Science.gov

Sample records for dnapl mass removal

  1. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, C. D.; Davis, G. B.; Bastow, T. P.; Woodbury, R. J.; Rao, P. S. C.; Annable, M. D.; Rhodes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L3/L2/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L2/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104 g day- 1 to 24-31 g day- 1 (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions also

  2. DNAPL REMOVAL MECHANISMS AND MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS DURING COSOLVENT-AIR FLOODING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent injection of cosolvent and air, a cosolvent-air (CA) flood was recently suggested for a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) remediation technology. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the DNAPL removal mechanisms of the CA flood and to quantify mass t...

  3. Linking Contaminant Mass Discharge to DNAPL Source Zone Architecture and Mass Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, K. D.; Suchomel, E. J.; Amos, B. K.; Loeffler, F. E.; Capiro, N. L.

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between partial dense nonaqueous phase (DNAPL) mass removal and plume behavior, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional aquifer cell containing a tetrachloroethene (PCE) source zone and a down-gradient plume region. PCE-DNAPL saturation distributions were quantified using a light transmission system and expressed in terms of a ganglia-to-pool (GTP) volume ratio. To achieve incremental mass removal, the aquifer cells were flushed with a 4% Tween 80 surfactant solution that increased the solubility of PCE by more than two orders-of-magnitude with minimal mobilization of entrapped PCE-DNAPL. For a ganglia-dominated source zone (GTP = 1.6) greater than 70% mass removal was required before measurable reductions in mass discharge were realized, while for pool-dominated source zones (GTP < 0.3) reductions in mass discharge versus mass removal approached a 1:1 correlation. Current experiments are designed to evaluate the potential for coupling aggressive mass removal with microbial reductive dechlorination.

  4. A framework for assessing risk reduction due to DNAPL mass removal from low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, R.A.; McWhorter, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    Many emerging remediation technologies are designed to remove contaminant mass from source zones at DNAPL sites in response to regulatory requirements. There is often concern in the regulated community as to whether mass removal actually reduces risk, or whether the small risk reductions achieved warrant the large costs incurred. This paper sets out a framework for quantifying the degree to which risk is reduced as mass is removed from shallow, saturated, low-permeability, dual-porosity, DNAPL source zones. Risk is defined in terms of meeting an alternate concentration level (ACL) at a compliance well in an aquifer underlying the source zone. The ACL is back-calculated from a carcinogenic health-risk characterization at a downstream water-supply well. Source-zone mass-removal efficiencies are heavily dependent on the distribution of mass between media (fractures, matrix) and phases (dissolved, sorbed, free product). Due to the uncertainties in currently-available technology performance data, the scope of the paper is limited to developing a framework for generic technologies rather than making risk-reduction calculations for specific technologies. Despite the qualitative nature of the exercise, results imply that very high mass-removal efficiencies are required to achieve significant long-term risk reduction with technology, applications of finite duration. 17 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Surfactant Enhanced DNAPL Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    or the permeability contrast (i.e., degree of heterogeneity) that is present in the DNAPL zone. To solubilize DNAPL with surfactants, a sufficient...with respect to the effects of permeability and heterogeneity upon the costs of SEAR: as permeability decreases and/or the degree of heterogeneity...not be an issue for surfactant recovery at all sites. The degree to which MEUF will concentrate the calcium is a function of the surfactant itself

  6. Coupling Aggressive Mass Removal with Microbial Reductive Dechlorination for Remediation of DNAPL Source Zones: A Review and Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Christ, John A.; Ramsburg, C. Andrew; Abriola, Linda M.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2005-01-01

    The infiltration of dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) into the saturated subsurface typically produces a highly contaminated zone that serves as a long-term source of dissolved-phase groundwater contamination. Applications of aggressive physical–chemical technologies to such source zones may remove > 90% of the contaminant mass under favorable conditions. The remaining contaminant mass, however, can create a rebounding of aqueous-phase concentrations within the treated zone. Stimulation of microbial reductive dechlorination within the source zone after aggressive mass removal has recently been proposed as a promising staged-treatment remediation technology for transforming the remaining contaminant mass. This article reviews available laboratory and field evidence that supports the development of a treatment strategy that combines aggressive source-zone removal technologies with subsequent promotion of sustained microbial reductive dechlorination. Physical–chemical source-zone treatment technologies compatible with posttreatment stimulation of microbial activity are identified, and studies examining the requirements and controls (i.e., limits) of reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes are investigated. Illustrative calculations are presented to explore the potential effects of source-zone management alternatives. Results suggest that, for the favorable conditions assumed in these calculations (i.e., statistical homogeneity of aquifer properties, known source-zone DNAPL distribution, and successful bioenhancement in the source zone), source longevity may be reduced by as much as an order of magnitude when physical–chemical source-zone treatment is coupled with reductive dechlorination. PMID:15811838

  7. Surfactant-Enhanced DNAPL Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-24

    DNAPL SOURCE REMEDIATION AT SITE 88, MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE vii AATDF AFCEE AFB AFP4 AQT B bgs CERCLA CITT em cmc cp cu d de DE&S DNAPL DoD...liquid meter(s) medium, middle Marine Corps Base maximum contaminant level millidarcies micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration unit minute(s) multi-level...present in the subsurface adjacent to a dry-cleaning facility operated by the Marine Corps Base (MCB) Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The contaminant was

  8. Evaluating the Relationship Between Source Zone Metrics and Down-Gradient Plume Response as a Function of Mixed DNAPL Mass Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cápiro, N. L.; Granbery, E. K.; Christ, J.; Pennell, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    phase was proportional to the mole fraction in the NAPL, consistent with a Raoult’s Law. It is hypothesized that the deviations from Raoult’s Law observed for PCE and TCE were caused by preferential solubilization of PCE within the hydrophobic core of the micelles. Work is on-going to quantify the preferential solubilization observed in the batch experiments, which will facilitate the incorporation of this relationship into multiphase compositional simulators. These simulators will then be used to improve the understanding of the inter-relationships between the initial source zone architecture, mass removal, reductions in mass flux and plume evolution in multi-component contaminated subsurface systems.

  9. Predicting DNAPL mass discharge from pool-dominated source zones.

    PubMed

    Christ, John A; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Pennell, Kurt D; Abriola, Linda M

    2010-05-20

    Models that link simplified descriptions of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone architecture with predictions of mass flux can be effective screening tools for evaluation of source zone management strategies. Recent efforts have focused on the development and implementation of upscaled models to approximate the relationship between mass removal and flux-averaged, down-gradient contaminant concentration (or mass flux) reduction. The efficacy of these methods has been demonstrated for ganglia-dominated source zones. This work extends these methods to source zones dominated by high-saturation DNAPL pools. An existing upscaled mass transfer model was modified to reproduce dissolution behavior in pool-dominated scenarios by employing a two-domain (ganglia and pools) representation of the source zone. The two-domain upscaled model is parameterized using the initial fraction of the source zone that exists as pool regions, the initial fraction of contaminant eluting from these pool regions, and the flux-averaged down-gradient contaminant concentration. Comparisons of model predictions with a series of three-dimensional source zone numerical simulations and data from two-dimensional aquifer cell experiments demonstrate the ability of the model to predict DNAPL dissolution from ganglia- and pool-dominated source zones for all levels of mass recovery.

  10. IMPACT OF DNAPL SOURCE TREATMENT ON CONTAMINANT MASS FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Implementation of remediation technologies at DNAPL contaminated sites has shown that large quantities of contaminants can be removed or degraded using in-situ heating, flushing or oxidation. The rate and magnitude of DNAPL removal is dependent upon site-specific and technology-...

  11. Composition Dependent Evolution in Mass Flux from Binary Trichloroethene/Tetrachloroethene-DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. I.; Cápiro, N. L.; Granbery, E. K.; Pennell, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    In order to accurately predict the efficacy of subsurface remediation for sites contaminated with multicomponent dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), it is necessary to link changes in aqueous phase contaminant discharge with source composition and distribution. Dissolution from a binary 1:1 (molar) mixture of trichloroethene- (TCE) and tetrachloroethene- (PCE) DNAPL was measured in three separate 2-dimensional aquifer cells (100 x 48 x 1.4 cm) that were packed with different background media (1:1 mixture 20:30 and 40:50 mesh; 20:30 mesh and 40:50 mesh Accusand) and low permeability zones. Initial DNAPL source zone architectures were varied to yield ganglia to pool (GTP) ratios of 0.44, 1.56, and 1.72. Down-gradient plume evolution and DNAPL spatial distribution were measured every 5 pore volumes (PV) from side port samples and a light transmission system that allowed non-invasive measurement of volumetric DNAPL saturation and source descriptive metrics at a resolution of 0.03 to 0.08 mm2. Flux-averaged PCE and TCE effluent concentrations were measured every 0.7 PVs from a fully screened effluent chamber. To accelerate changes in source zone architecture and overall mass removal, two surfactant floods (4% w/w Tween 80) were completed after mass discharge from the source zone reached a steady state. Mass flux reductions for a given amount of DNAPL mass removed were found to correspond strongly to the molar composition of DNAPL in the source zone and the initial DNAPL saturation distribution metric (e.g., GTP). Percent reductions in mass flux from the aquifer cells with ganglia dominated architectures were 98 and 72% for TCE and PCE respectively, with a final overall NAPL source zone molar ratio of 0.49:0.51 TCE: PCE ; and 97 and 79% for TCE and PCE with molar ratios of 0.19:0.81 TCE:PCE. Reductions in mass flux from the pool dominated source zone were 90 and 53% for TCE and PCE with a final overall DNAPL source zone mole fraction of 0.26:0.74 TCE:PCE. These

  12. The significance of heterogeneity on mass flux from DNAPL source zones: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Page, John W E; Soga, Kenichi; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2007-12-07

    Understanding the process of mass transfer from source zones of aquifers contaminated with organic chemicals in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) is of importance in site management and remediation. A series of intermediate-scale tank experiments was conducted to examine the influence of aquifer heterogeneity on DNAPL mass transfer contributing to dissolved mass emission from source zone into groundwater under natural flow before and after remediation. A Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) spill was performed into six source zone models of increasing heterogeneity, and both the spatial distribution of the dissolution behavior and the net effluent mass flux were examined. Experimentally created initial PCE entrapment architecture resulting from the PCE migration was largely influenced by the coarser sand lenses and the PCE occupied between 30 and 60% of the model aquifer depth. The presence of DNAPL had no apparent effect on the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the porous media. Up to 71% of PCE mass in each of the tested source zone was removed during a series of surfactant flushes, with associated induced PCE mobilization responsible for increasing vertical DNAPL distributions. Effluent mass flux due to water dissolution was also found to increase progressively due to the increase in NAPL-water contact area even though the PCE mass was reduced. Doubling of local groundwater flow velocities showed negligible rate-limited effects at the scale of these experiments. Thus, mass transfer behavior was directly controlled by the morphology of DNAPL within each source zone. Effluent mass flux values were normalized by the up-gradient DNAPL distributions. For the suite of aquifer heterogeneities and all remedial stages, normalized flux values fell within a narrow band with mean of 0.39 and showed insensitivity to average source zone saturations.

  13. FIELD AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF DNAPL REMEDIAL PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basic goal of DNAPL source treatment is to reduce health and environmental risks posed by the DNAPL contamination. Removing a sufficient mass of DNAPL to achieve concentration-based regulatory goals is difficult because of site hydrogeologic heterogeneity and uncertainties ab...

  14. Influence of mass transfer characteristics for DNAPL source depletion and contaminant flux in a highly characterized glaciofluvial aquifer.

    PubMed

    Maji, R; Sudicky, E A

    2008-11-14

    The transfer of contaminant mass between the nonaqueous- and aqueous-phases is a process of central importance for the remediation of sites contaminated by dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). This paper describes a comparison of the results obtained with various alternative DNAPL-aqueous-phase mass transfer models contained in the literature for predicting DNAPL source-zone depletion times in groundwater systems. These dissolution models were largely developed through laboratory column experiments. To gain insight into the implications of various representations of the local-scale kinetic as well as equilibrium DNAPL dissolution processes, aquifer heterogeneity and the complex architecture of a DNAPL source-zone, the aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are analyzed in a conditional stochastic framework. The hydrogeologic setting is a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer in Southwest Germany, referred to as the aquifer analog dataset, that was intensively characterized in three dimensions for hydrogeological parameters that include permeability, effective porosity, grain size, mineralogy and sorption coefficients. By embedding the various dissolution models into the compositional, multiphase flow model, CompFlow, the relative times predicted for complete depletion of a released DNAPL source due to natural dissolution are explored. Issues related to achieving environmental benefits through, for example, partial DNAPL-zone source removal via enhanced remedial technologies are also discussed. In this context, performance metrics in the form of peak aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are compared to each other. This is done for each of the alternative mass transfer models. A significant reduction in the fractional flux at a downstream location from the DNAPL source can be achieved by partial source-zone mass reduction; however, peak

  15. Influence of mass transfer characteristics for DNAPL source depletion and contaminant flux in a highly characterized glaciofluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, R.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2008-11-01

    The transfer of contaminant mass between the nonaqueous- and aqueous-phases is a process of central importance for the remediation of sites contaminated by dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). This paper describes a comparison of the results obtained with various alternative DNAPL-aqueous-phase mass transfer models contained in the literature for predicting DNAPL source-zone depletion times in groundwater systems. These dissolution models were largely developed through laboratory column experiments. To gain insight into the implications of various representations of the local-scale kinetic as well as equilibrium DNAPL dissolution processes, aquifer heterogeneity and the complex architecture of a DNAPL source-zone, the aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are analyzed in a conditional stochastic framework. The hydrogeologic setting is a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer in Southwest Germany, referred to as the aquifer analog dataset, that was intensively characterized in three dimensions for hydrogeological parameters that include permeability, effective porosity, grain size, mineralogy and sorption coefficients. By embedding the various dissolution models into the compositional, multiphase flow model, CompFlow, the relative times predicted for complete depletion of a released DNAPL source due to natural dissolution are explored. Issues related to achieving environmental benefits through, for example, partial DNAPL-zone source removal via enhanced remedial technologies are also discussed. In this context, performance metrics in the form of peak aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are compared to each other. This is done for each of the alternative mass transfer models. A significant reduction in the fractional flux at a downstream location from the DNAPL source can be achieved by partial source-zone mass reduction; however, peak

  16. Surfactant foam technology for in situ removal of heavy chlorinated compounds-DNAPLs.

    PubMed

    Maire, Julien; Coyer, Amandine; Fatin-Rouge, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    The use of surfactant foam for the remediation of a saturated soil contaminated with a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was investigated at bench-scale. Despite the presence of the DNAPL, high foam stability was obtained for a mixture of cocamidopropyl betaïne and dodecylsulfate at 0.05%. Foams were assessed in different injection conditions and were compared to commonly used remediation methods. Strong foams improved significantly the DNAPL recovery yield, which amounted up to 98%, owing to the propagation of a flat foam front, with low dissolution (<0.5 g l(-1)) and surfactant consumption (<10 g kg(-1) DNAPL recovered). The effects of important parameters (gas to liquid ratio, injection velocity, gas nature) and methods for foam production on pressure gradient (∇P), remediation efficiency and surfactant consumption were investigated. Even for low injection velocities (4×10(-4) ms(-1)), capillary numbers were high enough (∼8×10(-3)) to push the DNAPL efficiently. DNAPL lowered ∇P for foam propagation because of its destabilising effect. The use of CO2 as gas reduced the ∇Ps for foam propagation by 35%. ∇P were also decreased by 25% for gas to liquid ratios lower than 75%, whereas, DNAPL removal remained high. This technology should lower spreading risks and treatment costs.

  17. Mass Transfer from Entrapped DNAPL Sources Undergoing Remediation: Characterization Methods and Prediction Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-31

    Removal rates in dissolution experiments depend on flow rate, DNAPL saturation, porous media grain size and porous media wettability . Several... wettability that produced strong capillary barriers and higher DNAPL saturations tend to exhibit longer dissolution times than comparable...er ab io tic m ed iu m m ic ro be cu ltu re D I w at er ab io tic m ed iu m m ic ro be cu ltu re Seepage velocity (cm/min) 20% indicated medium 40

  18. Plume Development and Mass Flux Following Surfactant-Based Treatment of Heterogeneous PCE-DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomel, E. J.; Pennell, K. D.

    2004-12-01

    The zones of contamination at typical chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites can be divided into two regions: a source zone in which free-phase contaminants (dense nonaqueous phase liquids, or DNAPLs) are present, and a solute plume containing only dissolved-phase contaminants. Currently, pump-and-treat is the most common method for achieving dissolved-phase plume containment; however, it is widely recognized that this approach is generally ineffective for source zone mass removal. As a result, a number of innovative technologies for in situ DNAPL source zone treatment have been developed, but mass removal using these methods is often incomplete. In addition, the effects of partial source zone mass removal on subsequent dissolved-phase plume development and contaminant flux remain poorly understood. To address these issues laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in a two dimensional (2-D) aquifer cell having overall dimensions of 150 cm (length) by 48 cm (height) by 1.4 cm (internal thickness) and containing both source zone and down-gradient "plume" regions. The aquifer cells were packed under water-saturated conditions with Accusand (either 20/30 sieve size or a mixture of 50% 20/30 and 50% 40/50 sieve sizes). Within the source zone, three layers of F-70 Ottawa sand lenses were emplaced to mimic heterogeneous regions of lower permeability media. Following tetrachloroethene (PCE) release and redistribution in the source zone, a solubilizing surfactant solution containing 4% Tween 80 was used to achieve sequential PCE mass removals ranging from 30% to 80%. At the conclusion of each surfactant flood, down-gradient contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes were monitored at a hydraulic gradient of 1x10-3. The PCE-DNAPL distributions in the source zone were quantified using light transmission prior to and following each surfactant flood. PCE-DNAPL distribution was expressed in terms of a ganglia to pool ratio (G:P), for which the volume of PCE above residual

  19. EVALUATIONS OF DNAPL REMEDIAL PERFORMANCE BASED ON FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF CONTAMINANT FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under a concentration-based regulatory framework, the benefits of conducting dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source-zone remediation are questionable because of the impracticality of complete DNAPL elimination at most sites. Removing a sufficient mass of DNAPL to achieve c...

  20. SERDP AND NRMRL SPONSOR FIELD TEST OF COSOLVENT-ENHANCED DNAPL REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field test of multicomponent cosolvent flooding for in-situ remediation of DNAPL source zones was conducted at the Dover National Test Site (DNTS) at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, in July, 2001. The test was part of an Enhanced Source Removal (ESR) demonstration project fund...

  1. The use of mass depletion-mass flux reduction relationships during pumping to determine source zone mass of a reactive brominated-solvent DNAPL.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Davis, G B; Bastow, T P; Annable, M D; Trefry, M G; Furness, A; Geste, Y; Woodbury, R J; Rao, P S C; Rhodes, S

    2013-01-01

    Mass depletion-mass flux relationships usually applied to a groundwater plume were established at field scale for groundwater pumped from within the source zone of a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). These were used as part of multiple lines of evidence in establishing the DNAPL source mass and architecture. Simplified source mass-dissolved concentration models including those described by exponential, power, and error functions as well as a rational mass equation based on the equilibrium stream tube approach were fitted to data from 285 days of source zone pumping (SZP) from a single well which removed 152 kg of dissolved organics from a multi-component, reactive brominated solvent DNAPL. The total molar concentration of the source compound, tetrabromoethane and its daughter products was used as a single measure of contaminant concentration to relate to source mass. A partitioning inter-well tracer test (PITT) conducted prior to the SZP provided estimates of groundwater travel times, enabling parameterisation of the models. After accounting for capture of the down-gradient dissolved plume, all models provided a good fit to the observed data. It was shown that differentiation between models would only emerge after appreciably more pumping from the source zone. The model fits were not particularly sensitive to the exponent parameters and variance of groundwater travel time. In addition, the multi-component nature of the DNAPL did not seem to affect the utility of the models for the period examined. Estimates of the DNAPL mass prior to the start of SZP from the models were greatest where the log of the variance of travel time was used explicitly in the source depletion models (mean 295kg) compared to where the associated power exponent and variance was fitted freely (mean 258 kg). The estimates of source mass were close to that of 220kg determined from the PITT. In addition to the PITT, multi-level groundwater sampling from within the source zone provided

  2. Mass Transfer Limited Enhanced Bioremediation at Dnapl Source Zones: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The success of enhanced bioremediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) relies on accelerating contaminant mass transfer from the organic to the aqueous phase, thus enhancing the depletion of DNAPL source zones compared to natural dissolution. This is achieved by promoting biological activity that reduces the contaminant's aqueous phase concentration. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated that high reaction rates are attainable by specialized microbial cultures in DNAPL source zones, field applications of the technology report lower reaction rates and prolonged remediation times. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that the reaction rates are limited by the rate at which the contaminant partitions from the DNAPL to the aqueous phase. In such cases, slow mass transfer to the aqueous phase reduces the bioavailability of the contaminant and consequently decreases the potential source zone depletion enhancement. In this work, the effect of rate limited mass transfer on bio-enhanced dissolution of DNAPL chlorinated ethenes is investigated through a numerical study. A multi-phase, multi-component groundwater transport model is employed to simulate DNAPL mass depletion for a range of source zone scenarios. Rate limited mass transfer is modeled by a linear driving force model, employing a thermodynamic approach for the calculation of the DNAPL - water interfacial area. Metabolic reductive dechlorination is modeled by Monod kinetics, considering microbial growth and self-inhibition. The model was utilized to identify conditions in which mass transfer, rather than reaction, is the limiting process, as indicated by the bioavailability number. In such cases, reaction is slower than expected, and further increase in the reaction rate does not enhance mass depletion. Mass transfer rate limitations were shown to affect both dechlorination and microbial growth kinetics. The complex dynamics between mass transfer, DNAPL transport and distribution, and

  3. ANALYTICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACTS OF PARTIAL MASS DEPLETION IN DNAPL SOURCE ZONES (SAN FRANCISCO, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical solutions describing the time-dependent DNAPL source-zone mass and contaminant discharge rate are used as a flux-boundary condition in a semi-analytical contaminant transport model. These analytical solutions assume a power relationship between the flow-averaged sourc...

  4. CONTAMINANT FLUX RESPONSES TO THERMAL TREATMENT OF DNAPL SOURCE ZONES (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminant flux is being proposed as a metric to help elucidate the benefits of DNAPL source-zone remedial efforts. While it is clear that aggressive remediation technologies can rapidly remove DNAPL mass, experience has shown that complete removal is often not practicable. H...

  5. Changes in contaminant mass discharge from DNAPL source mass depletion: Evaluation at two field sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Michael C.; Wood, A. Lynn; Annable, Michael D.; Hatfield, Kirk; Cho, Jaehyun; Holbert, Charles; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Enfield, Carl G.; Lynch, Kira; Smith, Richard E.

    2008-11-01

    Changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from aggressive remediation of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone were investigated at two sites, one at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah, and the other at Ft. Lewis Military Reservation, Washington. Passive Flux Meters (PFM) and a variation of the Integral Pumping Test (IPT) were used to measure fluxes in ten wells installed along a transect down-gradient of the trichloroethylene (TCE) source zone, and perpendicular to the mean groundwater flow direction. At both sites, groundwater and contaminant fluxes were measured before and after the source-zone treatment. The measured contaminant fluxes ( J; ML - 2 T - 1 ) were integrated across the well transect to estimate contaminant mass discharge ( MD; MT - 1 ) from the source zone. Estimated MD before source treatment, based on both PFM and IPT methods, were ~ 76 g/day for TCE at the Hill AFB site; and ~ 640 g/day for TCE, and ~ 206 g/day for cis-dichloroethylene (DCE) at the Ft. Lewis site. TCE flux measurements made 1 year after source treatment at the Hill AFB site decreased to ~ 5 g/day. On the other hand, increased fluxes of DCE, a degradation byproduct of TCE, in tests subsequent to remediation at the Hill AFB site suggest enhanced microbial degradation after surfactant flooding. At the Ft. Lewis site, TCE mass discharge rates subsequent to remediation decreased to ~ 3 g/day for TCE and ~ 3 g/day for DCE ~ 1.8 years after remediation. At both field sites, PFM and IPT approaches provided comparable results for contaminant mass discharge rates, and show significant reductions (> 90%) in TCE mass discharge as a result of DNAPL mass depletion from the source zone.

  6. Changes in contaminant mass discharge from DNAPL source mass depletion: evaluation at two field sites.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Michael C; Wood, A Lynn; Annable, Michael D; Hatfield, Kirk; Cho, Jaehyun; Holbert, Charles; Rao, P Suresh C; Enfield, Carl G; Lynch, Kira; Smith, Richard E

    2008-11-14

    Changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from aggressive remediation of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone were investigated at two sites, one at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah, and the other at Ft. Lewis Military Reservation, Washington. Passive Flux Meters (PFM) and a variation of the Integral Pumping Test (IPT) were used to measure fluxes in ten wells installed along a transect down-gradient of the trichloroethylene (TCE) source zone, and perpendicular to the mean groundwater flow direction. At both sites, groundwater and contaminant fluxes were measured before and after the source-zone treatment. The measured contaminant fluxes (J; ML(-2)T(-1)) were integrated across the well transect to estimate contaminant mass discharge (M(D); MT(-1)) from the source zone. Estimated M(D) before source treatment, based on both PFM and IPT methods, were approximately 76 g/day for TCE at the Hill AFB site; and approximately 640 g/day for TCE, and approximately 206 g/day for cis-dichloroethylene (DCE) at the Ft. Lewis site. TCE flux measurements made 1 year after source treatment at the Hill AFB site decreased to approximately 5 g/day. On the other hand, increased fluxes of DCE, a degradation byproduct of TCE, in tests subsequent to remediation at the Hill AFB site suggest enhanced microbial degradation after surfactant flooding. At the Ft. Lewis site, TCE mass discharge rates subsequent to remediation decreased to approximately 3 g/day for TCE and approximately 3 g/day for DCE approximately 1.8 years after remediation. At both field sites, PFM and IPT approaches provided comparable results for contaminant mass discharge rates, and show significant reductions (>90%) in TCE mass discharge as a result of DNAPL mass depletion from the source zone.

  7. MEASUREMENTS OF CAPILLARY PRESSURE-SATURATION RELATIONSHIPS AND DNAPL DISTRIBUTION IN SILICA SANDS USING LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is a part of an ongoing research project that aims at assessing the environmental benefits of partial DNAPL removal. The laboratory part of the research project is to examine the functional relationship between DNAPL (modeled by PCE) architecture, mass removal and cont...

  8. Changes in Contaminant Mass Discharge from DNAPL Source Mass Depletion: Evaluation at Two Field Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from aggressive remediation of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone were investigated at two sites, one at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah, and the other at Ft. Lewis Military Reservation, WA. Passive Flux Meters (PFM) and a va...

  9. Long-term mass transfer and mixing-controlled reactions of a DNAPL plume from persistent residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding and being able to predict the long-term behavior of DNAPL (i.e., PCE and TCE) residuals after active remediation has ceased have become increasingly important as attention at many sites turns from aggressive remediation to monitored natural attenuation and long-term stewardship. However, plume behavior due to mass loading and reactions during these later phases is less studied as they involve large spatial and temporal scales. We apply both theoretical analysis and pore-scale simulations to investigate mass transfer from DNAPL residuals and subsequent reactions within the generated plume, and, in particular, to show the differences between early- and late-time behaviors of the plume. In the zone of entry of the DNAPL entrapment zone where the concentration boundary layer in the flowing groundwater has not fully developed, the pore-scale simulations confirm the past findings based on laboratory studies that the mass transfer increases as a power-law function of the Peclét number, and is enhanced due to reactions in the plume. Away from the entry zone and further down gradient, the long-term reactions are limited by the available additive and mixing in the porous medium, thereby behave considerably differently from the entry zone. For the reaction between the contaminant and an additive with intrinsic second-order bimolecular kinetics, the late-time reaction demonstrates a first-order decay macroscopically with respect to the mass of the limiting additive, not with respect to that of the contaminant. The late-time decay rate only depends on the intrinsic reaction rate and the solubility of the entrapped DNAPL. At the intermediate time, the additive decays exponentially with the square of time (t2), instead of time (t). Moreover, the intermediate decay rate also depends on the initial conditions, the spatial distribution of DNAPL residuals, and the effective dispersion coefficient.

  10. A consistent framework to predict mass fluxes and depletion times for DNAPL contaminations in heterogeneous aquifers under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jonas; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    At many hazardous waste sites and accidental spills, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as TCE, PCE, or TCA have been released into the subsurface. Once a DNAPL is released into the subsurface, it serves as persistent source of dissolved-phase contamination. In chronological order, the DNAPL migrates through the porous medium and penetrates the aquifer, it forms a complex pattern of immobile DNAPL saturation, it dissolves into the groundwater and forms a contaminant plume, and it slowly depletes and bio-degrades in the long-term. In industrial countries the number of such contaminated sites is tremendously high to the point that a ranking from most risky to least risky is advisable. Such a ranking helps to decide whether a site needs to be remediated or may be left to natural attenuation. Both the ranking and the designing of proper remediation or monitoring strategies require a good understanding of the relevant physical processes and their inherent uncertainty. To this end, we conceptualize a probabilistic simulation framework that estimates probability density functions of mass discharge, source depletion time, and critical concentration values at crucial target locations. Furthermore, it supports the inference of contaminant source architectures from arbitrary site data. As an essential novelty, the mutual dependencies of the key parameters and interacting physical processes are taken into account throughout the whole simulation. In an uncertain and heterogeneous subsurface setting, we identify three key parameter fields: the local velocities, the hydraulic permeabilities and the DNAPL phase saturations. Obviously, these parameters depend on each other during DNAPL infiltration, dissolution and depletion. In order to highlight the importance of these mutual dependencies and interactions, we present results of several model set ups where we vary the physical and stochastic dependencies of the input parameters and simulated processes. Under these

  11. Impacts of DNAPL Source Treatment: Experimental and Modeling Assessment of the Benefits of Partial DNAPL Source Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    activities continued until February 2003, after which pumping stopped and groundwater levels increased, allowing groundwater to flow over the spillway ...mass flux. It should be noted that, as shown by groundwater elevation data in Figure 4.1-2, groundwater flowed over the spillway for approximately...to predict dense non-aqueous phase liquid dissolution dynamics in laboratory flow chambers

  12. Consistent Simulation Framework for Efficient Mass Discharge and Source Depletion Time Predictions of DNAPL Contaminants in Heterogeneous Aquifers Under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, W.; Koch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting DNAPL fate and transport in heterogeneous aquifers is challenging and subject to an uncertainty that needs to be quantified. Models for this task needs to be equipped with an accurate source zone description, i.e., the distribution of mass of all partitioning phases (DNAPL, water, and soil) in all possible states ((im)mobile, dissolved, and sorbed), mass-transfer algorithms, and the simulation of transport processes in the groundwater. Such detailed models tend to be computationally cumbersome when used for uncertainty quantification. Therefore, a selective choice of the relevant model states, processes, and scales are both sensitive and indispensable. We investigate the questions: what is a meaningful level of model complexity and how to obtain an efficient model framework that is still physically and statistically consistent. In our proposed model, aquifer parameters and the contaminant source architecture are conceptualized jointly as random space functions. The governing processes are simulated in a three-dimensional, highly-resolved, stochastic, and coupled model that can predict probability density functions of mass discharge and source depletion times. We apply a stochastic percolation approach as an emulator to simulate the contaminant source formation, a random walk particle tracking method to simulate DNAPL dissolution and solute transport within the aqueous phase, and a quasi-steady-state approach to solve for DNAPL depletion times. Using this novel model framework, we test whether and to which degree the desired model predictions are sensitive to simplifications often found in the literature. With this we identify that aquifer heterogeneity, groundwater flow irregularity, uncertain and physically-based contaminant source zones, and their mutual interlinkages are indispensable components of a sound model framework.

  13. Natural and man-made controls on the performance of DNAPL-pump-and-treat systems -- A comparative case study

    SciTech Connect

    Losonsky, G.; Landry, G.R.; Valentine, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Although the recovery of dense non-aqueous liquids (DNAPLs) using pump-and-treat technology generally does not achieve regulatory cleanup criteria for dissolved phase concentrations in groundwater, the technology is commonly used to achieve two alternate goals--to recover DNAPL mass and to prevent or slow down the spread of DNAPL pools. Both the physico-chemical characteristics of the DNAPL and the hydrogeologic characteristics of the subsurface determine the effectiveness of DNAPL pump-and-treat systems in achieving these goals. Physico-chemical characteristics include density, viscosity, interfacial tension, and solubility. Some of these parameters can change naturally over time, and some can be manipulated using enhanced recovery agents, such as steam or surfactants. Hydrogeologic characteristics include hydraulic conductivity, anisotropy, heterogeneity, fracture porosity, capillary pressure, and hydraulic gradients. The operation of a pump-and-treat system necessarily affects the hydraulic gradients and capillary pressures governing subsurface fluid flow at a DNAPL site. Both naturally occurring low-permeability zones and man-made, compacted clay liners influence DNAPL migration. The performance of a DNAPL pump-and-treat system changes with time. High mass removal may occur early in the operation of such a system, whereas DNAPL migration away from the recovery wells or even out of the pumped hydrostratigraphic unit may dominate later stages of operation of the system. A comparison of several interim corrective measures (ICM) pump-and-treat systems at a site in the Gulf Coast illustrates the combined effects of both natural and man-made controls on the performance of the DNAPL recovery systems.

  14. Predicting DNAPL mass discharge and contaminated site longevity probabilities: Conceptual model and high-resolution stochastic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Nowak, W.

    2015-02-01

    Improper storage and disposal of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) has resulted in widespread contamination of the subsurface, threatening the quality of groundwater as a freshwater resource. The high frequency of contaminated sites and the difficulties of remediation efforts demand rational decisions based on a sound risk assessment. Due to sparse data and natural heterogeneities, this risk assessment needs to be supported by appropriate predictive models with quantified uncertainty. This study proposes a physically and stochastically coherent model concept to simulate and predict crucial impact metrics for DNAPL contaminated sites, such as contaminant mass discharge and DNAPL source longevity. To this end, aquifer parameters and the contaminant source architecture are conceptualized as random space functions. The governing processes are simulated in a three-dimensional, highly resolved, stochastic, and coupled model that can predict probability density functions of mass discharge and source depletion times. While it is not possible to determine whether the presented model framework is sufficiently complex or not, we can investigate whether and to which degree the desired model predictions are sensitive to simplifications often found in the literature. By testing four commonly made simplifications, we identified aquifer heterogeneity, groundwater flow irregularity, uncertain and physically based contaminant source zones, and their mutual interlinkages as indispensable components of a sound model framework.

  15. Can Pickering emulsion formation aid the removal of creosote DNAPL from porous media?

    PubMed

    Torres, Luis; Iturbe, Rosario; Snowden, M J; Chowdhry, Babur; Leharne, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the proposition that creosote, emplaced in an initially water saturated porous system, can be removed from the system through Pickering emulsion formation. Pickering emulsions are dispersions of two immiscible fluids in which coalescence of the dispersed phase droplets is hindered by the presence of colloidal particles adsorbed at the interface between the two immiscible fluid phases. Particle trapping is strongly favoured when the wetting properties of the particles are intermediate between strong water wetting and strong oil wetting. In this investigation the necessary chemical conditions for the formation of physically stable creosote-in-water emulsions protected against coalescence by bentonite particles were examined. It was established that physically stable emulsions could be formed through the judicious addition of small amounts of sodium chloride and the surfactant cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide. The stability of the emulsions was initially established by visual inspection. However, experimental determinations of emulsion stability were also undertaken by use of oscillatory rheology. Measurements of the elastic and viscous responses to shear indicated that physically stable emulsions were obtained when the viscoelastic systems showed a predominantly elastic response to shearing. Once the conditions were established for the formation of physically stable emulsions a "proof-of-concept" chromatographic experiment was carried out which showed that creosote could be successfully removed from a saturated model porous system.

  16. ALCOHOL FLUSHING FOR REMOVING DNAPL'S FROM CLAY AND SAND LAYERED AQUIFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Hayden; P. Padgett; C. Farrell; J. Diebold; X. Zhou; M. Hood

    1999-08-01

    Alcohol flushing, also called cosolvent flushing, is a relatively new in-situ remediation technology that shows promise for removing organic solvents from the soil and groundwater. Soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents and petroleum products is one of the most serious and widespread environmental problems of our time. Most of the DOE facilities and inactive sites are experiencing soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents. These water immiscible solvents have entered the subsurface from leaking underground storage tanks and piping, and from past waste handling and disposal practices such as leaking lagoons, holding ponds and landfills. In many cases, they have traveled hundreds of feet down into the saturated zone. If left in the soil, these chemicals may pose a significant environmental and human health risk. Alcohol flushing has potential for application to spilled solvents located deep within the saturated zone which are difficult if not impossible to remove by current remediation strategies, thus, greatly expediting restoration time, reducing total remediation cost and reducing risk.

  17. DNAPL Surface Chemistry: Its Impact on DNAPL Distribution in the Vadose Zone and its Manipulation to Enhance Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Suan Power; Stefan Grimberg; Miles Denham

    2003-06-16

    The remediation of DNAPLs in subsurface environments is often limited by the heterogeneous distribution of the organic fluid. The fraction of DNAPL that is in the high conductivity regions of the subsurface can often be recovered relatively easily, although DNAPL in lower conductivity regions is much more difficult to extract, either through direct pumping or remediation measures based on interface mass transfer. The distribution of DNAPL within the vadose zone is affected by a complex interplay of heterogeneities in the porous matrix and the interfacial properties defining the interactions among all fluid and solid phases. Decreasing the interfacial tension between a DNAPL and water in the vadose zone could change the spreading of the DNAPL, thereby increase the surface area for mass transfer and the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation.

  18. Numerical and experimental investigation of DNAPL removal mechanisms in a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W; Werth, Charles J; Valocchi, Albert J

    2009-10-13

    The purpose of this work is to identify the mechanisms that govern the removal of carbon tetrachloride (CT) during soil vapor extraction (SVE) by comparing numerical and analytical model simulations with a detailed data set from a well-defined intermediate-scale flow cell experiment. The flow cell was packed with a fine-grained sand layer embedded in a coarse-grained sand matrix. A total of 499 mL CT was injected at the top of the flow cell and allowed to redistribute in the variably saturated system. A dual-energy gamma radiation system was used to determine the initial NAPL saturation profile in the fine-grained sand layer. Gas concentrations at the outlet of the flow cell and 15 sampling ports inside the flow cell were measured during subsequent CT removal using SVE. Results show that CT mass was removed quickly in coarse-grained sand, followed by a slow removal from the fine-grained sand layer. Consequently, effluent gas concentrations decreased quickly at first, and then started to decrease gradually, resulting in long-term tailing. The long-term tailing was mainly due to diffusion from the fine-grained sand layer to the coarse-grained sand zone. An analytical solution for a one-dimensional advection and a first-order mass transfer model matched the tailing well with two fitting parameters. Given detailed knowledge of the permeability field and initial CT distribution, we were also able to predict the effluent concentration tailing and gas concentration profiles at sampling ports using a numerical simulator assuming equilibrium CT evaporation. The numerical model predictions were accurate within the uncertainty of independently measured or literature derived parameters. This study demonstrates that proper numerical modeling of CT removal through SVE can be achieved using equilibrium evaporation of NAPL if detailed fine-scale knowledge of the CT distribution and physical heterogeneity is incorporated into the model. However, CT removal could also be fit by a

  19. Multi objective optimization of the setup of a surfactant-enhanced DNAPL remediation.

    PubMed

    Schaerlaekens, Jan; Carmeliet, Jan; Feyen, Jan

    2005-04-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is widely considered a promising technique to remediate dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminations in-situ. The costs of a SEAR remediation are important and depend mostly on the setup of the remediation. Costs can be associated with the installation of injection and extraction wells, the required time of the remediation (and thus labor costs, lease of installations, and energy), the extracted water volume (the purification of the extracted water), and the injected surfactant amount. A cost-effective design of the remediation setup allows an optimal use of resources. In this work, a SEAR remediation was simulated for a hypothetical typical DNAPL contamination. A constrained multi-objective optimization of the model was applied to obtain a Pareto set of optimal remediation strategies with different weights for the two objectives of the remediation: (i) the maximal removal of DNAPL mass (ii) with a minimal total cost. A relatively sharp Pareto front was found, showing a considerable tradeoff between DNAPL removal and total remediation costs. These Pareto curves can help decision makers select an optimal remediation strategy in terms of cost and remediation efficiency depending on external constraints such as the available budget and obligatory remediation goals.

  20. Investigation of Chemical Reactivity, Mass Recovery and Biological Activity During Thermal Treatment of DNAPL Source Zones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    passive remediation ERH electrical resistive heating Fe iron Fe2+ ferrous iron Fe3+ ferric iron FeOOH iron oxide mineral FeS2 pyrite ...Silica Co. Laboratory in Berkeley Springs, WV for X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The mineral phases identified in the sand included pyrite ...marcasite (FeS2 - polymorph of pyrite ), and hematite (Fe2O3). The Ottawa sand was also analyzed for 20 elements using inductively coupled plasma mass

  1. Development of a Protocol and a Screening Tool for Selection of DNAPL Source Area Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    of organic carbon HD hydraulic displacement IRP Installation Restoration Program ISCO in situ chemical oxidation m3 cubic meter(s) MCL...bioremediation (EISB), in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), and co-solvent flushing ranged from 64% to 81%. If...mechanisms (e.g., oxidation , biodegradation, enhanced dissolution) may only result in relatively small incremental increases in DNAPL mass removal

  2. Coupling Surfactant Flushing and Bioaugmentation for PCE-DNAPL Source Zone Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cápiro, N. L.; Granbery, E. K.; Amos, B. K.; Löffler, F. E.; Pennell, K. D.

    2008-12-01

    Enhanced solubilization flushing using a biodegradable surfactant (Tween 80) was combined with bioaugmentation to initiate microbial reductive dechlorination and detoxify residual tetrachloroethene (PCE)- dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Dechlorination activity, spatial distribution of Dehalococcoides spp., and down-gradient plume development were monitored in a 2-D aquifer cell equipped with eighteen sampling ports. Saturation distributions of the PCE-DNAPL source zone were quantified using a light transmission system to determine the ganglia-to-pool (GTP) volume ratio, which was approximately 1.5 (i.e., 60% ganglia and 40% pools) prior to surfactant flushing. Flushing with three pore volumes (PVs) of 4% (w/w) Tween 80 solution recovered approximately 55% of the original PCE mass and reduced PCE effluent concentration from saturation (200 mg/L) to less than 50 mg/L. Following the introduction of reduced basal salts medium amended with 10 mM lactate, nine side ports located upstream and within the initial PCE- DNAPL source zone were augmented with Bio-Dechlor INOCULUM (BDI), a PCE-to-ethene dechlorinating consortium. Flux-averaged measurements of aqueous effluent samples revealed the conversion of PCE to cis-dichloroethene (DCE) with minimal lag time (7 days, approx. 1 PV), and vinyl chloride and ethene were detected within 10 PVs after bioaugmentation. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting Dehalococcoides spp. demonstrated growth once aqueous PCE concentrations decreased below inhibitory levels (~540 mM), with significant growth (2 to 4-orders of magnitude) near the remaining source zone. These results demonstrate the successful colonization of a pool-dominated (NAPL saturation >0.13) PCE- DNAPL source zone by a dechlorinating consortium following partial mass removal, and the potential for locally bioenhanced DNAPL dissolution.

  3. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L. |; Lowe, K.S.; Murdoch, L.D. |; Slack, W.W.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

  4. DNAPL Managements Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    case studies where MCLs were achieved throughout the DNAPL source zone. Another part of the challenge is that applying source-zone remediation...technologies without well-defined project objectives will likely lead to excessive costs, risks, or failures. Two case studies are presented to highlight... case studies where MCLs were achieved throughout the DNAPL source zone. Another part of the challenge is that applying source-zone remediation

  5. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2001-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  6. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2002-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  7. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2003-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  8. Numerical simulation of DNAPL emissions and remediation in a fractured dolomitic aquifer.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Robert G; Sudicky, Edward A; Park, Young-Jin; Illman, Walter A

    2012-08-01

    This study presents a numerical model of a large aqueous phase plume of a mixture of chlorinated solvents that has penetrated the fractured dolomitic bedrock near Smithville, Ontario, Canada several decades ago which, since 1989 has been hydraulically controlled by a pump-and-treat remediation system. A multiphase compositional model CompFlow is first applied to simulate the migration of DNAPLs in a discretely fractured porous medium with hydrostratigraphy representing the Smithville site. Results from CompFlow are used to estimate the pure-phase DNAPL distribution in the discrete fractures and rock matrix. Next, CompFlow results are employed to define the source term for a regional-scale transport simulation using HydroGeoSphere (HGS) by treating the layered, fractured dolomitic rocks as an equivalent porous continuum. Transport simulations are conducted both prior to and after the operation of the pump-and-treat system. Results reveal that considerable agreement with the observed mass removal data and TCE plume can be achieved by modifying the composition of the DNAPL source and by reducing the hydraulic conductivity (K) in the source zone region to account for preferential flow around it. Our transport model results support the conceptual model of TCE contamination which posits a mixed source (2 to 4%) of DNAPL with limited contact with actively flowing groundwater that is undergoing equilibrium dissolution. Model results also reveal that the pump-and-treat system has neither been effective in stabilizing the plume nor removing a significant amount of contaminant mass, but that the stability of the plume is instead due to first-order degradation.

  9. Characterizing Long-term Contaminant Mass Discharge and the Relationship Between Reductions in Discharge and Reductions in Mass for DNAPL Source Areas

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, D.E.; Carroll, K.C.; Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; McMillan, A.; Russo, A.; Plaschke, M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the temporal behavior of contaminant mass discharge, and the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in contaminant mass, for a very heterogeneous, highly contaminated source-zone field site. Trichloroethene is the primary contaminant of concern, and several lines of evidence indicate the presence of organic liquid in the subsurface. The site is undergoing groundwater extraction for source control, and contaminant mass discharge has been monitored since system startup. The results show a significant reduction in contaminant mass discharge with time, decreasing from approximately 1 to 0.15 kg/d. Two methods were used to estimate the mass of contaminant present in the source area at the initiation of the remediation project. One was based on a comparison of two sets of core data, collected 3.5 years apart, which suggests that a significant (~80%) reduction in aggregate sediment-phase TCE concentrations occurred between sampling events. The second method was based on fitting the temporal contaminant mass discharge data with a simple exponential source-depletion function. Relatively similar estimates, 784 and 993 kg, respectively, were obtained with the two methods. These data were used to characterize the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) and reductions in contaminant mass (MR). The observed curvilinear relationship exhibits a reduction in contaminant mass discharge essentially immediately upon initiation of mass reduction. This behavior is consistent with a system wherein significant quantities of mass are present in hydraulically poorly accessible domains for which mass removal is influenced by rate-limited mass transfer. The results obtained from the present study are compared to those obtained from other field studies to evaluate the impact of system properties and conditions on mass-discharge and mass-removal behavior. The results indicated that

  10. FLUX-BASED METHODS FOR DNAPL REMEDIATION DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    One tool that has been investigated for use in DNAPL site characterization and remediation is mass flux (mass per unit area per unit time) and mass discharge (mass per unit time) measurements. These measurements, when collected across one or more control planes located down grad...

  11. Comparison of Chlorinated Ethenes DNAPL Reductive Dechlorination by Indigenous and Evanite culture with Surfactant Tween-80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, R.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Lee, S.; Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Although many innovative technologies have been developed to enhance remediation of chlorinated ethenes(e.g. tetrachloroethene[PCE], trichloroethene[TCE])DNAPL source zones, they have been ineffective in reducing contaminant concentration to regulatory end points. Thus, combination of surfactant flushing process that removes significant contaminant mass with microbial reductive dechlorination, posttreatment "polishing step" to control the remaining DNAPL that may serve as a source of reducing equivalents and stimulate the dechlorinating bacterial communities may be an attractive remediation process alternatively. Microcosm studies were conducted to explore chlorinated ethenes, PCE/TCE of 3 ~ 30 mg/L dechlorination by indigenous microbial communities from TCE DNAPL source zones of Korea and Evanite culture in the presence of Tween-80 of 10 ~ 5,000 mg/L. In the microcosms for indigenous microbial communities, by-products(e.g. c-DCE, vinyl chloride) of reductive dechlorination of PCE/TCE were not detected. This results suggest dechlorinating bacteria might be not exist or high concentration of chlorinated ethenes inhibit activity of dechlorinating bacteria in indigenous microbial communities. But VFAs like acetate, methane and hydrogen gas from fermentation of Tween-80 were detected. So Tween-80 might estimated to serve as a source of reducing equivalents. To evaluate the dechlorinating ability of Evanite-culture, we added Evanite-culture to the microcosms for indigenous bacteria and monitored by-products of reductive dechlorination of PCE/TCE and VFAs and hydrogen gas.

  12. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Test Data for DNAPL Saturation Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T.; Boroumand, A.; Abriola, L. M.; Miller, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is a critical component for successful remediation of sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Although Push-Pull Tracer Tests (PPTTs) offer a promising approach for local in situ source zone characterization, non-equilibrium mass transfer effects and the spatial variability of saturation make their interpretation difficult. To better understand the dependence of well test data on these factors and as the basis for the estimation of the spatial DNAPL distribution, here we develop numerical methods based on the use of adjoint sensitivity mehtods to explore the sensitivity of PPTT observations to the distribution of DNAPL saturation. We examine the utility of the developed approach using three-dimensional hypothetical source zones containing heterogeneous DNAPL distributions. For model applications the flow fields are generated with MODFLOW and non-equilibrium tracer mass transfer is described by a linear driving force expression. Comprehensive modeling of partitioning tracer tests requires the solution of tracer mass balance equations in the aqueous and DNAPL phases. Consistent with this process coupling, the developed adjoint method introduces a vector of adjoint variables to formulate the coupled adjoint states equations for tracer concentrations in both the aqueous and NAPL phases. For the sensitivity analysis, we investigate how the tracer concentration in the well changes with perturbations of the saturation within the interrogated zone. Using the calculated sensitivity functions, coupled with the observed tracer breakthrough curve, we develop a nonlinear least-squares inverse method to determine three metrics related to the spatial distribution of DNAPL in the source zone: average DNAPL saturation, total mass of DNAPL and distance of the DNAPL from the test well. These results have utility for local source zone characterization and can provide an initial quantitative understanding of

  13. Use of emulsified vegetable oil to support bioremediation of TCE DNAPL in soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Mark; Fisher, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and trichloroethylene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was observed using two soil columns and subsequent reductive dechlorination of TCE was monitored over a three year period. Dyed TCE DNAPL (~ 75 g) was emplaced in one column (DNAPL column), while the second was DNAPL-free (plume column). EVO was added to both columns and partitioning of the EVO into the TCE DNAPL was measured and quantified. TCE (1.9 mM) was added to the influent of the plume column to simulate conditions down gradient of a DNAPL source area and the columns were operated independently for more than one year, after which they were connected in series. Initially limited dechlorination of TCE to cDCE was observed in the DNAPL column, while the plume column supported complete reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene. Upon connection and reamendment of the plume column with EVO, near saturation levels of TCE from the effluent of the DNAPL column were rapidly dechlorinated to c-DCE and VC in the plume column; however, this high rate dechlorination produced hydrochloric acid which overwhelmed the buffering capacity of the system and caused the pH to drop below 6.0. Dechlorination efficiency in the columns subsequently deteriorated, as measured by the chloride production and Dehalococcoides counts, but was restored by adding sodium bicarbonate buffer to the influent groundwater. Robust dechlorination was eventually observed in the DNAPL column, such that the TCE DNAPL was largely removed by the end of the study. Partitioning of the EVO into the DNAPL provided significant operational benefits to the remediation system both in terms of electron donor placement and longevity.

  14. Laboratory investigation of flux reduction from dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) partial source zone remediation by enhanced dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Andrew J.; Cho, Jaehyun; Basu, Nandita B.; Chen, Xiaosong; Annable, Michael D.; Jawitz, James W.

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the benefits of partial removal of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones using enhanced dissolution in eight laboratory scale experiments. The benefits were assessed by characterizing the relationship between reductions in DNAPL mass and the corresponding reduction in contaminant mass flux. Four flushing agents were evaluated in eight controlled laboratory experiments to examine the effects of displacement fluid property contrasts and associated override and underride on contaminant flux reduction ( Rj) vs. mass reduction ( Rm) relationships ( Rj( Rm)): 1) 50% ethanol/50% water (less dense than water), 2) 40% ethyl-lactate/60% water (more dense than water), 3) 18% ethanol/26% ethyl-lactate/56% water (neutrally buoyant), and 4) 2% Tween-80 surfactant (also neutrally buoyant). For each DNAPL architecture evaluated, replicate experiments were conducted where source zone dissolution was conducted with a single flushing event to remove most of the DNAPL from the system, and with multiple shorter-duration floods to determine the path of the Rj( Rm) relationship. All of the single-flushing experiments exhibited similar Rj( Rm) relationships indicating that override and underride effects associated with cosolvents did not significantly affect the remediation performance of the agents. The Rj( Rm) relationship of the multiple injection experiments for the cosolvents with a density contrast with water tended to be less desirable in the sense that there was less Rj for a given Rm. UTCHEM simulations supported the observations from the laboratory experiments and demonstrated the capability of this model to predict Rj( Rm) relationships for non-uniformly distributed NAPL sources.

  15. Correlation between DNAPL distribution area and dissolved concentration in surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation effluent: a two-dimensional flow cell study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bin; Li, Huiying; Du, Xiaoming; Zhong, Lirong; Yang, Bin; Du, Ping; Gu, Qingbao; Li, Fasheng

    2016-02-01

    During the process of surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), free phase dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) may be mobilized and spread. The understanding of the impact of DNAPL spreading on the SEAR remediation is not sufficient with its positive effect infrequently mentioned. To evaluate the correlation between DNAPL spreading and remediation efficiency, a two-dimensional sandbox apparatus was used to simulate the migration and dissolution process of 1,2-DCA (1,2-dichloroethane) DNAPL in SEAR. Distribution area of DNAPL in the sandbox was determined by digital image analysis and correlated with effluent DNAPL concentration. The results showed that the effluent DNAPL concentration has significant positive linear correlation with the DNAPL distribution area, indicating the mobilization of DNAPL could improve remediation efficiency by enlarging total NAPL-water interfacial area for mass transfer. Meanwhile, the vertical migration of 1,2-DCA was limited within the boundary of aquifer in all experiments, implying that by manipulating injection parameters in SEAR, optimal remediation efficiency can be reached while the risk of DNAPL vertical migration is minimized. This study provides a convenient visible and quantitative method for the optimization of parameters for SEAR project, and an approach of rapid predicting the extent of DNAPL contaminant distribution based on the dissolved DNAPL concentration in the extraction well.

  16. Characterization of a heterogeneous DNAPL source zone in the Borden aquifer using partitioning and interfacial tracers: residual morphologies and background sorption.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Niels; Cho, Jaehyun; Parker, Beth L; Annable, Michael D

    2010-06-25

    A partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) was performed in the Borden sand aquifer to characterize an aged heterogeneous DNAPL source zone. This zone evolved during 5 years of natural groundwater flow following the infiltration of 50 L chlorinated solvents DNAPL. To assess the lateral variability of remaining DNAPL mass and morphology, four sweepzones were analyzed. The low saturation residual nature of the source zone required correction of tracer breakthrough data for natural background sorption. Corrected estimates of the DNAPL percentage remaining (total 13.2-16.6%), average saturation (0.05-0.18%) and distribution across the sweepzones were in good agreement with previous findings based on detailed transect monitoring, core analyses and ground-penetrating radar reflection. Using a newly defined metric "average spherical radius equivalent (ASRE)", sweepzone estimates of the average size of DNAPL presence indicated the dominance of single pore DNAPL blobs and suggested the absence of DNAPL pools. Tracer tests indicated that DNAPL presence in the most DNAPL depleted sweepzone was potentially overestimated due to increased sediment sorption by residualized Sudan IV that was added to the DNAPL infiltrate. As hydrophobic compounds are normally present in spent solvent DNAPL, this suggests that additional sorption needs to be considered when using PITTs to characterize aged DNAPL source zones.

  17. DNAPL SITE EVALUATION - Project Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), especially chlorinated solvents, are among the most prevalent subsurface contaminants identified in ground-water supplies and at waste disposal sites. There are several site-characterization issues specific to DNAPL sites including (a) the...

  18. Characterization of DNAPL Source Zone Architecture and Associated Plume Response in 2-D Aquifer Cell Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granbery, E. K.; Cápiro, N.; Christ, J.; Pennell, K.

    2008-12-01

    A series of two-dimensional (2-D) aquifer cell experiments was conducted to evaluate the effects of DNAPL source zone architecture on down-gradient plume and flux-averaged effluent concentrations. The aquifer cells (1.0 m length x 48 cm height x 1.4 cm internal thickness) were packed with different size fractions of quartz sands and low permeability lens configurations to achieve a range of source zone saturation distributions. A mixed DNAPL, consisting of 1:1 trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE), was released into the source zone region of the aquifer cell at a flow rate of 2.0 ml/min and allowed to redistribute for a period of 48 hours. The DNAPL saturation distribution was quantified using a light transmission system and characterized by the ganglia-to-pool ratio (GTP, 0 to infinity) and ganglia fraction (GF, 0-100%), where saturations less than 0.13 represent discrete ganglia and saturations equal to or greater than 0.13 are considered to represent "pools". Effluent dissolved-phase TCE and PCE concentrations were monitored continuously, while down-gradient plume concentrations were collected periodically from 25 side-port samples. To accelerate mass removal, the aquifer cells were flushed with 1.5 pore volumes of 4% Tween 80, a nonionic, food-grade surfactant that has been shown to facilitate microbial reductive dechlorination. Experimental data are used to evaluate interrelationships between the initial source zone architecture, mass removal, reductions in mass flux, and plume evolution.

  19. Integration of Flux-Based Methods and Triad Principles for DNAPL Site Management, Part II: Review of Flux Measurement Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Managing dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminated sites continues to be among the most pressing environmental problems currently faced. One approach that has recently been investigated for use in DNAPL site characterization and remediation is mass flux (mass per unit ar...

  20. Compatibility of bentonite and DNAPLs

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, D.R.; Huling, S.G.

    1999-10-01

    The compatibility of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double ring, falling head permeameters. The hydraulic conductivity (K) of the bentonite clay was measured under three experimental conditions: (1) water soluble constituents of the DNAPLs were used to hydrate and permeate the bentonite; (2) bentonite pellets were submersed in DNAPL prior to hydration and permeation with water; and (3) DNAPLs were pooled on water-hydrated bentonite. Further, the effect of hydraulic head on water-hydrated bentonite permeated with TCE and the effects of TCE exposure time to mixtures of bentonite grout and sand were measured.

  1. COMPATIBILITY OF BENTONITE AND DNAPLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The compatibility of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double-ring, falling-head permeameters. The Hydraulic conductiv...

  2. Spatial and temporal dynamics of organohalide-respiring bacteria in a heterogeneous PCE-DNAPL source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cápiro, Natalie L.; Löffler, Frank E.; Pennell, Kurt D.

    2015-11-01

    Effective treatment of sites contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) requires detailed understanding of the microbial community responses to changes in source zone strength and architecture. Changes in the spatial and temporal distributions of the organohalide-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc) strains and Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ (GeoSZ) were examined in a heterogeneous tetrachloroethene- (PCE-) DNAPL source zone within a two-dimensional laboratory-scale aquifer flow cell. As part of a combined remedy approach, flushing with 2.3 pore volumes (PVs) of 4% (w/w) solution of the nonionic, biodegradable surfactant Tween® 80 removed 55% of the initial contaminant mass, and resulted in a PCE-DNAPL distribution that contained 51% discrete ganglia and 49% pools (ganglia-to-pool ratio of 1.06). Subsequent bioaugmentation with the PCE-to-ethene-dechlorinating consortium BDI-SZ resulted in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) formation after 1 PV (ca. 7 days), while vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene were detected 10 PVs after bioaugmentation. Maximum ethene yields (ca. 90 μM) within DNAPL pool and ganglia regions coincided with the detection of the vcrA reductive dehalogenase (RDase) gene that exceeded the Dhc 16S rRNA genes by 2.0 ± 1.3 and 4.0 ± 1.7 fold in the pool and ganglia regions, respectively. Dhc and GeoSZ cell abundance increased by up to 4 orders-of-magnitude after 28 PVs of steady-state operation, with 1 to 2 orders-of-magnitude increases observed in close proximity to residual PCE-DNAPL. These observations suggest the involvement of these dechlorinators the in observed PCE dissolution enhancements of up to 2.3 and 6.0-fold within pool and ganglia regions, respectively. Analysis of the solid and aqueous samples at the conclusion of the experiment revealed that the highest VC (≥ 155 μM) and ethene (≥ 65 μM) concentrations were measured in zones where Dhc and GeoSZ were predominately attached to the solids. These findings demonstrate

  3. DNAPL Extraction/Oleofilter Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Hazel, C.

    1997-11-03

    A short term, low flow DNAPL extraction test was performed from May 29 - 30, 1997, to gather additional information about the possibility of using monitoring well MSB-3D to recover source contamination from the M-Area Aquifer. Although no visible, free phase material was recovered, the groundwater did contain perchloroethylene (PCE) at and above aqueous solubility. Improvements in the pumping configuration were identified for future trials. Prior to final treatment in the M1 air stripper, the groundwater was passed through an Oleofiltration system to evaluate its capability as a treatment technology. The Oleofilter uses a combination of conventional gravity assisted separation with coalescing plates and a final polishing filter using proprietary coated granules to remove hydrocarbons. Although free phase DNAPL was not processed through the Oleofilter, the groundwater containing high levels of dissolved PCE was treated efficiently. Initially the Oleofilter removed 99 percent of the PCE. As the test progressed, this removal rate decreased to 83 percent as the granules became loaded with PCE. Longer term testing, perhaps with periodic backflushing, is required to determine the effective granule capacity.

  4. IMPACTS OF DNAPL SOURCE TREATMENT: OVERVIEW OF GWERD RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) is conducting research to evaluate the benefits derived from aggressive DNAPL source treatment. It is assumed that contaminant mass flux from the source zone can be used to estimate the performance of applied remedial ...

  5. Optimal search strategy for the definition of a DNAPL source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokou, Zoi; Pinder, George F.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryContamination created by dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) is a serious threat to the quality of the groundwater supply; thus, delineating and removing the DNAPL source is an essential step in a successful remediation strategy. The goal of this work is to create an optimal search strategy that identifies a DNAPL source using the least number of water quality samples. The search strategy includes a Monte Carlo stochastic groundwater flow and transport model, a predetermined set of potential source locations and a Kalman filter that updates the simulated contaminant concentration field using contaminant concentration data. The updated plume is compared to the concentration fields that emanate from each individual potential source using a technique rooted in fuzzy set theory. The comparison provides weights that reflect the degree of truth regarding the location of the source at the selected potential source locations. The steps described above are repeated until the weights stabilize and the optimal source location is determined. This paper presents the various mathematical tools employed in the search algorithm and their modifications for incorporation into the proposed methodology. The algorithm's effectiveness in identifying a DNAPL source is shown using a synthetic example.

  6. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  7. Radio frequency heating for in-situ remediation of DNAPL

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, R.S.

    1996-08-01

    In-situ radio frequency (RF) heating technology for treating soils contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) is described. RF imparts heat to non-conducting materials through the application of carefully controlled RF transmissions, improving contaminant flow characteristics and facilitating separation and removal from subsurface soils. The paper outlines advantages and limitations of RF remediation, process operations, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, and costs. Two case histories of RF remediation are briefly summarized. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Test plan for single well injection/extraction characterization of DNAPL

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.; Jerome, K.M.; Burdick, S.; Rossabi, J.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned Process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLS, or dense non aqueous Phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only ``proven`` cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on enhanced removal by surfactants and/or alcohols have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. As described below, carefully designed experiments similar to the enhanced removal methods may provide important characterization information on DNAPLs.

  9. Steam injection for in-situ remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, B.

    1996-08-01

    The potential for remediation of dense, nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination by steam injection is investigated, including the advantages and disadvantages of the technology. The primary advantage is the significant enhancement of removal rates through steam distillation. The disadvantages are related to the lack of field experience with the technology and difficulties related to steam override and channeling in heterogeneous soils. The problems related to steam injection in low permeability fractured clay are examined, and removal times and costs are postulated for a hypothetical DNAPL contamination scenario. It is concluded that steam injection has significant potential for remediation of DNAPL in fractured clay soils, but there is significant uncertainty in predictions of the performance of steam injection in these soils. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Application of 4D resistivity image profiling to detect DNAPLs plume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Tsai, Y.

    2008-12-01

    iron nanoparticles with pumps water remediation ways. The survey lines use the same length and the same position of the different time observation. The survey lines monitors the iron nanoparticles and pollution flow direction with remediation effect. By used the iron nanoparticles and pumping water remediation ways, the DNAPL plumes had eminent changed. Iron nanoparticles granule is smaller than the micron iron, Therefore the reaction rate was quite quick at the iron nanoparticles and pumps, but the ferric oxide can cause the electronic resistivity to elevate produces after the response. Pumps water rectifies may remove the ferric oxide to cause the electronic resistivity to reduce. The iron nanoparticles and pollution response is extremely obviously of the Resistivity Image Profile.

  11. Complex Electrical Resistivity for Monitoring DNAPL Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Brown; David Lesmes; John Fourkas

    2003-09-12

    Nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have landfills and buried waste areas. Of the various contaminants present at these sites, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are particularly hard to locate and remove. There is an increasing need for external or non-invasive sensing techniques to locate DNAPLs in the subsurface and to track their spread and monitor their breakdown or removal by natural or engineered means. G. Olhoeft and colleagues have published several reports based on laboratory studies using the complex resistivity method which indicate that organic solvents, notably toluene, PCE, and TCE, residing in clay-bearing soils have distinctive electrical signatures. These results have suggested to many researchers the basis of an ideal new measurement technique for geophysical characterization of DNAPL pollution. Encouraged by these results we proposed to bring the field measurement of complex resistivity as a means of pollution characterization from the conceptual stage to practice. We planned to document the detectability of clay-organic solvent interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further understanding of the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms, and then apply these observations to develop field techniques. As with any new research endeavor we note the extreme importance of trying to reproduce the work of previous researchers to ensure that any effects observed are due to the physical phenomena occurring in the specimen and not due to the particular experimental apparatus or method used. To this end, we independently designed and built a laboratory system, including a sample holder, electrodes, electronics, and data analysis software, for the measurement of the complex electrical resistivity properties of soil contaminated with organic solvents. The capabilities and reliability of this technique were documented. Using various standards we performed measurement accuracy, repeatability, and noise immunity

  12. Visualization Methods to Quantify DNAPL Dynamics in Chemical Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, X.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    A novel multiple-wavelength visualization method is under development for quantifying multiphase fluid dynamics in porous media. This technique is applied here for in situ characterization of laboratory-scale DNAPL chemical remediation, including co-solvent flushing and surfactant flushing. Development of this method is motivated by the limitations of current quantitative imaging methods. In the method both light adsorption (Beer's Law) and interfacial diffraction (Fresnel's Law) are considered. Furthermore, the use of multiple wavelengths introduces the ability to eliminate the interface structure effect. By using images taken at two wavelengths using band-pass filters, the heterogeneous DNAPL saturation distribution in a two- dimensional laboratory chamber can be quantified at any time during chemical remediation. Previously published DNAPL visualization techniques have been shown to be some accurate for post-spill conditions, but are ineffective once significant dissolution has occurred. The method introduced here is shown to achieve mass balances of 90% and greater even during chemical remediation. Furthermore, the heterogeneous saturation distribution in the chamber (i.e. Eulerian description) and the distribution over stream tubes (i.e. Lagrangian description) are quantified using the new method and shown to be superior to those obtained using the binary imaging technique.

  13. Transport, Targeting, and Applications of Metallic Functional Nanoparticles for Degradation of DNAPL Chlorinated Organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Gregory; Majetich, Sara; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Sholl, David; Tilton, Robert

    2004-06-15

    This project addresses the need for methods to remove or degrade subsurface contaminants that are present as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), and act as long-term sources of groundwater contamination. The goal is to build on a particle-based approach to subsurface contaminant remediation that is based partly on the recent success in using nanoparticle iron to degrade chlorinated compounds dissolved in groundwater, and knowledge of how colloids migrate in porous media. The objective is to engineer reactive nanoparticles that can decompose and potentially isolate DNAPL pollutants in the subsurface.

  14. ENHANCED MOBILITY OF DENSE NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPLs) USING DISSOLVED HUMIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect

    EDWIN S. OLSON; JOHN R. GALLAGHER; MARC D. KURZ

    1998-10-01

    The specific objectives of this subtask are as follows: � Evaluate the suitability of using humic acids to enhance the solubility and mobility of DNAPL contaminants sorbed to soils. � Evaluate the toxicity and bioavailablity of the DNAPLs to biodegrading microorganisms. To meet the first objective, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated a set of humic acids (two) with different chemical compositions and polarities for the following: � Ability of the humates to mobilize/solubilize selected (three) DNAPLs � Mobilization/solubilization in batch soil�water experiments (one soil) � Removal rate via biotreatment with a well-established active microbial culture. The second objective was met by evaluating the inhibiting effects of a leonardite-derived humic acid on active microbial populations.

  15. SYNTHESIS REPORT ON FIVE DENSE, NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUID (DNAPL) REMEDIATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) poses a difficult problem for subsurface remediation because it serves as a continuing source to dissolved phase ground water contamination and is difficult to remove from interstitial pore space or bedrock fractures in the subsurface. Numer...

  16. Test plan for Geo-Cleanse{reg_sign} demonstration (in situ destruction of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL))

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Accorsi, F.; Dingens, M.; Wilson, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only proven cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on destruction of DNAPL either in situ or ex situ have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. The proposed demonstration, as described in this report will evaluate the applicability to DNAPL plumes of a technology proven for in situ destruction of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) such as oils.

  17. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASS FLUX REDUCTION AND SOURCE-ZONE MASS REMOVAL: ANALYSIS OF FIELD DATA

    PubMed Central

    DiFilippo, Erica L.

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude of contaminant mass flux reduction associated with a specific amount of contaminant mass removed is a key consideration for evaluating the effectiveness of a source-zone remediation effort. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing, estimating, and predicting relationships between mass flux reduction and mass removal. Published data collected for several field studies were examined to evaluate relationships between mass flux reduction and source-zone mass removal. The studies analyzed herein represent a variety of source-zone architectures, immiscible-liquid compositions, and implemented remediation technologies. There are two general approaches to characterizing the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship, end-point analysis and time-continuous analysis. End-point analysis, based on comparing masses and mass fluxes measured before and after a source-zone remediation effort, was conducted for 21 remediation projects. Mass removals were greater than 60% for all but three of the studies. Mass flux reductions ranging from slightly less than to slightly greater than one-to-one were observed for the majority of the sites. However, these single-snapshot characterizations are limited in that the antecedent behavior is indeterminate. Time-continuous analysis, based on continuous monitoring of mass removal and mass flux, was performed for two sites, both for which data were obtained under water-flushing conditions. The reductions in mass flux were significantly different for the two sites (90% vs. ~8%) for similar mass removals (~40%). These results illustrate the dependence of the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship on source-zone architecture and associated mass-transfer processes. Minimal mass flux reduction was observed for a system wherein mass removal was relatively efficient (ideal mass transfer and displacement). Conversely, a significant degree of mass flux reduction was observed for a site wherein mass removal was inefficient

  18. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  19. Processes affecting soil and groundwater contamination by DNAPL in low-permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    This paper is one of a set of focus papers intended to document the current knowledge relevant to the contamination and remediation of soils and ground water by dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The emphasis is on low permeability media such as fractured clay and till and unconsolidated, stratified formations. Basic concepts pertaining to immiscible-fluid mixtures are described and used to discuss such aspects as DNAPL transport, dissolved-phase transport, and equilibrium mass distributions. Several implications for remediation are presented. 27 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. FIELD ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE DNAPL REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five DNAPL remediation technologies were evaluated in constructed test cells at the Dover National Test Site, Dover AFB, Delaware. The technologies were cosolvent solubilization, cosolvent mobilization, surfactant solubilization, complex sugar flushing and air sparging/soil vapor...

  1. DNAPL Remediation: Selected Projects Approaching Regulatory Closure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This paper is a status update on the use of DNAPL source reduction remedial technologies, and provides information about recent projects where regulatory closure has been reached or projects are approaching regulatory closure, following source reduction.

  2. Site Characterization Technologies for DNAPL Investigations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is intended to help managers at sites with potential or confirmed DNAPL contamination identify suitable characterization technologies, screen the technologies for potential application, learn about applications at similar sites, and...

  3. Does increasing the temperature induce DNAPL migration?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and chlorobenzene have been identified as contaminants in groundwater and are sometimes called Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPL). Thermal methods for remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater rely on raising the temperature o...

  4. High-resolution experiments on chemical oxidation of DNAPL in variable-aperture fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Masoud; Rajaram, Harihar; Detwiler, Russell L.; Jones, Trevor

    2015-04-01

    Chemical oxidation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) by permanganate has emerged as an effective remediation strategy in fractured rock. We present high-resolution experimental investigations in transparent analog variable-aperture fractures to improve understanding of chemical oxidation of residual entrapped trichloroethylene (TCE) in fractures. Four experiments were performed with different permanganate concentrations, flow rates, and initial TCE phase geometry. The initial aperture field and evolving entrapped-phase geometry were quantified for each experiment. The integrated mass transfer rate from the TCE phase for all experiments exhibited three time regimes: an early-time regime with slower mass transfer rates limited by low specific interfacial area; an intermediate-time regime with higher mass transfer rates resulting from breakup of large TCE blobs, which greatly increases specific interfacial area; and a late-time regime with low mass transfer rates due to the deposition of MnO2 precipitates. In two experiments, mass balance analyses suggested that TCE mass removal rates exceeded the maximum upper bound mass removal rates derived by assuming that oxidation and dissolution are the only mechanisms for TCE mass removal. We propose incomplete oxidation by permanganate and TCE solubility enhancement by intermediate reaction products as potential mechanisms to explain this behavior. We also speculate that some intermediate reaction products with surfactant-like properties may play a role in lowering the TCE-water interfacial tension, thus causing breakup of large TCE blobs. Our quantitative experimental measurements will be useful in the context of developing accurate computational models for chemical oxidation of TCE in fractures.

  5. Physics of DNAPL Migration and Remediation in the Presence of Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    CONRAD,STEPHEN H.; GLASS,ROBERT J.

    1999-11-29

    The goal of our research is to develop a fundamental quantitative understanding of the role of physical heterogeneities on DNAPL migration and remediation in aquifers. Such understanding is critical to cost effectively identify the location of the subsurface zone of contamination and design remediation schemes focused on removing the source of the contamination, the DNAPL itself. To reach this goal, the following objectives for the proposed research are defined: Objective 1: Develop fundamental understanding of the physics of DNAPL migration processes within heterogeneous porous media: (a) Conduct a suite of two-dimensional physical experiments within controlled and systematically varied heterogeneous porous media at scales up to one meter. Vary system parameters to consider a range of capillary and bond numbers within these heterogeneous porous structures. (b) Develop a new DNAPL migration model based on an up-scaling of invasion percolation (UP) to model the migration process. Compare the model predictions to experimental results. Accomplishing objective 1 provides a series of experiments against which we will be able to evaluate the validity of existing multi-phase flow theory as formulated in both percolation codes and in continuum flow codes. These experimental results will also provide new insights into DNAPL migration behavior. Development of the UIP model will provide an exciting alternative to continuum multi-phase flow codes since UIP offers several advantages for modeling DNAPL migration. The UIP model is fast, allowing for: (1) modeling in three dimensions; (2) the incorporation of much more geologic detail; and (3) its use in probabilistic modeling by way of Monte Carlo techniques. Objective 2: Develop fundamental understanding of the physics of DNAPL remediation processes within heterogeneous porous media: Conduct a suite of physical experiments within controlled and systematically varied heterogeneous porous media at scales up to one meter that

  6. Task 1.16 - Enhanced Mobility of Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) Using Dissolved Humic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Marc D. Kurz

    1998-02-01

    Chlorinated solvent contamination is widespread across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex and other industrial facilities. Because of the physical properties of dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), current treatment technologies are generally incapable of completely removing contamination from the source area. Incomplete removal means that the residual DNAPL WN persist as a long-term source of groundwater contamination. When DNALPs occur in the subsurface, they resist remediation, owing to low water volubility, high viscosity and interracial tension, and microbial recalcitrance. Because of their high density and polarity, they are usually found sorbed to aquifer solids or in pools on impermeable materials. Surfactants have been used with some success to reduce interracial tension between the aqueous and organic phases and improve volubility of DNAPLs. However, surfactants are expensive and toxic and exhibit an oxygen demand. An alternative is the use of dissolved humic acids in improving DNAPL mobilization and solubilization. Humic acids, a natural form of organic carbon, are abundant, inexpensive, and nontoxic; biodegrade slowly (low oxygen demand); and have excellent mobilization properties. The present work is to establish the feasibility of using hurnates for enhancing DNAPL remediation.

  7. Electroosmosis remediation of DNAPLS in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S V.

    1996-08-01

    Electroosmosis is the movement of water through a soil matrix induced by a direct current (DC) electric field. The technique has been used since the 1930s for dewatering and stabilizing fine-grained soils. More recently, electroosmosis has been considered as an in-situ method for soil remediation in which water is injected into the soil at the anode region to flush the contaminants to the cathode side for further treatment or disposal. The major advantage of electroosmosis is its inherent ability to move water uniformly through clayey, silty soils at 100 to 1000 times faster than attainable by hydraulic means, and with very low energy usage. Drawbacks of electroosmosis as a stand-alone technology include slow speed, reliance on solubilizing the contaminants into the groundwater for removal, potentially an unstable process for long term operation, and necessary additional treatment and disposal of the collected liquid. Possible remediation applications of electroosmosis for DNAPLs would be primarily in the removal of residual DNAPLs in the soil pores by electroosmotic flushing. The future of electroosmosis as a broad remedial method lies in how well it can be coupled with complementary technologies. Examples include combining electroosmosis with vacuum extraction, with surfactant usage to deal with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) through enhanced solubilization or mobilization, with permeability enhancing methods (hydrofracturing, pneumatic fracturing, etc.) to create recovery zones, and with in-situ degradation zones to eliminate aboveground treatment. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Nasal mass removal in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Wynne, Janna; Klause, Stephen; Stadler, Cynthia K; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2012-12-01

    Nasal masses in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) are not uncommon and can be challenging to diagnose and treat. Differential diagnoses for nasal masses in the koala are cryptococcal granulomas, nasal polyps, nasal adenocarcinoma, and osteochondromatosis. This report describes successful surgical approaches for two adult koalas with nasal masses and includes photodocumentation and description of the anatomy of the koala nasal passages from the postmortem transverse sectioning of a normal koala head. Surgical removal of the nasal masses in these koalas resulted in a rapid resolution of clinical signs.

  9. Interpreting DNAPL saturations in a laboratory-scale injection using one- and two-dimensional modeling of GPR Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.H.; Poeter, E.P.

    2005-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is used to track a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) injection in a laboratory sand tank. Before modeling, the GPR data provide a qualitative image of DNAPL saturation and movement. One-dimensional (1D) GPR modeling provides a quantitative interpretation of DNAPL volume within a given thickness during and after the injection. DNAPL saturation in sublayers of a specified thickness could not be quantified because calibration of the 1D GPR model is nonunique when both permittivity and depth of multiple layers are unknown. One-dimensional GPR modeling of the sand tank indicates geometric interferences in a small portion of the tank. These influences are removed from the interpretation using an alternate matching target. Two-dimensional (2D) GPR modeling provides a qualitative interpretation of the DNAPL distribution through pattern matching and tests for possible 2D influences that are not accounted for in the 1D GPR modeling. Accurate quantitative interpretation of DNAPL volumes using GPR modeling requires (1) identification of a suitable target that produces a strong reflection and is not subject to any geometric interference; (2) knowledge of the exact depth of that target; and (3) use of two-way radar-wave travel times through the medium to the target to determine the permittivity of the intervening material, which eliminates reliance on signal amplitude. With geologic conditions that are suitable for GPR surveys (i.e., shallow depths, low electrical conductivities, and a known reflective target), the procedures in this laboratory study can be adapted to a field site to delineate shallow DNAPL source zones.

  10. Study on contaminant mass removal by soil vapor extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fen, Chiu-Shia

    2015-04-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is an effective remediation technology for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones, particularly for high permeability soils. However, due to the nature of soil heterogeneities in most of the subsurface systems, the performance of SVE systems may be affected. Radius of influence (ROI) is usually evaluated at sites by measuring vacumm pressures of subsurface systems or through judging from the magnitudes of soil permeabilities. Within the area of a ROI, it is usually believed that the vaporized VOCs can be effectively removed from soil pores. Besides, it has been discussed whether continuous or pulsed venting operations is efficient for contaminant mass removal. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationships of subsurface vacuum pressure, pore gas velocity and contaminant mass removal rate from a venting well. A multiphase flow and multicompositional contaminant transport model will be applied to various scenarios of soil heterogeneities with different strategies of venting operation. We are, in an attempt, to find out controlling factors affecting the efficiency of contaminant mass removal from a venting well.

  11. Removal of the samarium isobaric interference from promethium mass analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Young, J.P.; Smith, D.H.

    1988-02-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) is used to eliminate isobaric interference when determining the isotopic abundances of an element. In this application, RIMS is applied to the determination of promethium with the removal of samarium interference. In particular, promethium-147 is separated form samarium-147 and samarium-152.

  12. How to Use Removable Mass Storage Memory Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Mass storage refers to the variety of ways to keep large amounts of information that are used on a computer. Over the years, the removable storage devices have grown smaller, increased in capacity, and transferred the information to the computer faster. The 8" floppy disk of the 1960s stored 100 kilobytes, or about 60 typewritten, double-spaced…

  13. High-Resolution Experiments on chemical oxidation of DNAPL in variable-aperture fractures: Delineation of three time regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, M.; Rajaram, H.; Detwiler, R. L.; Jones, T.

    2013-12-01

    formed a thin layer between the TCE blobs and the glass surfaces. The images from the experiments indicate that the blobs in the upstream do not disappear or break up as fast as the other TCE blobs during the experiment. The results of total mass transfer rate from DNAPL blobs for all three experiments exhibit three distinct time regimes. The total rate of mass transfer from free phase DNAPL is smaller at early time and increases as permanganate propagates into the fracture and occupies more fraction of the cell. The duration of this early time regime depends on the permanganate flow rate and initial TCE distribution within the fracture. During the intermediate time regime when the available volume of the fracture has almost filled with permanganate, the large TCE blobs start to break up into smaller blobs. Relatively High and constant total mass transfer rates are observed during this time regime. With time, MnO2 precipitation in the fracture leads to changes in the aperture field and flow field. Precipitated MnO2 around TCE blobs also decreases the DNAPL accessible surface area, resulting in a decline in total mass transfer rate during the late time regime. The effects of large scale parameters, such as flow rate, permanganate inflow concentration and initial TCE distribution on processes of DNAPL remediation will also be discussed in this work.

  14. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACTS OF PARTIAL DNAPL SOURCE ZONE DELETION USING SPARGING AS A REMEDIATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contamination of the subsurface environment by dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) is a wide-spread problem that poses a significant threat to soil and groundwater quality. Implementing different remediation techniques can lead to the removal of a high fraction of the DNA...

  15. MASS-REMOVAL AND MASS-FLUX-REDUCTION BEHAVIOR FOR IDEALIZED SOURCE ZONES WITH HYDRAULICALLY POORLY-ACCESSIBLE IMMISCIBLE LIQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M. L.; Difilippo, Erica L.; marble, justin C.; Oostrom, Mart

    2008-04-01

    A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate aqueous dissolution and mass-removal behavior for systems wherein immiscible liquid was non-uniformly distributed in physically heterogeneous source zones. The study focused specifically on characterizing the relationship between mass flux reduction and mass removal for systems for which immiscible liquid is poorly accessible to flowing water. Two idealized scenarios were examined, one wherein immiscible liquid at residual saturation exists within a lower-permeability unit residing in a higher-permeability matrix, and one wherein immiscible liquid at higher saturation (a pool) exists within a higher-permeability unit adjacent to a lower-permeability unit. The results showed that significant reductions in mass flux occurred at relatively moderate mass-removal fractions for all systems. Conversely, minimalmass flux reduction occurred until a relatively large fraction of mass (>80%) was removed for the control experiment, which was designed to exhibit ideal mass removal. In general, mass flux reduction was observed to follow an approximately one-to-one relationship with mass removal. Two methods for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior, one based on system-indicator parameters (ganglia-to-pool ratio) and the other a simple mass-removal function, were used to evaluate the measured data. The results of this study illustrate the impact of poorly accessible immiscible liquid on mass-removal and mass-flux processes, and the difficulties posed for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior.

  16. Reaction and Transport Processes Controlling In Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    VOCs (Watts et al. 1990, 1991, Gurol and Ravikumar 1991, Ravikumar and Gurol 1991, 1994, Leung et al. 1992, Hurst et al. 1993, Greenberg et al. 1998...coefficient at the beginning, ± 12% for the Reynolds number exponent , and ± 13% for the NAPL content exponent (Miller et al. 1990, Nambi and Powers 2003...choices by looking at 2-D systems with high DNAPL saturations resulting in slower mass transfer characterized by a significantly increased exponent on

  17. CONTROLLED RELEASE, BLIND TEST OF DNAPL REMEDIATION BY ETHANOL FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone was established within a sheet-pile
    isolated cell through a controlled release of perchloroethylene (PCE) to evaluate DNAPL
    remediation by in-situ cosolvent flushing. Ethanol was used as the cosolvent, and the main remedia...

  18. Field test of single well DNAPL characterization using alcohol injection/extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Rhoden, M.L.; Riha, B.; Burdick, S.

    1996-10-29

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. The authors performed injection/extraction characterization tests in six existing wells in A/M Area. Water concentrations for TCE and/or PCE in these wells ranged from 0% to 100% of solubility. For each test, small amounts of solubilizing solution were used to try to confirm or deny the presence or absence of DNAPL in the immediate vicinity of the well screen.

  19. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON (DNAPL CONFERENCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) is being conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island SC. The demonstration is being conducted by Geosyntec, the Nationa...

  20. The fundamentals and futures of removable mass storage alternatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempster, Linda

    1993-01-01

    This article reflects my view of how the storage products have been introduced into the marketplace, where they came from, and where others will continue to come from in the future. My corporate goal is to be a resource for those searching for removable solutions to mass storage problems. My introduction to optical storage occurred a few months before signing a non-disclosure agreement with FileNet on 8 Aug. 1983. By 87 or 88, as the optical craze was getting more popular, I started looking for similar or complementary storage technologies. I am still looking and my research is constantly turning up new entrants into this field. Due to the scope of the coverage in this field, this article does not dwell on any single technology. The goal is to provide information that is not compiled in any other single source and focus on facts that are not commonly known. I have provided a few baseline assumptions to ensure the mathematical calculations remain consistent: (1) hard-copy 8.5 in x 11 in documents which are scanned at 200 dots per inch (dpi) and compressed at a ratio of 10:1 result in a document image which requires an average of 50 Kilobytes (KB) of storage; (2) an average ASCII page requires 2 KB of storage; (3) an average flle cabinet drawer can hold 2500 pieces of paper; (4) one GB of storage can hold an average of 20,000 document images (a reel of 6250 tape holds 180 Megabytes (MB)).

  1. FIELD EVALUATION OF DNAPL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGIES: PROJECT OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five DNAPL remediation technologies were evaluated at the Dover National Test Site, Dover AFB, Delaware. The technologies were cosolvent solubilization, cosolvent mobilization, surfactant solubilization, complex sugar flushing and air sparging/soil vapor extraction. The effectiv...

  2. Monitoring Genetic and Metabolic Potential for In-Site Bioremediation: Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M.V.

    2000-07-20

    A number of DOE sites are contaminated with mixtures of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, in situ microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup, since it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in situ without the need for pump-and-treat or soil removal procedures, and without producing toxic byproducts. A rapid screening method to determine broad range metabolic and genetic potential for contaminant degradation would greatly reduce the cost and time involved in assessment for in situ bioremediation, as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. The objective of this project was the development of mass-spectrometry-based methods to screen for genetic potential for both assessment and monitoring of in situ bioremediation of DNAPLs. These methods were designed to provide more robust and routine methods for DNA-based characterization of the genetic potential of subsurface microbes for degrading pollutants. Specifically, we sought to (1) Develop gene probes that yield information equivalent to conventional probes, but in a smaller size that is more amenable to mass spectrometric detection, (2) Pursue improvements to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) methodology in order to allow its more general application to gene probe detection, and (3) Increase the throughput of microbial characterization by integrating gene probe preparation, purification, and MALDI-MS analysis.

  3. Technical and Regulatory Guidance for Surfactant/Cosolvent Flushing of DNAPL Source Zones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    Technical and Regulatory Guidance for Surfactant/Cosolvent Flushing of DNAPL Source Zones Prepared by Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Technical and Regulatory Guidance for Surfactant/Cosolvent Flushing of DNAPL Source... DNAPL Source Zones April 2003 Prepared by Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council Dense Nonaqueous Phase

  4. Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids ( DNAPLs ): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies Prepared by Interstate Technology and...Regulatory Cooperation Work Group DNAPLs /Chemical Oxidation Work Team June 2000 Technology Overview Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids ( DNAPLs ): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies 5a. CONTRACT

  5. Dnapl Site Remediation: Status and Research Needs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroo, H. F.; Kueper, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Remediation of sites impacted by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents remains technically challenging despite significant advances over the past 30 years. Contaminants are difficult to locate in the subsurface, and it is difficult to deliver remedial agents to the contamination effectively. If lower permeability media are present, these can act as diffusive sinks for aqueous and sorbed phase constituents, further complicating characterization and cleanup. DNAPL source zones are particularly difficult to remediate, and even after treatment these sources can persist for many decades, if not centuries, and it is difficult to transition sites to a passive management strategy. A recent expert panel on source zone remediation identified three overriding objectives for future remediation - to be more surgical, more sustainable, and more certain. Surgical remediation refers to precise delineation of contaminants and hydrogeology, with more targeted remediation efforts. Sustainable remediation refers to the growing need to consider all environmental impacts when developing remediation strategies, including energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, lifecycle impacts, and the increasing demand for clean water. Although considerable uncertainty is inherent in subsurface remediation, there is potential to reduce this uncertainty through improved monitoring and modeling. Specific characterization and remediation needs will be summarized separately. Improved technologies for source characterization are critical because inadequate characterization is common given the costs and limitations of current techniques. As a result, the performance of field-scale remediation technologies is frequently disappointing. Specific research needs to improve source zone characterization include: (i) better delineation and mass estimation, (ii) source zone architecture characterization methods, and (iii) increased resolution and fine-scale mapping of geologic

  6. Transport with Bimolecular Reactions: Applications to In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs by Permanganate in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Masoud

    Chemical oxidation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) by permanganate has emerged as an effective remediation strategy in fractured rock. Our objectives in this research were to carry out a sequence of experimental, computational and theoretical tasks aimed at improving current understanding of permanganate oxidation in fractured rock systems, and also develop modeling tools that can be used for preliminary design of oxidation schemes at field sites. Our research focused on both free-phase entrapped DNAPL in variable-aperture fractures and dissolved DNAPL in the rock matrix. In the first section of our research, we present high-resolution experimental investigations in transparent analog variable-aperture fractures to improve understanding of chemical oxidation of residual entrapped trichloroethylene (TCE) in fractures. Four experiments were performed with different permanganate concentrations, flow rates, and initial TCE phase geometry. The initial aperture field and evolving entrapped-phase geometry were measured quantitatively. We present results on the time-evolution of fracture-scale TCE consumption and DNAPL removal rates for all the experiments. In the next part of this work, we developed theoretical understanding of the reaction front dynamics in the case of chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase DNAPL within fracture-matrix system, backed up by numerical simulations. We also consider the influence of NOD consumption and contaminant sorption to solid aquifer materials in our models. Based on the results from this task we are able to propose simple strategies for remediation design (e.g. the time needed to degrade DNAPL inside the fracture-matrix system and the permanganate injection pattern) for a given set of conditions. Our numerical simulations of diffusion with bimolecular reaction in the rock matrix demonstrated a transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate - increasing with time initially, and transitioning to a decrease with time. We

  7. Impact of enhanced-flushing reagents and organic-liquid distribution on mass removal and mass-discharge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Nihat Hakan; Lee, Ann Russo; Brusseau, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    A series of column and flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate the impact of non-uniform organic-liquid distribution on the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in source zone mass under conditions of enhanced-solubilization flushing. Trichloroethene was used as the model organic liquid, and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and ethanol were used as representative enhanced-flushing reagents. The results were compared to those of water-flood control experiments. Concentrations of trichloroethene in the effluent exhibited multi-step behavior with time, wherein multiple secondary periods of quasi steady state were observed. This non-ideal behavior was observed for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. For all flow-cell experiments, the later stage of mass removal was controlled by the more poorly- accessible mass associated with higher-saturation zones. The profiles relating reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in mass exhibited generally similar behavior for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. This indicates that while the rates and magnitudes of mass removal are altered by the presence of a solubilization-reagent solution, the fundamental mass-removal process is not. The profiles obtained for the flow-cell systems differed from those obtained for the column systems, highlighting the impact of source-zone heterogeneity on mass-removal behavior. PMID:24563557

  8. Impact of enhanced-flushing reagents and organic-liquid distribution on mass removal and mass-discharge reduction.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Nihat Hakan; Lee, Ann Russo; Brusseau, Mark L

    2013-10-01

    A series of column and flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate the impact of non-uniform organic-liquid distribution on the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in source zone mass under conditions of enhanced-solubilization flushing. Trichloroethene was used as the model organic liquid, and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and ethanol were used as representative enhanced-flushing reagents. The results were compared to those of water-flood control experiments. Concentrations of trichloroethene in the effluent exhibited multi-step behavior with time, wherein multiple secondary periods of quasi steady state were observed. This non-ideal behavior was observed for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. For all flow-cell experiments, the later stage of mass removal was controlled by the more poorly- accessible mass associated with higher-saturation zones. The profiles relating reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in mass exhibited generally similar behavior for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. This indicates that while the rates and magnitudes of mass removal are altered by the presence of a solubilization-reagent solution, the fundamental mass-removal process is not. The profiles obtained for the flow-cell systems differed from those obtained for the column systems, highlighting the impact of source-zone heterogeneity on mass-removal behavior.

  9. A media maniac's guide to removable mass storage media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempster, Linda S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses at a high level, the many individual technologies available today in the removable storage arena including removable magnetic tapes, magnetic floppies, optical disks and optical tape. Tape recorders represented below discuss logitudinal, serpantine, logitudinal serpantine,and helical scan technologies. The magnetic floppies discussed will be used for personal electronic in-box applications.Optical disks still fill the role for dense long-term storage. The media capacities quoted are for native data. In some cases, 2 KB ASC2 pages or 50 KB document images will be referenced.

  10. Steam and ET-DSP combined for DNAPL remediation: full-scale site restoration at Young-Rainey Star Center

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, Gorm; Carroll, Steven; Sowers, Hank; McGee, Bruce; Juhlin, Randall; Daniel, Joe; Ingle, David S.

    2004-05-01

    In March of 2003, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) completed a full-scale nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) remediation of Area A of the Northeast Site at the Young-Rainey STAR Center, Largo, Florida. The site was contaminated with approximately 2,300 kg (5,000 lbs) of NAPL constituents such as TCE, cis-1,2-DCE, methylene chloride, toluene, and petroleum hydrocarbons. The site was remediated by SteamTech using a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and electrical resistance heating during operations lasting 4.5 months. After the target volume had been heated to or near boiling temperatures, pressure cycles were used to increase the mass removal rates. Each de-pressurization cycle led to large increases in the vapor phase recovery, until a final phase of diminishing returns was reached. Post-operational sampling at randomly selected locations showed the concentrations of all contaminants of concern (COC) to be well below the remedial goals. The majority of the groundwater samples were below maximum contaminant level (MCL) for all the contaminants of concern. The overall mass balance showed that about 0.5 kg (1 pound) of VOCs remained in the remedial volume, and showed remedial efficiencies of between 99.85 and 99.99 percent for the four chemicals of concern. This is the first full-scale demonstration of complete source removal at a DNAPL site. Since the post-operational sampling shows all concentrations to be below or close to groundwater MCLs, the thermal remedy may be satisfactory for site closure without a polishing phase.

  11. Phase I Field Test Results of an Innovative DNAPL Remediation Technology: The Hydrophobic Lance

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-01-28

    An innovative technology for recovery of pure phase DNAPL was deployed in the subsurface near the M-Area Settling Basin, continuing the support of the A/M Area Ground Water Corrective Action Program (per Part B requirements). This technology, the Hydrophobic Lance, operates by placing a neutral/hydrophobic surface (Teflon) in contact with the DNAPL. This changes the in situ conditions experienced by the DNAPL, allowing it to selectively drain into a sump from which it can be pumped. Collection of even small amounts of DNAPL can save years of pump-and-treat operation because of the generally low solubility of DNAPL components.

  12. The Outcome of Supernovae in Massive Binaries; Removed Mass, and its Separation Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Ryosuke; Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-09-01

    The majority of massive stars are formed in binary systems. It is hence reasonable to expect that most core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) take place in binaries and the existence of a companion star may leave some imprints in observed features. Having this in mind, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the collisions of CCSNe ejecta with the companion star in an almost-equal-mass (~10 M ⊙) binary to find out possible consequences of such events. In particular we pay attention to the amount of mass removed and its dependence on the binary separation. In contrast to the previous surmise, we find that the companion mass is stripped not by momentum transfer but by shock heating. Up to 25% of the original mass can be removed for the closest separations and the removed mass decreases as M ubvpropa -4.3 with the binary separation a. By performing some experimental computations with artificially modified densities of incident ejecta, we show that if the velocity of ejecta is fixed, the density of incident ejecta is the single important parameter that actually determines the removed mass as Mub \\propto ρ ej 1.4. On the other hand, another set of simulations with modified velocities of incident ejecta demonstrate that the strength of the forward shock, which heats up the stellar material and causes the mass loss of the companion star, is actually the key parameter for the removed mass.

  13. Dual-well recovery system design for enhanced DNAPL production

    SciTech Connect

    Nazar, A.; Gray, D.; Oolman, T.

    1997-12-31

    An innovative recovery well system was designed and installed for the enhanced recovery of dense non-aqueous phase liquid, DNAPL (creosote) at an active wood treating facility which had historic releases of wood treating chemicals to soils and groundwater. The regulatory objective of the work, which is being conducted pursuant to a State RCRA Post-Closure Permit, is to implement interim measures for enhanced DNAPL recovery in the vicinity of the downgradient point of compliance (POC) of a 2-acre RCRA Regulated Unit. The RCRA-Regulated Unit consists of two closed former surface impoundments formerly used for wastewater treatment. The facility is underlain by coarsening downward sand and gravel deposits ranging in thickness from about 75 to 90 feet below ground surface (ft-bgs). DNAPL is present in both residual and mobile phases throughout the saturated zone from a depth of approximately 25 to 90 ft-bgs. The DNAPL has also accumulated on the top of a confining clay layer which underlies the alluvial sand and gravel deposits. Due to the physical nature of the subsurface materials and the presence of DNAPL, innovative recovery well installation and design practices were required to provide for the ability to enhance DNAPL recovery. The technology consists of a dual-well recirculating design contained within a singular, large diameter borehole. The design incorporated innovative practices in drilling and installation, screen slot sizing, and well construction, featuring a dual-well design. Conventional mud rotary drilling techniques were utilized with innovative equipment modifications and the use of a natural organic polymer drilling fluid additive to enhance overall recovery well efficiency and performance.

  14. The Effects of Body Mass on Dung Removal Efficiency in Dung Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Nervo, Beatrice; Tocco, Claudia; Caprio, Enrico; Palestrini, Claudia; Rolando, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of body mass in structural-functional relationships is pressing, particularly because species losses often occur non-randomly with respect to body size. Our study examined the effects of dung beetle body mass on dung removal at two levels. First, we used the lab experiment to evaluate the efficiency of eight dung beetle species belonging to two functional groups (tunnelers, dwellers) on dung removal. Second, the same species employed in the lab were used in field mesocosms to examine the effects of the two functional groups on dung removal maintaining realistic differences in the total body mass between tunneler and dweller assemblages. Furthermore, the experimental assemblages contained one and four species within each functional group, so the effect of body mass heterogeneity was examined. We used a statistical approach (offset method) which took into account a priori constraints due to the study design allowing us to analyse the effect of larger species in mesocosm style experiments. Body size played a crucial role in dung removal: large beetles were more efficient than small ones and the percentage of removed dung increased with higher body mass heterogeneity. Tunnelers were more efficient than dwellers over both short and long time periods (one month and one year). Significant effects of dwellers were found only after one year. Moreover, our study showed that not including the body mass as an offset in the model resulted in sometimes different results, as the offset expresses dung removal independently of the body mass. This approach confirmed that body size is likely a pivotal factor controlling dung removal efficiency at multiple levels, from single species to overall dung beetle assemblages. Even though other specific traits should be examined, this study has begun to address the consequences of losing individuals with specific traits that are especially sensitive to perturbations. PMID:25229237

  15. The effects of body mass on dung removal efficiency in dung beetles.

    PubMed

    Nervo, Beatrice; Tocco, Claudia; Caprio, Enrico; Palestrini, Claudia; Rolando, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of body mass in structural-functional relationships is pressing, particularly because species losses often occur non-randomly with respect to body size. Our study examined the effects of dung beetle body mass on dung removal at two levels. First, we used the lab experiment to evaluate the efficiency of eight dung beetle species belonging to two functional groups (tunnelers, dwellers) on dung removal. Second, the same species employed in the lab were used in field mesocosms to examine the effects of the two functional groups on dung removal maintaining realistic differences in the total body mass between tunneler and dweller assemblages. Furthermore, the experimental assemblages contained one and four species within each functional group, so the effect of body mass heterogeneity was examined. We used a statistical approach (offset method) which took into account a priori constraints due to the study design allowing us to analyse the effect of larger species in mesocosm style experiments. Body size played a crucial role in dung removal: large beetles were more efficient than small ones and the percentage of removed dung increased with higher body mass heterogeneity. Tunnelers were more efficient than dwellers over both short and long time periods (one month and one year). Significant effects of dwellers were found only after one year. Moreover, our study showed that not including the body mass as an offset in the model resulted in sometimes different results, as the offset expresses dung removal independently of the body mass. This approach confirmed that body size is likely a pivotal factor controlling dung removal efficiency at multiple levels, from single species to overall dung beetle assemblages. Even though other specific traits should be examined, this study has begun to address the consequences of losing individuals with specific traits that are especially sensitive to perturbations.

  16. Synergistic, ultrafast mass storage and removal in artificial mixed conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chin; Fu, Lijun; Maier, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Mixed conductors—single phases that conduct electronically and ionically—enable stoichiometric variations in a material and, therefore, mass storage and redistribution, for example, in battery electrodes. We have considered how such properties may be achieved synergistically in solid two-phase systems, forming artificial mixed conductors. Previously investigated composites suffered from poor kinetics and did not allow for a clear determination of such stoichiometric variations. Here we show, using electrochemical and chemical methods, that a melt-processed composite of the ‘super-ionic’ conductor RbAg4I5 and the electronic conductor graphite exhibits both a remarkable silver excess and a silver deficiency, similar to those found in single-phase mixed conductors, even though such behaviour is not possible in the individual phases. Furthermore, the kinetics of silver uptake and release is very fast. Evaluating the upper limit set by interfacial ambipolar diffusion reveals chemical diffusion coefficients that are even higher than those achieved for sodium chloride in bulk liquid water. These results could potentially stimulate systematic research into powerful, even mesoscopic, artificial mixed conductors.

  17. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals in a municipal wastewater treatment plant: mass balance and removal processes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pin; Ding, Yunjie; Li, Hui; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2012-06-01

    Occurrence and removal efficiencies of fifteen pharmaceuticals were investigated in a conventional municipal wastewater treatment plant in Michigan. Concentrations of these pharmaceuticals were determined in both wastewater and sludge phases by a high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer. Detailed mass balance analysis was conducted during the whole treatment process to evaluate the contributing processes for pharmaceutical removal. Among the pharmaceuticals studied, demeclocycline, sulfamerazine, erythromycin and tylosin were not detected in the wastewater treatment plant influent. Other target pharmaceuticals detected in wastewater were also found in the corresponding sludge phase. The removal efficiencies of chlortetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamerazine, acetaminophen and caffeine were >99%, while doxycycline, oxytetracycline, sulfadiazine and lincomycin exhibited relatively lower removal efficiencies (e.g., <50%). For sulfamethoxazole, the removal efficiency was approximately 90%. Carbamazepine manifested a net increase of mass, i.e. 41% more than the input from the influent. Based on the mass balance analysis, biotransformation is believed to be the predominant process responsible for the removal of pharmaceuticals (22% to 99%), whereas contribution of sorption to sludge was relatively insignificant (7%) for the investigated pharmaceuticals.

  18. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  19. SIMULATION OF DNAPL DISTRIBUTION RESULTING FROM MULTIPLE SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-dimensional and three-phase (water, NAPL and gas) numerical simulator, called NAPL, was employed to study the interaction between DNAPL (PCE) plumes in a variably saturated porous media. Several model verification tests have been performed, including a series of 2-D labo...

  20. THE IMPACT OF PARTIAL DNAPL SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) constitute a long-term source of groundwater contamination and a significant effort is usually required to treat these contaminated waters and bring them back to maximum contaminant level (MCL) required by the regulatory authorities.
    Fi...

  1. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  2. The outcome of supernovae in massive binaries; removed mass, and its separation dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Ryosuke; Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-09-01

    The majority of massive stars are formed in binary systems. It is hence reasonable to expect that most core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) take place in binaries and the existence of a companion star may leave some imprints in observed features. Having this in mind, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the collisions of CCSNe ejecta with the companion star in an almost-equal-mass (∼10 M {sub ☉}) binary to find out possible consequences of such events. In particular we pay attention to the amount of mass removed and its dependence on the binary separation. In contrast to the previous surmise, we find that the companion mass is stripped not by momentum transfer but by shock heating. Up to 25% of the original mass can be removed for the closest separations and the removed mass decreases as M {sub ub}∝a {sup –4.3} with the binary separation a. By performing some experimental computations with artificially modified densities of incident ejecta, we show that if the velocity of ejecta is fixed, the density of incident ejecta is the single important parameter that actually determines the removed mass as M{sub ub}∝ρ{sub ej}{sup 1.4}. On the other hand, another set of simulations with modified velocities of incident ejecta demonstrate that the strength of the forward shock, which heats up the stellar material and causes the mass loss of the companion star, is actually the key parameter for the removed mass.

  3. The role of mass removal mechanisms in the onset of ns-laser induced plasma formation

    SciTech Connect

    Autrique, D.; Clair, G.; L'Hermite, D.; Alexiades, V.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-07-14

    The present study focuses on the role of mass removal mechanisms in ns-laser ablation. A copper sample is placed in argon, initially set at standard pressure and temperature. Calculations are performed for a 6 ns laser pulse with a wavelength of 532 nm and laser fluences up to 10 J/cm{sup 2}. The transient behavior in and above the copper target is described by a hydrodynamic model. Transmission profiles and ablation depths are compared with experimental results and similar trends are found. Our calculations reveal an interesting self-inhibiting mechanism: volumetric mass removal in the supercritical region triggers plasma shielding and therefore stops proceeding. This self-limiting process indicates that volumetric mass removal does not necessarily result in large ablation depths.

  4. Two-dimensional DNAPL migration affected by groundwater flow in unconfined aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Masashi; Endo, Kazuto; Kawabata, Junichi; Inui, Toru; Katsumi, Takeshi

    2004-07-05

    The dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) migration process was experimentally investigated in a laboratory-scale tank (150 cm width, 82.5 cm height, and 15 cm depth) to assess a site characterization on DNAPL contamination below a groundwater table. The heterogeneous ground of the tank model consisted of Toyoura sand (hydraulic conductivity, k = 1.5 x 10(-2) cm/s for void ratio, e = 0.62) and silica #7 sand (k = 2.3 x 10(-3) cm/s for e = 0.72). A series of experiments was carried out with or without lateral groundwater flow. Hydrofluoroether was used as a representative DNAPL. The main results obtained in this study are as follows: (1) the DNAPL plume does not invade into the less permeable soil layer with higher displacement pressure head; (2) the DNAPL plume migrates faster with lateral groundwater flow than without it; (3) lateral groundwater flow does not affect lateral DNAPL migration; rather, it promotes downward migration; and (4) pore DNAPL pressure without groundwater flow is higher than that with it. The above experimental results were compared with numerical analysis. The fundamental behaviors of DNAPL source migration observed experimentally are expected to be useful for assessing the characteristics of two-dimensional DNAPL migration in an aquifer.

  5. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    2003-12-11

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  6. Dissolution, Cyclodextrin-Enhanced Solubilization, and Mass Removal of an Ideal Multicomponent Organic Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling were conducted to examine the influence of a hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) solution on the dissolution of single- and three-component organic liquids. The results of batch experiments showed that HPCD-enhanced solubilization of the organic-liquid mixtures was ideal (describable using Raoult’s Law), and that solubilization-enhancement factors were independent of mixture composition. Addition of the HPCD solution to columns containing residual saturations of the organic liquid enhanced the dissolution and removal of all three compounds in the mixture. The results of the column experiments and multicomponent rate-limited dissolution modeling suggest that solubilization was ideal for both water and cyclodextrin flushing. Concomitantly, the mass-flux reduction versus mass removal behavior was ideal for all experiments. Mass transfer was increased for HPCD solubilization relative to the water flushing due to solubility and concentration-gradient enhancement. Organic-liquid composition did not significantly impact mass transfer coefficients, and fractional mass removal behavior during HPCD solubilization was nearly identical for each compound whether present as a single component or in a mixture. Additionally, mass transfer coefficients for aqueous and HPCD solubilization for single and multicomponent mixtures were not statistically different upon normalizing by the solubility enhancement factor. PMID:19233508

  7. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  8. Summary and Status of DNAPL Characterization and Remediation Activities in the A/M-Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K.M.

    2001-03-02

    This report summarizes historical A/M-Area DNAPL activities and data, and presents the overall A/M-Area strategy flowchart, the status work for each DNAPL source zone (or potential source zone), and future A/M-Area DNAPL plans.

  9. Factors Controlling DNAPL Migration in a Fracture Network: Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Yeo, I.; Lee, K.

    2002-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) has received considerable attention in recent years, and the attention on characterizing and quantifying the migration of DNAPL in geological formations has been given to the migration of DNAPL in porous media, not much in fractured rock. The spilled DNAPL that is heavier than water migrates downward to fractured bedrocks under the influence of gravity and is a long-term contaminant source. Although the progress has been accomplished on the development of algorithms for the numerical solution of the macroscopic models of contaminant transport in rock fractures, a lack of fundamental understanding exists concerning the interactive effects of the structural characteristics of fractures and fluid rheology on the patterns of DNAPL migration in a fracture network. In particular, little experimental work has been done on DNAPL migration in a fracture network. The two-dimensional fracture network was built up. Water was applied to both sides of a fracture network to have intended hydraulic head, and TCE was injected into one of vertical fractures. TCE migration process was recorded with digital camcorder. The dynamic macro-modified invasion percolation (DMMIP) model is suggested by integrating groundwater flow factor with MMIP that reflects the capillary effect, gravity-destabilization condition and viscous force of DNAPL. The information gained from experiments was analyzed and used for testing the DMMIP model to characterize the DNAPL migration pathway in a fracture network. DMMIP simulations and laboratory experiments show a good agreement. The results of DMMIP simulations and laboratory experiments show that in addition to gravity force, water viscous force considerably affects migration of DNAPL in rock fractures. This study will provide a step-stone for further developing reliable numerical simulators of the DNAPL migration in a fracture network that are required for the implementation of rational

  10. Chronocoulometry for quantitative control of mass removal in micro-structures and sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, B. K.; Smith, S. T.; Pratt, J. R.; Shaw, G. A.

    2012-10-15

    In this work, tungsten wires have been etched in a KOH electrolyte solution. Based on the oxidation state of the electrolytic dissolution reaction's product and time integration of the Faradaic current produced during the reaction, this method is capable of providing a direct measurement of the change in mass of a structure from anodic dissolution. To assess the application of this process for controlled mass removal spanning sub-micrograms to milligrams, two experimental studies and accompanying uncertainty analyses have been undertaken. In the first of these, 5 tungsten wires of length 30 mm were used to remove mass values ranging from 50 to 350 {mu}g. Uncertainty estimates indicate relative combined standard uncertainties of less than 0.3% in the mass changes determined from the measurement of Faradaic current. Comparison of the mass change determined using the electrolytic method, and using a precision ultra-microbalance agreed within this uncertainty. The charge-based method was then applied to modify the dynamic characteristics of a quartz tuning fork oscillator. In these experiments, tungsten fiber attached to one tine of the oscillator was etched in 5 {mu}g increments up to 120 {mu}g of total removed mass. In general, frequency shifts of 2.8 Hz{center_dot}{mu}g{sup -1} were observed, indicating sub-microgram resolution for the characterization of probes based on frequency shift and charge-based mass measurement. Taken together, this study provides the basis for a precision method for determining changes in mass based on electrical measurements from an electrochemical system. The utility of this technique is demonstrated through controlled modification of the dynamic properties of a mechanical oscillator.

  11. Chronocoulometry for quantitative control of mass removal in micro-structures and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, B. K.; Smith, S. T.; Pratt, J. R.; Shaw, G. A.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, tungsten wires have been etched in a KOH electrolyte solution. Based on the oxidation state of the electrolytic dissolution reaction's product and time integration of the Faradaic current produced during the reaction, this method is capable of providing a direct measurement of the change in mass of a structure from anodic dissolution. To assess the application of this process for controlled mass removal spanning sub-micrograms to milligrams, two experimental studies and accompanying uncertainty analyses have been undertaken. In the first of these, 5 tungsten wires of length 30 mm were used to remove mass values ranging from 50 to 350 μg. Uncertainty estimates indicate relative combined standard uncertainties of less than 0.3% in the mass changes determined from the measurement of Faradaic current. Comparison of the mass change determined using the electrolytic method, and using a precision ultra-microbalance agreed within this uncertainty. The charge-based method was then applied to modify the dynamic characteristics of a quartz tuning fork oscillator. In these experiments, tungsten fiber attached to one tine of the oscillator was etched in 5 μg increments up to 120 μg of total removed mass. In general, frequency shifts of 2.8 Hz.μg-1 were observed, indicating sub-microgram resolution for the characterization of probes based on frequency shift and charge-based mass measurement. Taken together, this study provides the basis for a precision method for determining changes in mass based on electrical measurements from an electrochemical system. The utility of this technique is demonstrated through controlled modification of the dynamic properties of a mechanical oscillator.

  12. Development and application of a screening model for evaluating bioenhanced dissolution in DNAPL source zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Thomas J.; Abriola, Linda M.; Gibson, Jenny L.; Smits, Kathleen M.; Christ, John A.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation, a widely applied treatment technology for source zones contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), has proven economical and reasonably efficient for long-term management of contaminated sites. Successful application of this remedial technology, however, requires an understanding of the complex interaction of transport, mass transfer, and biotransformation processes. The bioenhancement factor, which represents the ratio of DNAPL mass transfer under microbially active conditions to that which would occur under abiotic conditions, is commonly used to quantify the effectiveness of a particular bioremediation remedy. To date, little research has been directed towards the development and validation of methods to predict bioenhancement factors under conditions representative of real sites. This work extends an existing, first-order, bioenhancement factor expression to systems with zero-order and Monod kinetics, representative of many source-zone scenarios. The utility of this model for predicting the bioenhancement factor for previously published laboratory and field experiments is evaluated. This evaluation demonstrates the applicability of these simple bioenhancement factors for preliminary experimental design and analysis, and for assessment of dissolution enhancement in ganglia-contaminated source zones. For ease of application, a set of nomographs is presented that graphically depicts the dependence of bioenhancement factor on physicochemical properties. Application of these nomographs is illustrated using data from a well-documented field site. Results suggest that this approach can successfully capture field-scale, as well as column-scale, behavior. Sensitivity analyses reveal that bioenhanced dissolution will critically depend on in-situ biomass concentrations.

  13. Field demonstration of DNAPL dehalogenation using emulsified zero-valent iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Geiger, Cherie; Clausen, Chris; Brooks, Kathleen; Coon, Christina; O'Hara, Suzanne; Krug, Thomas; Major, David; Yoon, Woong-Sang; Gavaskar, Arun; Holdsworth, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first field-scale demonstration conducted to evaluate the performance of nanoscale emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) injected into the saturated zone to enhance in situ dehalogenation of dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) containing trichloroethene (TCE). EZVI is an innovative and emerging remediation technology. EZVI is a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable emulsion that forms emulsion droplets consisting of an oil-liquid membrane surrounding zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in water. EZVI was injected over a five day period into eight wells in a demonstration test area within a larger DNAPL source area at NASA's Launch Complex 34 (LC34) using a pressure pulse injection method. Soil and groundwater samples were collected before and after treatment and analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to evaluate the changes in VOC mass, concentration and mass flux. Significant reductions in TCE soil concentrations (>80%) were observed at four of the six soil sampling locations within 90 days of EZVI injection. Somewhat lower reductions were observed at the other two soil sampling locations where visual observations suggest that most of the EZVI migrated up above the target treatment depth. Significant reductions in TCE groundwater concentrations (57 to 100%) were observed at all depths targeted with EZVI. Groundwater samples from the treatment area also showed significant increases in the concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. The decrease in concentrations of TCE in soil and groundwater samples following treatment with EZVI is believed to be due to abiotic degradation associated with the ZVI as well as biodegradation enhanced by the presence of the oil and surfactant in the EZVI emulsion.

  14. Field Demonstration of DNAPL Dehalogenation Using Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Geiger, Cherie; Clausen, Chris; Brooks, Kathleen; Coon, Christina; O'Hara, Suzanne; Krug, Thomas; Major, David; Yoon, Sam; Gavaskar, Arun; Holdsworth, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first field-scale demonstration conducted to evaluate the performance of nano-scale emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) injected into the saturated zone to enhance in situ dehalogenation of dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) containing trichloroethene (TCE). EZVI is an innovative and emerging remediation technology. EZVI is a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable emulsion that forms emulsion droplets consisting of an oil-liquid membrane surrounding zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in water. EZVI was injected over a five day period into eight wells in a demonstration test area within a larger DNAPL source area at NASA's Launch Complex 34 (LC34) using a pressure pulse injection method. Soil and groundwater samples were collected before and after treatment and analyzed for volatile organic compounds (V005) to evaluate the changes in VOC mass, concentration and mass flux. Significant reductions in TCE soil concentrations (>80%) were observed at four of the six soil sampling locations within 90 days of EZVI injection. Somewhat lower reductions were observed at the other two soil sampling locations where visual observations suggest that most of the EZVI migrated up above the target treatment depth. Significant reductions in TCE groundwater concentrations (57 to 100%) were observed at all depths targeted with EZVI. Groundwater samples from the treatment area also showed significant increases in the concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. The decrease in concentrations of TCE in soil and groundwater samples following treatment with EZVI is believed to be due to abiotic degradation associated with the ZVI as well as biodegradation enhanced by the presence of the oil and surfactant in the EZVI emulsion.

  15. Application of an Optimal Search Strategy for the DNAPL Source Identification to a Field Site in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longting, M.; Ye, S.; Wu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Identification and removing the DNAPL source in aquifer system is vital in rendering remediation successful and lowering the remediation time and cost. Our work is to apply an optimal search strategy introduced by Zoi and Pinder[1], with some modifications, to a field site in Nanjing City, China to define the strength, and location of DNAPL sources using the least samples. The overall strategy uses Monte Carlo stochastic groundwater flow and transport modeling, incorporates existing sampling data into the search strategy, and determines optimal sampling locations that are selected according to the reduction in overall uncertainty of the field and the proximity to the source locations. After a sample is taken, the plume is updated using a Kalman filter. The updated plume is then compared to the concentration fields that emanate from each individual potential source using fuzzy set technique. The comparison followed provides weights that reflect the degree of truth regarding the location of the source. The above steps are repeated until the optimal source characteristics are determined. Considering our site case, some specific modifications and work have been done as follows. K random fields are generated after fitting the measurement K data to the variogram model. The locations of potential sources that are given initial weights are targeted based on the field survey, with multiple potential source locations around the workshops and wastewater basin. Considering the short history (1999-2010) of manufacturing optical brightener PF at the site, and the existing sampling data, a preliminary source strength is then estimated, which will be optimized by simplex method or GA later. The whole algorithm then will guide us for optimal sampling and update as the investigation proceeds, until the weights finally stabilized. Reference [1] Dokou Zoi, and George F. Pinder. "Optimal search strategy for the definition of a DNAPL source." Journal of Hydrology 376.3 (2009): 542

  16. DNAPL Dissolution in Bedrock Fractures And Fracture Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    capillary pressure, wettability , interfacial tension and relative permeability (63). The advancing DNAPL front and intersecting fractures will be only be...UCRL-JC-149856- ABS . ER-1554 Final Report 130 (12) Rubin, H., K. Rathfelder, K., Abriola, L.M., Spiller, M., Köngeter, J. Using continuum... wettability and saturation on liquid-liquid interfacial area in porous media. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2002, 37, 584-591. (94) Morley, M.C., Yamamoto, H

  17. Organic Dye Effects on DNAPL Entry Pressure in Water Saturated Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, G.M.

    2001-10-02

    One of three diazo dyes with the same fundamental structure have been used in most studies of DNAPL behavior in porous media to stain the NAPL: Sudan III, Sudan IV, or Oil-Red-O. The dyes are generally implicitly assumed to not influence DNAPL behavior. That assumption was tested using simple entry pressure experiments.

  18. Assessment and Delineation of DNAPL Source Zones at Hazardous Waste Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides a framework to assess the presence of DNAPL in the subsurface and for delineating the spatial extent of a DNAPL source zone. Direct and indirect site investigation methods are discussed, as well as their applicability in unconsolidated deposits and fracture...

  19. THE MEASUREMENT AND USE OF CONTAMINANT FLUX AS AN ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR DNAPL REMEDIAL PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current remedial techniques are unable to completely eliminate all dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) from source zone areas at most sites, and conflicting views on the benefits of partial DNAPL source zone remediation exist in the literature. A comparison of contaminant flux...

  20. MEASUREMENT AND USE OF CONTAMINANT FLUX AS AN ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR DNAPL REMEDIAL PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current remedial techniques are unable to completely eliminate all dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) from source zone areas at most sites, and conflicting views on the benefits of partial DNAPL source zone remediation exist in the literature. A comparison of contaminant flux...

  1. Rapid detergent removal from peptide samples with ethyl acetate for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Yee-Guide; Stanley, E Richard

    2010-02-01

    Detergents are required for the extraction of hydrophobic proteins and for the maintenance of their solubility in solution. However, the presence of detergents in the peptide samples severely suppresses ionization in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis and decreases chromatographic resolution in LC-MS. Thus, detergents must be removed for sensitive detection of peptides by MS. This unit describes a rapid protocol in which ethyl acetate extraction is used to remove octylglucoside from protease digests without loss of peptides. This procedure can also be used to reduce interference by sodium dodecyl sulfate, Nonidet P-40, or Triton X-100 in peptide samples for MS analysis.

  2. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  3. Removal of chlorofluorocarbons by increased mass exchange between the stratosphere and troposphere in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Butchart, N; Scaife, A A

    2001-04-12

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), along with bromine compounds, have been unequivocally identified as being responsible for most of the anthropogenic destruction of stratospheric ozone. With curbs on emissions of these substances, the recovery of the ozone layer will depend on their removal from the atmosphere. As CFCs have no significant tropospheric removal process, but are rapidly photolysed above the lower stratosphere, the timescale for their removal is set mainly by the rate at which air is transported from the troposphere into the stratosphere. Using a global climate model we predict that, in response to the projected changes in greenhouse-gas concentrations during the first half of the twenty-first century, this rate of mass exchange will increase by 3% per decade. This increase is due to more vigorous extra-tropical planetary waves emanating from the troposphere. We estimate that this increase in mass exchange will accelerate the removal of CFCs to an extent that recovery to levels currently predicted for 2050 and 2080 will occur 5 and 10 years earlier, respectively.

  4. Mass removal by oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Fox, Charles D.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Gosse, Ryan C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    The various effects of laser heating of carbon materials are key to assessing laser weapon effectiveness. Porous graphite plates, cylinders, and cones with densities of 1.55 to 1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10-kW fiber laser at 0.075 to 3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 to 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7-mm-thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be redeposited on the graphite surface. Dramatic graphite crystalline structures are also produced at higher laser irradiances. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. At ˜3.5 kW/cm2, the fractions of the mass removed from the cylindrical samples in the crater, surrounding trench, and outer region of decreased porosity are 38%, 47%, and 15%, respectively. Graphite is particularly resistant to damage by high power lasers. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  5. Time scales of DNAPL migration in sandy aquifers examined via numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, J.I.; Pang, T.; Kueper, B.H.

    2007-03-15

    The time required for dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to cease migrating following release to the subsurface is a valuable component of a site conceptual model. This study uses numerical simulation to investigate the migration of six different DNAPLs in sandy aquifers. The most influential parameters governing migration cessation time are the density and viscosity of the DNAPL and the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. Releases of between 1 and 40 drums of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs, characterized by relatively high density and low viscosity, require on the order of months to a few years to cease migrating in a heterogeneous medium sand aquifer having an average hydraulic conductivity of 7.4 x 10{sup -3} cm/s. In contrast to this, the release of 20 drums of coal tar {rho}{sub D} = 1061 kg/m{sup 3}, {mu}{sub D} = 0.161 Pa(.)s) requires more than 100 years to cease migrating in the same aquifer. Altering the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer results in a proportional change in cessation times. Parameters that exhibit relatively little influence on migration time scales are the DNAPL-water interfacial tension, release volume, source capillary pressure, mean aquifer porosity, and ambient ground water hydraulic gradient. This study also demonstrates that low-density DNAPLs (e.g., coal tar) give rise to greater amounts of lateral spreading and greater amounts of pooling on capillary barriers than high-density DNAPLs such as trichloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene.

  6. Effects of Gravity and Aperture Statistics on DNAPL Entrapment in Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, J. A.; Cianflone, S.; Dickson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are an important class of groundwater contaminants. Their migration pathways are particularly difficult to locate in fractured rock aquifers, which are abundant in North America. Over one million people in Southern Ontario alone obtain their drinking water from the Silurian dolostone bedrock. Once a DNAPL is trapped in an aquifer, it becomes a long-term threat to the source water quality. It is imperative to be able to locate and quantify trapped DNAPL to implement appropriate remedial strategies. This study quantifies volumetric DNAPL entrapment utilizing an invasion percolation (IP) approach to simulate the imbibition of water in a DNAPL-saturated fracture. The relationship between the volumetric fraction of trapped DNAPL, aperture field statistics and fracture orientation was investigated by varying a number of parameters; overall, 34,560 simulation were completed. The standard deviation (σb) and mean (μb) of the apertures were varied from 0.01-0.3 mm and 0.5-1.5 mm, respectively. The standard deviation (σz) and correlation length (λz) of the mid aperture field were varied from 0.01-10mm and 5-50mm, respectively. Fracture orientation was varied from 60o above (super-horizontal) to 60o below (sub-horizontal) horizontal.The results demonstrate that: 1) fractures oriented sub-horizontally permit the complete drainage of DNAPL, though this does not occur for horizontal and super-horizontal fractures; 2) when the coefficient of variation (COV) is larger than 0.1 the fracture orientation has little effect on the volumetric ratio of DNAPL entrapped; and 3) increasing standard deviation of the mid aperture field increases the range of the volumetric ratio of trapped DNAPL.

  7. Selenium removal and mass balance in a constructed flow-through wetland system.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Tanji, K K; Lin, Z Q; Terry, N; Peters, D W

    2003-01-01

    A field study on the removal of Se from agricultural subsurface drainage was conducted from May 1997 to February 2001 in the Tulare Lake Drainage District (TLDD) of San Joaquin Valley, California. A flow-through wetland system was constructed consisting of ten 15- x 76-m unlined cells that were continuously flooded and planted with either a monotype or combination of plants, including sturdy bulrush [Schoenoplectus robustus (Pursh) M.T. Strong], baltic rush (Juncus balticus Willd.), smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora Loisel.), rabbitsfoot grass [Polypogon monspeliensis (L.) Desf.], salt-grass lDistichlis spicata (L.) Greene], cattail (Typha latifolia L.), tule [Schoenoplectus acutus (Muhl. ex Bigelow) A. Löve & D. Löve], and widgeon grass (Ruppia maritima L.). One cell had no vegetation planted. The objectives of this research were to evaluate Se removal efficiency of each wetland cell and to carry out a mass balance on Se. The inflow drainage water to the cells had average annual Se concentrations of 19 to 22 microg L(-1) dominated by selenate [Se(VI), 95%]. Average weekly water residence time varied from about 3 to 15 d for Cells 1 through 7 (target 7 d), 19 to 33 d for Cells 8 and 9 (target 21 d), and 13 to 18 d for Cell 10 (target 14 d). Average weekly Se concentration ratios of outflow to inflow ranged from 0.45 to 0.79 and mass ratio (concentration x water volume) from 0.24 to 0.52 for year 2000, that is, 21 to 55% reduction in Se concentration and 48 to 76% Se removal in mass by the wetland, respectively. The nonvegetated cell showed the least Se removal both in concentration and in mass. The global mass balance showed that on the average about 59% of the total inflow Se was retained within the cells and Se outputs were outflow (35%), seepage (4%), and volatilization (2%). Independent measurements of the Se retained in the cells totaled 53% of the total Se inflow: 33% in the surface (0-20 cm) sediment, 18% in the organic detrital layer above the

  8. Transport, Targeting, and Applications of Metallic Functional Nanoparticles for Degradation of DNAPL Chlorinated Organic Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory V. Lowry; Sara Majetich; Krzysztof Matyjaszewski; David Sholl; Robert Tilton

    2006-12-27

    Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) such as trichloroethylene act as long term sources of groundwater contaminants and are difficult and expensive to remediate. DNAPL-contaminated sites are a significant financial liability for the Department of Energy and the private sector. The objective of this study was to engineer reactive Fe-based nanoparticles with specialized polymeric coatings to make them mobile in the subsurface and to provide them with an affinity for the DNAPL/water interface. The synthesis, characterization, and reactivity/mobility of the engineered particles, and a molecular dynamic model that predicts their behavior at the DNPAL/water interface are described in this report.

  9. Use of an Intermediate-Scale Tank to Study Strategies for Modified NZVI Emplacement for Effective Treatment of DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Mittal, M.; Phenrat, T.; Fagerlund, F.; Kim, H.; Cihan, A.; Lowry, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) sources act as long term sources of ground water contamination. Emplacing modified nano-scale zero valent iron (NZVI) particles in the source zone and area immediately downstream of the source zone may serve the dual purpose of reducing the mass transfer from entrapped DNAPL and reductive dechlorination of the dissolved mass, thus reducing the total mass loading to the plume. Placement of NZVI is expected to alter porosity resulting in flow bypassing which may reduce treatment efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction will depend on the NZVI mass emplacement and its distribution. Another issue of concern is whether DNAPL mass rebounds if the emplaced NZVI is oxidized. In an ongoing study, the basic processes of NZVI reactivity and mass flux reduction were investigated in small cells, columns and tanks. To understand these processes and upscale them to larger systems, a series of experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional intermediate scale tank. This paper presents the results from one of these experiments that focused on evaluating the effects of emplacing the modified NZVI particles in the source zone with the DNAPL and to intercept the dissolved plume immediately down gradient of the source with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the net mass flux loading to the plume. A 5 cm x 5 cm PCE source zone in a coarse sand lens embedded in a finer sand matrix was created in an intermediate scale tank 2.4 m x 1.2 m x 0.55 m. The mass flux generation from source zone and the plume configuration were monitored using aqueous samples extracted at 4 vertical arrays containing 9 ports in each. Polymer coated NZVI particles were injected 7.5 cm downstream of the source zone creating a reactive zone of 14 cm x 14 cm x 5.5 cm such that the particles blanketed the PCE source zone. Dissolved PCE concentrations were monitored after NZVI injection using the same vertical sampling array. Dechlorination byproducts were monitored to

  10. Mass-transfer limitations for nitrate removal in a uranium-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Cirpka, Olaf A; Wu, Weimin; Fienen, Michael N; Jardine, Philip M; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Watson, David B; Criddle, Craig S; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2005-11-01

    A field test on in situ subsurface bioremediation of uranium(VI) is underway at the Y-12 National Security Complex in the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. Nitrate has a high concentration at the site, which prevents U(VI) reduction, and thus must be removed. An acidic-flush strategy for nitrate removal was proposed to create a treatment zone with low levels of accessible nitrate. The subsurface at the site contains highly interconnected fractures surrounded by matrix blocks of low permeability and high porosity and is therefore subject to preferential flow and matrix diffusion. To identify the heterogeneous mass transfer properties, we performed a novel forced-gradient tracer test, which involved the addition of bromide, the displacement of nitrate, and the rebound of nitrate after completion of pumping. The simplest conceptualization consistent with the data is that the pore-space consists of a single mobile domain, as well as a fast and a slowly reacting immobile domain. The slowly reacting immobile domain (shale matrix) constitutes over 80% of the pore volume and acts as a long-term reservoir of nitrate. According to simulations, the nitrate stored in the slowly interacting immobile domain in the fast flow layer, at depths of about 12.2-13.7 m, will be reduced by an order of magnitude over a period of about a year. By contrast, the mobile domain rapidly responds to flushing, and a low average nitrate concentration can be maintained if the nitrate is removed as soon as it enters the mobile domain. A field-scale experiment in which the aquifer was flushed with acidic solution confirmed our understanding of the system. For the ongoing experiments on microbial U(VI) reduction, nitrate concentrations must be low in the mobile domain to ensure U(VI) reducing conditions. We therefore conclude that the nitrate leaching out of the immobile pore space must continuously be removed by in situ denitrification to maintain favorable conditions.

  11. Migration and Entrapment of DNAPLs in Heterogeneous Systems: Impact of Waste and Porous Medium Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Linda M. Abriola; Avery H. Demond

    2005-01-10

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) pose a significant threat to soil and groundwater at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Evidence suggests that subsurface wettability variations are present at many of these sites as a result of spatical and temporal variations in aqueous phase chemistry, contaminant aging, mineralogy and organic matter. The presence of such heterogeneity may significantly influence DNAPL migration and entrapment in the saturated zone.

  12. On the Importance of Gravity in DNAPL Invasion of Saturated Horizontal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Cianflone, Sean P L; Dickson, Sarah E; Mumford, Kevin G

    2017-01-01

    Invasion percolation (IP) models of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) invasion into saturated horizontal fractures typically neglect viscous and gravity forces, as it is assumed that capillarity dominates in many situations. An IP model simulating DNAPL invasion into saturated horizontal fractures was modified to include gravity as a local effect. The model was optimized using a genetic algorithm, and demonstrated that the inclusion of gravity is important for replicating the architecture of the DNAPL invasion pattern. The optimized gravity-included simulation showed the DNAPL invasion pattern to be significantly more representative of the experimentally observed pattern (80% accuracy) than did the optimized gravity-neglected simulation (70% accuracy). Additional simulations of DNAPL invasion in 360 randomly generated fractures were compared with and without gravity forces. These simulations showed that with increasing fracture roughness, the minimum difference between simulations with and without gravity increases to 35% for a standard deviation of the mid-aperture elevation field (SDz ) of 10 mm. Even for low roughness (SDz = 0.1 mm), the difference was as high as 30%. Furthermore, a scaled Bond Number is defined which includes data regarding DNAPL type, media type and statistical characteristics of the fracture. The value of this scaled Bond Number can be used to determine the conditions under which gravity should be considered when simulating DNAPL invasion in a macroscopically horizontal fracture. Finally, a set of equations defining the minimum and maximum absolute percentage difference between gravity-included and gravity-neglected simulations is presented based on the fracture and DNAPL characteristics.

  13. Delineation of creosote-based DNAPLs using CPT-deployed laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggery, D.A. Jr.; Misquitta, N.J; Coll, F.R..

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a case study of the first commercial use of cone penetrometer testing (CPT)/deployed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to address the following objectives at a creosote DNAPL site. The objectives of the investigation using CPT/LIF were to: quickly and cost effectively delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of creosote DNAPL in soil/groundwater; delineate/differentiate creosote DNAPL constituents within the extent of DNAPL; delineate dissolved-phase versus free phase DNAPL compounds in the subsurface. The complexity of investigating the extent of creosote DNAPL magnifies the time and cost of the application of conventional investigative techniques. The application of CPT/LIF at the subject site allowed a comparison between CPT/LIF and more conventional investigative techniques. If the objectives were achieved in a shorter time-frame, and at a lesser cost than traditional methods, then the CPT/LIF method would be confirmed as a viable, field-scale technology for investigating appropriate wood-treating sites.

  14. Interpreting DNAPL saturations in a laboratory-scale injection with GPR data and direct core measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Poeter, Eileen P.

    2003-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is used to track a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) injection in a laboratory sand tank. Before data reduction, GPR data provide a qualitative measure of DNAPL saturation and movement. One-dimensional (1D) GPR modeling provides a quantitative interpretation of DNAPL volume within a given thickness during and after the injection. This is confirmed qualitatively by visual inspection of cores and two-dimensional GPR modeling. DNAPL saturation in sub-layers of that thickness could not be quantified because calibration of the 1D GPR model is non-unique when both permittivity and depth of multiple layers are unknown. Accurate quantitative interpretation of DNAPL volumes using 1D GPR modeling requires: 1) identification of a suitable target that produces a strong reflection and is not subject to any multidimensional interference; 2) knowledge of the exact depth of that target; and 3) use of two-way radar-wave travel times through the medium to the target to determine the permittivity of the intervening material, which eliminates reliance upon reflection amplitude. With geologic conditions that are suitable for GPR surveys (i.e., shallow depths and low electrical conductivities), the procedures in this laboratory study can be adapted to a field site to identify DNAPL source zones after a release has occurred.

  15. Numerical Modeling for Integrated Design of a DNAPL Partitioning Tracer Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Divine, C. E.; Dugan, P. J.; Wolf, L.; Boving, T.; Louth, M.; Brusseau, M. L.; Hayes, D.

    2002-12-01

    Partitioning tracer tests (PTTs) are commonly used to estimate the location and volume of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) at contaminated groundwater sites. PTTs are completed before and after remediation efforts as one means to assess remediation effectiveness. PTT design is complex. Numerical models are invaluable tools for designing a PTT, particularly for designing flow rates and selecting tracers to ensure proper tracer breakthrough times, spatial design of injection-extraction wells and rates to maximize tracer capture, well-specific sampling density and frequency, and appropriate tracer-chemical masses. Generally, the design requires consideration of the following factors: type of contaminant; distribution of contaminant at the site, including location of hot spots; site hydraulic characteristics; measurement of the partitioning coefficients for the various tracers; the time allotted to conduct the PTT; evaluation of the magnitude and arrival time of the tracer breakthrough curves; duration of the tracer input pulse; maximum tracer concentrations; analytical detection limits for the tracers; estimation of the capture zone of the well field to tracer ensure mass balance and to limit residual tracer concentrations left in the subsurface; effect of chemical remediation agents on the PTT results, and disposal of the extracted tracer solution. These design principles are applied to a chemical-enhanced remediation effort for a chlorinated-solvent dense NAPL (DNAPL) site at Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base in Virginia Beach, Virginia. For this project, the hydrology and pre-PTT contaminant distribution were characterized using traditional methods (slug tests, groundwater and soil concentrations from monitoring wells, and geoprobe analysis), as well as membrane interface probe analysis. Additional wells were installed after these studies. Partitioning tracers were selected based on the primary DNAPL contaminants at the site, expected NAPL saturations

  16. Estimation of mass transfer and kinetics in operating biofilters for removal of VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.W.; Davison, B.H.; Gable, C.C.

    1997-11-18

    Long-term, stable operation of trickle-bed bioreactors remains desirable, but is difficult to achieve for industrial processes, which generate continuous streams of dilute gaseous hydrocarbons. Mass transfer and kinetic parameters are difficult to measure, complicating predictive estimates. Two methods are presented which were used to predict the importance of mass transfer versus kinetics limitations in operating trickle-bed biofilters. Both methods altered the overall kinetic activity of the biofilter and estimated the effective mass transfer coefficient (K{sub 1}a) by varying the VOC (volatile organic contaminant) loading rate and concentration. The first method, used with developing biofilters possessing low biomass, involved addition of cultured biomass to the recirculating liquid to effect an overall change in VOC removal capacity. The second method altered the total bed temperature of a well-established biofilter to effect a change. Results and modeling from these experiments are presented for a mixed culture biofilter which is capable of consuming sparingly soluble alkanes, such as pentane and isobutane. Methods to control overgrowth are discussed which were used to operate one reactor continuously for over 24 months with sustained degradation of VOC alkanes with a rate of 50 g/h/m{sup 3}.

  17. The Impact of Well-Field Configuration and Permeability Heterogeneity on Contaminant Mass Removal and Plume Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of well-field hydraulics and permeability heterogeneity on mass-removal efficiency for systems comprising large groundwater contaminant plumes. A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model was used to simulate the impact of different well-field configurations on pump-and-treat mass removal for heterogeneous domains. The relationship between reduction in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) and mass removal (MR) was used as the metric to examine remediation efficiency. The impacts of well-field configuration on mass removal behavior is attributed to mass-transfer constraints associated with regions of low flow, which can be muted by the influence of permeability heterogeneity. These impacts are reflected in the associated CMDR-MR profiles. Systems whose CDMR-MR profiles are below the 1:1 relationship line are associated with more efficient well-field configurations. The impact of domain heterogeneity on mass-removal effectiveness was investigated in terms of both variance and correlation scale of the random permeability distributions and indexed by the CMDR-MR relationship. Data collected from pump-and-treat operations conducted in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) federal Superfund site were used as a case study. The comparison between simulated and measured site data supports the general validity of the numerical model, and results from the case study are consistent with the conclusions of the theoretical study. These results illustrate that the CMDR-MR relationship can be an effective way to quantify the impacts of different factors on mass-removal efficiency.

  18. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  19. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; ...

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts andmore » noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.« less

  20. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to monitor detergents removal from a membrane protein sample.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Han, Fang; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2009-12-01

    In membrane protein biochemical and structural studies, detergents are used to mimic membrane environment and maintain functional, stable conformation of membrane proteins in the absence of lipid bilayers. However, detergent concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent is usually unknown. Here, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) method was developed to quantify four detergents which are frequently used in membrane protein structural studies. To remove excessive detergents, a filtered centrifugation using Centricon tubes was applied. A membrane protein Ig-Beta fragment in four different detergent micelles was exemplified. Detergent concentrations in the upper and lower fraction of the Centricon tube were measured after each round of centrifugation. The results were very consistent to basic properties of detergent micelles in aqueous solvents. Therefore, coupling of GC-MS-SIM and detergent removal by Centricon tubes, detergents concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent could be controlled, which will expedite membrane protein structural and biochemical studies.

  1. A Comparative Study of Mass Removal Loads for a Range of Stormwater Treatment Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avellaneda, P. M.; Houle, J. J.; Roseen, R. M.; Ballestero, T. P.

    2005-05-01

    When evaluating performance efficiencies for stormwater BMPs, there are significant challenges with regards to normalizing the variations in design, and hydraulic and hydrological conditions. There can be significant variations that must be considered such as rainfall intensity and duration, influent quality, watershed characteristics, loading functions, antecedent dry period, and maintenance. This study assessed mass removal loads for different stormwater management measures, all located in the same facility. The research facility is unique because it enables monitoring of 12 different treatment devices in parallel. For this purpose, a 9-acre commuter parking lot at the University of New Hampshire was chosen to provide runoff. There are three classes of devices examined at the site, conventional structural Best Management Practices (BMP), Low Impact Development (LID) designs, and manufactured devices. These include a subsurface gravel wetland, a detention pond, a sand filter, a bioretention system, a vegetated swale, and 7 different manufactured devices. Flow was evenly distributed and piped to each stormwater treatment. An on-site rain gauge provided rainfall data and samples of stormwater influent and effluent (for each stormwater treatment) were collected during monitoring rainfall events between August (2004) and April (2005). Temperature, dissolved oxygen and conductivity were measured continuously. Runoff constituents such as TSS, TP, TN, Cu, metals, nutrients and bacteria were measured in temporal water samples for each monitoring rainfall event. Results are presented as both concentration and Event Mean Concentrations (EMCs) to evaluate mass load removal. The watershed rainfall-runoff pattern was investigated as well as a statistical analysis to determine whether or not the differences between inflow and effluent water quality parameters were statistically significant. Earlier results have shown significant differences in the effluent water quality

  2. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jong Hyun

    2000-05-01

    The morphology of craters resulting from high irradiance laser ablation of silicon was measured using a white light interferometry microscope. The craters show a dramatic increase in their depth and volume at a certain irradiance, indicating a change in the primary mechanism for mass removal. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to characterize and differentiate the mass ejection processes for laser irradiances above and below the threshold value. Time-resolved images show distinct features of the mass ejected at irradiances above the threshold value including the presence of micron-sized particulates; this begins at approximately 300 ~ 400 ns after the start of laser heating. The analysis of the phenomena was carried out by using two models: a thermal evaporation model and a phase explosion model. Estimation of the crater depth due to the thermally evaporated mass led to a large underestimation of the crater depth for irradiances above the threshold. Above the threshold irradiance, the possibility of phase explosion was analyzed. Two important results are the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature and the time for vapor bubbles that are generated in the superheated liquid to achieve a critical size. After reaching the critical size, vapor bubbles can grow spontaneously resulting in a violent ejection of liquid droplets from the superheated volume. The effects of an induced transparency, i.e. of liquid silicon turning into an optically transparent liquid dielectric medium, are also introduced. The estimated time for a bubble to reach the critical size is in agreement with the delay time measured for the initiation of large mass ejection. Also, the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature at the time of the beginning of the large mass ejection is representative of the crater depth at the threshold irradiance. These results suggest that phase explosion is a plausible thermal

  3. DOE-EMSP Final Report: Characterization of Changes in Colloid and DNAPL Affecting Surface Chemistry and Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Susan E. Powers; Stefan J. Grimberg; Miles Denham

    2007-02-07

    The waste disposal to the M-area basin and A-14 outfall at the Savannah River Department of Energy facility in Aiken SC (USA) included a wide variety of inorganic aqueous flows and organic solvents in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The DNAPL has migrated through the subsurface resulting in widespread groundwater contamination. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify processes that could have affected the migration and remediation of the DNAPL in the subsurface. It was hypothesized that the variety of waste disposed at this site could have altered the mineral, microbial and DNAPL properties at this site relative to other DNAPL sites. The DNAPL was determined to have a very low interfacial tension and is suspected to be distributed in fine grained media, thereby reducing the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation efforts. Although the DNAPL is primarily comprised of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethane, it also contains organic acids and several heavy metals. Experimental results suggest that iron from the aqueous and DNAPL phases undergoes precipitation and dechlorination reactions at the DNAPL-water interface, contributing to the low interfacial tension and acidity of the DNAPL. Biological activity in the contaminated region can also contribute to the low interfacial tension. PCE degrading bacteria produce biosurfactants and adhere to the DNAPL-water interface when stressed by high tetrachloroethene or low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The presence of iron can reduce the interfacial tension by nearly an order of magnitude, while the PCE degraders reduced the interfacial tension by nearly 50%. Abiotic changes in the mineral characteristics were not found to be substantially different between contaminated and background samples. The research completed here begins to shed some insight into the complexities of DNAPL fate and migration at sites where co-disposal of many different waste products occurred. Quantifying

  4. Ultrasonic properties of granular media saturated with dnapl/watermixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Geller, J.T.; Harris, J.M.

    2007-09-15

    We present the results of four experiments investigating the ultrasonic properties of granular materials partially saturated with trichloroethylene (TCE), a dense non-aqueous contaminant. P-wave velocity measurements were made under in situ effective stress conditions using a pulse transmission cell at ?250 kHz. Two synthetic samples and two natural aquifer cores were fully saturated with water and then subjected to an axial injection of TCE. The resulting measurements show reductions in P-wave velocity of up to 15% due to contaminant saturation. A theoretical model combining Gassmann fluid substitution and Hill's equation was used to estimate the effects of DNAPL saturation; this model underpredicted observed reductions in velocity at high TCE saturations. A linear relationship, expressed in terms of volumetric contaminant fraction, provided an excellent empirical fit to the laboratory measurements.

  5. DNAPL characterization using the Ribbon NAPL sampler: Methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.

    2000-04-25

    The Ribbon NAPL Sampler (RNS) is a direct sampling device that provides detailed depth discrete mapping of Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) in a borehole. This characterization method provides a yes or no answer to the presence of NAPLs and is used to complement and enhance other characterization techniques. Several cone penetrometer deployment methods are in use and methods for other drilling techniques are under development. The RNS has been deployed in the vadose and saturated zones at four different sites. Three of the sites contain DNAPLs from cleaning and degreasing operations and the fourth site contains creosote from a wood preserving plant. A brief description of the process history and geology is provided for each site. Where available, lithology and contaminant concentration information is provided and discussed in context with the RNS results.

  6. Importance of enhanced mass resolution in removing interferences when measuring volatile organic compounds in human blood by using purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bonin, M A; Ashley, D L; Cardinali, F L; McGraw, J M; Patterson, D G

    1992-11-01

    The number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can be purged from human blood is so great that they cannot be separated completely by capillary gas chromatography. As a result, the single-mass chromatograms used for quantitating the target compounds by mass spectrometry have many interferences at nominal (integer) mass resolution of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The results of these interferences range from small errors in quantitation to completely erroneous results for the target VOCs. By using a magnetic sector mass spectrometer, these interferences at nominal mass can be removed at higher resolution by lowering the ion chromatogram windows around the masses of interest. At 3000 resolution (10% valley definition), unique single-ion chromatograms can be made for the quantitation ions of the target VOCs. Full-scan mass data are required to allow the identification of unknown compounds purged from the blood. By using isotope-dilution mass spectrometry, most target VOCs can be detected in the low parts per trillion range for a 10-mL quantity of blood from which the VOCs have been removed by a purge-and-trap method.

  7. A DNAPL emergency remedial action program in a developing country: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nobre, M.M. . Dept. of Geology); Daus, A.D. )

    1993-10-01

    At the 44th Annual National Ground Water Association Convention in Las Vegas, a poster was presented that described a large DNAPL ground-water contamination problem at an industrial complex that produces chlorinated hydrocarbons in Brazil. The industrial complex lies above a major drinking water aquifer. Ground-water monitoring wells were installed in an effort to define the extent of the dissolve-phase ground-water plume. Field and laboratory data were analyzed, a ground-water flow model was developed, and a feasibility study was conducted to identify, evaluate, and select emergency interim remedial measures. Interim remedial measures were implemented less than six months from installation of the first monitoring well and included ground-water extraction and treatment to provide hydraulic control of the plume and prevent further migration of contaminants to downgradient receptors. In the subsequent year since the first interim ground-water extraction well was installed a number of key tasks have been completed. Ground-water extraction and monitoring identified a preferred pathway for contaminant migration. The remedial strategy for the site includes developing an efficient ground-water hydraulic control program based on collapse of the plume width and shortening the overall plume length (in progress). After an efficient hydraulic control program has been installed and verified, efforts will focus on source mass reduction. Long-term hydraulic control is anticipated to be an integral part of the remediation program.

  8. Ensemble of Surrogates-based Optimization for Identifying an Optimal Surfactant-enhanced Aquifer Remediation Strategy at Heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W., Sr.; Xin, X.; Luo, J.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, M.; Hou, Z.; Ouyang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) strategy for aquifers contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) based on an ensemble of surrogates-based optimization technique. A saturated heterogeneous medium contaminated by nitrobenzene was selected as case study. A new kind of surrogate-based SEAR optimization employing an ensemble surrogate (ES) model together with a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. Four methods, namely radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), kriging (KRG), support vector regression (SVR), and kernel extreme learning machines (KELM), were used to create four individual surrogate models, which were then compared. The comparison enabled us to select the two most accurate models (KELM and KRG) to establish an ES model of the SEAR simulation model, and the developed ES model as well as these four stand-alone surrogate models was compared. The results showed that the average relative error of the average nitrobenzene removal rates between the ES model and the simulation model for 20 test samples was 0.8%, which is a high approximation accuracy, and which indicates that the ES model provides more accurate predictions than the stand-alone surrogate models. Then, a nonlinear optimization model was formulated for the minimum cost, and the developed ES model was embedded into this optimization model as a constrained condition. Besides, GA was used to solve the optimization model to provide the optimal SEAR strategy. The developed ensemble surrogate-optimization approach was effective in seeking a cost-effective SEAR strategy for heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites. This research is expected to enrich and develop the theoretical and technical implications for the analysis of remediation strategy optimization of DNAPL-contaminated aquifers.

  9. Petroleum mass removal from low permeability sediment using air sparging/soil vapor extraction: impact of continuous or pulsed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Brian C.; Aelion, C. Marjorie

    2000-02-01

    Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) are innovative remediation techniques that utilize volatilization and microbial degradation to remediate petroleum spills from soils and groundwater. This in situ study investigated the use of AS/SVE to remediate a gasoline spill from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) in the low permeability, clayey soil of the Appalachian Piedmont. The objectives of this study were to evaluate AS/SVE in low permeability soils by quantifying petroleum mass removal rates, monitoring vadose zone contaminant levels, and comparing the mass extraction rates of continuous AS/SVE to 8 and 24 h pulsed operation. The objectives were met by collecting AS/SVE exhaust gas samples and vadose zone air from multi-depth soil vapor probes. Samples were analyzed for O 2, CO 2, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), and total combustible hydrocarbon (TCH) concentrations using portable hand meters and gas chromatography. Continuous AS/SVE was effective in removing 608 kg of petroleum hydrocarbons from low permeability soil in 44 days (14.3 kg day -1). Mass removal rates ranged from 2.6 times higher to 5.1 times lower than other AS/SVE studies performed in sandy sediments. BTEX levels in the vadose zone were reduced from about 5 ppm to 1 ppm. Ten pulsed AS/SVE tests removed 78 kg in 23 days and the mean mass removal rate (17.6 kg day -1) was significantly higher than the last 15 days of continuous extraction. Pulsed operation may be preferable to continuous operation because of increased mass removal and decreased energy consumption.

  10. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-12-01

    This annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), Task 5 (2D seismic design, acquisition, and processing), and Task 6 (2D seismic reflection, interpretation, and AVO analysis) on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford Site. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as a monitoring tool to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The second deployment is to the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Naval Weapons Station Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12), Charleston, SC to further test the technique to detect high concentrations of DNAPL. The Charleston Naval Weapons Station SWMU-12 site was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Based upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth, the project team collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and an experimental P-wave seismic reflection line. After preliminary data analysis of the VSP data and the experimental reflection line data, it was decided to proceed with Task 5 and Task 6. Three high resolution P-wave reflection profiles were collected with two objectives; (1) design the reflection survey to image a target depth of 20 feet below land surface to assist in determining the geologic controls on the DNAPL plume geometry, and (2) apply AVO analysis to the seismic data to locate the zone of high concentration of DNAPL. Based upon the results of the data processing and interpretation of the seismic data, the project team was able to map the channel that is controlling the DNAPL plume

  11. Use of 222Rn as a natural tracer to evaluate the efficiency of flushing test at DNAPL contaminated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Joun, W.; Kim, H.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    Flushing test was applied to remediate the depth-discrete residual dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) sources in an unsaturated zone at an industrial complex in Wonju, Korea. Remediation efficiency for flushing test was evaluated by comparing the natural tracer 222Rn concentration data in groundwater and the mass discharges of trichloroethylene (TCE) through a cross section before and during the test period. In the previous research performed at the study site, the location of residual DNAPL sources in the unsaturated zone was identified using the natural tracer 222Rn and contaminant concentrations based on the information for characteristics of radon which was partitioning into TCE. The natural injection method and pressurized injection method were applied for water injection. Uncontaminated groundwater around main source area was used as injection water. Temporal and spatial monitoring results show that a combined water injection (conducting both natural injection and pressurization injection) is an effective operation method. The 222Rn activities and TCE concentrations in groundwater fluctuated irregularly with water level increase at the main source area. The natural tracer 222Rn in groundwater originating from the underlying crystalline biotite granite, had a wide range from 15,000 to 183,000 Bq/m3 and total concentrations of TCE ranged from 0.03 to 1.79 mg/l. These temporal variations in 222Rn activities might be caused by not only the unknown quantities of residual TCE in the unsaturated zone but also the characteristics of radon partitioning into residual TCE with water level increase. From these results, the 222Rn activities could not be used directly as a natural tracer to evaluate the remediation efficiency due to the irregular production. Therefore, for more precise efficiency evaluation, the comparative analysis between 222Rn activities and relative contaminant concentrations data is required.

  12. Suspected bilateral phrenic nerve damage following a mediastinal mass removal in a 17-week-old pug.

    PubMed

    Raillard, Mathieu; Murison, Pamela J; Doran, Ivan P

    2017-03-01

    The anesthetic management of a pediatric pug for removal of a mediastinal mass is described. During recovery from anesthesia, the dog's respiratory pattern was compatible with bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Incidence, complications, possible treatments of phrenic nerve injury, problems of long-term mechanical ventilation, and alternative case management are discussed.

  13. Permanganate Treatment of DNAPLs in Reactive Barriers and Source Zone Flooding Schemes - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.W.

    2000-10-01

    This study provides a detailed process-level understanding of the oxidative destruction of the organic contaminant emphasizing on reaction pathways and kinetics. A remarkable rise in the MnO{sup {minus}} consumption rate with TCA and PCE mixtures proves that the phase transfer catalysts have the ability to increase oxidation rate of DNAPLs either in pure phase or mixtures and that there is significant potential for testing the catalyzed scheme under field conditions. Secondly, as an attempt to enhance the oxidation of DNAPL, we are trying to exploit cosolvency effects, utilizing various alcohol-water mixtures to increase DNAPL solubilization. Preliminary results of cosolvency experiments indicate the enhancement in the transfer of nonaqueous phase TCE to TBA-water solution and the rate of TCE degradation in aqueous phase.

  14. Evaluation of the likelihood of DNAPL presence at NPL sites: National results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The document presents the results of a survey undertaken by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund). The survey was designed to estimate the proportion of National Priorities List (NPL) sites where Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) may be present. Earlier studies by OERR suggested that DNAPLs may be more common at hazardous waste sites than previously thought, and may act as a continuing source of contamination thus reducing the ability of pump-and-treat systems to attain cleanup goals within expected timeframes (Evaluation of Ground Water Extraction Remedies, Phase II, EPA 9355.4-05). The study represents the first systematic nation-wide review of NPL sites designed to estimate the extent of subsurface DNAPL contamination.

  15. Comparison of dechlorination rates for field DNAPL vs synthetic samples: effect of sample matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Sakulchaicharoen, N.; Herrera, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Nanometals have received significant attention in recent years due to their ability to rapidly destroy numerous priority source zone contaminants in controlled laboratory studies. This has led to great optimism surrounding nanometal particle injection for insitu remediation. Reported dechlorination rates vary widely among different investigators. These differences have been ascribed to differences in the iron types (granular, micro, or nano-sized iron), matrix solution chemistry and the morphology of the nZVI surface. Among these, the effects of solution chemistry on rates of reductive dechlorination of various chlorinated compounds have been investigated in several short-term laboratory studies. Variables investigated include the effect of anions or groundwater solutes such as SO4-2, Cl-, NO3-, pH, natural organic matters (NOM), surfactant, and humic acid on dechlorination reaction of various chlorinated compounds such as TCE, carbon tetrachloride (CT), and chloroform (CF). These studies have normally centered on the assessment of nZVI reactivity toward dechlorination of an isolated individual contaminant spiked into a ground water sample under ideal conditions, with limited work conducted using real field samples. In this work, the DNAPL used for the dechlorination study was obtained from a contaminatied site. This approach was selected to adequately simulate a condition where the nZVI suspension was in direct contact with DNAPL and to isolate the dechlorination activity shown by the nZVI from the groundwater matrix effects. An ideal system "synthetic DNAPL" composed of a mixture of chlorinated compounds mimicking the composition of the actual DNAPL was also dechlorinated to evaluate the DNAPL "matrix effect" on NZVI dechlorination activity. This approach allowed us to evaluate the effect of the presence of different types of organic compounds (volatile fatty acids and humic acids) found in the actual DNAPL on nZVI dechlorination activity. This presentation will

  16. In Situ Oxidation and Associated Mass-Flux-Reduction/Mass-Removal Behavior for Systems with Organic Liquid Located in Lower-Permeability Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, justin C.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Janousek, Hilary; Brusseau, M. L.

    2010-07-21

    The effectiveness of permanganate for in situ chemical oxidation of organic liquid (trichloroethene) trapped in lower-permeability (K) zones located within a higher-permeability matrix was examined in a series of flow-cell experiments. The permanganate solution was applied in both continuous and pulsed-injection modes. Manganese-oxide precipitation, as confirmed by use of SEM-EDS, occurred within, adjacent to, and downgradient of the lower-K zones, reflective of trichloroethene oxidation. During flow interruptions, precipitate formed within the surrounding higher-permeability matrix, indicating diffusive flux of aqueous-phase trichloroethene from the lower-K zones. The impact of permanganate treatment on mass flux behavior was examined by conducting water floods after permanganate injection. The results were compared to those of water-flood control experiments. The amount of water flushing required for complete contaminant mass removal was reduced for all permanganate treatments for which complete removal was characterized. However, the nature of the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship observed during water flooding varied as a function of the specific permanganate treatment.

  17. In situ oxidation and associated mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior for systems with organic liquid located in lower-permeability sediments.

    PubMed

    Marble, Justin C; Carroll, Kenneth C; Janousek, Hilary; Brusseau, Mark L

    2010-09-20

    The effectiveness of permanganate for in situ chemical oxidation of organic liquid (trichloroethene) trapped in lower-permeability (K) zones located within a higher-permeability matrix was examined in a series of flow-cell experiments. The permanganate solution was applied in both continuous and pulsed-injection modes. Manganese-oxide precipitation, as confirmed by use of SEM-EDS, occurred within, adjacent to, and downgradient of the lower-K zones, reflective of trichloroethene oxidation. During flow interruptions, precipitate formed within the surrounding higher-permeability matrix, indicating diffusive flux of aqueous-phase trichloroethene from the lower-K zones. The impact of permanganate treatment on mass flux behavior was examined by conducting water floods after permanganate injection. The results were compared to those of water-flood control experiments. The amount of water flushing required for complete contaminant mass removal was reduced for all permanganate treatments for which complete removal was characterized. However, the nature of the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship observed during water flooding varied as a function of the specific permanganate treatment.

  18. Online matrix removal platform for coupling gel-based separations to whole protein electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Compton, Philip D; Tran, John C; Kelleher, Neil L

    2015-05-01

    A fractionation method called gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE) has been used to dramatically increase the number of proteins identified in top-down proteomic workflows; however, the technique involves the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a surfactant that interferes with electrospray ionization. Therefore, an efficient removal of SDS is absolutely required prior to mass analysis. Traditionally, methanol/chloroform precipitation and spin columns have been used, but they lack reproducibility and are difficult to automate. Therefore, we developed an in-line matrix removal platform to enable the direct analysis of samples containing SDS and salts. Only small molecules like SDS permeate a porous membrane and are removed in a manner similar to cross-flow filtration. With this device, near-complete removal of SDS is accomplished within 5 min and proteins are subsequently mobilized into a mass spectrometer. The new platform was optimized for the analysis of GELFrEE fractions enriched for histones extracted from human HeLa cells. All four core histones and their proteoforms were detected in a single spectrum by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The new method versus protein precipitation/resuspension showed 2- to 10-fold improved signal intensities, offering a clear path forward to improve proteome coverage and the efficiency of top-down proteomics.

  19. Site characterization for DNAPL contamination: An evolutionary process

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, R.A. . Hazardous Waste Program)

    1993-03-01

    Kerr-McGee Chemical Corporation and its predecessor operated a pressure-type creosote wood preserving facility in Kansas City, Missouri, from 1907--1983. The facility property is approximately 104 acres in size and is located in the flood plain of the Blue River. Investigation of subsurface contamination of the blue River alluvium related to releases from waste management units (e.g., former surface impoundment used for wastewater treatment, wood treating process/kickback area) at the site has been evolutionary process driven by the regulatory requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Site investigation techniques have ranged from initial installation of rudimentary boreholes/monitoring wells to assess gross lithology/groundwater quality to recent use of an extensive Cone Penetrometer Survey (CPS) to refine interactions. Although the site-wide characterization has not yet been completed, knowledge gained through the evolutionary investigation process has been used successfully to guide decisions concerning interim remedial measures (e.g., placement of wells for recovery of DNAPL) and should allow for expedient, focused development of additional site investigation and long-term remedial action work plans.

  20. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON (Battelle Conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) was conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island, SC. The EZVI technology was developed at the University of Central Fl...

  1. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) is being conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island SC. The demonstration is being conducted by Geosyntec, the Nationa...

  2. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON (BATTELLE PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) is being conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island SC. The EZVI technology was developed at the University of Central ...

  3. Spatial And Temporal Distribution Of Microbial Communities In A TCE DNAPL Site: SABRE Field Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project was conducted to evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. To study performance of this technology, a test cell was constructed with a longitudi...

  4. ENHANCED CONTACT OF COSOLVENT AND DNAPL IN POROUS MEDIA BY CONCURRENT INJECTION OF COSOLVENT AND AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of sites contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) is a major
    environmental problem and cosolvent flooding is proposed as a remedial alternative. The
    efficacy of cosolvent flooding is a function of the degree of mixing between the injected
    remed...

  5. A MODIFIED LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION METHOD FOR DNAPL SATURATION MEASUREMENTS IN 2-D MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this research, a light transmission visualization (LTV) method was used to quantify dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) saturation in two-dimensional (2-D), two fluid phase systems. The method is an expansion of earlier LTV methods and takes into account both absorption an...

  6. A SCREENING MODEL FOR SIMULATING DNAPL FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA: THEORETICAL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There exists a need for a simple tool that will allow us to analyze a DNAPL contamination scenario from free-product release to transport of soluble constituents to downgradient receptor wells. The objective of this manuscript is to present the conceptual model and formulate the ...

  7. SERDP and ESTCP Expert Panel Workshop on Reducing the Uncertainty of DNAPL Source Zone Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    6 3.4 UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACT OF VADOSE ZONE PROCESSES ...23 7.1 INTEGRATE DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES FOR CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION...decision-making processes for characterization and remediation. The inherent uncertainties in addressing DNAPL source zones require an

  8. Mean and variance of DNAPL ringer development in a saturated, randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, A. M.; Neuman, S. P.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorinated organic solvents such as TCE and PCE are among the most ubiquitous and problematic groundwater contaminants at many sites. They usually enter the subsurface in the form of organic liquids which exhibit low miscibility with water and thus form a separate dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Here we analyze the movement of DNAPL in a three-dimensional randomly heterogeneous porous medium saturated with water. We consider the fluid interface between DNAPL and water to form a sharp boundary at which the capillary pressure head, assumed equal to the entry pressure head of DNAPL, is prescribed either deterministically or randomly. We treat log hydraulic conductivity as a statistically homogeneous random field with given mean, variance and covariance, This allows us to cast the corresponding boundary-value problem in the form of an integro-differential equation, in which the parameters and domain of integration are random. Expanding this equation in a Taylor series about the mean position of the front, and averaging in probability space, yields leading-order ensemble I moment equations for the mean and variance of front evolution with time. Previously we solved these moment equations analytically in one-dimension with gravity, to first order in the variance of log conductivity, and compared our solution with the results of Monte Carlo sjmulations. Here we solve the same moment equations numerically in two-spatial dimensions without gravity.

  9. Characterizing The Microbial Community In A TCE DNAPL Site: SABRE Column And Field Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project is evaluating accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In support of a field scale pilot test, column studies were conducted to design the system and ob...

  10. Transport, Targeting and Applications of Metallic Functional Nanoparticles for Degradation of DNAPL Chlorinated Organic Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Gregory V.; Majetich, Sara; Sholl, David; Tilton, Robert D.; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Liu, Yueqiang; Sarbu, Traian; Almusallam, Abdulwahab; Redden, George D.; Meakin, Paul; Rollins, Harry W.

    2004-03-31

    Recently, laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that zero-valent iron nanoparticles (colloids) can rapidly transform dissolved chlorinated organic solvents into non-toxic compounds. This technology also has the potential to address Dense Non- Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) contamination, one of DOE's primary contamination problems. This project develops and tests polymer-modified reactive nanoscale Fe0 particles for in situ delivery to chlorinated solvents that are present as DNAPLs in the subsurface. The surfaces of reactive Fe0-based nanoparticles are modified with amphiphilic block copolymers to maintain a stable suspension of the particles in water for transport in a porous matrix and to create an affinity for the water-DNAPL interface. Ultimately this will provide an improved technology to locate and eliminate DNAPL, a recalcitrant and persistent source for groundwater contamination by chlorinated solvents. Candidate polymers have been synthesized and attached to 20 nm SiO2 particles using Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP). The physical properties (hydrodynamic radius, stability, TCE-water partitioning behavior, mobility in a porous matrix) of these nanostructures have been determined. The particles (dp {approx}102 nm) are water soluble and partition to the TCE-water interface. The physical and chemical properties (e.g. oxide phase and thickness) of Fe0 nanoparticles synthesized using different techniques and the effects of these properties on particle reactivity and efficiency have been evaluated. Numerical models (Brownian Dynamics) have been developed to predict the aqueous diffusivities of these particle-polymer nanostructures.

  11. MONITOIRNG OF A CONTROLLED DNAPL SPILL USING A PROTOTYPE DIELECTRIC LOGGING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) utilized their prototype dielectric logging tool to monitor a controlled Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) spill into a large tank located at the University of California Richmond Field Station (RFS) containing multiple sand and clayey sand...

  12. Bisphenol-A removal in various wastewater treatment processes: operational conditions, mass balance, and optimization.

    PubMed

    Guerra, P; Kim, M; Teslic, S; Alaee, M; Smyth, S A

    2015-04-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) was analyzed in 499 liquid and 347 solid samples collected from twenty-five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to investigate parameters affecting BPA occurrence, removal, and fate. Lagoons, chemically-assisted primary treatment, secondary treatment, and advanced treatment processes were included. Median BPA concentrations in influent and final effluent were 400 ng/L and 150 ng/L, respectively. Median removal efficiencies ranged from 1 to 77%. Respective median BPA levels in primary sludge, secondary biological sludge, and biosolids were 230, 260, and 460 ng/g with digested biosolids having the highest concentrations. The biological aerated filter and membrane bioreactor processes showed the best performance, while chemically-assisted primary treatment achieved the lowest removal. Biodegradation and sorption contributing to BPA removal were influenced by operational conditions: hydraulic retention time (HRT), solids retention time (SRT), and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS). The influence of HRT, SRT, and MLSS in the bioreactor was stronger during cold temperatures. In order to achieve above 80% removal, the required conditions for HRT, SRT, and MLSS were 13 h, 7 days, and 1600 mg/L during summer (median temperature 19 °C) and 13 h, 17 days, and 5300 mg/L during winter (median temperature 10 °C); indicating that longer SRT and higher MLSS were needed during winter. BPA's sorption tendency to sludge was strongly influenced by the degree of nitrification and HRT.

  13. The Impact of Permanganate NOD Kinetics on Treatment Efficiency and NAPL Mass Transfer Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.; Thomson, N. R.; Xu, X.

    2006-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a technology that involves the degradation of target contaminants through the application of a chemical oxidant to the contaminated subsurface which increases mass transfer from free and sorbed dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Laboratory experiments, and both pilot- and full- scale applications using permanganate in porous media, low permeability media, and fractured systems have demonstrated effective DNAPL mass removal. Unfortunately the presence of naturally occurring reduced species associated with the aquifer material can exert a significant permanganate demand, or natural oxidant demand (NOD), thereby reducing the mass of oxidant available for the destruction of the contaminant(s) of concern as well as reducing the oxidation rate. Recent laboratory efforts indicate that this demand is not a single-valued quantity, but is kinetically controlled and depends on the parameters of the test system and type of reduced aquifer material species present. This finding suggests that, in addition to advection and dispersion, the transport of permanganate within a DNAPL source zone will be controlled by the kinetic competition for permanganate between the target organic compound(s) and the NOD, and therefore the overall mass transfer or dissolution rate which has been shown to be enhanced in the presence of permanganate will be impacted. Hence a number of different processes are involved during a permanganate injection episode, and the role to which the permanganate NOD kinetics play is presently unclear. As a first step to understand how NOD kinetics affect the oxidation of residual non-aqueous phase liquids, we performed a series of one- dimensional mathematical simulations in which both experimentally observed NOD and organic oxidation kinetics were employed. The NOD kinetic expressions were based on data collected from a series of laboratory experiments involving well-mixed batch reactor and column systems from several

  14. Removing Biases in Resolved Stellar Mass Maps of Galaxy Disks through Successive Bayesian Marginalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.; Magris C., Gladis; Bruzual A., Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Stellar masses of galaxies are frequently obtained by fitting stellar population synthesis models to galaxy photometry or spectra. The state of the art method resolves spatial structures within a galaxy to assess the total stellar mass content. In comparison to unresolved studies, resolved methods yield, on average, higher fractions of stellar mass for galaxies. In this work we improve the current method in order to mitigate a bias related to the resolved spatial distribution derived for the mass. The bias consists in an apparent filamentary mass distribution and a spatial coincidence between mass structures and dust lanes near spiral arms. The improved method is based on iterative Bayesian marginalization, through a new algorithm we have named Bayesian Successive Priors (BSP). We have applied BSP to M51 and to a pilot sample of 90 spiral galaxies from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey. By quantitatively comparing both methods, we find that the average fraction of stellar mass missed by unresolved studies is only half what previously thought. In contrast with the previous method, the output BSP mass maps bear a better resemblance to near-infrared images.

  15. Computational and Experimental Investigation of Contaminant Plume Response to DNAPL Source Zone Architecture and Depletion in Porous and Fractured Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    igneous and metamorphic rocks ), DNAPL will preferentially enter 167 of 254 and remain within the fracture network, because the DNAPL entry pressure is...to validate the proposed computational approaches; and (5) to apply the technique at a well-characterized fractured rock site at Smithville, Ontario...Additional laboratory experiments with a rock block showed that Transient Hydraulic Tomography based on the SIF technology is a promising technology in

  16. Estimating the Extent and Thickness of DNAPL within the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.G.; Payne, T.H.; Looney, B.B.; Rossabi, J.

    1996-12-20

    The objective of this study is to refine the current conceptual model for the extent, character, and thickness of DNAPL contamination in the A/M Area. The evaluation is based upon historical records of operations and waste management and on detailed screening of historical groundwater concentrations against solubility limits. The topology of the Green Clay confining zone is used as the primary factor determining DNAPL pool thickness and resulting migration paths.

  17. Mobilization and entry of DNAPL pools into finer sand media by cosolvents: two-dimensional chamber studies.

    PubMed

    Van Valkenburg, Michael E; Annable, Michael D

    2002-12-01

    Two-dimensional chamber studies were conducted to determine qualitative and quantitative performance of cosolvents targeted at pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) (perchlorethylene, PCE) residing above a fine-grain capillary barrier. Downward mobilization of DNAPL, up gradient along an overriding cosolvent front, was observed. This produced significant pooling above a fine-grain layer that in some cases lead to entry into the capillary barrier beneath. Entry pressure calculations using physical and hydrogeologic parameters provided an excellent prediction of breakthrough of DNAPL into the capillary barrier. Calculations predict approximately 0.5 m of DNAPL would be necessary to enter a Beit Netofa clay, under extreme cosolvent flooding conditions (100% ethanol). Gradient injection of cosolvent did not appear to provide any benefit suggesting a rapid decrease in interfacial tension (IFT) compared to the rate of DNAPL solubilization. Use of a partitioning alcohol (tertiary butyl alcohol, TBA) resulted in DNAPL swelling and reduced entry into the capillary barrier. However, the trapping of flushing solution, containing PCE, could potentially lead to longer remediation times.

  18. Dissolved plume attenuation with DNAPL source remediation, aqueous decay and volatilization — Analytical solution, model calibration and prediction uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack C.; Park, Eungyu; Tang, Guoping

    2008-11-01

    A vertically-integrated analytical model for dissolved phase transport is described that considers a time-dependent DNAPL source based on the upscaled dissolution kinetics model of Parker and Park with extensions to consider time-dependent source zone biodecay, partial source mass reduction, and remediation-enhanced source dissolution kinetics. The model also considers spatial variability in aqueous plume decay, which is treated as the sum of aqueous biodecay and volatilization due to diffusive transport and barometric pumping through the unsaturated zone. The model is implemented in Excel/VBA coupled with (1) an inverse solution that utilizes prior information on model parameters and their uncertainty to condition the solution, and (2) an error analysis module that computes parameter covariances and total prediction uncertainty due to regression error and parameter uncertainty. A hypothetical case study is presented to evaluate the feasibility of calibrating the model from limited noisy field data. The results indicate that prediction uncertainty increases significantly over time following calibration, primarily due to propagation of parameter uncertainty. However, differences between the predicted performance of source zone partial mass reduction and the known true performance were reasonably small. Furthermore, a clear difference is observed between the predicted performance for the remedial action scenario versus that for a no-action scenario, which is consistent with the true system behavior. The results suggest that the model formulation can be effectively utilized to assess monitored natural attenuation and source remediation options if careful attention is given to model calibration and prediction uncertainty issues.

  19. Mass flow of antibiotics in a wastewater treatment plant focusing on removal variations due to operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Marx, Conrad; Günther, Norbert; Schubert, Sara; Oertel, Reinhard; Ahnert, Markus; Krebs, Peter; Kuehn, Volker

    2015-12-15

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are not designed to purposefully eliminate antibiotics and therefore many previous investigations have been carried out to assess their fate in biological wastewater treatment processes. In order to consolidate previous findings regarding influencing factors like the solid and hydraulic retention time an intensive monitoring was carried out in a municipal WWTP in Germany. Over a period of 12months daily samples were taken from the in- and effluent as well as diverse sludge streams. The 14 selected antibiotics and one metabolite cover the following classes: cephalosporins, diaminopyrimidines, fluoroquinolones, lincosamide, macrolides, penicillins, sulfonamides and tetracyclines. Out of the 15 investigated substances, the removal of only clindamycin and ciprofloxacin show significant correlations to SRT, temperature, HRT and nitrogen removal. The dependency of clindamycin's removal could be related to the significant negative removal (i.e. production) of clindamycin in the treatment process and was corrected using the human metabolite clindamycin-sulfoxide. The average elimination was adjusted from -225% to 3% which suggests that clindamycin can be considered as an inert substance during the wastewater treatment process. Based on the presented data, the mass flow analysis revealed that macrolides, clindamycin/clindamycin-sulfoxide and trimethoprim were mainly released with the effluent, while penicillins, cephalosporins as well as sulfamethoxazole were partly degraded in the studied WWTP. Furthermore, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin are the only antibiotics under investigation with a significant mass fraction bound to primary, excess and digested sludge. Nevertheless, the sludge concentrations are highly inconsistent which leads to questionable results. It remains unclear whether the inconsistencies are due to insufficiencies in sampling and/or analytical determination or if the fluctuations can be considered reasonable for

  20. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2003-07-15

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  1. Determination of arsenic in gold by flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with matrix removal by reductive precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becotte-Haigh, Paul; Tyson, Julian F.; Denoyer, Eric; Hinds, Michael W.

    1996-12-01

    Arsenic was determined in gold by flow injection hydride generation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following a batch mode reductive precipitation removal of the interfering gold matrix. A solution of potassium iodide, L-ascorbic acid, and hydrochloric acid was used as the reluctant. The recovery of gold by precipitation and filtration was 99 ± 3%. The detection limit for arsenic in gold was 55 ng g -1 in the solid. The concentration of arsenic that was determined in the Royal Canadian Mint gold sample FAU-10 was 29.7 μg g -1 in the solid; this value was indistinguishable, with 95% confidence, from values determined at the Royal Canadian Mint by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The standard deviation for four replicate determinations of the arsenic in FAU-10 was 0.972 μg g -1 in the solid.

  2. Displacement and sweep efficiencies in a DNAPL recovery test using micellar and polymer solutions injected in a five-spot pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Hébert, Alain; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre; Gabriel, Uta

    2004-11-01

    Soil washing with micellar solutions is a promising alternative for the remediation of DNAPL source zones. As with any flushing technology, the success of soil washing with micellar solutions depends in a very large part on the ability of the solution to contact the contaminant (sweep efficiency) and then on the efficiency of contaminant removal once this contact is made (displacement efficiency). We report here on a field test where a micellar solution was used to recover a DNAPL in an open five-spot pattern in which polymer solutions were also injected before and after the washing solution to improve sweep efficiency. The washing solution formulation was optimised in the laboratory prior to the test to obtain good dissolution capacity. For a high-concentration and low-volume soil flushing remediation test such as the one performed (0.8 pore volumes of actual washing solution injected), slug sizing of the washing solution is critical. It was evaluated by an analytical solution. In a five-spot pattern, the displacement efficiency of the washing solution was observed to vary in the porous medium as a function of the radial distance from the injection well because: (1) the volume of the washing solution flowing through a section of the test cell changes (maximum close to the injection well and minimal at the pumping wells); (2) the in situ velocity changes (maximum at the wells and minimum between the wells) and; (3) the contact time of the washing solution with the NAPL changes as a function of the distance from the injection well. The relative importance of the recovery mechanisms, mobilisation and dissolution, was also observed to vary in the test cell. The reduced velocity increased the contact time of the washing solution with the DNAPL enhancing its dissolution, but the decrease of the capillary number caused less mobilisation. The washing process is much more extensive around the injection well. The use of an injection-pumping pattern allowing a complete sweep

  3. IN-SITU THERMAL TREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND MASS REMOVAL METRICS AT FORT LEWIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EGDY is the source of a potentially expanding three mile long TCE plume in a sole source drinking water aquifer. Thermal remediation is being employed to reduce source mass loading to the dissolved phase aquifer plume and reduce the time to reach site cleanup goals. This is...

  4. Investigation of surfactant-enhanced mass removal and flux reduction in 3D correlated permeability fields using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changyong; Werth, Charles J; Webb, Andrew G

    2008-09-10

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to visualize the NAPL source zone architecture before and after surfactant-enhanced NAPL dissolution in three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneously packed flowcells characterized by different longitudinal correlation lengths: 2.1 cm (aquifer 1) and 1.1 cm (aquifer 2). Surfactant flowpaths were determined by imaging the breakthrough of a paramagnetic tracer (MnCl(2)) analyzed by the method of moments. In both experimental aquifers, preferential flow occurred in high permeability materials with low NAPL saturations, and NAPL was preferentially removed from the top of the aquifers with low saturation. Alternate flushing with water and two surfactant pulses (5-6 pore volumes each) resulted in approximately 63% of NAPL mass removal from both aquifers. However, overall reduction in mass flux (Mass Flux 1) exiting the flowcell was lower in aquifer 2 (68%) than in aquifer 1 (81%), and local effluent concentrations were found to increase by as high as 120 times at local sampling ports from aquifer 2 after surfactant flushing. 3D MRI images of NAPL revealed that NAPL migrated downward and created additional NAPL source zones in previously uncontaminated areas at the bottom of the aquifers. The additional NAPL source zones were created in the direction transverse to flow in aquifer 2, which explains the higher mass flux relative to aquifer 1. Analysis using a total trapping number indicates that mobilization of NAPL trapped in the two coarsest sand fractions is possible when saturation is below 0.5 and 0.4, respectively. Results from this study highlight the potential impacts of porous media heterogeneity and NAPL source zone architecture on advanced in-situ flushing technologies.

  5. Simultaneous sample preconcentration and matrix removal using field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ammar, Assad; Siripinyanond, Atitaya; Barnes, Ramon M.

    2001-10-01

    An on-channel sample preconcentration-matrix removal arrangement, based on coupling field-flow fractionation (FFF) to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), has been constructed for on-line sample pretreatment ICP-MS trace element determination. A commercial FFF system is modified to incorporate an on-channel preconcentration procedure allowing injection of up to 50 ml of sample, which could be preconcentrated by 50-1400 fold. A high molecular weight complexing agent added to the sample forms strong complexes with the measured trace analytes but not with the sample matrix. When the sample-complexing agent mixture is introduced to the FFF unit, the uncomplexed matrix element is removed by permeation through a membrane that separates the FFF sample compartment. The trace analytes remain in the FFF channel, because their high molecular weight complexes do not permeate through the membrane. Preconcentration and matrix elimination occur simultaneously. The matrix-free, preconcentrated sample is introduced directly to the ICP-MS nebulizer. The method was tested using 10-ml sample aliquots that contain As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Re, Sn, Te, Tl, Y, Zn and Zr analytes and 5000 mg l -1 Ca or Na matrices and ethylene imine polymer complexing agent. Copper and Re isotopic ratio values in reference standards also were determined after preconcentration and matrix element removal.

  6. Modeling GPR data to interpret porosity and DNAPL saturations for calibration of a 3-D multiphase flow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneddon, Kristen W.; Powers, Michael H.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Poeter, Eileen P.

    2002-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are a pervasive and persistent category of groundwater contamination. In an effort to better understand their unique subsurface behavior, a controlled and carefully monitored injection of PCE (perchloroethylene), a typical DNAPL, was performed in conjunction with the University of Waterloo at Canadian Forces Base Borden in 1991. Of the various geophysical methods used to monitor the migration of injected PCE, the U.S. Geological Survey collected 500-MHz ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. These data are used in determining calibration parameters for a multiphase flow simulation. GPR data were acquired over time on a fixed two-dimensional surficial grid as the DNAPL was injected into the subsurface. Emphasis is on the method of determining DNAPL saturation values from this time-lapse GPR data set. Interactive full-waveform GPR modeling of regularized field traces resolves relative dielectric permittivity versus depth profiles for pre-injection and later-time data. Modeled values are end members in recursive calculations of the Bruggeman-Hanai-Sen (BHS) mixing formula, yielding interpreted pre-injection porosity and post-injection DNAPL saturation values. The resulting interpreted physical properties of porosity and DNAPL saturation of the Borden test cell, defined on a grid spacing of 50 cm with 1-cm depth resolution, are used as observations for calibration of a 3-D multiphase flow simulation. Calculated values of DNAPL saturation in the subsurface at 14 and 22 hours after the start of injection, from both the GPR and the multiphase flow modeling, are interpolated volumetrically and presented for visual comparison.

  7. Refinement of the Kansas City Plant site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL)

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.; Hall, S.C.; Baker, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document presents a refinement of the site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (KCP). This refinement was prompted by a review of the literature and the results of a limited study that was conducted to evaluate whether pools of DNAPL were present in contaminated locations at the KCP. The field study relied on the micropurge method of sample collection. This method has been demonstrated as a successful approach for obtaining discrete samples within a limited aquifer zone. Samples were collected at five locations across 5-ft well screens located at the base of the alluvial aquifer at the KCP. The hypothesis was that if pools of DNAPL were present, the dissolved concentration would increase with depth. Four wells with highly contaminated groundwater were selected for the test. Three of the wells were located in areas where DNAPL was suspected, and one where no DNAPL was believed to be present. The results demonstrated no discernible pattern with depth for the four wells tested. A review of the data in light of the available technical literature suggests that the fine-grained nature of the aquifer materials precludes the formation of pools. Instead, DNAPL is trapped as discontinuous ganglia that are probably widespread throughout the aquifer. The discontinuous nature of the DNAPL distribution prevents the collection of groundwater samples with concentrations approaching saturation. Furthermore, the results indicate that attempts to remediate the aquifer with conventional approaches will not result in restoration to pristine conditions because the tortuous groundwater flow paths will inhibit the efficiency of fluid-flow-based treatments.

  8. Analyzing Remediation Technologies for Department of Energy Sites contaminated with DNAPL Pollitants - Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony F. Paptyi, Captain, USAF

    1997-03-01

    A comprehensive literature review to investigate the following topics: * Decision analysis - with specific attention to geologic applications * Multiattribute Utility Theory (MAUT) The development of DA tools that will accommodate life cycle cost, time, stochastic performance measures, and decision maker preferences for selecting remediation or containment technology trains for DNAPL contaminated sites A thorough sensitivity analysis of the results of the WAG6 site specific analysis for a specified spill volume Conclusions regarding the model and the sensitivity analysis Recommendations for further research

  9. The DNAPL Remediation Challenge: Is There a Case for Source Depletion?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    vendors, which adds to uncertainties of cost, risk of failure, and risk of bankruptcy by the vendor. An additional uncertainty at most sites is the...current default assumption is that DNAPL sites will require several decades to centuries of plume management with signifi cant cost and future uncertainty...required for regulatory compliance, long-term source-zone and plume containment has evolved into the generally recognized low-cost default strategy, but

  10. Mass of chlorinated volatile organic compounds removed by Pump-and-Treat, Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey, 1996-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2011-01-01

    Pump and Treat (P&T) remediation is the primary technique used to contain and remove trichloroethylene (TCE) and its degradation products cis 1-2,dichloroethylene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) from groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. Three methods were used to determine the masses of TCE, cDCE, and VC removed from groundwater by the P&T system since it became fully operational in 1996. Method 1, is based on the flow volume and concentrations of TCE, cDCE, and VC in groundwater that entered the P&T building as influent. Method 2 is based on withdrawal volume from each active recovery well and the concentrations of TCE, cDCE, and VC in the water samples from each well. Method 3 compares the maximum monthly amount of TCE, cDCE, and VC from Method 1 and Method 2. The greater of the two values is selected to represent the masses of TCE, cDCE and VC removed from groundwater each month. Previously published P&T monthly reports used Method 1 to determine the mass of TCE, cDCE, and VC removed. The reports state that 8,666 pounds (lbs) of TCE, 13,689 lbs of cDCE, and 2,455 lbs of VC were removed by the P&T system during 1996-2010. By using Method 2, the mass removed was determined to be 8,985 lbs of TCE, 17,801 lbs of cDCE, and 3,056 lbs of VC removed, and Method 3, resulted in 10,602 lbs of TCE, 21,029 lbs of cDCE, and 3,496 lbs of VC removed. To determine the mass of original TCE removed from groundwater, the individual masses of TCE, cDCE, and VC (determined using Methods 1, 2, and 3) were converted to numbers of moles, summed, and converted to pounds of original TCE. By using the molar conversion the mass of original TCE removed from groundwater by Methods 1, 2, and 3 was 32,381 lbs, 39,535 lbs, and 46,452 lbs, respectively, during 1996-2010. P&T monthly reports state that 24,805 lbs of summed TCE, cDCE, and VC were removed from groundwater. The simple summing method underestimates the mass of original TCE removed by the P&T system.

  11. A mechanism of basal spacing reduction in sodium smectitic clay materials in contact with DNAPL wastes.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Cinar, Derya; Otero-Diaz, Margarita; Demond, Avery H

    2016-09-01

    There has been concern regarding the possible attack of clays in aquitards, slurry walls and landfill liners by dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) wastes, resulting in cracking. Despite the fact that a reduction in basal spacing in sodium smectitic clay materials has been linked to cracking, no plausible mechanism by which this reduction occurs in contact with waste DNAPLs has been formulated. To elucidate a mechanism, screening studies were conducted that showed that the combination of an anionic surfactant (AOT), a nonionic surfactant (TritonX-100) and a chlorinated solvent, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), could replicate the basal spacing reduction and cracking behavior of water-saturated bentonite caused by two waste DNAPLs obtained from the field. FTIR measurements of this system showed a displacement of the HOH bending band of water symptomatic of desiccation. Sorption measurements showed that the uptake of AOT by bentonite increased eight fold in the presence of TritonX-100 and PCE. The evidence presented here supports a mechanism of syneresis, involving the extraction of water from the interlayer space of the clay through the synergistic sorption of a nonionic and anionic surfactant mixture. It is speculated that the solvation of water in reverse micellar aggregates is the process driving the syneresis.

  12. Mixed region reactors for in situ treatment of DNAPL contaminated low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    Fine-textured soils and sediments contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) present a significant environmental restoration challenge. An emerging approach to rapid in situ treatment within low permeability media involves the use of soil mixing to create mixed region reactors wherein biological or physical/chemical treatment processes can be employed. In cohesive soils, mixing breaks up the original soil structure and produces soil aggregates or clods separated by interaggregate void spaces. These void spaces create preferential flow paths for more efficient extraction of contaminants from the soil matrix or more rapid diffusion of treatment agents into the soil aggregates. This enhancement technology has been most successfully used with vapor stripping. However, other technologies can also be coupled with soil mixing including chemical degradation, biodegradation and solidification. The application of this technology to DNAPL-contaminated low permeability media appears promising but requires further experiments and models that can simulate the movement of DNAPLs in mixed regions. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Removing costs from the health care supply chain: lessons from mass retail.

    PubMed

    Agwunobi, John; London, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Improved supply-chain management and high-volume purchasing have benefited other industries. This same approach could also reduce health care costs. Streamlining layers in the supply chain and using purchasing volume to reduce prices can save money and may improve care. Providing access to in-store health clinics and low-cost generic drugs are examples of how this approach is being tested by mass retailers. We examine lessons learned from these and similar initiatives and identify opportunities to cut the costs of generic and name-brand drugs, medical supplies, over-the-counter remedies, and vision care.

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF PILOT-SCALE PREVAPORATION SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND REMOVAL FROM A SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION FLUID. I. SPIRAL WOUND MEMBRANE MODULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the summer of 1996, a pilot-scale demonstration of a surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) process for removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from soils was conducted at Hill Air Force Base in Layton, Utah. Five thousand gallons of the extracted DNAP...

  15. The transport behaviour of elemental mercury DNAPL in saturated porous media: Analysis of field observations and two-phase flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweijen, Thomas; Hartog, Niels; Marsman, Annemieke; Keijzer, Thomas J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Mercury is a contaminant of global concern. The use of elemental mercury in various (former) industrial processes, such as chlorine production at chlor-alkali plants, is known to have resulted in soil and groundwater contaminations worldwide. However, the subsurface transport behaviour of elemental mercury as an immiscible dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in porous media has received minimal attention to date. Even though, such insight would aid in the remediation effort of mercury contaminated sites. Therefore, in this study a detailed field characterization of elemental mercury DNAPL distribution with depth was performed together with two-phase flow modelling, using STOMP. This is to evaluate the dynamics of mercury DNAPL migration and the controls on its distribution in saturated porous media. Using a CPT-probe mounted with a digital camera, in-situ mercury DNAPL depth distribution was obtained at a former chlor-alkali-plant, down to 9 m below ground surface. Images revealing the presence of silvery mercury DNAPL droplets were used to quantify its distribution, characteristics and saturation, using an image analysis method. These field-observations with depth were compared with results from a one-dimensional two-phase flow model simulation for the same transect. Considering the limitations of this approach, simulations reasonably reflected the variability and range of the mercury DNAPL distribution. To further explore the impact of mercury's physical properties in comparison with more common DNAPLs, the migration of mercury and PCE DNAPL in several typical hydrological scenarios was simulated. Comparison of the simulations suggest that mercury's higher density is the overall controlling factor in controlling its penetration in saturated porous media, despite its higher resistance to flow due to its higher viscosity. Based on these results the hazard of spilled mercury DNAPL to cause deep contamination of groundwater systems seems larger than for any other

  16. The transport behaviour of elemental mercury DNAPL in saturated porous media: analysis of field observations and two-phase flow modelling.

    PubMed

    Sweijen, Thomas; Hartog, Niels; Marsman, Annemieke; Keijzer, Thomas J S

    2014-06-01

    Mercury is a contaminant of global concern. The use of elemental mercury in various (former) industrial processes, such as chlorine production at chlor-alkali plants, is known to have resulted in soil and groundwater contaminations worldwide. However, the subsurface transport behaviour of elemental mercury as an immiscible dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in porous media has received minimal attention to date. Even though, such insight would aid in the remediation effort of mercury contaminated sites. Therefore, in this study a detailed field characterization of elemental mercury DNAPL distribution with depth was performed together with two-phase flow modelling, using STOMP. This is to evaluate the dynamics of mercury DNAPL migration and the controls on its distribution in saturated porous media. Using a CPT-probe mounted with a digital camera, in-situ mercury DNAPL depth distribution was obtained at a former chlor-alkali-plant, down to 9 m below ground surface. Images revealing the presence of silvery mercury DNAPL droplets were used to quantify its distribution, characteristics and saturation, using an image analysis method. These field-observations with depth were compared with results from a one-dimensional two-phase flow model simulation for the same transect. Considering the limitations of this approach, simulations reasonably reflected the variability and range of the mercury DNAPL distribution. To further explore the impact of mercury's physical properties in comparison with more common DNAPLs, the migration of mercury and PCE DNAPL in several typical hydrological scenarios was simulated. Comparison of the simulations suggest that mercury's higher density is the overall controlling factor in controlling its penetration in saturated porous media, despite its higher resistance to flow due to its higher viscosity. Based on these results the hazard of spilled mercury DNAPL to cause deep contamination of groundwater systems seems larger than for any other

  17. Impact of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone architecture on mass removal mechanisms in strongly layered heterogeneous porous media during soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charles J; Valocchi, Albert J; Oostrom, Mart

    2008-08-20

    An existing multiphase flow simulator was modified in order to determine the effects of four mechanisms on NAPL mass removal in a strongly layered heterogeneous vadose zone during soil vapor extraction (SVE): a) NAPL flow, b) diffusion and dispersion from low permeability zones, c) slow desorption from sediment grains, and d) rate-limited dissolution of trapped NAPL. The impacts of water and NAPL saturation distribution, NAPL-type (i.e., free, residual, or trapped) distribution, and spatial heterogeneity of the permeability field on these mechanisms were evaluated. Two different initial source zone architectures (one with and one without trapped NAPL) were considered and these architectures were used to evaluate seven different SVE scenarios. For all runs, slow diffusion from low permeability zones that gas flow bypassed was a dominant factor for diminished SVE effectiveness at later times. This effect was more significant at high water saturation due to the decrease of gas-phase relative permeability. Transverse dispersion contributed to fast NAPL mass removal from the low permeability layer in both source zone architectures, but longitudinal dispersion did not affect overall mass removal time. Both slow desorption from sediment grains and rate-limited mass transfer from trapped NAPL only marginally affected removal times. However, mass transfer from trapped NAPL did affect mass removal at later time, as well as the NAPL distribution. NAPL flow from low to high permeability zones contributed to faster mass removal from the low permeability layer, and this effect increased when water infiltration was eliminated. These simulations indicate that if trapped NAPL exists in heterogeneous porous media, mass transfer can be improved by delivering gas directly to zones with trapped NAPL and by lowering the water content, which increases the gas relative permeability and changes trapped NAPL to free NAPL.

  18. Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) Removal from Fractured Rock using Thermal Conductive Heating (TCH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    or karst . As control of water inflow may be problematic in fractured media and karst , and capture of contaminants may be difficult, effectiveness is...fractured media and karst , and capture of contaminants may be difficult, effectiveness is expected to be limited in these settings. If water inflow...conductive heating below the water table… As control of water inflow may be problematic in fractured media and karst , and capture of contaminants may be

  19. Removal of Endobronchial Malignant Mass by Cryotherapy Improved Performance Status to Receive Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Heng; Wang, Tsai-Yu; Yu, Chih-Teng; Chou, Chun-Liang; Lin, Shu-Min; Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Chung, Fu-Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Although malignant endobronchial mass (MEM) has poor prognosis, cryotherapy is reportedly a palliative treatment. Clinical data on postcryotherapy MEM patients in a university-affiliated hospital between 2007 and 2011 were evaluated. Survival curve with or without postcryotherapy chemotherapy and performance status (PS) improvement of these subjects were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. There were 59 patients (42 males), with median age of 64 years (range, 51–76, and median performance status of 2 (interquartile range [IQR], 2-3). Postcryotherapy complications included minor bleeding (n = 12) and need for multiple procedures (n = 10), while outcomes were relief of symptoms (n = 51), improved PS (n = 45), and ability to receive chemotherapy (n = 40). The survival of patients with chemotherapy postcryotherapy was longer than that of patients without such chemotherapy (median, 534 versus 106 days; log-rank test, P = 0.007; hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.10–0.69). The survival of patients with PS improvement postcryotherapy was longer than that of patients without PS improvement (median, 406 versus 106 days; log-rank test, P = 0.02; hazard ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.10–0.81). Cryotherapy is a feasible treatment for MEM. With better PS after cryotherapy, further chemotherapy becomes possible for patients to improve survival when MEM caused dyspnea and poor PS. PMID:25383370

  20. Normalization Approaches for Removing Systematic Biases Associated with Mass Spectrometry and Label-Free Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Barry, Richard C.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Johnson, Ethan T.; Qian, Weijun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-02-01

    Central tendency, linear regression, locally weighted regression, and quantile techniques were investigated for normalization of peptide abundance measurements obtained from high-throughput liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR MS). Arbitrary abundances of peptides were obtained from three sample sets, including a standard protein sample, two Deinococcus radiodurans samples taken from different growth phases, and two mouse striatum samples from control and methamphetamine-stressed mice (strain C57BL/6). The selected normalization techniques were evaluated in both the absence and presence of biological variability by estimating extraneous variability prior to and following normalization. Prior to normalization, replicate runs from each sample set were observed to be statistically different, while following normalization replicate runs were no longer statistically different. Although all techniques reduced systematic bias, assigned ranks among the techniques revealed significant trends. For most LC-FTICR MS analyses, linear regression normalization ranked either first or second among the four techniques, suggesting that this technique was more generally suitable for reducing systematic biases.

  1. A Steady-State Mass Transfer Model of Removing CPAs from Cryopreserved Blood with Hollow Fiber Modules

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Weiping; Zhou, Xiaoming; Heimfeld, Shelly; Reems, Jo-Anna; Gao, Dayong

    2010-01-01

    Hollow fiber modules are commonly used to conveniently and efficiently remove cryoprotective agents (CPAs) from cryopreserved cell suspensions. In this paper, a steady-state model coupling mass transfers across cell and hollow fiber membranes is theoretically developed to evaluate the removal of CPAs from cryopreserved blood using hollow fiber modules. This steady-state model complements the unsteady-state model which was presented in our previous study. As the steady-state model, unlike the unsteady-state model, can be used to evaluate the effect of ultrafiltration flow rates on the clearance of CPAs. The steady-state model is validated by experimental results and then is compared with the unsteady-state model. Using the steady-state model, the effects of ultrafiltration flow rates, NaCl concentrations in dialysate, blood flow rates and dialysate flow rates on CPA concentration variation and cell volume response are investigated in detail. According to the simulative results, the osmotic damage of red blood cells (RBCs) can easily be reduced by increasing ultrafiltration flow rates, increasing NaCl concentrations in dialysate, increasing blood flow rates or decreasing dialysate flow rates. PMID:20524740

  2. Carbon mass balance and microbial ecology in a laboratory scale reactor achieving simultaneous sludge reduction and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei; Li, Liang; Kotay, Shireen Meher; Goel, Ramesh

    2014-04-15

    Solids reduction in activated sludge processes (ASP) at source using process manipulation has been researched widely over the last two-decades. However, the absence of nutrient removal component, lack of understanding on the organic carbon, and limited information on key microbial community in solids minimizing ASP preclude the widespread acceptance of sludge minimizing processes. In this manuscript, we report simultaneous solids reduction through anaerobiosis along with nitrogen and phosphorus removals. The manuscript also reports carbon mass balance using stable isotope of carbon, microbial ecology of nitrifiers and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Two laboratory scale reactors were operated in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic (A(2)O) mode. One reactor was run in the standard mode (hereafter called the control-SBR) simulating conventional A(2)O type of activated sludge process and the second reactor was run in the sludge minimizing mode (called the modified-SBR). Unlike other research efforts where the sludge minimizing reactor was maintained at nearly infinite solids retention time (SRT). To sustain the efficient nutrient removal, the modified-SBR in this research was operated at a very small solids yield rather than at infinite SRT. Both reactors showed consistent NH3-N, phosphorus and COD removals over a period of 263 days. Both reactors also showed active denitrification during the anoxic phase even if there was no organic carbon source available during this phase, suggesting the presence of denitrifying PAOs (DNPAOs). The observed solids yield in the modified-SBR was 60% less than the observed solids yield in the control-SBR. Specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) for the modified-SBR was almost 44% more than the control-SBR under identical feeding conditions, but was nearly the same for both reactors under fasting conditions. The modified-SBR showed greater diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and PAOs compared to the control-SBR. The diversity of PAOs

  3. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Bradford; Stephen Holbrook; Scott B. Smithson

    2004-12-09

    The focus of this project is direct detection of DNAPL's specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from multi-fold surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine state-of-the-art GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects.

  4. Extension and field application of an integrated DNAPL source identification algorithm that utilizes stochastic modeling and a Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokou, Zoi; Pinder, George F.

    2011-02-01

    SummaryThe design of an effective groundwater remediation system involves the determination of the source zone characteristics and subsequent source zone removal. The work presented in this paper focuses on the three-dimensional extension and field application of a previously described source zone identification and delineation algorithm. The three-dimensional search algorithm defines how to achieve an acceptable level of accuracy regarding the strength, geographic location and depth of a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source while using the least possible number of water quality samples. Target locations and depths of potential sources are identified and given initial importance measures or weights using a technique that exploits expert knowledge. The weights reflect the expert's confidence that the particular source location is the correct one and they are updated as the investigation proceeds. The overall strategy uses stochastic groundwater flow and transport modeling assuming that hydraulic conductivity is known with uncertainty (Monte Carlo approach). Optimal water quality samples are selected according to the degree to which they contribute to the total concentration uncertainty reduction across all model layers and the proximity of the samples to the potential source locations. After a sample is taken, the contaminant concentration plume is updated using a Kalman filter. The set of optimal source strengths is determined using linear programming by minimizing the sum of the absolute differences between modeled and measured concentration values at sampling locations. The Monte Carlo generated suite of plumes emanating from each individual source is calculated and compared with the updated plume. The scores obtained from this comparison serve to update the weights initially assigned by the expert, and the above steps are repeated until the optimal source characteristics are determined. The algorithm's effectiveness is demonstrated by performing a

  5. A miniaturised electron ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer that uses a unique helium ion removal pulsing technique specifically for gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Jiang; Huang, Zhengxu; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Hui; Tan, Guobin; Gao, Wei; Yang, Peng-yuan

    2013-06-21

    A miniaturised reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with an electron ionisation ion source has been developed for the analysis of gases. An entirely new helium ion removal pulsing technique in this mass spectrometer is used to achieve an improved performance for the first time. The helium carrier gas, which enters into the source along with the gaseous sample, is simultaneously ionised and then orthogonally introduced into the time-of-fight mass analyser. Once the relatively light helium ions in the ion packet become extremely close to the reflectron plate (B-plate for short in this article), a modulated pulse is instantaneously applied on the B-plate and a negative reflectron voltage is set to the B-plate and lasts for a very short period, during which all the helium ions are directly bumped into the B-plate and subsequently removed. The helium ion removal pulsing technique can efficiently avoid saturation of the micro-channel plate caused by too many helium ions. A compact and durable instrument is designed, which has a mass resolving resolution greater than 400 FWHM for online gas analysis. The technology may also be further developed to remove other ions for TOF mass spectrometry.

  6. 3D Self-Potential Inversion for Monitoring DNAPL Contaminant Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, B. J.; Sogade, J.; Vichabian, Y.; Morgan, F. D.

    2005-05-01

    Self-potential (SP) data are collected over an area known to be contaminated with Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The field experiment consists of approximately 100 SP measurements on a surface grid and in four boreholes, and is repeated after one year. DNAPLs are known to undergo redox reactions during their degradation in the environment, which is often biologically mediated. Self-potential geophysics is employed in this study because of its sensitivity to the in-situ biochemical processes that degrade the contaminants. These reactions provide an electrochemical source that is manifested as an SP signature at the measurement locations remote from the contaminated areas. 3D inversion of the SP data is therefore needed to spatially locate the distribution of sources, which is related to contaminant presence. The inversion incorporates the 3D resistivity structure collected at the same site, and is better constrained in depth by using borehole data and regularization. Ground truth information taken after the first field experiment provides concentration data with depth for several DNAPL species in five boreholes. There is a good correlation between the ground truth data and SP source inversion, though this comparison is limited by several factors: the difference in resolution of the ground truth and inverted data, and the dependence of the redox processes on other constituents that were not measured during the ground truthing, such as oxygen content or microbial presence. Inversion of the second year's dataset provides information on the changes in the contaminant distribution, either due to natural degradation or ongoing remediation.

  7. DNAPL Source Zone Depletion During In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO): Experimental and Modeling Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    16 pp., http://gwtf.cluin.org/docs/options/dnapl_goals_paper.pdf. USHHS. (2002). “Report on Carcinogens , Tenth Edition” U.S. Department of Health...Report on Carcinogens , Tenth Edition. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Toxicology Program, December 2002...intermediate-scale 2D tank was constructed (L x W x H = 243.5cm x 8.0cm x 45.5cm) of clear acrylic, with 1.5mm diameter sampling ports (sealed with rubber

  8. Engineered Natural Geosorbents for In Situ Immobilization of DNAPLs and Heavy Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Walter J. Weber; Gordon M. Fair; Earnest Boyce

    2006-12-01

    Extensive subsurface contamination by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) organic solvents and heavy metals is common place at many DOE facilities. Poor performances and excessive costs have made traditional technologies and approaches less than satisfactory for remediation of such sites. It is increasingly apparent that marginal improvements in conventional methods and approaches will not suffice for clean up of many contaminated DOE sites. Innovative approaches using new and/or existing technologies in more efficient and cost-effective ways are thus urgently required.

  9. Analysis of urinary metabolic signatures of early hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after surgical removal using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guozhu; Zhu, Bin; Yao, Zhenzhen; Yin, Peiyuan; Lu, Xin; Kong, Hongwei; Fan, Fei; Jiao, Binghua; Xu, Guowang

    2012-08-03

    The objective of present study was to offer insights into the metabolic responses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to surgical resection and the metabolic signatures latent in early HCC recurrence (one year after operation). Urinary metabolic profiling employing gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) was utilized to investigate the complex physiopathologic regulations in HCC after operational intervention. It was revealed that an intricate series of metabolic regulations including energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, nucleoside metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, gut floral metabolism, etc., principally leading to the direction of biomass synthesis, could be observed after tumor surgical removal. Moreover, metabolic differences between recurrent and nonrecurrent patients had emerged 7 days after initial operation. The metabolic signatures of HCC recurrence principally comprised notable up-regulations of lactate excretion, succinate production, purine and pyrimidine nucleosides turnover, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, aromatic amino acid turnover, cysteine and methionine metabolism, and glyoxylate metabolism, similar to metabolic behaviors of HCC burden. Sixteen metabolites were found to be significantly increased in the recurrent patients compared with those in nonrecurrent patients and healthy controls. Five metabolites (ethanolamine, lactic acid, acotinic acid, phenylalanine and ribose) were further defined; they were favorable to the prediction of early recurrence.

  10. High-field FT-ICR mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy to characterize DOM removal through a nanofiltration pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Francisco, Nuria; Harir, Mourad; Lucio, Marianna; Ribera, Gemma; Martínez-Lladó, Xavier; Rovira, Miquel; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philipe; Hertkorn, Norbert; Caixach, Josep

    2014-12-15

    Ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were combined to evaluate the molecular changes of dissolved organic matter (DOM) through an ultrafiltration-nanofiltration (UF-NF) pilot plant, using two dissimilar NF membranes tested in parallel. The sampling was performed on seven key locations within the pilot plant: pretreated water, UF effluent, UF effluent after addition of reagents, permeate NF 1, permeate NF 2, brine NF 1 and brine NF 2, during two sampling campaigns. The study showed that there is no significant change in the nature of DOM at molecular level, when the water was treated with UF and/or with the addition of sodium metabisulfite and antiscaling agents. However, enormous decrease of DOM concentration was observed when the water was treated on the NF membranes. The NF process preferentially removed compounds with higher oxygen and nitrogen content (more hydrophilic compounds), whereas molecules with longer pure aliphatic chains and less content of oxygen were the ones capable of passing through the membranes. Moreover, slight molecular selectivity between the two NF membranes was also observed.

  11. Changes in concentrations of a TCE plume in near- stream zones of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    A field investigation of a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume originating at an industrial complex and its discharges to a stream nearby showed that apparent plume attenuation occurred in the near-stream zone of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream prior to discharging to the stream. The concentrations of TCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in groundwater, hyporheic water, stream water and streambed, and hydrogeology were characterized using mini-piezometers, monitoring wells, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys, and soil coring. In the near stream zones temporal and spatial TCE plume concentration changes and mass fluxes were investigated along the flowpath of groundwater discharging to the stream. It is evident that observed concentrations of contaminants (TCE and cis-DCE) were reduced in the near-stream zone, resulting that TCE and cis-DCE were not detected in the streambed and stream water. Ground GPR surveys done in the near stream zone found that wire and water treatment pipe conduits were buried under the ground next to the stream, which could lead groundwater flow field distortion in this zone. At streambed, the GPR survey and soil coring indicated the presence of low permeable zones consisting of rotten material deposits at the top of 0.3 m ~ 0.8 m underlain by silty sands. These hydrogeological features can also attribute to no detection of contaminants in the streambed and stream water because low permeable zone is an obstacle to effective interactions between groundwater and stream water. More investigations will be carried out for comprehensive understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical processes associated with TCE plume attenuation in near stream zones and streambed in the site.

  12. Combining Experiments and Simulation of Gas Absorption for Teaching Mass Transfer Fundamentals: Removing CO2 from Air Using Water and NaOH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, William M.; Jackson, Yaminah Z.; Morin, Michael T.; Ferraro, Giacomo P.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and computer models for studying the mass transfer process of removing CO2 from air using water or dilute NaOH solution as absorbent are presented. Models tie experiment to theory and give a visual representation of concentration profiles and also illustrate the two-film theory and the relative importance of various…

  13. Demonstration of ISCO Treatment of a DNAPL Source Zone at Launch Complex 34 in Cape Canaveral Air Station, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency DNAPL Consortium (IDC) was formally established in 1999 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration as a vehicle for marshalling the resourc...

  14. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detections of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, John; Smithson, Scott B.; Holbrook, W. Stephen

    2004-06-14

    The focus of our work is direct detection of DNAPLs, specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine sophisticated GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects. Implementation and verification of these methodologies will be a significant advance in GPR research and in meeting DOE's need for reliable in-situ characterization of DNAPL contamination. Chlorinated solvents have much lower electric permittivity and conductivity than water. An electrical property contrast is induced when solvents displace water in the sediment column resulting in an anomalous GPR signature. To directly identify zones of DNAPL contamination, we focus on three aspects of reflected wave behavior--propagation velocity, frequency dependent attenuation, and amplitude variation with offset (AVO). Velocity analysis provides a direct estimate of electric permittivity, attenuation analysis provides a measure of conductivity, and AVO behavior is used to estimate the permittivity ratio at a reflecting boundary. Areas of anomalously low electric permittivity and conductivity are identified as potential DNAPL rich zones. Preliminary work illustrated significant potential for quantitative direct detection methodologies in identifying shallow DNAPL source zones. It is now necessary to verify these methodologies in a field setting. To this end, the project is field oriented and has three primary objectives: (1) Develop a suite of methodologies for direct detection of DNAPLs from surface GPR data (2) Controlled field verification at well characterized, contaminated sites (3

  15. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, John; Smithson, Scott B.; Holbrook, W. Stephen

    2003-06-01

    The focus of our work is direct detection of DNAPLs, specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine sophisticated GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects. Implementation and verification of these methodologies will be a significant advance in GPR research and in meeting DOE's need for reliable in-situ characterization of DNAPL contamination. Chlorinated solvents have much lower electric permittivity and conductivity than water. An electrical property contrast is induced when solvents displace water in the sediment column resulting in an anomalous GPR signature. To directly identify zones of DNAPL contamination, we focus on three aspects of reflected wave behavior--propagation velocity, frequency dependent attenuation, and amplitude variation with offset (AVO). Velocity analysis provides a direct estimate of electric permittivity, attenuation analysis provides a measure of conductivity, and AVO behavior is used to estimate the permittivity ratio at a reflecting boundary. Areas of anomalously low electric permittivity and conductivity are identified as potential DNAPL rich zones. Preliminary work illustrated significant potential for quantitative direct detection methodologies in identifying shallow DNAPL source zones. It is now necessary to verify these methodologies in a field setting. To this end, the project is field oriented and has three primary objectives: (1) Develop a suite of methodologies for direct detection of DNAPLs from surface GPR data (2) Controlled field verification at well characterized, contaminated sites (3

  16. Dip-angle influence on areal DNAPL recovery by co-solvent flooding with and without pre-flooding.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Glen R; Li, Minghua; Husserl, Johana; Ocampo-Gómez, Ana M

    2006-01-10

    A two-dimensional (2D) laboratory model was used to study effects of gravity on areal recovery of a representative dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant by an alcohol pre-flood and co-solvent flood in dipping aquifers. Recent studies have demonstrated that injection of alcohol and co-solvent solutions can be used to reduce in-situ the density of DNAPL globules and displace the contaminant from the source zone. However, contact with aqueous alcohol reduces interfacial tension and causes DNAPL swelling, thus facilitating risk of uncontrolled downward DNAPL migration. The 2D laboratory model was operated with constant background gradient flow and a DNAPL spill was simulated using tetrachloroethene (PCE). The spill was dispersed to a trapped, immobile PCE saturation by a water flood. Areal PCE recovery was studied using a double-triangle well pattern to simulate a remediation scheme consisting of an alcohol pre-flood using aqueous isobutanol ( approximately 10% vol.) followed by a co-solvent flood using a solution of ethylene glycol (65%) and 1-propanol (35%). Experiments were conducted with the 2D model oriented in the horizontal plane and compared to experiments at the 15 degrees and 30 degrees dip-angle orientations. Injection was applied either in the downward or upward direction of flow. Experimental results were compared to theoretical predictions for flood front stability and used to evaluate effects of gravity on areal PCE recovery. Sensitivity experiments were performed to evaluate effects of the alcohol pre-flood on PCE areal recovery. For experiments conducted with the alcohol pre-flood and the 2D model oriented in the horizontal plane, results indicate that 89-93% of source zone PCE was recovered. With injection oriented downward, results indicate that areal PCE recovery was 70-77% for a 15 degrees dip angle and 57-59% for a 30 degrees dip angle. With injection oriented upward, results indicate that areal PCE recovery was 57-60% at the 30

  17. Application of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry to the assessment of odorant removal in a biological air cleaner for pig production.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael J; Liu, Dezhao; Guldberg, Lise Bonne; Feilberg, Anders

    2012-03-14

    There is an urgent need to develop odor reduction technologies for animal production facilities, and this requires a reliable measurement technique for estimating the removal of odorants. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate the application of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for continuous measurements at a biofilter from SKOV A/S installed at a pig production facility. PTR-MS was able to handle the harsh conditions with high humidity and dust load in a biofilter and provide reliable data for the removal of odorants, including the highly odorous sulfur compounds. The biofilter removed 80-99% of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, phenols, and indoles and ca. 75% of hydrogen sulfide. However, only ~0-15% of methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide was removed. In conclusion, PTR-MS is a promising tool that can be used to improve the development of biological air cleaning and other odor reduction technologies toward significant odorants.

  18. Assessment of trace organic chemical removal by a membrane bioreactor using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and a yeast screen bioassay.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather M; Troester, Martin; Khan, Stuart J; McDonald, James A; Watkins, Graeme; Stuetz, Richard M

    2009-12-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) was assessed for the removal of estrogens, androgens, and a selection of pharmaceuticals and personal care products. The biomass and aqueous components of the MBR were investigated to determine whether removal was by biodegradation or by adsorption to the biomass. Removal was monitored using chemical analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as biological analysis using estrogenic and androgenic yeast assays. Results showed that the MBR was effective in removing the compounds of concern from raw influent with removal rates between 78 and 99%. Removal efficiencies were comparable or better than those reported for conventional activated sludge systems, which was attributed to the relatively high sludge retention time of the MBR. The biomass component showed significant concentrations of salicylic acid, triclosan, and 4-tert-octylphenol. Estrogenic and androgenic activity was also measured in the biomass. Estrone was identified as the main compound responsible for the estrogenic activity. It was concluded that the main removal pathway was biodegradation, but sorption to biomass may also be important, particularly for triclosan and 4-tert-octylphenol.

  19. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability.

  20. Containment and restoration technology development for DNAPL in fractured bedrock (an overview of the Smithville Phase IV Program)

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Currently, no proven technology exists for containing and restoring fractured carbonate bedrock environments that have been contaminated by Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs). Over the past decade Canada`s Orphan Sites Program and the US Superfund Program have spent billions of dollars on site restoration and yet not one DNAPL site has ever been successfully cleaned-up. Current research and technology development efforts are generally less than five years old and have focused on porous media research. Fractured media flow and contaminant transport are recognized as much more complex issues, but have received comparatively little attention. It is estimated that there are hundreds of fractured rock DNAPL contaminated sites in Canada and the United States. The Smithville Phase IV Bedrock Remediation Program was established to contain and remediate a DNAPL spill site in a carbonate bedrock aquifer located in the Niagara region, Canada. The program recognizes the need to develop new technical solutions and is doing this through site specific investigations, laboratory studies, modelling and pilot scale tests of promising containment and restoration technologies. An innovative management structure has been established to direct the final stage of this project through an agreement of common interest with all former stakeholders. This independent Board`s directive is to contain and remediate the DNAPL remaining in the ground beneath and adjacent to the site and to form partnerships with world-renowned scientists and researchers to develop and implement leading edge technology. This paper provides an overview of the challenges, plans and accomplishments of the Smithville remediation project. The innovative management approach applied at the site has reduced bureaucracy and costs and has promoted partnership and consortia arrangements that are now being realized for site funding.

  1. The efficiency evaluation of in situ remediation performed around the source zone of DNAPL contaminated site, Wonju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    The location of DNAPL source and distribution of contaminant plume at an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea, was examined based on the combined results of seasonal impact analysis, historical approach, radon tracer approach, and chemical fingerprinting conducted from 2009 to 2013 (Yang et al., 2013). With regard to the amount of contaminants discharged at this study site, there is no exact information on disposal. Therefore, various remediation technologies such as soil vapor extraction, soil flushing, biostimulation, and pump-and-treatment have been performed to eliminate the contaminant sources of trichloroethylene (TCE) and to prevent the migration of TCE plume from remediation target zones. Also, dissolved TCE concentration and mass of residual TCE in the initial stage of disposal were estimated to evaluate the efficiency of in situ remediation. The remediation efficiency according to the remediation actions was evaluated by tracing a time-series of plume evolution and estimating the temporal mass discharge at three transects (Source, Transec-1, Transect-2) which was assigned along the groundwater flow path. From results of periodically monitored TCE concentration at main source zone, the TCE level (15.74 mg/L) before the remediation dramatically decreased up to 0.56 mg/L at the end of year 2012 due to the effect of remediation. During the intensive remediation period from 2012 to 2013, the early average mass discharge (26.58 g/day) at source transect was decreased to average 4.99 g/day. Especially, in case of surfactant flushing test which was conducted to eliminate the residual TCE, the efficiency of surfactant flushing test was evaluated using the recovery rate of chloride ion which was used as tracer. The results for recovery rate of chloride ion show that test wells observed the slow recovery rate represented more effective dissolution of TCE than wells showing the rapid recovery rate. By using the source zone monitoring data and analytical solution, initial

  2. The Use of Molecular and Genomic Techniques Applied to Microbial Diversity, Community Structure, and Activities at DNAPL and Metal Contaminated Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of in situ subsurface remediation strategies have been developed to mitigate contamination by chlorinated solvent dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) and metals. Geochemical methods include: zerovalent iron emplacement, various electrolytic applications, elec...

  3. Stochastic Approach for Modeling of DNAPL Migration in Heterogeneous Aquifers: Model Development and Experimental Data Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. W.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Turner, A.; Russell, T. F.

    2004-12-01

    Modeling of the complex behavior of DNAPLs in naturally heterogeneous subsurface formations poses many challenges. Even though considerable progress have been made in developing improved numerical schemes to solve the governing partial differential equations, most of these methods still rely on deterministic description of the processes. This research explores the use of stochastic differential equations to model multiphase flow in heterogeneous aquifers, specifically the flow of DNAPLs in saturated soils. The models developed are evaluated using experimental data generated in two-dimensional test systems. A fundamental assumption used in the model formulation is that the movement of a fluid particle in each phase is described by a stochastic process and that the positions of all fluid particles over time are governed by a specific law. It is this law, which we seek to determine. The approach results in a nonlinear stochastic differential equation describing the position of the non-wetting phase fluid particle. The nonlinearity in the stochastic differential equation arises because both the drift and diffusion coefficients depend on the volumetric fraction of the phase, which in turn depends on the position of the fluid particles in the problem domain. The concept of a fluid particle is central to the development of the proposed model. Expressions for both saturation and volumetric fraction are developed using this concept of fluid particle. Darcy's law and the continuity equation are used to derive a Fokker-Planck equation governing flow. The Ito calculus is then applied to derive a stochastic differential equation(SDE) for the non-wetting phase. This SDE has both drift and diffusion terms which depend on the volumetric fraction of the non-wetting phase. Standard stochastic theories based on the Ito calculus and the Wiener process and the equivalent Fokker-Planck PDE's are typically used to model diffusion processes. However, these models, in their usual form

  4. Improved isotope ratio measurement performance in liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry by removing excess oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hettmann, Elena; Brand, Willi A; Gleixner, Gerd

    2007-01-01

    A low dead volume oxygen scrubbing system was introduced in a commercially available liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) interface to enhance the analytical capability of the system. In the LC/IRMS interface carbon from organic samples is converted into CO(2) inside the mobile phase by wet chemical oxidation using peroxodisulfate (Na(2)S(2)O(8)). After passing the hot reaction zone, surplus oxygen (O(2)) remains dissolved in the liquid phase. Both CO(2) and O(2) diffuse through a transfer membrane into the helium carrier and are transferred to the mass spectrometer. The presence of O(2) in the ion source may have detrimental effects on measurement accuracy and precision as well as on filament lifetime. As a remedy, a new on-line O(2)-removing device has been incorporated into the system. The new O(2) scrubber consists of two parallel hot copper reduction reactors (0.8 mm i.d., active length 120 mm) and a switch-over valve between them. One reactor is regenerated using He/H(2) while the other is actively scavenging O(2) from the gas stream. The capacity of each reduction reactor, expressed as usage time, is between 40 and 50 min. This is sufficient for a single LC run for sugars and organic acids. A further increase of the reduction capacity is accompanied by a peak broadening of about 100%. After switching to a freshly reduced reactor the oxygen background and the delta(13)C values of the reference gas need up to 500 s to stabilize. For repeated injections the delta(13)C values of sucrose remain constant (+/-0.1 per thousand) for about 3000 s. The long-term stability for measurements of sucrose was 0.11 per thousand without the reduction oven and improved slightly to 0.08 per thousand with the reduction oven. The filament lifetime improved by more than 600%, thereby improving the long-term system stability and analytical efficiency. In addition the costs per analysis were reduced considerably.

  5. SATURATION MEASUREMENT OF IMMISCIBLE FLUIDS IN 2-D STATIC SYSTEMS: VALIDATION BY LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION (SAN FRANCISCO, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is a part of an ongoing research project that aims at assessing the environmental benefits of DNAPL removal. The laboratory part of the research project is to examine the functional relationship between DNAPL architecture, mass removal and contaminant mass flux in 2-D ...

  6. Quantitative assessment of electrical resistivity tomography for monitoring DNAPLs migration - Comparison with high-resolution light transmission visualization in laboratory sandbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yaping; Shi, Xiaoqing; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Wu, Jichun; Revil, André

    2017-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) migration and distribution is essential for the decision of an effective remediation strategy. Light transmission visualization (LTV) has shown its accuracy and efficiency for measuring DNAPLs saturation and water content in the laboratory, but it cannot be implemented in three dimensional sandbox or field-scale sites. Recently developed electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been applied in monitoring the migration and distribution of DNAPLs in bench- and field-scale studies. However, the evaluation of the ability of ERT for monitoring DNAPLs migration by a direct comparison of ERT with high-resolution techniques such as LTV within an experimental system is still lacking. Two sandbox experiments with different permeability conditions are conducted to quantitatively assess the capability of ERT for monitoring the DNAPLs migration. During the injections, LTV method is used to visualize the DNAPLs migration and provide high-resolution saturation data while ERT method is applied to capture the change of resistivity. The results from the comparison between LTV and ERT methods show that ERT is successful in detecting the accumulation and flow bypassing phenomenon around the low-permeability lenses, as well as the penetration through the high-permeability lenses. There is a fair correlation between the resistivity and saturation with overall correlation coefficients above 0.6, except at last stage. However, using classical regularization techniques (based on smoothness), the area of DNAPLs plume determined by ERT is commonly overestimated. Compared to the plume around the low-permeability lenses, the plume around the high-permeability lenses estimated by ERT is more extensive due to larger resistivity contrasts. In addition, ERT measurements indicate that the resistivity increase caused by the low-saturation DNAPLs is not apparent enough, which is likely to be covered up under the changing

  7. [Analysis of rice leaves proteomes by liquid chromatography-tandem, mass spectrometry based on the purification using a novel affinity detergent removal spin column].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolin; Gong, Jiadi; Chen, Mingxue; Yu, Shasha; Bian, Yingfang; Cao, Zhaoyun

    2014-11-01

    A purification method was established for the analysis of proteomes in rice leaves based on a novel detergent removal spin column (DRSC). The proteins were extracted by phenol protein extraction method followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) lysis. The lysate was purified by the detergent removal spin column and the enzymolytic peptides were detected by the nanoflow liquid chromatography-hybrid linear trap quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometry (nanoLC-LTQ/Orbitrap). In terms of SDS removal efficiencies and protein identification, the method of DRSC was compared with those of filter aided sample preparation (FASP) and acetone precipitation. As a result, there were good efficiencies ( > 95%) of SDS removal for the three methods. With the DRSC purification strategy, 563 proteins were identified from rice leaves, while only 196 and 306 proteins were identified by FASP and acetone precipitation procedures respectively, in spite of certain complementarities among these identified proteins by the three methods. DRSC is suitable for proteins with various relative molecular masses and pI values. However, there were similar losses of proteins with different relative molecular masses and pI values with the other two methods. Using the established method, 588 proteins were identified by once injection analysis. According to the molecular functions, 296 proteins with at least two identified peptides can be classified into eight categories with binding activity, enzyme activity, transporter activity, inhibitor activity, structural constitute, catalytic activity, other and unknown functions. The method provides technical reference for conducting rice proteomes.

  8. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  9. Removal of ordering ambiguity for a class of position dependent mass quantum systems with an application to the quadratic Liénard type nonlinear oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Chithiika Ruby, V.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.; Chandrasekar, V. K.

    2015-01-15

    We consider the problem of removal of ordering ambiguity in position dependent mass quantum systems characterized by a generalized position dependent mass Hamiltonian which generalizes a number of Hermitian as well as non-Hermitian ordered forms of the Hamiltonian. We implement point canonical transformation method to map one-dimensional time-independent position dependent mass Schrödinger equation endowed with potentials onto constant mass counterparts which are considered to be exactly solvable. We observe that a class of mass functions and the corresponding potentials give rise to solutions that do not depend on any particular ordering, leading to the removal of ambiguity in it. In this case, it is imperative that the ordering is Hermitian. For non-Hermitian ordering, we show that the class of systems can also be exactly solvable and is also shown to be iso-spectral using suitable similarity transformations. We also discuss the normalization of the eigenfunctions obtained from both Hermitian and non-Hermitian orderings. We illustrate the technique with the quadratic Liénard type nonlinear oscillators, which admit position dependent mass Hamiltonians.

  10. Biological degradation of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ensley, B.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1996-08-01

    In situ bioremediation is a very attractive, safe and efficient method of not only removing, but eliminating hazardous compounds from the environment. However, the quickest and most efficient method of restoring a hazardous waste site would be to link several remediation processes. In situ biodegradation can involve the addition of nutrients, oxygen, electron donors, electron acceptors, organisms or all the above. These amendments can be introduced and coupled to a variety of other technologies such as permeability enhancements, chemical treatments and/or physical processes. In addition to in situ technologies, bioremediation in bioreactors is an efficient tool facilitating mineralization of contaminants. Overall, biodegradation has a significant potential to increase the rate of site restoration and decrease overall costs. 37 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Nitrate removal under different ecological remediation measures in Taihu Lake: a 15N mass-balance approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Li, Zhengkui; Zhang, Wanguang

    2014-12-01

    Ecological remediation is an important measure for the protection of lake water quality in removing nutrients, such as nitrate (NO3 (-)). In this study, four bioremediation processes (bare sediment, immobilized nitrogen cycling bacteria (INCB) added, Elodea nuttallii added, E. nuttallii-INCB assemblage) were operated at a lab to elucidate the effect of macrophyte appearance and INCB addition on NO3 (-) removal and achieve the optimal processes for biomediation. (15) N-NO3 solution was added to microcosms to identify the key nitrogen transformation processes responsible for NO3 (-) removal. Results showed that nitrate removal was significantly enhanced after the addition of INCB and E. nuttallii. In the treatments with INCB added, E. nuttallii added, and INCB and E. nuttallii-INCB assemblage, nitrate removal ratio achieved 94.74, 98.76, and 99.15 %, respectively. In contrast, only 23.47 % added nitrate was removed in the control. Plant uptake and denitrification played an important role in nitrogen removal. The water quality was substantially improved by the addition of INCB and macrophyte that can accelerate denitrification and promote nitrogen assimilation of plants. The results indicated that plant uptake and microbial denitrification were key processes for nitrate removal.

  12. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for Task 4 site evaluation, Task 5 seismic reflection design and acquisition, and Task 6 seismic reflection processing and interpretation on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. During this reporting period the project had an ASME peer review. The findings and recommendation of the review panel, as well at the project team response to comments, are in Appendix A. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM and the peer review it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. Under the rescope of the project, Task 4 would be performed at the Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Charleston, SC and not at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) project at SRS. The project team had already completed Task 4 at the M-area seepage basin, only a few hundred yards away from the DUS site. Because the geology is the same, Task 4 was not necessary. However, a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) was conducted in one well to calibrate the geology to the seismic data. The first deployment to the DUS Site (Tasks 5 and 6) has been completed. Once the steam has been turned off these tasks will be performed again to compare the results to the pre-steam data. The results from the first deployment to the DUS site indicated a seismic amplitude anomaly at the location and depths of the known high concentrations of DNAPL. The deployment to another site with different geologic conditions was supposed to occur during this reporting period. The first site selected was DOE Paducah, Kentucky. After almost eight months of negotiation, site access was denied requiring the selection of another site

  13. Ultrasonic properties of granular media saturated with DNAPL/water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo-Franklin, J. B.; Geller, J. T.; Harris, J. M.

    2007-04-01

    We present the results of four experiments investigating the ultrasonic properties of granular materials partially saturated with trichloroethylene (TCE), a dense non-aqueous contaminant. P-wave velocity measurements were made under in situ effective stress conditions using a pulse transmission cell at ~250 kHz. Two synthetic samples and two natural aquifer cores were fully saturated with water and then subjected to an axial injection of TCE. The resulting measurements show reductions in P-wave velocity of up to 15% due to contaminant saturation. A theoretical model combining Gassmann fluid substitution and Hill's equation was used to estimate the effects of DNAPL saturation; this model underpredicted observed reductions in velocity at high TCE saturations. A linear relationship, expressed in terms of volumetric contaminant fraction, provided an excellent empirical fit to the laboratory measurements.

  14. Hydraulic fracturing to enhance the remediation of DNAPL in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, L.; Slack, B.

    1996-08-01

    Meager rates of fluid flow are a major obstacle to in situ remediation of low permeability soils. This paper describes methods designed to avoid that obstacle by creating fractures and filling them with sand to increase well discharge and change paths of fluid flow in soil. Gently dipping fractures 10 m in maximum dimension and 1 to 2 cm thick can be created in some contaminated soils at depths of a few in or greater. Hydraulic fractures can also be used to create electrically conductive layers or to deliver granules of chemically or biologically active compounds that will degrade contaminants in place. Benefits of applying hydraulic fractures to DNAPL recovery include rates of fluid recovery, enhancing upward gradients to improve hydrodynamic stabilization, forming flat-lying reactive curtains to intersect compounds moving downward, or improving the performance of electrokinetics intended to recover compounds dissolved in water. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate oxidation of coal tar DNAPLs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Libin; Wang, Li; Hu, Xingting; Wu, Peihui; Wang, Xueqing; Huang, Chumei; Wang, Xiangyang; Deng, Dayi

    2016-11-15

    The feasibility of ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate for effective oxidation of twenty 2-6 ringed coal tar PAHs in a biphasic tar/water system and a triphasic tar/soil/water system were investigated and established. The results indicate that ultrasonic assistance, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature are all required to achieve effective oxidation of coal tar PAHs, while the heating needed can be provided by ultrasonic induced heating as well. Further kinetic analysis reveals that the oxidation of individual PAH in the biphasic tar/water system follows the first-order kinetics, and individual PAH oxidation rate is primary determined by the mass transfer coefficients, tar/water interfacial areas, the aqueous solubility of individual PAH and its concentration in coal tar. Based on the kinetic analysis and experimental results, the contributions of ultrasound, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature to PAHs oxidation were characterized, and the effects of ultrasonic intensity and oxidant dosage on PAHs oxidation efficiency were investigated. In addition, the results indicate that individual PAH degradability is closely related to its reactivity as well, and the high reactivity of 4-6 ringed PAHs substantially improves their degradability.

  16. Acidification due to microbial dechlorination near a trichloroethene DNAPL is overcome with pH buffer or formate as electron donor: experimental demonstration in diffusion-cells.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jo; Maes, Nele; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Acidification due to microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) can limit the bio-enhanced dissolution of TCE dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This study related the dissolution enhancement of a TCE DNAPL to the pH buffer capacity of the medium and the type of electron donor used. In batch systems, dechlorination was optimal at pH7.1-7.5, but was completely inhibited below pH6.2. In addition, dechlorination in batch systems led to a smaller pH decrease at an increasing pH buffer capacity or with the use of formate instead of lactate as electron donor. Subsequently, bio-enhanced TCE DNAPL dissolution was quantified in diffusion-cells with a 5.5 cm central sand layer, separating a TCE DNAPL layer from an aqueous top layer. Three different pH buffer capacities (2.9 mM-17.9 mM MOPS) and lactate or formate as electron donor were applied. In the lactate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor increased from 1.5 to 2.2 with an increase of the pH buffer capacity. In contrast, in the formate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor (2.4±0.3) was unaffected by the pH buffer capacity. Measurement of the pore water pH confirmed that the pH decreased less with an increased pH buffer capacity or with formate instead of lactate as electron donor. These results suggest that the significant impact of acidification on bio-enhanced DNAPL dissolution can be overcome by the amendment of a pH buffer or by applying a non acidifying electron donor like formate.

  17. Degradation of multi-DNAPLs by a UV/persulphate/ethanol system with the additional injection of a base solution.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Gu; Do, Si-Hyun; Kwon, Yong-Jae; Kong, Sung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the inhibited influences on and solution to the degradation of four types of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) (i.e. perchloroethylene [PCE], trichloroethylene [TCE], chloroform [CF], and carbon tetrachloride [CT]) all at the same instance in groundwater (GW). Degradations of DNAPLs in de-ionized water (DW) and GW were carried out by applying an ultraviolet radiation-activated persulphate (UV/PS) system. PCE and TCE were degraded by over 90% and CT was only degraded by 25% in both DW and GW. However, CF was degraded by over 90% in DW, while it was only degraded by 50% in GW. First of all, degradations with an inorganic anion (either Cl- or HCO3-) indicated that the lower degradation of CF in GW was caused by the existence of the chloride ion. Moreover, the low CF degradation in GW was overcome by the additional injection of a base solution (sodium hydroxide [NaOH]) into the UV/PS system. The results showed that PCE, TCE, and CF were degraded by over 90%, respectively, when a molar ratio of [base]0:[PS]0 was larger than 0.5:1, but CT was still not effectively degraded in the UV/PS system. To achieve effective CT degradation, UV/PS with the ethanol (EtOH) system was evaluated and it was found that it degraded CT over 90%. However, at this time, CF was not effectively degraded in the UV/PS/EtOH system. Finally, degradations of DNAPLs in the UV/PS/EtOH system with the additional injection of a base solution were conducted and it showed that multi-DNAPLs were degraded by over 90%, respectively, when the molar ratio of [PS]0:[EtOH]0:[base]0 was 1:1:3.

  18. One-step selective electrokinetic removal of inorganic anions from small volumes and its application as sample clean-up for mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Tubaon, Ria Marni; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2017-03-10

    The presence of inorganic anions in a sample interferes with mass spectrometric (MS) analysis. Here, a simple method to remove these ions from a liquid sample in one-step is described. The inorganic anions present in a 50μL sample were extracted into a low pH solution inside a 200μm i.d.×33cm long capillary by the use of an electric field. The selective removal of unwanted anions and retention of target analytes was accomplished by control of the apparent electrophoretic velocities of anions and analytes at a boundary that separated the sample and extraction solution. No physical barrier (e.g., membrane) was required and with the boundary situated at the tip of the capillary, efficient removal of inorganic anions (e.g., >80% removal) and good recovery of target analytes (e.g., >80% recovery) were achieved. The time required for removal of the inorganic anions was found to depend on their initial concentrations. The removal process was investigated using different concentrations of bromide and nitrate (as potassium salts) and negatively chargeable drugs as target analytes. This micro-sample clean-up technique used no organic solvents and little consumables and was studied to the determination of 0.6μg/L arsenic and 8.3μg/L vanadium in 500mg/L sodium chloride using inductively coupled plasma MS and 50μM angiotensin I in 1000mg/L sodium chloride using electrospray ionisation MS. Micro-sample clean-up was performed for 45min at 3kV in both demonstrations. The calculated recoveries for the metals at trace levels were 110-130%, and for the peptide was 103.8%.

  19. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples; Jerome Eyer

    2001-05-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a 14 month proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are a noninvasive means towards site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This report covers the results of Task 3 and change of scope of Tasks 4-6. Task 1 contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task 2 is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data designed to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task 3 is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. Task 4, 5, and 6 were designing, acquiring, processing, and interpretation of a three dimensional seismic survey (3D) at the Z-9 crib area at 200 west area, Hanford.

  20. Challenges for simultaneous nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal in microbial aggregates: mass transfer limitation and nitrous oxide production.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rikke Louise; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Giugliano, Valerio; Blackall, Linda Louise

    2005-05-01

    The microbial community composition and activity was investigated in aggregates from a lab-scale bioreactor, in which nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal occurred simultaneously. The biomass was highly enriched for polyphosphate accumulating organisms facilitating complete removal of phosphorus from the bulk liquid; however, some inorganic nitrogen still remained at the end of the reactor cycle. This was ascribed to incomplete coupling of nitrification and denitrification causing NO(3)(-) accumulation. After 2 h of aeration, denitrification was dependent on the activity of nitrifying bacteria facilitating the formation of anoxic zones in the aggregates; hence, denitrification could not occur without simultaneous nitrification towards the end of the reactor cycle. Nitrous oxide was identified as a product of denitrification, when based on stored PHA as carbon source. This observation is of critical importance to the outlook of applying PHA-driven denitrification in activated sludge processes.

  1. Mass transfer study on the electrochemical removal of copper ions from synthetic effluents using reticulated vitreous carbon.

    PubMed

    Britto-Costa, Pedro H; Ruotolo, Luís Augusto M

    2013-01-01

    Porous electrodes have been successfully used for metal electrodeposition from diluted aqueous solution due to their high porosity and specific surface area, which lead to high mass transfer rates. This work studies the mass transfer of copper electrodeposition on reticulated vitreous carbon in a flow reactor without membrane. The flow configuration, otherwise the filter-press electrochemical reactors, was designed in order to minimize the pressure drop. The mass transfer coefficient was determined by voltammetric and galvanostatic electrodeposition. In the voltammetric experiments a Luggin capillary was used to measure the current-potential curves and to determine the limiting current (and, consequently, the mass transfer coefficient). In the galvanostatic experiments the concentration-time curves were obtained and considering a limiting current kinetics model, the mass transfer coefficient (k(m)) was determined for different flow velocities. The results showed that both methods give similar values of k(m), thus the voltammetric method can be recommended because it is faster and simpler. Finally, the reactor performance was compared with others from literature, and it was observed that the proposed reactor design has high Sherwood numbers similar to other reactor configurations using membranes and reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes.

  2. Seasonal and spatial variations of PPCP occurrence, removal and mass loading in three wastewater treatment plants located in different urbanization areas in Xiamen, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Li, Mingyue; Ma, Cong; Chen, Xiangqiang; Xie, Xiaoqing; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and fate of 48 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in different urbanization areas in Xiamen, China was investigated over one year. Results showed that PPCPs were widely detected, but the major PPCPs in the influent, effluent, and sludge were different. Spatial and seasonal variations of PPCP levels in the influent and sludge were observed. The removal efficiencies for most PPCPs were similar among the three WWTPs, although they employed different biological treatment processes. Furthermore, the mass loadings per inhabitant of most pharmaceuticals had a positive correlation with the urbanization levels, indicating that most pharmaceutical usage was higher in the urban core compared to the suburban zones. The total mass loadings of all the 48 PPCPs in the effluent and waste sludge showed close proportions, which suggested the importance of proper waste sludge disposal to prevent a large quantity of PPCPs from entering the environment.

  3. Validation and Application of the Mass Balance Model To Determine the Effectiveness of Portable Air Purifiers in Removing Ultrafine and Submicrometer Particles in an Apartment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Chen; Catalano, Paul J; Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-08-18

    We validated the use of the mass balance model to determine the effectiveness of portable air purifiers in removing ultrafine (<0.10 μm) and submicrometer particles (0.10-0.53 μm) in an apartment. We evaluated two identical portable air purifiers, equipped with high efficiency particulate air filters, for their performance under three different air flow settings and three target air exchange rates: 0.60, 0.90, and 1.20 h(-1). We subsequently used a mixed effects model to estimate the slope between the measured and modeled effectiveness by particle size. Our study showed that effectiveness was highly particle size-dependent. For example, at the lowest target air exchange rate, it ranged from 0.33 to 0.56, 0.51 to 0.75, and 0.60 to 0.81 for the three air purifier flow settings, respectively. Our findings suggested that filtration was the dominant removal mechanism for submicrometer particles, whereas deposition could play a more important role in ultrafine particle removal. We found reasonable agreement between measured and modeled effectiveness with size-resolved slopes ranging from 1.11 ± 0.06 to 1.25 ± 0.07 (mean ± SE), except for particles <35 nm. Our study design can be applied to investigate the performances of other portable air purifiers as well as the influences of various parameters on effectiveness in different residential settings.

  4. Influence of Mass Transfer Kinetics on Interpretation of Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervin, R. E.; Boroumand, A.; Abriola, L. M.; Ramsburg, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    model containing a linear driving force expression to describe the tracer mass transfer. Mass transfer coefficients in all simulations were produced using available correlations for pool dissolution. Perfect knowledge of the DNAPL and permeability distributions, as well as relative permeability effects enabled the numerical model to better capture the asymmetry observed in the production curves. We then began to systematically simplify the numerical model to explore which assumptions associated with the analytical solution cause its poor performance. These assumptions include: uniform packing distribution, uniform DNAPL distribution, equilibrium partitioning, and no permeability reduction due to the presence of the DNAPL. Results suggest only limited degradation in model performance when the medium permeability and DNAPL saturation are assumed to be uniform, and relative permeability effects are neglected. In contrast, model performance was considerably poorer when mass transfer kinetics were neglected. These results highlight the importance of including mass transfer kinetics when characterizing local-scale DNAPL architecture.

  5. Evaluating DNAPL Source and Migration Zones: M-Area Settling Basin and the Western Sector of A/M Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.G.

    2001-09-11

    The objective of this investigation is to critically evaluate previous characterization and remediation data to determine the current extent and distribution of DNAPL associated with releases at the M-Area Basin within A/M Area. The primary objective of the effort is to develop an approximate recommendation for the target treatment location and volume near the M Area Settling Basin. Through this analysis the final objective is to identify those subsurface regions having specific geometry and character necessary to cost-effectively deploy DNAPL specific remediation alternatives.

  6. Nitrogen removal and mass balance in newly-formed Myriophyllum aquaticum mesocosm during a single 28-day incubation with swine wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Shunan; Wang, Yi; Li, Yong; Xiao, Runlin; Li, Hongfang; He, Yang; Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Di; Li, Xi; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this research was to assess the applicability of Myriophyllum (M.) aquaticum for swine wastewater treatment. Nitrogen (N) removal processes were investigated in M. aquaticum mesocosms with swine wastewater (SW), 50% diluted swine wastewater (50% SW), and two strengths of synthetic wastewater, 200 mg [Formula: see text] L(-1) (200 [Formula: see text] ) and 400 mg [Formula: see text] L(-1) (400 [Formula: see text] ). During a 28-day incubation period, the average [Formula: see text] and TN removal rates were 99.8% and 94.2% for 50% SW and 99.8% and 93.8% for SW, which were greater than 86.5% and 83.7% for 200 [Formula: see text] , and 73.7% and 74.1% for 400 [Formula: see text] , respectively. A maximum areal total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 157.8 mg N m(-2) d(-1) was found in M. aquaticum mesocosms with SW. During the incubation period, the observed dynamics of [Formula: see text] concentrations in water and gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nirK and nirS in soil unraveled strong nitrification and denitrification processes occurring in M. aquaticum mesocosms with swine wastewater. The N mass balance analysis indicated that plant uptake and soil N accumulation accounted for 17.9-42.2% and 18.0-43.8% of the initial TN load, respectively. The coupled nitrification and denitrification process was calculated to account for, on average, 36.8% and 62.8% of TN removal for 50% SW and SW, respectively. These findings demonstrated that the N uptake by M. aquaticum contributed to a considerable proportion of N removal. In particular, the activities of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrification microbes responsible for nitrification and denitrification processes in M. aquaticum mesocosm accelerated [Formula: see text] and TN removal from swine wastewater.

  7. Long-term observations of black carbon mass concentrations at Fukue Island, western Japan, during 2009-2015: constraining wet removal rates and emission strengths from East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Yugo; Pan, Xiaole; Miyakawa, Takuma; Komazaki, Yuichi; Taketani, Fumikazu; Uno, Itsushi; Kondo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Long-term (2009-2015) observations of atmospheric black carbon (BC) mass concentrations were performed using a continuous soot-monitoring system (COSMOS) at Fukue Island, western Japan, to provide information on wet removal rate constraints and the emission strengths of important source regions in East Asia (China and others). The annual average mass concentration was 0.36 µg m-3, with distinct seasonality; high concentrations were recorded during autumn, winter, and spring and were caused by Asian continental outflows, which reached Fukue Island in 6-46 h. The observed data were categorized into two classes, i.e., with and without a wet removal effect, using the accumulated precipitation along a backward trajectory (APT) for the last 3 days as an index. Statistical analysis of the observed ΔBC / ΔCO ratios was performed to obtain information on the emission ratios (from data with zero APT only) and wet removal rates (including data with nonzero APTs). The estimated emission ratios (5.2-6.9 ng m-3 ppb-1) varied over the six air mass origin areas; the higher ratios for south-central East China (30-35° N) than for north-central East China (35-40° N) indicated the relative importance of domestic emissions and/or biomass burning sectors. The significantly higher BC / CO emission ratios adopted in the bottom-up Regional Emission inventory in Asia (REAS) version 2 (8.3-23 ng m-3 ppb-1) over central East China and Korea needed to be reduced at least by factors of 1.3 and 2.8 for central East China and Korea, respectively, but the ratio for Japan was reasonable. The wintertime enhancement of the BC emission from China, predicted by REAS2, was verified for air masses from south-central East China but not for those from north-central East China. Wet removal of BC was clearly identified as a decrease in the ΔBC / ΔCO ratio against APT. The transport efficiency (TE), defined as the ratio of the ΔBC / ΔCO ratio with precipitation to that without precipitation, was

  8. Permanganate treatment of DNAPLs in reactive barriers and source zone flooding schemes. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.W.

    1997-01-01

    'The goals of this study are (1) to elucidate the basic mechanisms by which potassium permanganate oxidizes common chlorinated solvents, various constituents in aqueous solution, and porous-medium solids, and (2) to assess the potential for chemical oxidation by potassium permanganate to serve as a remedial scheme involving either source zone flooding or reactive barriers. The research plan involves a combined experimental/modeling study that builds on the extensive previous work in the area of reactive barrier systems, and modeling of reactive contaminant transport. The experimental studies are being undertaken at The Ohio State University by Dr. Schwartz and his co-workers. The modeling work is being conducted in Albuquerque, NM by Dr. Zhang of Intera, Inc. The workplan for this study is designed around the following four objectives (1) to describe through batch experiments the kinetics and mechanisms by which potassium permanganate oxidizes dissolved tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and dichloroethene (DCE), (2) to examine using column studies the nature and kinetics of reactions between potassium permanganate, residual DNAPLs (PCE, TCE, and DCE) and porous medium solids, (3) to represent the process understanding in flow and transport models that demonstrate the potential applicability of the approach, and (4) to apply the resulting computer code in the development of appropriate field tests for assessing the approach.'

  9. Hydrogeophysical imaging of deposit heterogeneity and groundwater chemistry changes during DNAPL source zone bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J E; Wilkinson, P B; Wealthall, G P; Loke, M H; Dearden, R; Wilson, R; Allen, D; Ogilvy, R D

    2010-10-21

    Robust characterization and monitoring of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is essential for designing effective remediation strategies, and for assessing the efficacy of treatment. In this study high-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was evaluated as a means of monitoring a field-scale in-situ bioremediation experiment, in which emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) electron donor was injected into a trichloroethene source zone. Baseline ERT scans delineated the geometry of the interface between the contaminated alluvial aquifer and the underlying mudstone bedrock, and also the extent of drilling-induced physical heterogeneity. Time-lapse ERT images revealed major preferential flow pathways in the source and plume zones, which were corroborated by multiple lines of evidence, including geochemical monitoring and hydraulic testing using high density multilevel sampler arrays within the geophysical imaging planes. These pathways were shown to control the spatial distribution of the injected EVO, and a bicarbonate buffer introduced into the cell for pH control. Resistivity signatures were observed within the preferential flow pathways that were consistent with elevated chloride levels, providing tentative evidence from ERT of the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents.

  10. Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

  11. Testing of Performance of a Scroll Pump in Support of Improved Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) Mass Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Yee, Glenda F.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Flynn, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the results of ground testing of a scroll pump with a potential of being a substitute for the current vacuum pump of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR). Assessments of the pressure-time, pump-down time, pump power and the pump noise were made for three configurations of the pump the first of which was without the gas ballast, the second with the gas ballast installed but not operating and the third with the gas ballast operating. The tested scroll pump exhibited optimum characteristics given its mass and power requirements. The pump down time required to reach a pressure of 50 Torr ranged from 60 minutes without the ballast to about 120 minutes with the gas ballast operational. The noise emission and the pump power were assessed in this paper as well.

  12. A study on unsaturated zone characterization and feasibility of soil vapor extraction at a DNAPL-contaminated site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Man Na Mi; Yeo, In Wook

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater contamination by Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs), such as trichloroethylene (TCE), have been found in many industrial complexes, which is one of the most pressing problems in contaminant hydrology. As DNAPL is denser than water, it migrates downward through the overlying sediments and water table, and there, it forms a long term source of contamination due to its low solubility in water. DNAPL research site, located in Wonju, Republic of Korea, is contaminated with TCE (trichloroethylene), which was used as solvent from 1988 to 1997, and contaminated top soil dug out up to 3 m deep in 2004 to 2005. However, a high concentration (15 mg/L) of TCE in groundwater exceeding drinking water standard (0.03 mg/L in Korea) is still detected in the source zone area. Recent studies showed that the rise in water table led to an increase in TCE concentration, indicating that TCE sources existed in unsaturated zone above/around the water table. Therefore, the purpose of this study aims to characterize unsaturated zone in terms of air permeability and flow connectivity between the boreholes penetrating unsaturated zone, which will consequently be used for the design of pilot scale soil vapor extraction (SVE) system. Five boreholes with three multi-level screens at the depth of 3.0 to 4.5 m, 5.5 to 7.0, and 8.0 to 12.0 m were installed at the source zone for field tests. Pneumatic tests were performed to determine the air permeability. The average air permeability was measured to be 2.18×10-6 cm2. Pressure-drawdown curve well matched leaky aquifer type, indicating that air leaks through the ground surface. Air flow tests were also carried out to investigate air flow connectivity between multi-level wells. When injecting air through the upper level of the well, vertical air flow toward the surface mainly took place with horizontal flow limited. On the other hand, when injecting air to the lower part, the horizontal air flow was well made through unsaturated

  13. Simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate using rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and perchlorate removal in drinking water.

    PubMed

    West, Danielle M; Mu, Ruipu; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa; Ma, Yinfa; Adams, Craig; Eichholz, Todd; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan

    2015-06-01

    Perchlorate and bromate occurrence in drinking water causes health concerns due to their effects on thyroid function and carcinogenicity, respectively. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to advance a sensitive method for simultaneous rapid detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water system, (2) to systematically study the occurrence of these two contaminants in Missouri drinking water treatment systems, and (3) to examine effective sorbents for minimizing perchlorate in drinking water. A rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPIC-MS/MS) method was advanced for simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water. The HPIC-MS/MS method was rapid, required no preconcentration of the water samples, and had detection limits for perchlorate and bromate of 0.04 and 0.01 μg/L, respectively. The method was applied to determine perchlorate and bromate concentrations in total of 23 selected Missouri drinking water treatment systems during differing seasons. The water systems selected include different source waters: groundwater, lake water, river water, and groundwater influenced by surface water. The concentrations of perchlorate and bromate were lower than or near to method detection limits in most of the drinking water samples monitored. The removal of perchlorate by various adsorbents was studied. A cationic organoclay (TC-99) exhibited effective removal of perchlorate from drinking water matrices.

  14. Mass loading and removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products including psychoactives, antihypertensives, and antibiotics in two sewage treatment plants in southern India.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Bikram; Balakrishna, Keshava; Joshua, Derrick Ian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination by pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) is barely studied in India despite being one of the largest global producers and consumers of pharmaceuticals. In this study, 29 pharmaceuticals and six metabolites were determined in sewage treatment plants (STPs) in Udupi (STPU: population served ∼150,000) and Mangalore (STPM: population served ∼450,000); the measured mean concentrations ranged from 12 to 61,000 ng/L and 5.0 to 31,000 ng/L, respectively. Atorvastatin (the most prescribed antihypercholesterolemic in India), mefenamic acid, and paraxanthine were found for the first time in wastewater in India at the mean concentrations of 395 ng/L, 1100 ng/L, and 13,000 ng/L, respectively. Select pharmaceutical metabolites (norverapamil and clopidogrel carboxylic acid) were found at concentrations of upto 7 times higher than their parent drugs in wastewater influent and effluent. This is the first study in India to report mass loading and emission of PPCPs and their select metabolites in STPs. The total mass load of all PPCPs analyzed in this study at STPU (4.97 g/d/1000 inhabitants) was 3.6 times higher than calculated for STPM. Select recalcitrant PPCPs (carbamazepine, diazepam, and clopidogrel) were found to have negative or no removal from STPU while additional treatment with upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor at STPM removed (up to 95%) these PPCPs from STPM. Overall, 5.1 kg of caffeine, 4.1 kg of atenolol, 2.7 kg of ibuprofen, and 1.9 kg of triclocarban were discharged annually from STPU. The PPCP contamination profile in the Indian STP was compared with a similar study in the USA.

  15. Demonstration of Resistive Heating Treatment of DNAPL Source Zone at Launch Complex 34 in Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, Final Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency DNAPL Consortium (IDC) was formally established in 1999 by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The IDC performed five remediation techniques: ...

  16. Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) Used to Estimate the Multiphase Model Parameters for DNAPL Infiltration Experiments in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Zheng, F.; Xu, H.; Sun, Y.; Wu, J.

    2014-12-01

    A series of 2-D sandbox experiments were conducted to investigate the infiltration behavior of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) in saturated heterogeneous porous media. The modified light transmission (LT) method based on Bob et al. (2008) was used to quantify the DNAPL saturation during the infiltration process. A multiphase numerical simulator T2VOC was then used to simulate the experiments. With the EnKF method, static parameters such as permeability, porosity, residual NAPL saturation, and van Genutchen parameters (such as αnw and n), and dynamic variables like DNAPL saturation were continuously updated to match with the realtime observation data from LT method for history matching purposes. It is shown that the EnKF sometimes fails badly in the analysis (or updating) of saturations due to the nonlinearity between model variables and observable variables. Common sequential data assimilation algorithms based on the Kalman filter were also compared and discussed about the multiphase flow problem in porous media. Acknowledgements This research was financially supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China grants No. 41030746 and 41172206. Reference [1] Bob, M.M., Brooks, M.C., Mravik, S.C., Wood, A.L., 2008. A modified light transmission visualization method for DNAPL saturation measurements in 2-D models. Adv. Water Resour., 31, 727-742.

  17. DEMONSTRATION OF IN SITU DEHALOGENATION OF DNAPL THROUGH INJECTION OF EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALIENT IRON AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 34 IN CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the technical and cost performance of emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) technology when applied to DNAPL contaminants in the saturated zone. This demonstration was conducted at Launch Complex 34, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, w...

  18. Demonstration of Steam Injection/Extraction Treatment of a DNAPL Source Zone at Launch Complex 34 in Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Final Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency DNAPL Consortium (IDC) was formally established in 1999 by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The IDC performed five remediation techniques: ...

  19. THE VELOCITY OF DNAPL FINGERING IN WATER-SATURATED POROUS MEDIA LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS AND A MOBILE-IMMOBILE-ZONE MODEL. (R826157)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are immiscible with water and can give rise to highly fingered fluid distributions when infiltrating through water-saturated porous media. In this paper, a conceptual mobile¯immobile¯zone (MIZ) model is pr...

  20. Monitoring genetic and metabolic potential for in situ bioremediation: Mass spectrometry. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M.V.; Hurst, G.B.; Britt, P.F.; McLuckey, S.A.; Doktycz, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    'A number of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites are contaminated with mixtures of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform,. perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, in situ microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup because it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in situ without producing toxic byproducts. A rapid screening method to determine the broad range metabolic and genetic potential for contaminant degradation would greatly reduce the cost and time involved in assessment for in situ bioremediation as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. In this project, the ORNL Organic Mass Spectrometry (OMS) group is developing mass-spectrometry-based methods to screen for the genetic and metabolic potential for assessment and monitoring of in situ bioremediation of DNAPLs. In close collaboration, Professor Mary Lidstrom''s group at the University of Washington is identifying short DNA sequences related to microbial processes involved in the biodegradation of pollutants. This work will lay the foundation for development of a field-portable mass-spectrometry-based technique for rapid assessment and monitoring of bioremediation processes on site.'

  1. In-situ biochemical remediation of chlorinated organic compounds present as DNAPL using vitamin B12 and reduced titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesage, S.; Sorel, D.; Cherry, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of using a biochemical treatment for the cleanup of DNAPL solvents in the saturated zone was tested using an in-situ large vertical column. Laboratory column studies have shown that a mixture of vitamin B12 and titanium citrate pumped through a column containing 100 {mu}L of tetrachloroethene can completely dissolve and degrade the residual to ethene in a few days. A vertical test column, 80 cm in diameter was installed within a sheet-pile cell isolating a portion of aquifer at CFB Borden. An equimolar mixture of tetrachloroethene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane was injected below the water table to form a residual DNAPL. The injection withdrawal system was operated in an upward flow mode over a 2 m height. In order for the reaction to be proceed, the in-situ pH must be greater than 7 and the Eh lower than -480 mV. The redox of the aquifer and the formation of reaction products was monitored on site, through 8 side pods equipped with stainless steel tubing terminated with 40 {mu}m porous cups, installed at different heights in the test column. The volatile products at the withdrawal well were monitored on-line by dynamic headspace analysis/gas chromatography.

  2. Behavior of DNAPL mixture of organometallic and chlorinated solvent in the presence of surfactants and alcohols as density modifying agents.

    PubMed

    Talawat, Jaruwan; Sabatini, David A; Tongcumpou, Chantra

    2013-01-01

    This work evaluates the behavior of surfactant and alcohols in combination with a mixture of tributyltinchloride (TBT) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with the goal of modifying the mixed oil from being a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). Phase behavior of the mixed oil was studied under various combinations of surfactant, alcohol, and salinity. Phase density conversion was examined using pseudo-ternary phase diagrams constructed between the mixed oil, surfactant solution (4 wt%), and two types of alcohols (n-butyl alcohol (BuOH) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA)). Aqueous phase solubilization and oil phase density modification were studied at varying alcohol to surfactant (A/S) ratios. The results showed that the optimum surfactant system was sodium dihexylsulfosuccinate (SDHS) and hexadecyl diphenyloxidedisulfonate (C16DPDS) (3.6 wt% and 0.4 wt%, respectively) with salt (NaCl) of 3 wt%. From pseudo-ternary phase diagrams, BuOH was found to produce a larger LNAPL region than TBA. From solubilization studies, the surfactant system plus either TBA or BuOH caused PCE preferential solubilization and this preference was more pronounced at higher total surfactant concentration in the system with TBA addition. In terms of density modification, BuOH produced lower oil density than TBA at high A/S ratio. This phase behavior knowledge can be used to optimize site remediation of organometallic DNAPLs.

  3. Numerical Modeling Analysis of Hydrodynamic and Microbial Controls on DNAPL Pool Dissolution and Detoxification: Dehalorespirers in Co-culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wesseldyke, Eric S.; Becker, Jennifer G.; Seagren, Eric A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Zhang, Changyong

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants like tetrachloroethene (PCE) can be “bioenhanced” via biodegradation, which increases the concentration gradient at the DNAPL–water interface. Model simulations were used to evaluate the impact of ecological interactions between different dehalorespiring strains and hydrodynamics on the bioenhancement effect and the extent of PCE dechlorination. Simulations were performed using a two-dimensional coupled flow-transport model, with a DNAPL pool source and two microbial species, Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195 and Desulfuromonas michiganensis, which compete for electron acceptors (e.g., PCE), but not for their electron donors. Under biostimulation, low vx conditions, D. michiganensis alone significantly enhanced dissolution by rapidly utilizing aqueous-phase PCE. In co-culture under these conditions, D. mccartyi 195 increased this bioenhancement modestly and greatly increased the extent of PCE transformation. Although D. michiganensis was the dominant population under low velocity conditions, D. mccartyi 195 dominated under high velocity conditions due to bioclogging effects.

  4. Liquid-liquid mass transfer of partitioning electron donors in chlorinated solvent source zones.

    PubMed

    Cápiro, Natalie L; Granbery, Emmie K; Lebrón, Carmen A; Major, David W; McMaster, Michaye L; Pound, Michael J; Löffler, Frank E; Pennell, Kurt D

    2011-02-15

    A combination of batch and column experiments evaluated the mass transfer of two candidate partitioning electron donors (PEDs), n-hexanol (nHex) and n-butyl acetate (nBA), for enhanced bioremediation of trichloroethene (TCE)-dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Completely mixed batch reactor experiments yielded equilibrium TCE-DNAPL and water partition coefficients (KNW) for nHex and nBA of 21.7 ± 0.27 and 330.43 ± 6.7, respectively, over a range of initial PED concentrations up to the aqueous solubility limit of ca. 5000 mg/L. First-order liquid-liquid mass transfer rates determined in batch reactors with nBA or nHex concentrations near the aqueous solubility were 0.22 min(-1) and 0.11 min(-1), respectively. Liquid-liquid mass transfer under dynamic flow conditions was assessed in one-dimensional (1-D) abiotic columns packed with Federal Fine Ottawa sand containing a uniform distribution of residual TCE-DNAPL. Following pulse injection of PED solutions at pore-water velocities (vp) ranging from 1.2 to 6.0 m/day, effluent concentration measurements demonstrated that both nHex and nBA partitioned strongly into residual TCE-DNAPL with maximum effluent levels not exceeding 35% and 7%, respectively, of the applied concentrations of 4000 to 5000 mg/L. PEDs persisted at effluent concentrations above 5 mg/L for up to 16 and 80 pore volumes for nHex and nBA, respectively. Mathematical simulations yielded KNW values ranging from 44.7 to 48.2 and 247 to 291 and liquid-liquid mass transfer rates of 0.01 to 0.03 min(-1) and 0.001 to 0.006 min(-1) for nHex and nBA, respectively. The observed TCE-DNAPL and water mass transfer behavior suggests that a single PED injection can persist in a treated source zone for prolonged time periods, thereby reducing the need for, or frequency of, repeated electron donor injections to support bacteria that derive reducing equivalents for TCE reductive dechlorination from PED fermentation.

  5. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    microbial cultures. The microorganisms responsible for biosurfactant production was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas Sp (designated as Pseudomonas Sp ANBIOSURF-1, Gene bank no: FJ930079), Pseudomonas stutzeri (MTCC 10033), Pseudomonas Sp (MTCC 10032) from groundwater, soil and municipal sewage sludge enrichments respectively. This study confirms that biosurfactants can be produced under anaerobic conditions and also in sufficient quantities. The cultures were also able to cometabolically degrade PCE to Ethylene. The isolated microorganisms can be used for remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites by in-situ biosurfactant production.

  6. Restricted access supramolecular solvents for removal of matrix-induced ionization effects in mass spectrometry: Application to the determination of Fusarium toxins in cereals.

    PubMed

    García-Fonseca, Sergio; Rubio, Soledad

    2016-02-01

    Ion suppression/enhancement caused by matrix effects continues being a major concern in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This research explores the ability of a supramolecular solvent (SUPRAS) made up of inverted hexagonal aggregates of oleic acid to behave as a liquid with restricted access properties (SUPRAS-RAM). Fusarium toxins in cereals were extracted with the oleic acid-based SUPRAS-RAM prior to their quantification by LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-ion trap-MS (LC-ESI-IT-MS) in order to investigate the capability of this solvent to remove or reduce ionization suppression and/or enhancement in the analysis of complex samples by MS. The method involved the vortex-shaking of 300 mg of cereal with 600 μL of the SUPRAS-RAM for 15 min, centrifugation for separation of the supernatant and quantitation by LC-ESI-IT-MS. Macromolecules such as proteins and carbohydrates were excluded from extraction by chemical and physical mechanisms. Extraction of analytes and sample clean-up were thus carried out in a single step. No evaporation of the extracts was needed. Method detection limits for the legislated Fusarium toxins [i.e. deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA) and fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2)] were 15 μg kg(-1) for DON and ZEA and 8 μg kg(-1) for fumonisins. These values were far below the maximum levels set by the European Commission for these toxins in foodstuffs. The method was successfully applied to the determination of these toxins in wheat and maize harvested in the South of Spain. No contamination of Fusarium toxins was found in samples at detectable levels. Recoveries in spiked samples were in the range 87-105%, with relative standard deviations between 1 and 7%. The use of the oleic acid-based SUPRAS-RAM effectively removed matrix interferences and allowed reliable quantitation of Fusarium toxins in cereals using solvent-based calibration.

  7. Determining estrogenic steroids in Taipei waters and removal in drinking water treatment using high-flow solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yang; Wen, Tzu-Yao; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Lien, Guang-Wen

    2007-06-01

    River water and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents from metropolitan Taipei, Taiwan were tested for the presence of the pollutants estrone (E1), estriol (E3), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) using a new methodology that involves high-flow solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The method was also used to investigate the removal of the analytes by conventional drinking water treatment processes. Without adjusting the pH, we extracted 1-L samples with PolarPlus C18 Speedisks under a flow rate exceeding 100 mL/min, in which six samples could be done simultaneously using an extraction station. The adsorbent was washed with 40% methanol/60% water and then eluted by 50% methanol/50% dichloromethane. The eluate was concentrated until almost dry and was reconstituted by 20 microL of methanol. Quantitation was done by LC-MS/MS-negative electrospray ionization in the selected reaction monitoring mode with isotope-dilution techniques. The mobile phase was 10 mM N-methylmorpholine aqueous solution/acetonitrile with gradient elution. Mean recoveries of spiked Milli-Q water were 65-79% and precisions were within 2-20% of the tested concentrations (5.0-200 ng/L). The method was validated with spiked upstream river water; precisions were most within 10% of the tested concentrations (10-100 ng/L) with most RSDs<10%. LODs of the environmental matrixes were 0.78-7.65 ng/L. A pre-filtration step before solid-phase extraction may significantly influence the measurement of E1 and EE2 concentrations; disk overloading by water matrix may also impact analyte recoveries along with ion suppression. In the Taipei water study, the four steroid estrogens were detected in river samples (ca. 15 ng/L for E2 and EE2 and 35-45 ng/L for E1 and E3). Average levels of 19-26 ng/L for E1, E2, and EE2 were detected in most wastewater effluents, while only a single effluent sample contained E3. The higher level in the river was likely

  8. Adenoid removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... This does not cause problems most of the time. Alternative Names Adenoidectomy; Removal of adenoid glands Images Adenoid removal - series References Wetmore RF. Tonsils and adenoids. In: Kliegman ...

  9. In situ, field-scale evaluation of surfactant-enhanced DNAPL recovery using a single-well, ``push-pull'' test

    SciTech Connect

    Istok, J.D.; Field, J.A.

    1999-10-01

    The overall goal of this project was to further develop the single-well, ``push-pull'' test method as a feasibility assessment and site-characterization tool for studying the fundamental fate and transport behavior of injected surfactants and their ability to solubilize and mobilize dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface. The specific objectives were to develop a modified push-pull test for use in identifying and quantifying the effects of sorption, precipitation, and biodegradation on the fate and transport of injected surfactants, use the developed test method to quantify the effects of these processes on the ability of injected surfactants to solubilize and mobilize residual phase trichloroethane (TCE), and demonstrate the utility of the developed test method for performing site characterization and feasibility studies for surfactant-enhanced DNAPL recovery systems in the field. The results from the intermediate-scale laboratory experiments conducted for this project indicate that the single-well, push-pull test method can provide quantitative information on the effectiveness of injected surfactants in enhancing DNAPL solubilization in natural aquifer sediments. Specifically, the results of this research demonstrate the ability of the single-well, push-pull test to characterize the behavior of multi-component surfactants in the presence of natural aquifer sediment under laboratory and in-situ field conditions.

  10. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs): Migration and entrapment in a nonuniform permeability field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, John A.; Lemke, Lawrence D.; Abriola, Linda M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of reduced dimensionality (two-dimensional (2-D) versus 3-D) on predictions of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) infiltration and entrapment in statistically homogeneous, nonuniform permeability fields was investigated using the University of Texas Chemical Compositional Simulator (UTCHEM), a 3-D numerical multiphase simulator. Hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability relationships implemented in UTCHEM were benchmarked against those of another lab-tested simulator, the Michigan-Vertical and Lateral Organic Redistribution (M-VALOR). Simulation of a tetrachloroethene spill in 16 field-scale aquifer realizations generated DNAPL saturation distributions with approximately equivalent distribution metrics in two and three dimensions, with 2-D simulations generally resulting in slightly higher maximum saturations and increased vertical spreading. Variability in 2-D and 3-D distribution metrics across the set of realizations was shown to be correlated at a significance level of 95-99%. Neither spill volume nor release rate appeared to affect these conclusions. Variability in the permeability field did affect spreading metrics by increasing the horizontal spreading in 3-D more than in 2-D in more heterogeneous media simulations. The assumption of isotropic horizontal spatial statistics resulted, on average, in symmetric 3-D saturation distribution metrics in the horizontal directions. The practical implication of this study is that for statistically homogeneous, nonuniform aquifers, 2-D simulations of saturation distributions are good approximations to those obtained in 3-D. However, additional work will be needed to explore the influence of dimensionality on simulated DNAPL dissolution.

  11. The Migration and Entrapment of DNAPLs in Physically and Chemically Heterogeneous Porous Media - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/15/2000

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, L. M.; Demond, A. H.

    2000-09-15

    Hazardous dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), such as chlorinated solvents, are slightly water soluble and pose a serious threat to soil and groundwater supplies in many portions of the United States. The migration and entrapment of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment is typically believed to be controlled by physical heterogeneities; i.e, layers and lenses of contrasting soil texture. The rationale for this assumption is that capillarity, as determined by the soil texture, is the dominant transport mechanism. Capillarity also depends on interfacial tension and medium wettability. Interfacial tension and medium wettability may be spatially and temporally dependent due to variations in aqueous phase chemistry, contaminant aging, and/or variations in mineralogy and organic matter distributions. Such chemical heterogeneities have largely been ignored to date, even though they are known to have dramatic effects on the hydraulic property relations. Numerical multiphase flow and transport models typically assume that solids are water-wet and that interfacial tension is constant. The primary objective of this research is to investigate the influence of coupled physical and chemical heterogeneities on the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs. This objective will be accomplished through a combination of laboratory and numerical experiments. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to examine: (i) aqueous phase chemistry effects on medium wettability and interfacial tension; and (ii) relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure relations for chemically heterogeneous systems. An important objective of this research is to modify a two-dimensional multiphase flow and transport model to account for chemically and physically heterogeneous systems. This numerical simulator will be used in conjunction with independently measured parameters to simulate two-dimensional DNAPL infiltration experiments. Comparisons of simulated and laboratory data will provide a means to

  12. The Impact of DNAPL Source-Zone Architecture on Contaminant Mass Flux and Plume Evolution in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    NUMBER 429 Shantz Bldg Tucson , AZ 85721 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...rectangular flow-cell experiments with water flooding only (open symbols) and water flooding after pulsed injection of 4.5 pore volumes of 15 mm...water flooding only (open symbols) vs. water flooding after permanganate treatment (ISCO) (closed symbols) for 1 PV injections of the 63.3 mm

  13. CONCURRENT INJECTION OF COSOLVENT AND AIR FOR ENHANCED PCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to use preferential flow of air to improve the dynamics of cosolvent displacement in order to enhance DNAPL displacement and dissolution. The concurrent injection of cosolvent and air was evaluated in a glass micromodel for a DNAPL remediation technolog...

  14. Determining effective interfacial tension and predicting finger spacing for DNAPL penetration into water-saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Smith, J E; Zhang, Z F

    2001-03-01

    The difficulty in determining the effective interfacial tension limits the prediction of the wavelength of fingering of immiscible fluids in porous media. A method to estimate the effective interfacial tension using fractal concepts was presented by Chang et al. [Water Resour. Res. 30 (1994) 125]. We modified the method in that the macroscopic interface length was used instead of the system width. Methods to determine the macroscopic and the microscopic interface length are given. Lab experiments of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) penetrating into water-saturated glass beads were carried out in a two-dimensional (2-D) transparent chamber. The displacement processes were recorded using a 35-mm camera or a video camera, which was directly connected to and controlled by a computer. Unlike the method of Chang et al. (1994), the modified method used here gives a constant value of the effective interfacial tension over time. The predicted wavelengths of fingering are relatively close to those observed except for the fine beads.

  15. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  16. Laboratory Determination of Gas-Side Mass Transfer Coefficients Applicable to Soil Venting Systems for Removing Petroleum Hydrocarbons from Vadose Zone Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    monolayers situated on either side of this interface (Treybal, 1980; Henley and Seader , 1981). This equilibrium condition may be used to describe mass transfer...W.F. Reehl and D.H. Rosenblatt, eds., Handbook of Chemical Property Estimation Methods, American Chemical Society, 1990. Henley, E.J. and J.D. Seader

  17. The influence of cosolvent and heat on the solubility and reactivity of organophosphorous pesticide DNAPL alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Muff, Jens; MacKinnon, Leah; Durant, Neal D; Bennedsen, Lars Frausing; Rügge, Kirsten; Bondgaard, Morten; Pennell, Kurt

    2016-11-01

    The presented research concerned the compatibility of cosolvents with in situ alkaline hydrolysis (ISAH) for treatment of organophosphorous (OPP) pesticide contaminated sites. In addition, the influence of moderate temperature heat increments was studied as a possible enhancement method. A complex dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) of primarily parathion (~50 %) and methyl parathion (~15 %) obtained from the Danish Groyne 42 site was used as a contaminant source, and ethanol and propan-2-ol (0, 25, and 50 v/v%) was used as cosolvents in tap water and 0.34 M NaOH. Both cosolvents showed OPP solubility enhancement at 50 v/v% cosolvent content, with slightly higher OPP concentrations reached with propan-2-ol. Data on hydrolysis products did not show a clear trend with respect to alkaline hydrolysis reactivity in the presence of cosolvents. Results indicated that the hydrolysis rate of methyl-parathion (MP3) decreased with addition of cosolvent, whereas the hydrolysis rate of ethyl-parathion (EP3) remained constant, and overall indications were that the hydrolysis reactions were limited by the rate of hydrolysis rather than NAPL dissolution. In addition to cosolvents, the influence of low-temperature heating on ISAH was studied. Increasing reaction temperature from 10 to 30 °C provided an average rate of hydrolysis enhancement by a factor of 1.4-4.8 dependent on the base of calculation. When combining 50 v/v% cosolvent addition and heating to 30 °C, EP3 solubility was significantly enhanced and results for O,O-diethyl-thiophosphoric acid (EP2 acid) showed a significant enhancement of hydrolysis as well. However, this could not be supported by para-nitrophenol (PNP) data indicating the instability of this product in the presence of cosolvent.

  18. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be

  19. Enhanced aqueous dissolution of a DNAPL source to characterize the source strength function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Annable, Michael D.; Schaefer, Charles E.; Ault, Timothy D.; Cho, Jaehyun; Jawitz, James W.

    2014-11-01

    Simplified analytical solutions, developed as source strength functions (SSFs), are capable of describing the temporal dissolution of nonaqueous phase liquids in groundwater, which is useful for predicting source longevity and can serve as a guide for remedial activities. Here, SSF parameters were estimated by fitting enhanced aqueous dissolution data from a flow cell consisting of three injection and four extraction wells to analytical dissolution models (power law model (PLM) and equilibrium streamtube model (EST)) at a trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated site, Alameda Point, California. Both the PLM and the EST model were able to characterize the observed aqueous TCE dissolution during enhanced water flooding. Additional field activities conducted at the site included soil core collection, a recirculated partitioning tracer test, passive flux meter transects, and push-pull tracer tests. The additional site characterization data were used to independently estimate the observed SSF parameters using information such as the TCE mass, distribution and porous media heterogeneity. The exponential decay model (a subset of the PLM) accurately predicted the enhanced dissolution, likely because the site was significantly aged (most of the mass in the plume rather than in the source zone) or middle stage, and the mass in the source zone could be approximately estimated. The EST tracer-based model, when combined with data from the recirculated partitioning tracer test, soil cores, and the push-pull tracer test, was capable of accurately predicting the observed aqueous dissolution. The mass in the source zone and the fraction of contaminated flowpaths were the most important site characteristics, requiring the greatest accuracy to predict aqueous dissolution. Establishing steady state dissolution was essential to provide a more accurate estimate of the fraction contaminated and high resolution data from soil cores in the source zone were needed to estimate the mass present.

  20. Fishhook removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection such as redness, swelling, pain, or drainage. Wire cutting method: First, wash your hands with soap ... cut it off just behind the barb with wire cutters. Remove the rest of the hook by ...

  1. Kidney removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and medical centers are doing this surgery using robots . Why the Procedure is Performed Kidney removal may ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  2. Tick removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... are small, insect-like creatures that live in woods and fields. They attach to you as you ... your clothes and skin often while in the woods. After returning home: Remove your clothes. Look closely ...

  3. Cataract removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... incision. Extracapsular extraction: The doctor uses a small tool to remove the cataract in mostly one piece. This procedure uses a larger incision. Laser surgery: The doctor guides a machine that uses laser energy to make the incisions ...

  4. Tick Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are several tick removal devices on the market, but a plain set of fine-tipped tweezers ... for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) Division of Vector- ...

  5. Tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Burris, Katy; Kim, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Tattoos have been a part of costume, expression, and identification in various cultures for centuries. Although tattoos have become more popular in western culture, many people regret their tattoos in later years. In this situation, it is important to be aware of the mechanisms of tattoo removal methods available, as well as their potential short- and long-term effects. Among the myriad of options available, laser tattoo removal is the current treatment of choice, given its safety and efficacy.

  6. Tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal.

  7. Laboratory-Scale Column Testing Using IONSIV IE-911 for Removing Cesium from Acidic Tank Waste Simulant. 2: Determination of Cesium Exchange Capacity and Effective Mass Transfer Coefficient from a 500-cm3 Column Experiement

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Tranter; R.D. Tillotson; T.A. Todd

    2005-04-01

    A semi-scale column test was performed using a commercial form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) for removing radio-cesium from a surrogate acidic tank solution, which represents liquid waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The engineered form of CST ion exchanger, known as IONSIVtmIE-911 (UOP, Mt. Laurel,NJ, USA), was tested in a 500-cm3 column to obtain a cesium breakthrough curve. The cesium exchange capacity of this column matched that obtained from previous testing with a 15-mc3 column. A numerical algorithm using implicit finite difference approximations was developed to solve the governing mass transport equations for the CST columns. An effective mass transfer coefficient was derived from solving these equations for previously reported 15 cm3 tests. The effective mass transfer coefficient was then used to predict the cesium breakthrough curve for the 500-cm3 column and compared to the experimental data reported in this paper. The calculated breakthrough curve showed excellent agreement with the data from the 500-cm3 column even though the interstitial velocity was a factor of two greater. Thus, this approach should provide a reasonable method for scale up to larger columns for treating actual tank waste.

  8. Mass spectrometric characterization of the Campylobacter jejuni adherence factor CadF reveals post-translational processing that removes immunogenicity while retaining fibronectin binding.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Marzook, N Bishara; Deutscher, Ania; Falconer, Linda; Crossett, Ben; Djordjevic, Steven P; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major gastrointestinal pathogen that colonizes host mucosa via interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (Fn). Fn-binding is mediated by a 37 kDa outer membrane protein termed Campylobacter adherence Factor (CadF). The outer membrane protein profile of a recent gastrointestinal C. jejuni clinical isolate (JHH1) was analysed using 2-DE and MS. Several spots were identified as products of the cadF gene. These included mass and pI variants of 34 and 30 kDa, as well as 24 kDa (CadF(24)) and 22 kDa (CadF(22)) mass variants. CadF variants were fully characterized by MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-MS/MS. These data confirmed that CadF forms re-folding variants resulting in spots with lower mass and varying pI that are identical at the amino acid sequence level and are not modified post-translationally. CadF(22) and CadF(24), however, were characterized as N-terminal, membrane-associated polypeptides resulting from cleavage between serine(195) and leucine(196), and glycine(201) and phenylalanine(202), respectively. These variants were more abundant in the virulent (O) isolate of C. jejuni NCTC11168 when compared with the avirulent (genome sequenced) isolate. Hexahistidine fusion constructs of full-length CadF (34 kDa), CadF(24), and the deleted C-terminal OmpA domain (14 kDa; CadF(14)) were created in Escherichia coli. Recombinant CadF variants were probed against patient sera and revealed that only full-length CadF retained reactivity. Binding assays showed that CadF(24) retained Fn-binding capability, while CadF(14) did not bind Fn. These data suggest that the immunogenic epitope of CadF is cleaved to generate smaller Fn-binding polypeptides, which are not recognized by the host humoral response. CadF cleavage therefore may be associated with virulence in C. jejuni.

  9. Characterization of TCE DNAPL and Dissolved Phase Transport in Karst Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, M.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated sites are a threat to the environment and human health. Of particular concerns is the contamination of karst groundwater systems (KGWSs). Their heterogeneous character, rapid flow through conduits, high permeability zones, and strong storage capacity in the rock porous-matrix pose a high risk of exposure over large areas and temporal scales. To achieve effective remedial actions for TCE removal, it is important to understand and quantify the fate and transport process of trichloroethylene in these systems. This research studies the fate, transport, and distribution of TCE Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) and associated dissolved species in KGWSs. Experiments are conducted in a karstified limestone physical model, a limestone rock mimicking a saturated confined karst aquifer. After injecting TCE solvent into a steady groundwater flow field, samples are taken spatially and temporally and analyzed for TCE NAPL and dissolved phases. Data analysis shows the rapid detection of TCE NAPL and high aqueous concentrations along preferential pathway, even at distances far away from the injection point. Temporal distribution curves exhibit spatial variations related to the limestone rock heterogeneity. Rapid response to TCE concentrations is associated with preferential flow paths. Slow response with long tailing indicates rate-limited diffusive transport in the rock matrix. Overall, results indicate that karstified limestone has a high capacity to rapidly transport pure and dissolved TCE along preferential flow paths, and to store and slowly release TCE over long periods of time.

  10. Hair removal.

    PubMed

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New treatment procedures are evolving. Consumer-based treatments with portable home devices are rapidly evolving, and presently include low-level diode lasers and IPL devices.

  11. Removal of high-salinity matrices through polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration for the detection of trace levels of REEs using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hualing; Lin, Jijun; Gong, Zhenbin; Huang, Jiahua; Yang, Shifeng

    2015-10-01

    The polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration (PCUF) technique was applied to separate trace levels of rare earth elements (REEs), including scandium, yttrium and the lanthanides, from high-salinity matrices prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The REEs were converted into REE-polymer complexes using the water-soluble polymer polyacrylic acid (PAA) at a specified pH, retained on the ultrafiltration membrane of centrifugal filter units, and finally eluted using diluted nitric acid to achieve separation from matrices with relatively high levels of various inorganic ions, such as sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chlorine ions. Numerous factors affecting the PCUF efficiency were optimized. The optimal conditions included the addition of 30 mg L(-1) of PAA, a pH of 7.5, a reaction time of 40 min at room temperature, and 5.0 mL of 3% nitric acid (v/v) eluent. Under these conditions, the analytes were quantitatively separated and recovered, with a resulting relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (0.05 µg L(-1), n=5) and standard addition recoveries between 89.2% (La) and 95.8% (Sm) for matrices of various salinities. The blank samples for the method ranged from 0.0003 µg L(-1) (Dy) to 0.0031 µg L(-1) (Sc), and the limits of quantification (LOQs, 10σ) were between 0.0006 µg L(-1) (Dy) and 0.0026 µg L(-1) (Sc). Furthermore, the salinity of the sample exhibited no effect on the REE-polymer complex formation process. Finally, the method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of dissolved Sc, Y, and lanthanides in coastal and estuarine seawater samples.

  12. A controlled field experiment on groundwater contamination by a multicomponent DNAPL: creation of the emplaced-source and overview of dissolved plume development.

    PubMed

    Rivett, M O; Feenstra, S; Cherry, J A

    2001-05-01

    A unique field experiment has been undertaken at the CFB Borden research site to investigate the development of dissolved chlorinated solvent plumes from a residual dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source. The "emplaced-source" tracer test methodology involved a controlled emplacement of a block-shaped source of sand containing chlorinated solvents below the water table. The gradual dissolution of this residual DNAPL solvent source under natural aquifer conditions caused dissolved solvent plumes of trichloromethane (TCM), trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) to continuously develop down gradient. Source dissolution and 3-D plume development were successfully monitored via 173 multilevel samplers over a 475-day tracer test period prior to site remediation research being initiated. Detailed groundwater level and hydraulic conductivity data were collected. Development of plumes with concentrations spanning 1-700,000 micrograms/1 is described and key processes controlling their migration identified. Plumes were observed to be narrow due to the weakness of transverse dispersion processes and long due to advection and significant longitudinal dispersion, very limited sorptive retardation and negligible, if any, attenuation due to biodegradation or abiotic reaction. TCM was shown to be essentially conservative, TCE very nearly conservative and PCE, consistent with its greater hydrophobicity, more retarded yet having a greater mobility than observed in previous Borden field tests. The absence of biodegradation was ascribed to the prevailing aerobic conditions and lack of any additional biodegradable carbon substrates. The transient groundwater flow regime caused significant transverse lateral plume movement, plume asymmetry and was likely responsible for most of the, albeit limited, transverse horizontal plume spreading. In agreement with the widespread incidence of extensive TCE and PCE plumes throughout the industrialized world, the experiment indicates

  13. A novel numerical approach for the solution of the problem of two-phase, immiscible flow in porous media: Application to LNAPL and DNAPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; El Amin, Mohamed F.

    2012-05-01

    The flow of two immiscible fluids in porous media is ubiquitous particularly in petroleum exploration and extraction. The displacement of one fluid by another immiscible with it represents a very important aspect in what is called enhanced oil recovery. Another example is related to the long-term sequestration of carbon dioxide, CO2, in deep geologic formations. In this technique, supercritical CO2 is introduced into deep saline aquifer where it displaces the hosting fluid. Furthermore, very important classes of contaminants that are very slightly soluble in water and represent a huge concern if they get introduced to groundwater could basically be assumed immiscible. These are called light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL) and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). All these applications necessitate that efficient algorithms be developed for the numerical solution of these problems. In this work we introduce the use of shifting matrices to numerically solving the problem of two-phase immiscible flows in the subsurface. We implement the cell-center finite difference method which discretizes the governing set of partial differential equations in conservative manner. Unlike traditional solution methodologies, which are based on performing the discretization on a generic cell and solve for all the cells within a loop, in this technique, the cell center information for all the cells are obtained all at once without loops using matrix oriented operations. This technique is significantly faster than the traditional looping algorithms, particularly for larger systems when coding using languages that require repeating interpretation each time a loop is called like Mat Lab, Python and the like. We apply this technique to the transport of LNAPL and DNAPL into a rectangular domain.

  14. Validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection of nicotine biomarkers in hair and an evaluation of wash procedures for removal of environmental nicotine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eleanor I; Murray, Gordon J; Rollins, Douglas E; Tiffany, Stephen T; Wilkins, Diana G

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to develop and validate a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method for the quantification of nicotine, eight nicotine metabolites, and two minor tobacco alkaloids in fortified analyte-free hair and subsequently apply this method to hair samples collected from active smokers. An additional aim of the study was to include an evaluation of different wash procedures for the effective removal of environmentally deposited nicotine from tobacco smoke. An apparatus was designed for the purpose of exposing analyte-free hair to environmental tobacco smoke in order to deposit nicotine onto the hair surface. A shampoo/water wash procedure was identified as the most effective means of removing nicotine. This wash procedure was utilized for a comparison of washed and unwashed heavy smoker hair samples. Analytes and corresponding deuterated internal standards were extracted using a cation-exchange solid-phase cartridge. LC-MS-MS was carried out using an Acquity™ UPLC(®) system (Waters) and a Quattro Premier XE™ triple quadrupole MS (Waters) operated in electrospray positive ionization mode, with multiple reaction monitoring data acquisition. The developed method was applied to hair samples collected from heavy smokers (n = 3) and low-level smokers (n = 3) collected through IRB-approved protocols. Nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine were quantified in both the washed and unwashed hair samples collected from three heavy smokers, whereas 3-hydroxycotinine was quantified in only one unwashed sample and nicotine-1'-oxide in the washed and unwashed hair samples from two heavy smokers. In contrast, nicotine-1'-oxide was quantified in one of the three low-level smoker samples; nicotine was quantified in the other two low-level smoker samples. No other analytes were detected in the hair of the three low-level smokers.

  15. Radionuclide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sorg, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

  16. Removal of BrO₃⁻ from drinking water samples using newly developed agricultural waste-based activated carbon and its determination by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Mu; Khan, Mohammad R; ALOthman, Zeid A; AlSohaimi, Ibrahim; Rodriguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Turki, Turki M; Ali, Rahmat

    2015-10-01

    Activated carbon was prepared from date pits via chemical activation with H3PO4. The effects of activating agent concentration and activation temperature on the yield and surface area were studied. The optimal activated carbon was prepared at 450 °C using 55 % H3PO4. The prepared activated carbon was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis, and Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area. The prepared date pit-based activated carbon (DAC) was used for the removal of bromate (BrO3 (-)). The concentration of BrO3 (-) was determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass tandem spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The experimental equilibrium data for BrO3 (-) adsorption onto DAC was well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model and showed maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 25.64 mg g(-1). The adsorption kinetics of BrO3 (-) adsorption was very well represented by the pseudo-first-order equation. The analytical application of DAC for the analysis of real water samples was studied with very promising results.

  17. ZVI-Clay remediation of a chlorinated solvent source zone, Skuldelev, Denmark: 1. Site description and contaminant source mass reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjordbøge, Annika S.; Riis, Charlotte; Christensen, Anders G.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Field investigations on the effects of ZVI-Clay soil mixing were conducted at a small DNAPL source zone with PCE as the parent compound. In a one-year monitoring program, soil samples were collected at three horizontal sampling planes (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 m bgs.). PCE was found to have a pseudo first-order degradation half-life of 47 days resulting in more than 99% depletion of the source mass after one year. The main degradation product was ethene, while only low concentrations of the primarily biotic sequential degradation products (cDCE, VC) were detected. The soil mixing resulted in more homogeneous vertical conditions, while the horizontal homogenization was very limited. Iron was delivered in the full targeted depth with an average iron enrichment of 3.1%, and an average decline in the oxidation-reduction potential of more than 500 mV. Due to the applied top-down addition of ZVI, the iron content decreased from 4.6% to 2.1% on average over a depth of 5 m; hence, there is a potential for optimization of the delivery method. Most in situ technologies are limited by subsurface heterogeneities, whereby the successful dispersion of geological units and contaminants holds great promise for remediation of DNAPL source zones with ZVI-Clay soil mixing.

  18. ENHANCED SOURCE REMOVAL OF NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID CONTAMINANTS BY CHEMICAL-BASED FLOODING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as gasoline and halogenated solvents (trichloroethylene (TCE) and teterachloroethylene (PCE), etc) enter the subsurface after a spill, or from leaking underground storage tanks. The presence of residual dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) ...

  19. Removal - An alternative to clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Feinhals, J.; Kelch, A.; Kunze, V.

    2007-07-01

    This presentation shows the differences between the application of clearance and removal, both being procedures for materials leaving radiation protection areas permanently. The differentiation will be done on the basis of the German legislation but may be also applicable for other national legislation. For clearance in Germany two basic requirements must be given, i.e. that the materials are activated or contaminated and that they result from the licensed use or can be assigned to the scope of the license. Clearance needs not to be applied to objects in Germany which are to be removed only temporarily from controlled areas with the purpose of repair or reuse in other controlled areas. In these cases only the requirements of contamination control apply. In the case of removal it must either be proved by measurements that the relevant materials are neither activated nor contaminated or that the materials result from areas where activation or contamination is impossible due to the operational history considering operational procedures and events. If the material is considered neither activated nor contaminated there is no need for a clearance procedure. Therefore, these materials can be removed from radiation protection areas and the removal is in the responsibility of the licensee. Nevertheless, the removal procedure and the measuring techniques to be applied for the different types of materials need an agreement from the competent authority. In Germany a maximum value of 10% of the clearance values has been established in different licenses as a criterion for the application of removal. As approximately 2/3 of the total mass of a nuclear power plant is not expected to be contaminated or activated there is a need for such a procedure of removal for this non contaminated material without any regulatory control especially in the case of decommissioning. A remarkable example is NPP Stade where in the last three years more than 8600 Mg were disposed of by removal and

  20. Phenol removal pretreatment process

    DOEpatents

    Hames, Bonnie R.

    2004-04-13

    A process for removing phenols from an aqueous solution is provided, which comprises the steps of contacting a mixture comprising the solution and a metal oxide, forming a phenol metal oxide complex, and removing the complex from the mixture.

  1. Turbomachinery debris remover

    DOEpatents

    Krawiec, Donald F.; Kraf, Robert J.; Houser, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

  2. Wart remover poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Wart removers are medicines used to get rid of warts. Warts are small growths on the skin that are caused by a virus. They are usually painless. Wart remover poisoning occurs when someone swallows or uses ...

  3. Spider Vein Removal

    MedlinePlus

    Spider veins: How are they removed? I have spider veins on my legs. What options are available ... M.D. Several options are available to remove spider veins — thin red lines or weblike networks of ...

  4. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... malignant. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  5. Removal program priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-31

    The directive contains general policy guidelines regarding removal program priorities as it specifically relates to the 10 regional offices. Emphasis is placed on addressing the most serious public health and environmental threats (classic emergencies, time-critical removals at NPL sites, and time-critical removals at non-NPL sites). Regions are urged to pursue cleanup by the responsible parties (RP) and manage the removal program within the boundaries of their resources.

  6. Weakly supervised glasses removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yisu; Wen, Lijie

    2015-03-01

    Glasses removal is an important task on face recognition, in this paper, we provide a weakly supervised method to remove eyeglasses from an input face image automatically. We choose sparse coding as face reconstruction method, and optical flow to find exact shape of glasses. We combine the two processes iteratively to remove glasses more accurately. The experimental results reveal that our method works much better than these algorithms alone, and it can remove various glasses to obtain natural looking glassless facial images.

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the state-of-art technology for removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation includes results of several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from existing arsenic removal plants and key results from several EPA sponsored research studies. T...

  8. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  9. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  10. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  11. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  12. Final Technical Report EMSP 70045 Investigation of Pore Scale Processes That Affect Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles W.; Webb, Andrew W.

    2004-12-10

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination in the vadose zone is a significant problem at Department of Energy sites. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is commonly used to remediate DNAPLs from the vadose zone. In most cases, a period of high recovery has been followed by a sustained period of low recovery. This behavior has been attributed to multiple processes including slow interphase mass transfer, retarded vapor phase transport, and diffusion from unswept zones of low permeability. This research project used a combination of laboratory experimentation and mathematical modeling to determine how these various processes interact to limit the removal of DNAPL components in heterogeneous porous media during SVE. Our results were applied to scenarios typical of the carbon tetrachloride spill zone at the Hanford Site. Our results indicate that: (a) the initial distribution of the spilled DNAPL (i.e., the spill-zone architecture) has a major influence upon the performance of any subsequent SVE operations; (b) while the pattern of higher and lower conductivity soil zones has an important impact upon spill zone architecture, soil moisture distribution plays an even larger role when there are large quantities of co-disposed waste-water (as in the Hanford scenario); (c) depending upon soil moisture dynamics, liquid DNAPL that is trapped by surrounding water is extremely difficult to remove by SVE; (d) natural barometric pumping can remove a large amount of the initial DNAPL mass for spills occurring close to the land surface, and hence the initial spilled inventory will be over-estimated if this process is neglected.

  13. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  14. Engineering Challenges for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    Recent modeling studies on the instability of the debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have underlined the need for active debris removal. A 2009 analysis by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office shows that, in order to maintain the LEO debris population at a constant level for the next 200 years, an active debris removal of about five objects per year is needed. The targets identified for removal are those with the highest mass and collision probability products in the environment. Many of these objects are spent upper stages with masses ranging from 1 to more than 8 metric tons, residing in several altitude regions and concentrated in about 10 inclination bands. To remove five of those objects on a yearly basis, in a cost-effective manner, represents many challenges in engineering, technology development, and operations. This paper outlines a conceptual end-to-end debris removal operation, including launch, precision tracking, rendezvous, stabilization (of the tumbling targets), capture, and deorbit of the targets; and highlights major challenges associated with the operations. Pros and cons of several proposed removal techniques are also evaluated.

  15. Device for removing blackheads

    DOEpatents

    Berkovich, Tamara

    1995-03-07

    A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

  16. Removal of broken hardware.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J; McElvany, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    Despite advances in metallurgy, fatigue failure of hardware is common when a fracture fails to heal. Revision procedures can be difficult, usually requiring removal of intact or broken hardware. Several different methods may need to be attempted to successfully remove intact or broken hardware. Broken intramedullary nail cross-locking screws may be advanced out by impacting with a Steinmann pin. Broken open-section (Küntscher type) intramedullary nails may be removed using a hook. Closed-section cannulated intramedullary nails require additional techniques, such as the use of guidewires or commercially available extraction tools. Removal of broken solid nails requires use of a commercial ratchet grip extractor or a bone window to directly impact the broken segment. Screw extractors, trephines, and extraction bolts are useful for removing stripped or broken screws. Cold-welded screws and plates can complicate removal of locked implants and require the use of carbide drills or high-speed metal cutting tools. Hardware removal can be a time-consuming process, and no single technique is uniformly successful.

  17. The fundamental mechanisms of material removal by fluidjet machining

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1994-06-01

    The fundamental mechanisms of material removal by fluidjet machining have been theoretically and experimentally investigated as a potential method for dismantling nuclear weapons with efficiency and safety. Preliminary experiments and analyses have revealed that at small standoff distances between the nozzle exit and the target workpiece there is no mass removal from the workpiece, but that far from the nozzle there exists an optimum standoff distance at which the jet impact removes mass from the workpiece at a maximum rate. Such results suggest a mass-removal process due to the droplets and ligaments impinging on the material that cause sudden pressure increases in the impact regions. This proposed material-removal mechanism has been addressed theoretically by considering a series of multiple droplet impacts on a material. The calculated results display a series of pressure peaks at the target surface as each of these droplets strikes the material, supporting the plausibility of the proposed mass-removal scenario at the optimum standoff distance. Although plausible further experiments and analyses are needed to verify the proposed jet-induced mass removal mechanism.

  18. Gallbladder removal - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... the surgeon needs to switch to an open surgery if laparoscopic surgery cannot be successfully continued. Other reasons for removing the gallbladder by open surgery: Unexpected bleeding during the laparoscopic operation Obesity Pancreatitis (inflammation in the pancreas) Pregnancy ( ...

  19. Asbestos Removal Case History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Stanley J.

    1986-01-01

    The engineer for a California school district describes the asbestos removal from the ceilings of El Camino High School. Discusses forming a design team, use of consultants, specifications, relations with contractors, and staff notification. (MLF)

  20. Mechanical Foam Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streech, Neil

    1994-01-01

    Filter removes foam from soapy water stream discharged by primary phase separator of water-reclamation system. Uses no antifoam chemicals, contains no moving parts and requires no energy input other than small energy needed to pump water through filter.

  1. Paint removal using lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Garmire, E

    1995-07-20

    Experiments to investigate the potential for practical laser graffiti-removal systems are reported. A universal engineering curve for the time needed for removal of paint from nonconductive substrates that was valid over a range of 10(7) in intensity was measured with a variety of lasers. Comparable times were measured for conductive substrates, when pulses shorter than the thermal conduction times were used. Analysis suggests that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers may be the most efficient means for removing graffiti and other unwanted paint. An 1-m(2) area of paint 14 µm thick can be removed in approximately 10 min with a 50-Hz laser system of 15-W average power.

  2. Paint removal using lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Katherine; Garmire, Elsa

    1995-07-01

    Experiments to investigate the potential for practical laser graffiti-removal systems are reported. A universal engineering curve for the time needed for removal of paint from nonconductive substrates that was valid over a range of 107 in intensity was measured with a variety of lasers. Comparable times were measured for conductive substrates, when pulses shorter than the thermal conduction times were used. Analysis suggests that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers may be the most efficient means for removing graffiti and other unwanted paint. An 1-m2 area of paint 14 mu m thick can be removed in approximately 10 min with a 50-Hz laser system of 15-W average power.

  3. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... will make your scar show less. Thyroid Hormone Replacement You may need to take thyroid hormone medicine ... natural thyroid hormone. You may not need hormone replacement if only part of your thyroid was removed. ...

  4. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Weifang; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  5. Removing Images From Microfilm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    Film softened, scraped, and then dried. Unwanted images removed from microfilm for softening base film with hot water, scraping film and drying with isopropyl alcohol. Method simple and no visible damage to film.

  6. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  7. Sulfur removal from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Lompa-Krzymien, L.

    1985-01-01

    Coal is treated to remove both pyritic and organic sulfur by contacting with an aqueous solution comprising cupric ions at temperatures of about 140/sup 0/ C.-200/sup 0/ C. under autogenic pressure, until substantial amounts of the sulfur are solubilized, separating the coal solids, and washing the solids with water to remove soluble forms of sulfur, iron and copper therefrom. The copper can be recovered and recycled as a cupric salt.

  8. Laser hair removal pearls.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  9. Integrated pollutant removal: modeling and experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and computational work at the Albany Research Center, USDOE is investigating an integrated pollutant removal (IPR) process which removes all pollutants from flue gas, including SOX, NOX, particulates, CO2, and Hg. In combination with flue gas recirculation, heat recovery, and oxy-fuel combustion, the process produces solid, gas, and liquid waste streams. The gas exhaust stream comprises O2 and N2. Liquid streams contain H2O, SOX, NOX, and CO2. Computer modeling and low to moderate pressure experimentation are defining system chemistry with respect to SOX and H2O as well as heat and mass transfer for the IPR process.

  10. Space Station trash removal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A trash removal system for space stations is described. The system is comprised of a disposable trash bag member and an attached, compacted large, lightweight inflatable balloon element. When the trash bag member is filled, the astronaut places the bag member into space through an airlock. Once in the vacuum of space, the balloon element inflates. Due to the large cross-sectional area of the balloon element relative to its mass, the combined balloon element and the trash bag member are slowed by atmospheric drag to a much greater extent than the Space Station's. The balloon element and bag member lose altitude and re-enter the atmosphere, and the elements and contents are destroyed by aerodynamic heating. The novelty of this system is in the unique method of using the vacuum of space and aerodynamic heating to dispose of waste material with a minimum of increase in orbital debris.

  11. Characterisation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids of coal tar using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchotte-Lindsay, Caroline; McGregor, Laura; Richards, Phil; Kerr, Stephanie; Glenn, Aliyssa; Thomas, Russell; Kalin, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) is a recently developed analytical technique in which two capillary columns with different stationary phases are placed in series enabling planar resolution of the analytes. The resolution power of GCxGC is one order of magnitude higher than that of one dimension gas chromatography. Because of its high resolution capacity, the use of GCxGC for complex environmental samples such as crude oils, petroleum derivatives and polychlorinated biphenyls mixtures has rapidly grown in recent years. We developed a one-step method for the forensic analysis of coal tar dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) sites. Coal tar is the by-product of the gasification of coal for heating and lighting and it is composed of thousands of organic and inorganic compounds. Before the boom of natural gases and oils, most towns and cities had one or several manufactured gas plants that have, in many cases, left a devastating environmental print due to coal tar contamination. The fate of coal tar DNAPLs, which can persist in the environment for more than a hundred years, is therefore of crucial interest. The presented analytical method consists of a unique clean-up/ extraction stage by pressurized liquid extraction and a single analysis of its organic chemical composition using GCxGC coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). The chemical fingerprinting is further improved by derivatisation by N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) of the tar compounds containing -OH functions such as alcohols and carboxylic acids. We present here how, using the logical order of elution in GCxGC-TOFMS system, 1) the identification of never before observed -OH containing compounds is possible and 2) the isomeric selectivity of an oxidation reaction on a DNAPL sample can be revealed. Using samples collected at various FMGP sites, we demonstrate how this GCxGC method enables the simultaneous

  12. Laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, there have been numerous advances in hair laser removal that utilize melanin as a chromophore. All of the devices on the market may be used in patients with light skin (phototypes I-III) and yield hair reduction near 75%. The ruby (694 nm) laser, alexandrite (755 nm) laser, and diode (810 nm) laser, as well as intense pulsed light are commonly used devices for hair laser removal. The long-pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser represents the safest device for hair removal in dark-skinned patients because of its long wavelength, although the diode laser, alexandrite laser, and intense pulse light may be used. For treatment of light hair, combination radiofrequency and optical devices as well as photodynamic therapy are under investigation.

  13. Arsenic removal from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  14. Gasless laparoscopic removal of retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Viani, M P; Poggi, R V; Pinto, A; Maruotti, R A

    1995-02-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor originating from the smooth muscular tissue in any part of the organism. The only therapy is its complete removal. We describe herein the operative treatment of a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma with gasless laparoscopic complete removal. The procedure was successfully performed in a consenting woman with an abdominal mass. Gasless laparoscopic removal was performed with a mechanical retractor (Laparolift, Origin Medsystem Inc.), obviating the creation of the pneumoperitoneum and of the sealed environment. The technique is a simple, safe, and effective surgical method. Gasless technique guarantees a clear vision, makes possible continuous suction of smoke and fluids, and allows the use of conventional instruments and easy management of suturing. The present case has proved to be another abdominal procedure that can be carried out with all the advantages of gasless miniinvasive surgery.

  15. Dry removal of asbestos.

    PubMed

    Elias, J D

    1981-08-01

    A method for the dry removal of friable asbestos has been developed. The Workplace Safety and Health Branch in Manitoba's Limited have co-operated in the production of an improved procedure. It was employed for the first time in the fall of 1979 when the Industrial Hygiene Section was asked for advice about removal of asbestos from a Winnipeg School Division warehouse. Fans were used to maintain the work area under negative pressure to prevent the spread of asbestos throughout the building. The exhaust air was filtered to prevent environmental contamination, and special precautions were taken to protect workers.

  16. Removable feedwater sparger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.

    1994-01-01

    A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith.

  17. Quickly Removable Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, John S.

    1988-01-01

    Unit removed with minimal disturbance. Valve inlet and outlet ports adjacent to each other on same side of valve body. Ports inserted into special manifold on fluid line. Valve body attached to manifold by four bolts or, alternatively, by toggle clamps. Electromechanical actuator moves in direction parallel to fluid line to open and close valve. When necessary to clean valve, removed simply by opening bolts or toggle clamps. No need to move or separate ports of fluid line. Valve useful where disturbance of fluid line detrimental or where fast maintenance essential - in oil and chemical industries, automotive vehicles, aircraft, and powerplants.

  18. Optimising Laser Tattoo Removal

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Kabir; Ranjan, Rashmi; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are the standard modality for tattoo removal. Though there are various factors that determine the results, we have divided them into three logical headings, laser dependant factors such as type of laser and beam modifications, tattoo dependent factors like size and depth, colour of pigment and lastly host dependent factors, which includes primarily the presence of a robust immune response. Modifications in the existing techniques may help in better clinical outcome with minimal risk of complications. This article provides an insight into some of these techniques along with a detailed account of the factors involved in tattoo removal. PMID:25949018

  19. Drum lid removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Pella, Bernard M.; Smith, Philip D.

    2010-08-24

    A tool for removing the lid of a metal drum wherein the lid is clamped over the drum rim without protruding edges, the tool having an elongated handle with a blade carried by an angularly positioned holder affixed to the midsection of the handle, the blade being of selected width to slice between lid lip and the drum rim and, when the blade is so positioned, upward motion of the blade handle will cause the blade to pry the lip from the rim and allow the lid to be removed.

  20. Optimising laser tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Ranjan, Rashmi; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are the standard modality for tattoo removal. Though there are various factors that determine the results, we have divided them into three logical headings, laser dependant factors such as type of laser and beam modifications, tattoo dependent factors like size and depth, colour of pigment and lastly host dependent factors, which includes primarily the presence of a robust immune response. Modifications in the existing techniques may help in better clinical outcome with minimal risk of complications. This article provides an insight into some of these techniques along with a detailed account of the factors involved in tattoo removal.

  1. Mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Leo

    1987-01-01

    Observational evidence for mass loss from cool stars is reviewed. Spectra line profiles are used for the derivation of mass-loss rates with the aid of the equation of continuity. This equation implies steady mass loss with spherical symmetry. Data from binary stars, Mira variables, and red giants in globular clusters are examined. Silicate emission is discussed as a useful indicator of mass loss in the middle infrared spectra. The use of thermal millimeter-wave radiation, Very Large Array (VLA) measurement of radio emission, and OH/IR masers are discussed as a tool for mass loss measurement. Evidence for nonsteady mass loss is also reviewed.

  2. Parathyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and will remove the diseased glands with the instruments. Endoscopic parathyroidectomy: Your surgeon will make two or three small cuts in the front of your neck and one cut above the top of your collarbone. This reduces visible scarring, pain, and recovery time. This cut is less than ...

  3. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  4. Bunion removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... clean and dry until it is removed. Take sponge baths or cover your foot and dressing with a plastic bag when you take showers if it is OK with your health care provider. Make sure water cannot leak into the bag.

  5. Improved Paint Removal Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-25

    4 (Phenol)1: p1P4 ji:i Condition of Point Surface Condition of Paint: Surface 4 after 45 minutes ufter 25 minutes Ten~t Pronsidure No. I. on~ Tent ...the ,.I .- pit so high velume water flow can be used to flush the pit floor clean at I the end of each day. Installation of removable grating is also

  6. Scrotal masses

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause scrotal masses can be easily treated. Even testicular cancer has a high cure rate if found and ... your provider to determine if it may be testicular cancer. Prevention You can prevent scrotal masses caused by ...

  7. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... lumpy mass in the right upper quadrant. Liver enlargement (hepatomegaly) can cause a firm, irregular mass below ... the kidney (usually only affects one kidney). Spleen enlargement (splenomegaly) can sometimes be felt in the left- ...

  8. Adsorption and removal of graphene dispersants.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Hansen, Matthew J; Bari, Rozana; Parviz, Dorsa; Metzler, Shane D; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K; Green, Micah J

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate three different techniques (dialysis, vacuum filtration, and spray drying) for removal of dispersants from liquid-exfoliated graphene. We evaluate these techniques for elimination of dispersants from both the bulk liquid phase and from the graphene surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms dispersant removal by these treatments. Vacuum filtration (driving by convective mass transfer) is the most effective method of dispersant removal, regardless of the type of dispersant, removing up to ∼95 wt.% of the polymeric dispersant with only ∼7.4 wt.% decrease in graphene content. Dialysis also removes a significant fraction (∼70 wt.% for polymeric dispersants) of un-adsorbed dispersants without disturbing the dispersion quality. Spray drying produces re-dispersible, crumpled powder samples and eliminates much of the unabsorbed dispersants. We also show that there is no rapid desorption of dispersants from the graphene surface. In addition, electrical conductivity measurements demonstrate conductivities one order of magnitude lower for graphene drop-cast films (where excess dispersants are present) than for vacuum filtered films, confirming poor inter-sheet connectivity when excess dispersants are present.

  9. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  10. Laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimi, Omar A; Avram, Mathew M; Hanke, C William; Kilmer, Suzanne L; Anderson, R Rox

    2011-01-01

    The extended theory of selective photothermolysis enables the laser surgeon to target and destroy hair follicles, thereby leading to hair removal. Today, laser hair removal (LHR) is the most commonly requested cosmetic procedure in the world and is routinely performed by dermatologists, other physicians, and non-physician personnel with variable efficacy. The ideal candidate for LHR is fair skinned with dark terminal hair; however, LHR can today be successfully performed in all skin types. Knowledge of hair follicle anatomy and physiology, proper patient selection and preoperative preparation, principles of laser safety, familiarity with the various laser/light devices, and a thorough understanding of laser-tissue interactions are vital to optimizing treatment efficacy while minimizing complications and side effects.

  11. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Neuhaus, John E.

    1992-01-01

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  12. Investigations in gallium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  13. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  14. Runaway Rubber Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    16, No. 1, Jan 1944, pp. 53-68. 4. Moore, D.F., The Friction of Pneumatic Tyres , Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam, The Netherlands...timing of rubber removal are addressed. i’ ’ - " " - . 1.3 The Method of Research. A literature review first investigates the history , mechanics...mechanics of tire-pavement friction are fundamental to any study of the runway rubber process. In this section the history and two main components of

  15. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  16. Laser removal of tattoos.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; Fatuzzo, G; Narcisi, A; Abruzzese, C; Caperchi, C; Gamba, A; Parisella, F R; Persechino, S

    2012-01-01

    In Western countries the phenomenon of "tattooing" is expanding and tattoos are considered a new fashion among young people. In this paper we briefly trace the history of tattooing, the techniques used, the analysis of pigments used, and their possible adverse reactions. We also carried out a review of the international literature on the use of Q-switched laser in tattoo removal and its complications, and we describe our experience in the use of this technique.

  17. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  18. Neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed.

  19. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  20. Bioretention column studies of phosphorus removal from urban stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-hsu; Davis, Allen P; Needelman, Brian A

    2007-02-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of bioretention as a stormwater management practice using repetitive bioretention columns for phosphorus removal. Bioretention media, with a higher short-term phosphorus sorption capacity, retained more phosphorus from infiltrating runoff after 3 mg/L phosphorus loading. A surface mulch layer prevented clogging after repetitive total suspended solids input. Evidence suggests that long-term phosphorus reactions will regenerate active short-term phosphorus adsorption sites. A high hydraulic conductivity media overlaying one with low hydraulic conductivity resulted in a higher runoff infiltration rate, from 0.51 to 0.16 cm/min at a fixed 15-cm head, and was more efficient in phosphorus removal (85% mass removal) than a profile with low conductivity media over high (63% mass removal). Media extractions suggest that most of the retained phosphorus in the media layers is available for vegetative uptake and that environmental risk thresholds were not exceeded.

  1. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  2. Mower/Litter Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Burg Corporation needed to get more power out of the suction system in their Vac 'N Bag grass mower/litter remover. The president submitted a problem statement to the Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Transfer Office, which devised a way to guide heavier items of trash to a point where suction was greatest, and made changes to the impeller and the exhaust port, based on rocket propulsion technology. The improved system is used by highway departments, city governments and park authorities, reducing work time by combining the tasks of grass cutting and vacuuming trash and grass clippings.

  3. Hot Oil Removes Wax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Mineral oil heated to temperature of 250 degrees F (121 degrees C) found effective in removing wax from workpieces after fabrication. Depending upon size and shape of part to be cleaned of wax, part immersed in tank of hot oil, and/or interior of part flushed with hot oil. Pump, fittings, and ancillary tooling built easily for this purpose. After cleaning, innocuous oil residue washed off part by alkaline aqueous degreasing process. Serves as relatively safe alternative to carcinogenic and environmentally hazardous solvent perchloroethylene.

  4. Inertial Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth P.

    2007-01-01

    The inertial balance is one device that can help students to quantify the quality of inertia--a body's resistance to a change in movement--in more generally understood terms of mass. In this hands-on activity, students use the inertial balance to develop a more quantitative idea of what mass means in an inertial sense. The activity also helps…

  5. Mercury removal sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  6. X-31 wing removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    U.S. and German personnel of the X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Technology Demonstrator aircraft program removing the right wing of the aircraft, which was ferried from Edwards Air Force Base, California, to Europe on May 22, 1995 aboard an Air Force Reserve C-5 transport. The X-31, based at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was ferried to Europe and flown in the Paris Air Show in June. The wing of the X-31 was removed on May 18, 1995, to allow the aircraft to fit inside the C-5 fuselage. Officials of the X-31 project used Manching, Germany, as a staging base to prepare the aircraft for the flight demonstration. At the air show, the X-31 demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. The aircraft arrived back at Edwards in a Air Force Reserve C-5 on June 25, 1995 and off loaded at Dryden June 27. The X-31 aircraft was developed jointly by Rockwell International's North American Aircraft Division (now part of Boeing) and Daimler-Benz Aerospace (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm), under sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Defense and The German Federal Ministry of Defense.

  7. Engine Removal Projection Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2005-06-02

    The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

  8. Comparison of veterinary drug residue results in animal tissues by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole or quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry after different sample preparation methods, including use of a commercial lipid removal product.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Lehotay, Steven J; Stevens, Joan; Zweigenbaum, Jerry

    2017-04-01

    Veterinary drug residues in animal-derived foods must be monitored to ensure food safety, verify proper veterinary practices, enforce legal limits in domestic and imported foods, and for other purposes. A common goal in drug residue analysis in foods is to achieve acceptable monitoring results for as many analytes as possible, with higher priority given to the drugs of most concern, in an efficient and robust manner. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has implemented a multiclass, multi-residue method based on sample preparation using dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) for cleanup and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QQQ) for analysis of >120 drugs at regulatory levels of concern in animal tissues. Recently, a new cleanup product called "enhanced matrix removal for lipids" (EMR-L) was commercially introduced that used a unique chemical mechanism to remove lipids from extracts. Furthermore, high-resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q/TOF) for (U)HPLC detection often yields higher selectivity than targeted QQQ analyzers while allowing retroactive processing of samples for other contaminants. In this study, the use of both d-SPE and EMR-L sample preparation and UHPLC-QQQ and UHPLC-Q/TOF analysis methods for shared spiked samples of bovine muscle, kidney, and liver was compared. The results showed that the EMR-L method provided cleaner extracts overall and improved results for several anthelmintics and tranquilizers compared to the d-SPE method, but the EMR-L method gave lower recoveries for certain β-lactam antibiotics. QQQ vs. Q/TOF detection showed similar mixed performance advantages depending on analytes and matrix interferences, with an advantage to Q/TOF for greater possible analytical scope and non-targeted data collection. Either combination of approaches may be used to meet monitoring purposes, with an edge in efficiency to d-SPE, but greater instrument robustness and less matrix effects when

  9. Active Debris Removal and the Challenges for Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent modeling studies on the instability of the debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have underlined the need for active debris removal. A 2009 analysis by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office shows that, in order to maintain the LEO debris population at a constant level for the next 200 years, an active debris removal of about five objects per year is needed. The targets identified for removal are those with the highest mass and collision probability products in the environment. Many of these objects are spent upper stages with masses ranging from 1 to more than 8 metric tons, residing in several altitude regions and concentrated in about 7 inclination bands. To remove five of those objects on a yearly basis, in a cost-effective manner, represents many challenges in technology development, engineering, and operations. This paper outlines the fundamental rationale for considering active debris removal and addresses the two possible objectives of the operations -- removing large debris to stabilize the environment and removing small debris to reduce the threat to operational spacecraft. Technological and engineering challenges associated with the two different objectives are also discussed.

  10. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals.

  11. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  12. Black hole hair removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Mandal, Ipsita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-07-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair — degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  13. Rubber stopper remover

    DOEpatents

    Stitt, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    A device for removing a rubber stopper from a test tube is mountable to an upright wall, has a generally horizontal splash guard, and a lower plate spaced parallel to and below the splash guard. A slot in the lower plate has spaced-apart opposing edges that converge towards each other from the plate outer edge to a narrowed portion, the opposing edges shaped to make engagement between the bottom of the stopper flange and the top edge of the test tube to wedge therebetween and to grasp the stopper in the slot narrowed portion to hold the stopper as the test tube is manipulated downwardly and pulled from the stopper. The opposing edges extend inwardly to adjoin an opening having a diameter significantly larger than that of the stopper flange.

  14. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  15. Mass Deacidification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Carolyn

    1979-01-01

    Reviews methods being developed for mass deacidification of books to prevent deterioration of paper. The use of diethyl zinc, liquified gas, and morpholine, and the advantages, disadvantages, and cost of each are considered. A 26-item bibliography is included. (JD)

  16. Proanthocyanidin-based Endotoxin Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-16

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 Proanthocyanidin-based Endotoxin Removal January 16, 2014 Approved for public release...17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Proanthocyanidin-based Endotoxin Removal Brandy J. White, James B. Delehanty, Baochuan Lin, and George P. Anderson Naval...Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified SAR 20 Brandy J. White (202) 404-6100 The application of proanthocyanidins (PACs) to the capture and removal of

  17. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents a long term performance study of two iron removal water treatment plants to remove arsenic from drinking water sources. Performance information was collected from one system located in midwest for one full year and at the second system located in the farwest...

  18. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Nier, A.O.C.

    1959-08-25

    A voltage switching apparatus is described for use with a mass spectrometer in the concentratron analysis of several components of a gas mixture. The system automatically varies the voltage on the accelerating electrode of the mass spectrometer through a program of voltages which corresponds to the particular gas components under analysis. Automatic operation may be discontinued at any time to permit the operator to manually select any desired predetermined accelerating voltage. Further, the system may be manually adjusted to vary the accelerating voltage over a wide range.

  19. Removal of dimethyl phthalate from water by ozone microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Jabesa, Abdisa; Ghosh, Pallab

    2016-10-27

    This work investigates the removal of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) from water using ozone microbubbles in a pilot plant of 20 dm(3) capacity. Experiments were performed under various reaction conditions to examine the effects of the initial concentration of DMP, pH of the medium, ozone generation rate, and the role of H2O2 on the removal of DMP. The DMP present in water was effectively removed by the ozone microbubbles. The removal was effective in neutral and alkaline media. Increase in the initial concentration of the target pollutant negatively affected its removal efficiency. The removal efficiency dramatically increased from 1% to 99% when the ozone generation rate was increased from 0.28 to 1.94 mg s(-1) at pH 7. The total organic carbon measurements revealed that a complete mineralization of DMP was achieved within 1.8 ks at the high ozone feed rate. The use of t-butyl alcohol as the hydroxyl radical scavenger confirmed that the reaction between the target organic compound and ·OH radical dominated over its direct reaction with ozone. The reaction between DMP and ozone followed an overall second-order kinetics. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient of ozone in the reacting system and the enhancement factor increased with increasing initial concentration of DMP. Very low values of Hatta number were obtained at all initial concentrations of DMP and pH, which show that the mass transfer resistance was small.

  20. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  1. Nitrogen removal in recirculated duckweed ponds system.

    PubMed

    Benjawan, L; Koottatep, T

    2007-01-01

    Duckweed-based ponds (DWBPs) have the potential for nitrogen (N) removal from wastewater; however, operational problems such as duckweed die-off regularly occur. In this study, effluent recirculation was applied to the DWBPs to solve the above problem as well as to investigate N removal mechanisms. Two pilot scale recirculated DWBPs were employed to treat municipal wastewater. The average removal efficiencies for TN, TKN and NH4-N were 75%, 89% and 92%, respectively at TN loading of 1.3 g/m2.d and were 73%, 74% and 76%, respectively at TN loading of 3.3 g/m2.d. The effluent of the system under both operational conditions had stable quality and met the effluent standard. Duckweed die-off was not observed during the study, which proves the system stability and effluent recirculation which is thought to be a reason. N-mass balance revealed that nitrification-denitrification and duckweed uptake play major roles in these recirculated DWBPs. The rates of nitrification-denitrification were increased as TN loading was higher, which might be an influence from an abundance of N and a suitable condition. The rates of N uptake by duckweed were found similar and did not depend on the higher TN loading applied, as the duckweed has limited capacity to assimilate it.

  2. Chabazite biofilter for enhanced stormwater nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel P

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced nitrogen removal from stormwater using chabazite, a natural cation exchanger, was evaluated in a pilot-plant biofilter operated for 216 days. A parallel sand filter served as the control. The biofilters were subject to various operating modes including baseline periods of steady flowrate and loading, simulated high flowrate (storm) events following steady flowrates, high flowrates following extended no-flow periods, and with limited influent dissolved oxygen. Under steady-flow operation, chabazite removed 93% of ammonium and sand removed 87%; total inorganic nitrogen was reduced 35% by chabazite versus 15% by sand. In a simulated storm event following steady-flow operation, 97% of cumulative ammonia mass was retained by the chabazite biofilter versus 70% for sand. Following a 40 day no-flow period, the chabazite biofilter retained 98% of influent ammonium in a storm event while sand exhibited high effluent ammonium. Chabazite ammonium retention was high under limited influent dissolved oxygen, verses significant breakthrough by the sand biofilter. Chabazite media provided superior performance resiliency under dynamic conditions that typify stormwater treatment.

  3. Evaluation of trichloroethene recovery processes in heterogeneous aquifer cells flushed with biodegradable surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomel, Eric J.; Ramsburg, C. Andrew; Pennell, Kurt D.

    2007-12-01

    The ability of two biodegradable surfactants, polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween® 80) and sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate (Aerosol® MA), to recover a representative dense non-aqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL), trichloroethene (TCE), from heterogeneous porous media was evaluated through a combination of batch and aquifer cell experiments. An aqueous solution containing 3.3% Aerosol MA, 8% 2-propanol and 6 g/l CaCl 2 yielded a weight solubilization ratio (WSR) of 1.21 g TCE/g surfactant, with a corresponding liquid-liquid interfacial tension (IFT) of 0.19 dyn/cm. Flushing of aquifer cells containing a TCE-DNAPL source zone with approximately two pore volumes of the AMA formulation resulted in substantial (> 30%) mobilization of TCE-DNAPL. However, a TCE mass recovery of 81% was achieved when the aqueous-phase flow rate was sufficient to displace the mobile TCE-DNAPL toward the effluent well. Aqueous solutions of Tween 80 exhibited a greater capacity to solubilize TCE (WSR = 1.74 g TCE/g surfactant) and exerted markedly less reduction in IFT (10.4 dyn/cm). These data contradict an accepted empirical correlation used to estimate IFT values from solubilization capacity, and indicate a unique capacity of T80 to form concentrated TCE emulsions. Flushing of aquifer cells with less than 2.5 pore volumes of a 4% T80 solution achieved TCE mass recoveries ranging from 66 to 85%, with only slight TCE-DNAPL mobilization (< 5%) occurring when the total trapping number exceeded 2 × 10 - 5 . These findings demonstrate the ability of Tween 80 and Aerosol MA solutions to efficiently recover TCE from a heterogeneous DNAPL source zone, and the utility of the total trapping number as a design parameter for a priori prediction of DNAPL mobilization and bank angle formation when flushing with low-IFT solutions. Given their potential to stimulate microbial reductive dechlorination at low concentrations, these surfactants are well-suited for remedial action plans that couple

  4. Water quality improvement through bioretention media: nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Davis, Allen P; Shokouhian, Mohammad; Sharma, Himanshu; Minami, Christie

    2006-03-01

    High nutrient inputs and eutrophication continue to be one of the highest priority water quality problems. Bioretention is a low-impact development technology that has been advocated for use in urban and other developed areas. This work provides an in-depth analysis on removal of nutrients from a synthetic stormwater runoff by bioretention. Results have indicated good removal of phosphorus (70 to 85%) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (55 to 65%). Nitrate reduction was poor (< 20%) and, in several cases, nitrate production was noted. Variations in flowrate (intensity) and duration had a moderate affect on nutrient removal. Mass balances demonstrate the importance of water attenuation in the facility in reducing mass nutrient loads. Captured nitrogen can be converted to nitrate between storm events and subsequently washed from the system. Analysis on the fate of nutrients in bioretention suggests that accumulation of phosphorus and nitrogen may be controlled by carefully managing growing and harvesting of vegetation.

  5. On the mass of 40 Eri B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, Detlev; Weidemann, Volker

    1991-01-01

    New observations of the gravitational redshift of 40 Eri B are combined with the recent improvement in the parallax determination to derive a mass of 0.53 + or - 0.04 solar masses for the white dwarf. This is much closer to the typical value for white dwarfs, and is consistent with mass-radius relations, but inconsistent with the astrometric mass determination (0.43 + 0.02 solar masses). While the error of the astrometric mass determination might be larger than usually assumed, a discrepancy remains, which cannot be explained. If the high mass could be confirmed, it would remove 40 Eri B as a case in favor of the merging hypothesis for the explanation of the existence of low-mass white dwarfs.

  6. ARSENIC REMOVAL COST ESTIMATING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Removal Cost Estimating program (Excel) calculates the costs for using adsorptive media and anion exchange treatment systems to remove arsenic from drinking water. The program is an easy-to-use tool to estimate capital and operating costs for three types of arsenic re...

  7. Barnacle removal process and product

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, T.L.

    1984-07-24

    Barnacles from marine vessels are removed by spraying the surfaces thereof with a mixture the active ingredients of which are a hydrocarbon liquid oil; a surfactant; alcohol; a metal hypochlorite; and an alkyl, dialkyl benzyl ammonium salt. After the solution has been applied to the surfaces for about 20 minutes, the barnacles are removed by power spraying the surfaces with water.

  8. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2011-02-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  9. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2010-07-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  10. Nutrient Removal in Wastewater Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Kanti L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the sources and effects of nutrients in wastewater, and the methods of their removal in wastewater treatment. In order to conserve water resources and eliminate the cost of nutrient removal, treated effluent should be used wherever possible for irrigation, since it contains all the ingredients for proper plant growth. (JR)

  11. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  12. Laser assisted hair-removal.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, S; Elsaie, M L; Nouri, K

    2009-10-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the hair follicle by targeting melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Laser hair removal is achieved through follicular unit destruction based on selective photothermolysis. The principle of selective photothermolysis predicts that the thermal injury will be restricted to a given target if there is sufficient selective absorption of light and the pulse duration is shorter than the thermal relaxation time of the target. This review will focus on the mechanisms of laser assisted hair removal and provide an update on the newer technologies emerging in the field of lasers assisted hair removal.

  13. Layer modeling of zinc removal from metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yujie; Li, Xingang; Ding, Hui

    2015-08-01

    A layer model was established to elucidate the mechanism of zinc removal from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation. The removal process was optimized by response surface methodology, and the optimum operating conditions were the chamber pressure of 0.1Pa, heating temperature of 923K, heating time of 60.0min, particle size of 70 mesh (0.212mm) and initial mass of 5.25g. Evaporation efficiency of zinc, the response variable, was 99.79%, which indicates that the zinc can be efficiently removed. Based on the experimental results, a mathematical model, which bears on layer structure, evaporation, mass transfer and condensation, interprets the mechanism of the variable effects. Especially, in order to reveal blocking effect on the zinc removal, the Blake-Kozeny-Burke-Plummer equation was introduced into the mass transfer process. The layer model can be applied to a wider range of metal removal by vacuum distillation.

  14. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  15. Biosurfactant-enhanced removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Chi; Huang, Yi-Chien; Wei, Yu-Hong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2009-08-15

    A screening method was developed to evaluate the oil removal capability of biosurfactants for oil-contaminated soils collected from a heavy oil-polluted site. The ability of removing total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) from soil by two biosurfactants was identified and compared with that of synthetic surfactants. The results show that biosurfactants exhibited much higher TPH removal efficiency than the synthetic ones examined. By using 0.2 mass% of rhamnolipids, surfactin, Tween 80, and Triton X-100, the TPH removal for the soil contaminated with ca. 3,000 mg TPH/kg dry soil was 23%, 14%, 6%, and 4%, respectively, while removal efficiency increased to 63%, 62%, 40%, and 35%, respectively, for the soil contaminated with ca. 9000 mg TPH/kg dry soil. The TPH removal efficiency also increased with an increase in biosurfactant concentration (from 0 to 0.2 mass%) but it did not vary significantly for the contact time of 1 and 7 days.

  16. Removal of detergents from proteins and peptides in a spin-column format.

    PubMed

    Antharavally, Babu S

    2012-08-01

    To enable downstream analysis, it is critical to remove unbound detergents from protein and peptide samples. This unit describes the use of a high-performance resin that offers exceptional detergent removal for proteins and peptides. The easy-to-use spin format significantly improves results over the standard drip column and batch methodologies, with >95% removal of 1% to 5% detergents, including SDS, sodium deoxycholate, CHAPS, Triton X-100, Triton X-114, NP-40, Brij-35, octyl glucoside, octyl thioglucoside, and lauryl maltoside, with high recovery of proteins and peptides. Detergent removal efficiency is evaluated using colorimetric methods and mass spectrometry (MS). BSA tryptic peptides have been successfully analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MS for identification of protein, following detergent removal using the resin. Advantages of this method include speed (less than 15 min), efficient detergent removal, and high recovery of proteins and peptides.

  17. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  18. MASS SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheimer, F.; Bell, J.W.

    1959-02-17

    An improvement in the mounting arrangement for the ion source within the vacuum tank of a calutron is presented. The entire source is supported by the vacuum envelope through the medium of a bracket secured to a removable face plate. The bracket forms a supporting platform that is generally transverse to the magnetic field. The ion generator is mounted on a pedestal-type insulator supported on the bracket, and the hot leads are brought into the vacuum envelope through a tubular elbow connected to the vacuum envelope, having the axis of its outer opening aligned with the magnetic field at which point a bushing-type insulator is employed. With this arrangement thc ion source is maintained at a positive potential with respect to the vacuum tank and the problem of electron bombardment of the insulator is considerably reduced.

  19. Mass Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    2001-01-18

    The purpose of this CRADA was to use Honeywell's experience in low temperature cofire ceramics and traditional ceramics to assemble a relatively low-cost, mass-producible miniature mass analyzer. The specific design, given to us by Mass Sensors, LLC, was used to test for helium. The direct benefit for the participant was to have a prototype unit assembled for the purpose of proof of concept and the ability to secure venture capital investors. From that, the company would begin producing their own product for sale. The consumer/taxpayer benefits come from the wide variety of industries that can utilize this technology to improve quality of life. Medical industry can use this technology to improve diagnostic ability; manufacturing industry can use it for improved air, water, and soil monitoring to minimize pollution; and the law enforcement community can use this technology for identification of substances. These are just a few examples of the benefit of this technology. The benefits to DOE were in the area of process improvement for cofire and ceramic materials. From this project we demonstrated nonlinear thickfilm fine lines and spaces that were 5-mil wide with 5-mil spaces; determined height-to diameter-ratios for punched and filled via holes; demonstrated the ability to punch and fill 5-mil microvias; developed and demonstrated the capability to laser cut difficult geometries in 40-mil ceramic; developed and demonstrated coupling LTCC with standard alumina and achieving hermetic seals; developed and demonstrated three-dimensional electronic packaging concepts; and demonstrated printing variable resistors within 1% of the nominal value and within a tightly defined ratio. The capability of this device makes it invaluable for many industries. The device could be used to monitor air samples around manufacturing plants. It also could be used for monitoring automobile exhaust, for doing blood gas analysis, for sampling gases being emitted by volcanoes, for studying

  20. Pollutant removal characteristics of a two-influent-line BNR process performing denitrifying phosphorus removal: role of sludge recycling ratios.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Leng, Feng; Chen, Piao; Kueppers, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    This paper studied denitrifying phosphorus removal of a novel two-line biological nutrient removal process treating low strength domestic wastewater under different sludge recycling ratios. Mass balance of intracellular compounds including polyhydroxyvalerate, polyhydroxybutyrate and glycogen was investigated together with total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP). Results showed that sludge recycling ratios had a significant influence on the use of organics along bioreactors and 73.6% of the average removal efficiency was obtained when the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) ranged from 175.9 mgL(-1) to 189.9 mgL(-1). The process performed better under a sludge recycling ratio of 100% compared to 25% and 50% in terms of ammonia and COD removal rates. Overall, TN removal efficiency for 50% and 100% sludge recycling ratios were 56.4% and 61.9%, respectively, unlike the big gap for carbon utilization and the TP removal rates, indicating that the effect of sludge recycling ratio on the anaerobic compartments had been counteracted by change in the efficiency of other compartments. The higher ratio of sludge recycling was conducive to the removal of TN, not in favor of TP, and less influence on COD. Thus, 25% was considered to be the optimal sludge recycling ratio.

  1. USGS Dam Removal Science Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellmore, J. Ryan; Vittum, Katherine; Duda, Jeff J.; Greene, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    This database is the result of an extensive literature search aimed at identifying documents relevant to the emerging field of dam removal science. In total the database contains 179 citations that contain empirical monitoring information associated with 130 different dam removals across the United States and abroad. Data includes publications through 2014 and supplemented with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Inventory of Dams database, U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System and aerial photos to estimate locations when coordinates were not provided. Publications were located using the Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Clearinghouse for Dam Removal Information.

  2. Enhancement of the natural organic matter removal from drinking water by nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, A; Liikanen, R; Nyström, M; Lindqvist, N; Tuhkanen, T

    2004-03-01

    Finnish surface waters are abundant in natural organic matter. Natural organic matter can be removed from drinking water in a water treatment process by coagulation and filtration. The standard treatment operations are not able to remove the smallest molar mass fraction of organic matter and the intermediate molar mass matter is only partly removed. The removal of residual natural organic matter from drinking water by nanofiltration was evalueted in this study. Three different nanofiltration membranes were compared in filtering six pre-treated surface waters. The total organic carbon content of the feed waters varied from 2.0 to 4.2 mg l(-1). Other water quality parameters measured were conductivity, alkalinity, hardness, UV-absorbance, SUVA, E2/E3 value and molecular size distribution by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. The natural organic matter removal efficiencies of the membranes were good and varied between 100% and 49%, and between 85% and 47% according to molecular size distribution and total organic carbon measurements, respectively. Removal of different molecular size fractions varied from 100% to 56%, 100% to 54% and 88% to 19%, regarding high molar mass, intermediate molar mass and low molar mass organic matter, respectively. The Desal-5 DL membrane produced the highest natural organic matter removals.

  3. Phosphorus speciation and treatment using enhanced phosphorus removal bioretention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiayu; Davis, Allen P

    2014-01-01

    This field research investigated the water quality performance of a traditional bioretention cell retrofitted with 5% (by mass) water treatment residual (WTR) for enhanced phosphorus removal. Results indicate that WTR incorporation into the bioretention media does not negatively influence the infiltration mechanism of the bioretention system. Total suspended solids (TSS), total phosphorus (TP), and particulate phosphorus (PP) concentrations in runoff inflow were significantly reduced compared to outflow due to filtration of particulate matter. TP concentrations were significantly reduced by the bioretention cell; before WTR retrofit TP export occurred. Although net removal of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) from incoming runoff was not found, leaching of dissolved phosphorus (DP) was prevented not only from incoming runoff, but also from the media and captured PP. Near constant outflow SRP and DOP concentrations suggest an equilibrium adsorption treatment mechanism. Both event mean concentrations and mass loads were reduced for TSS and all P species. Pollutant mass removals were higher than the event mean concentration removals due to the attenuation of volume by the bioretention media.

  4. Documentation for POTW Removal Rates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Table VI of the RFI presents removal and destruction rates for toxic chemicals sent to POTWs, based on experimental and estimated data compiled by the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) Program.

  5. Spleen removal - laparoscopic - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneeze to ease discomfort and protect your incision. Wound Care If stitches, staples, or glue were used ... 57 Read More Spleen removal Patient Instructions Surgical wound care - open Review Date 3/13/2015 Updated ...

  6. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminar las cicatrices del acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  7. Removing Silicone Grease from Glassware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Thomas H.

    1997-07-01

    A recent note in this Journal (1) described the use of 5% aqueous hydrofluoric acid for removing silicone grease residues from round-bottom flasks. A safer and more convenient alternative is a saturated solution of sodium hydroxide in ethanol.

  8. Active debris removal of multiple priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Lüpken, A.; Flegel, S.; Gelhaus, J.; Möckel, M.; Kebschull, C.; Wiedemann, C.; Vörsmann, P.

    2013-05-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 km with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry in SSO, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome.Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any further launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target.In this paper, chemical and electric propulsion systems were analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The targets were chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission efficiency. Total mission time, ΔV and system mass were identified as key parameters to allow for an evaluation of the different concepts. It was shown that it

  9. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.

    1962-01-01

    method is described for operating a mass spectrometer to improve its resolution qualities and to extend its period of use substantially between cleanings. In this method, a small amount of a beta emitting gas such as hydrogen titride or carbon-14 methane is added to the sample being supplied to the spectrometer for investigation. The additive establishes leakage paths on the surface of the non-conducting film accumulating within the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer, thereby reducing the effect of an accumulated static charge on the electrostatic and magnetic fields established within the instrument. (AEC)

  10. Article removal device for glovebox

    DOEpatents

    Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

    1973-12-01

    An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

  11. Electronic Commerce Removing Regulatory Impediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    AD-A252 691 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Removing Regulatory Impediments ~DuiG A% ELECTE I JUL1 8 1992 0 C D Daniel J. Drake John A. Ciucci ... - ""N ST AT KE...Management Institute 6400 Goldsboro Road Bethesda, Maryland 20817-5886 92 LMI Executive Summary ELECTRONIC COMMERCE : REMOVING REGULATORY IMPEDIMENTS... Electronic Commerce techniques, such as electronic mail and electronic data interchange (EDI), enable Government agencies to conduct business without the

  12. Paint Removal from Family Housing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    chloride, but these are less effective. Multiple component paints that cure by chemical reaction (e.g., epoxies, coal tar epoxies, polyurethanes, and...surface of the coating, and a fresh coat of remover was applied to the underlying coating. The reaction then continued until the base wood was exposed...Both products were also tested for removing a baked finish from aluminum siding. In this test, the 700-W was more effective than 667-W, probably

  13. Innovative approach to asbestos removal

    SciTech Connect

    Kahal, E J

    1984-01-01

    The most common asbestos materials used at the Savannah River site include: steam pipe insulation; powerhouse boiler insulation; wallboards; roofing materials; and cement products. Asbestos was also found in a number of other materials: aprons; gaskets; laboratory hot pads; and talcum powder used for gloves. Techniques for removal; personnel training; mechanical ventilation; and personnel isolation techniques are described for completing asbestos removal safely and without boiler downtime. (PSB)

  14. Responses of Ambystoma gracile to the removal of introduced nonnative fish from a mountain lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Robert L.; Larson, Gary L.; Samora, B.

    2004-01-01

    Introduced, nonnative brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were removed from a mountain lake in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, to examine the capacity of native Ambystoma gracile (Northwestern Salamander) in the lake to respond to the intentional removal of fish. Temporal trends (N) were calculated for A. gracile larvae/neotene and egg mass relative abundances in the Fish Removal and an adjacent Fishless Lake. The diel and spatial patterns of A. gracile in the lakes were also enumerated during time-intervals of fish presence in and after fish removal from the Fish Removal Lake. Sixty-six fish were removed from the Fish Removal Lake. The Ns for relative abundances in the Fish Removal Lake were positive for the study period and indicated that the number of larvae/neotenes and egg masses observed in the lake increased concurrent with the removal and extirpation of fish from the lake. Numbers of larvae/neotenes and egg masses observed in the Fishless Lake varied annually, but no overall positive or negative trends were evident during the study. Ambystoma gracile in the Fish Removal Lake, during fish presence, were predominantly nocturnal and located in the shallow, structurally complex nearshore area of the lake. After fish were removed, the number of A. gracile observed in the lake increased, especially during the day and in the deeper, less structurally complex offshore area of the lake. Fishless Lake A. gracile were readily observed day and night in all areas of the lake throughout the study. The A. gracile in the Fish Removal Lake behaviorally adapted to the presence of introduced fish and were able to recover from the affects of the fish following fish removal. This study underscores the important relationship between species life history and the variability of responses of montane aquatic-breeding amphibians to fish introductions in mountain lakes.

  15. Guidelines for laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Casey, Angela S; Goldberg, David

    2008-03-01

    Requests for removal of unwanted body hair are common in dermatologic and surgical practices. Technology continues to improve the achievement of a more permanent reduction through the use of lasers. Despite the increased use of lasers, to date, few guidelines exist in terms of how to approach laser hair removal. Specifically, one must understand the mechanism of hair growth and how lasers work to target the hair follicle. There is significant variation among practitioners in pre-and post-laser recommendations to patients as well as intervals between treatment sessions. We performed a thorough review of the literature in order to determine evidence for the ideal interval between treatment sessions and the ideal number of sessions. We also sought to establish, based on published reports, the recommendations for shaving, plucking, waxing or other hair removal methods prior to laser hair removal and the guidelines for sun exposure before and after laser treatments. Finally, we searched the literature to find out whether there are areas that should not be treated with laser hair removal. The evidence and recommendations in this article aim to help guide practitioners in their approach to laser hair removal.

  16. Removal of unwanted facial hair.

    PubMed

    Shenenberger, Donald W; Utecht, Lynn M

    2002-11-15

    Unwanted facial hair is a common problem that is seldom discussed in the primary care setting. Although men occasionally request removal of unwanted facial hair, women most often seek help with this condition. Physicians generally neglect to address the problem if the patient does not first request help. The condition may be caused by androgen overproduction, increased sensitivity to circulating androgens, or other metabolic and endocrine disorders, and should be properly evaluated. Options for hair removal vary in efficacy, degree of discomfort, and cost. Clinical studies on the efficacy of many therapies are lacking. Short of surgical removal of the hair follicle, the only permanent treatment is electrolysis. However, the practice of electrolysis lacks standardization, and regulation of the procedure varies from state to state. Shaving, epilation, and depilation are the most commonly attempted initial options for facial hair removal. Although these methods are less expensive, they are only temporary. Laser hair removal, although better studied than most methods and more strictly regulated, has yet to be proved permanent in all patients. Eflornithine, a topical treatment, is simple to apply and has minimal side effects. By the time most patients consult a physician, they have tried several methods of hair removal. Family physicians can properly educate patients and recommend treatment for this common condition if they are armed with basic knowledge about the treatment options.

  17. Mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burlingame, A.L.; Baillie, T.A.; Derrick, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It is the intention of the review to bring together in one source the direction of major developments in mass spectrometry and to illustrate these by citing key contributions from both fundamental and applied research. The Review is intended to provide the reader with a sense of the main currents, their breadth and depth, and probable future directions. It is also intended to provide the reader with a glimpse of the diverse discoveries and results that underpin the eventual development of new methods and instruments - the keys to obtaining new insights in all the physical, chemical, and biological sciences which depend on mass spectrometry at various levels of sophistication. Focal points for future interdisciplinary synergism might be selective quantitative derivatization of large peptides, which would convey properties that direct fragmentation providing specific sequence information, or optimization of LCMS for biooligomer sequencing and mixture analysis, or the perfect way to control or enhance the internal energy of ions of any size, or many others. 1669 references.

  18. How Effective are Existing Arsenic Removal Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will summarize the system performance results of the technologies demonstrated in the arsenic demonstration program. The technologies include adsorptive media, iron removal, iron removal with iron additions, iron removal followed by adsorptive media, coagulatio...

  19. Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; A. Campos; H. Kugel; J. Leisure; A.L. Roquemore; S. Wagner

    2008-09-01

    We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 μm spacing is biased to 30 – 50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts is related to the mass of dust impinging on the grid. The particles typically vaporize in a few seconds restoring the previous voltage standoff. Experience on NSTX however, showed that in a tokamak environment it was still possible for large particles or fibers to remain on the grid causing a long term short circuit. We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles. Experiments with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations, and exit flow orientations have given an optimal configuration that effectively removes particles from an area up to 25 cm² with a single nozzle. In a separate experiment we are developing an advanced circuit grid of three interlocking traces that can generate a miniature electrostatic traveling wave for transporting dust to a suitable exit port. We have fabricated such a 3-pole circuit board with 25 micron insulated traces that operates with voltages up to 200 V. Recent results showed motion of dust particles with the application of only 50 V bias voltage. Such a device could potentially remove dust continuously without dedicated interventions and without loss of machine availability for plasma operations.

  20. Reaction mechanism of dicofol removal by cellulase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyuan; Yang, Ting; Zhai, Zihan; Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear whether dicofol should be defined as a persistent organic pollutant. Its environmental persistence has gained attention. This study focused on its degradation by cellulase. Cellulase was separated using a gel chromatogram, and its degradation activity towards dicofol involved its endoglucanase activity. By analyzing the kinetic parameters of cellulase reacting with mixed substrates, it was shown that cellulase reacted on dicofol and carboxyl methyl cellulose through two different active centers. Thus, the degradation of dicofol was shown to be an oxidative process by cellulase. Next, by comparing the impacts of tert-butyl alcohol (a typical OH free-radical inhibitor) on the removal efficiencies of dicofol under both cellulase and Fenton reagent systems, it was shown that the removal of dicofol was initiated by OH free radicals produced by cellulase. Finally, 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone and chloride were detected using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and ion chromatography analysis, which supported our hypothesis. The reaction mechanism was analyzed and involved an attack by OH free radicals at the orthocarbon of dicofol, resulting in the degradation product 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Removal via Passive Thermal Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Michael; Hanford, Anthony; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes a regenerable approach to separate carbon dioxide from other cabin gases by means of cooling until the carbon dioxide forms carbon dioxide ice on the walls of the physical device. Currently, NASA space vehicles remove carbon dioxide by reaction with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or by adsorption to an amine, a zeolite, or other sorbent. Use of lithium hydroxide, though reliable and well-understood, requires significant mass for all but the shortest missions in the form of lithium hydroxide pellets, because the reaction of carbon dioxide with lithium hydroxide is essentially irreversible. This approach is regenerable, uses less power than other historical approaches, and it is almost entirely passive, so it is more economical to operate and potentially maintenance- free for long-duration missions. In carbon dioxide removal mode, this approach passes a bone-dry stream of crew cabin atmospheric gas through a metal channel in thermal contact with a radiator. The radiator is pointed to reject thermal loads only to space. Within the channel, the working stream is cooled to the sublimation temperature of carbon dioxide at the prevailing cabin pressure, leading to formation of carbon dioxide ice on the channel walls. After a prescribed time or accumulation of carbon dioxide ice, for regeneration of the device, the channel is closed off from the crew cabin and the carbon dioxide ice is sublimed and either vented to the environment or accumulated for recovery of oxygen in a fully regenerative life support system.

  2. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Dennis L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Hackel, Lloyd; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Dane, C. Brent; Mrowka, Stanley

    1999-11-16

    A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  3. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  4. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  5. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  6. Designing successful removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Daher, Tony; Hall, Dan; Goodacre, Charles J

    2006-03-01

    In today's busy dental offices, removable partial denture design is often abdicated by dentists, both as a result of a lack of experience and consensus of design and because of educational failure on the part of dental schools. The result is delegation of the clinical design process to the lab technician. The lack of clinical data provided to the dental technician jeopardizes the quality of care. This article will focus on a logical and simple approach to this problem, making removable partial denture design simple and predictably achievable. The clinical evidence related to removable partial denture design will be described, along with a checklist to simplify the process and make it practical and applicable to everyday clinical practice.

  7. Alternative strategies for removing bromate

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M. ); Amy, G.; Ozekin, K.; Zhai, W.; Westerhoff, P. )

    1994-10-01

    Stage 1 of the Disinfectants-Disinfection By-Products Rule specifies a maximum contaminant level of 10[mu]g/L for bromate ion, a by-product of the ozonation of natural water containing bromide ion. Several options for removing bromate after its formation are evaluated: reduction with ferrous iron (Fe[sup 2+]), reduction on the surface of activated carbon, ultraviolet irradiation, and high-energy electron beam irradiation. For all the processes, bromide was found in the treated water, which indicates that the dominating mechanism of bromate removal is chemical reduction. If Fe[sup 2+] is introduced after preozonation, it may function both as a reducing agent for bromate and as a coagulant for dissolved organic carbon removal.

  8. Hair removal on dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Maglogiannis, Ilias; Delibasis, Kostantinos

    2015-08-01

    Digital Dermoscopy is a tool commonly used by dermatologists for assisting the diagnosis of skin lesions. The presence of hair in such dermoscopic images frequently occludes significant diagnostic information and reduces their value. In this work we propose algorithms that successfully identify and remove hair from the dermoscopic images. The proposed algorithms consist of two parts; the first deals with the identification of hair, while the second part concerns the image restoration using interpolation. For the evaluation of the algorithms we used ground truth images with synthetic hair and compared the results with the commonly used in the literature DullRazor tool. According to the experimental results the proposed hair removal algorithms can be used successfully in the detection and removal of both dark and light colored hair.

  9. Laser Tattoo Removal: An Update.

    PubMed

    Naga, Lina I; Alster, Tina S

    2017-02-01

    Tattoo art has been around for thousands of years in every culture and is currently flourishing in all age groups, social classes, and occupations. Despite the rising popularity of tattoos, demand for their removal has also increased. While various treatments, including surgical excision, dermabrasion, and chemical destruction have historically been applied, over the past 2 decades, lasers have revolutionized the way tattoos are treated and have become the gold standard of treatment. To achieve optimal cosmetic outcome of treatment, lasers emitting high energies and short pulses are required to adequately destroy tattoo ink. We review the history of laser tattoo removal, outlining the challenges inherent in developing lasers that can most effectively remove tattoo particles while safely protecting skin from unwanted injury.

  10. Laser-based coatings removal

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  11. Inhibition of chemical dose in biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in simultaneous chemical precipitation for phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchen; Shi, Hanchang; Li, Wenlin; Hou, Yanling; He, Miao

    2011-03-01

    A study on the influence of chemical dosing on biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal was carried out through batch experimental tests by lab-scale and a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (employing a typical anaerobic-anoxic-oxic treatment). Results indicated that the inhibition of aluminum salt on biological phosphorus release and uptake processes is significant, as well as the inhibition of aluminum salt on Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) is dominantly observed in the nitrification process and is recoverability. The inhibition of iron salt in biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal is weak, and only the inhibition of iron salt on phosphorus release at anaerobic periods emerge under large dosing. Evidence shows persistent inhibition from the accumulation of chemical doses in sludge mass. Intermittent chemical dosing proves recommendable for simultaneous chemical phosphorus removal.

  12. Masses, mixing angles and phases of general Majorana neutrino mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, Biswajit; Chakraborty, Mainak; Ghosal, Ambar

    2013-10-01

    General Majorana neutrino mass matrix is complex symmetric and for three generations of neutrinos it contains 12 real parameters. We diagonalize this general neutrino mass matrix and express the three neutrino masses, three mixing angles, one Dirac CP phase and two Majorana phases (removing three unphysical phases) in terms of the neutrino mass matrix elements. We apply the results in the context of a neutrino mass matrix derived from a broken cyclic symmetry invoking type-I seesaw mechanism. Phenomenological study of the above mass matrix allows enough parameter space to satisfy the neutrino oscillation data with only 10% breaking of this symmetry. In this model only normal mass hierarchy is allowed. In addition, the Dirac CP phase and the Majorana phases are numerically estimated. Σ m i and | m νee | are also calculated.

  13. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  14. MICROBIOLOGICAL REMOVAL BY FILTRATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filtration ws originally used to remove contaminants that affect the appearance, odor, and taste of drinking water. Later it was demonstrated that bacteria in drinking water were causative agents of disease. Water treatment technology improved with the addition of disinfection, c...

  15. Waterjet processes for coating removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Fletcher; Cosby, Steve; Hoppe, David

    1995-01-01

    USBI and NASA have been testing and investigating the use of high pressure water for coating removal for approximately the past 12 years at the Automated TPS (Thermal Protection System - ablative materials used for thermal protection during ascent and descent of the solid rocket boosters) Removal Facility located in the Productivity Enhancement Complex at Marshall Space Flight Center. Originally the task was to develop and automate the removal process and transfer the technology to a production facility at Kennedy Space Center. Since that time more and more applications and support roles for the waterjet technology have been realized. The facility has become a vital part of development activities ongoing at MSFC. It supports the development of environmentally compliant insulations, sealants, and coatings. It also supports bonding programs, test motors, and pressure vessels. The most recent role of the cell is supporting Thiokol Corporation's solid rocket motor program in the development of waterjet degreasing and paint stripping methods. Currently vapor degreasing methods use 500,000 lbs. of ozone depleting chemicals per year. This paper describes the major cell equipment, test methods practiced, and coatings that have been removed.

  16. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Tiziana; Figoli, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs) look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s) plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration. PMID:25826756

  17. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected.

  18. GLYPHOSATE REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated-carbon, oxidation, conventional-treatment, filtration, and membrane studies are conducted to determine which process is best suited to remove the herbicide glyphosate from potable water. Both bench-scale and pilot-scale studies are completed. Computer models are used ...

  19. Removing Solids From Supercritical Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus removes precipitated inorganic salts and other solids in water-recycling process. Designed for use with oxidation in supercritical water which treats wastes and yields nearly pure water. Heating coils and insulation around vessel keep it hot. Locking bracket seals vessel but allows it to be easily opened for replacement of filled canisters.

  20. Mercury Removal from Waste Organics

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, R.L.; Klasson, T.; Taylor, P.A.

    1999-02-28

    Mercury was effectively removed from the oil via sorption using SAMMS.The method was demonstrated on a large scale using ORNL waste oil contaminated with mercury. This technology is ready for further demonstration and implementation when the SAMMS material is available in large quantities.

  1. Removable singularities of holomorphic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirka, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    Several sufficient conditions for the removability of singular sets with area zero are obtained for holomorphic functions in plane domains and on Riemann surfaces, under certain metric and topological assumptions about cluster sets of these functions and the limit sets of their graphs. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  2. Jail Removal Cost Study. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This second volume of the jail removal cost study provides a detailed report of the study findings which examine the costs, experiences, and ramifications of removing children from adult jails and lockups. The foreword supplies background information and hypothetical removal cost estimates. The approach used to conduct the jail removal cost study…

  3. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  4. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  5. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  6. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  7. Removing lead from metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation: factorial design and removal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingang; Gao, Yujie; Ding, Hui

    2013-10-01

    The lead removal from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation was optimized using experimental design, and a mathematical model was established to elucidate the removal mechanism. The variables studied in lead evaporation consisted of the chamber pressure, heating temperature, heating time, particle size and initial mass. The low-level chamber pressure was fixed at 0.1 Pa as the operation pressure. The application of two-level factorial design generated a first-order polynomial that agreed well with the data for evaporation efficiency of lead. The heating temperature and heating time exhibited significant effects on the efficiency, which was validated by means of the copper-lead mixture experiments. The optimized operating conditions within the region studied were the chamber pressure of 0.1 Pa, heating temperature of 1023 K and heating time of 120 min. After the conditions were employed to remove lead from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards, the efficiency was 99.97%. The mechanism of the effects was elucidated by mathematical modeling that deals with evaporation, mass transfer and condensation, and can be applied to a wider range of metal removal by vacuum distillation.

  8. Mass versus relativistic and rest masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, L. B.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of relativistic mass, which increases with velocity, is not compatible with the standard language of relativity theory and impedes the understanding and learning of the theory by beginners. The same difficulty occurs with the term rest mass. To get rid of relativistic mass and rest mass it is appropriate to replace the equation E =mc2 by the true Einstein's equation E0=mc2, where E0 is the rest energy and m is the mass.

  9. Integrated Cr(VI) removal using constructed wetlands and composting.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Mar-Yam; Chowdhury, Abu Khayer Md Muktadirul Bari; Michailides, Michail K; Akratos, Christos S; Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Vayenas, Dimitrios V

    2015-01-08

    The present work was conducted to study integrated chromium removal from aqueous solutions in horizontal subsurface (HSF) constructed wetlands. Two pilot-scale HSF constructed wetlands (CWs) units were built and operated. One unit was planted with common reeds (Phragmites australis) and one was kept unplanted. Influent concentrations of Cr(VI) ranged from 0.5 to 10mg/L. The effect of temperature and hydraulic residence time (8-0.5 days) on Cr(VI) removal were studied. Temperature was proved to affect Cr(VI) removal in both units. In the planted unit maximum Cr(VI) removal efficiencies of 100% were recorded at HRT's of 1 day with Cr(VI) concentrations of 5, 2.5 and 1mg/L, while a significantly lower removal rate was recorded in the unplanted unit. Harvested reed biomass from the CWs was co-composted with olive mill wastes. The final product had excellent physicochemical characteristics (C/N: 14.1-14.7, germination index (GI): 145-157%, Cr: 8-10mg/kg dry mass), fulfills EU requirements and can be used as a fertilizer in organic farming.

  10. Water quality improvement through bioretention: lead, copper, and zinc removal.

    PubMed

    Davis, Allen P; Shokouhian, Mohammad; Sharma, Himanshu; Minami, Christie; Winogradoff, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Intensive automobile use, weathering of building materials, and atmospheric deposition contribute lead, copper, zinc, and other heavy metals to urban and roadway runoff. Bioretention is a low-impact-development best management practice that has the potential to improve stormwater quality from developed areas. The practice represents a soil, sand, organic matter, and vegetation-based storage and infiltration facility used in parking lots and on individual lots to treat runoff. Investigations using pilot-plant laboratory bioretention systems and two existing bioretention facilities documented their effectiveness at removing low levels of lead, copper, and zinc from synthetic stormwater runoff. Removal rates of these metals (based on concentration and total mass) were excellent, reaching close to 100% for all metals under most conditions, with effluent copper and lead levels mostly less than 5 microg/L and zinc less than 25 microg/L. Somewhat less removal was noted for shallow bioretention depths. Runoff pH, duration, intensity, and pollutant concentrations were varied, and all had minimal effect on removal. The two field investigations generally supported the laboratory studies. Overall, excellent removal of dissolved heavy metals can be expected through bioretention infiltration. Although the accumulation of metals is a concern, buildup problems are not anticipated for more than 15 years because of the low metal concentrations expected in runoff.

  11. Food Mass Reduction Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Stoklosa, Adam M.

    2009-01-01

    Future long duration manned space flights beyond low earth orbit will require the food system to remain safe, acceptable, and nutritious while efficiently balancing appropriate vehicle resources such as mass, volume, power, water, and crewtime. Often, this presents a challenge since maintaining the quality of the food system can result in a higher mass and volume. The Orion vehicle is significantly smaller than the Shuttle vehicle and the International Space Station and the mass and volume available for food is limited. Therefore, the food team has been challenged to reduce the mass of the packaged food from 1.82 kg per person per day to 1.14 kg per person per day. Past work has concentrated on how to reduce the mass of the packaging which contributes to about 15% of the total mass of the packaged food system. Designers have also focused on integrating and optimizing the Orion galley equipment as a system to reduce mass. To date, there has not been a significant effort to determine how to reduce the food itself. The objective of this project is to determine how the mass and volume of the packaged food can be reduced while maintaining caloric and hydration requirements. The following tasks are the key elements to this project: (1) Conduct further analysis of the ISS Standard Menu to determine moisture, protein, carbohydrate, and fat levels. (2) Conduct trade studies to determine how to bring the mass of the food system down. Trade studies may include removing the water of the total food system and/or increasing the fat content. (3) Determine the preferred method for delivery of the new food (e.g. bars, or beverages) and the degree of replacement. (4) Determine whether there are commercially available products that meet the requirements. By the end of this study, an estimate of the mass and volume savings will be provided to the Constellation Program. In addition, if new technologies need to be developed to achieve the mass savings, the technologies, timeline, and

  12. Active space debris removal by a hybrid propulsion module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, L. T.; Bernelli, F.; Maggi, F.; Tadini, P.; Pardini, C.; Anselmo, L.; Grassi, M.; Pavarin, D.; Francesconi, A.; Branz, F.; Chiesa, S.; Viola, N.; Bonnal, C.; Trushlyakov, V.; Belokonov, I.

    2013-10-01

    During the last 40 years, the mass of the artificial objects in orbit increased quite steadily at the rate of about 145 metric tons annually, leading to a total tally of approximately 7000 metric tons. Now, most of the cross-sectional area and mass (97% in LEO) is concentrated in about 4600 intact objects, i.e. abandoned spacecraft and rocket bodies, plus a further 1000 operational spacecraft. Simulations and parametric analyses have shown that the most efficient and effective way to prevent the outbreak of a long-term exponential growth of the catalogued debris population would be to remove enough cross-sectional area and mass from densely populated orbits. In practice, according to the most recent NASA results, the active yearly removal of approximately 0.1% of the abandoned intact objects would be sufficient to stabilize the catalogued debris in low Earth orbit, together with the worldwide adoption of mitigation measures. The candidate targets for removal would have typical masses between 500 and 1000 kg, in the case of spacecraft, and of more than 1000 kg, in the case of rocket upper stages. Current data suggest that optimal active debris removal missions should be carried out in a few critical altitude-inclination bands. This paper deals with the feasibility study of a mission in which the debris is removed by using a hybrid propulsion module as propulsion unit. Specifically, the engine is transferred from a servicing platform to the debris target by a robotic arm so to perform a controlled disposal. Hybrid rocket technology for de-orbiting applications is considered a valuable option due to high specific impulse, intrinsic safety, thrust throttle ability, low environmental impact and reduced operating costs. Typically, in hybrid rockets a gaseous or liquid oxidizer is injected into the combustion chamber along the axial direction to burn a solid fuel. However, the use of tangential injection on a solid grain Pancake Geometry allows for more compact design of

  13. Direct Push Chemical Sensors for DNAPL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    SPOC ) ........................................... 39 2.2.2.1.4 Emission detection system...fluorescence to the surface for measurement. Both fibers are SMA terminated at the surface. 39 2.2.2.1.3 Shock-protected optical compartment ( SPOC ...DTI typically uses a SPOC with its Geoprobe to jackhammer the LIF probe into the sub-surface to delineate typical POL spills. Fibers terminated into

  14. Understanding soluble arsenate removal kinetics by zerovalent iron media.

    PubMed

    Melitas, Nikos; Wang, Jianping; Conklin, Martha; O'Day, Peggy; Farrell, James

    2002-05-01

    Zerovalent iron filings have been proposed as a filter medium for removing arsenic compounds from potable water supplies. This research investigated the kinetics of arsenate removal from aqueous solutions by zerovalent iron media. Batch experiments were performed to determine the effect of the iron corrosion rate on the rate of As(V) removal. Tafel analyses were used to determine the effect of the As(V) concentration on the rate of iron corrosion in anaerobic solutions. As(V) removal in column reactors packed with iron filings was measured over a 1-year period of continuous operation. Comparison of As(V) removal by freely corroding and cathodically protected iron showed that rates of arsenate removal were dependent on the continuous generation of iron oxide adsorption sites. In addition to adsorption site availability, rates of arsenate removal were also limited by mass transfer associated with As(V) diffusion through iron corrosion products. Steady-state removal rates in the column reactor were up to 10 times faster between the inlet-end and the first sampling port than between the first sampling port and the effluent-end of the column. Faster removal near the influent-end of the column was due to a faster rate of iron oxidation in that region. The presence of 100 microg/L As(V) decreased the iron corrosion rate by up to a factor of 5 compared to a blank electrolyte solution. However, increasing the As(V) concentration from 100 to 20,000 microg/L resulted in no further decrease in the iron corrosion rate. The kinetics of arsenate removal ranged between zeroth- and first-order with respect to the aqueous As(V) concentration. The apparent reaction order was dependent on the availability of adsorption sites and on the aqueous As(V) concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses showed the presence of iron metal, magnetite (Fe3O4), an Fe(III) oxide phase, and possibly an Fe(II,III) hydroxide phase in the reacted iron filings. These mixed valent oxide phases are

  15. Review of arsenic removal technologies for contaminated groundwaters.

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, K. B.; Kaminski, M. D.; Nunez, L.

    2003-05-02

    iron because iron precipitates in the presence of air, which could clog and foul the column. Synthetic sorbents are highly selective and effective and do not pose a significant waste disposal concern because they are generally non-hazardous. Aqua-bind. is perhaps the most effective synthetic sorbent available for removing arsenic, but it must be mass-produced to realize low cost. Naturally occurring solids are cheap and remove arsenic well; however, the removal rate is often very slow and the solids can harbor bacteria. This report reviews competing technologies for removal of water-borne arsenic to establish a baseline for technology improvements. Specifically, the information in this report will serve as a basis for developing a low-cost separation technology using functionalized magnetic particles to adsorb arsenic and permanent magnets to separate the arsenic-loaded magnetic particles from the cleaned water.

  16. Microalgae removal with Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Barrado-Moreno, M M; Beltran-Heredia, J; Martín-Gallardo, J

    2016-02-01

    Moringa oleifera seed extract was tested for algae (Chlorella, Microcystis, Oocystis and Scenedesmus) removal by Jar-test technique. This coagulant can be used in drinking water treatment. Jar-test has been carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of this natural coagulant agent inside real surface water matrix. The influence of variables has been studied in this process, including operating parameters such as coagulant dosage, initial algae concentration, pH, agitation time and water matrix. Removal capacity is verified for water with high contamination of algae while the process is not affected by the pH and water matrix. Coagulation process may be modelling through Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption hypothesis, so acceptable r2 coefficients are obtained.

  17. Aerobic exercise increases phosphate removal during hemodialysis: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Orcy, Rafael; Antunes, Maria Fernanda; Schiller, Tamires; Seus, Thamires; Böhlke, Maristela

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that exercise during hemodialysis (HD) could increase the efficacy of solute removal, although this hypothesis has not been conclusively evaluated. The goal of this study was to compare the removal of low-molecular weight solutes between HD sessions, with and without aerobic exercise. It was a controlled clinical trial, including HD patients in a randomly cross-over design, such that each patient received a HD session with exercise (intervention) and the next one without exercise (control), three times each. In the exercise sessions, patients pedaled on a cycle ergometer for 60 minutes. The total mass of removed urea, potassium, creatinine, and phosphate were calculated from the solutes concentration in dialysate (continuous spent sampling of dialysate). This was evaluated in a total of 132 HD sessions of patients with a mean age of 54 ± 15 years, 75% male and HD vintage of 3 (2-13) years. Phosphate removal in dialysate during intervention sessions was significantly higher (5.6 [2.5-18.9] vs. 5.1 [1.5-11.2] mg/min) than during control sessions, P = 0.04. The median mass of phosphate removed during control HD session was 1226 (367.8-2697.2) vs. 1348.6 (613.0-4536.2) mg/session during intervention sessions. The exercise did not modify the removal of urea (control 122.6 [61.3-286.0] vs. exercise 112.4 [51.1-250.3] mg/min, P = 0.44), creatinine (control 5.6 [2.5-13.8] vs. exercise 5.6 [2.5-12.8] mg/min, P = 0.49), or potassium (control 13.3 [11.2-15.8] vs. exercise 13.8 [6.6-15.8] mEq/min, P = 0.49). Aerobic exercise during HD increases the efficacy of phosphate removal, without changing urea, creatinine and potassium removal. The implications of this finding in mineral and bone disease and cardiovascular disease need to be evaluated on future clinical trials.

  18. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  19. Thorium removal by different adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Michail; Kasselouri-Rigopoulou, Vasilia; Galiatsatou, Polymnia; Konstantopoulou, Cathrine; Oikonomou, Dimitrios

    2003-02-28

    The removal of radiotoxic Th(4+) from aqueous solutions has been explored using two different groups of adsorptive materials (e.g. two activated carbons and four zeolites-two natural and two synthetic). The activated carbons were prepared from solvent extracted olive pulp (SEOP) and olive stone (OS) by a two-step physical activation method with steam. They were characterized by N(2) at 77K adsorption, Hg porosimetry and by determination of their iodine number. All carbons prepared are of the H-type (e.g. contain mainly basic surface oxides) confirmed by the results of the Boehm's method. The natural zeolites, clinoptilolite (NaCLI) and mordenite (NaMOR), were pretreated with Na(+) before the adsorption experiments, while the synthetic ones, NaX and NaA, were provided in their commercial sodium form. The natural zeolites, NaCLI and NaMOR, utilized 11.5 and 38.6% of the theoretical ion-exchange capacity, based on Al content, respectively, while NaX and NaA utilized 41.5 and 45.9%, respectively. The activated carbons showed better removal capability than NaCLI. NaMOR, showed comparable results to the carbon originated from OS, but lower removal capability than the carbon originated from SEOP. The synthetic zeolites showed the highest removal ability for thorium ions due to their increased ion-exchange capacity because of their cleaner and larger framework channels and their higher number of ion-exchange sites. The carbons adsorption capacity mainly depends on the content and nature of functional surface groups. The adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The former achieved best fits and was further applied to obtain the respective Langmuir constant and maximum adsorption capacity for each system.

  20. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-06

    Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet version), March 13, 2007. 30 Abductions by N. Korea not...3007. 33 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions, International Herald Tribune, September 4, 2007, p. 5...spring of 2007 to smuggle conventional arms, including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri

  1. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-10

    and Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet version), March 13, 2007. Korea’s nuclear programs and...the President by Foreign Print Media, August 30, 3007. 30 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions...including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan navy intercepted and

  2. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  3. Environmentally Compliant Coating Remover Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    Penetrating Lubricants 16 10 Metalworking Fluids 62 8 Sorbents 72 17 Adhesive and Mastic Removers 25 19 Greases 18 5 Glass Cleaners 11 11 Firearm...Lubricants 8 2 Chain, Cable, and Gear Lubricants 33 13 Corrosion Preventatives 19 10 Industrial and Multipurpose Cleaners 114 40 Parts Wash Solutions...AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for

  4. METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

  5. Contaminant Removal From Natural Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Geiger, Cheri L. (Inventor); Reinhart, Debra (Inventor); Fillpek, Laura B. (Inventor); Coon, Christina (Inventor); Devor, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles is used to remediate contaminated natural resources, such as groundwater and soil. In a preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion removes heavy metals, such as lead (pb), from contaminated natural resources. In another preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion is a bimetallic emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles doped with a catalytic metal to remediate halogenated aromatic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), from natural resources.

  6. Lead removal in rats using calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Olga V; Sgrebneva, Marina N; Kiselev, Vladimir I; Khotimchenko, Yuri S

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure, even at low levels, causes a variety of health problems. The aims of this study were to investigate the tissue distribution of lead in the bodies of rats, to evaluate lead removal from the internal organs and bones using calcium alginate in doses of 500, 200 and 100 mg/kg per day for 28 days and to assess the impact of calcium alginate on the level of essential elements. Lead (Pb), calcium (Ca), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) levels in the blood, hearts, kidneys, livers and femurs of the experimental animals were measured using mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The results revealed that lead acetate exposure increased the levels of Pb in the blood and organs of the animals and significantly reduced contents of Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Treatment with calcium alginate in dose 500 mg/kg contributed to significant decreases in the amount of lead in the kidney, heart and bones of animals and a slight increase in the content of essential elements in the liver, kidneys and heart, although these changes were not significant. Decreasing of lead was not significant in the internal organs, bones and blood of animals treated with calcium alginate 200 and 100 mg/kg. Consequently, calcium alginate dose of 500 mg/kg more efficiently removes lead accumulated in the body. Calcium alginate does not have negative effect on level of essential elements quite the contrary; reducing the levels of lead, calcium alginate helps normalize imbalances of Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. The results of this study suggest that calcium alginate may potentially be useful for the treatment and prevention of heavy metal intoxications.

  7. Snowmelt pollutant removal in bioretention areas.

    PubMed

    Muthanna, Tone Merete; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke; Thorolfsson, Sveinn T

    2007-10-01

    Snow accumulating in urban areas and alongside roads can accumulate high pollutant loads and the subsequent snowmelt can produce high pollutant loads in receiving waters. This paper examines the treatment of roadside snowmelt in bioretention with respect to pollutant removal, pollutant pathways, and major sinks. Bioretention was used to treat snowmelt from three types of urban roads in Trondheim, Norway: residential, medium, and roads with high-density traffic. Metal retention in bioretention boxes had a mass reduction in zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium in the range of 89-99%, and a decrease in outflow concentrations in the range 81-99%. Cadmium was only measured in the water samples, while the other three metals were traced through the system to identify the main sinks. The top mulch layer was the largest sink for the retained metals, with up to 74% of the zinc retained in this mulch layer. The plant metal uptakes were only 2-8% of the total metal retention; however, the plants still play an important role with respect to root zone development and regeneration, which fosters infiltration and reduces the outflow load. Dissolved pollutants in snowmelt tend to be removed with the first flush of meltwater, creating an enrichment ratio with respect to the average pollutant concentrations in the snow. The effect of this enrichment ratio was examined through the bioretention system, and found to be less predominant than that typically reported for untreated snowmelt. The enrichment factors were in the range of 0.65-1.51 for the studied metals.

  8. Dye removal by immobilised fungi.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Couto, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Dyes are widely used within the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, printing, textile and leather industries. This has resulted in the discharge of highly coloured effluents that affect water transparency and gas solubility in water bodies. Furthermore, they pose a problem because of their carcinogenicity and toxicity. Therefore, removal of such dyes before discharging them into natural water streams is essential. For this, appropriate treatment technologies are required. The treatment of recalcitrant and toxic dyes with traditional technologies is not always effective or may not be environmentally friendly. This has impelled the search for alternative technologies such as biodegradation with fungi. In particular, ligninolytic fungi and their non-specific oxidative enzymes have been reported to be responsible for the decolouration of different synthetic dyes. Thus, the use of such fungi is becoming a promising alternative to replace or complement the current technologies for dye removal. Processes using immobilised growing cells seem to be more promising than those with free cells, since the immobilisation allows using the microbial cells repeatedly and continuously. This paper reviews the application of fungal immobilisation to dye removal.

  9. Virus Removal by Biogenic Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    De Gusseme, B.; Du Laing, G; Hennebel, T; Renard, P; Chidambaram, D; Fitts, J; Bruneel, E; Van Driessche, I; Verbeken, K; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L{sup -1} bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L{sup -1} Ce(III) as CeNO{sub 3} was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal.

  10. Comprehensive composition of Creosote using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS).

    PubMed

    Gallacher, Christopher; Thomas, Russell; Taylor, Christopher; Lord, Richard; Kalin, Robert M

    2017-03-13

    Creosote is a distillation product of coal tar and is widely used as wood preservative for railway sleepers, utility poles and for other applications. Creosote can have potentially negative effects on the environment and many of the components are toxic. This study presents the analysis of a Creosote sample from a former wood impregnation plant located in the UK. The sample was analysed using two dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS) and a database of compounds that could be detected was produced. The GCxGG-TOFMS was capable of detecting 1505 individual compounds, which is far more than previous estimates for the number of compounds present within Creosote. Post extraction derivatization using BTSFA with 1% TMCS was employed to increase the potential number of compounds detected with 255 derivatized compounds detected, 231 of which would not have been detected without prior derivatization. Selected derivatized compounds were quantified with limits of detection ranging from 0.6 mg/kg to 1.6 mg/kg from a concentrated dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This work presents the first published full analysis of a Creosote using GCxGC-TOFMS combined with derivatization.

  11. Determination of biological removal of recalcitrant organic contaminants in coal gasification waste water.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qinhong; Tabassum, Salma; Yu, Guangxin; Chu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Zhenjia

    2015-01-01

    Coal gasification waste water treatment needed a sustainable and affordable plan to eliminate the organic contaminants in order to lower the potential environmental and human health risk. In this paper, a laboratory-scale anaerobic-aerobic intermittent system carried out 66 operational cycles together for the treatment of coal gasification waste water and the removal capacity of each organic pollutant. Contaminants included phenols, carboxylic acids, long-chain hydrocarbons, and heterocyclic compounds, wherein the relative content of phenol is up to 57.86%. The long-term removal of 77 organic contaminants was evaluated at different hydraulic retention time (anaerobic24 h + aerobic48 h and anaerobic48 h +aerobic48 h). Contaminant removal ranged from no measurable removal to near-complete removal with effluent concentrations below the detection limit. Contaminant removals followed one of four trends: steady-state removal throughout, increasing removal to steady state (acclimation), decreasing removal, and no removal. Organic degradation and transformation in the reaction were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technology.

  12. Test masses for the G-POEM test of the weak equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Phillips, James D.; Popescu, Eugeniu M.

    2011-11-01

    We describe the design of the test masses that are used in the ‘ground-based principle of equivalence measurement’ test of the weak equivalence principle. The main features of the design are the incorporation of corner cubes and the use of mass removal and replacement to create pairs of test masses with different test substances. The corner cubes allow for the vertical separation of the test masses to be measured with picometer accuracy by SAO's unique tracking frequency laser gauge, while the mass removal and replacement operations are arranged so that the test masses incorporating different test substances have nominally identical gravitational properties.

  13. MASS SUBSTRUCTURE IN ABELL 3128

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J.; Dell’Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-20

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  14. Primary mass standard based on atomic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter; Gläser, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The paper summarises the activities of several national and international Metrology Institutes in replacing the kilogram artefact, the unit of mass, by the mass of a certain number of atoms, in particular the atomic masses of silicon or bismuth. This task is based on two different experiments: a very accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, measuring the density and lattice parameter of an enriched silicon-28 crystal, and the accumulation of decelerated bismuth-209 ions by using a mass separator. The relative measurement uncertainties reached so far are in the first case 2 parts in 107, and in the latter several part in 104. The bismuth experiment is still in an early state of the work. The ratios between the masses of 28Si or 209Bi, respectively, and the present atomic mass standard, the mass of 12C, can be determined with an accuracy now approaching 10-10 using high precision Penning traps mass spectrometers.

  15. Spectral Induced Polarization Response of Unconsolidated Saturated Sand and Surfactant Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL), such as chlorinated solvents, are common groundwater contaminants. Traditional pump-and-treat methods are often not effective at removing residual DNAPL from the subsurface. Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is a promising remediatio...

  16. FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF PRE- AND POST-REMEDIAL CONTAMINANT FLUX BY INTEGRAL PUMPING TESTS (WASHINGTON, DC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The complete removal of all dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant from source zone areas has not been demonstrated with current remedial techniques, and conflicting views on the benefits of partial DNAPL source zone remediation have been expressed in the literature. ...

  17. Dense nonaqueous phase liquid tracer tests: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Burt, R A; Christians, G L; Williams, S P; Wilson, D J

    2001-12-01

    Two dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tracer tests were carried out in a shallow aquifer north of Fort Worth, TX. i-Propanol was used as the nonpartitioning tracer: n-hexanol and n-octanol were the partitioning tracers. Field data, mathematical modeling, the results of column tests, and field tracer tests with NaCl were used in designing the DNAPL tracer tests. The results indicated the presence of DNAPL at both sites tested; semi-quantitative estimates of the amounts of DNAPL present were obtained by mathematical modeling. Interpretation was complicated by heterogeneity of the aquifer and mass transport effects.

  18. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes

  19. Removing Pubic Hair (For Young Women)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Removing Pubic Hair Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 March 2017. +Related Content Key Facts Removing pubic hair is a personal preference. There are no health ...

  20. Self Insuring against Asbestos Removal Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slutzky, Lorence H.

    1987-01-01

    Asbestos removal is costly and many contractors have difficulty in obtaining insurance coverage. Presents a case for self insuring if contractors perform the removal work in compliance with state and federal regulations. Includes a reference list. (MD)