as NtTrxf and NtTrxm, was isolated from Nicotiana tabacum plants. It was found that bacterially expressed tobacco Trx f and Trx m, in addition to their disulphide reductase activity, possessed chaperone-like properties. In vitro, Trx f and Trx m could both facilitate the reactivation of the cysteine-free form of chemically denatured glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (foldase chaperone activity) and prevent heat-induced malate dehydrogenase aggregation (holdase chaperone activity). Our results led us to infer that the disulphide reductase and foldase chaperone functions prevail when the proteins occur as monomers and the well-conserved non-active cysteine present in Trx f is critical for both functions. By contrast, the holdase chaperone activity of both Trxs depended on their oligomeric status: the proteins were functional only when they were associated with high molecular mass protein complexes. Because the oligomeric status of both Trxs was induced by salt and temperature, our data suggest that plastid Trxs could operate as molecular holdase chaperones upon oxidative stress, acting as a type of small stress protein. PMID:21948853

  14. Regulation of Neuronal Survival Factor MEF2D by Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; She, Hua; Gearing, Marla; Colla, Emanuela; Lee, Michael; Shacka, John J.; Mao, Zixu

    2009-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy controls the degradation of selective cytosolic proteins and may protect neurons against degeneration. In a neuronal cell line, we found that chaperone-mediated autophagy regulated the activity of myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a transcription factor required for neuronal survival. MEF2D was observed to continuously shuttle to the cytoplasm, interact with the chaperone Hsc70, and undergo degradation. Inhibition of chaperone-mediated autophagy caused accumulation of inactive MEF2D in the cytoplasm. MEF2D levels were increased in the brains of α-synuclein transgenic mice and patients with Parkinson’s disease. Wild-type α-synuclein and a Parkinson’s disease–associated mutant disrupted the MEF2D-Hsc70 binding and led to neuronal death. Thus, chaperone-mediated autophagy modulates the neuronal survival machinery, and dysregulation of this pathway is associated with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:19119233

  15. Effect of the Surface Charge of Artificial Chaperones on the Refolding of Thermally Denatured Lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fan; Shen, Liangliang; Wang, Jianzu; Qu, Aoting; Yang, Huiru; Zhang, Zhenkun; An, Yingli; Shi, Linqi

    2016-02-17

    Artificial chaperones are of great interest in fighting protein misfolding and aggregation for the protection of protein bioactivity. A comprehensive understanding of the interaction between artificial chaperones and proteins is critical for the effective utilization of these materials in biomedicine. In this work, we fabricated three kinds of artificial chaperones with different surface charges based on mixed-shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), and investigated their protective effect for lysozymes under thermal stress. It was found that MSPMs with different surface charges showed distinct chaperone-like behavior, and the neutral MSPM with PEG shell and PMEO2MA hydrophobic domain at high temperature is superior to the negatively and positively charged one, because of the excessive electrostatic interactions between the protein and charged MSPMs. The results may benefit to optimize this kind of artificial chaperone with enhanced properties and expand their application in the future.

  16. Unfolding the Therapeutic Potential of Chemical Chaperones for Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Theodor; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao; Tuo, Jingsheng

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies suggest that pathological processes involved in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) might induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Growing evidence demonstrates the ability of chemical chaperones to decrease ER stress and ameliorate ER stress-related disease phenotypes, suggesting that the field of chaperone therapy might hold novel treatments for AMD. In this review, we examine the evidence suggesting a role for ER stress in AMD. Furthermore, we discuss the use of chaperone therapy for the treatment of ER stress-associated diseases, including other neurodegenerative diseases and retinopathies. Finally, we examine strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human disease. PMID:18528533

  17. Study of Receptor-Chaperone Interactions Using the Optical Technique of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Mustafa, Mohd K.; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Lacey, Joanne; Smith, David P.; Abell, Benjamin M.; Nabok, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    This work describes a detailed quantitative interaction study between the novel plastidial chaperone receptor OEP61 and isoforms of the chaperone types Hsp70 and Hsp90 using the optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The receptor OEP61 was electrostatically immobilized on a gold surface via an intermediate layer of polycations. The TIRE measurements allowed the evaluation of thickness changes in the adsorbed molecular layers as a result of chaperone binding to receptor proteins. Hsp70 chaperone isoforms but not Hsp90 were shown to be capable of binding OEP61. Dynamic TIRE measurements were carried out to evaluate the affinity constants of the above reactions and resulted in clear discrimination between specific and nonspecific binding of chaperones as well as differences in binding properties between the highly similar Hsp70 isoforms. PMID:21767504

  18. Pharmacological chaperone approaches for rescuing GPCR mutants: Current state, challenges, and screening strategies.

    PubMed

    Beerepoot, Pieter; Nazari, Reza; Salahpour, Ali

    2017-03-01

    A substantial number of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) genetic disorders are due to mutations that cause misfolding or dysfunction of the receptor product. Pharmacological chaperoning approaches can rescue such mutant receptors by stabilizing protein conformations that behave similar to the wild type protein. For example, this can be achieved by improving folding efficiency and/or interaction with chaperone proteins. Although efficacy of pharmacological chaperones has been demonstrated in vitro for a variety of GPCRs, translation to clinical use has been limited. In this paper we discuss the history of pharmacological chaperones of GPCR's and other membrane proteins, the challenges in translation to the clinic, and the use of different assays for pharmacological chaperone discovery.

  19. Targeting the molecular chaperone SlyD to inhibit bacterial growth with a small molecule</