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  1. Doctor Chekhov's doctors.

    PubMed

    Crommelynck, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was both a writer and a doctor, as well as a patient. In spite of his literary success, he did not turn away from medicine until 1897, at the age of 37, when his tuberculosis became too serious. During his medical studies in Moscow, he wrote short stories, at night, under various pseudonyms to provide money for his family; all his life, Chekhov was his parents' financial support. It was Alexei Suvorin (1834-1912), the powerful director of Novoye Vremya (New Times), and the well-known writer Dimitry Grigorovich (1822-1899) who persuaded him that he had exceptional literary talent and requested him to abandon pseudonyms and sign his articles. So, for all his life, he practiced medicine as a district doctor and wrote plays and short stories. In each of his plays, except The Cherry Orchard, Chekhov introduced characters of doctors, principally Yevgeny Konstantinovich Lvov in Ivanov and Mikhail Lvovich Astrov in Uncle Vanya, as well as Khrushchev in The Wood Demon, Dorn in The Seagull, Tcheboutykin in The Three Sisters, and Triletski in Platonov. In his countless short stories, there are numerous doctors, for instance Professor Stepanovich (A Dreary Story), Doctors Kirilov (Enemies), Sobol (My Wife), Outchinnikov (An Inconvenience), Dymov (The Grasshopper), Startsvev (Ionitch), and others. Chekhov's main interest in psychiatry was clearly visible in The Nervous Breakdown, The Black Monk, The Man in a Case, A Doctor's Visit, and WardNo. 6 with Dr. Ragin. In his short stories as in his plays, Chekhov relied on his knowledge of provincial life; his doctor's characters were not professors, academicians, or Moscow's great physicians, but instead exhausted hard workers, with no effective diagnostic and therapeutic means, and poorly paid. Unlike himself, none of Chekhov's doctors was a writer or breadwinner, and Chekhov did not like to lay emphasis on the disease.

  2. Doctoral surplus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Universities in the United States are producing about 25% more doctorates in science and engineering than the U.S. economy can absorb, according to a new study by the Rand Corporation and Stanford University's Institute for Higher Education Research. The study looked at 13 science and engineering fields, covering 210 doctorate-granting institutions and more than 1,000 educational institutions that employ people with doctorates. The study was done by Stanford Professor William Massy and Charles Goldman of Rand, with graduate students Marc Chun and Beryle Hsiao.The researchers found that supply and demand do not work in the usual way to regulate the employment market for doctoral candidates. In labor markets, when job opportunities decrease, fewer people usually seek to enter the field. In the case of Ph.D.s, however, the researchers found that neither departments nor prospective doctoral students take close accounting of the doctorate employment gap.

  3. Ageing doctors.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Steven; Milligan, Eleanor

    2017-03-01

    Doctors are neither more nor less susceptible than the general population to the effects of ageing. The relevance of deterioration with age depends on the nature of the work undertaken. Reduced muscle strength and visual and auditory deterioration can compromise clinical ability. Accumulation of chronic disease further reduces capacity. Cognitive decline is of particular importance, as good medical care requires considerable cognitive function. Patient safety is paramount, yet older doctors are an important part of the medical workforce and their value should be recognised. Changes in patient case mix, work place support systems and individual adjustments can assist safe practice. Deterioration in health should be acknowledged and requires proactive management. Current methods of ensuring competence are inadequate for supporting ageing doctors. A new initiative is recommended comprising collaboration between regulators, colleges and employing institutions to support the ageing doctor in providing safe and effective practice.

  4. Talking with Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Talking with Your Doctor Planning Your Doctor Visit A Partnership How well you ... about. (Watch the video to get tips on planning for your doctor visit. To enlarge the video, ...

  5. Suicide In Doctors And Wives Of Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    1980-01-01

    This paper re-examines the widespread belief that doctors have a proneness for suicide greater than the general population. The Standardized Mortality Ratio for male physicians is 335 and for single women doctors 257. Doctors' wives have an even greater risk: their SMR is 458. These rates for doctors are higher than for most other professional groups (except pharmacists) and the rate for doctors' wives far exceeds that for wives of other professionals. The intrinsic causes of the physician's high occupational mortality include his knowledge of toxicology and ready access to lethal drugs, so that impulsive suicide is more often successful. Professional stress and overwork, particularly the unrelenting responsibility for decisions upon which the lives of others may depend, have been inculpated. These stresses interact with the decline in the doctors' self-respect and with a personality that is prestige-oriented and independent. Some physicians turn in their frustration to alcohol/and or drugs, accelerating the process of deterioration. The high suicide rate in doctors' wives appears to be the result of unrequited needs for caring and dependency which the doctors' career demands and personality deny them. PMID:21293651

  6. Choosing a Family Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the whole family. Family doctors create caring relationships with patients and their families. They really get ... questions.Remember, it takes time to build a relationship with your doctor. Last Updated: May 2014 This ...

  7. Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctor Finding a doctor with special training in movement disorders can make a big difference in your ... Goldstein Goldstone Gollomp Goodman Gorman Gottschalk Graff Greeley Green Gregory Griffith Grill Grillone Grist Grossman Groves Gudesblatt ...

  8. Succeeding with Your Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Jerry; Bathmaker, Ann Marie; Hunt, Cheryl; McCulloch, Gary; Sikes, Pat

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this book is to support, inform and guide students (and by implication their supervisors) through a doctoral programme. The book is intended for students working towards either a "taught" doctorate (such as an EdD) or a course of study leading to a PhD. The authors recognize that doctoral programmes have changed and these changes are…

  9. Developing Online Doctoral Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipere, Ngoni

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to identify best practices in online doctoral programming and to synthesise these practices into a framework for developing online doctoral programmes. The field of online doctoral studies is nascent and presents challenges for conventional forms of literature review. The literature was therefore reviewed using a…

  10. Doctoral Scientists in Oceanography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    The purpose of this report was to classify and count doctoral scientists in the United States trained in oceanography and/or working in oceanography. Existing data from three sources (National Research Council's "Survey of Earned Doctorates," and "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," and the Ocean Sciences Board's "U.S. Directory of Marine…

  11. Doctors in Balzac's work.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Balzac wrote his novels during a time of great literary and scientific change. Romanticism gave way to the school of realism, of which Balzac could be considered the founder. It was via realism, where both the positive and negative aspects of life were depicted, that doctors naturally gained a much more active role in novels. In conjunction with this was the development of science and medicine, which fascinated Balzac, also leading to the significant and prevalent role of doctors in his works. His fascination with the sciences led to him to gain many acquaintances and much knowledge in the medical domain, especially in neuropsychiatry and physiology. His fictional doctors, such as Desplein and Bianchon, thus demonstrate considerable knowledge of pathology, physiology, and neuropsychiatry. The doctors in Balzac's novels can be grouped into four categories: provincial doctors, Parisian doctors, country doctors, and military doctors. They were most often fictitious representations of real individuals (e.g. Guillaume Dupuytren), and often symbolize schools of thought which were in vogue at the time. In addition to the accurate scientific depiction of doctors, it must be noted that his doctors not only played an active role in clinically assessing their patients, but also had a sociological role in assessing society; it is through his doctors that Balzac gave his opinion of the world in which he lived.

  12. Female Physicist Doctoral Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why…

  13. Should junior doctors strike?

    PubMed

    Toynbee, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam Aj; Clacey, Joe; Broome, Matthew R

    2016-03-01

    An impasse in negotiations between the Department of Health (DoH) and the British Medical Association in November this year led to an overwhelming vote for industrial action (IA) by junior doctors. At the time of writing, a last minute concession by DoH led to a deferment of IA to allow further negotiations mediated by the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service. However, IA by junior doctors remains a possibility if these negotiations stall again. Would the proposed action be ethically justifiable? Furthermore, is IA by doctors ever ethically defendable? Building on previous work, we explore important ethical considerations for doctors considering IA. The primary moral objection to doctors striking is often claimed to be risk of harm to patients. Other common arguments against IA by doctors include breaching their vocational responsibilities and possible damage to their relationship with patients and the public in general. These positions are in turn countered by claims of a greater long-term good and the legal and moral rights of employees to strike. Absolute restrictions appear to be hard to justify in the modern context, as does an unrestricted right to IA. We review these arguments, find that some common moral objections to doctors striking may be less relevant to the current situation, that a stronger contemporary objection to IA might be from a position of social justice and suggest criteria for ethically permissible doctor IA.

  14. Is your doctor competent?

    PubMed

    Condor, B

    1997-01-01

    HIV-positive patients are consistently healthier and live longer when their care is managed by a physician with significant experience in treating HIV and AIDS, and it is essential for patients to seek out health care providers who keep up with current treatment guidelines. Experienced doctors generally offer more aggressive treatments, and are willing to abandon treatment regimens that are not effective. Communication is essential between the patient and doctor, and must include a review of side effects and the necessity of strict adherence to treatments. A series of questions is included to help patients assess whether their doctor is up to date on current treatments.

  15. Doctor of osteopathic medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Wilkins; 2010. Gevitz N. The "doctor of osteopathy": expanding the scope of practice. J Am Osteopath ... 6):ES28-S38. Moore WJ. The eccentricities of osteopathy. BMJ . 2012;345:e5890. Stark J. A degree ...

  16. Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get My Plan Info Service Status Countries ZIP Code Enter Valid ZIP Code Plans Clear Profile Find a Doctor Your health ... Live? Please enter your country and/or ZIP code Country: Zip Code: All Provider Directories I know ...

  17. Talking to Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ... Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  18. Doctor-patient relationship

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    The doctor-patient relationship is an intricate concept in which patients voluntarily approach a doctor and become part of a contract by which they tend to abide by doctor’s instructions. Over recent decades, this relationship has changed dramatically due to privatization and commercialization of the health sector. A review of the relevant literature in the database of MEDLINE published in English between 1966 and August 2015 was performed with the following keywords: doctor-patient relationship, physician-patient relationship, ethics, and Islam. The Muslim doctor should be familiar with the Islamic teachings on the daily issues faced in his/her practice and the relationship with his/her patients. PMID:26837392

  19. [Chekhov as a doctor].

    PubMed

    Rooijmans, H G M

    2003-03-01

    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was not only a writer, but also a doctor. One might think that he was primarily concerned with writing, but he also dedicated himself fully to being a doctor. When he had to give up his practice in 1897 upon urgent medical advice, he experienced it as a great loss. As a medic he often felt unsure and believed that he failed in his duties. This did not change the fact that many patients called upon him for assistance. They were probably also fond of him because of his genuine interest in their living conditions and because of his compassion. In terms of his scientific activities, his attempt to have his visit in 1890 to the Russian penal colony Sakhalin recognised as a dissertation failed. In many ways, Chekhov was a hard-working idealist, but one without illusions. Doctors appear as the main character or one of the main characters in 25 of Chekhov's hundreds of stories as well as in various plays. Although Chekhov undoubtedly will have incorporated his own experiences into his works, he did not give a picture of his own medical activities in the doctors he portrayed. A large number of the doctors he describes are depressed, nervous or irritable. Others are naïve and clumsy, while others still are skeptic, cynical or disillusioned. In some of the descriptions the image of Chekhov as a doctor may be observed.

  20. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    PubMed

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  1. Bringing Pedagogy to Doctoral Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison; Kamler, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the role of publication in taking forward the work of the doctorate. Low publication rates from doctoral degrees have been noted as a problem in the quality of doctoral education for preparing students to participate in research cultures. At the same time there is ambivalence and some resistance among doctoral supervisors and…

  2. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    PubMed

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  3. Mandatory notification of impaired doctors.

    PubMed

    Beran, R G

    2014-12-01

    Mandatory reporting of impaired doctors is compulsory in Australasia. Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency guidelines for notification claim high benchmark though the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians suggest they still obstruct doctors seeking help. Western Australia excludes mandatory reporting of practitioner-patients. This study examines reporting, consequences and international experiences with notification. Depressed doctors avoid diagnosis and treatment, fearing consequences, yet are more prone to marital problems, substance dependence and needing psychotherapy. South African research confirms isolation of impaired doctors and delayed seeking help with definable characteristics of those at risk. New Zealand data acknowledge: errors occur; questionable contribution from mandatory reporting; issues concerning competence assessment; favouring reporting to senior colleagues or self-intervention to compliance with mandatory reporting. UK found an anaesthetist guilty of professional misconduct for not reporting and sanctioned doctors regarding Harold Shipman. Australians are reluctant to report, fearing legalistic intrusion into care. Australian research confirmed definable characteristics for doctors with psychiatric illness or alcohol abuse. Exposure to legal medicine evokes personal disenchantment for doctors involved. Medicine poses barriers for impaired doctors. Spanish and UK doctors do not use general practitioners and may have suboptimal care. US and European doctors self-medicate using samples. US drug-dependent doctors also prescribe for spouses. Junior doctors are losing empathy with the profession. UK doctors favour private care, avoiding public scrutiny. NZ and Brazil created specific services for doctors, which appear effective. Mandatory reporting may be counterproductive requiring reappraisal.

  4. Doctoring the Knowledge Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I examine the impact of the new 'knowledge economy' on contemporary doctoral education. I argue that the knowledge economy promotes a view of knowledge and knowledge workers that fundamentally challenges the idea of a university as a community of autonomous scholars transmitting and adding to society's 'stock of knowledge'. The paper…

  5. The doctor's defense.

    PubMed

    Tur, Richard H S

    2002-10-01

    The paper takes as its point of departure a relatively recent case which attracted publicity in Britain, concerning a doctor charged with (but acquitted of) the murder of his terminally ill patient, and critically examines the criminal law of England and Wales relating to homicide in the context of medical practice. While similar issues obviously arise in many other countries, no comparative study is attempted in the paper. However, the arguments which have been presented are of more than local interest. From an analysis of this case and others, it appears that there is in common law something which can be called the doctor s defense. It holds that a doctor may, when caring for a patient who is suffering great pain, lawfully administer pain-killing drugs, despite the fact that, as the doctor well knows, one certain or highly probable consequence will be to shorten the patient s life. Current justifications for this defense are either incoherent or too weak. Some require that different conceptions of intention be deployed, depending on whether the agent is a doctor or not. Others rely on the philosophically controversial doctrine of double effect. Still others invoke an implausible notion of minimal causation. All these justifications apply readily enough to morally and factually easy cases, but fail in hard cases where the need for some justification is most pressing. These justifications seem incapable of providing adequate guidance to prosecutors or trial judges. Absent principled and transparent justification, the English criminal justice system exhibits different outcomes on what appear to be broadly similar facts. It is disturbing that the law is uncertain and incapable of giving adequate guidance. A doctor, compelled by conscience to intervene to end a person s life, should certainly be ready and willing to face rigorous legal scrutiny, but the law applied should not be arbitrary and random, nor should the outcome turn solely or chiefly on prosecutorial

  6. Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... each time you call. Nighttime calls should be reserved for more urgent issues — remember, the doctor is ... your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty ...

  7. Working with doctors and nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... with doctors and nurses Answering questions, filling out papers, getting poked and prodded — going to the doctor ... your parents may get a bill or insurance papers that list the services you got. Ask your ...

  8. Doctorateness as a Threshold Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafford, Vernon; Leshem, Shosh

    2009-01-01

    Achieving a doctorate presents candidates with certain challenges--undertaking the research, writing the thesis and defending both at their viva. Throughout that doctoral journey, candidates are expected to display doctorateness in their thesis via the characteristics of high-quality scholarly research. The blockages that occur and prevent…

  9. Entrepreneurship and UK Doctoral Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Tristram; Bentley, Kieran; Marriott, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the experience of UK doctoral graduates in pursuing entrepreneurial careers: there is evidence that this applies to a substantial number--about 10%--of doctoral graduates. The nature of their experience was explored using 37 interviews with doctoral entrepreneurs. The research was funded by Vitae (www.vitae.ac.uk), an…

  10. Online Doctorates for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Ron Dickson knew he needed a terminal degree. In the early 2000s, he was toiling away as an assistant superintendent in a suburban Phoenix school district, but he had higher aspirations--a superintendency. Yet with a family and a demanding job, he wasn't sure how he could swing a doctoral degree. He diligently checked out the traditional Ed.D. and…

  11. Doctoring in Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Henry

    1983-01-01

    Health care in Eastern Europe has not achieved world standards nor the goals of planners of socialist societies. With luck, perseverance, bribes or good connections, it is possible to obtain good medical and surgical care in Eastern Europe for a major illness. Primary and even secondary care usually are substandard, however, and often completely unacceptable to most Western foreigners. The reasons for this are complex but mainly rooted in different attitudes of health workers towards their patients, poor physical plants, poor salary structures, inadequate advancement opportunities for health care workers, poor social status and professional recognition for nurses and almost complete isolation of the average primary care doctor from hospital medicine. PMID:6659504

  12. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation between viewer and viewed representing public attitudes towards doctors, medicine, and science. PMID:20944763

  13. Re-Imagining Doctoral Education: Professional Doctorates and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison; Brennan, Marie; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Portents of the demise of the Professional Doctorate have emerged in some recent policy and institutional circles in Australia, raising questions about the meaning and relevance of the Professional Doctorate in an era of "league tables" and research assessment in Australia. This article argues that such portents, based largely on narrow…

  14. [Asylum of doctors].

    PubMed

    Arantes, Marco Antonio

    2008-01-01

    An impassioned writer, suburbano, black, daring, ironic, combative, accursed, and misunderstood by his contemporaries, Afonso Henriques de Lima Barreto (1881-1922) traveled to hell, experiencing the scorn of critics, failure as a writer, and his family's indifference towards his literary vocation. Restless in his pain and heavy-handed with hypocrites, he grappled with the tragedies of madness, alcoholism, and prejudice at a time when assuming one's condition as a black was an act of courage. His conscious observations about doctors, the mad, and madness is the point of departure for this study, based on the writer's experience at the Hospício Nacional and on a review of significant excerpts from Lima Barreto's literary production. The later stands as an institutional and political issue and a criticism of the discourses that played important roles in preserving the structures of domination in the Old Republic.

  15. Doctorate Program Trains Industrial Chemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The University of Texas (Dallas) has initiated a new Ph.D. program specifically to train chemists for doctoral level work in industry (Doctor of Chemistry). Participants will complete three research practica (at an industrial site and in two laboratory settings) instead of the traditional dissertation, emphasizing breadth and flexibility in…

  16. Women, Men and the Doctorate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centra, John A; Kuykendall, Nancy M.

    This study describes the current status and professional development of a sample of women doctorates and compares them to a sample of men who have attained the same educational status. Chapters cover the sample and procedures used; employment patterns; doctorates in academe; publications, income, and job satisfaction; marriage and family life;…

  17. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  18. The Doctorate in Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher Michael; Shin, Richard Q.; Smith, Lance C.

    2011-01-01

    The doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision is the terminal degree in the field of counselor education within the U.S. The authors surveyed CACREP-accredited doctoral programs to assess department characteristics, clinical experience and credentials, research experience, and the admission, retention, and evaluation of students. Results…

  19. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  20. Doctoral Preparation and Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farren, Elizabeth A.

    1991-01-01

    According to responses from 76 percent of 200 nurses surveyed, nurses who earn doctorates in any field are likely to go on to conduct nursing research. What seems more important than type of degree is whether the nurses were exposed to computers or participated in faculty research as doctoral students. (Author)

  1. Doctoral preparation and research productivity.

    PubMed

    Farren, E A

    1991-01-01

    According to this study, nurses who earn doctorates in any field are likely to go on to conduct nursing research. What seems more important than type of degree is whether or not the nurses were exposed to computers or participated in faculty research while doctoral students.

  2. A marketing clinical doctorate programs.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Isaac D; Kimball, Olive M

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, clinical doctorate programs in health disciplines have proliferated amid both support and controversy among educators, professional organizations, practitioners, administrators, and third-party payers. Supporters argue that the explosion of new knowledge and increasing sophistication of technology have created a need for advanced practice models to enhance patient care and safety and to reduce costs. Critics argue that necessary technological advances can be incorporated into existing programs and believe that clinical doctorates will increase health care costs, not reduce them. Despite the controversy, many health disciplines have advanced the clinical doctorate (the most recent is the doctor of nursing practice in 2004), with some professions mandating the doctorate as the entry-level degree (i.e., psychology, pharmacy, audiology, and so on). One aspect of the introduction of clinical doctoral degrees has been largely overlooked, and that is the marketing aspect. Because of marketing considerations, some clinical doctorates have been more successfully implemented and accepted than others. Marketing is composed of variables commonly known as "the four P's of marketing": product, price, promotion, and place. This report explores these four P's within the context of clinical doctorates in the health disciplines.

  3. [Doctor's attendance in police custody].

    PubMed

    Chariot, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Medical examination is a right for every person detained in police custody in France. Examination of detainees usually takes place in the police station so that the doctor can assess the conditions in which the detainee is being held. In some cases, such as type I diabetes care, detainees need to be examined and treated in a hospital. Doctors are subject to a duty of care and prevention. Description of recent traumatic injuries is part of the doctor's mission. They should prescribe any ongoing treatment which needs to be continued, as well as any emergency treatment required. Custody officers may monitor the detainee and administer medication. Doctor's opinion should be given in a national standard document. If the doctor considers that the custody conditions are disgraceful, they may refuse to express an opinion as to whether the detainee is fit for custody.

  4. Occupational allergy in medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Kusaka, Yukinori; Suganuma, Narufumi; Nagasawa, Sumio; Deguchi, Yoji

    2004-03-01

    Allergic diseases have increased in many developed countries including Japan. Doctors are also at risk for allergic diseases from exposure to allergens in working conditions and hospital environments. We investigated the factors relating to occupational allergy in doctors. Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to all doctors (n=895) who had previously graduated from School of Medicine, Fukui Medical University. Data from 307 responders (response rate: 34.3%, male 241, female 66, mean age +/- S.D., 30.8 +/- 4.2) were analyzed. Eighty-nine doctors stated that they had occupational allergy including contact dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and/or asthma. Fifty-four had contact dermatitis caused by surgical gloves; 77 had contact dermatitis from disinfectants, e.g. 23 from chlorhexidine gluconate; 21 from povidone iodine; and 15 from ethanol. Fifteen doctors experienced allergic rhinitis and/or asthma caused by handling laboratory animals. Univariate analysis showed that profession (surgical doctors) and past histories of allergic diseases (rhinitis, sinusitis, or atopic dermatitis) were significantly related to occupational allergy in doctors, but that gender, smoking or physical exercise were not significantly related to it. A logistic regression analysis showed that past histories of allergic diseases and the profession of surgical doctors were significantly related to occupational allergy, but that gender, age or smoking were not significantly related to it. The results of the present study suggest that past history of allergic diseases is a factor predisposing to occupational allergy in doctors. It is necessary and possible to extend more prophylactic measures for doctors, especially for surgeons, because exposure to responsible agents and materials for them can be more frequent.

  5. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... AE, Solomon PR. Life adjustments for memory loss, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. In: Budson AE, Solomon PR, eds. ...

  6. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... or someone else, every time I have a seizure? What safety measures do I need to take ...

  7. The doctors of time.

    PubMed

    Hall, W J

    2000-01-04

    Throughout human history, we have sought to understand the changes we observe in ourselves and in others with the passage of time. Does this so-called aging process have some purpose, and to what extent can we control what are otherwise inexorable consequences? Although various philosophical traditions have offered different interpretations of the relation between age and time, a more unified concept of human aging may be developing. Ancient philosophical concepts are converging with insights from developmental genetics, molecular biology, and clinical research. This new approach suggests that aging is a continuum of human growth and development, full of potential and highly modifiable by a combination of personal responsibility and appropriate medical care. In providing this care to older adults, skillful physicians use time as a key diagnostic and therapeutic tool to interpret symptoms properly and to place treatment choices in the context of human values that may change with age. We who care for older adults are the doctors of time. Sadly, in our contemporary system of medical care, time is one of the least understood and most poorly used tools. A medical care system that is increasingly oriented toward minimizing the time spent caring for older adults cannot possibly increase the quality of life for the rapidly growing elderly population. With the potential for substantial life extension within our grasp, we must develop attitudes and skills that are more compatible with the value systems of our older patients.

  8. [Advancement of the medical doctorate].

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Förster, R; Schmidt, R E

    2009-08-01

    The medical doctorate and the subsequent advanced research qualification in medicine have an exceptional position within the natural sciences. While, in the German system, graduation to the degree of a medical doctor is often an initiation into scientific practice, the in-depth scientific education of medical doctors may be achieved in various configurations. In recent years, structured programs for doctorates in medicine and natural sciences have found increasing acceptance, following recommendations of national scientific councils ("Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft" and "Hochschulrat"). Hannover Medical School has been offering such programs for a number of years. The StrucMed program increases the quality of medical doctorate studies, typically performed in the third and fourth years of university studies. The Hannover Biomedical Research School (HBRS) combines several programs for a doctorate in natural sciences, creating a platform for an internationally oriented education of post-graduates in various disciplines of life sciences. Evaluating the achievements and career paths of the trainees will contribute to the successful integration of research work in an efficiency-oriented clinical environment.

  9. Profile of the Nontraditional Doctoral Degree Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    What type of individual pursues a nontraditional doctoral degree? Although answering this question is the main purpose of this chapter, there is an underlying story that provides context for how and why these individuals came to pursue a doctoral degree. The tremendous growth in the number of doctoral students and doctoral degree-granting…

  10. Quiero un Libro. I Want a Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fullerton. Div. of Library Science.

    This vocabulary improvement handbook was designed to be an aid to children's and young adult librarians serving in public and school libraries who know little or no Spanish, but who wish to serve their Spanish-speaking community. Content and design of the handbook emanated from class discussions by participants in the Library Training Institute…

  11. [The clown doctor: an introduction].

    PubMed

    Rösner, M

    2010-02-01

    In the literature, increasing numbers of practitioners have reported their experience using clown doctors in geriatric settings. The reports agree on the positive effects on persons with dementia and also on their caregivers. However, empirical studies on its effectiveness are rare. This article presents the field of activity of a clown doctor in geriatric settings as well as an overview of current scientific research on the topic and the effects on persons with dementia and nursing staff. It will be become clear that the clown doctor is a supporting therapeutic intervention. Through the clown representation, it is possible to obtain access to and interact with a person with dementia, thus, maintaining social contact of the patient with his/her environment. This effect leads to an increase of well-being and contributes to a reduction of problematic behavior. In addition to reduced workload and relief for the nursing staff, it has a positive effect on the working atmosphere.

  12. Medical English for Finnish Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Collan, Y.; Lock, S. P.; Pyke, D. A.; Whimster, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Courses in medical editing and medical English are relatively new and infrequent. We have now provided seven of them for Finnish doctors who wished to publish their work in English, to present papers in English to conferences, to work in English-speaking countries—or who wanted to improve their knowledge of the language. Although such courses should be tailored to individual needs, most participants seem to have found them helpful, particularly the sessions spent in the language laboratories. We suggest that courses in medical English might be useful for both medical students and postgraduate doctors outside English-speaking countries. PMID:4821015

  13. Why treat doctors like pushers?

    PubMed Central

    Beyerstein, B L; Alexander, B K

    1985-01-01

    Harsher laws and enforcement procedures are making Canadian physicians more vulnerable to conviction as drug traffickers. The authors question this development on the grounds that it extends a drug prohibition policy that has failed in the past and has incurred intolerable social costs. To help envision an alternative, the authors discuss conflicting claims about the British tradition of permitting doctors to prescribe narcotics to addicts. They conclude that, with some restrictions, allowing Canadian doctors to prescribe narcotics according to their judgements of patient needs would be more efficacious than increasing the penalties they face for violating nonmedical norms. PMID:3971250

  14. Industry-Oriented Doctorate Established.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes an industry-related program at the University of Texas (Arlington) leading to a Doctorate of Science in Applied Chemistry. The program requires an industrial internship and a dissertation based on research involving both the university's chemistry faculty and chemists in industry. (SK)

  15. Critical Reflection as Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter considers how doctoral education, particularly in applied settings such as education, social work, counseling, and health care, could be reimagined if it was organized around the idea and process of critical reflection: of helping students to better understand how power operates in educational environments and how students' sense of…

  16. Family Planning Handbook for Doctors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ronald L., Ed.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) believes that all people have the right to family planning information, including premarital and marital counseling, contraception information, and sex education. This physician's handbook is designed to provide all doctors with the necessary instructions on the latest family planning methods…

  17. Literature Reviews: Advising Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Brent

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available information has created new opportunities and challenges for today's research students. Academic and public libraries have developed sophisticated electronic databases to better manage knowledge to make it more accessible to researchers. Literature reviews are a major challenge for doctoral students. The focus of…

  18. Doctoral Research on the Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jablonsky, Adelaide

    For the last few years, ERIC-CUE has published a series entitled "the Doctoral Research Series," the first of which focused on the education of Mexican-American children. The second collection of annotated bibliographies concentrated on problems of desegregation, and the third on early childhood education. These bibliographies were organized by…

  19. Doctorate nursing degree in Spain

    PubMed Central

    López-Montesinos, Mª José; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and descriptive study of the process of change being experienced in the Spanish university system over the last decade (2005-2014). OBJECTIVE: To describe the structural changes occurring in Nursing Education in Spain, reaching access to doctoral studies from the European Convergence Process and the subsequent legislative development. METHODOLOGY: Bibliographical review of royal decrees and reference literature on the subject of study and descriptive analysis of the situation. RESULTS: Carries various changes suffered in the curricula of nursing education in the last decade, the legislation of the European Higher Education sets the guidelines for current studies of Masters and Doctorates. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of the Master and Doctorate stages after a basic degree, which is now possible with the new legislation. A formal beginning made of scientific nursing in order to generate their own lines of research led by Doctors of nursing who can integrate in research groups under the same condition as other researcher, yet now, from the nursing discipline itself. PMID:26312628

  20. Reforming Doctoral Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitusikova, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Doctoral education in Europe has been undergoing a major transformation in the last decade. This transformation has occurred in response to several challenges: the changing nature of the labor market in the globalized economy; the European Union's common agenda in research and education, which seeks to make Europe the most competitive…

  1. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  2. Questions to ask your child's doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Child's Doctor About Neuroblastoma? Updated March 14, 2104. Cancer.org. www.cancer.org/cancer/neuroblastoma/detailedguide/neuroblastoma-talking-with-doctor . Accessed August 3, ...

  3. Cataracts - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about cataracts; Lens implants - what to ask your doctor ... What is a cataract? How will cataract surgery help my vision? If I have cataracts in both eyes, can I have surgery on ...

  4. Lyme disease - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about Lyme disease; Lyme borreliosis - questions; Bannwarth syndrome - questions ... I am treated with antibiotics? How can my doctor diagnose me with Lyme disease? Can I be ...

  5. Make the most of your doctor visit

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000860.htm Make the most of your doctor visit To use the sharing features on this ... all of your medicines. When to Call the Doctor You should call your provider when: You have ...

  6. Blood Poisoning: When to See a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... I have blood poisoning. Should I see my doctor? Answers from James M. Steckelberg, M.D. "Blood ... requires prompt medical attention. When to see a doctor If you recently had a medical or dental ...

  7. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... school people I should tell about my child's concussion? Can my child stay for a full day? ...

  8. Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000184.htm Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... with your child's doctor about the type of anesthesia that will be best for your child. Below ...

  9. Doctoral Program Selection Using Pairwise Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadisina, Suresh K.; Bhasin, Vijay

    1989-01-01

    The application of a pairwise comparison methodology (Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process) to the doctoral program selection process is illustrated. A hierarchy for structuring and facilitating the doctoral program selection decision is described. (Author/MLW)

  10. Taking Medicines Safely: At Your Doctor's Office

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely At Your Doctor's Office Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Download ... Articles Medicines: Use Them Safely / At Your Doctor's Office / Ask Your Pharmacist / Now, It's Your Turn: How ...

  11. COPD - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis - what to ask your doctor; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - what to ask your doctor ... Systems Improvement. Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). 10th ed. Updated January 2016. www.icsi. ...

  12. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... a tension-type headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical problems can cause headaches? What ...

  13. Hybrid Doctoral Program: Innovative Practices and Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvich, Dori; Manning, JoAnn; McCormick, Kathy; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects on how one mid-Atlantic University innovatively incorporated technology into the development of a hybrid doctoral program in educational leadership. The paper describes a hybrid doctoral degree program using a rigorous design; challenges of reworking a traditional syllabus of record to a hybrid doctoral program; the perceptions…

  14. Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Susan T.

    The data presented in this report shows trends in doctorate awards by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The source of the data is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The SED has been conducted annually for the National Science Foundation…

  15. Reshaping Doctoral Education: International Approaches and Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison, Ed.; Danby, Susan, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The number of doctorates being awarded around the world has almost doubled over the last ten years, propelling it from a small elite enterprise into a large and ever growing international market. Within the context of increasing numbers of doctoral students this book examines the new doctorate environment and the challenges it is starting to face.…

  16. Advising Doctoral Students in Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Christy Moran; Augustine-Shaw, Donna; Fairbanks, Amanda; Adams-Wright, Gayla

    2016-01-01

    Because almost one half of students enrolled in American doctoral programs do not complete their degrees, the factors that lead to doctoral student attrition need to be identified. Research suggests that the nature of the advisor-advisee relationship contributes to the persistence levels of doctoral students. In this study, we conducted a content…

  17. Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Susan T.

    The data in this report show trends in doctorate awards by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The source of the data is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The SED is conducted annually for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and four…

  18. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities: Summary Report 2000. Survey of Earned Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffer, Thomas B.; Dugoni, Bernard L.; Sanderson, Allen R.; Sederstrom, Scott; Ghadialy, Rashna; Rocque, Peter

    This report presents data on recipients of research doctorates awarded by U.S. universities from July 1, 1999 through June 30, 2000. The information is taken from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, an annual census of new doctoral recipients. The 406 universities in the United States that confer research doctorates awarded a total of 41,368…

  19. The Doctoral Origins of Economics Faculty and the Education of New Economics Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Paul J.; Willis, Rachel A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines doctoral origins of economics faculty training new doctorates in economics. Finds that doctoral origins are highly concentrated, with the top ten schools producing 47% of the faculty at Ph.D.-granting schools, 54% of weighted doctoral-production faculty, and 67% of thesis supervisors at 47 top schools. (DSK)

  20. The advertising of doctors' services.

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, D H

    1991-01-01

    Medicine is unique among professions and trades, offering a 'product' which is unlike any other. The consequences for patients of being attracted by misleading information to an inappropriate doctor or service are such as to demand special restrictions on the advertising of doctors' services. Furthermore, health care in the UK is organised around the 'referral system', whereby general practitioners refer patients to specialists when necessary rather than have specialists accept patients on self-referral. But this need not inhibit the provision of helpful factual information to those who need it. Recent policy changes by the General Medical Council considerably broaden the scope for general practitioners to make factual information of their services available to local people, while safeguarding the public against promotional activities which are designed to increase demand for certain kinds of specialist service by playing upon individuals' fears and lack of medical knowledge. PMID:2033629

  1. Talking With Your Doctor: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Your Doctor (National Eye Institute) Also in Spanish Talking to Your Doctor (National Institutes of Health) ... Doctor (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Understanding Your Doctors and Other Caregivers (Joint Commission) - ...

  2. 6. Doctor on the sidelines.

    PubMed

    Verrall, Geoffrey M; Brukner, Peter D; Seward, Hugh G

    2006-03-06

    Effectively managing on-field emergencies is the most important role of the doctor on the sidelines. Pre-event preparation is essential and should include a formulated plan for dealing with emergencies and access to emergency equipment such as a stretcher and a bag and mask. Game day injuries should be assessed by adhering as closely as possible to a normal clinical consultation, with a proper history and examination being performed for all injuries. The athlete with an on-field head injury should be treated as having a concomitant cervical spine injury until proven otherwise. Athletes with any symptoms after head injury should be comprehensively and continuously assessed. Return-to-play decisions are made by balancing the risk of injury recurrence, the potential severity of injury recurrence and the benefits of returning to the field (which are higher at elite than amateur level). There is currently a shortage of doctors willing to cover sports events in Australia, which is partially explained by inadequate remuneration, inadequate facilities provided at venues, inadequate training opportunities in sports medicine, and fear of the medicolegal consequences in taking on the role as a team doctor.

  3. Doctor-patient relationship. Islamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed A

    2016-02-01

    The doctor-patient relationship is an intricate concept in which patients voluntarily approach a doctor and become part of a contract by which they tend to abide by doctor's instructions. Over recent decades, this relationship has changed dramatically due to privatization and commercialization of the health sector. A review of the relevant literature in the database of MEDLINE published in English between 1966 and August 2015 was performed with the following keywords: doctor-patient relationship, physician-patient relationship, ethics, and Islam. The Muslim doctor should be familiar with the Islamic teachings on the daily issues faced in his/her practice and the relationship with his/her patients.

  4. Teaching doctors to treat doctors: medical student peer counselling.

    PubMed

    Spiro, J H; Roenneburg, M; Maly, B J

    1980-01-01

    Physicians' emotional problems need to be recognized and treated. Intervention and prevention in this problem area have been attempted at the Medical College of Wisconsin through a programme of peer counselling designed to teach student physicians how to recognize and treat emotional difficulties faced by their peers. During the 18 months that the programme has been in operation, 20 peer counsellors reported a total 1,185 hours spent in counselling their peers, lending credence to the speculation that doctors will turn to their peers for help if, in medical school, there is acceptance of fallibility and responsiveness on the part of peers.

  5. Doctor on a mountaineering expedition.

    PubMed Central

    A'Court, C. H.; Stables, R. H.; Travis, S.

    1995-01-01

    Doctors are welcome members on mountaineering expeditions to remote areas, but practical advice on how to prepare and what kit to take can be difficult to find. This article is a ragbag of useful advice on diverse topics. It explains the necessary preparation, provides tips for a healthy expedition, and summarises the common disorders encountered at high altitude. The comprehensive drug and equipment lists and first aid kit for climbers were used for the 1992 Everest in winter expedition. They are there to be sacrificed to personal preference and the experience and size of individual expeditions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7767198

  6. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  7. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs.

  8. Retaining rural doctors: doctors' preferences for rural medical workforce incentives.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhu; Scott, Anthony; McGrail, Matthew; Humphreys, John; Witt, Julia

    2014-11-01

    Many governments have implemented incentive programs to improve the retention of doctors in rural areas despite a lack of evidence of their effectiveness. This study examines rural general practitioners' (GPs') preferences for different types of retention incentive policies using a discrete choice experiment (DCE). In 2009, the DCE was administered to a group of 1720 rural GPs as part of the "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL)" study. We estimate both a mixed logit model and a generalized multinomial logit model to account for different types of unobserved differences in GPs' preferences. Our results indicate that increased level of locum relief incentive, retention payments and rural skills loading leads to an increase in the probability of attracting GPs to stay in rural practice. The locum relief incentive is ranked as the most effective, followed by the retention payments and rural skills loading payments. These findings are important in helping to tailor retention policies to those that are most effective.

  9. Doctor and Patient Questions as a Measure of Doctor-Centredness in UAE Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on a description of consultations conducted in English between doctors and patients of various nationalities in the hospitals of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, specifically the extent to which such consultations are doctor-centered. (Author/VWL)

  10. Characteristics of PETE Doctoral Level Institutions: Descriptions of Programs, Faculty and Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, B. Ann; Rikard, G. Linda

    2011-01-01

    The present study of Doctoral PETE programs provided an extensive description of demographic data which included: (a) doctoral program characteristics, (b) faculty, and (c) doctoral graduates. Several data sets from the academic years of 2005-06 and 2008-09 as well as selected summary data from 1996-97 through 2008-09 were used to make comparisons…

  11. On Doctoral Student Development: Exploring Faculty Mentoring in the Shaping of African American Doctoral Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of faculty mentorship in the shaping of African American doctoral student success. A case analysis framework is used to investigate the belief systems that doctoral students held about their doctoral experience. Data collection involved a one-phase semi-structured interview protocol used to gather information…

  12. What Disengages Doctoral Students in the Biological and Environmental Sciences from Their Doctoral Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, V.; Taina, J.; Pyhältö, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causes of student disengagement from their doctoral studies in the biological and environmental sciences. The data came from interviews of 40 doctoral students (male = 15, female = 25) and underwent qualitative analysis for content. Our results showed that doctoral studies provide multiple contexts for disengagement, such…

  13. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  14. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  15. Challenges to the Doctoral Journey: A Case of Female Doctoral Students from Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bireda, Asamenew Demessie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate some challenges female doctoral students experience in their doctoral journey. The study used a qualitative design and structured interviews. The theoretical framework that guided the study was that of Urie Bronfenbrenner's ecosystemic theory. A purposely selected sample of five female doctoral students from the…

  16. Doctoral Studies in Romania: Admission Procedures, Social, and Legal Aspects of Doctoral Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miclea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    This contribution presents a concise and up-to-date report of doctoral studies in Romania, with a special emphasis on legal and social aspects. The author also argues that in order to be sustainable, the reform of doctoral studies should be substantiated by the differentiation of universities, reliable post-doctoral programmes, and a substantive…

  17. Beyond Survival in a Doctoral Program: A Guide for Graduate and Doctoral Students in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Ernest Y.; Montemayor, Joaquin

    A guide to the doctoral studies program in education is presented to lessen the difficulty students often have in interpreting directives about the program. Brief historical information on the doctorate and the dynamics of fund finding are considered. The following areas are addressed: general requirements for the doctorate; graduate school…

  18. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  19. Tips for Talking to Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9#header-section #main-nav, #overlay-menu nav, #mobile-menu, #one-page-nav li .hover-caption{font- ... by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: appointment expectations, communication, doctor's office, examination, family doctor, health history, health ...

  20. European Industrial Doctorates: Marie Curie Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Commission, 2012

    2012-01-01

    European industrial doctorates are joint doctoral training projects funded by the European Union (EU) and open to all research fields. The project brings together an academic participant (university, research institution, etc.) and a company. They have to be established in two different EU Member States or associated countries. Associated partners…

  1. Interdisciplinary Doctoral Research Supervision: A Scoping Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanstone, Meredith; Hibbert, Kathy; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; McKenzie, Pam; Pitman, Allan; Lingard, Lorelei

    2013-01-01

    This scoping literature review examines the topic of interdisciplinary doctoral research supervision. Interdisciplinary doctoral research programs are expanding in response to encouragement from funding agencies and enthusiasm from faculty and students. In an acknowledgement that the search for creative and innovative solutions to complex problems…

  2. Passionate Scholars: Transformative Learning in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Long, Judith; Schapiro, Steven A.; McClintock, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the relationships among student-centered doctoral study for scholar-practitioners, adult development, and transformative learning. In this research study, the authors describe a project that explores an expanded conceptualization of doctoral education that is grounded in an integrative perspective on adult development and on…

  3. The Risky Business of Doctoral Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica; Sanderson, Don; Evans, Terry; Lawson, Alan; Taylor, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Universities are under no less pressure to adopt risk management strategies than other public and private organisations. The risk management of doctoral education is a particularly important issue given that a doctorate is the highest academic qualification a university offers and stakes are high in terms of assuring its quality. However, intense…

  4. Current Issues in Social Work Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of doctoral programs in social work is to prepare research-scientists who contribute to knowledge that guides professional practice and educators competent to teach new cohorts of social work practitioners. In grooming stewards of the profession, doctoral programs also must prepare their graduates to support the larger contemporary…

  5. Addressing the Curriculum Problem in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bill

    2012-01-01

    How best to understand the curriculum problem in doctoral research education: that is the question that this paper engages. It begins by noting that curriculum as such is little referenced and inadequately theorised in higher education and certainly in doctoral education, and indeed has been described as a "missing term". The paper then…

  6. Different Types of Doctoral Study Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahenius, Katja; Martinsuo, Miia

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a doctor can be viewed as a highly personal and unique experience, which is why many factors influence the completion or non-completion of the doctoral degree. The attention in previous research has been on the students' characteristics, and the university faculty role in promoting degree progress. Therefore, more research is needed on…

  7. David Baines: Rural Doctor, Lecturer, Dancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the career of David Baines, an American Indian doctor who successfully integrates traditional and modern medicine. Describes problems faced by American Indian doctors, the tremendous amount of work involved in medical training, and problems associated with working in rural areas and trying to straddle two opposing cultures when…

  8. Doctor of Professional Counseling: The Next Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern, Stephen; Cade, Rochelle; Locke, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Professional doctorates have been established in the allied health professions by clinicians seeking the highest levels of independent practice. Allied health professional doctorates include nursing practice (DNP), occupational therapy (OTD), psychology (PsyD), social work (DSW), and marriage and family therapy (DMFT). Lessons learned from the…

  9. The Agile Approach with Doctoral Dissertation Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tengberg, Lars Göran Wallgren

    2015-01-01

    Several research findings conclude that many doctoral students fail to complete their studies within the allowable time frame, in part because of problems related to the research and supervision process. Surveys show that most doctoral students are generally satisfied with their dissertation supervision. However, these surveys also reveal some…

  10. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper. PMID:27417625

  11. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-06-30

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper.

  12. U.S. Doctors Still Over-Prescribing Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... 162364.html U.S. Doctors Still Over-Prescribing Drugs: Survey More than 1 in 4 say antibiotics are ... doctors are still prescribing these treatments, a new survey of doctors reveals. Antibiotics are by far the ...

  13. The Overseas Doctors Training Scheme: failing expectations.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Overseas Doctors Training Scheme needs appraisal. Set up 10 years ago to improve the quality of postgraduate training that overseas (non-European) doctors receive in Britain, the scheme has been popular, but it is questionable how far it has achieved its aims. If Britain is to continue to employ large numbers of overseas doctors in training grades, both through the scheme and through independent arrangements, the apparent mismatch between their expectations and the reality of what Britain offers must be tackled. Images p1629-a PMID:7993422

  14. The doctor(s) in house: an analysis of the evolution of the television doctor-hero.

    PubMed

    Strauman, Elena C; Goodier, Bethany C

    2011-03-01

    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the "television doctor" by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal of scientifically uncovering and resolving instances of disease. This article examines the implicit and explicit messages in House M.D. and critically analyzes both the show and its lead character in relation to the traditional medical drama genre that highlights the "doctor-hero" as the central character. While at first House seems to completely violate narrative and generic norms, ultimately the program provides a new form that reinforces the presence of the doctor-hero, but highlights House's character as the central figure who is personally and interpersonally problematic but biomedically effective.

  15. Cultural initiation of medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Zsinkó-Szabó, Zoltán; Lázár, Imre

    2013-12-01

    Eighteen years experience of teaching medical anthropology at a Hungarian medical school offers insight into the dynamics of interference between the rationalist epistemological tradition of biomedicine as one of the central paradigms of modernism and the cultural relativism of medical anthropology, as cultural anthropology is considered to be one of the generators of postmodern thinking. Tracing back the informal "prehistory" of our Institute, we can reveal its psychosomatic, humanistic commitment and critical basis as having represented a kind of counterculture compared with the technocrats of state-socialist Hungary's health ideology. The historical change and socio-cultural transition in Hungary after 1989 was accompanied by changes in the medical system as well as in philosophy and in the structure of the teaching of social sciences. The developing pluralism in the medical system together with the pluralism of social ideologies allowed the substitution of the dogmatic Marxist-Leninist framework with the more pragmatic and empiricist behavioral sciences including medical sociology and medical anthropology. The conflict between the initiation function of the hard preclinical training of the first two years, and the reflective, relativistic and critical narrative on "biomedicine as culture bound entity" constructed by medical anthropology during the second year of medical training is discussed. We also submit our fieldwork data gained as a result of a two year investigation period focusing on diverse initiation types of "would be" physicians. The main proportion of our data derives from individual semi structured deep interviews together with focus group interviews carried out with medical students of upper years. Finally, the role of medical anthropology in the "rite of passage" of becoming a medical doctor is summarized, paying attention to their field work reports and the risks and gains in this process.

  16. AMA Physician Select: Online Doctor Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership | JAMA Network | AMA Store DoctorFinder This online physician Locator helps you find a perfect match for ... with basic professional information on virtually every licensed physician in the United States. This includes more than ...

  17. Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... citing a doctor for nonpayment of certain administrative fees to suspending or revoking his or her license ... not have prepaid health coverage. What are the fees for services? Must they be paid in full ...

  18. Varicose veins - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... what to ask your doctor References Goldman MP, Weiss RA. Phleblogy and treatment of leg veins. In: ... and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  19. Questions for Your Doctor: Your First Visit

    MedlinePlus

    The Testicular Cancer Resource Center Questions for your Doctor: Your First Visit This list of questions is intended to help ... cancer, be happy, but also be aware that testicular cancer is misdiagnosed as epididymitis or something similar almost ...

  20. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000222.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  1. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... gov® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  2. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... gov ® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  3. Advancing the profession through doctoral education.

    PubMed

    Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Spolarich, Ann Eshenaur

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education in dental hygiene is necessary to create a cadre of dental hygiene researchers and scholars, and to develop educators who will expand the body of knowledge for the profession. Dental hygienists with advanced degrees will require skill sets that parallel those of other professionals if they are to function productively as credible, equal members of interprofessional teams. Doctorally-prepared dental hygienists will be working as leaders, administrators and researchers, and will be influential in creating models that increase access to care, developing collaborative health care teams and improving health outcomes. The doctorate of philosophy is the terminal graduate degree for any discipline, and is the pinnacle for the profession. This paper explores the development of doctoral degrees for dental hygiene, and encourages educators to develop models for graduate programs based upon considerations presented here.

  4. Constipation - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000214.htm Constipation - what to ask your doctor To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Constipation is when you are passing stools less often ...

  5. Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000223.htm Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor To use the ... enable JavaScript. Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within ...

  6. Talking to Your Doctor (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & ... about raising personal subjects (like physical development or sexual health), it's helpful to know that doctors deal with ...

  7. Heart failure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000224.htm Heart failure - what to ask your doctor To use the ... a pump that moves blood through your body. Heart failure occurs when blood does not move well and ...

  8. Kidney stones - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000186.htm Kidney stones - what to ask your doctor To use the ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms ...

  9. Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about radiation therapy ... National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people with cancer. Cancer.gov. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/radiationttherapy.pdf . Updated May 2007. ...

  10. SAS doctors career progression survey 2013.

    PubMed

    Oroz, Carlos; Sands, Lorna R; Lee, John

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a national survey of Staff, Associate Specialists and Specialty (SAS) doctors working in sexual health clinics in the UK in 2013 in order to explore their career progression. The aim of the survey was to assess SAS doctors' experience in passing through the thresholds and to gather information about the adherence by SAS doctors and employers to the terms and conditions of service laid out by the new 2008 contract. Out of 185 responders, whom the authors estimate comprise 34% of the total workforce, 159 were on the new contract. Of those, most SAS doctors were women (84%), the majority (67%) worked less than nine programmed activities per week; only a few had intentions to join the consultant grade (15%), and a considerable minority (26%) were older than 54 years of age and likely to retire in the next ten years. The survey showed that most participating SAS doctors had undergone appraisal in the previous 15 months (90%), most had a job planning discussion (83%) with their employer and most had some allocated time for supporting professional activities (86%). However, a significant minority had no appraisal (10%), no job planning discussion (17%) and had no allocated supporting professional activities (14%), which allows time for career development in the specialty. Most SAS doctors, who had the opportunity, had progressed through the thresholds automatically (88%); some experienced difficulties in passing (8%) and only a few did not pass (4%). SAS doctors must ensure that they work together with their employer in order to improve adherence to the terms and conditions of service of the contract, which allow for career progression and benefit both the individual doctors and ultimately service provision.

  11. Doctor-Patient Relationship in Psychiatry*

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawala, Paresh D.

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the issue of doctor-patient relationship in view of a changing world with special emphasis on mental health professionals. It takes into account transference and counter-transference issues in doctor-patient relationships. It deals with issues pertaining to consent and liabilities, confidentiality and patient protection. Role of a psychiatrist as a leader in the art of communication is touched upon. In the end issues about professional fees and ethics too is dealt with. PMID:25838726

  12. Interpersonal perception in the context of doctor-patient relationships: a dyadic analysis of doctor-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Kenny, David A; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Weijden, Trudy van der; Leblanc, Annie; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Légaré, France; Campbell, Craig

    2010-03-01

    Doctor-patient communication is an interpersonal process and essential to relationship-centered care. However, in many studies, doctors and patients are studied as if living in separate worlds. This study assessed whether: 1) doctors' perception of their communication skills is congruent with their patients' perception; and 2) patients of a specific doctor agree with each other about their doctor's communication skills. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three provinces in Canada with 91 doctors and their 1749 patients. Doctors and patients independently completed questions on the doctor's communication skills (content and process) after a consultation. Multilevel modeling provided an estimate of the patient and doctor variance components at both the dyad-level and the doctor-level. We computed correlations between patients' and doctors' perceptions at both levels to assess how congruent they were. Consensus among patients of a specific doctor was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean score of the rating of doctor's skills according to patients was 4.58, and according to doctors was 4.37. The dyad-level variance for the patient was .38 and for the doctor was .06. The doctor-level variance for the patient ratings was .01 and for the doctor ratings, .18. The correlation between both the patients' and the doctors' skills' ratings scores at the dyad-level was weak. At the doctor-level, the correlation was not statistically significant. The ICC for patients' ratings was .03 and for the doctors' ratings .76. Overall, this study suggests that doctors and their patients have a very different perspective of the doctors' communication skills occurring during routine clinical encounters.

  13. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  14. Some Thoughts on Doctoral Preparation in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reys, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Arguments for significantly improving doctoral programs have long been made, both nationally and internationally. The nature and variety of doctoral programs makes it difficult to single out specific changes that would be equally applicable to every discipline-specific doctoral program. Therefore, this commentary will focus on doctoral programs…

  15. Supporting Doctoral Students in Their Professional Identity Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasanen, Keijo; Korpiaho, Kirsi

    2011-01-01

    Doctoral programmes and education do not necessarily pay enough attention to the professional development of the student. Doctoral students may struggle with an unclear conception of who they can and want to become as a result of their doctoral studies. This paper describes an event that aimed to provide doctoral students with opportunities to…

  16. Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1991. Selected Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    The data presented in this report show trends in doctorate production by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The data comes from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which is conducted annually. Doctoral degrees such as the Ph.D. or D.Sc. are…

  17. Student Perceptions of Nurse Doctorates: Similarities and Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudacek, Sharon; Carpenter, Dona Rinaldi

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 341 doctor of philosophy, 47 doctorate of nursing science, and 13 doctor of education nursing students found that Ph.D. candidates perceived a stronger research preparation, which they would not receive in the other two doctoral programs. They did not perceive the Ph.D. as preparing them to be educators, practitioners, or…

  18. The Rise of Professional Doctorates: Case Studies of the Doctorate in Education in China, Iceland and Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildy, Helen; Peden, Sanna; Chan, Karyn

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education is going through a period of transition. This transition is evident in the many varieties of doctoral degrees currently offered in higher education institutions worldwide, from the traditional research-based Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to the Professional Doctorate and the New Route PhD. This article reports on a study which…

  19. An Appreciative Inquiry into Educational Administration Doctoral Programs: Stories from Doctoral Students at Three Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.; Zepeda, Sally J.; Peters, April L.; Hummel, Crystal; Kruskamp, William H.; San Martin, Teresa; Wynne, Stefanie C.

    2007-01-01

    A case study using appreciate inquiry identified and described the experiences of five educational administration doctoral students representing three universities regarding their doctoral program studies and dissertation process. Data were collected using reflective narratives and the Left Hand Right Hand Column Case Method. Data revealed (a) the…

  20. Doctoral Studies in Spain: Changes to Converge with Europe in the Internationalisation of the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramírez, Magdalena Jiménez

    2016-01-01

    In Spain, the organisation of doctoral studies has been substantially modified to come into line with the changes introduced by the agenda of the Bologna process. These changes have been specified in a number of statements by European Ministers of Education, and have required alterations to Spanish doctoral regulations. The aim of these changes…

  1. Reexamining the Structure of Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, James

    2003-01-01

    Considers how Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife" is a model of Edgar Allan Poe's aesthetic of the short story. Examines this work on many levels. Concludes that great writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, challenge readers to find the clues, to connect the dots, to pay attention to the "little details." (SG)

  2. Science/Engineering Doctorate Production Increases in 1981; More New Doctorates Seek Nonacademic Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Resources Studies Highlights, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Results of the 1981 Survey of Earned Doctorates, which is conducted by five federal agencies, are summarized. About 95 percent of the annual cohort of recipients of the Ph.D. and similar doctorates respond to the survey questionnaire. The database also includes some information on nonrespondents obtained from public sources; recipients of…

  3. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  4. The Criminal Justice Doctorate: A Study of Doctoral Programs in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felkenes, George T.

    Graduates of six institutions were surveyed in an effort to develop a profile of doctoral graduates from institutions that have traditionally offered doctoral programs oriented specifically toward the field of criminal justice. A second research objective was to develop an understanding of the attitudes, frustrations, and utilization patterns of…

  5. Child Development and the Coworking of Doctor and Teacher: A Waldorf School Doctor's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnow, Gerald F.

    This paper draws on the nearly 20 years' experiences of a school doctor working with teachers at the Rudolf Steiner School in New York City to describe general principles of assessing child development in relation to educational progress. The paper contrasts the customary role of school doctors (related to conducting physical examinations for…

  6. Persisting Dreams: The Impact of the Doctoral Socialization Process on Latina Post-Doctoral Career Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerband, Yamissette Milagros

    2016-01-01

    Latinas are underrepresented within the professorate and within doctoral programs, particularly within Research Intensive Institutions. This dissertation explores how the doctoral socialization process impacts the pipeline from the Ph.D. to scholarly careers for Latinas in Research universities. Given the low numbers of representation and…

  7. Researching Doctoral Pedagogy Close up: Design and Action in Two Doctoral Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danby, Susan; Lee, Alison

    2012-01-01

    With growing international interest in diversifying sites for pedagogical work within the doctorate, doctoral programmes of different kinds are being developed in different disciplinary, institutional and national settings. However, little is known about how the pedagogical work of these programmes is designed and enacted, and with what effects.…

  8. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors’ comments about working whilst acutely ill. Design Self-completed questionnaire surveys. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. Results The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor’s ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. Conclusions We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work. PMID:27066264

  9. [The profile training of aviation doctors].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Lizogub, I N

    2011-11-01

    Authors consider the trends of training doctors in the specialty "physician in aerospace medicine". First level is initial training for faculty training of doctors. The higher level is vocational retraining and advanced training in the departments of postgraduate and further education. It solved the issues of preparation of specialists in various areas of aviation medicine: medical-chairman of the Flight Commission, an expert medical doctor-flight expert committee, a specialist laboratory (Cabinet) of Aviation Medicine, the Medical Director of Aviation (enterprise, organization), etc. The highest level of training is residency. The necessity of legislative consolidation of an independent direction for the organization of training and medical support of aviation operations is proved.

  10. The practice doctorate: innovation or disruption?

    PubMed

    Chase, Susan K; Pruitt, Rosanne H

    2006-05-01

    Advanced practice nurses, particularly nurse practitioners, have been described as a disruptive innovation. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has proposed that by 2015 all advanced practice nurses be prepared with a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). This article uses critical reflection on published literature to examine the potential difficulties that mandating such a change may present to potential students, practicing advanced practice nurses, colleges of nursing, and doctoral education in general. After considering the pressures in the nursing profession to prepare nurse faculty and reviewing the success of current models of education for advanced practice, we explore in depth the unintended consequences of the AACN recommendation. Implications for academic nursing, curriculum, advanced practice nurses, doctoral education, titling and licensure, economic issues, and the lack of evaluation research are addressed. We recommend abandoning the 2015 deadline for implementation of advanced practice nurse preparation with the DNP.

  11. Improving incident reporting among junior doctors

    PubMed Central

    Hotton, Emily; Jordan, Lesley; Peden, Carol

    2014-01-01

    To ensure systems in hospitals improve to make patient care safer, learning must occur when things go wrong. Incident reporting is one of the commonest mechanisms used to learn from harm events and near misses. Only a relatively small number of incidents that occur are actually reported and different groups of staff have different rates of reporting. Nationally, junior doctors are low reporters of incidents, a finding supported by our local data. We set out to explore the culture and awareness around incident reporting among our junior doctors, and to improve the incident reporting rate within this important staff group. In order to achieve this we undertook a number of work programmes focused on junior doctors, including: assessment of their knowledge, confidence and understanding of incident reporting, education on how and why to report incidents with a focus on reporting on clinical themes during a specific time period, and evaluation of the experience of those doctors who reported incidents. Junior doctors were asked to focus on incident reporting during a one week period. Before and after this focussed week, they were invited to complete a questionnaire exploring their confidence about what an incident was and how to report. Prior to “Incident Reporting Week”, on average only two reports were submitted a month by junior doctors compared with an average of 15 per month following the education and awareness week. This project highlights the fact that using a focussed reporting period and/or specific clinical themes as an education tool can benefit a hospital by promoting awareness of incidents and by increasing incident reporting rates. This can only assist in improving hospital systems, and ultimately increase patient safety. PMID:26734264

  12. Improving junior doctor handover between jobs

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is one of the most important issues in healthcare. In recent years there has been much focus on “Black Wednesday”; the day that Foundation doctors start their first jobs. Great efforts have been made to ensure that patient safety on this day has improved, with the main example being that newly qualified doctors now use some of their free time between medical school and starting their first job to shadow their outgoing counterparts. However, because Foundation doctors start a brand new job approximately every four months for two years, subsequent job changeovers were identified as a time of potential problems and increased patient risk. It is not practical to shadow prior to every job because junior doctors are needed in their current post right up until changeover day, so a simple way to smooth this transition was needed. A handover lunch seemed to be a feasible solution. The day before Foundation doctors change jobs, an hour is dedicated for Foundation Year 1 doctors (F1's) to sit down together over lunch (provided by the mess) and take a formal handover of all relevant information about their forthcoming job and discuss current inpatients. Results showed that 100% of those surveyed mentioned face to face handover as essential, 93.75% said it was either helpful or extremely helpful to have a dedicated time for F1's to handover, and 12.5% said they would not have sought a face to face handover otherwise. Apart from being extremely simple and cheap, it was very popular with the F1's in the trust. It enables effective working from day one and is a great team building activity. PMID:27493740

  13. Running effective meetings: a primer for doctors

    PubMed Central

    O'Dea, N A; de Chazal, P; Saltman, D C; Kidd, M R

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses a series of exercises and practical examples to assist individuals and groups of doctors in training to gain skills in a critical area of management: conducting and participating in effective meetings. Through this paper, readers will be shown how to recognise and manage situations as they occur in meetings to work towards appropriate outcomes. By understanding the elements of conducting a meeting from preparation through to follow up, doctors will be able to conduct and participate more effectively in meetings that arise in their workplaces. PMID:16822922

  14. Doctoral graduates in mental health nursing in Victoria, Australia: the doctoral experience and contribution to scholarship.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Edward, Karen-Leigh; Welch, Tony

    2008-08-01

    The last decade has seen a substantial increase in the number of psychiatric or mental health nurses in Victoria, Australia who hold doctoral qualifications. The literature refers to the importance of scholarship for the professional development and recognition of nursing as a discipline. However, there is a paucity of literature addressing the contribution of nursing doctoral graduates to scholarship in mental health nursing or indeed the broader nursing profession. This paper presents the findings from a survey of psychiatric nurse doctoral graduates currently residing in the State of Victoria. A questionnaire was developed by the authors and distributed to the known doctoral graduates. The main findings demonstrate considerable variation in the discipline and topic of inquiry and in the extent to which doctoral studies had led to dissemination of research findings and engagement in further scholarly activity. The strengthening of mental health nursing knowledge requires scholarship and doctoral graduates are expected to make a major contribution, through research and the dissemination of findings. This paper presents a descriptive overview of doctoral graduates in one State of Australia with a particular focus on research and scholarship.

  15. The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Recognizing a Need or Graying the Line Between Doctor and Nurse?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jason E.

    2008-01-01

    The distinction between doctor and nurse has been historically visible to patients, and the scope of practice for each healthcare provider has been clearly marked by a wall of separation rooted in state law. In fact, even the titles by which these providers have been addressed have remained constant, with the term “doctor” being reserved for reference to physicians. With the advent of the new doctor of nursing practice degree, however, the clear distinction between doctor and nurse is in jeopardy. Moreover, accompanying the push toward a practice doctorate for advanced nursing practice is a call for the expansion of the scope of advanced nursing practice. The urgent questions at hand are the following: First, is a practice doctorate necessary or even appropriate for advanced nursing practice? Second, should the scope of advanced nursing practice be extended at this time? In addition to the increased educational requirements placed on aspiring advanced practice nurses and the associated increase in costs of obtaining the requisite education, requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing risks blurring the line between doctor and nurse and creates a potential for patient confusion. A true need for requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing has not been demonstrated. Moreover, the states should tread carefully when considering expanded roles for advanced practice nurses to avoid creating conflict within the medical community. Considering the level of qualification of today's medical school applicants, perhaps we should be training more physicians to meet the demand head-on rather than creating a separate practice doctorate to fill the gap. PMID:19099003

  16. MFT Doctoral Dissertations: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James

    2013-01-01

    This brief report responds to the relative dearth of information available about MFT doctoral dissertations. A preliminary analysis of one COAMFTE [Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education] program is detailed. Suggestions for future action are offered. (Contains 1 table.)

  17. Research Education Ontologies: Exploring Doctoral Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how research candidate becoming is situated within the contemporary higher education policy context and in investigating alternatives. The idea for the paper arises out of a simple observation: that the Doctorate is a degree in philosophy. What does this observation have to offer for understanding research candidate…

  18. Doctoral Programs: Changing High Rates of Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Maroney, Kenneth; Nelson, Kaye W.; Abel, Annette L.; Abel, Holly S.

    2006-01-01

    Attrition of doctoral students is costly to society. This study examines organizational and personal factors that contribute to the number of graduate students leaving their program of study prior to receiving the terminal degree. The authors make suggestions for program modification and present results from a stress-management intervention…

  19. Response: Training Doctoral Students to Be Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollio, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to begin framing doctoral training for a science of social work. This process starts by examining two seemingly simple questions: "What is a social work scientist?" and "How do we train social work scientists?" In answering the first question, some basic assumptions and concepts about what constitutes a "social work…

  20. The Changing Career Preferences of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemme, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    Doctoral students, during the course of their training, develop an academic habitus that corresponds to their field of study. They adopt the perspective of the senior members of their discipline, among which their supervisor, and identify themselves to the academic profession. Consequently, the majority envision themselves in academic positions…

  1. A New Look at the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Robert G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A report on recent endeavors to improve the doctoral program in the Spanish department at the University of Connecticut. It also draws upon resolutions of 1972 conferences on graduate study at Wichita State University and the University of Texas. Individualized instruction, improved student-teacher relations and revision of examinations are basic…

  2. Doctoral Education and Transformative Consumer Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mari, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines why and how transformative consumer research (TCR) can become a relevant perspective in doctoral programs. The article draws selectively from studies published in consumer behavior, marketing, and marketing education that theoretically or empirically address this topic. It discusses the meaning and background of TCR together…

  3. Identity Development and Mentoring in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Leigh A.; Burns, Leslie D.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Leigh Hall and Leslie Burns use theories of identity to understand mentoring relationships between faculty members and doctoral students who are being prepared as educational researchers. They suggest that becoming a professional researcher requires students to negotiate new identities and reconceptualize themselves both as people…

  4. Completion Mindsets and Contexts in Doctoral Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Pam; Bowden, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Doctoral candidates are now located within a research context of performativity where the push to successfully complete in a timely manner is central. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of completion mindset within a completion context to assist research students and supervisors. Design/methodology/approach: The research was…

  5. Creativity in Doctoral Research: A Reasonable Expectation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargar, Robert R.; Dnan, James K.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the relationships between doctoral students and their research problems under circumstances presently thought to be ideal for creative research endeavor. The article focuses on three contextual perspectives: (1) psychological and primarily affective, (2) theoretical-methodological and primarily cognitive, and (3) institutional. (CT)

  6. The Doctorate in the Nordic Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein; Tvede, Olaf

    1998-01-01

    Overview of research training systems leading to doctoral degrees in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden emphasizes the structure of postgraduate education, administration and funding, number of students, time to degree, completion rates, labor market, and study abroad. Comparisons to U.S., British, German, and French systems suggests a trend…

  7. The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jill Alexa

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with 21 US schools of education, the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) has created a network of education faculty who are differentiating the EdD from the PhD in order to better meet the needs of their practitioner-scholar students. Their discussions center on two questions: "What are the knowledge, skills, and…

  8. Criteria and Instruments for Doctoral Program Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Álvarez-Montero, Francisco; Mojardín-Heráldez, Ambrocio; Audelo-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Graduate studies, and in particular doctoral ones, pursue the development of scientific researchers able to make original contributions in a specific area of knowledge. However, attrition rates indicate that achieving this goal is not easy. The available evidence indicates that there are behavioral factors, positive and negative, that influence…

  9. Doctoral Dissertations Recently Completed or in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louise

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six doctoral dissertations currently in progress or completed during 1993 that may be of interest to those in the school library media field. Topics include technology; information seeking; literacy; the portrayal of African American males in realistic fiction picture books; and the role of youth services librarians. (KRN)

  10. Research Methodologies and the Doctoral Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Gary A.

    1997-01-01

    Doctoral students often select one of four common research methodologies that are popular in the social sciences and education today: positivist; interpretive; ideological; and pragmatic. But choice of methodology also influences the student's choice of course work, membership of dissertation committee, and the form and structure of the…

  11. How can Doctors Improve their Communication Skills?

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Piyush; Kumari, Archana; Chakrawarty, Avinash

    2015-03-01

    The process of curing a patient requires a holistic approach which involves considerations beyond treating a disease. It warrants several skills in a doctor along with technical expertise. Studies have shown that good communication skill in a doctor improve patient's compliance and overall satisfaction. There are certain basic principles of practicing good communication. Patient listening, empathy, and paying attention to the paraverbal and non verbal components of the communication are the important ones that are frequently neglected. Proper information about the nature, course and prognosis of the disease is important. Besides, patients and attendants should always be explained about the necessity and yield of expensive investigations and risks/benefits involved in invasive procedures. One should be extremely cautious while managing difficult encounters and breaking bad news. Formal training of the doctors in improving communication skills is necessary and has proven to improve overall outcome. The authors recommend inclusion of formal training in communication skills in medical curriculum and training of practising doctors in the form of CMEs and CPEs.

  12. Developing and Implementing an Online Doctoral Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combe, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical reflection of the development and implementation of one of the first online doctoral programs in the UK set up at the University of Northumbria, Newcastle in 2000. Design/methodology/approach: The method adopted for analysis takes the form of a case study. Findings: Effective market research has to be undertaken…

  13. Adapting and Merging Methodologies in Doctoral Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Ronit Ben-Bassat; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how research methodologies were modified and integrated during the doctoral research conducted by the first author under the supervision of the second author. The research project concerned trying to understand why teachers do or don't use "Jeliot", a program animation system designed to facilitate teaching and learning of…

  14. Student Socialization in Interdisciplinary Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boden, Daniel; Borrego, Maura; Newswander, Lynita K.

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary approaches are often seen as necessary for attacking the most critical challenges facing the world today, and doctoral students and their training programs are recognized as central to increasing interdisciplinary research capacity. However, the traditional culture and organization of higher education are ill-equipped to…

  15. A New Standard for Measuring Doctoral Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a new standard for measuring graduate programs in the United States. The Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, produced by Academic Analytics, a for-profit company, rates faculty members' scholarly output at nearly 7,300 doctoral programs around the country. It examines the number of book and journal articles published by…

  16. Talking to Your Doctor (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... than done. Being examined and questioned about your body can also be ... things you can bear in mind to make it easier: Your doctor's seen it ...

  17. The Evolution of Doctoral Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education in social work is evolving as a major enterprise in American higher education, with more than 80 programs now in place. Committed to providing stewards of the profession, these PhD and DSW programs also are a major impetus for research and are the primary faculty pipeline for the 735 CSWE-accredited professional social work…

  18. Professional Doctorates and Careers: The Spanish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Juan Francisco Canal; Perez, Manuel Antonio Muniz

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses the determining factors weighted by doctoral graduates when choosing their professional careers. In Spain, the analysis of such a group has been traditionally excluded from the empiric studies. On the one hand, the lack of databases made it difficult to see their professional situation, and on the other, a university career…

  19. Now & Then: The Long-Distance Doctor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Betsy K.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the mathematics used by Bernard Harris, Jr., the first African American astronaut to walk in space who is also an engineer, physician, medical research scientist, and pioneer space doctor. Includes a mission specialist activity sheet about understanding the magnitude of living in space. (MKR)

  20. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  1. Promoting Team Leadership Skills in Doctoral Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Whetton, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral programs can serve as an optimal opportunity for candidates to engage in tasks and activities to transform them and their schools. The paradigm shifts in such preparation involve moving from sitting and getting to making and taking. Most importantly, it requires building leadership skills and styles necessary to bring about desired change…

  2. Pleasure, Change and Values in Doctoral Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This article explores pleasure in terms of the values of independent judgement, writerly authority, originality and singularity associated with doctoral study. It also considers how pleasure can be understood as a mode of experience that acts as a force for change. Here, the article takes a broad Deleuzian approach that is concerned with our…

  3. Examining Dissatisfaction with an Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenby, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background: Online learning community based education is still new. As institutions implement new programs they can encounter learner satisfaction issues. Purpose: To investigate learner unhappiness during the second semester of a new online doctoral program and develop a substantive grounded theory concerning its cause(s). Setting: The Doctorado…

  4. How Six Sigma Methodology Improved Doctors' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafiropoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Six Sigma methodology was used in a District General Hospital to assess the effect of the introduction of an educational programme to limit unnecessary admissions. The performance of the doctors involved in the programme was assessed. Ishikawa Fishbone and 5 S's were initially used and Pareto analysis of their findings was performed. The results…

  5. Reshaping Leadership Development through Distance Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the recent creation at a western Canadian university of a distance-delivery Doctor of Education in educational leadership and administration that was developed in response to ongoing requests from the field. A rationale for the design of the program is presented based on the need for national and global graduate study networks…

  6. The Online Doctorate: Flexible, but Credible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghezzi, Patti

    2007-01-01

    Modern school administrators are finding flexible opportunities to pursue doctoral degrees online. Cyber institutions such as Walden University, University of Phoenix and Argosy University--as well as a few traditional universities that have forged into the electronic arena--can accommodate time-strapped educators no matter where they live, as…

  7. The Curriculum Question in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Ocampo, Gabriela; Kiley, Margaret; Lopes, Amélia; Malcolm, Janice; Menezes, Isabel; Morais, Ricardo; Virtanen, Viivi

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of doctoral education has changed immensely during the last decades. Different transnational policies, different publics, different purposes and different academic careers all contribute to the need for a new understanding of this underresearched field. Our focus is on explicit curriculum analysis to undertake intentional and…

  8. Educating Scholars: Doctoral Education in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Zuckerman, Harriet; Groen, Jeffrey A.; Brucker, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the worldwide prestige of America's doctoral programs in the humanities, all is not well in this area of higher education and hasn't been for some time. The content of graduate programs has undergone major changes, while high rates of student attrition, long times to degree, and financial burdens prevail. In response, the Andrew W. Mellon…

  9. Authorial Stance in Thai Students' Doctoral Dissertation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getkham, Kunyarut

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how linguistic devices are used to convey authorial stance in 36 Introduction sections and 36 Discussion sections of doctoral dissertations written in English by Thai students graduated in language education from different universities in the United States during the period 2008 to 2013. It also compares the use of…

  10. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:Oct 4, ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  11. Australian orchids and the doctors they commemorate.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2013-01-21

    Botanical taxonomy is a repository of medical biographical information. Such botanical memorials include the names of some indigenous orchids of Australia. By searching reference texts and journals relating to Australian botany and Australian orchidology, as well as Australian and international medical and botanical biographical texts, I identified 30 orchids indigenous to Australia whose names commemorate doctors and other medical professionals. Of these, 24 have names that commemorate a total of 16 doctors who worked in Australia. The doctors and orchids I identified include: doctor-soldiers Richard Sanders Rogers (1862-1942), after whom the Rogers' Greenhood (Pterostylis rogersii) is named, and Robert Brown (1773-1858), after whom the Purple Enamel Orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) is named; navy surgeon Archibald Menzies (1754-1842), after whom the Hare Orchid (Leptoceras menziesii) is named; radiologist Hugo Flecker (1884-1957) after whom the Slender Sphinx Orchid (Cestichis fleckeri) is named; and general medical practitioner Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881-1964), after whom the Kesteven's Orchid (Dendrobium kestevenii) is named. Biographic references in scientific names of plants comprise a select but important library of Australian medical history. Such botanical taxonomy commemorates, in an enduring manner, clinicians who have contributed to biology outside clinical practice.

  12. Republished: instigating change: trainee doctors' perspective.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Nassim; Shahaney, Sumera; Martin, Guy; Ahmad, Ahmir; Moghul, Masood

    2013-10-01

    In the 21st century, the core skills of trainee doctors are evolving as clinicians, leaders and innovators. Leadership skills are an essential tool for all doctors and need to be an integral part of their training and learning as set out in the General Medical Council's Good Medical Practice. It is essential to develop these skills at an early stage and continually improve them. A group of junior doctors participated in a pilot programme for leadership with the aim of executing a quality improvement (QI) project. This article describes our experiences of both the course itself and the project undertaken by our group. As part of the process of implementing change, we faced a number of challenges which contributed to our learning. These have been explored as well as potential ways to overcome them to enable the swift and smooth development of future QI projects. Using an example of a QI project looking at handover, this article demonstrates how a trainee doctor can implement their project for both professional and institutional improvement.

  13. Strains in the nurse-doctor relationship.

    PubMed

    Selmanoff, E D

    1968-03-01

    Many problems and conflicts between nurses and doctors in the hospital stem from the organizational structure of the hospital rather than from the personalities of the individuals involved. Nurses often assert the latter. Understanding these conflicts requires that they be examined in terms of the organizational context within which they occur. To understand the modern American hospital it is useful to view its development. Private practitioners who at one time had cared for patients in their homes shifted the locus of care to the hospital as medical care became more complex in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Three selected aspects of hospital structure that are seen as sources of strain for nurses in their relationship with doctors are: (1) Doctors do not see themselves as full-fledged members of the hospital organization. While nurses, who do, feel bound by the operating rules of the hospital, doctors tend to operate as free agents. There is probably little that nurses can do to reduce this source of strain. (2) The hospital has two lines of authority, administrative and medical, unlike most large-scale organizations which have only one. Nurses are in the former while doctors are in the latter hierarchy. The "influence relationship" between nurses and doctors is largely unarticulated; informally "negotiated" patterns prevail. Nurses can be more aggressive in attempting to develop institutional patterns that are mutually satisfactory to themselves and to doctors and that meet the needs of the hospital as a whole. (3) In the absence of a functioning health team nurses have assumed responsibility, without the requisite authority, for the coordination of patient care. Although this action is for the immediate benefit of patients nurses should realize that it also tends to retard the development of needed organizational changes in the hospital. Nurses generally accept the possibility of changing the personality structure of an individual. They should be

  14. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK) doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE). Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ) items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK) medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%). NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also. PMID:27907983

  15. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. Allergic rhinitis - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... and animal dander are also called allergic rhinitis. Hay fever is another word often used for this problem. ... to ask your doctor about allergic rhinitis - child; Hay fever - what to ask your doctor - child; Allergies - what ...

  17. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Colorectal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer? It’s important to have frank, ... treatment? Do I need to see any other doctors or health professionals? If I’m concerned about ...

  18. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  19. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? As you cope with cancer and cancer ... Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  20. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Multiple Myeloma? As you deal with your cancer and the ... Your Doctor About Multiple Myeloma? More In Multiple Myeloma About Multiple Myeloma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  1. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  2. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  3. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kidney Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions ... Ask Your Doctor About Kidney Cancer? More In Kidney Cancer About Kidney Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  4. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer? It is important for you to have honest, ... Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer? More In Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  5. When You Visit Your Doctor After a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... inbox ! When You Visit Your Doctor - After a Heart Attack After a Heart Attack Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor: Have you ... body? Did you have this pain before your heart attack? What brings it on? How frequently do you ...

  6. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Bile Duct Cancer? It is important to have frank, open ... Doctor About Bile Duct Cancer? More In Bile Duct Cancer About Bile Duct Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  7. Many Doctors Get Payments from Drug Companies, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164203.html Many Doctors Get Payments From Drug Companies, Study Shows But few patients know about financial ... News) -- Many American doctors receive payments from drug companies, but few patients know about those financial ties, ...

  8. Communication with Your Family and Your Doctor about Your Wishes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this! Home » Be Prepared Communication With Your Family And Your Doctor About Your Wishes Thinking and ... difficult questions: 1. Why is communication with your family and doctor so important? Talking about and planning ...

  9. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? It is important to have honest, ... Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  10. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi Sarcoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? As you cope with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and ...

  11. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  12. Refractive eye surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about refractive eye surgery; Nearsightedness surgery - what to ask your doctor; LASIK - what to ... Will this surgery help my type of vision problem? Will I still need glasses or contact lenses after the surgery? Will ...

  13. Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor after weight-loss surgery ... perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient - 2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of ...

  14. Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor before weight-loss surgery ... perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient - 2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of ...

  15. Diversifying the Pipeline Into Doctoral Nursing Programs: Developing the Doctoral Advancement Readiness Self-Assessment.

    PubMed

    DeWitty, Vernell P; Tabloski, Patricia A; Millett, Catherine M; Hambrick, Marion Evan; Shreffler, Megan; Downing, Christine A; Huerta, Carolina G

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and psychometric analysis of the Doctoral Readiness Self-Assessment for Doctoral Study. This survey was developed as the first step of a Web-based, on-line mentoring platform for nurses who are considering a doctoral degree program. By identifying and anticipating the predictors and barriers of success in doctoral nursing education, including practical (finances, time, geographical restriction) and personal factors (motivation, attitudes, perceived ability to navigate the application process), students are guided through a self-reflective process to determine readiness. Factor analysis revealed that interest, readiness, and support represent 3 distinct factors that may be used for additional analysis to predict future enrollment in doctoral nursing degree programs. The internal reliability analysis revealed that removing 3 items from the 15-item scale increased Cronbach's alpha from 0.75 to 0.80, and these factors explained 51.25% of variance. The self-assessment results can inform faculty's work as they mentor and guide students through the application, admission, and financial support processes for doctoral study.

  16. Violence against doctors: 2. Effects of violence on doctors working in accident and emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M A; Al-Sahlawi, K S; Shahid, A A; Awadh, J A; Abu-Shammah, H

    1999-12-01

    There is abundant evidence to suggest that doctors are increasingly being exposed to violent incidents at their workplace. The possible effects of aggression on an individual are varied and likely to depend on the severity and frequency of episodes and the perceived vulnerability to further episodes. The reported sequaelae of violent incidents towards doctors include varied psychological disturbances, and changes in behaviour, such as increasing prescribing, ongoing fear of violence at work, and poor staff morale. We investigated the effects of violence against doctors in the accident and emergency departments in Kuwait. Seventy-five (86%) out of 87 doctors exposed to violent incidents reported one or more of the symptoms consisting of: depression, reliving experience (flashbacks), insomnia, and taking 'time off'. The effects lasted for more than 4 weeks in 25, for 3-4 weeks in 17, and for 2-3 weeks in 21. The duration of symptoms was longer in doctors exposed to verbal insults or threats of imminent violence coupled with incidents involving single acts of violence. Out of a total of 101 doctors; 90 (89%) remained worried about violence at work and 72 (71%) thought training to deal with potentially violent situations would be useful.

  17. A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Doctor-Patient Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Margaret

    This study analyzed doctor-patient communication from a sociolinguistic perspective, focusing on two issues: (1) why patients are not more effective in asserting themselves in talking with doctors, and (2) why doctors don't talk more like normal people (i.e., patients). Research on communication in health care contexts is reviewed, looking at such…

  18. "Tough Love and Tears": Learning Doctoral Writing in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitchison, Claire; Catterall, Janice; Ross, Pauline; Burgin, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary changes to the doctorate mean student researchers are likely to be expected to write differently, write more and more often, and yet, despite a growing interest in doctoral education, we still know relatively little about the teaching and learning practices of students and supervisors vis-a-vis doctoral writing. This paper draws from…

  19. Purposes, Diversities, and Futures in MFT Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral education in marital and family therapy (MFT) plays a crucial role in the future of the field. In this article, I write about the purposes, diversities, and futures of MFT doctoral education from the perspective of having hired 18 full-time MFT faculty over the last 13 years. I argue that the field needs well-rounded doctoral-level…

  20. Focusing on Doctoral Students' Experiences of Engagement in Thesis Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about what inspires students to be involved in their doctoral process and stay persistent when facing challenges. This study explored the nature of students' engagement in the doctoral work. Altogether, 21 behavioural sciences doctoral students from one top-level research community were interviewed. The interview data were…

  1. Doctoral Assistants = Critical Friends: A Simple yet Complex Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, John; Laguerre, Fabrice; Moore, Eric; Reedy, Katherine; Rose, Scott; Vickers, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) encourages doctoral candidates volunteering in order to give back and continue their relationship with the university after completing their dissertation. Volunteering can take on many forms, from acting as doctoral assistants to performing the role of critical friends on future doctoral…

  2. Doctoral Programs in Special Education: The Nation's Supplier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Pion, Georgine M.; Tyler, Naomi Chowdhuri; Gilmore, Robert

    2003-01-01

    After a systematic national search, 86 special education doctoral programs were found to be active in 1999. Program administrators were surveyed and results indicate most special education doctoral programs are under enrolled, doctoral students' enrollment has declined 30% over the last 20 years, and programs are not highly selective. (Contains…

  3. One University's Approach to Defining and Supporting Professional Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    The changing market for doctorally prepared workers led one institution to examine its overall approach to defining and supporting professional doctorates. After a review of existing scholarship and internal practices, a white paper was created to capture the various ways that these degrees can be distinguished from the academic doctorate (PhD) at…

  4. Exploring Persistence, Challenges, and Barriers of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Edward C., Jr.; Gies, Maria; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning doctoral candidates ascribed to their persistence in doctoral programs despite challenges they experienced impeding a timely completion of their dissertations. Participants were six doctoral candidates (four women, two men) who had not yet completed a dissertation research proposal. This…

  5. Barefoot-Doctors. Occasional Paper No. 77-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Joel

    A description of "barefoot doctors" in the People's Republic of China is presented. These peasant doctors are commune workers who have taken basic courses in medical treatment. Because 80% of the population lives in a rural agricultural setting, and because most doctors and medical services are located in cities, there is a serious need…

  6. Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1995 Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    This report profiles the demographic and employment characteristics of doctorate-level scientists and engineers in the United States. The data presented were collected through the 1995 Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR). The purpose of the SDR is to estimate the number of people holding research doctorates from U.S. institutions in science and…

  7. Doctoral Dissertation Research in Rehabilitation Counseling: 2008-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Timothy N.; Phillips, Brian N.; Zanskas, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    This article continues the tradition of reviews documenting doctoral rehabilitation research. Doctoral dissertations completed during calendar years 2008-2010 from recognized doctoral rehabilitation programs were identified and reviewed using the same approach used by Tansey, Zanskas, and Phillips. Analysis of 88 dissertations resulted in a…

  8. Going for the Gold Tassel: Getting a Doctoral Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Clark A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to explain the constructs of doctrine and doctorate to the fire service. The methodology applied the Carnegie Foundation review of the doctorate as the basics for explaining what stewards of the fire service discipline will do with a doctoral degree. Although the fire service is an interdisciplinary occupation, the…

  9. Identifying, Characterising and Assessing New Practices in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baschung, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, European doctoral education has principally taken place within the binary relationship of professors and their doctoral students according to the "apprenticeship model." However, in the last one to two decades, this model has been questioned. Governments and higher education institutions (HEIs) reform doctoral education by…

  10. Doctoral Dissertation Research in Rehabilitation Counseling: 2005-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Timothy N.; Zanskas, Stephen A.; Phillips, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Graduates of doctoral level programs are the stewards of their profession. Historically, doctoral dissertation research has been summarized as a service to improve research accessibility, analyze research trends, and suggest potential areas for future inquiry. The current review analyzes 99 doctoral dissertations from recognized rehabilitation…

  11. Perceptions of Mattering in the Doctoral Student and Advisor Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Holly Anne

    2015-01-01

    The advising relationship has been acknowledged as one of the most important factors in doctoral student persistence and attrition. Less researched are psychosocial factors that contribute to doctoral student persistence and completion. Preliminary research including measures of psychosocial factors on doctoral student success found…

  12. Scholarly Productivity and Social Work Doctorates: Patterns among African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiele, Jerome H.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 300 African-American social work faculty concerning their scholarly productivity in terms of published journal articles. Found that African-American social work doctorates publish just as much as do other social work doctorates and that younger age (31-40) for receiving the doctorate is associated with higher publication rates. (KS)

  13. Exploring the Nexus between Research and Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Margot; Evans, Terry; Macauley, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the nexus between doctoral education and research, and developments in how research is organised and funded is of significance as doctoral education is both part of the higher education system for teaching and learning, and part of the research enterprise. Doctoral candidates are both students and effectively early career researchers.…

  14. Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about ear tube surgery; Tympanostomy - what to ask your doctor; Myringotomy - what to ask your doctor ... Why does my child need ear tubes? Can we try other treatments? ... the surgery? Is it safe to wait before getting ear tubes? Will ...

  15. Obstacles to Success--Doctoral Student Attrition in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    The article explores doctoral attrition in South Africa, investigating and comparing the attributions of attrition of doctoral students and PhD programme leaders. The article is based on secondary data analysis of two large studies on doctoral education in South Africa. The main point of the article is that the different understandings of the…

  16. U.S. Community College Professional Staff Seek South African Doctoral Degrees: An Analysis of an International Doctoral Program Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Margaret Vail

    2011-01-01

    Prominent challenges facing contemporary community colleges are enhancing leadership capacity and serving their diverse student populations. While doctoral education constitutes a mainstay strategy for developing community college leaders, community college professionals face constraints accessing doctoral programs. The innovation of an…

  17. Short counseling techniques for busy family doctors.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, V. H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce two short counseling skills for busy family doctors: the BATHE technique and the DIG technique. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The BATHE technique indicates five areas for questioning patients who require counseling: background, affect, trouble, handling, and empathy. No research on use of the technique has been published. The DIG technique is the author's modification of the BATHE technique. MAIN FINDINGS: While the efficacy of counseling in general was validated, more research on the effectiveness on these two techniques needs to be done. CONCLUSIONS: Since counseling is an integral part of family practice, family doctors will find these techniques useful. Each is easy to learn and takes less than 15 minutes to complete. PMID:9111987

  18. Jack the Ripper and doctor-identification.

    PubMed

    Shuster, S

    1975-01-01

    It is possible that Jack the Ripper can be understood in terms of doctor-identification borne of one or more terrifying experiences he may have had with doctors during his childhood. The fantasies acted out by this primitive murderer are similar to the fantasies experienced by people who have been surgically traumatized as children. The evidence suggests that the activities of Jack the Ripper resemble the acting-out of a horror story in which he, as the main character, played to the population of London as an actor plays to his audience, through the need to discharge anxiety and regain some kind of emotional balance. When his depredation failed to achieve the desired results for him, the Ripper probably commited suicide.

  19. Nurses' and doctors' perspectives on slow codes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jacinta

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain nurses' and doctors' perspectives on the practice of slow codes, which are cardiopulmonary resuscitative efforts that are intentionally performed too slowly for resuscitation to occur. A Heideggerian phenomenological study was conducted in 2005, during which data were gathered in the Republic of Ireland from three nurses and two doctors (via unstructured interviews) and analysed using Colaizzi's reductive procedure. Slow codes do occur in Ireland and are intended as beneficent acts. However, slow codes were identified as pointless and undignified when intrusive measures were employed. There is a need for discussion on the topic of slow codes in Ireland, and for aids to cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making to be developed, such as advance directives, communication training, clinical guidelines and an explanatory leaflet for patients and families.

  20. The McKnight Doctoral Fellowship Program: Toward a Seamless Approach to the Production of African American Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Marvin P.

    2006-01-01

    The McKnight Doctoral Fellowship Program (MDFP) in Florida addresses the issue of under-representation of African American doctorates by adopting a "seamless" approach in supporting African-Americans pursuing a doctoral degree and beyond. The success of the MDFP suggests a need to reconsider graduate support for minority students that…

  1. Reasons for Doctoral Non-Completion: One Non-Completing Doctoral Student's Voice on Limitations in the Academic Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philpott, Carey

    2015-01-01

    Timely completion has recently been an important focus of academic literature on supervising Doctoral students. This paper is a reflection on the academic literature on timely doctoral completion by a former Doctoral student who has been a serial non-completer. This reflection explores whether academics' constructions, reported in the research…

  2. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  3. Marcel Proust's fictional diseases and doctors.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Marcel Proust (1875-1922), the son and brother of famous physicians, had close and continuous contact with medicine and doctors in connection with chronic asthma, neurasthenia, medical 'tourism', and self-medication. This proximity to medical issues is obvious in his work, particularly his novel In Search of Lost Time, which today is still considered one of the most important literary works ever. In this novel, medicine, patients, and doctors are everywhere, and it can be claimed that while it is often considered to be the great novel of memory, medicine in itself also can be seen as a true character of the story, in which Proust displays surprisingly extensive knowledge. Neurasthenia and asthma (i.e. Proust's diseases), as well as specific neurological disorders, such as stroke, migraine, epilepsy, and dementia, appear in the novel. The disease of the narrator's grandmother remains a piece of anthology, and probably remains the best literary report of a progressive stroke leading to death. Proust also quoted neurological conditions which were virtually unreported in his time, such as phantom limb syndrome and poststroke depression associated with aphasia in Baron Charlus. Doctors are nearly systematically depicted as incompetent and superficial, characteristics which appear to increase with academic titles and glory. The main physician of the novel, Professor Cottard, even ends up writing fake certificates for his rich friend Mrs. Verdurin during World War I so that she can obtain fresh croissants for breakfast, while poor people around her are starving. When called to examine a dying patient, one of the real doctors of the novel, Professor Dieulafoy, says and does nothing except ask for his fees. This defiance and criticism of physicians were indeed those of Proust in real life.

  4. Doctors and torture: the police surgeon.

    PubMed

    Burges, S H

    1980-09-01

    Much has been written by many distinguished persons about the philosophical, religious and ethical considerations of doctors and their involvement with torture. What follows will not have the erudition or authority of the likes of St Augustine, Mahatma Gandi, Schopenhauer or Thomas Paine. It represents the views of a very ordinary person; a presumption defended by the submission that many very ordinary persons have been, and will be, instruments for effecting, assisting or condoning the physical or mental anguish of others. As practitioners of medicine, we are particularly vulnerable, since our particular knowledge and our privileged position may be so easily abused--to the detriment of others. Those of us who practice clinical forensic medicine have even greater responsibility by virtue of our daily contact with the enforcement of law, criminal procedure, and the machinations of the judiciary. We are thus particularly well placed to monitor, encourage or discourage the occurrence of evil practices within the community. It is imperative, therefore, that the ordinary doctor should be cognisant of, and be party to, a code of conduct formulated by his peers and having reference to his obligations as a citizen, and doctor, and to his ability to manipulate human activity. Forensic physicians have further discretionary powers as arbiters in the marriage of the art and ethics of healing with the principles and practice of justice.

  5. Training Doctors for Person-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    English, Jeannine

    2016-03-01

    Person-centered care, in which an individual patient's goals and preferences are treated as paramount, should be the standard throughout the nation. Achieving this ideal will require a change in the culture of health care, and medical schools can play a vital role in helping achieve it. Lack of communication, uncoordinated services, and dealings with sometimes-aloof clinicians and staff all can increase stress and undermine a person's sense of well-being. In a person-centered system, such experiences would be much less common. The cultural shift starts with the idea of "engaging the consumer" rather than "treating the patient." Such engagement requires honoring individuality. The doctor may have a certain way of doing things. But people vary enormously in their values and priorities. They have different goals, different thresholds of pain, different anxieties, different needs for support, different backgrounds, and different resources to draw on. Individuals should feel empowered, aware of their choices, and connected to their health care providers through meaningful communication and understanding. They deserve to feel that their personal dignity and their wishes are a top priority. They should be made to feel that they, along with their caregivers, are members of the care team. This change will benefit not only patients and families but doctors as well. Doctors will benefit from more insight into the individuals they serve, their interactions with consumers and caregivers will be more positive, and the quality of care will improve.

  6. Why are junior doctors reluctant to consult attending physicians?

    PubMed

    Swank, Otto H

    2010-03-01

    A physician performs two tasks: making diagnoses and determining treatments. To reduce medical error, junior doctors are supposed to consult their supervisors when they face uncommon circumstances. However, recent research shows that junior doctors are reluctant to do so. This paper presents a model that explains (i) which junior doctors shy away from consulting; (ii) when junior doctors are reluctant; (iii) the importance of protocols in the medical sector; and (iv) when consulting is a sign of strength or a sign of weakness. Furthermore, I show that encouraging junior doctors to consult by investigating mishaps leads to another distortion: they will give too much weight to own assessments.

  7. Skill set development of doctoral and post-doctoral graduates in life sciences.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, R S

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and post-doctoral training programs at leading research universities in the USA are highly important in generating the much needed knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics for keeping rural and urban economies strong and societies healthy and prosperous. In addition, innovative graduate and post doctoral research programs are the driving engines of the success of U.S. economy and have made the U.S. the most successful model of generating new knowledge in the broader areas of life sciences (and agricultural education, research, and extension). We need to do everything in our power to make these training programs innovative, collaborative, independent, and resourceful so that students are trained in different disciplines making them more flexible within a range of challenges and opportunities. The training programs must empower students to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the society in 21st century and make our students competitive within a global economic system, to improve the health of the nation's economy. If our land grant schools and institutions of higher learning are not preparing doctoral students to be globally competitive scientists to create new knowledge and technologies to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the 21st century, then either we need to redefine the mission of our land grant system or we risk losing our role to serve the public and industry effectively. Doctoral and post doctoral students should be given the needed skills and experiences to prepare them for tenure track faculty jobs at leading US Universities in the 21st century as well as prepare them for the world outside of academia. I would say minimum competency skills are needed as "bare survival skills" for all doctoral students to become successful after obtaining PhD degrees. Today's PhD students will be working in a global but highly competitive, rapidly changing, and complex world. It is no longer enough to be a good

  8. Factors associated with doctors' knowledge on antibiotic use in China.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Wang, Sijie; Yin, Xiaoxv; Bai, Jigeng; Gong, Yanhong; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-03-24

    Misuse of antibiotics by the medical profession is a global concern. Examining doctors' knowledge about antimicrobials will be important in developing strategies to improve antibiotic use. The aim of the study was to survey Chinese doctors' knowledge on antibiotics and reveal the factors associated with their level of knowledge. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shanxi in central China. A total of 761 physicians were surveyed using a structured self-administered questionnaire. A generalized linear regression model was used to identify the factors associated with doctors' knowledge on antibiotic. Based on a full score of 10, the average score for doctors' knowledge on antibiotics was 6.29 (SD = 1.79). Generalized linear regression analysis indicated that doctors who either worked in the internal medicine department, who were chief doctors or who received continuing education on antibiotic, had better knowledge of antibiotics. Compared with doctors working in tertiary hospitals, doctors working in secondary hospitals or primary healthcare facilities had poorer knowledge about antibiotics. Chinese doctors have suboptimal knowledge about antimicrobials. Ongoing education is effective to enhance doctors' knowledge, but the effect remains to be further improved. More targeted interventions and education programs should improve knowledge about antimicrobials, especially for doctors working in primary healthcare institutions.

  9. Doctors as patients: a systematic review of doctors' health access and the barriers they experience

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Margaret; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Clavarino, Alexandra; Doust, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Background The need to improve doctors' access to health care by reducing the barriers they experience has been regularly described in the literature, yet the barriers experienced are not well defined, despite the volume of expert opinion in this area. Aim To define what is known about doctors' access to health care from the data within the current literature. Design of study A systematic review of studies of doctors' health access. Method A systematic search of MEDLINE® and CINAHL, supplemented by citation searches and searches of the grey literature, identified both quantitative and qualitative studies. Two reviewers used specific criteria for inclusion of studies and quality assessment. The data were tabulated and analysed. Results Twenty-six articles met the inclusion criteria. The paucity of data and the overall poor quality of those data are highlighted. Despite this, many doctors appear to have a GP, but this does not ensure adequate health access. Systemic barriers to healthcare access (long hours and cultural issues) are more significant than individual barriers. Conclusion Expert opinion in this field is supported by poor-quality data. The current knowledge reveals important similarities between doctors and the general population in their healthcare access, especially with mental health issues. Understanding this may help the medical profession to respond to these issues of ‘doctors’ health' more effectively. PMID:18611318

  10. How To Talk to Your Doctor (and Get Your Doctor To Talk to You!). An Educational Workshop on Doctor Patient Communication = Como Hablarle a su Doctor (iY que su doctor le hable a usted!). Un seminario educativo sobre la comunicacion entre el doctor y el paciente.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX.

    This workshop, written in both English and Spanish, focuses on improving communication between physician and patient. In the workshop, the trainers will talk about "building bridges" between patient and doctor by understanding the doctor's role and his/her duty to the patient. According to the workshop, a person's doctor should…

  11. The Development of Online Doctor Reviews in China: An Analysis of the Largest Online Doctor Review Website in China

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the time of Web 2.0, more and more consumers have used online doctor reviews to rate their doctors or to look for a doctor. This phenomenon has received health care researchers’ attention worldwide, and many studies have been conducted on online doctor reviews in the United States and Europe. But no study has yet been done in China. Also, in China, without a mature primary care physician recommendation system, more and more Chinese consumers seek online doctor reviews to look for a good doctor for their health care concerns. Objective This study sought to examine the online doctor review practice in China, including addressing the following questions: (1) How many doctors and specialty areas are available for online review? (2) How many online reviews are there on those doctors? (3) What specialty area doctors are more likely to be reviewed or receive more reviews? (4) Are those reviews positive or negative? Methods This study explores an empirical dataset from Good Doctor website, haodf.com—the earliest and largest online doctor review and online health care community website in China—from 2006 to 2014, to examine the stated research questions by using descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, and multivariate linear regression. Results The dataset from the Good Doctor website contained 314,624 doctors across China and among them, 112,873 doctors received 731,543 quantitative reviews and 772,979 qualitative reviews as of April 11, 2014. On average, 37% of the doctors had been reviewed on the Good Doctor website. Gynecology-obstetrics-pediatrics doctors were most likely to be reviewed, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.497 (95% CI 1.461-1.535), and internal medicine doctors were less likely to be reviewed, with an OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.921-0.960), relative to the combined small specialty areas. Both traditional Chinese medicine doctors and surgeons were more likely to be reviewed than the combined small specialty areas, with an OR of 1

  12. Doctor in the lab: what is it like for a doctor to work with scientists?

    PubMed Central

    Jorm, C. M.; Stamford, J. A.; Strunin, L.

    1996-01-01

    As clinical academic medical departments strive to improve the quality of their research, clinicians and scientists are forced into closer liaison. In many cases, clinical departments now have research laboratories directed by "basic scientists" but often staffed, in part at least, by doctors. To someone who has not worked in one, these laboratories may seem uncompromising and forbidding work environments. This article presents a "case report" written from the viewpoints of the doctor, the scientist, and the professor. Images p868-a PMID:8870579

  13. Perceived need and barriers to continuing professional development among doctors.

    PubMed

    Ikenwilo, Divine; Skåtun, Diane

    2014-08-01

    There is growing need for continuing professional development (CPD) among doctors, especially following the recent introduction of compulsory revalidation for all doctors in the United Kingdom (UK). We use unique datasets from two national surveys of non-training grade doctors working in the National Health Service in Scotland to evaluate doctors' perceptions of need and barriers to CPD. We test for differences over time and also examine differences between doctor grades and for other characteristics such as gender, age, contract type and specialty. Doctors expressed the greatest need for CPD in clinical training, management, and information technology. In terms of perceived barriers to CPD, lack of time was expressed as a barrier by the largest proportion of doctors, as was insufficient clinical cover, lack of funding, and remoteness from main education centres. The strength of perceived need for particular CPD activities and the perceived barriers to CPD varied significantly by doctors' job and personal characteristics. An understanding of the perceived needs and barriers to CPD among doctors is an important precursor to developing effective educational and training programmes that cover their professional practice and also in supporting doctors towards successful revalidation.

  14. Essential therapeutics skills required of junior doctors.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Mathew J; Abouyannis, Michael; Butt, Tehreem F

    2012-12-01

    Junior doctors are responsible for the majority of in-hospital prescription errors. Little research has explored their confidence to prescribe, or practical therapeutics related tasks which they are required to perform in day-to-day practice. This survey aimed to explore these areas, gather feedback regarding therapeutics teaching at undergraduate level, and to apply findings to undergraduate training at University of Birmingham. Questionnaire-based survey of all first-year postgraduate doctors (PG1) attending teaching hospitals in the Birmingham and Worcester regions towards the end of the PG1 year. Doctors were asked about difficulties in prescribing, satisfaction with undergraduate training, and how frequently they undertook particular tasks pertaining to therapeutics. Qualitative data on suggestions for improving the curriculum were also collected. Difficulties were commonly encountered with prescribing warfarin, controlled drugs and syringe-driven drugs. Most (87.4 %) had been required to administer intravenous medications. Nearly all had prescribed to 'special groups' such as the elderly (100 %) and patients with renal disease (98.3 %). Thirty-seven percent were not satisfied with their undergraduate therapeutics teaching, and many (56.2 %) recommended making teaching more relevant to clinical practice. Many PG1s expressed difficulties in prescribing potentially dangerous medications. Although better than other UK surveys, significant numbers were not satisfied with undergraduate teaching. The strong opinion was for teaching to become more practical and more relevant. Prescriptions which PG1s are commonly asked to write have been described. Findings have guided improvements to undergraduate teaching and assessment in therapeutics at the University of Birmingham, and may offer guidance to other medical schools.

  15. Enslaved Africans and doctors in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Martia Graham

    2003-03-01

    This interpretation of the relationship between enslavement and American medicine in 19th century South Carolina reveals the intimacy that existed between Africans enslaved in that state and the doctors who practiced and taught there. Enslaved Africans were resourceful and reliable medical figures in the slave community. Their knowledge of medical botany permeated the slave quarters and plantation hospitals and was appropriated into southern medical knowledge. The trajectories of the careers of three South Carolina physicians are tied to their practice around and on the enslaved. The beginnings of gynecological surgery are linked to 1840s experimentation on enslaved African women performed by one of them.

  16. "Ways of Knowing" in Doctoral Examination: How Examiners Position Themselves in Relation to the Doctoral Candidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovat, Terence

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses ways in which examiners position themselves in relation to doctoral students' knowledge. The epistemological thesis of Habermas is utilized and its well-established connections with the world of formal learning re-stated. Against this conceptual framework, the examiner reports are appraised with a view to identifying the ways…

  17. Pathways to the Doctorate Degree: A Phenomenological Study of African American Women in Doctorate Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Luciana Janee'

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the number of advanced degree recipients is more than an educational issue; it is also a key social issue. "A college-educated population results in pivotal benefits to society" (The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2004, p. 1). Although African Americans have made steady and notable progress in doctorate degree…

  18. How Male and Female Doctoral Students Experience Their Doctoral Programs Similarly and Differently.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Wei

    The life and educational experiences of nine male students during their doctoral programs were studied using the narrative tradition of qualitative research with multiple interviews with each participant. Their responses were then compared with those from a similar dissertation study that focused on the experiences of female graduate students from…

  19. An Analysis of Doctoral Students' Perceptions of Mentorship during Their Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Klossner, Joanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Mentorship has been established as a key facilitator of professional socialization for athletic trainers into various professional roles. Understanding how current doctoral students are trained to serve in future faculty roles is critical, as there is an increased demand for athletic trainers to serve in this capacity. Objective: Gain an…

  20. Doctorate of nursing practice: blueprint for excellence.

    PubMed

    Sperhac, Arlene M; Clinton, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A great deal of work has been done during the past several years since the American Association of Colleges of Nursing voted in October 2004 to move advanced practice nursing to the doctoral level by 2015. Following the approval, task forces were formed to address curriculum issues and the strategies for transitioning advanced practice nursing education from the master's level to the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP). The DNP curriculum contains content on leadership, management, and other topics that are needed to address some of the issues in the health care system that traditionally have not been included in most master of science in nursing curricula, as well as additional essential content and nurse practitioner competencies. As pediatric nurse practitioners and other advanced practice nurses go forward in their careers, the DNP may have an impact on their role. In this article, the background of the DNP movement, changes in advanced practice nursing education, and the concerns of currently practicing pediatric nurse practitioners prepared at the master's level will be addressed.

  1. [Breaking bad news--information for doctors].

    PubMed

    Kotlinowska, Barbara; Wilusz, Mirosława

    2010-01-01

    The article broaches the subject of breaking bad news. Medical doctors deal with such a problem frequently, not always well-prepared for their role. Obviously, each patient should be treated individually, not only because every disease is a unique case, but also because patients have their own hopes and expectations. In order to conduct a discussion containing bad news, it is worth to base on the scheme presented in the article. Preparation for the meeting is crucial. Besides the fact that it facilitates the dialogue, it also enables presenting information in the right way. Firstly, it is important to listen to the patient carefully, clarify his concerns and then answer all his questions and doubt. Next, if the patient is willing, the doctor should discuss the state of health, possible therapies and prognosis. The end of the talk should consist of appropriate summary and the date of the next meeting. The article emphasize that truth and reliability are extremely significant in contact with a patient. Moreover, it presents the area of information which can be talked about with the family. The authors try to approach the dialogue which contains bad news, reveal various possibility of conducting the discussion and dealing with problems.

  2. Doctoring as leadership: the power to heal.

    PubMed

    Schei, Edvin

    2006-01-01

    Physician power has been attacked, and tabooed, in legitimate efforts to strengthen patients' rights. Yet the structural and symbolic power wielded by doctors is what makes good and right healing actions possible. Avoiding the power issue contributes to a confusing state, where patient trust is faltering and physicians are uncertain about how to fulfill the doctor's role with the intellectual tools of mere science and technology. I argue that constitutive characteristics of health, illness, and the clinical encounter necessitate a prescriptive and responsible healing agent who is more than a technocrat, an information broker, or a seller. The article proposes clinical leadership as a concept offering practical and ethical direction to clinicians, education, research, and health policy. Leadership presupposes reflective awareness of physicians' structural and symbolic power, and is displayed as discerning, empowering improvisations in critical situations, based on empathy and willingness to learn from patients. The notion of clinical leadership highlights patient vulnerability, medicine's ethical core, and the importance of character development in medical education.

  3. Teaching fellowships for UK foundation doctors.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Teaching Fellowships for junior doctors in their second post-graduate (FY2) year should be considered by medical students and junior doctors in UK. FY2 Teaching Fellowships are available in many foundation schools as part of the UK Academic Foundation Programme. Although programme structures differ between schools, they are designed to allow junior trainees to take time out from clinical practice to develop their teaching skills and gain insights into medication education careers. The advantages of an FY2 teaching fellowship include valuable experience of teaching and formal feedback not available to other trainees; the opportunity to further develop your portfolio; further development of the trainee's own knowledge and skills; the stimulation of working with students. Potential drawbacks to be considered are reduced direct clinical contact; reduced salary; difficulty carrying out education research in the allocated time frame; occasional difficulties establishing the teacher-student relationship while the trainee is at a relatively junior level. Experience of medical education as an FY2 trainee provides a helpful stepping stone whether or not the trainee further pursues education as a career, because the teaching skills are transferable to any specialty, and the unique experience enhances the trainee's confidence as a role model for junior colleagues.

  4. Doctors' strikes and mortality: a review.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Solveig Argeseanu; Mitchell, Kristina; Narayan, K M; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-12-01

    A paradoxical pattern has been suggested in the literature on doctors' strikes: when health workers go on strike, mortality stays level or decreases. We performed a review of the literature during the past forty years to assess this paradox. We used PubMed, EconLit and Jstor to locate all peer-reviewed English-language articles presenting data analysis on mortality associated with doctors' strikes. We identified 156 articles, seven of which met our search criteria. The articles analyzed five strikes around the world, all between 1976 and 2003. The strikes lasted between nine days and seventeen weeks. All reported that mortality either stayed the same or decreased during, and in some cases, after the strike. None found that mortality increased during the weeks of the strikes compared to other time periods. The paradoxical finding that physician strikes are associated with reduced mortality may be explained by several factors. Most importantly, elective surgeries are curtailed during strikes. Further, hospitals often re-assign scarce staff and emergency care was available during all of the strikes. Finally, none of the strikes may have lasted long enough to assess the effects of long-term reduced access to a physician. Nonetheless, the literature suggests that reductions in mortality may result from these strikes.

  5. Engaging doctors in the health care revolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas H; Cosgrove, Toby

    2014-06-01

    A health care revolution is under way, and doctors must be part of it. But many are deeply anxious and angry about the transformation, fearing loss of autonomy, respect, and income. Given their resistance, how can health system Leaders engage them in redesigning care? In this article, Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Press Ganey's chief medical officer, and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, describe a framework they've developed for encouraging buy-in. Adapting Max Weber's "typology of motives," and applying behavioral economics and other motivational principles, they describe four tactics leadership must apply in concert: engaging doctors in a noble shared purpose; addressing their economic self-interest; leveraging their desire for respect; and appealing to their sense of tradition. Drawing from experiences at the Mayo Clinic, Geisinger Health System, Partners HealthCare, the Cleveland Clinic, Ascension Health, and others, the authors show how the four motivational levers work together to bring this critical group of stakeholders on board.

  6. Issues and challenges in international doctoral education in nursing.

    PubMed

    Ketefian, Shaké; Davidson, Patricia; Daly, John; Chang, Esther; Srisuphan, Wichit

    2005-09-01

    Education is a driving force in improving the health and welfare of communities globally. Doctoral education of nurses has been identified as a critical factor for provision of leadership in practice, scholarship, research, policy and education. Since the genesis of doctoral education in nursing in the USA in the 1930s, this movement has burgeoned to over 273 doctoral programs in over 30 countries globally. The present article seeks to identify the issues and challenges in nursing doctoral education globally, and those encountered by doctoral program graduates in meeting the challenges of contemporary health care systems. Information was derived from a comprehensive literature review. Electronic databases and the Internet, using the Google search engine, were searched using the key words "doctoral education"; "nursing"; "International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing"; "global health"; "international research collaboration". Doctoral education has been a critical force in developing nurse leaders in education, management, policy and research domains. An absence of consensus in terminology and of accurate minimum data sets precludes comparison and debate across programs. The complexity and dynamism of contemporary globalized communities render significant challenges in the conduct of doctoral programs. Addressing funding issues and faculty shortages are key issues for doctoral programs, especially those in developing countries, to achieve an identity uniquely their own. These challenges can also afford considerable opportunities for discussion, debate and the formulation of innovative and collaborative solutions to advance nursing knowledge and scholarship. In spite of discrete differences between countries and regions, the similarities in the issues facing the development of doctoral programs internationally are more striking than the differences. The harnessing of a global collective to address these issues will likely serve to not only forge the future

  7. National agenda for advanced practice nursing: the practice doctorate.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide the background and rationale for the practice doctorate in nursing. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing's Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing, approved in October 2004, will be discussed. Outlined are some of the changes that will be needed in education, regulation, and advanced practice. Common questions and concerns that advanced practice nurses have, including titling, salary, and transitioning to the doctor of nursing practice degree, will be addressed.

  8. [The virtuous doctor in cinema: the final examination].

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Gustavo

    2014-10-01

    The virtuous doctor has subscribed an oath and by subscribing to this solemn promise, he is committed to live in accordance with the purposes, obligations and virtues established in the medical profession. Cinematic art has shown only a superficial interest in complex aspects of medical profession. An exception is Ingmar Bergman's film "Wild Strawberries", where Professor Isak Borg, a widowed 76-year-old physician, is to be awarded the Doctor Jubilaris degree, 50 years after he received his doctorate at Lund University. During the trip, Isak is forced by a nightmare to reevaluate his professional life as not being a virtuous doctor.

  9. [The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate].

    PubMed

    Kiljander, Toni; Toikka, Jyri; Koskenvuo, Juha; Jaakkola, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate Most doctoral candidates find the public defense of a doctoral thesis an exciting and stressful experience. In this study, Holter recording during the defense was made for four doctoral candidates of the Faculty of Medicine. Maximum heart rate among the subjects was on the average 172 beats/min with a median heart rate of 116 beats/min. Sympathicotonia and release of stress hormones associated with the defense raise the heart rate to levels that may be very high for several hours. This is a risk factor for a coronary event and should be considered, if the doctoral candidate has coronary heart disease, carries risk factors for coronary heart disease, or is an elderly person.

  10. The master degree: A critical transition in STEM doctoral education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Sheila Edwards

    The need to broaden participation in the nation's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate and graduate programs is currently a matter of national urgency. The small number of women and underrepresented minorities (URM) earning doctoral degrees in STEM is particularly troubling given significant increases in the number of students earning master's degrees since 1990. In the decade between 1990 and 2000, the total number of master's recipients increased by 42%. During this same time period, the number of women earning master's degrees increased by 56%, African Americans increased by 132%, American Indians by 101%, Hispanics by 146%, and Asian Americans by 117% (Syverson, 2003). Growth in underrepresented group education at the master's level raises questions about the relationship between master's and doctoral education. Secondary data analysis of the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) was used to examine institutional pathways to the doctorate in STEM disciplines and transitions from master's to doctoral programs by race and gender. While the study revealed no significant gender differences in pathways, compared to White and Asian American students, URM students take significantly different pathways to the doctorate. URM students are significantly more likely to earn the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees at three different institutions. Their path is significantly more likely to include earning a master's degree en route to the doctorate. Further, URM students are more likely to experience transition between the master's and doctoral degrees, and the transitions are not limited to those who earn master's degrees at master's-only institutions. These findings suggest that earning a master's degree is more often a stepping stone to the doctorate for URM students. Master's degree programs, therefore, have the potential to be a valuable resource for policymakers and graduate programs seeking to increase the diversity of URM students

  11. Edinburgh doctors and their physic gardens.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2008-12-01

    Edinburgh has had eight physic gardens on different sites since its first one was created by the Incorporation of Barbers and Surgeons in 1656. As the gardens grew in size, they evolved from herb gardens to botanic gardens with small herbaria for the supply of medical herbs. They were intended for the instruction of medical, surgical and apothecary students and, in the case of the physicians, to demonstrate the need for a physicians' college and a pharmacopoeia. Some of the doctors in charge of them were equally famous and influential in botany as in medicine, and while Edinburgh Town Council enjoyed the fame the gardens brought to the city it was parsimonious and slow to support its botanical pioneers. The gardens are celebrated today in the Sibbald Garden within the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

  12. Thomas Bowdler: censor, philanthropist, and doctor.

    PubMed

    Jellineck, E H

    2001-09-29

    A recent biography of the physician William Osler credits him with having generated a verb, to "oslerize", as a synonym for euthanasia. Actually, Osler had been mocking his own impending senescent uselessness at the time of his move from Baltimore to Oxford. That neologism did not last. Two earlier doctors who did make it to the dictionaries in a verbally eponymous way were F A Mesmer and Thomas Bowdler, and Bowdler, at least, would not have liked the recognition. The first use of the verb to "bowdlerise" seems to have been in 1836, with a reference to "names in the writings of the apostles which modern ultrachristians would probably have Bowdlerized". However, Bowdler is better remembered for his cleaning up of the plays of Shakespeare.

  13. Junior doctors' preferences for specialty choice.

    PubMed

    Sivey, Peter; Scott, Anthony; Witt, Julia; Joyce, Catherine; Humphreys, John

    2012-12-01

    A number of studies suggest that there is an over-supply of specialists and an under-supply of general practitioners in many developed countries. Previous econometric studies of specialty choice from the US suggest that although income plays a role, other non-pecuniary factors may be important. This paper presents a novel application of a choice experiment to identify the effects of expected future earnings and other attributes on specialty choice. We find the implied marginal wage estimated from our discrete choice model is close to the actual wages of senior specialists, but much higher than those of senior GPs. In a policy simulation we find that increasing GPs' earnings by $50,000, or increasing opportunities for procedural or academic work can increase the number of junior doctors choosing general practice by between 8 and 13 percentage points. The simulation implies an earnings elasticity of specialty choice of 0.95.

  14. Do medical doctors respond to economic incentives?

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Leif; Di Tommaso, Maria Laura; Strøm, Steinar

    2013-03-01

    A longitudinal analysis of married physicians labor supply is carried out on Norwegian data from 1997 to 1999. The model utilized for estimation implies that physicians can choose among 10 different job packages which are a combination of part time/full time, hospital/primary care, private/public sector, and not working. Their current choice is influenced by past available options due to a habit persistence parameter in the utility function. In the estimation we take into account the budget constraint, including all features of the tax system. Our results imply that an overall wage increase or less progressive taxation moves married physicians toward full time job packages, in particular to full time jobs in the private sector. But the overall and aggregate labor supply elasticities in the population of employed doctors are rather low compared to previous estimates.

  15. Clown doctors: shaman healers of Western medicine.

    PubMed

    Van Blerkom, L M

    1995-12-01

    The Big Apple Circus Clown Care Unit, which entertains children in New York City hospitals, is compared with non-Western healers, especially shamans. There is not only superficial resemblance--weird costumes, music, sleight of hand, puppet/spirit helpers, and ventriloquism--but also similarity in the meanings and functions of their performances. Both clown and shaman violate natural and cultural rules in their performances. Both help patient and family deal with illness. Both use suggestion and manipulation of medical symbols in attempting to alleviate their patients' distress. Just as traditional ethnomedical systems have been integrated with Western medicine in other societies, clown doctors can provide complementary therapy that may enhance the efficacy of medical treatment in developed nations, particularly for children.

  16. Is there a doctor in the house?

    PubMed

    Chiodo, G T; Tolle, S W; Critchlow, C

    2000-01-01

    The two cases presented deal with urgent situations experienced by persons unknown to the dentist in the area. It is likely that dentists, physicians, nurses, and other medical professionals will encounter persons in urgent need of medical attention in other venues. Certainly, it is possible for someone to experience an emergency in a ballpark, grocery store, church, or other public gathering. While these settings may not offer the advantage of a medical emergency kit, they do pose the same ethical requirement for those trained in medical management of urgent problems to step forward, identify themselves, and attempt to help the ill person. Fortunately, most non-air settings usually allow for contacting emergency medical help and prompt transport to hospitals. The public may never reach a general understanding of the extent to which doctors other than physicians are trained to handle medical emergencies. Similarly, when someone in a crowded theater yells, "Is there a doctor in the house?" he or she most likely is thinking about a physician. This does not mean that a dentist is excused from acting as a medically trained Good Samaritan. The ethical obligation of specific beneficence requires dentists to minister to the ill in medical emergencies unless a more qualified health care provider is present and identifies himself or herself. The ethical obligation of general beneficence requires dentists and other citizens to assist those in urgent circumstances whose needs do not call upon specialized knowledge or training. Fortunately, the law in this country is designed to protect those who do attempt to help those in need.

  17. Doctor and pharmacist - back to the apothecary!

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Peterson, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    The Australian National Medicines Policy embodies four tenets: availability, quality, safety and efficacy of medicines; timely access to affordable medicines; quality use of medicines (QUM); and a responsible and viable medicines industry. The promotion of QUM requires a multidisciplinary approach, including contributions from government, the pharmaceutical industry, health professionals, consumers and academia. However, there are significant tensions and unintended effects associated with the multidisciplinary approach, especially with the relationships between prescribers and dispensers of medicines. The general practitioner and the pharmacist share a common ancestor - the apothecary. The separation of dispensing from prescribing, which began in medieval Europe and 19th century England, reframed and confined the patient-doctor relationship to one of diagnosis, prescription and non-drug management. The role of pharmacists was limited to dispensing, though the present trend is for their responsibilities to be widened. Historical antecedents, the contribution of an increasing number of actors to the costs of health care, universal health insurance and an evolving regulatory framework, are among the factors influencing doctor-pharmacist relations. The prescribing and dispensing of medicines must be guided by an ethical clinical governance structure encompassing health professionals, regulators, the pharmaceutical industry and consumers. There must be close monitoring of safety and effectiveness, and promotion of quality use of medicines and improved patient outcomes. Ongoing training and professional development, within and across professional boundaries, is essential to support harmonious and cost-effective inter-professional practice. The approach must be "apothecarial" with complementary roles and responsibilities for the prescriber and dispenser within the patient-clinician therapeutic relationship, and not adversarial.

  18. Medical Professionalism: Conflicting Values for Tomorrow's Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Simon; Barclay, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Background New values and practices associated with medical professionalism have created an increased interest in the concept. In the United Kingdom, it is a current concern in medical education and in the development of doctor appraisal and revalidation. Objective To investigate how final year medical students experience and interpret new values of professionalism as they emerge in relation to confronting dying patients and as they potentially conflict with older values that emerge through hidden dimensions of the curriculum. Methods Qualitative study using interpretative discourse analysis of anonymized student reflective portfolios. One hundred twenty-three final year undergraduate medical students (64 male and 59 female) from the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine supplied 116 portfolios from general practice and 118 from hospital settings about patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Results Professional values were prevalent in all the portfolios. Students emphasised patient-centered, holistic care, synonymous with a more contemporary idea of professionalism, in conjunction with values associated with the ‘old’ model of professionalism that had not be directly taught to them. Integrating ‘new’ professional values was at times problematic. Three main areas of potential conflict were identified: ethical considerations, doctor-patient interaction and subjective boundaries. Students explicitly and implicitly discussed several tensions and described strategies to resolve them. Conclusions The conflicts outlined arise from the mix of values associated with different models of professionalism. Analysis indicates that ‘new’ models are not simply replacing existing elements. Whilst this analysis is of accounts from students within one UK medical school, the experience of conflict between different notions of professionalism and the three broad domains in which this conflict arises are relevant in other areas of medicine and in

  19. What Do Doctoral Students Value in Their Ideal Mentor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell-Ellison, Bethany A.; Dedrick, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to the construct validity of the scores from Rose's (2003) 34-item "Ideal Mentor Scale" (IMS) and to examine whether male and female doctoral students value different attributes in their ideal mentor. Two hundred and twenty-four doctoral students from colleges (Education, Public Health, Nursing, Arts and…

  20. Doctoral Students' Identity Positioning in Networked Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koole, Marguerite; Stack, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors explored identity positioning as perceived by doctoral learners in online, networked-learning environments. The study examined two distance doctoral programs at a Canadian university. It was a qualitative study based on methodologies involving open coding and discourse analysis. The social positioning cycle, based on…

  1. Professional Doctoral Theses by Explication as Professional Management Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explain the nature, and identify the quality criteria of a doctoral thesis by explication for professional management development. Design/methodology/approach: A working definition of a professional doctoral explication thesis (DET) is proposed and substantiated by five experts. The paper takes a practical, educational…

  2. Promoting Leadership in Doctoral Programs in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reys, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics educators have many different opportunities to reflect leadership throughout their careers. High quality doctoral programs provide a rich and stimulating environment that supports the development of leadership qualities. This paper describes some ways that leadership can be fostered in doctoral programs in mathematics education.

  3. Planning for Doctoral Nursing Education in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPheeters, Harold L.

    The need and demand for new doctoral nursing programs in the South was assessed, using data collected by the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing (SCCEN). To learn how many doctoral nurses are now employed and how many are anticipated to be needed by 1990, SCCEN surveyed all collegiate nursing education programs in the Southern…

  4. Doctors in ancient Greek and Roman rhetorical education.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Craig A

    2013-10-01

    This article collects and examines all references to doctors in rhetorical exercises used in ancient Greek and Roman schools in the Roman Empire. While doctors are sometimes portrayed positively as philanthropic, expert practitioners of their divinely sanctioned art, they are more often depicted as facing charges for poisoning their patients.

  5. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk, ask your doctor if you should begin screening earlier than age 50. If You’re Having Symptoms Tell your doctor if you have any of these symptoms— Blood in or on your stool (bowel movement). Stomach pain, aches, or cramps that do not go ...

  6. Doctor-Patient Communication in Southeast Asia: A Different Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D. F.; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative…

  7. Lively Bureaucracy? The ESRC's Doctoral Training Centres and UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Ingrid; McAlpine, Lynn; Mills, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the changing relationships between the UK government, its research councils and universities, focusing on the governing, funding and organisation of doctoral training. We use the Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs) funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a prism through which to study the shifting nature of…

  8. Patterns and Trends of Canadian Social Work Doctoral Dissertations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, David W.; Lach, Lucyana; Blumenthal, Anne; Akesson, Bree

    2015-01-01

    The first social work doctoral program in Canada began in 1952. Relatively recently, the number of programs has grown rapidly, doubling in the past 10 years to 14 programs. Despite the expansion there is no systematic understanding of the patterns and trends in doctoral research. In this study we review 248 publicly available dissertations from…

  9. The Rich Get Richer: International Doctoral Candidates and Scholarly Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotterall, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Identity lies at the heart of doctoral study--a mysterious learning process which culminates in Ph.D. students' metamorphosis into doctors. This paper explores the identity-related experiences of six international Ph.D. students enrolled at an Australian university by examining how different individuals, events and interactions contributed to (or…

  10. Gatecrashing the Oasis? A Joint Doctoral Dissertation Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Ken; Speedy, Jane; Wyatt, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the institutional and individual struggles surrounding the submission for examination of a jointly authored doctoral dissertation at a U.K. civic university. Two of the article's authors (Gale and Wyatt) were the dissertation's authors, and Speedy, the article's third author, is their supervisor. Joint doctoral dissertations…

  11. Using Technology to Reduce Attrition of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Freda; Igein, Godwin

    2007-01-01

    Attrition of doctoral students at the rate of 50-60% of those who enter the program, suggests the need to examine alternative strategies within educational institutions in working with doctoral students. The purpose of this paper is to suggest how incorporating Internet technology might be one alternative in reducing attrition in doctoral…

  12. Political Transformation and Research Methodology in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Chaya

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between political change and epistemologies and methodologies employed at doctorate level. It does so by analysing the range of topics, questions and methodologies used by doctoral students at the University of Pretoria's Faculty of Education between 1985 and 2005--a time-frame that covers the decade before and…

  13. Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad program provides grants to colleges and universities to fund individual doctoral students to conduct research in other countries in modern foreign languages and area studies for periods of six to 12 months. This program holds an annual competition. Institutions of higher education in the…

  14. Doctoral Student Learning and Development: A Shared Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bair, Carolyn R.; Haworth, Jennifer Grant; Sandfort, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Historically, student affairs professionals focused their work almost exclusively on undergraduate students. Doctoral faculty remained focused on the comprehensive needs of doctoral students. However, this situation is changing. Due largely to growth in numbers and diversity of graduate students, student affairs professionals at colleges and…

  15. Conceptual Frameworks in the Doctoral Research Process: A Pedagogical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Jeanette; Smyth, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to consideration of the role of conceptual frameworks in the doctoral research process. Through reflection on the two authors' own conceptual frameworks for their doctoral studies, a pedagogical model has been developed. The model posits the development of a conceptual framework as a core element of the doctoral…

  16. Doctoral Accounting Candidates: A Profile of Demographics and Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backmon, Ida Robinson

    1998-01-01

    Presents information on minority doctoral students in accounting, drawing on surveys completed by 47 such students. Outlines demographic characteristics, and identifies respondents' rankings of costs and benefits of pursuing a doctorate in accounting. Most respondents were professionally certified and were interested in academic careers. (SLD)

  17. Personal Commitment, Support and Progress in Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsuo, Miia; Turkulainen, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research on doctoral education has associated study progress with the student's own capabilities and faculty support. The purpose of this study is to investigate how students' personal commitment and various forms of support, as well as their complementary effects, explain progress in doctoral studies. Data were collected by a…

  18. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities. Summary Report 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syverson, Peter D.

    A brief summary of data, in tables with some narrative, from the Survey of Earned Doctorates during fiscal year 1980 is presented. Both research and applied research doctorates with these degree designations are included: DAS, DArch, DA, DBA, JCD, DCJ, DCrim, EdD, DEng, DESc, ScDE, DEnv, DED, DFA, DF, DGS, DHS (Health and Safety), DHS (Hebrew…

  19. Signature Pedagogy in California State University Educational Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Charles; Brown-Welty, Sharon; Cohn, Kathleen; Rodriguez, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine signature pedagogies for the education doctorate. Three California State University campuses that have started new Ed.D. programs examine practices that distinguish the education doctoral experience from other professions. Embedded field work, the professional seminar, and the research and writing support…

  20. Original Knowledge, Gender and the Word's Mythology: Voicing the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Using mythology as a generative matrix, this article investigates the relationship between knowledge, words, embodiment and gender as they play out in academic writing's voice and, in particular, in doctoral voice. The doctoral thesis is defensive, a performance seeking admittance into discipline scholarship. Yet in finding its scholarly voice,…

  1. Learning Networks and the Journey of "Becoming Doctor"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn; Mewburn, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Scholars such as Kamler and Thompson argue that identity formation has a key role to play in doctoral learning, particularly the process of thesis writing. This article builds on these insights to address other sites in which scholarly identity is performed within doctoral candidature. Drawing on actor-network theory, the authors examine the role…

  2. Professional Identity Development of Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollarhide, Colette T.; Gibson, Donna M.; Moss, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors used grounded theory to explore professional identity transitions for 23 counselor education doctoral students in a cross-section sample based on nodal points in their programs. The transformational tasks that doctoral students face involve integration of multiple identities, evolution of confidence and legitimacy, and acceptance of…

  3. Bodies in Narratives of Doctoral Students' Learning and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Nick; Paulson, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Existing research on doctoral education documents levels of satisfaction, the difficulties students face and variations according to demographic variables. Cognitive dimensions of learning are emphasised, and calls to attend to bodies in doctoral education remain largely unheeded. This article draws on theoretical work that rejects Cartesian…

  4. The Shortage of Doctorally Prepared Nursing Faculty: A Dire Situation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Linda E.; Sechrist, Karen R.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of national survey data on nursing faculty identified the following trends: since 1993, the mean age of doctorally prepared faculty has increased; average retirement age is 62.5; 200-300 faculty are eligible for retirement annually from 2003-2012; mean number of years in nursing doctoral programs is 8.3. Earlier entry into doctoral…

  5. Part-Time Doctoral Student Socialization through Peer Mentorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bircher, Lisa S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the socialization (Weidman, Twale, & Stein, 2001) experiences of part-time doctoral students as a result of peer mentorship in one college. Part-time doctoral students are identified as students who are maintaining full-time employment or obligations outside of the university. The…

  6. Professional and Personal Development in Contemporary Gerontology Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Rowles, Graham D.; Watkins, John F.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the Gerontology Doctoral Student Assessment Model (GDSAM), a comprehensive web-based system premised on developing an evaluation mechanism attuned to the special requirements of advanced graduate education at the doctoral level. The system focuses on longitudinal tracking of selected dimensions of intellectual,…

  7. Drivers and Interpretations of Doctoral Education Today: National Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Lesley; Bengtsen, Søren S. E.; del Pilar Gallego Castaño, Liliana; Crossouard, Barbara; Keefer, Jeffrey M.; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, doctoral education has undergone a sea change with several global trends increasingly apparent. Drivers of change include massification and professionalization of doctoral education and the introduction of quality assurance systems. The impact of these drivers, and the forms that they take, however, are dependent on doctoral…

  8. Is imperfection becoming easier to live with for doctors?

    PubMed Central

    Aasland, Olaf G

    2017-01-01

    Objective Being involved in serious patient injury is devastating for most doctors. During the last two decades, several efforts have been launched to improve Norwegian doctors’ coping with adverse events and complaints. Methods The method involved survey to a representative sample of 1792 Norwegian doctors in 2012. The questions on adverse events and its effects were previously asked in 2000. Results Response rate was 71%. More doctors reported to have been involved in episodes with serious patient harm in 2012 (35%) than in 2000 (28%), and more of the episodes were reported as required by law. Doctors below age 50 report better support from colleagues, more collegial retrospective discussion on the event and less patient/family blame. In all, 27% of the doctors had been reported to the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision; 79% of these complaints were rejected; 73% of the doctors who had received a reaction from the health authorities found the reaction reasonable, but almost one out of five practiced more testing and referrals after a complaint and 25% claimed that the complaint had made them into a more fearful doctor. Conclusion Our results indicate that adverse events are being met more openly in 2012 than in 2000, and that coping with imperfection and patient complaints is less devastating for new generations of doctors.

  9. Paradigm Devolution: The Twilight of Traditional Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonstrom, Wendy Jean

    2009-01-01

    In this reflection, the author proposes that doctoral education is currently undergoing paradigm devolution. Her perspective is that of a doctoral student, specifically a full-time graduate student working towards a Ph.D. in adult education. This fall semester marks her last of coursework, and she finds herself searching to make meaning of the…

  10. Personal Study Planning in Doctoral Education in Industrial Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahenius, K.; Martinsuo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The duration of doctoral studies has increased in Europe. Personal study planning has been considered as one possible solution to help students in achieving shorter study times. This study investigates how doctoral students experience and use personal study plans in one university department of industrial engineering. The research material…

  11. Opportunities to Learn Scientific Thinking in Joint Doctoral Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Grout, Brian W.; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    2015-01-01

    Research into doctoral supervision has increased rapidly over the last decades, yet our understanding of how doctoral students learn scientific thinking from supervision is limited. Most studies are based on interviews with little work being reported that is based on observation of actual supervision. While joint supervision has become widely…

  12. Student Mobility and Doctoral Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sehoole, Chika Trevor

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses doctoral education programmes in South Africa with a particular focus on student mobility. It investigates pull and push factors as a conceptual framework, arguing that the patterns of student mobility in doctoral education programmes in South Africa follow the patterns of international student mobility elsewhere, which are…

  13. The Career Paths of Doctoral Graduates in Austria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Economists and policy makers often emphasise the importance of human capital as a key determinant in the pursuit of economic growth. The highest formal qualification in the educational system is the doctorate, which is attained after the first stage of tertiary education at ISCED 6 level. Doctorate holders play a central role in research and…

  14. Introducing the First Hybrid Doctoral Program in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Matthew J.; Zellner, Andrea L.; Roseth, Cary J.; Dickson, Robin K.; Dickson, W. Patrick; Bell, John

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 Michigan State University launched the first hybrid doctoral program in Educational Technology. This 5-year program blends face-to-face and online components to engage experienced, working education professionals in doctoral study. In this paper, we describe the design and evolution of the program as well as the response from students. We…

  15. Annual Report: Doctoral Program Committee, Academic Year 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievrouw, Leah A.; Leazer, Greg; Lynch, Beverly; Abler, Susan; Mediavilla, Cynthia

    This document summarizes the activities of the University of California, Los Angeles's (UCLA's) Department of Library and Information Science (DLIS) Doctoral Program Committee, 1996-97. These activities are organized into two main areas: Operations and Students. Doctoral Program Committee (DPC) operations outlined include: preparing major policy…

  16. Faculty Perceptions of Common Challenges Encountered by Novice Doctoral Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michelle A.; Feldon, David F.; Timmerman, Briana E.; Chao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Although learning to write for publication is an important outcome of doctoral education, it has received surprisingly little scholarly attention. Within a socialization and supervisor pedagogy framework, this study uses narratives of faculty who regularly write with their doctoral students for publication to expose challenges students commonly…

  17. From medical doctor to medical director: leadership style matters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; Wood, Edward V; Ibram, Ferda

    2015-07-01

    Leadership is a skill to be developed by all doctors from the foundation trainee to the director of the board. This article explores the impact of leadership style on performance and considers techniques to develop doctors' leadership skills and personal effectiveness.

  18. Pedagogical Implications of Working with Doctoral Students at a Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikeley, Felicity; Muschamp, Yolande

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues raised when delivering professional doctorate programmes to students at a distance. It explores the importance in doctoral study of engagement with a research community, what a "community of practice" might mean within the academic context and the problematic nature of working with students already operating within…

  19. The Engaged Dissertation: Exploring Trends in Doctoral Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Audrey J.; Tuchmayer, Jeremy B.; Morin, Shauna M.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which doctoral students are conducting community-engaged scholarship and investigated the characteristics of their degree-granting institutions. The research utilized the most immediate work of doctoral students by examining completed dissertations. Analysis showed which graduate students are pursuing community…

  20. An Investigation of Generic Structures of Pakistani Doctoral Thesis Acknowledgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rofess, Sakander; Mahmood, Muhammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates Pakistani doctoral thesis acknowledgements from genre analysis perspective. A corpus of 235 PhD thesis acknowledgements written in English was taken from Pakistani doctoral theses collected from eight different disciplines. HEC Research Repository of Pakistan was used as a data sources. The theses written by Pakistani…

  1. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  2. Work-Based Doctorates: Professional Extension at the Highest Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Carol; Lester, Stan

    2012-01-01

    The growth and evolution of professional doctorates in Australia, the UK and other parts of the English-speaking world has been widely reported and discussed. Recently, forms of doctorate have emerged that are not geared to specific professions or disciplines, and that are used by senior practitioners as vehicles for professional development and…

  3. Motive for Reviewing Higher Education Administration Doctoral Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chukwuemeka, Veronica O.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the research question: "What is the Motive for the Review of Higher Education Administration (HEA) Doctoral Degree Programs? The data derived from a larger study, "Impact of Program Review on Higher Education Administration Doctoral Degree Programs" that documents, through in-depth case studies, the processes faculty and…

  4. Transnational Education: A Case Study of One Professional Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Marnie

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a Doctor of Education program in a transnational setting is contextualized in Australian national policies for international higher education and influences of regionalization and globalization. The doctorate was designed to meet aspirations of professional practitioners in Australia and South East Asia where the School had…

  5. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities. Summary Report 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilford, Dorothy M.

    A brief summary of data gathered from the Survey of Earned Doctorates during the academic year 1976-1977 is presented in this, the eleventh in a series of yearly summaries of data, a series that began in 1967. Data was obtained from questionnaires filled out by the graduates as they completed all requirements for their doctoral degrees, and refers…

  6. The Role of the Dissertation in Music Education Doctoral Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Wendy L.; Cassidy, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    This survey study was designed to determine attributes of, and attitudes toward, the doctoral dissertation. Of particular interest was music education faculty awareness and implementation of project-based dissertations as alternatives to traditional dissertations. Respondents, music education program heads at doctoral granting institutions (N =…

  7. Students' Research Self-Efficacy during Online Doctoral Research Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltes, Beate; Hoffman-Kipp, Peter; Lynn, Laura; Weltzer-Ward, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This study will explore student skill development and research self-efficacy as related to online doctoral students' first core research course experience. Findings from this study will be used to inform instructors in effective ways to support doctoral students during their early research experiences. This support will ensure that online graduate…

  8. Financing and Restructuring Doctoral Education in the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the author argues that a combination of short- and longer-run economic and political forces pose a threat to the well-being of the nation's doctoral programs. After briefly touching on the impact of current economic problems on doctoral education at private universities, he then discusses the growing pressure on academia to expand…

  9. Leveraging Value in Doctoral Student Networks through Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilbeam, Colin; Lloyd-Jones, Gaynor; Denyer, David

    2013-01-01

    UK higher education policy relating to doctoral-level education assumes that student networks provide the basis for informal learning and the acquisition of necessary skills and information. Through semi-structured interviews with 17 doctoral students from a UK management school, this study investigated the value of these networks to students, the…

  10. Assessment of Examinations in Computer Science Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys the examination requirements for attaining degree candidate (candidacy) status in computer science doctoral programs at all of the computer science doctoral granting institutions in the United States. It presents a framework for program examination requirement categorization, and categorizes these programs by the type or types…

  11. Which Doctor to Trust: A Recommender System for Identifying the Right Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Cuili; Yang, Haoyu; Huang, Degen; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Key opinion leaders (KOLs) are people who can influence public opinion on a certain subject matter. In the field of medical and health informatics, it is critical to identify KOLs on various disease conditions. However, there have been very few studies on this topic. Objective We aimed to develop a recommender system for identifying KOLs for any specific disease with health care data mining. Methods We exploited an unsupervised aggregation approach for integrating various ranking features to identify doctors who have the potential to be KOLs on a range of diseases. We introduce the design, implementation, and deployment details of the recommender system. This system collects the professional footprints of doctors, such as papers in scientific journals, presentation activities, patient advocacy, and media exposure, and uses them as ranking features to identify KOLs. Results We collected the information of 2,381,750 doctors in China from 3,657,797 medical journal papers they published, together with their profiles, academic publications, and funding. The empirical results demonstrated that our system outperformed several benchmark systems by a significant margin. Moreover, we conducted a case study in a real-world system to verify the applicability of our proposed method. Conclusions Our results show that doctors’ profiles and their academic publications are key data sources for identifying KOLs in the field of medical and health informatics. Moreover, we deployed the recommender system and applied the data service to a recommender system of the China-based Internet technology company NetEase. Patients can obtain authority ranking lists of doctors with this system on any given disease. PMID:27390219

  12. [Doctor Bronisław Hager (1890-1969)--doctor and politician].

    PubMed

    Drozdz, Łukasz M; Iwaniszyn-Popowicz, Iwona J; Mokrus, Oliwia M; Madry, Łukasz J

    2008-01-01

    Doctor Bronisław Hager was born into the family of the Polish intelligentsia. He was brought up according to the Polish tradition with respect for freedom and independence. His father, Maxymilian was a fervent fighter in the struggle for independence of Silesia. His mother was involved in community service. Bronisław Hager finished his medical studies at Collegium Medicum of Jagiellonian University on 27th March 1914. Between World War I and World War II he actively fought for joining Silesia to Poland. During World War II he emigrated to London where he became one of members of the Polish government in exile. At the end of World War II he was a doctor of United Nations in Bavaria. He came back to the country on 22th November 1946. He settled in Tarnowskie Góry and worked at the community health center till 1967. He translated Sir Alexander Fleming's work on the discovery and using of penicillin. He died on 30th June 1969. Bronisław Hager was a good doctor, a great politician, a wonderful speaker and a real Pole.

  13. Doctor-Shopping Behavior among Patients with Eye Floaters.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Gow-Lieng; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-07-13

    Patients suffering from eye floaters often resort to consulting more than one ophthalmologist. The purpose of this study, using the Health Belief Model (HBM), was to identify the factors that influence doctor-shopping behavior among patients with eye floaters. In this cross-sectional survey, 175 outpatients who presented floaters symptoms were enrolled. Data from 143 patients (77 first time visitors and 66 doctor-shoppers) who completed the questionnaire were analyzed. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that women and non-myopia patients were significantly related with frequent attendance and doctor switching. Though the HBM has performed well in a number of health behaviors studies, but most of the conceptual constructors of HBM did not show significant differences between the first time visitors and true doctor-shoppers in this study. Motivation was the only significant category affecting doctor-shopping behavior of patients with eye floaters.

  14. Hospital doctors' career structure and misuse of medical womanpower.

    PubMed

    Bewley, B R; Bewley, T H

    1975-08-09

    Biological and culturel differences between men and women lead to severe discrimination against women doctors who bear the burdens of pregnancy, child-rearing, and housework. These lead, from equality within medical school and at qualification, to increasing failure to obtain posts commensurate with their innate abilities. Women doctors who temporarily and partially drop out of full-time practice have been studied frequently, but men (who are equally expensive to train) have not, despite their disappearing from National Health Service practice through emigration, death, alcoholism, suicide, or removal from the Medical Register. In a working lifetime of forty years, a woman doctor with an average family is likely to do seven-eighths of the work of a doctor who has not had to carry the primary responsibility of bearing and rearing children. Doctors with dependants are handicapped, and a separate career structure might be set up for them. Supernumerary consultant posts are proposed.

  15. Selecting doctoral programs in nursing: resources for students and faculty.

    PubMed

    Jones, K D; Lutz, K F

    1999-01-01

    Sixty-nine doctoral programs in nursing are currently offered at 75 universities in the United States. Resources to assist prospective doctoral students in making decisions concerning successfully pursuing doctoral education are collected and organized by a variety of nursing organizations. Nurses in academic settings access these lists and specialty publications through their deans' offices and professional affiliations. Prospective students, on the other hand, are largely employed in clinical settings and are often unaware of the existence of this information, which could assist them in their decisions. The purpose of this article is to provide prospective doctoral students and the faculty that may advise them with a current information to use in selecting a doctoral program in nursing.

  16. Doctor AI: Predicting Clinical Events via Recurrent Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Edward; Bahadori, Mohammad Taha; Schuetz, Andy; Stewart, Walter F.; Sun, Jimeng

    2017-01-01

    Leveraging large historical data in electronic health record (EHR), we developed Doctor AI, a generic predictive model that covers observed medical conditions and medication uses. Doctor AI is a temporal model using recurrent neural networks (RNN) and was developed and applied to longitudinal time stamped EHR data from 260K patients over 8 years. Encounter records (e.g. diagnosis codes, medication codes or procedure codes) were input to RNN to predict (all) the diagnosis and medication categories for a subsequent visit. Doctor AI assesses the history of patients to make multilabel predictions (one label for each diagnosis or medication category). Based on separate blind test set evaluation, Doctor AI can perform differential diagnosis with up to 79% recall@30, significantly higher than several baselines. Moreover, we demonstrate great generalizability of Doctor AI by adapting the resulting models from one institution to another without losing substantial accuracy. PMID:28286600

  17. Doctor-Shopping Behavior among Patients with Eye Floaters

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Gow-Lieng; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from eye floaters often resort to consulting more than one ophthalmologist. The purpose of this study, using the Health Belief Model (HBM), was to identify the factors that influence doctor-shopping behavior among patients with eye floaters. In this cross-sectional survey, 175 outpatients who presented floaters symptoms were enrolled. Data from 143 patients (77 first time visitors and 66 doctor-shoppers) who completed the questionnaire were analyzed. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that women and non-myopia patients were significantly related with frequent attendance and doctor switching. Though the HBM has performed well in a number of health behaviors studies, but most of the conceptual constructors of HBM did not show significant differences between the first time visitors and true doctor-shoppers in this study. Motivation was the only significant category affecting doctor-shopping behavior of patients with eye floaters. PMID:26184266

  18. Importance and benefits of the doctoral thesis for medical graduates

    PubMed Central

    Giesler, Marianne; Boeker, Martin; Fabry, Götz; Biller, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The majority of medical graduates in Germany complete a doctorate, even though a doctoral degree is not necessary for the practice of medicine. So far, little is known about doctoral candidates’ view on the individual benefit a doctoral thesis has for them. Consequently, this is the subject of the present investigation. Method: Data from surveys with graduates of the five medical faculties of Baden-Württemberg from the graduation years 2007/2008 (N=514) and 2010/2011 (N=598) were analysed. Results: One and a half years after graduating 53% of those interviewed had completed their doctorate. When asked about their motivation for writing a doctoral thesis, participants answered most frequently “a doctorate is usual” (85%) and “improvement of job opportunities” (75%), 36% said that an academic career has been their primary motive. Less than 10% responded that they used their doctoral thesis as a means to apply for a job. The proportion of graduates working in health care is equally large among those who have completed a thesis and those who have not. Graduates who pursued a thesis due to scientific interest are also currently more interested in an academic career and recognise more opportunities for research. An implicit benefit of a medical thesis emerged with regard to the self-assessment of scientific competences as those who completed a doctorate rated their scientific competencies higher than those who have not. Discussion: Although for the majority of physicians research interest is not the primary motivation for completing a doctorate, they might nevertheless achieve some academic competencies. For graduates pursuing an academic career the benefit of completing a medical thesis is more obvious. PMID:26958656

  19. Urban Culturally and Ethnically Diverse Doctoral Students and Their Perceptions of Doctoral Program Design Features and Procedures: An Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Ann I.; Barbetta, Patricia; Cramer, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The mission for Urban SEALS (Special Education Academic Leaders), a federally funded doctoral preparation program, is to prepare doctoral-level special educators, including those who are culturally and/or linguistically diverse (CLD) to assume leadership roles in the education of urban students with disabilities who are CLD. This report provides…

  20. Patients who use e-mediated communication with their doctor: new constructions of trust in the patient-doctor relationship.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Hege K; Trondsen, Marianne; Kummervold, Per Egil; Gammon, Deede; Hjortdahl, Per

    2006-02-01

    The introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) into the patient-doctor relationship represents a significant change in modern health care. Communication via computers-e-mediated communication-is affecting the context of patient-doctor interaction, touching core elements of the relationship. Based on data from a qualitative study conducted among Norwegian patients who had used ICT to communicate with their doctors, the authors argue that patients' use of ICT and the element of trust in the patient-doctor relationship influence each other. Furthermore, they contend that patients' constructions of trust in this relationship can be understood in light of basic mechanisms in modern society. The study sheds light on some potential concerns and benefits as communication technology increasingly is integrated into the patient-doctor relationship.

  1. 78 FR 25705 - Applications for New Awards; Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Applications for New Awards; Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) Fellowship Program...: Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) Fellowship Program Notice inviting applications...-Hays DDRA Fellowship Program provides opportunities to doctoral candidates to engage in...

  2. Physicians' perceptions of doctor shopping in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, E Gail; Moss, Alvin H

    2010-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse and diversion continue to be serious problems in West Virginia and nationwide. Doctor shopping (visiting multiple doctors in a short time frame with the intent to deceive them to obtain controlled substances) is illegal and one way that patients gain access to prescription drugs. We surveyed West Virginia physicians in emergency medicine, family medicine, and internal medicine to determine their experience with and attitudes toward doctor shopping, and to assess attitudes toward proposed legislation to protect physicians who report doctor shoppers to law enforcement officials. Of 452 physicians surveyed, 258 responded (57%). Emergency medicine physicians had the highest response rate (61%) and most frequent encounters (once a week or more often) with doctor shoppers compared to family medicine and internal medicine physicians (88% vs 25% vs 14%, P < .001). Eighty-one percent of physicians reported using the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy Controlled Substances Monitoring Program website, but only 22 percent presently report doctor shoppers. If the law protected them, 85 percent of all physicians reported they would be likely to report doctor shoppers.

  3. Enhancing communication in oncology outpatient consultations: critical reflections from doctors

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Roger; Cox, Karen; Steward, William

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The experiences of patients diagnosed with advanced incurable cancer and the doctors who conducted their medical consultations were studied in order to improve the understanding of what happens in consultations, when bad news is disclosed. The major objective of the study was to critically reflect upon doctor-patient communication, in such situations, with a view to considering future strategies for doctors’ continuing professional development. Methods Sixteen patients and sixteen Oncologists, from a cancer centre in the UK were recruited into this ethnographic study. One hundred and fifteen episodes of data were collected from audio recorded consultations; interviews with doctors and patients and their relatives and observations of consultations. These data were analysed using a constant comparison method. Results Interactions between doctors and patients are complex and consultations can be challenging for both of them. Some doctors spoke openly about their need for additional support to enhance their communication related competencies within Oncology consultations. These doctors wanted to observe their peers conducting consultations. They also wanted to receive feedback about their own clinical practices. These doctors stated that they wanted an open culture whereby they could talk freely about difficult and emotionally challenging consultations without fear of being considered incompetent by their Consultants, who act in a clinical supervisory role. Conclusions To help practitioners consolidate their practice in such settings it is necessary to develop better collaborations among practitioners within clinical practice. Providing individual supervisory sessions or group workshops can facilitate reflective learning and provide an open and supportive learning culture.

  4. Locum doctors in general practice: motivation and experiences.

    PubMed Central

    McKevitt, C; Morgan, M; Hudson, M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence of dissatisfaction with locum doctors' performance, but little is known about doctors who work as locums in general practice or about their experiences of this work. AIM: To describe the motivations and experiences of doctors providing locum cover in general practices. METHOD: A postal questionnaire survey distributed to locums through organizations such as locum groups, commercial agencies, and general practices. RESULTS: Questionnaires were returned by 111 doctors currently working as locums in general practice. Four main reasons for working as a locum GP were: as a short-term option while between posts, to gain experience of different practices before commitment to one practice, to balance work and family or other commitments, to continue part-time work after retirement. One-quarter of responders intended to continue working as a locum indefinitely. The drawbacks of locum work included frustration with low status, lack of security, and difficulty accessing structured training and education. CONCLUSION: Locum doctors in general practice are a heterogeneous group that includes those who have chosen this type of work. The doctors who intend to continue as locums indefinitely represent a useful resource in primary care whose ability to provide short-term cover could be maximized. The need to control the quality of 'freelance' doctors should not overshadow the need to control the quality of their working environments. PMID:10621983

  5. Doctors for Tribal Areas: Issues and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mavalankar, Dileep

    2016-01-01

    Health parameters of tribal population had always been a concern for India's march towards Millennium development Goals (MDG's). Tribal population contributes 8.6% of total population, in spite of efforts and commitment of Government of India towards MGD, India lagged far behind from achieving and optimal health of tribal population will be a concern for achieving Sustainable development Goals SDG's also. Some of the common health problems of the tribal population face are deficiency of essential components in diet like energy malnutrition, protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Goiter, Gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dysentery and parasitic infections are very common. High prevalence of genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia and others are endemic in few tribes of India. Tribal Health is further compounded issues by social issues like excessive consumption of alcohol, poor access to contraceptive, substance abuse and gender based violence. Besides other reasons, like poor budget allocation, difficult to reach, poor access to health care facility, severe shortage of qualified health workers and workforce led to poor governance of health sector in tribal areas. Present view point reflects on the issues of inadequacy of doctors in tribal area and suggests possible solutions. PMID:27385868

  6. Patients' Expectations as to Doctors' Behaviors During Appointed Visits.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Krzysztof; Leoniuk, Katarzyna; Janaszczyk, Agata; Pietrzykowska, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    Numerous guidelines for students and medical professionals provide the instructions of proper behavior during encounters with patients in a doctor's office. However, they quite often do not consider cultural differences that may affect the doctor-patient relationship. In our study we analyzed Polish patients' expectations (N = 976) for their physicians' actual behavior. We compared our results with analogue studies performed in the United States. We determined that patient expectations concerning a desirable form of verbal and nonverbal communication with a physician vary to a considerable degree. Relatively universal, however, is the wish that the doctors introduce themselves and apply personalized forms of contact.

  7. Glasgow patients' attitude to doctors' dress and appearance.

    PubMed

    Dover, S

    1991-11-01

    Three hundred out patients were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their views of doctors' dress and appearance. The majority felt that this was important. Most patients did not mind a male doctor with an earring, a women in trousers or a man without a tie. A majority preferred their doctors to wear a white coat, be free of political badges and for men to have conventional length hair. Older patients are stricter than young patients. Most strict patients would accept more relaxed standards at night and during the weekend.

  8. Three key components to successfully completing a nursing doctoral program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald G; Delmore, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Using their personal experience, the authors identify three key components to successfully completing a nursing doctoral program. The first component is asking the right questions to determine the doctoral degree best suited for the potential student. The second component is having a strategic plan that includes aspects such as financial considerations (research costs and potential financial support) and the development of a strong support system (specifically study pairs). The third component is the development of a systematic approach to completing the research, writing the dissertation, and completing the oral requirements. Addressing these areas will help students balance the many demands of doctoral study.

  9. Doctor-patient relationships (DPR) in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaozhuang; Xu, Xuehu; Trigo, Virginia; Ramalho, Nelson J C

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop and test theory on how commitment human resource (HR) practices affect hospital professionals' job satisfaction that motivates them to generate desirable patient care and subsequently improve doctor-patient relationships (DPR) and second, to examine how commitment HR practices influence hospital managers and clinicians in different ways. Design/methodology/approach Using a cross-sectional survey, the authors collected data from 508 clinicians and hospital managers from 33 tertiary public hospitals in China. Structural equation model was employed to test the relationships of the variables in the study. Findings Commitment HR practices positively affect the job satisfaction of the healthcare professionals surveyed and a positive relationship is perceived between job satisfaction and DPR. Overall, the model shows a reversal on the strongest path linking job satisfaction and DPR whereby managers' main association operates through extrinsic job satisfaction while for clinicians it occurs through intrinsic satisfaction only. Practical implications DPR might be improved by applying commitment HR practices to increase healthcare professional's intrinsic and extrinsic satisfaction. In addition, while recognizing the importance of compensation and benefits to address the underpayment issue of Chinese healthcare professionals, empowerment and autonomy in work, and the use of subjects' expertise and skills may serve as stronger motivators for clinicians rather than hard economic incentives in achieving DPR improvements. Originality/value This study contributes to the small but growing body of research on human resource management (HRM) in the healthcare sector with new evidence supporting the link between commitment HR practice and work attitudes, as well as work attitudes and patient care from the perspective of clinicians and hospital managers. This study represents an initial attempt to examine the associations

  10. A Rating of Doctoral Programs in Speech Communication, 1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Renee; Barker, Larry

    1977-01-01

    Reviews a survey evaluation of speech communication doctoral programs existing in 1976. Available from: ACA Bulletin, Robert Hall, Editor, Speech Communication Association, 5205 Leesburg Pike, Suite 1001, Falls Church, VA 22041. (MH)

  11. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day Browse Sections The Basics Overview Benefits and Risks ... sure why this works. Can taking aspirin every day cause any side effects? Taking aspirin daily isn' ...

  12. 9 Out of 10 Doctors Like Their Jobs

    MedlinePlus

    ... html 9 Out of 10 Doctors Like Their Jobs A new survey finds that two-thirds would ... and Human Services. More Health News on: Health Occupations Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Health ...

  13. Estimates of the Supply and Demand for Doctorally Prepared Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacox, Ada

    1993-01-01

    Estimates the current supply of doctorally prepared nurses and compares the supply with projected estimates of demand. Addresses the need for nursing to maintain visibility within the broader scientific community. (JOW)

  14. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Stanley Schwartz, Photographer 1971 DOCTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Stanley Schwartz, Photographer 1971 DOCTOR HUBBARD'S SIGN ON NORTH WALL, NORTHEAST CORNER OF HOUSE - Governor John Hubbard House, 52 Winthrop Street, Hallowell, Kennebec County, ME

  15. 233. Photocopied July 1978. (QMC) 'PLANS AND ELEVATIONS OF DOCTOR'S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    233. Photocopied July 1978. (QMC) 'PLANS AND ELEVATIONS OF DOCTOR'S HOUSE. QUINCY MINE. AUG. 1901.' ILLUSTRATES ALTERATIONS TO AN EXISTING BUILDING. LOCATED WEST SIDE OF ROUTE 41, SOUTH OF QMC OFFICE. - Quincy Mining Company, Hancock, Houghton County, MI

  16. Doctoral Curriculum Studies in an Age of Shifting Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansaldo, Jim; Goodman, Jesse

    2002-01-01

    Describes faculty and student experiences involving efforts to restructure the curriculum-studies doctoral program at Indiana University in light of shifting and ambiguous field boundaries. (Contains 26 references.) ((PKP)

  17. What Does the Doctor Look for on a Mammogram?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our team is made up of doctors and master’s-prepared nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care ... reality. DONATE Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer ...

  18. Marie Curie's Doctoral Thesis: Prelude to a Nobel Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolke, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Traces the life and research techniques of Marie Curie's doctoral dissertation leading to the discovery and purification of radium from ore. Reexamines the discoveries of other scientists that helped lead to this separation. (ML)

  19. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should You Ask Your Doctor About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? As you cope with cancer and cancer treatment, ... About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  20. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should You Ask Your Doctor About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? As you cope with cancer and cancer treatment, ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  1. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice.

  2. Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163468.html Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn With February designated National Heart Month, ... that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor ...

  3. The Spin Doctor: An Alternative Model of Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumpter, Randy; Tankard, James W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that the Spin Doctor is a new communication role, and raises questions about its relationship to the traditional public relations model. Discusses the implication of this new role for mass communication theory and for the practice of journalism. (SR)

  4. Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... child express these fears and overcome them. Common Fears and Concerns About Medical Exams Things that often ... going to the doctor include: Separation. Kids often fear that their parents may leave them in the ...

  5. Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to ... in a positive way to help promote the relationship between your child and the doctor. Address Any Guilty Feelings A ...

  6. [Parent-doctor relations in oncology: a qualitative approach].

    PubMed

    Grau, C; Rubio, Claudia Grau; Espada, M C; Barón, Ma Carmen Espada; Fortes, M C; Fortes del Valle, Ma Carmen

    2010-01-01

    We want to learn how parents of children with cancer perceive their relationship with hospital staff, especially with doctors. We used group-based qualitative methodology. The sample is composed of 14 mothers/fathers whose children contracted the disease more than two years previously. All parents want information that is both intelligible and detailed. The word cancer has a strong social stigma and is avoided when giving information to parents and to children. Communication between doctors and parents can lead to situations of tension during diagnosis and relapses. Parents trust the professionalism of doctors. Parents also want doctors to be competent and to have human qualities. The preparation of reports by physicians is the task most criticized by parents.

  7. Halachic infertility: rabbis, doctors, and the struggle over professional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ivry, Tsipy

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes a public controversy surrounding the hormonal treatment of infertility associated with observance of rabbinic law to illuminate the reach of rabbi-doctor relations in a local configuration of religion and biomedicine that I call "kosher medicine." I combine a historical perspective on the evolution of religious laws governing menstruation, and the rabbi-doctor relations with a contemporary ethnography of these relations and laws to illuminate the interplay of continuities, discontinuities, tradition, and modernity and their uses and abuses in the contemporary mode of interpenetration between observant Judaism and biomedicine. The controversy highlights asymmetric permeations into biomedical and rabbinic professional domains. Collaborations persist as long as doctors who declare their incompetence in rabbinic law accommodate to demands of rabbis who are expert in it and also claim competence to challenge medical decisions. Once a doctor demonstrates competence in rabbinic law to challenge rabbinic directives a crisis develops.

  8. Using oxygen at home - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000251.htm Using oxygen at home - what to ask your doctor To ... lungs or heart, you will need to use oxygen in your home. Below are questions you may ...

  9. Challenges to research productivity of doctoral program nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy J; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine, responding to a national health care crisis and related nursing labor force concerns, has called for an increase in the proportion of registered nurses with baccalaureate or higher degrees to 80% and a doubling of the number of nurses with doctorates by 2020. Simultaneously, large numbers of senior faculty are starting to retire, whereas the movement of doctorally prepared nurses into academia is insufficient to replace them. Issues associated with the efforts of nursing programs to increase their capacity to respond to the Institute of Medicine's recommendations, particularly the effect on scholarly productivity among nursing faculty in doctoral programs, are examined in this article. Creative strategies for promoting scholarly productivity among doctoral program faculty are identified.

  10. For People with Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis Basics For People With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor Publication available in: ... and your special needs. Medical Specialists Who Treat Osteoporosis After an initial assessment, it may be necessary ...

  11. [Corruption risks in relations between doctor and patient ].

    PubMed

    Kolwitz, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the problem of corruption occurring in the relationship between doctor and patient. The doctor-patient relationship, including the provision of health services, is one of several potential areas of corruption in the health care system. Among the reasons for the existence of corruption in these relationships are the need to obtain better healthcare for the patient, and higher earnings in the case of a doctor. Indications of corruption are utilitarian (action for personal advantage without ethical aspects), but may also be (actually or in the patient's opinion) the only way to obtain services and save health and even life. Corruption between the doctor and the patient can be limited by better organization of the health care system, including the financing of benefits and education of medical personnel and patients, as well as traditional legal measures, such as prevention or the application of criminal sanctions.

  12. Can children's paintings of their doctors be interpreted?

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Robin; Philipp, Ernst; Pendered, Lucy; Barnard, Colin; Hall, Michael

    1986-01-01

    There is increased emphasis nowadays on the role of the general practitioner in preventive care for children. Accordingly, an analysis of the child's perception of the doctor and of the factors which influence and mould that perception are important. In New Zealand children's paintings have been used for such analyses. The present study looked at children's paintings of their family doctors in a Devonshire village. The findings show that boys are more likely than girls to depict their doctors as a gruesome or threatening character, and suggest that medical contact has little, if any, influence on character portrayal of doctors. Other factors that might influence character portrayal and are now thought worthy of detailed study, include television viewing patterns, personality, age, home background and artistic ability. PMID:3735216

  13. Norfolk general practice: a comparison of rural and urban doctors

    PubMed Central

    Fearn, Richard M.G.

    1988-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was sent to all Norfolk practitioners, allowing a comparison to be made between rural general practice and urban practice in Norwich and Great Yarmouth. However, when Norfolk town and country doctors were compared, little difference was found in their personal or practice characteristics. In respect of their workload rural doctors, as expected, carried out more procedures overall but, somewhat surprisingly, did not make more home visits. Both sets of doctors had similar views on their present and future role in general practice. When Norfolk doctors collectively were compared with general practitioners nationally their service appeared to be of a high standard. The only uncertainty surrounded the effects of the greater clustering of Norfolk surgeries, together with the levels of home visiting and their attendant effects on patient accessibility. PMID:3255815

  14. [Patient - doctor relationship from perspective of the Karpman drama triangle].

    PubMed

    Samborska-Sablik, Anna; Sablik, Zbigniew

    2016-11-25

    Patients' confidence in doctors has been decreased for last years despite successes of Polish medicine. It seems to be related to particular conditions of patient - doctor relationship and patient's negative emotions may frequently burden it from the beginning. They may allow an interpersonal game, the Drama Triangle, to appear in the relationship. 3 persons are typically involved in the game: a victim, a persecutor and a rescuer. All of them neither feel guilty about the situation nor their activities are aimed at solving the crucial problem. It maintains continuation of the game. Both patient and doctor are capable to attend the game as any of the person mentioned above. Authors of the article think frameworks of organization of the health care system should permit doctors not only to tackle main disease but also to devote time individually tailored to patient's emotional problems.

  15. Black doctors and discrimination under South Africa's apartheid regime.

    PubMed

    Digby, Anne

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses an under-researched group and provides an analytical overview of the comparative experiences of African, Indian and Coloured doctors at South African universities during the apartheid era. It probes diversity of experience in training and practice as well as gendered differentiation amongst black students before going on to discuss the careers and political activism of black doctors as well as the impact of recent transformational change on their position. It briefly assesses how singular this South African experience was.

  16. [Civil, criminal and ethical liability of medical doctors].

    PubMed

    Udelsmann, Artur

    2002-01-01

    In the last years doctors have been the target of a growing number of civil, criminal law suits, as well as ethical procedures. Medicine is a widely targeted career, not only owing to its inherent risks, but also owing to a mistaken approach of the Judiciary Power about the obligations of medical doctors. Decisions of the Medical Board in ethical procedures have an impact in civil and criminal justice and therefore should be followed closely. The purpose of this review is to provide a wide view from a doctor-lawyer perspective of cases involving civil, criminal liability of anesthesiologists as well as ethical procedures against them, in an effort to make them comprehensible to doctors. After a brief historical introduction civil liability foundations and legal articles are examined. Responsibilities of doctors, hospitals and health insurance providers are discussed separately, as well as reparation mechanisms. Crimes possible to occur during medical practice and respective penalties are described; the direct relationship between crime and civil reparation is demonstrated. The administrative nature of ethical procedure is described, emphasizing that the legal character of its penalties often serve as grounds for civil and criminal justice decisions. Prevention is still the best medicine. Good medical practice and a good medical-patient relationship are still the best ways to minimize lawsuits and their repercussions. Doctors should have some knowledge of juridical mechanisms in lawsuits and ethical procedures, but should not take defense initiatives without prior consultation of an attorney. Civil, criminal and ethical liability of physicians.

  17. Doctors on Values and Advocacy: A Qualitative and Evaluative Study.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Siun; Little, Miles

    2016-05-11

    Doctors are increasingly enjoined by their professional organisations to involve themselves in supraclinical advocacy, which embraces activities focused on changing practice and the system in order to address the social determinants of health. The moral basis for doctors' decisions on whether or not to do so has been the subject of little empirical research. This opportunistic qualitative study of the values of medical graduates associated with the Sydney Medical School explores the processes that contribute to doctors' decisions about taking up the advocate role. Our findings show that personal ideals were more important than professional commitments in shaping doctors' decisions on engagement in advocacy. Experiences in early life and during training, including exposure to power and powerlessness, significantly influenced their role choices. Doctors included supraclinical advocacy in their mature practices if it satisfied their desire to achieve excellence. These findings suggest that common approaches to promoting and facilitating advocacy as an individual professional obligation are not fully congruent with the experiences and values of doctors that are significant in creating the advocate. It would seem important to understand better the moral commitments inherent in advocacy to inform future developments in codes of medical ethics and medical education programs.

  18. Doctor's perception of doctor-patient relationships in emergency departments: What roles do gender and ethnicity play?

    PubMed Central

    Babitsch, Birgit; Braun, Tanja; Borde, Theda; David, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Background Emergency departments continuously provide medical treatment on a walk-in basis. Several studies investigated the patient's perception of the doctor-patient relationship, but few have asked doctors about their views. Furthermore, the influence of the patient's ethnicity and gender on the doctor's perception remains largely unanswered. Methods Based on data collated in three gynaecology (GYN)/internal medicine (INT) emergency departments in Berlin, Germany, we evaluated the impact of the patient's gender and ethnicity on the doctors' satisfaction with the course of the treatment they provided. Information was gathered from 2.429 short questionnaires completed by doctors and the medical records of the corresponding patients. Results The patient's ethnicity had a significant impact on the doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR) for physician satisfaction was significantly lower for patients of Turkish origin (OR = 2.6 INT and 5.5 GYN) than for those of German origin. The main reasons stated were problems with communication and a perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment. The odds ratios for dissatisfaction due to a lack of language skills were 4.48 (INT) and 6.22 (GYN), and those due to perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment were 0.75 (INT) and 0.63 (GYN). Sex differences caused minor variation. Conclusion The results show that good communication despite language barriers is crucial in providing medical care that is satisfactory to both patient and doctors, especially in emergency situations. Therefore the use of professional interpreters for improved communication and the training of medical staff for improved intercultural competence are essential for the provision of adequate health care in a multicultural setting. PMID:18405351

  19. Doctoral Student Learning Patterns: Learning about Active Knowledge Creation or Passive Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral studies are about learning to create new knowledge and to become a researcher. Yet surprisingly little is known about the individual learning patterns of doctoral students. The study aims to explore learning patterns among natural science doctoral students. The participants included 19 doctoral students from a top-level natural science…

  20. The Role of Doctoral Advisors: A Look at Advising from the Advisor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Benita J.; Austin, Ann E.

    2009-01-01

    The doctoral advisor is said to be one of the most important persons--if not "the" single most critical person--with whom doctoral students will develop a relationship during their doctoral degree programs (Baird 1995). However, we have limited knowledge regarding how doctoral advisors see their roles and responsibilities as advisors. Therefore,…

  1. The Experiences of Blacks Who Obtained Doctorates from Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickelberry, Tressie A.

    2012-01-01

    Being in a doctoral program requires a substantial amount of one's time, energy, and commitment. Doctoral students face many challenges while pursuing their degrees. For example, some may be on financial aid, work full-time, and/or have a family. While doctoral students face many hurdles, Black doctoral students face additional barriers. The…

  2. Write Away from It All! The Value of Running a Writing Retreat for Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Geraldine; Wright, Hazel; Holley, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral candidates often struggle to write at doctoral level. This struggle has many causes, but includes finding the time and support to write. We analyse a doctoral writing retreat aimed to encourage doctoral candidates to develop their academic writing and offer new insights into successful retreats. A comprehensive review of the literature…

  3. Trends in science and engineering doctorate production, 1975-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.

    1995-12-31

    The present and future of U.S. industries will depend on the nation`s ability to attract and develop human capital. What kind of workforce will lead us into the next century? Using data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates and the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, we examine trends in the number of doctoral degrees conferred to U.S. citizens in science and engineering (S/E) fields from 1975-1990. Analyses show that non-Asian minorities and women are still heavily underrepresented at the highest level of S/E education. Women, however, made relatively more gains in terms of number and proportion than did minority groups. African Americans had the smallest growth in the minority doctoral population, both in absolute and relative terms. The degree of field segregation between whites and minorities as well as between males and females is more pronounced at work than in training. Results also show that the number of minority S/E doctorates with definite career plans is declining. Nonetheless, the full-time employment rates in the doctoral workforce remain high and comparable across groups. The disparity in earnings is larger between males and females than that between males and females than that between whites and minorities. These trends suggest that minorities between whites and minorities. These trends suggest that minorities and women have made inroads in S/E doctoral training. Non-Asian minorities will have the greatest potential for expansion in mathematics, computer science, and engineering, primarily because of their lower employment rates in these areas.

  4. Foreign science and engineering doctoral attainment at American universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Robert V.

    This dissertation analyzes the nearly 100,000 foreign students who attained science and engineering (S&E) doctorates in the five fields of physical sciences, life sciences, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences, and social and behavioral sciences at American universities from 1994 to 2005. Two models are presented. In the first model controlling for population, multivariate regression results testing for whether foreign students from higher or lower income nations (181 nations) tended to attain S&E doctorates showed that certain S&E fields tended to be represented by students from higher income nations early in the time period (e.g. 1994 to 1999) but the national income variable explaining foreign S&E doctoral attainment was not statistically significant in four of the fields after the year 2000. Four nations, China, India, South Korea and Taiwan stand out due to their large S&E doctoral student presence at American universities, but virtually all growth in foreign doctoral attainment in four of the S&E fields from 1994 to 2005 came from Chinese students, and this growth was most pronounced after the year 2001. In short, whereas the foreign student populations from South Korea and Taiwan were the outliers in 1994 and as such skewed testing results, they had largely been displaced in 2005 by the increased presence of Chinese students. From the US public policy perspective, to the extent that growth in foreign S&E doctoral attainment is an issue to include its related costs and benefits, the appropriate policy focus should shift more specifically towards the growth in Chinese S&E doctoral attainment. Further, with the exception of China and India, foreign doctoral students from the lowest income nations of the world in all five S&E fields were greatly under represented on American campuses from 1994 to 2005. Testing results from the second model complement the findings in the first model. Whereas the first model tested for the effects of national income on

  5. Doctor-patient communication in Southeast Asia: a different culture?

    PubMed

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D F; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-03-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative study based on principles of grounded theory. Twenty residents and specialists and 20 patients of a low or high educational level were interviewed in internal medicine outpatient clinics of an Indonesian teaching hospital and two affiliated hospitals. During 26 weeks we engaged in an iterative interview and coding process to identify emergent factors. Patients were generally dissatisfied with doctors' communication style. The doctors indicated that they did not deliberately use a one-way style. Communication style appeared to be associated with characteristics of Southeast Asian culture, the health care setting and medical education. Doctor-patient communication appeared to be affected by cultural characteristics which fell into two broad categories representing key features of Southeast Asian culture, "social distance" and "closeness of relationships", and to characteristics categorized as "specific clinical context". Consideration of these characteristics could be helpful in promoting the use of a partnership communication style.

  6. [Proposal to sports pharmacist as a sports doctor].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    I am a team doctor of three competition groups including professional cycling team for ten years. The most troublesome issue as a sports doctor is the problem about doping. I cope thanks to a mobile telephone and an e-mail regardless of place and time, but introduce some examples because I still experience many doping "near miss" cases. In addition, there are problems in road competition spots as follows; 1) There are few team doctors. I am pressed by the consultation from plural teams, 2) An unexperienced doctor of the doping knowledge often prescribes prohibited drugs, 3) There are problems with no understanding of the medicine made in foreign countries, Chinese medicine, a generic drug, and supplements which obtained on the internet. I hope that anti-doping education in faculty of pharmaceutical sciences is made mandatory, sports pharmacists taken to the sports spot along increase, and a system and a database to teach local doctors and players quickly will be achieved in future.

  7. An investigation of anatomical competence in junior medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A T M; Kooloos, Jan G M; Bolhuis, Sanneke M; Laan, Roland F J M

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an attempt to delineate the nature of anatomical competence. The research question is: what kind of anatomical knowledge do junior medical doctors use during a consultation with a patient presenting with a shoulder complaint? Ten junior medical doctors participated in this stimulated recall study. Each of them was videotaped while performing a consultation with a standardized patient with a complex shoulder complaint. The recording was viewed immediately after. Participants were videotaped again while verbalizing the thoughts they remembered having during the consultation. Verbatim transcriptions were coded by two coders using the qualitative data analysis ATLAS.ti software. Results were that these junior medical doctors used anatomical knowledge in all phases of the consultation, especially during physical examination. The use of anatomical terms was strongly associated with clinical reasoning and it was apparent that every subject visualized relevant anatomical information. Conclusion is that young medical doctors actively use their anatomical knowledge and it seems that the relevant anatomy consists largely of adequate visual representations in memory. Anatomy teachers should focus the students' learning activity on building an adequate visual representation of anatomical structures. This should be supported by assessments that test the quality of the students' visual representations.

  8. Cruise ship's doctors - company employees or independent contractors?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, cruise companies have stated that they are in the transport business but not in the business of providing medical services to passengers. They have claimed not to be able to supervise or control the ship's medical personnel and cruise ship's doctors have therefore mostly been signed on as independent contractors, not employees. A United States court decision from 1988, Barbetta versus S/S Bermuda Star, supported this view and ruled that a ship's owner cannot be held vicariously liable for the negligence of the ship's doctor directed at the ship's passengers. Some years ago a cruise passenger fell and hit his head while boarding a trolley ashore. Hours later he was seen aboard by the ship's doctor, who sent him to a local hospital. He died 1 week later, and his daughter filed a complaint alleging the cruise company was vicariously liable for the purported negligence of the ship's doctor and nurse, under actual or apparent agency theories. A United States district court initially dismissed the case, but in November 2014 the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit disagreed and reversed. From then on independently contracted ship's doctors may be considered de facto employees of the cruise line. The author discusses the employment status of physicians working on cruise ships and reviews arguments for and against the Appellate Court's decision.

  9. Teaching doctors to take alcohol histories: a limited success story.

    PubMed

    Rowland, N; Maynard, A K; Kennedy, P F; Wintersgill, W; Stone, W D

    1988-11-01

    Doctors often lack the knowledge and skills to identify and assess those who drink to excess and are unsure of what their preventive and educational role should be. As part of a prospective study of early identification and intervention with general hospital patients who drink to excess, we were interested to discover whether brief education about alcohol-related problems and training in the use of a quick and efficient alcohol screening questionnaire would improve doctors' alcohol history-taking and thus their identification of those at risk. The case notes of every fifth admission to orthopaedic and medical wards at the York District Hospital were studied before and after doctor education. Recorded information on both alcohol and tobacco increased over the period reviewed, reflecting perhaps doctors' growing awareness of the health-threatening aspects of these drugs. While there was no major change in doctors' alcohol history-taking, with two thirds of case notes making no mention, or only vague mention, of alcohol, there was a significant post-education increase in the number of patients for whom detailed drinking histories were recorded, but no significant changes in tobacco histories. Small but significant improvements such as these are important in view of the size of the medical problems arising from the use of alcohol.

  10. Learning through inter- and intradisciplinary problem solving: using cognitive apprenticeship to analyse doctor-to-doctor consultation.

    PubMed

    Pimmer, Christoph; Pachler, Norbert; Nierle, Julia; Genewein, Urs

    2012-12-01

    Today's healthcare can be characterised by the increasing importance of specialisation that requires cooperation across disciplines and specialities. In view of the number of educational programmes for interdisciplinary cooperation, surprisingly little is known on how learning arises from interdisciplinary work. In order to analyse the learning and teaching practices of interdisciplinary cooperation, a multiple case study research focused on how consults, i.e., doctor-to-doctor consultations between medical doctors from different disciplines were carried out: semi-structured interviews with doctors of all levels of seniority from two hospital sites in Switzerland were conducted. Starting with a priori constructs based on the 'methods' underpinning cognitive apprenticeship (CA), the transcribed interviews were analysed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. The research contributes to three debates: (1) socio-cognitive and situated learning, (2) intra- and interdisciplinary learning in clinical settings, and (3), more generally, to cooperation and problem solving. Patient cases, which necessitate the cooperation of doctors in consults across boundaries of clinical specialisms, trigger intra- as well as interdisciplinary learning and offer numerous and varied opportunities for learning by requesting doctors as well as for on-call doctors, in particular those in residence. The relevance of consults for learning can also be verified from the perspective of CA which is commonly used by experts, albeit in varying forms, degrees of frequency and quality, and valued by learners. Through data analysis a model for collaborative problem-solving and help-seeking was developed which shows the interplay of pedagogical 'methods' of CA in informal clinical learning contexts.

  11. "Junior Doctor Decision Making: Isn't that an Oxymoron?" A Qualitative Analysis of Junior Doctors' Ward-Based Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Stephanie; Mattick, Karen; Postlethwaite, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Unacceptable levels of adverse healthcare events, combined with changes to training, have put the spotlight on junior doctor decision-making. This study aimed to describe the decisions made by junior doctors and the contextual factors influencing how decisions were made and justified. Stimulated recall interviews with 20 junior doctors across five…

  12. Doctors in society. Medical professionalism in a changing world.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Medicine bridges the gap between science and society. Indeed, the application of scientific knowledge to human health is a crucial aspect of clinical practice. Doctors are one important agent through which that scientific understanding is expressed. But medicine is more than the sum of our knowledge about disease. Medicine concerns the experiences, feelings, and interpretations of human beings in often extraordinary moments of fear, anxiety, and doubt. In this extremely vulnerable position, it is medical professionalism that underpins the trust the public has in doctors. This Working Party was established to define the nature and role of medical professionalism in modern society. Britain's health system is undergoing enormous change. The entry of multiple health providers, the wish for more equal engagement between patients and professionals, and the ever-greater contribution of science to advances in clinical practice all demand a clear statement of medicine's unifying purpose and doctors' common values. What is medical professionalism and does it matter to patients? Although evidence is lacking that more robust professionalism will inevitably lead to better health outcomes, patients certainly understand the meaning of poor professionalism and associate it with poor medical care. The public is well aware that an absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. The Working Party's view, based on the evidence it has received, is that medical professionalism lies at the heart of being a good doctor. The values that doctors embrace set a standard for what patients expect from their medical practitioners. The practice of medicine is distinguished by the need for judgement in the face of uncertainty. Doctors take responsibility for these judgements and their consequences. A doctor's up-to-date knowledge and skill provide the explicit scientific and often tacit experiential basis for such judgements. But because so much of medicine's unpredictability calls for

  13. Measuring time to the doctorate: reinterpretation of the evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, W G; Lord, G; Sosa, J A

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing concern that the length of time it takes to earn a doctorate in this country has increased dramatically over the last 20 years. The regularly cited evidence--organized by the year in which recipients of doctorates were awarded their degrees--is seriously misleading, however. The application of stable population theory to the problem suggests that the steady fall in the sizes of entering cohorts to graduate school has inflated both the measure of the absolute level of median time to degree and the increase in time to degree. When the same underlying data are reorganized by the year in which recipients of doctorates received their baccalaureate, the statistical bias is eliminated, and the median total time to degree in the humanities is shown to have risen 15-20% rather than the reported 40%. PMID:11607149

  14. [The doctor-patient relationship in the novel Thibault].

    PubMed

    Radu, Ancuta

    2008-12-01

    A masterpiece of the realistic novel, Les Thibault is a document of political and social life before and during the First World War. At the same time, it is a document of the status of medicine at the beginning of the 20th century. Roger Martin du Gard collected information on the diseases of the time, on medical deontology and on the doctor-patient relationship which is established during the medical encounter. The novel reflects the author's ability to transform a document into literary fiction. Antoine Thibault, who represents the ideal doctor, is able to create a perfect relationship with his patients, basing this on confidence. He also provides one of the literary models of a doctor practicing medicine from a sense of vocation.

  15. [Physician's role in "medical drama" pitfall? Reflection of stereotypical images of doctors in context of contemporary doctor's series].

    PubMed

    Köhler, M; Grabsch, C; Zellner, M; Noll-Hussong, M

    2014-04-17

    In contemporary U.S. doctor's series, the characters are usually represented by good-looking or typical character actors. The aim of our pilot study was to investigate whether the long-term impact of this format on German television viewers could have an influence on the choice of doctor in Germany. Two different groups of people anticipating TV consumption patterns were questioned: a first group of younger adults who knew theTV series was asked to judge their doctor choice using a web-based survey tool with respect to three criteria (sympathy, expertise and own treatment preference). The second group of adults beyond the 40th year of life who need not know theTV series were shown photos of the serial figures. Study participants should select the "doctor" of which they would most likely want to be treated and this based on two predetermined reasons (sympathy or expertise). Our results indicate that stereotypical images of doctors found high approval only in the first group of people, while the participants in the second group decided in majorityfora more realistic representation of average appearance.

  16. Counselling for burnout in Norwegian doctors: one year cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gude, Tore; Tyssen, Reidar; Aasland, Olaf G

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate levels and predictors of change in dimensions of burnout after an intervention for stressed doctors. Design Cohort study followed by self reported assessment at one year. Setting Norwegian resource centre. Participants 227 doctors participating in counselling intervention, 2003-5. Interventions Counselling (lasting one day (individual) or one week (group based)) aimed at motivating reflection on and acknowledgement of the doctors’ situation and personal needs. Main outcome measures Levels of burnout (Maslach burnout inventory) and predictors of reduction in emotional exhaustion investigated by linear regression. Results 185 doctors (81%, 88 men, 97 women) completed one year follow-up. The mean level of emotional exhaustion (scale 1-5) was significantly reduced from 3.00 (SD 0.94) to 2.53 (SD 0.76) (t=6.76, P<0.001), similar to the level found in a representative sample of 390 Norwegian doctors. Participants had reduced their working hours by 1.6 hours/week (SD 11.4). There was a considerable reduction in the proportion of doctors on full time sick leave, from 35% (63/182) at baseline to 6% (10/182) at follow-up and a parallel increase in the proportion who had undergone psychotherapy, from 20% (36/182) to 53% (97/182). In the whole cohort, reduction in emotional exhaustion was independently associated with reduced number of work hours/week (β=0.17, P=0.03), adjusted for sex, age, and personality dimensions. Among men “satisfaction with the intervention” (β=0.25, P=0.04) independently predicted reduction in emotional exhaustion. Conclusions A short term counselling intervention could contribute to reduction in emotional exhaustion in doctors. This was associated with reduced working hours for the whole cohort and, in men, was predicted by satisfaction with the intervention. PMID:19001492

  17. Student assistantships: bridging the gap between student and doctor

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, James GM; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the General Medical Council UK (GMC) published its updated guidance on medical education for the UK medical schools – Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009. The Council recommended that the UK medical schools introduce, for the first time, a clinical placement in which a senior medical student, “assisting a junior doctor and under supervision, undertakes most of the duties of an F1 doctor”. In the UK, an F1 doctor is a postgraduation year 1 (PGY1) doctor. This new kind of placement was called a student assistantship. The recommendation was considered necessary because conventional UK clinical placements rarely provided medical students with opportunities to take responsibility for patients – even under supervision. This is in spite of good evidence that higher levels of learning, and the acquisition of essential clinical and nontechnical skills, depend on students participating in health care delivery and gradually assuming responsibility under supervision. This review discusses the gap between student and doctor, and the impact of the student assistantship policy. Early evaluation indicates substantial variation in the clarity of purpose, setting, length, and scope of existing assistantships. In particular, few models are explicit on the most critical issue: exactly how the student participates in care and how supervision is deployed to optimize learning and patient safety. Surveys indicate that these issues are central to students’ perceptions of the assistantship. They know when they have experienced real responsibility and when they have not. This lack of clarity and variation has limited the impact of student assistantships. We also consider other important approaches to bridging the gap between student and doctor. These include supporting the development of the student as a whole person, commissioning and developing the right supervision, student-aligned curricula, and challenging the risk assumptions of health care providers. PMID:26109879

  18. Ethical erosion in newly qualified doctors: perceptions of empathy decline

    PubMed Central

    Stratta, Emily C.; Baker, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to understand whether UK Foundation doctors perceived the phenomena of ethical erosion and empathy decline during their initial period of clinical practice, and if so, why this occurred. Methods This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with nine doctors in their first year of clinical practice at Royal Bolton Hospital, UK. Participants were invited to discuss the definition of empathy, how individuals acquire and maintain empathic ability, perceptions of ethical erosion in the self and others, and how clinical experiences have influenced their empathic ability. The interviews were transcribed, and analysed to identify emergent themes. Results Each participant reported a conscious acknowledgement of empathy decline in their own and their colleagues’ early clinical experiences as doctors. Stressful working environments, the prioritisation of patients’ physical rather than psychological well-being, and the attitudes of senior colleagues were all suggested as possible causes. Some doctors believed that specialties with reduced patient contact had a culture which precluded empathy, and influenced their own practice. In addition, some described how their value judgements of patients had affected their ability to empathise. However, all doctors perceived that empathy skills were desirable in senior clinicians, and some believed that educational interventions may be useful in arresting ethical erosion.   Conclusions Newly qualified doctors are aware of ethical erosion in themselves and their colleagues as they begin clinical practice. This has serious implications for patient care. Improving working conditions may reverse this trend. Empathy skills training within undergraduate and postgraduate curricula may be a useful intervention. PMID:27608488

  19. Burnout among doctors in residency training in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Ogundipe, O A; Olagunju, A T; Lasebikan, V O; Coker, A O

    2014-08-01

    The mental health of doctors is an issue of growing concern all over the world as it frequently interplays with their professional trainings and responsibilities. This study was done to determine the pattern and correlates of burnout among 204 doctors undergoing residency training. Eligible participants were interviewed using designed questionnaire, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The mean age of participants was 33.44±4.50. Ninety-three (45.6%) respondents reported burnout in the dimension of emotional exhaustion (EE), 118 (57.8%) in the dimension of depersonalization (D), and 126 (61.8%) in the dimension of reduced personal accomplishment (RPA). Factors that were significantly associated with all the dimensions of burnout were perceived heavy workload and presence of emotional distress (based on GHQ score of ≥3). The perception of call duty as being not stressful was negatively predictive of burnout in the emotional exhaustion subscale (odds ratio [OR]=0.52; 95%confidence interval [CI]=0.29-0.97; p=0.03), while emotional distress was a positive predictor (OR=6.97; 95%CI=3.28-14.81; p<0.001]. Absence of doctor-to-doctor conflict negatively predicted burnout in the depersonalization subscale (OR=0.36; 95%CI=0.17-0.76); p<0.01), while older age (OR=0.66; 95%CI=0.47-0.95; p=0.03) and adequate support from the management (OR=0.45; 95%CI=0.22-0.90; p=0.02) constituted negative predictors of burnout in the reduced personal accomplishment subscale. Burnout is highly prevalent among resident doctors. Evolvement of comprehensive mental health services, training supports, conflict de-escalation/resolution mechanisms, and periodic assessment are indicated to mitigate work related distress with burn out among resident doctors, while improving their productivity.

  20. Efficiently, Effectively Detecting Mobile App Bugs with AppDoctor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    leading to the failure. Once AppDoctor collects a set of bug reports, it runs automated diagnosis to classify reports into bugs and FPs by replaying...convenience the apps bring. A key reason for buggy apps is that they must handle a vast variety of system and user actions such as being randomly killed by...the OS to save resources, but app developers, facing tough competitions, lack time to thor- oughly test these actions. AppDoctor is a system for effi

  1. The "doctor-customer" relationship: Hippocrates in the modern marketplace.

    PubMed

    Mulhall, Kevin J; Ahmed, Aftab; Masterson, Eric

    2002-01-01

    We performed a consecutive survey of 100 people presenting to a hospital injury clinic to ascertain their attitude to terminology currently used to describe them in our own institution and in the international literature. The results of this demonstrated that the subjects significantly preferred the traditional assignation "patient" rather than terms such as client or customer. This finding reflects the need to remember peoples' attitudes and expectations from their consultation with their doctor. Although business models undoubtedly help in the provision of an efficient health care service, remaining at the centre of this encounter is a doctor-patient relationship that involves a more complex interaction than simply a market transaction.

  2. Collaboration between nurses and doctors in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lockhart-Wood, K

    Several authors have identified collaboration between nurses and doctors as problematic. Benner (1984) stressed that teamwork and collaboration between the disciplines was crucial for both patient care and team morale. The purpose of this article is to evaluate critically and discuss the research studies which have been conducted into the dynamics of the nurse/doctor relationship. A number of characteristics are significant in influencing the collaborative process. These include excellent communication skills, respecting the value of colleagues' roles, the ability to share points of view and trust.

  3. The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Anne Griswold; Smith, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Ethical questions dealt with by nurses who have Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees include traditional bioethical questions, but also business and legal ethics. Doctorally prepared nurses are increasingly in positions to make ethical decisions rather than to respond to decisions made by others. The traditional master's-degree advanced practice nursing curriculum does not address the extended expertise and decision-making skills needed by DNP practitioners as they face these new types of ethical dilemmas. We propose that a curricular framework that addresses clinical, research, business, and legal ethics is needed by all DNP students.

  4. Operationalizing the Student Electronic Portfolio for Doctoral Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Willmarth-Stec, Melissa; Beery, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing trend toward use of the electronic portfolio (e-portfolio) in Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. E-portfolios can provide documentation of competencies and achievement of program outcomes while showcasing a holistic view of the student achievement. Implementation of the e-portfolio requires careful decision making concerning software selection, set-up, portfolio components, and evaluation. The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of an e-portfolio in a Doctor of Nursing Practice program and provide lessons learned during the implementation stage.

  5. Assessment of examinations in computer science doctoral education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys the examination requirements for attaining degree candidate (candidacy) status in computer science doctoral programs at all of the computer science doctoral granting institutions in the United States. It presents a framework for program examination requirement categorization, and categorizes these programs by the type or types of candidacy examinations that are required. The performance of computer science departments, estimated via two common surrogate metrics, in these different categories of candidacy requirements are compared and contrasted and the correlation between candidacy requirements and program/department performance is assessed.

  6. Preparing Emerging Doctoral Scholars for Transdisciplinary Research: A Developmental Approach.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Susan P; Nurius, Paula S

    Research models that bridge disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological boundaries are increasingly common as funders and the public push for timely, effective, collaborative responses to pressing social and environmental problems. Although social work is inherently an integrative discipline, there is growing recognition of the need to better prepare emerging scholars for sophisticated transdisciplinary and translational research environments. This paper outlines a developmental, competency-oriented approach to enhancing the readiness of doctoral students and emerging scholars in social work and allied disciplines for transdisciplinary research, describes an array of pedagogical tools applicable in doctoral course work and other program elements, and urges coordinated attention to enhancing the field's transdisciplinary training capacity.

  7. Scientometric Study of Doctoral Theses of the Physical Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anilkumar, N.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of bibliographies compiled from theses submitted in the period 2001-2005. The bibliographies have been studied to find out how research carried out at PRL is being used by the doctoral students. Resources are categorized by type of resource — book, journal article, proceedings, doctoral thesis, etc., to understand the usage of content procured by the library. The period of the study, 2001-2005, has been chosen because technology is changing so fast and so are the formats of scholarly communications. For the sake of convenience, only the "e-journals period" is considered for the sample.

  8. Doctors' attitudes on civil defence and nuclear weapon issues.

    PubMed

    Hunter-Brown, I H

    1989-01-01

    97 out of 219 doctors responded to a questionnaire on medical aspects of nuclear weapons. A majority of the respondents considered that the then-current civil defence planning was not a valuable use of National Health Service resources, and that an attack with nuclear weapons would cause a degree of suffering beyond the profession's capacity to treat; thought doctors should have a special voice on nuclear issues; and believed Britain should not be increasing its nuclear weapons, and that if expenditure on them were reduced, the savings should go on health. The high support for organizations like MAPW was gratifying.

  9. [Gender (role) aspects in doctor-patient communication].

    PubMed

    Sieverding, M; Kendel, F

    2012-09-01

    Aspects of gender and gender roles are important factors influencing the interactions between physicians and their patients. On the one hand, gender roles have an impact on the behavior of the patients, such as in health care utilization or use of preventive examinations. On the other hand, gender issues influence doctors' actions with respect to communication, diagnosis, and treatment. Here, a gender bias may lead to misdiagnosis and inadequate treatment. In this paper certain pertinent aspects of gender roles in the doctor-patient relationship are discussed and illustrated by empirical findings.

  10. Waiting time and doctor shopping in a mixed medical economy.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Raymond Y T; Leung, Gabriel M; McGhee, Sarah M; Johnston, Janice M

    2004-11-01

    Waiting time generally acts as a rationing mechanism in the public health care system. In theory, patients who have a higher valuation of time are more likely to seek alternative care (i.e. doctor shopping) if there is a parallel private sector than those who have weaker time preference. However, the existing settings of many health care systems do not allow patients to reveal their preference of such. The data presented in this study suggest a positive association between patients' expressed value of time and doctor shopping behaviour in Hong Kong. Patients who were assigned longer waiting times relative to their expected horizon were more likely to seek private alternative care.

  11. Should doctors inform terminally ill patients? The opinions of nationals and doctors in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, A; al-Saadi, A M; al-Kaabi, A S; al-Kaabi, M R; al-Bedwawi, S S; al-Kaabi, S O; al-Neaimi, S B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the opinions of nationals (Emiratis) and doctors practising in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with regard to informing terminally ill patients. DESIGN: Structured questionnaires administered during January 1995. SETTING: The UAE, a federation of small, rich, developing Arabian Gulf states. PARTICIPANTS: Convenience samples of 100 Emiratis (minimum age 15 years) and of 50 doctors practising in government hospitals and clinics. RESULTS: Doctors emerged as consistently less in favour of informing than the Emiratis were, whether the patient was described as almost certain to die during the next six months or as having a 50% chance of surviving, and even when it was specified that the patient was requesting information. In the latter situation, a third of doctors maintained that the patient should not be told. Increasing survival odds reduced the number of doctors selecting to inform; but it had no significant impact on Emiratis' choices. When Emiratis were asked whether they would personally want to be informed if they had only a short time to live, less than half responded in the way they had done to the in principle question. CONCLUSIONS: The doctors' responses are of concern because of the lack of reference to ethical principles or dilemmas, the disregard of patients' wishes and dependency on survival odds. The heterogeneity of Emiratis' responses calls into question the usefulness of invoking norms to explain inter-society differences. In the current study, people's in principle choices did not provide a useful guide to how they said they would personally wish to be treated. PMID:9134491

  12. The Relationships among Production Changes, Employment Outcomes and Program Prestige for English and History Doctorates between 1973 and 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Tim W., III

    2009-01-01

    English and History doctoral programs produced varying amounts of doctoral degrees between 1973 and 2003. These doctoral degree recipients experienced changing employment outcomes influenced by program prestige. The main goal of this study is to explain the changes over time in doctoral degree production and employment outcomes for doctoral degree…

  13. The Relevance of Doctoral Training in Different Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein; Olsen, Terje Bruen

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relevance of doctoral training (thesis, coursework and generic skills) for a career in three types of labour market: academia, applied research institutes and industrial laboratories, and non-research workplaces. Data are drawn from a mail survey among PhD holders in Norway. In total, more than 40% of the respondents had…

  14. Developing Critical Reflection in Professional Focused Doctorates: A Facilitator's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambrook, Sally; Stewart, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the challenges and opportunities for expediting critical reflection in management education and development to highlight particularly how critical reflection has been facilitated within the context of a professionally focused doctoral programme. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on empirical research…

  15. John Swales as Mentor: The View from the Doctoral Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebs, Margaret; Fredrickson, Kirstin M.; Hyon, Sunny; Samraj, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Four of linguist John Swales's former doctoral students narrate their experiences with his mentoring style. Four important areas for mentoring are discussed: beginning the research process; analysis and writing; preparation for academic career; and the relationship between advisor and student. Narratives reveal both the complexity of the graduate…

  16. "If We Build It...": Towards a Doctoral Program in Museology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Lois H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Explains the idea of a multidisciplinary doctoral curriculum that would blend and foster activity in five areas: (1) foundational disciplinary literature, (2) research and theory about museums, (3) operation of and practices in museums, (4) research methodology, and (5) design and evaluation of practice. (DDR)

  17. Implementing Comprehensive Teacher Training in Business Doctoral Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightman, Harvey J.; Nargundkar, Satish

    2013-01-01

    The advent of digital course offerings, the use of social media, the integration of the Khan Academy into curricula, the use of smart phones and tablets, and massive online courses place greater emphasis than ever on effective teaching. While business schools fund faculty development in teaching, too few doctoral programs offer systematic teacher…

  18. Training Humanities Doctoral Students in Collaborative and Digital Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensslin, Astrid; Slocombe, Will

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the pedagogic rationale, didactic design and implications of an AHRC-funded doctoral training scheme in collaborative and digital multimedia in the humanities. In the second part of this article we discuss three areas of provision that were identified as particularly significant and/or controversial. These include (1) desktop…

  19. Evaluating Doctoral Supervision: Tensions in Eliciting Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison; McKenzie, Jo

    2011-01-01

    In the context of intensifying accountability for academic work internationally, there are increasing pressures on individual supervisors, departments and universities to evaluate the quality of doctoral supervision. Existing evaluation tools are focused at departmental rather than individual level and are mostly quantitative. Evaluation for…

  20. Socialization Experiences Resulting from Doctoral Engineering Teaching Assistantships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena, Irene B.; Diefes-Dux, Heidi A.; Capobianco, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and characterize the types of socialization experiences that result from engineering teaching assistantships. Using situated learning and communities of practice as the theoretical framework, this study highlights the experiences of 28 engineering doctoral students who worked as engineering teaching…

  1. A Relational Approach to Mentoring Women Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammel, Jo Ann; Rutstein-Riley, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Our study examines the relationships of six dyads of women advisors and advisees in one doctoral program to understand power, context, and personal transformation. We found that mentoring is context specific and power dynamics range from equitable to hierarchical. This article explores the connection between relational cultural theory and…

  2. Team Modes and Power: Supervision of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Margaret J.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, team supervision in doctoral studies is widely practised across Australian universities. The interpretation of 'team' is broad and there is evidence of experimentation with supervisory models. This paper elaborates upon a taxonomy of team modes and power forms based on a recent qualitative study across universities in a number of states…

  3. Graduates' Reflections on an Online Doctorate in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Julia S.; Risner, Mary E.; Lowder, Laura; Hart, Mark; Bachenheimer, Barry

    2014-01-01

    In recent years online education doctorates have become more prevalent to accommodate the growing need for distance academic preparation. Due to the newness of these degree programs, there is a dearth of information in the literature on learner perspectives of effective online teaching and learning strategies. The authors of this paper are recent…

  4. Doctoral Education in Community Health Nursing: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Pamela N.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    According to responses from 23 of 52 doctoral nursing program directors and interviews with 16, newer programs tend to offer more general rather than specialized curricula. Only four identified community health nursing as a specialty, all in older, long-standing programs. (SK)

  5. An Investigation of Anatomical Competence in Junior Medical Doctors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an…

  6. MedlinePlus FAQ: Information on Doctors or Hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: Many health topic pages in MedlinePlus contain a section which lists directories of doctors and services relevant to the topic. The Directories page lists many sources of information about physicians, other ...

  7. The Doctoral Degree in Geography: A South African Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Enrolments in doctoral degrees in South Africa mirror international trends and there is a strong national policy emphasis on these higher qualifications to fulfil needs, not only of the academy, but also of the economy and broader society. There are significant constraints, however, including the historical legacy of apartheid that has left the…

  8. Doctoral Students' Sense of Relational Agency in Their Scholarly Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Keskinen, Jenni

    2012-01-01

    The literature emphasizes the importance of integrating doctoral students into scholarly communities and practices at the very beginning of their studies. Although the importance of student participation in a scholarly community has been recognized empirical evidence concerning the quality of participation that promotes such engagement is scarce.…

  9. Practitioner Research in Education: The Critical Perspectives of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkington, Rachel M.

    2009-01-01

    Why do teachers and other educational practitioners become researchers of their own practice? Is their primary motivation one of self-development, the attainment of a doctoral qualification, or the desire to improve outcomes for their learners? Practitioner research is often believed to bring about transformation, particularly in its more…

  10. Trends in Doctoral Research on English Language Teaching in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özmen, Kemal Sinan; Cephe, Pasa Tevfik; Kinik, Betül

    2016-01-01

    This review examines the doctoral research in Turkey completed between 2010 and 2014 in the area of English language teaching and learning. All of the dissertations (N = 137) indexed in the National Theses Database have been included in order to analyze dissertations' subject areas, research paradigms/techniques, and research contexts as well as…

  11. Key Writing Challenges of Practice-Based Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Caroline; Nelson, Cynthia D.

    2007-01-01

    Building on the increasing interest within English for Academic Purposes (EAP) in postgraduate literacy development, this article examines the complexities of writing research at the academic/professional interface. It analyses two literature reviews by professional doctorate students at an Australian university who were writing research in their…

  12. Chinese Overseas Doctoral Student Narratives of Intercultural Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Lily; Edwards, Viv

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore how Chinese overseas doctoral students adjust to a different academic, social and cultural environment, using Giddens' theoretical framework of self-identity. The findings indicate the participants proactively used various coping strategies in meeting challenges and adapting to new social environments. Continuity and…

  13. Should doctors intentionally do less than the best?

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, J

    1999-01-01

    The papers of Burley and Harris, and Draper and Chadwick, in this issue, raise a problem: what should doctors do when patients request an option which is not the best available? This commentary argues that doctors have a duty to offer that option which will result in the individual affected by that choice enjoying the highest level of wellbeing. Doctors can deviate from this duty and submaximise--bring about an outcome that is less than the best--only if there are good reasons to do so. The desire to have a child which is genetically related provides little, if any, reason to submaximise. The implication for cloning, preimplantation diagnosis and embryo transfer is that doctors should only produce a clone or transfer embryos expected to enjoy a level of wellbeing which is less than that enjoyed by other children the couple could have, if there is a good reason to employ that technology. This paper sketches what might constitute a good reason to submaximise. PMID:10226916

  14. A Doctor Talks to 5-to-8-Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilach, Dona Z.; Mandel, Elias

    One of a series of books written by doctors for their patients, this publication gives information about life in casual and straightforward children's language. Birds, fish and other animals are compared to humans and are used as examples to explain conception, birth and the development of babies to adulthood. To illustrate important concepts,…

  15. Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Faculty-Doctoral Student Coauthorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michelle A.; Timmerman, Briana Crotwell; Feldon, David F.; Strickland, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Using faculty narratives, this study identifies factors affecting the occurrence of faculty-doctoral student coauthorship. Norms of the discipline, resources, faculty goals for students, faculty goals for themselves, and institutional expectations emerged as dominant factors. Each factor is explored separately and as part of an interlocking…

  16. Doctoral Production in South Africa: Statistics, Challenges and Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Johann

    2011-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed new interest in doctoral production in South Africa. In the first section of the article, it is argued that this new interest has its roots in various higher education policy documents over the past decade. The second part of the article presents some of the most recent statistics on various aspects of doctoral…

  17. Demand for a Canadian Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugsley, John A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of larger Canadian hospitals, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and recent pharmacy graduates employed in Ontario hospitals investigated the demand for a doctoral program in pharmacy in Canada, particularly at the University of Toronto. Results clearly demonstrate the need for such a program. (Author/MSE)

  18. The Struggle to Make Sense of Doctoral Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Sandra; Haque, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Semi-structured, qualitative interviews conducted with an ethno-culturally diverse group of 27 doctoral students in one Canadian university department produced narratives that often featured stories of stress and struggle. Two interrelated themes emerging from the data are highlighted here: surviving financially and dealing with divisions and…

  19. Sore Throat? Know When To Call the Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOA Certification DO Jobs Online Doctors That DO Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Pinterest What is a DO? How Are DOs Licensed? How Are DOs Certified? Search for a DO Health Library Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library ...

  20. Enacting Feminist Alliance Principles in a Doctoral Writing Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swadener, Beth Blue; Peters, Lacey; Eversman, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a multivocal narrative approach to analyze the dynamics, accomplishments, and challenges of an interdisciplinary doctoral support group consisting primarily of female members. The authors raise issues of power, alliance, troubling expert-novice models of mentoring, and the role of social justice pedagogy in the group.

  1. Mexican American Social Workers' Perceptions of Doctoral Education and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Mary; Deepak, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Latinos in the social work academy is critical due to current underrepresentation in social work education programs and rapid Latino population growth in the United States. In this qualitative study, perceptions of Mexican American master's of social work-level practitioners regarding social work doctoral education and academia were…

  2. Power and Emotion in Doctoral Supervision: Implications for HRD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doloriert, Clair; Sambrook, Sally; Stewart, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper the authors seek to argue that doctoral supervision is one type of human resource development relationship in higher education (HE), and that this relationship may be close or distanced, and involve technical and social support. The paper aims to highlight the seldom-discussed aspects of power and emotion within doctoral…

  3. Conceptions of Research: The Doctoral Student Experience in Three Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubb, Jenni; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how doctoral students perceive research work in the context of their own PhD projects. Thirty-two students from a Finnish university were interviewed, representing three disciplines: medicine, natural sciences and behavioural sciences. Their conceptions of research varied in terms of describing research as "a job to…

  4. Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program on Young Children, Indiana University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Myrtle

    This document discusses the nature and objective of the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program on Young Children (IDPYC), which is designed to prepare leaders to function as "interface" (or, catalysts) in settings that concern young children. This program trains them to attain the following characteristics: (a) a sound background and knowledge base in…

  5. Shortage of trained doctors signals hard times for abortion providers.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    The American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists is an 18 year old coalition of 960 doctors who refuse to perform abortions. In addition, they are committed to aggressively counseling women with unintended pregnancies to continue to full term. Today there are so many pressures on doctors not to perform abortions that they are turning away from the procedure. Financial, peer, an activist pressure all contribute to this change. A 1986 study found that 66% of gynecologists would not perform abortions. A National Abortion Federation study found that only 50% of training programs in medical schools offer abortion training. Further, the majority of these are optional so a great many doctors are leaving medical school with no training in abortion. Currently in 83% of the counties in the US there are no abortion providers. Utah has only 2, North and South Dakota each have 1. Women may still have the right to have abortions, but there is no Constitutional provision to ensure their doctor will be willing to perform one.

  6. Leadership in Doctoral Dissertations of Educational Sciences in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yardibi, Nursel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine tendencies in educational sciences doctoral dissertations according to divisions, research methods and desings, data collection tools, data analysis techniques, and leadership levels in Turkey. This content analysis study has been desinged with qualitative research methods. This research has been limited by…

  7. Motivations of Baby Boomer Doctoral Learners: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julia J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a substantive theory of the motivations of Baby Boomer doctoral learners, using the grounded theory approach. These Baby Boomers possess a wealth of wisdom. Their experiences, coupled with educational credentials, could take their leadership abilities to the next level. The grounded theory method developed by…

  8. What Impact Can Organisations Expect from Professional Doctorates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Slade, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study of the impact of professional doctorate programmes on graduates and their work organisations. Telephone interviews were carried out with graduates and nominated peer and senior colleagues to elucidate the types of change apparent and the impact of those changes. We found that all interviewees reported development…

  9. Logic Models: Evaluating Education Doctorates in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creighton, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The author suggests the Logic Model, used especially in the Health Science field, as a model for evaluating the quality of the educational doctorate (i.e., EdD). The manuscript highlights the newly developed EdD program at Virginia Tech.

  10. African-American Women and Doctoral Study: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Susan E.

    Case studies are presented of three African-American women who earned doctoral degrees in physical education and sport disciplines between 1971 and 1990. Personal interviews were conducted with the informants on issues related to the campus environment as well as financial and academic factors. The case studies are analyzed in terms of the women's…

  11. Health Research Facilities: A survey of Doctorate-Granting Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atelsek, Frank J.; Gomberg, Irene L.

    The survey data cover three broad categories: (1) the status of existing health research facilities at doctorate-granting institutions (including their current value, adequacy, and condition); (2) the volume of new construction in progress; and (3) the additions to health research facilities anticipated during the next 5 years…

  12. Mexican American Women Pursuing Counselor Education Doctorates: A Narrative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinojosa, Tamara J.; Carney, JoLynn V.

    2016-01-01

    The authors used narrative inquiry and Anzaldúa's (1999) bordlerlands theory to understand the cultural experiences of 5 Mexican American women in doctoral programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Results indicated that participants navigated multiple cultural spheres and that the…

  13. Beyond Skills: Embodying Writerly Practices through the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the features and potential of an embodied, rather than merely skills-based, approach to doctoral writing. The authors' conceptual framework is derived from the phenomenological literature, particularly Heidegger's critique of modern life as permeated by a quest for mastery and control. They address two key questions…

  14. Alimentar: Theorizing Pedagogy, Curriculum, and Mentorship for Democratic Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly J.; Turner-Nash, Kindel

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual paper suggests ways in which pedagogical practices, curriculum, and mentorship could foster democracy in doctoral education. Building upon critical, dialogic, caring, anti-colonial, and engaged pedagogies, we propose a framework for examining marginal spaces of teacher and student relationships that build upon life-projects…

  15. Colleagues in Training: How Senior Faculty View Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardun, Carol J.; McKeever, Robert; Pressgrove, Geah N.; McKeever, Brooke Weberling

    2015-01-01

    A survey of 241 full professors in journalism and mass communication were asked their views on doctoral education. Results indicated that the expected number of publications students should generate from their dissertations was positively correlated with the number of publications professors produced from their own dissertations, supporting the…

  16. Developing doctoral scientists for drug discovery: pluridimensional education required.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R

    2013-02-01

    Research universities continue to produce new scientists capable of generating knowledge with the potential to inform disease etiology and treatment. Mounting interest of doctoral-level experimental science students in therapeutics-related research careers is discordant with the widespread lack of direct drug-discovery and development experience, let alone commercialization success, among university faculty and administrators. Likewise, the archetypical publication- and grant-fueled, principal investigator (PI)-focused academic system ("PI-stan") risks commoditization of science students pursuing their doctorates as a labor source, rendering them ill-prepared for career options related to therapeutics innovation by marginalizing their development of "beyond-the-bench" professional skills foundational to modern drug-discovery campaigns and career fluency. To militate against professionalization deficits in doctoral drug-discovery researchers, the author--a scientist-administrator-consultant with decades of discovery research and development (R&D), business, and educator experience in commercial and university settings--posits a critical need for pluridimensionality in graduate education and mentorship that extends well beyond thesis-related scientific domains/laboratory techniques to instill transferable operational-intelligence, project/people-management, and communication competencies. Specific initiatives are advocated to help enhance the doctoral science student's market competitiveness, adaptability, and navigation of the significant research, commercial, and occupational challenges associated with contemporary preclinical drug-discovery R&D.

  17. ABibliography of Doctoral Dissertations in Television and Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Kenneth R., Comp.

    The third edition of this bibliography of doctoral dissertations in television and radio lists over 900 titles reported through June of 1970. The dissertations have been grouped into categories such as commercial broadcasting; educational broadcasting; broadcasting and government; broadcasting, politics, and controversial issues; broadcasting as…

  18. Research in Outdoor Education: (Summaries of Doctoral Studies).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammerman, Donald R., Comp.; And Others

    Approximately 117 doctoral studies on outdoor education which were completed in the past 3 decades are presented. The documents are available to the Council on Outdoor Education and Camping of the American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation for publication and distribution to outdoor education leaders interested in the…

  19. Economics of Corruption in Doctoral Education: The Dissertations Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of "dissertations for sale" in Russia. The tasks of this anthropological study include establishing the problem of corruption in doctoral education, identification of the dissertations suppliers, study of the specific services they offer, analysis of their prices on different services, and generalizations…

  20. The end of the golden age of doctoring.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, John B; Marceau, Lisa D

    2002-01-01

    Eight interrelated reasons for the decline of the golden age of doctoring are discussed in this article. Major extrinsicfactors (generally outside the control of the profession) include (1) the changing nature of the state and loss of its partisan support for doctoring, (2) the bureaucratization (corporatization) of doctoring; (3) the emerging competitive threat from other health care workers; (4) the consequences of globalization and the information revolution; (5) the epidemiologic transition and changes in the public conception of the body; and (6) changes in the doctor-patient relationship and the erosion of patient trust. Major intrinsic factors are (7) the weakening of physicians' labor market position through oversupply; and (8) the fragmentation or weakening of the physicians, union (AMA). Despite the recent sociopolitical transformation of modern U.S. medicine, our thinking remains wedded to a now inadequate theoretical approach. A future sociology of the professions can no longer overlook now pervasive macrostructural influences on provider behavior (corporate dominance). Until these influences are appropriately recognized and incorporated in social analyses, most policies designed to restore the professional ideal have little chance of success.

  1. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students' Training Experiences in Primary Care Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Jared

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on counseling psychology doctoral students' perspectives regarding their practicum training experience in primary care psychology. The four participants included three females and one male. Semi-structured individual and focus group interviews were used to explore participants' experiences. The participants described…

  2. Doctoral Education--Taking Salzburg Forward: Implementation and New Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European University Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the continued implementation of reforms in doctoral education building on the Salzburg Principles and Recommendations. It is directed at university leaders who want to continue and deepen the implementation of Salzburg at the strategic level, ensuring a consistent, institution-wide approach…

  3. Written Feedback in Intercultural Doctoral Supervision: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Linlin

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the feedback interactions in an intercultural supervision context between a white New Zealand supervisor and a Chinese international doctoral student, who is also the author (and researcher) of this study. Using mixed methods, it examines the supervisor's written feedback on a draft PhD proposal and the student's feedback…

  4. India's Doctor Shortage Reflects Problems in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neelakantan, Shailaja

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that India's medical profession is in a crisis. For every 10,000 people in India there are only six doctors, compared with nearly 55 in the United States and nearly 21 in Canada. The problem is likely to get worse before it gets better. Professors are leaving medical schools for better-paying jobs in private hospitals and in…

  5. The Doctoral Comprehensive Examination: Fine-Tuning the Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughead, Teri Olisky

    1997-01-01

    Uses Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives to fine-tune the process of designing, preparing for, evaluating, and providing feedback about the doctoral comprehensive examination. Examines the purpose and objectives of comprehensive examinations, curriculum design, preparation for the exam, test item development, evaluation criteria, and…

  6. Report Urges Greater Coordination of European Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2007-01-01

    A new report assessing the state of doctoral education in Europe says that, even as 47 European nations enter the final phase of harmonizing their degree programs, Ph.D.-level education across Europe suffers from a lack of coordination and cooperation. "There is an urgent need for greater consultation and coordination at the regional,…

  7. The Impact of Labor Demand on Time to the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to estimate the impact of labor demand on time to the doctorate. Empirical investigation of this relationship in previous research was hampered by the difficulty of measuring labor demand. I construct a measure of labor demand in seven fields in the humanities and social sciences based on the annual number of job listings…

  8. Doctoral Education in the Biomedical Sciences: Back to the Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobil, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This article examines the debate over reform of doctoral education in biomedicine and concludes that the two solutions most advocated are flawed, and that the broad nonscientific education some would like to see in the graduate curriculum is most appropriate in the undergraduate years. More rigorous graduate education, not job-related training, is…

  9. Doctoral Oral Examinations and Contemporary Counselor Education: Are They Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Charles R., III.; Robertson, Derek L.; Foster, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study examined 160 former students' perceptions of one assessment tradition in counselor education: the doctoral oral examination. The findings suggest that oral examinations continue to have substantive value for students, but changes are needed to ensure their future objectivity, transparency, and regard for students'…

  10. Goals of Quality in Doctoral Studies and Forecasted Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelvys, Rimantas

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the quality assurance policy of doctoral studies implemented in Lithuania and its probable outcomes are forecasted. In scientific literature the quality of education is commonly defined as a holistic phenomenon composed of the quality of initial conditions, quality of process and quality of outputs. The accomplished document…

  11. Doctoral Pedagogy in Stage One: Forming a Scholarly Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    As a contribution to the scholarship of teaching (Boyer, 1990), the author conducted a self-study of praxis (Kemmis & Smith, 2008) to identify and describe how certain pedagogies help students meet "stage one" challenges in doctoral education (Lovitts, 2001) at one university. Findings from a literature review identified the…

  12. [Communication within the health care team: doctors and nurses].

    PubMed

    Kollár, János

    2016-04-24

    Proper communication within the health care team is especially important in terms of creating safe emotional and professional conditions for the team members and for quality healing. The aim of the study is to explore the factors that hinder appropriate communication between doctors and nurses and thus to make the effective elimination of the communication disturbances possible. Investigation in main medical databases and general search engines were used for analysing the phenomenon. It was revealed that communication between doctors and nurses is restrained by factors that can be observed on individual, professional and system levels as well. Role confusion, lack of trust, communication barriers arising from hierarchical inequalities, leadership problems, differences in qualifications, burnout and organizational problems can equally be found amongst them. The effectiveness of communication between nurses and doctors in Hungary is especially strongly influenced by the fear of losing jobs, the financial problems arising from different degree of gratuity and the phenomenon of burnout. Changes on individual, professional and system levels are equally important for significant improvement in the communication between doctors and nurses. Joint trainings based on strong organizational development skills and joint conferences could promote significantly better flow of information, mutual appreciation and harmonization.

  13. Evaluating Doctoral Programmes in Africa: Context and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Michael; Backhouse, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Models of doctoral education in Africa remained similar to those in European universities, well into the 2000s. However, there has been an increasing realisation that such programmes are ill-suited for the African realities. With recent efforts to revitalise higher education in Africa, considerable attention has been placed on the need to explore…

  14. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Trainees' Satisfaction with Clinical Methods Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menke, Kristen Ann

    2015-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral trainees' satisfaction with their clinical methods training is an important predictor of their self-efficacy as counselors, persistence in graduate programs, and probability of practicing psychotherapy in their careers (Fernando & Hulse-Killacky, 2005; Hadjipavlou & Ogrodniczuk, 2007; Morton & Worthley,…

  15. Women of African Descent: Persistence in Completing Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddrisu, Vannetta Bailey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the educational persistence of women of African descent (WOAD) in pursuit of a doctorate degree at universities in the southeastern United States. WOAD are women of African ancestry born outside the African continent. These women are heirs to an inner dogged determination and spirit to survive despite all odds (Pulliam, 2003,…

  16. An Interpretive Study of Doctoral Mentoring in Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Thomas W.; Readence, John E.; Barone, Diane M.; Sylvester, Terry

    2004-01-01

    This research focused on one mentor and her advisee and how they characterized the mentoring process and their roles in it. The mentor, a seasoned veteran, was independent, self-motivated, and passionate about her work. The doctoral student, on the other hand, sought the expertise of a more knowledgeable person to help her deal with, and reduce,…

  17. Doctorate as Genre: Supporting Thesis Writing across Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly learning advisors provide generic support for doctoral students. The terms "genre" (a category, type or family) and "generic" (ambiguously both "of a category" and "non-specific") are interrogated here in relation to such support. Literary studies scholars divide texts by genre for the purpose…

  18. [Interpersonal games as a method for doctors' occupational stress].

    PubMed

    Samborska-Sablik, Anna; Sablik, Zbigniew; Gaszyński, Tomasz; Drożdż, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Doctors are frequently expose to stress during their occupational work. It is mainly the result of burdens caused by taking care of patients, dysfunctional arrangements of the health care system and difficult relationships in their workplace. Chronic stress brings negative emotions and they need to cope with them . Doctors, willing to achieve it, may initiate interpersonal games with the hidden motive of restoring their internal balance. Based on transactional analysis, the authors describe some of the games which may be found in doctors' environment: "How to get out of there", "Mine is better than yours", "Scapegoat", "Fault" and "double bind". The outcome of the games may be receiving a support, proving a benefit derived from stress, getting the feeling of being not guilty, justification, or releasing emotions in apparently unintended way. Interpersonal games may help stressed doctors to get rid of internal tension but at the same time they may be a source of stress for other participants in the games. The way to limit their destructive impact is to create such administrative and organizational solutions which allow to make working conditions more friendly.

  19. Joint Supervision Practices in Doctoral Education--A Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahenius, Katja; Ikävalko, Heini

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of students' experiences of joint supervision practices and supervisors' professional work in doctoral education in one department of a Finnish university. A qualitative methodology was used to explore students' experiences of joint supervision practices and an inductive protocol was used to analyse the data gathered…

  20. Reframing European Doctoral Training for the New ERA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repeckaite, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the institutionalization of European higher education and training, as well as research and innovation, policy entered a new phase: a number of financial instruments were simplified and merged. The Erasmus Mundus programme, wherein consortia of European and overseas universities built joint master's or doctoral degrees, was split into two…

  1. Coteaching in Counselor Education: Preparing Doctoral Students for Future Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltrinic, Eric R.; Jencius, Marty; McGlothlin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored 10 counselor education doctoral students' coteaching experiences with faculty members. Three coteaching structures identified from the data were relational, operational, and developmental. A definition of coteaching supported by the findings is presented. Implications for counselor education programs,…

  2. Counselor Education Doctoral Students' Experiences with Multiple Roles and Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Kristen N.; Ebrahim, Christine H.; Herlihy, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to explore 10 counselor education doctoral students' lived experiences with multiple roles and relationships. Four superordinate themes were found: power differential, need for education, transformation, and learning from experiences. Findings revealed that multiple roles and relationships offer…

  3. [A village fair. Beware of the travelling quack doctor].

    PubMed

    Keeman, J N Hans

    2012-01-01

    What appears to be an image of a merry village fair is actually a warning against the practices of the travelling quack doctor. An iconological description reveals the hidden meaning of the imagery portrayed in a 17th-century genre painting.

  4. The practice doctorate: where do Canadian nursing leaders stand?

    PubMed

    Joachim, Gloria

    2008-01-01

    This article calls upon Canadian nursing leaders to examine the merits and downsides of the new practice doctorate degree - the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). The impetus for the DNP arose from within the American nursing profession in order to address the knowledge and skills needed by advanced practice nurses to work in today's complex healthcare environment. The DNP is the newest practice doctorate degree and in 2015 will be the entry to practice degree required of all new advanced practice nurses in the United States. Advanced practice nurses who will have the practice doctorate include clinical nurse specialists, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives and nurse anaesthetists. With the establishment and acceptance of the DNP in the United States, American advanced practice nurses will have a different knowledge base than Canadian advanced practice nurses. The evolution and state of advanced practice nursing in Canada are discussed in this article. Canadian nursing leaders must discuss the DNP, its merits and downsides within the Canadian context and begin to make informed decisions about whether or not the DNP should come to Canada.

  5. Doctorate in nursing practice: a survey of massachusetts nurses.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Rosanna F; Pulcini, Joyce; Haggerty, Lois A; Tang, Trinh

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) resolved that a new practice degree, the doctorate in nursing practice (DNP), is to become the terminal practice degree and minimum education standard for advanced practice nurses by the year 2015(American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2004). AACN position statement on the practice doctorate in nursing. Retrieved July 1, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu.html). The DNP will have a clinical-intensive focus. Advanced practice nurses potentially impacted by this resolution will include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists. A task force at the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College conducted an electronic survey in 2006 in an attempt to understand nurses' thoughts about doctoral preparation and the interest of nurses in Massachusetts in pursuing doctoral study. A self-selected group of 376 nurses participated in the study. Nurses identified both positive and negative perceptions related to the degree's viability and practicality, with a majority (55%) preferring the DNP as an educational option.

  6. Guiding Social Work Doctoral Graduates through Scholarly Publications and Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Cynthia L.; Tomal, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminating the work of social work doctoral graduates aligns with the Council on Social Work Education's National Statement on Research Integrity in Social Work publication practices and the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics. Publications and presentations are essential to their future success, yet little support is provided…

  7. Action Research and the Educational Doctorate: New Promises and Visions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambo, Debby; Isai, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    This case study reveals the development and action research work of a student in a newly designed educational doctorate aimed at preparing scholarly and influential practitioners. Data were gathered from a research journal, field notes, email correspondence, observation, and dissertation work, and analyzed with a constant comparative approach.…

  8. Evaluating Perry's Structured Approach for Professional Doctorate Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Michael; Farr-Wharton, Ben; von der Heidt, Tania; Sheldon, Neroli

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate examiner reactions to doctorate of business administration (DBA) theses at an Australian university applying Perry's structured approach to thesis presentation, which had its origin in the marketing discipline, but is now widely applied to other business disciplines. Design/methodology/approach:…

  9. Faculty Concerns Related to Distance Learning within Nontraditional Doctoral Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, H. Wells; Session, Carmen L.

    2011-01-01

    As a unique academic offering, the nontraditional, distance-delivered doctorate poses particular issues for faculty members who choose to teach in such a program. Among these issues are compensation, administrative support, technology, innovation, time demands, workload, and promotion and tenure. In this chapter, the authors identify and provide…

  10. Mentoring for Professional Geropsychology within a Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Bob G.

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in doctoral programs in professional psychology has its roots in mentoring in science programs of all types. Professional psychology in general may suffer from conflating mentoring with clinical supervision. Using the Pikes Peak Model competencies as a framework, mentoring in attitudes, knowledge, and skills related to professional…

  11. A Phenomenological Investigation of Counseling Doctoral Students Becoming Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Jessica M.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Godwin Weisberger, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Women often face challenges when balancing academic and familial responsibilities (Gilbert, 2008); Trepal & Stinchfield, 2012). This phenomenological study explored women's (N = 10) experiences of becoming mothers during a doctoral program in counseling. The results highlight the importance of mentorship and other protective factors associated…

  12. Infusing CSPAP Knowledge, Training and Research into Doctoral PETE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusseau, Timothy A.

    2017-01-01

    This article will highlight ways in which the University of Utah has collaboratively promoted and prepared doctoral students to teach and conduct research on comprehensive school physical activity programs (CSPAPs). Specifically, the article addresses the coursework, assistantships/practical experiences, and research requirements that are used to…

  13. Doctoral Comprehensive Exams in Marketing: Current Practices and Emerging Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Nicole; Beatty, Sharon E.; Foxx, William

    2004-01-01

    Current and emerging issues concerning the written comprehensive exam process are addressed. Both the purpose and structure of this exam are considered. Survey results are presented that describe the purposes of the exam from the perspective of doctoral coordinators. Also included is a description of how marketing departments are currently…

  14. The Accelerated Doctor of Optometry Program: Outcomes Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Depeuw M.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 101 graduates of the New England College of Optometry's (Massachusetts) accelerated doctoral program through 1995 and 141 graduates of the four-year program in 1990-95 illustrate the accelerated program's success in terms of graduate involvement in optometric education, medical education, and/or research, professional leadership,…

  15. Teaching "Doctor Faustus" through the "Ars Moriendi" Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fike, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The rough edges in Christopher Marlowe's intellectual life serve as a foil to the mainstream Christianity in "Doctor Faustus": the playwright had a reputation for atheism or at least for unorthodox opinions; papers allegedly found in a writing room that he shared with Thomas Kyd denied the deity of Christ; and twelve days before he was…

  16. Elusive Equity in Doctoral Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the drive to expand the quantity and quality of PhD's in South Africa and the impact this has had on under-represented groups, in particular black graduates. Based on both qualitative and quantitative data, the paper argues that while there has been a significant increase in the number of black students in doctoral education,…

  17. Expanding Doctoral Education in South Africa: Pipeline or Pipedream?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss both the status of the PhD in South Africa and the feasibility of the country's aspiration to increase by fivefold the production of PhDs by 2025. Based on the first empirical studies on doctoral education in South Africa, it argues that in order to move towards this target, an expanded and coordinated…

  18. Teaching Future Teachers: A Model Workshop for Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryce, Julia M.; Ainbinder, Alisa; Werner-Lin, Allison V.; Browne, Teri A.; Smithgall, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Doctoral student training has become focused in recent years on acquiring subject-area knowledge and research skills, rather than on teaching. This shift often leaves aspiring junior faculty feeling unprepared to address the demanding pedagogical requirements of the professoriate. In the area of social work, few programs contain a structured,…

  19. The Keys to Success in Doctoral Studies: A Preimmersion Course.

    PubMed

    Salani, Deborah; Albuja, Laura Dean; Azaiza, Khitam

    2016-01-01

    This article will review an innovative on-line preimmersion course for a hybrid doctor of nursing practice (DNP) program and a traditional face-to-face doctor of philosophy nursing program. The doctoral candidates include both postbaccalaureate and postmaster's students. The authors of the preimmersion course developed and initiated the course in order to address various issues that have surfaced in discussions between students and faculty. Examples of common themes identified include writing skills, statistics, life-work-school balance, and navigating instructional technology. Doctoral studies may pose challenges to students studying nursing, in regard to academic rigor and experiencing on-line education for the first time, especially for students who have been out of school for an extended amount of time or are not accustomed to a nontraditional classroom; thus, having a preimmersion course established may facilitate a smooth transition to rigorous academic studies in a hybrid program. The course, which was developed and delivered through Blackboard, a learning management system, includes the following 9 preimmersion modules: academic strategies (learning styles, creating an effective PowerPoint presentation), library support (introduction to the university library, literature review tutorial, and citation styles), mindfulness, wellness, statistics essentials, writing express, DNP capstone, netiquette, and DNP/doctor of philosophy mentorship. Each module consists of various tools that may promote student success in specific courses and the programs in general. The purpose of designing the preimmersion course is to decrease attrition rates and increase success of the students. While the majority of students have succeeded in their coursework and been graduated from the program, the authors of this article found that many students struggled with the work, life, and school balance. Future work will include the evaluation of results from graduate students enrolled in

  20. Broadening the search for minority science and engineering doctoral starts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazziel, William E.; Brazziel, Marian E.

    1995-06-01

    This analysis looked at doctorate completion in science and engineering (S&E) by underrepresented minorities: blacks, Hispanics and Indian Americans. These are the groups we must increasingly depend upon to make up for shortfalls in science and engineering doctorate production among American citizens. These shortfalls derive from truncated birth rates among white people, for the most part. The analysis answered several questions officials will need to know the answers to if we are to plan effectively to develop the talents of these individuals. Specifically, the National Science Foundation asked us to look at the feasibility of involving nontraditional minority science and engineering graduates (baccalaureates at 25+) as doctoral starts, along with minority S&E graduates who had taken jobs with corporations to pay off student loans and military personnel involved in S&E study and S&E work (see NSF report of research under grant SED-9107756). We found that nontraditional minority S&E doctorate recipients matched their traditional counterparts in elapsed time to degree and similar indicators. They had less in the way of support for doctoral study, however. We found that minority S&E graduates who took jobs in corporations were keenly interested in returning to campus to complete degrees. We also found that many bright minority youngsters are studying S&E subjects in the Community College of the Air Force and in U.S. Army SOC colleges. Some have enrolled in baccalaureate programs on university campuses and plan to continue on to the PhD. We concluded that money is important in tapping these talent pools to make up for the demographically driven shortfalls discussed above.