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  1. Doctor Chekhov's doctors.

    PubMed

    Crommelynck, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was both a writer and a doctor, as well as a patient. In spite of his literary success, he did not turn away from medicine until 1897, at the age of 37, when his tuberculosis became too serious. During his medical studies in Moscow, he wrote short stories, at night, under various pseudonyms to provide money for his family; all his life, Chekhov was his parents' financial support. It was Alexei Suvorin (1834-1912), the powerful director of Novoye Vremya (New Times), and the well-known writer Dimitry Grigorovich (1822-1899) who persuaded him that he had exceptional literary talent and requested him to abandon pseudonyms and sign his articles. So, for all his life, he practiced medicine as a district doctor and wrote plays and short stories. In each of his plays, except The Cherry Orchard, Chekhov introduced characters of doctors, principally Yevgeny Konstantinovich Lvov in Ivanov and Mikhail Lvovich Astrov in Uncle Vanya, as well as Khrushchev in The Wood Demon, Dorn in The Seagull, Tcheboutykin in The Three Sisters, and Triletski in Platonov. In his countless short stories, there are numerous doctors, for instance Professor Stepanovich (A Dreary Story), Doctors Kirilov (Enemies), Sobol (My Wife), Outchinnikov (An Inconvenience), Dymov (The Grasshopper), Startsvev (Ionitch), and others. Chekhov's main interest in psychiatry was clearly visible in The Nervous Breakdown, The Black Monk, The Man in a Case, A Doctor's Visit, and WardNo. 6 with Dr. Ragin. In his short stories as in his plays, Chekhov relied on his knowledge of provincial life; his doctor's characters were not professors, academicians, or Moscow's great physicians, but instead exhausted hard workers, with no effective diagnostic and therapeutic means, and poorly paid. Unlike himself, none of Chekhov's doctors was a writer or breadwinner, and Chekhov did not like to lay emphasis on the disease. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Doctoral surplus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Universities in the United States are producing about 25% more doctorates in science and engineering than the U.S. economy can absorb, according to a new study by the Rand Corporation and Stanford University's Institute for Higher Education Research. The study looked at 13 science and engineering fields, covering 210 doctorate-granting institutions and more than 1,000 educational institutions that employ people with doctorates. The study was done by Stanford Professor William Massy and Charles Goldman of Rand, with graduate students Marc Chun and Beryle Hsiao.The researchers found that supply and demand do not work in the usual way to regulate the employment market for doctoral candidates. In labor markets, when job opportunities decrease, fewer people usually seek to enter the field. In the case of Ph.D.s, however, the researchers found that neither departments nor prospective doctoral students take close accounting of the doctorate employment gap.

  3. Ageing doctors.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Steven; Milligan, Eleanor

    2017-03-01

    Doctors are neither more nor less susceptible than the general population to the effects of ageing. The relevance of deterioration with age depends on the nature of the work undertaken. Reduced muscle strength and visual and auditory deterioration can compromise clinical ability. Accumulation of chronic disease further reduces capacity. Cognitive decline is of particular importance, as good medical care requires considerable cognitive function. Patient safety is paramount, yet older doctors are an important part of the medical workforce and their value should be recognised. Changes in patient case mix, work place support systems and individual adjustments can assist safe practice. Deterioration in health should be acknowledged and requires proactive management. Current methods of ensuring competence are inadequate for supporting ageing doctors. A new initiative is recommended comprising collaboration between regulators, colleges and employing institutions to support the ageing doctor in providing safe and effective practice.

  4. Doctor Shopping

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments. PMID:23346518

  5. Rembrandt's doctors.

    PubMed

    Abastado, Philippe; Chemla, Denis

    2007-06-01

    Medical doctors appear in numerous Rembrandt paintings and reciprocally, physicians interested in art have used their diagnostic skills in dissecting the painter's work, especially his lifetime of self-portraits. The possible existence of skin and eye diseases, hypothyroidism and Horton's disease, and psychiatric and psychological traits has been a matter of everlasting debate, as summarised in the present paper. Most of all, the ageing process reveals itself over time in the continuity of the self-portraits. In the quest for signs of illness, the slightest bump in the canvas can be considered a symptom, and the examination of Rembrandt's self-portraits is a difficult exercise. However, the resulting published papers have given rise to a great number of diagnostic hypotheses.

  6. Talking with Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Talking with Your Doctor Planning Your Doctor Visit A Partnership How well you ... about. (Watch the video to get tips on planning for your doctor visit. To enlarge the video, ...

  7. Suicide In Doctors And Wives Of Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    1980-01-01

    This paper re-examines the widespread belief that doctors have a proneness for suicide greater than the general population. The Standardized Mortality Ratio for male physicians is 335 and for single women doctors 257. Doctors' wives have an even greater risk: their SMR is 458. These rates for doctors are higher than for most other professional groups (except pharmacists) and the rate for doctors' wives far exceeds that for wives of other professionals. The intrinsic causes of the physician's high occupational mortality include his knowledge of toxicology and ready access to lethal drugs, so that impulsive suicide is more often successful. Professional stress and overwork, particularly the unrelenting responsibility for decisions upon which the lives of others may depend, have been inculpated. These stresses interact with the decline in the doctors' self-respect and with a personality that is prestige-oriented and independent. Some physicians turn in their frustration to alcohol/and or drugs, accelerating the process of deterioration. The high suicide rate in doctors' wives appears to be the result of unrequited needs for caring and dependency which the doctors' career demands and personality deny them. PMID:21293651

  8. Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctor Finding a doctor with special training in movement disorders can make a big difference in your ... Goldstein Goldstone Gollomp Goodman Gorman Gottschalk Graff Greeley Green Gregory Griffith Grill Grillone Grist Grossman Groves Gudesblatt ...

  9. Developing Online Doctoral Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipere, Ngoni

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to identify best practices in online doctoral programming and to synthesise these practices into a framework for developing online doctoral programmes. The field of online doctoral studies is nascent and presents challenges for conventional forms of literature review. The literature was therefore reviewed using a…

  10. Succeeding with Your Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Jerry; Bathmaker, Ann Marie; Hunt, Cheryl; McCulloch, Gary; Sikes, Pat

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this book is to support, inform and guide students (and by implication their supervisors) through a doctoral programme. The book is intended for students working towards either a "taught" doctorate (such as an EdD) or a course of study leading to a PhD. The authors recognize that doctoral programmes have changed and these changes are…

  11. Succeeding with Your Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Jerry; Bathmaker, Ann Marie; Hunt, Cheryl; McCulloch, Gary; Sikes, Pat

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this book is to support, inform and guide students (and by implication their supervisors) through a doctoral programme. The book is intended for students working towards either a "taught" doctorate (such as an EdD) or a course of study leading to a PhD. The authors recognize that doctoral programmes have changed and these changes are…

  12. Doctoral Scientists in Oceanography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    The purpose of this report was to classify and count doctoral scientists in the United States trained in oceanography and/or working in oceanography. Existing data from three sources (National Research Council's "Survey of Earned Doctorates," and "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," and the Ocean Sciences Board's "U.S. Directory of Marine…

  13. Doctoral Scientists in Oceanography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    The purpose of this report was to classify and count doctoral scientists in the United States trained in oceanography and/or working in oceanography. Existing data from three sources (National Research Council's "Survey of Earned Doctorates," and "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," and the Ocean Sciences Board's "U.S. Directory of Marine…

  14. Developing Online Doctoral Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipere, Ngoni

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to identify best practices in online doctoral programming and to synthesise these practices into a framework for developing online doctoral programmes. The field of online doctoral studies is nascent and presents challenges for conventional forms of literature review. The literature was therefore reviewed using a…

  15. Doctors in Balzac's work.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Balzac wrote his novels during a time of great literary and scientific change. Romanticism gave way to the school of realism, of which Balzac could be considered the founder. It was via realism, where both the positive and negative aspects of life were depicted, that doctors naturally gained a much more active role in novels. In conjunction with this was the development of science and medicine, which fascinated Balzac, also leading to the significant and prevalent role of doctors in his works. His fascination with the sciences led to him to gain many acquaintances and much knowledge in the medical domain, especially in neuropsychiatry and physiology. His fictional doctors, such as Desplein and Bianchon, thus demonstrate considerable knowledge of pathology, physiology, and neuropsychiatry. The doctors in Balzac's novels can be grouped into four categories: provincial doctors, Parisian doctors, country doctors, and military doctors. They were most often fictitious representations of real individuals (e.g. Guillaume Dupuytren), and often symbolize schools of thought which were in vogue at the time. In addition to the accurate scientific depiction of doctors, it must be noted that his doctors not only played an active role in clinically assessing their patients, but also had a sociological role in assessing society; it is through his doctors that Balzac gave his opinion of the world in which he lived.

  16. Should junior doctors strike?

    PubMed

    Toynbee, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam Aj; Clacey, Joe; Broome, Matthew R

    2016-03-01

    An impasse in negotiations between the Department of Health (DoH) and the British Medical Association in November this year led to an overwhelming vote for industrial action (IA) by junior doctors. At the time of writing, a last minute concession by DoH led to a deferment of IA to allow further negotiations mediated by the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service. However, IA by junior doctors remains a possibility if these negotiations stall again. Would the proposed action be ethically justifiable? Furthermore, is IA by doctors ever ethically defendable? Building on previous work, we explore important ethical considerations for doctors considering IA. The primary moral objection to doctors striking is often claimed to be risk of harm to patients. Other common arguments against IA by doctors include breaching their vocational responsibilities and possible damage to their relationship with patients and the public in general. These positions are in turn countered by claims of a greater long-term good and the legal and moral rights of employees to strike. Absolute restrictions appear to be hard to justify in the modern context, as does an unrestricted right to IA. We review these arguments, find that some common moral objections to doctors striking may be less relevant to the current situation, that a stronger contemporary objection to IA might be from a position of social justice and suggest criteria for ethically permissible doctor IA.

  17. Female Physicist Doctoral Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why…

  18. Female Physicist Doctoral Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why…

  19. [The happy doctor].

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Christel M P; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Descriptive, questionnaire-based. To study what makes doctors and medical students happy: Descriptive, questionnaire-based. Descriptive, questionnaire-based. For the purposes of this study, doctors and medical students completed an online questionnaire in the summer of 2012. They were presented with questions enquiring into general characteristics and into happiness. We asked them to define happiness, and to describe their happiest moments. The results were interpreted with the aid of simple statistics. 401 doctors, registrars and medical students took part in the study. 41% of the respondents were male and 59% female. Average age was 40 years. Students, GPs, anaesthesiologists and internists were the best represented. On average, the participants gave their 'happiness' a score of 7.6. The younger doctors (< 30 years) were slightly less happy (7.4) than doctors > 48 years (7.8), which also explains the relatively low scores for students (7.1). GPs were the happiest, with an average score of 7.9, closely followed by the 'other doctors', with an average score of 7.8, and the medical specialists (7.6). Within the specialties, bearing in mind that the low numbers means that results should be interpreted with some caution, the doctors with 'minority specialties' were the happiest, followed by internists and the supporting specialties. Psychiatrists and surgical colleagues can be found at the bottom of the list. The determinants 'love and relationships' and 'family' contribute the most to feeling happy. Older doctors are happier than younger doctors and GPs are generally happier than medical specialists. The determinants 'love and relationships' and family' are the most important for doctors' happiness.

  20. Is your doctor competent?

    PubMed

    Condor, B

    1997-01-01

    HIV-positive patients are consistently healthier and live longer when their care is managed by a physician with significant experience in treating HIV and AIDS, and it is essential for patients to seek out health care providers who keep up with current treatment guidelines. Experienced doctors generally offer more aggressive treatments, and are willing to abandon treatment regimens that are not effective. Communication is essential between the patient and doctor, and must include a review of side effects and the necessity of strict adherence to treatments. A series of questions is included to help patients assess whether their doctor is up to date on current treatments.

  1. Doctor of osteopathic medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Wilkins; 2010. Gevitz N. The "doctor of osteopathy": expanding the scope of practice. J Am Osteopath ... 6):ES28-S38. Moore WJ. The eccentricities of osteopathy. BMJ . 2012;345:e5890. Stark J. A degree ...

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  3. Doctor-patient relationship

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    The doctor-patient relationship is an intricate concept in which patients voluntarily approach a doctor and become part of a contract by which they tend to abide by doctor’s instructions. Over recent decades, this relationship has changed dramatically due to privatization and commercialization of the health sector. A review of the relevant literature in the database of MEDLINE published in English between 1966 and August 2015 was performed with the following keywords: doctor-patient relationship, physician-patient relationship, ethics, and Islam. The Muslim doctor should be familiar with the Islamic teachings on the daily issues faced in his/her practice and the relationship with his/her patients. PMID:26837392

  4. [Chekhov as a doctor].

    PubMed

    Rooijmans, H G M

    2003-03-01

    Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was not only a writer, but also a doctor. One might think that he was primarily concerned with writing, but he also dedicated himself fully to being a doctor. When he had to give up his practice in 1897 upon urgent medical advice, he experienced it as a great loss. As a medic he often felt unsure and believed that he failed in his duties. This did not change the fact that many patients called upon him for assistance. They were probably also fond of him because of his genuine interest in their living conditions and because of his compassion. In terms of his scientific activities, his attempt to have his visit in 1890 to the Russian penal colony Sakhalin recognised as a dissertation failed. In many ways, Chekhov was a hard-working idealist, but one without illusions. Doctors appear as the main character or one of the main characters in 25 of Chekhov's hundreds of stories as well as in various plays. Although Chekhov undoubtedly will have incorporated his own experiences into his works, he did not give a picture of his own medical activities in the doctors he portrayed. A large number of the doctors he describes are depressed, nervous or irritable. Others are naïve and clumsy, while others still are skeptic, cynical or disillusioned. In some of the descriptions the image of Chekhov as a doctor may be observed.

  5. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    PubMed

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  6. Bringing Pedagogy to Doctoral Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison; Kamler, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the role of publication in taking forward the work of the doctorate. Low publication rates from doctoral degrees have been noted as a problem in the quality of doctoral education for preparing students to participate in research cultures. At the same time there is ambivalence and some resistance among doctoral supervisors and…

  7. Wanted--doctors who care.

    PubMed

    Lovdal, L T; Pearson, R

    1989-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine what consumers value in doctors' behavior. Results indicate that consumers in the sample population studied prefer doctors who are friendly and caring as well as those who are technically competent. However, these respondents reported less favorable opinions about doctors' friendliness (i.e., affective behavior) than they did about doctors' competence (i.e., instrumental behavior).

  8. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    PubMed

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  9. The accountability of doctor to doctor.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A

    1985-08-10

    Modern medicine has made lapses in performance by doctors potentially more dangerous. The author considers professional peer review to be a more effective means of ensuring high standards than dependence on either patient satisfaction or legal procedures. The lack of a hierarchical system in the British medical system gives added importance to peer review procedures. Performance must be assessed by various criteria, both clinical and managerial. Audit review meetings can also provide a forum for the consideration of resource utilization and its ethical dilemmas.

  10. [Murder of the doctor].

    PubMed

    Lorettu, Liliana; Falchi, Lorenzo; Nivoli, Fabrizia L; Milia, Paolo; Nivoli, Giancarlo; Nivoli, Alessandra M

    2015-01-01

    To examine possible risk factors for the doctor to be killed by the patient in the clinical practice by examining a series of murders that involved physicians. This aim has been achieved through a retrospective review on clinical cases of doctors killed by patients within the period between 1988 and 2013, in Italy. In this period 18 Italian doctors have been killed in the workplace, with a rate of 0.3/100,000. In 7 cases, the murder resulted in the context of doctor-dissatisfaction; in 7 cases the murder was committed by a psychiatric patient; 1 case in the context of a stalking; 3 cases occurred in a workplace which was not safe enough. Four categories of at-risk contexts have been identified. One category includes a murder in the context of a doctor-dissatisfaction, perceived by patient. The second category concerns murders committed by patients suffering from mental illness. A third category includes homicides in a workplace which is not safe. The last category comprises the murder in the context of stalking. These categories identify specific dangerous situations for physicians, in which are highlighted elements that have played a crucial role in the murder and for which special precautions are suggested preventive.

  11. Are doctors altruistic?

    PubMed

    Glannon, W; Ross, L F

    2002-04-01

    There is a growing belief in the US that medicine is an altruistic profession, and that physicians display altruism in their daily work. We argue that one of the most fundamental features of medical professionalism is a fiduciary responsibility to patients, which implies a duty or obligation to act in patients' best medical interests. The term that best captures this sense of obligation is "beneficence", which contrasts with "altruism" because the latter act is supererogatory and is beyond obligation. On the other hand, we offer several examples in which patients act altruistically. If it is patients and not the doctors who are altruistic, then the patients are the gift-bearers and to that extent doctors owe them gratitude and respect for their many contributions to medicine. Recognising this might help us better understand the moral significance of the doctor-patient relationship in modern medicine.

  12. The doctor's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Irvine, D H; Donaldson, L J

    1995-10-01

    The close relationship between expenditure on health care and the countless individual judgements made by doctors for their patients means that any discussion about rationing must involve the process of clinical decision-making. Increasingly, doctors are being drawn into rationing by two powerful forces. Firstly, through the corporate responsibilities of those working within a managed health care system in which organisational objectives and budgetary constraints are agreed and specified in a much more explicit way than ever before. Secondly, by the professionally-led movement towards more clinically effective practice. These, in combination, are leading towards a fundamental review of the nature and ethical basis of clinical practice in which the duty of doctors to individual patients must be balanced against the wider considerations.

  13. Mandatory notification of impaired doctors.

    PubMed

    Beran, R G

    2014-12-01

    Mandatory reporting of impaired doctors is compulsory in Australasia. Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency guidelines for notification claim high benchmark though the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians suggest they still obstruct doctors seeking help. Western Australia excludes mandatory reporting of practitioner-patients. This study examines reporting, consequences and international experiences with notification. Depressed doctors avoid diagnosis and treatment, fearing consequences, yet are more prone to marital problems, substance dependence and needing psychotherapy. South African research confirms isolation of impaired doctors and delayed seeking help with definable characteristics of those at risk. New Zealand data acknowledge: errors occur; questionable contribution from mandatory reporting; issues concerning competence assessment; favouring reporting to senior colleagues or self-intervention to compliance with mandatory reporting. UK found an anaesthetist guilty of professional misconduct for not reporting and sanctioned doctors regarding Harold Shipman. Australians are reluctant to report, fearing legalistic intrusion into care. Australian research confirmed definable characteristics for doctors with psychiatric illness or alcohol abuse. Exposure to legal medicine evokes personal disenchantment for doctors involved. Medicine poses barriers for impaired doctors. Spanish and UK doctors do not use general practitioners and may have suboptimal care. US and European doctors self-medicate using samples. US drug-dependent doctors also prescribe for spouses. Junior doctors are losing empathy with the profession. UK doctors favour private care, avoiding public scrutiny. NZ and Brazil created specific services for doctors, which appear effective. Mandatory reporting may be counterproductive requiring reappraisal.

  14. Finding the Right Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to start is good old-fashioned word of mouth, said Harlan Krumholz, M.D., a cardiologist at ... he said. “Everyone is left to rely on word of mouth, but make sure to go to doctors who ...

  15. Doctoring the Knowledge Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I examine the impact of the new 'knowledge economy' on contemporary doctoral education. I argue that the knowledge economy promotes a view of knowledge and knowledge workers that fundamentally challenges the idea of a university as a community of autonomous scholars transmitting and adding to society's 'stock of knowledge'. The paper…

  16. Doctoring the Knowledge Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I examine the impact of the new 'knowledge economy' on contemporary doctoral education. I argue that the knowledge economy promotes a view of knowledge and knowledge workers that fundamentally challenges the idea of a university as a community of autonomous scholars transmitting and adding to society's 'stock of knowledge'. The paper…

  17. The doctor's defense.

    PubMed

    Tur, Richard H S

    2002-10-01

    The paper takes as its point of departure a relatively recent case which attracted publicity in Britain, concerning a doctor charged with (but acquitted of) the murder of his terminally ill patient, and critically examines the criminal law of England and Wales relating to homicide in the context of medical practice. While similar issues obviously arise in many other countries, no comparative study is attempted in the paper. However, the arguments which have been presented are of more than local interest. From an analysis of this case and others, it appears that there is in common law something which can be called the doctor s defense. It holds that a doctor may, when caring for a patient who is suffering great pain, lawfully administer pain-killing drugs, despite the fact that, as the doctor well knows, one certain or highly probable consequence will be to shorten the patient s life. Current justifications for this defense are either incoherent or too weak. Some require that different conceptions of intention be deployed, depending on whether the agent is a doctor or not. Others rely on the philosophically controversial doctrine of double effect. Still others invoke an implausible notion of minimal causation. All these justifications apply readily enough to morally and factually easy cases, but fail in hard cases where the need for some justification is most pressing. These justifications seem incapable of providing adequate guidance to prosecutors or trial judges. Absent principled and transparent justification, the English criminal justice system exhibits different outcomes on what appear to be broadly similar facts. It is disturbing that the law is uncertain and incapable of giving adequate guidance. A doctor, compelled by conscience to intervene to end a person s life, should certainly be ready and willing to face rigorous legal scrutiny, but the law applied should not be arbitrary and random, nor should the outcome turn solely or chiefly on prosecutorial

  18. Working with doctors and nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... with doctors and nurses Answering questions, filling out papers, getting poked and prodded — going to the doctor ... your parents may get a bill or insurance papers that list the services you got. Ask your ...

  19. Foundation doctors' induction experiences.

    PubMed

    Miles, Susan; Kellett, Joanne; Leinster, Sam J

    2015-07-24

    It is well established that trainee doctors struggle with the transition from medical school to starting work and feel unprepared for many aspects of their new role. There is evidence that suitable induction experiences improve competence and confidence, but available data indicate that trainee doctors on the UK Foundation Programme are commonly not experiencing useful inductions. The aim of the reported research was to explore trainee doctors' experiences with induction during their first year of the Foundation Programme to identify the most useful characteristics. A questionnaire was designed to explore trainee doctors' experiences with induction at two points during their first Foundation year, during the first and third of three rotations, to enable all induction experiences on offer during the year to be surveyed. Data were collected using an anonymous questionnaire distributed during a teaching session, with an online version available for those trainees not present. Questions gathered information about characteristics of the inductions, usefulness of components of the inductions and what gaps exist. 192 Foundation trainee doctors completed the questionnaire during Rotation 1 and 165 during Rotation 3. The findings indicated that induction experiences at the beginning of the year, including the local Preparation for Professional Practice week, were more useful than those received for later rotations. Longer inductions were more useful than shorter. Departmental inductions were generally only moderately helpful and they missed many important characteristics. Gaps in their inductions identified by many trainees matched those aspects judged to be most useful by those trainees who had experienced these characteristics. Many Foundation trainee doctors are experiencing inadequate inductions, notably at the department level. Trainees are starting rotations in new departments without rudimentary knowledge about their role and responsibilities in that department

  20. Doctorateness as a Threshold Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafford, Vernon; Leshem, Shosh

    2009-01-01

    Achieving a doctorate presents candidates with certain challenges--undertaking the research, writing the thesis and defending both at their viva. Throughout that doctoral journey, candidates are expected to display doctorateness in their thesis via the characteristics of high-quality scholarly research. The blockages that occur and prevent…

  1. Entrepreneurship and UK Doctoral Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Tristram; Bentley, Kieran; Marriott, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the experience of UK doctoral graduates in pursuing entrepreneurial careers: there is evidence that this applies to a substantial number--about 10%--of doctoral graduates. The nature of their experience was explored using 37 interviews with doctoral entrepreneurs. The research was funded by Vitae (www.vitae.ac.uk), an…

  2. Entrepreneurship and UK Doctoral Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Tristram; Bentley, Kieran; Marriott, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the experience of UK doctoral graduates in pursuing entrepreneurial careers: there is evidence that this applies to a substantial number--about 10%--of doctoral graduates. The nature of their experience was explored using 37 interviews with doctoral entrepreneurs. The research was funded by Vitae (www.vitae.ac.uk), an…

  3. Doctorateness as a Threshold Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafford, Vernon; Leshem, Shosh

    2009-01-01

    Achieving a doctorate presents candidates with certain challenges--undertaking the research, writing the thesis and defending both at their viva. Throughout that doctoral journey, candidates are expected to display doctorateness in their thesis via the characteristics of high-quality scholarly research. The blockages that occur and prevent…

  4. Online Doctorates for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Ron Dickson knew he needed a terminal degree. In the early 2000s, he was toiling away as an assistant superintendent in a suburban Phoenix school district, but he had higher aspirations--a superintendency. Yet with a family and a demanding job, he wasn't sure how he could swing a doctoral degree. He diligently checked out the traditional Ed.D. and…

  5. Online Doctorates for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Ron Dickson knew he needed a terminal degree. In the early 2000s, he was toiling away as an assistant superintendent in a suburban Phoenix school district, but he had higher aspirations--a superintendency. Yet with a family and a demanding job, he wasn't sure how he could swing a doctoral degree. He diligently checked out the traditional Ed.D. and…

  6. Doctoring in Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Henry

    1983-01-01

    Health care in Eastern Europe has not achieved world standards nor the goals of planners of socialist societies. With luck, perseverance, bribes or good connections, it is possible to obtain good medical and surgical care in Eastern Europe for a major illness. Primary and even secondary care usually are substandard, however, and often completely unacceptable to most Western foreigners. The reasons for this are complex but mainly rooted in different attitudes of health workers towards their patients, poor physical plants, poor salary structures, inadequate advancement opportunities for health care workers, poor social status and professional recognition for nurses and almost complete isolation of the average primary care doctor from hospital medicine. PMID:6659504

  7. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation between viewer and viewed representing public attitudes towards doctors, medicine, and science. PMID:20944763

  8. Tomorrow's doctors: today's mistakes?

    PubMed

    Monkhouse, W S; Farrell, T B

    1999-01-01

    Tomorrow's Doctors, published by the General Medical Council of the UK in December 1993, has prompted far-reaching changes to medical education in Britain. We draw attention to some inconsistencies in the document and to those aspects of it that we maintain are undesirable. We question the emphasis in Tomorrow's Doctors on change in view of the unchanging nature of the structure and function of the human body. We doubt the wisdom of exhorting students to learn through curiosity and experiment, such methods being wasteful of time and resources when used in the context of accepted core material. We do not accept that the information overload is an automatic result of traditional methods of delivering education, and we are by no means convinced that the university model is the right one for medical education. In the face of experts being unable to agree on or to define scientific method, we wonder if consideration of this is appropriate in an undergraduate medical course, and we doubt that ethics and criticism are rightly placed in the undergraduate curriculum. The drawbacks of systems-based teaching are considered in the light of the disease process, and we draw attention to the lack of evidence for the document's condemnation of departmental structures and its uncritical espousal of integration. Finally, we consider some of the ways in which these changes have affected anatomy.

  9. [Doctors in love].

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how often doctors fall in love or are in a relationship with a colleague. Descriptive questionnaire. Doctors and medical students completed an online questionnaire during the summer of 2012. The questions concerned baseline characteristics as well as their feelings of happiness. In addition, we asked them whether they were in love or had ever been with a colleague and whether this had resulted in a steady relationship. A total of 401 individuals participated, of which 41% were male and 59% female. Their mean age was 40 years. Altogether, 40% of the participants indicated to be or have been in love with a colleague. This occurred more often in women than men. In 82% the relationship was of an equivalent nature; it was hierarchical in the remainder. In only 23% of cases, the relationship was steady; this was independent of age. Dermatologists appeared to be the least apt to fall in love with a colleague, while obstetricians had the highest rate. Although love between colleagues is a frequently occurring phenomenon, this is associated with a steady relationship in only about 25% of cases. There is wide variation among specialists in their proneness to intercollegial love.

  10. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-06-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  11. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    PubMed

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  12. [Medical mistakes in doctors novels].

    PubMed

    Langeveld, Cornelis H Kees

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether doctors novels give a realistic picture of medical practice. Descriptive, qualitative analysis. 6 items in total from two series of doctors novels (4 Dutch 'Doctors novels' and 2 'Dr. Anne Maas' publications) were examined. The series 'Doctors novels' was translated from English, the 'Dr. Anne' novels were written by Dutch authors. The medical situations were located mostly in hospital emergency departments and operation rooms. Medical specialisms were represented mainly by surgeons, emergency care doctors, orthopaedic specialists, cardiologists and gynaecologists. In the series 'Doctors novels' most of the patients described suffered a trauma. In the 'Dr. Anne' series the patients admitted to the emergency department had a greater range of medical conditions. In the series 'Doctors novels' 3 of the 4 main characters were pregnant. In one case, giving birth was described in detail. The doctors novels which were studied give an unbalanced and distorted view of medical practice. The medical information was sometimes incorrect, partly due to lack of knowledge by the author, partly due to incorrect translation from English. The reality of medical practice was not represented accurately in either of the series investigated, although the medical information in the 'Doctors novels' series appeared to be accurate more often than that in the 'Dr. Anne' series.

  13. "Te Quiero, Tito"--FLES Email Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doloff, Deby

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Spanish-as-a-foreign language email project carried out with kindergartners through third graders from six elementary schools. The project involves a traveling Teddy bear named Tito. (Author/VWL)

  14. Quiero un Libro. I Want a Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fullerton. Div. of Library Science.

    This vocabulary improvement handbook was designed to be an aid to children's and young adult librarians serving in public and school libraries who know little or no Spanish, but who wish to serve their Spanish-speaking community. Content and design of the handbook emanated from class discussions by participants in the Library Training Institute…

  15. Quiero un Libro. I Want a Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fullerton. Div. of Library Science.

    This vocabulary improvement handbook was designed to be an aid to children's and young adult librarians serving in public and school libraries who know little or no Spanish, but who wish to serve their Spanish-speaking community. Content and design of the handbook emanated from class discussions by participants in the Library Training Institute…

  16. Re-Imagining Doctoral Education: Professional Doctorates and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison; Brennan, Marie; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Portents of the demise of the Professional Doctorate have emerged in some recent policy and institutional circles in Australia, raising questions about the meaning and relevance of the Professional Doctorate in an era of "league tables" and research assessment in Australia. This article argues that such portents, based largely on narrow…

  17. Re-Imagining Doctoral Education: Professional Doctorates and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison; Brennan, Marie; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Portents of the demise of the Professional Doctorate have emerged in some recent policy and institutional circles in Australia, raising questions about the meaning and relevance of the Professional Doctorate in an era of "league tables" and research assessment in Australia. This article argues that such portents, based largely on narrow…

  18. [Asylum of doctors].

    PubMed

    Arantes, Marco Antonio

    2008-01-01

    An impassioned writer, suburbano, black, daring, ironic, combative, accursed, and misunderstood by his contemporaries, Afonso Henriques de Lima Barreto (1881-1922) traveled to hell, experiencing the scorn of critics, failure as a writer, and his family's indifference towards his literary vocation. Restless in his pain and heavy-handed with hypocrites, he grappled with the tragedies of madness, alcoholism, and prejudice at a time when assuming one's condition as a black was an act of courage. His conscious observations about doctors, the mad, and madness is the point of departure for this study, based on the writer's experience at the Hospício Nacional and on a review of significant excerpts from Lima Barreto's literary production. The later stands as an institutional and political issue and a criticism of the discourses that played important roles in preserving the structures of domination in the Old Republic.

  19. Patient-doctor communication.

    PubMed

    Teutsch, Carol

    2003-09-01

    Communication is an important component of patient care. Traditionally, communication in medical school curricula was incorporated informally as part of rounds and faculty feedback, but without a specific or intense focus on skills of communicating per se. The reliability and consistency of this teaching method left gaps, which are currently getting increased attention from medical schools and accreditation organizations. There is also increased interest in researching patient-doctor communication and recognizing the need to teach and measure this specific clinical skill. In 1999, the Accreditation of Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented a requirement for accreditation for residency programs that focuses on "interpersonal and communications skills that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their families, and other health professionals." The National Board of Medical Examiners, Federation of State Medical Boards. and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates have proposed an examination between the. third and fourth year of medical school that "requires students to demonstrate they can gather information from patients, perform a physical examination, and communicate their findings to patients and colleagues" using standardized patients. One's efficiency and effectiveness in communication can be improved through training, but it is unlikely that any future advances will negate the need and value of compassionate and empathetic two-way communication between clinician and patient. The published literature also expresses belief in the essential role of communication. "It has long been recognized that difficulties in the effective delivery of health care can arise from problems in communication between patient and provider rather than from any failing in the technical aspects of medical care. Improvements in provider-patient communication can have beneficial effects on health outcomes". A systematic review of

  20. The Doctorate in Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher Michael; Shin, Richard Q.; Smith, Lance C.

    2011-01-01

    The doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision is the terminal degree in the field of counselor education within the U.S. The authors surveyed CACREP-accredited doctoral programs to assess department characteristics, clinical experience and credentials, research experience, and the admission, retention, and evaluation of students. Results…

  1. Doctorate Program Trains Industrial Chemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The University of Texas (Dallas) has initiated a new Ph.D. program specifically to train chemists for doctoral level work in industry (Doctor of Chemistry). Participants will complete three research practica (at an industrial site and in two laboratory settings) instead of the traditional dissertation, emphasizing breadth and flexibility in…

  2. Women, Men and the Doctorate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centra, John A; Kuykendall, Nancy M.

    This study describes the current status and professional development of a sample of women doctorates and compares them to a sample of men who have attained the same educational status. Chapters cover the sample and procedures used; employment patterns; doctorates in academe; publications, income, and job satisfaction; marriage and family life;…

  3. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  4. Doctoral Preparation and Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farren, Elizabeth A.

    1991-01-01

    According to responses from 76 percent of 200 nurses surveyed, nurses who earn doctorates in any field are likely to go on to conduct nursing research. What seems more important than type of degree is whether the nurses were exposed to computers or participated in faculty research as doctoral students. (Author)

  5. Doctoral preparation and research productivity.

    PubMed

    Farren, E A

    1991-01-01

    According to this study, nurses who earn doctorates in any field are likely to go on to conduct nursing research. What seems more important than type of degree is whether or not the nurses were exposed to computers or participated in faculty research while doctoral students.

  6. Designing Doctoral Programs in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, John P., Ed.

    This report contains nine speeches presented at a Conference on Designing Doctoral Programs in Education held at Kansas State University on June 28-29, 1968. Titles included are: 1) "The Role of Doctoral Programs in Today's and Tomorrow's University"; "Trends in Student Personnel Work: Implications for Graduate Education"; "Research Training in…

  7. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  8. The Doctorate in Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher Michael; Shin, Richard Q.; Smith, Lance C.

    2011-01-01

    The doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision is the terminal degree in the field of counselor education within the U.S. The authors surveyed CACREP-accredited doctoral programs to assess department characteristics, clinical experience and credentials, research experience, and the admission, retention, and evaluation of students. Results…

  9. Doctorate Program Trains Industrial Chemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The University of Texas (Dallas) has initiated a new Ph.D. program specifically to train chemists for doctoral level work in industry (Doctor of Chemistry). Participants will complete three research practica (at an industrial site and in two laboratory settings) instead of the traditional dissertation, emphasizing breadth and flexibility in…

  10. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  11. A marketing clinical doctorate programs.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Isaac D; Kimball, Olive M

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, clinical doctorate programs in health disciplines have proliferated amid both support and controversy among educators, professional organizations, practitioners, administrators, and third-party payers. Supporters argue that the explosion of new knowledge and increasing sophistication of technology have created a need for advanced practice models to enhance patient care and safety and to reduce costs. Critics argue that necessary technological advances can be incorporated into existing programs and believe that clinical doctorates will increase health care costs, not reduce them. Despite the controversy, many health disciplines have advanced the clinical doctorate (the most recent is the doctor of nursing practice in 2004), with some professions mandating the doctorate as the entry-level degree (i.e., psychology, pharmacy, audiology, and so on). One aspect of the introduction of clinical doctoral degrees has been largely overlooked, and that is the marketing aspect. Because of marketing considerations, some clinical doctorates have been more successfully implemented and accepted than others. Marketing is composed of variables commonly known as "the four P's of marketing": product, price, promotion, and place. This report explores these four P's within the context of clinical doctorates in the health disciplines.

  12. [Doctor's attendance in police custody].

    PubMed

    Chariot, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Medical examination is a right for every person detained in police custody in France. Examination of detainees usually takes place in the police station so that the doctor can assess the conditions in which the detainee is being held. In some cases, such as type I diabetes care, detainees need to be examined and treated in a hospital. Doctors are subject to a duty of care and prevention. Description of recent traumatic injuries is part of the doctor's mission. They should prescribe any ongoing treatment which needs to be continued, as well as any emergency treatment required. Custody officers may monitor the detainee and administer medication. Doctor's opinion should be given in a national standard document. If the doctor considers that the custody conditions are disgraceful, they may refuse to express an opinion as to whether the detainee is fit for custody.

  13. Occupational allergy in medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Kusaka, Yukinori; Suganuma, Narufumi; Nagasawa, Sumio; Deguchi, Yoji

    2004-03-01

    Allergic diseases have increased in many developed countries including Japan. Doctors are also at risk for allergic diseases from exposure to allergens in working conditions and hospital environments. We investigated the factors relating to occupational allergy in doctors. Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to all doctors (n=895) who had previously graduated from School of Medicine, Fukui Medical University. Data from 307 responders (response rate: 34.3%, male 241, female 66, mean age +/- S.D., 30.8 +/- 4.2) were analyzed. Eighty-nine doctors stated that they had occupational allergy including contact dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and/or asthma. Fifty-four had contact dermatitis caused by surgical gloves; 77 had contact dermatitis from disinfectants, e.g. 23 from chlorhexidine gluconate; 21 from povidone iodine; and 15 from ethanol. Fifteen doctors experienced allergic rhinitis and/or asthma caused by handling laboratory animals. Univariate analysis showed that profession (surgical doctors) and past histories of allergic diseases (rhinitis, sinusitis, or atopic dermatitis) were significantly related to occupational allergy in doctors, but that gender, smoking or physical exercise were not significantly related to it. A logistic regression analysis showed that past histories of allergic diseases and the profession of surgical doctors were significantly related to occupational allergy, but that gender, age or smoking were not significantly related to it. The results of the present study suggest that past history of allergic diseases is a factor predisposing to occupational allergy in doctors. It is necessary and possible to extend more prophylactic measures for doctors, especially for surgeons, because exposure to responsible agents and materials for them can be more frequent.

  14. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... AE, Solomon PR. Life adjustments for memory loss, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. In: Budson AE, Solomon PR, eds. ...

  15. Angina - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about angina and heart disease; Coronary artery disease - what to ask your doctor ... when it happens? When should I call the doctor? When should I call 911? How much exercise ...

  16. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  17. Masculinity in the doctor's office: Masculinity, gendered doctor preference and doctor-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Himmelstein, Mary S; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity data suggest that men have shorter life expectancies than women and outrank women on several leading causes of death. These gendered disparities may be influenced by psychosocial factors like masculinity. Three studies (Total N=546) examined the role of masculinity in men's doctor choices and doctor-patient interactions. In Studies 1 and 2, men completed measures of masculinity, gender bias, and doctor preference. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the direct relationship between masculinity and male doctor preference and the indirect relationship of masculinity on male doctor preference through an association with gendered competence stereotypes. Participants in Study 3 disclosed symptoms in private followed by disclosure to a male or female interviewer in a clinical setting. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), we examined the interaction among symptom reporting, masculinity and doctor gender, controlling for participant comfort. In Study 1, results suggested that masculinity encouraged choice of a male doctor directly and indirectly via beliefs that men make more competent doctors than women; Study 2 directly replicated the results of Study 1. In Study 3, independent of participant comfort, an interaction between interviewer gender and masculinity emerged such that men scoring higher on masculinity reported symptoms less consistently to male interviewers (relative to higher scoring men reporting to female interviewers); the reverse was found for men scoring low on masculinity. Taken together these studies suggest that masculinity may affect men's health by encouraging choice of a male doctor with whom doctor-patient communication may be impaired. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The doctors of time.

    PubMed

    Hall, W J

    2000-01-04

    Throughout human history, we have sought to understand the changes we observe in ourselves and in others with the passage of time. Does this so-called aging process have some purpose, and to what extent can we control what are otherwise inexorable consequences? Although various philosophical traditions have offered different interpretations of the relation between age and time, a more unified concept of human aging may be developing. Ancient philosophical concepts are converging with insights from developmental genetics, molecular biology, and clinical research. This new approach suggests that aging is a continuum of human growth and development, full of potential and highly modifiable by a combination of personal responsibility and appropriate medical care. In providing this care to older adults, skillful physicians use time as a key diagnostic and therapeutic tool to interpret symptoms properly and to place treatment choices in the context of human values that may change with age. We who care for older adults are the doctors of time. Sadly, in our contemporary system of medical care, time is one of the least understood and most poorly used tools. A medical care system that is increasingly oriented toward minimizing the time spent caring for older adults cannot possibly increase the quality of life for the rapidly growing elderly population. With the potential for substantial life extension within our grasp, we must develop attitudes and skills that are more compatible with the value systems of our older patients.

  19. Preparing for your Doctor Visit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Visiting Your Doctor Evaluation + Tests Autonomic Testing Nerve/Skin/Muscle Biopsy Computerized Axial Tomography Scan (CAT) Electrodiagnostic Testing Lumbar Puncture Imaging Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Peripheral Neuropathy ...

  20. [Advancement of the medical doctorate].

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Förster, R; Schmidt, R E

    2009-08-01

    The medical doctorate and the subsequent advanced research qualification in medicine have an exceptional position within the natural sciences. While, in the German system, graduation to the degree of a medical doctor is often an initiation into scientific practice, the in-depth scientific education of medical doctors may be achieved in various configurations. In recent years, structured programs for doctorates in medicine and natural sciences have found increasing acceptance, following recommendations of national scientific councils ("Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft" and "Hochschulrat"). Hannover Medical School has been offering such programs for a number of years. The StrucMed program increases the quality of medical doctorate studies, typically performed in the third and fourth years of university studies. The Hannover Biomedical Research School (HBRS) combines several programs for a doctorate in natural sciences, creating a platform for an internationally oriented education of post-graduates in various disciplines of life sciences. Evaluating the achievements and career paths of the trainees will contribute to the successful integration of research work in an efficiency-oriented clinical environment.

  1. Moral distress among Norwegian doctors.

    PubMed

    Førde, R; Aasland, O G

    2008-07-01

    Medicine is full of value conflicts. Limited resources and legal regulations may place doctors in difficult ethical dilemmas and cause moral distress. Research on moral distress has so far been mainly studied in nurses. To describe whether Norwegian doctors experience stress related to ethical dilemmas and lack of resources, and to explore whether the doctors feel that they have good strategies for the resolution of ethical dilemmas. Postal survey of a representative sample of 1497 Norwegian doctors in 2004, presenting statements about different ethical dilemmas, values and goals at their workplace. The response rate was 67%. 57% admitted that it is difficult to criticize a colleague for professional misconduct and 51% for ethical misconduct. 51% described sometimes having to act against own conscience as distressing. 66% of the doctors experienced distress related to long waiting lists for treatment and to impaired patient care due to time constraints. 55% reported that time spent on administration and documentation is distressing. Female doctors experienced more stress that their male colleagues. 44% reported that their workplace lacked strategies for dealing with ethical dilemmas. Lack of resources creates moral dilemmas for physicians. Moral distress varies with specialty and gender. Lack of strategies to solve ethical dilemmas and low tolerance for conflict and critique from colleagues may obstruct important and necessary ethical dialogues and lead to suboptimal solutions of difficult ethical problems.

  2. Profile of the Nontraditional Doctoral Degree Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    What type of individual pursues a nontraditional doctoral degree? Although answering this question is the main purpose of this chapter, there is an underlying story that provides context for how and why these individuals came to pursue a doctoral degree. The tremendous growth in the number of doctoral students and doctoral degree-granting…

  3. Solo doctors and ethical isolation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R J

    2009-11-01

    This paper uses the case of solo doctors to explore whether working in relative isolation from one's peers may be detrimental to ethical decision-making. Drawing upon the relevance of communication and interaction for ethical decision-making in the ethical theories of Habermas, Mead and Gadamer, it is argued that doctors benefit from ethical discussion with their peers and that solo practice may make this more difficult. The paper identifies a paucity of empirical research related to solo practice and ethics but draws upon more general medical ethics research and a study that identified ethical isolation among community pharmacists to support the theoretical claims made. The paper concludes by using the literary analogy of Soderberg's Doctor Glas to illustrate the issues raised and how ethical decision-making in relative isolation may be problematical.

  4. [The clown doctor: an introduction].

    PubMed

    Rösner, M

    2010-02-01

    In the literature, increasing numbers of practitioners have reported their experience using clown doctors in geriatric settings. The reports agree on the positive effects on persons with dementia and also on their caregivers. However, empirical studies on its effectiveness are rare. This article presents the field of activity of a clown doctor in geriatric settings as well as an overview of current scientific research on the topic and the effects on persons with dementia and nursing staff. It will be become clear that the clown doctor is a supporting therapeutic intervention. Through the clown representation, it is possible to obtain access to and interact with a person with dementia, thus, maintaining social contact of the patient with his/her environment. This effect leads to an increase of well-being and contributes to a reduction of problematic behavior. In addition to reduced workload and relief for the nursing staff, it has a positive effect on the working atmosphere.

  5. More Doctors or Better Care?

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Diane E.; McGrail, Kimberlyn M.

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Medical Association's More Doctors, More Care campaign seeks to align physician supply targets with policy decisions elsewhere in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Using OECD data for 19 countries to assess the relationship between physician supply and healthcare outcomes, we have determined that there is no association between avoidable mortality and overall physician supply. Similarly, there is no relationship between avoidable mortality and general practitioners and family physicians per capita, specialists per capita, nurses per capita, doctors and nurses per capita or health expenditures per capita. These findings should move us to recognize that (a) more doctors will not necessarily translate into better healthcare outcomes for Canadians and (b) it is in Canadians' better interests that we instead focus on realizing opportunities to improve access to high-quality care and to ensure that changes in physician turnover do not threaten the current generalist-to-specialist mix. PMID:20676248

  6. Medical English for Finnish Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Collan, Y.; Lock, S. P.; Pyke, D. A.; Whimster, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Courses in medical editing and medical English are relatively new and infrequent. We have now provided seven of them for Finnish doctors who wished to publish their work in English, to present papers in English to conferences, to work in English-speaking countries—or who wanted to improve their knowledge of the language. Although such courses should be tailored to individual needs, most participants seem to have found them helpful, particularly the sessions spent in the language laboratories. We suggest that courses in medical English might be useful for both medical students and postgraduate doctors outside English-speaking countries. PMID:4821015

  7. The doctor-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H H

    1983-08-01

    This essay focuses on the doctor-patient relationship as a measure of ethical behavior by the physician. The perspective is derived from commitment as a religious humanist to the Judaic heritage, and experience in hospitals. The ethical responsibility to be competent professionally is presupposed. Emphasis is placed on the need of the physician to respect the autonomy of the patient as person, thus to limit the paternalism inherent in the physician's position, and to re-enforce this with compassion. Judaic sources supporting such conduct are cited. Exception is taken to decisions by civil and rabbinic judges which disregard the intimacy of the doctor-patient relationship.

  8. Mrs Hitler and her doctor.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Sandy

    2005-12-01

    The doctor who attended the mother of Adolf Hitler in her terminal illness has been blamed as a cause of the Holocaust. The medical details recorded of this professional relationship are presented and discussed. Dr Bloch's medical care of Mrs Hitler was consistent with the prevailing medical practice of the management of fungating breast carcinoma. Indeed, the general practitioner's care and attention of the family appear to have been astute and supportive. There is nothing to suggest that Dr Bloch's medical care was other than competent. Doctors who have the (mis)fortune to professionally attend major figures of history may be unfairly viewed, despite their appropriate and adequate care.

  9. Why treat doctors like pushers?

    PubMed Central

    Beyerstein, B L; Alexander, B K

    1985-01-01

    Harsher laws and enforcement procedures are making Canadian physicians more vulnerable to conviction as drug traffickers. The authors question this development on the grounds that it extends a drug prohibition policy that has failed in the past and has incurred intolerable social costs. To help envision an alternative, the authors discuss conflicting claims about the British tradition of permitting doctors to prescribe narcotics to addicts. They conclude that, with some restrictions, allowing Canadian doctors to prescribe narcotics according to their judgements of patient needs would be more efficacious than increasing the penalties they face for violating nonmedical norms. PMID:3971250

  10. Management of Mass Casualties Using Doctor Helicopters and Doctor Cars.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Kouhei; Omori, Kazuhiko; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Yanagawa, Youichi

    At approximately 10 o'clock in September 2015, a minibus carrying 18 people accidentally slid backwards because of a malfunctioning brake system while climbing a steep incline on Togasayama Mountain, colliding with a van (Toyota HiAce wagon) carrying 11 people that was situated behind the minibus. Togasayama Mountain is located 1 hour by car and 10 minutes by helicopter from our hospital. The minibus slid off a roadside cliff at a height of 0.5 m and rolled over after colliding with the van. There were 7 victims with yellow tags and 22 with green tags. Two Doctor Helicopters and 1 Doctor Car cooperated with the fire departments by providing medical treatments, selection of medical facilities, and dispersion transportation. In this mass casualty event, there were no mortalities, and all of the victims recovered without sequelae. The coordinated and combined use of Doctor Helicopters and Doctor Cars in addition to the activities of the fire department in response to a mass casualty event resulted in appropriate triage, medical treatments, selection of medical facilities, and dispersion transportation. Copyright © 2017 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Literature Reviews: Advising Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Brent

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available information has created new opportunities and challenges for today's research students. Academic and public libraries have developed sophisticated electronic databases to better manage knowledge to make it more accessible to researchers. Literature reviews are a major challenge for doctoral students. The focus of…

  12. Industry-Oriented Doctorate Established.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes an industry-related program at the University of Texas (Arlington) leading to a Doctorate of Science in Applied Chemistry. The program requires an industrial internship and a dissertation based on research involving both the university's chemistry faculty and chemists in industry. (SK)

  13. Doctoral Study Attrition in Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunneborg, Clifford E.; Lunneborg, Patricia W.

    The primary motivation behind this prediction study was the concern voiced over the problem of attrition in graduate school. Noting a 45% dropout rate in psychology doctoral students who began between 1955 and 1964 and were studied in 1968, one author deplored the loss in time and effort to students and faculty when students leave graduate school.…

  14. Critical Reflection as Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter considers how doctoral education, particularly in applied settings such as education, social work, counseling, and health care, could be reimagined if it was organized around the idea and process of critical reflection: of helping students to better understand how power operates in educational environments and how students' sense of…

  15. Doctoral Research on the Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jablonsky, Adelaide

    For the last few years, ERIC-CUE has published a series entitled "the Doctoral Research Series," the first of which focused on the education of Mexican-American children. The second collection of annotated bibliographies concentrated on problems of desegregation, and the third on early childhood education. These bibliographies were organized by…

  16. Critical Reflection as Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter considers how doctoral education, particularly in applied settings such as education, social work, counseling, and health care, could be reimagined if it was organized around the idea and process of critical reflection: of helping students to better understand how power operates in educational environments and how students' sense of…

  17. Industry-Oriented Doctorate Established.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes an industry-related program at the University of Texas (Arlington) leading to a Doctorate of Science in Applied Chemistry. The program requires an industrial internship and a dissertation based on research involving both the university's chemistry faculty and chemists in industry. (SK)

  18. Family Planning Handbook for Doctors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ronald L., Ed.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) believes that all people have the right to family planning information, including premarital and marital counseling, contraception information, and sex education. This physician's handbook is designed to provide all doctors with the necessary instructions on the latest family planning methods…

  19. Neuroscience Doctorates in the Sixties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magoun, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Surveys Dissertation Abstracts'', lists of neuroscientists, and grants awarded by the National Institutes of Mental Health for the 1960's, and identifies the 75 institutions, most graduating Ph.D's in the neurosciences. The relatively greater increase in these degrees than for all bioscience doctorates should be considered in planning doctoral…

  20. Family Planning Handbook for Doctors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ronald L., Ed.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) believes that all people have the right to family planning information, including premarital and marital counseling, contraception information, and sex education. This physician's handbook is designed to provide all doctors with the necessary instructions on the latest family planning methods…

  1. Instigating change: trainee doctors' perspective.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Nassim; Shahaney, Sumera; Martin, Guy; Ahmad, Ahmir; Moghul, Masood

    2012-09-01

    In the 21st century, the core skills of trainee doctors are evolving as clinicians, leaders and innovators. Leadership skills are an essential tool for all doctors and need to be an integral part of their training and learning as set out in the General Medical Council's Good Medical Practice. It is essential to develop these skills at an early stage and continually improve them. A group of junior doctors participated in a pilot programme for leadership with the aim of executing a quality improvement (QI) project. This article describes our experiences of both the course itself and the project undertaken by our group. As part of the process of implementing change, we faced a number of challenges which contributed to our learning. These have been explored as well as potential ways to overcome them to enable the swift and smooth development of future QI projects. Using an example of a QI project looking at handover, this article demonstrates how a trainee doctor can implement their project for both professional and institutional improvement.

  2. Doctoral Level Chemical Engineering Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culberson, Oran L.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a doctorate level elective course in chemical engineering economics offered at the University of Tennessee. Students, working in pairs as a project team, must apply their knowledge of basic economics to the solution of a research question or problem. (BT)

  3. Reforming Doctoral Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitusikova, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Doctoral education in Europe has been undergoing a major transformation in the last decade. This transformation has occurred in response to several challenges: the changing nature of the labor market in the globalized economy; the European Union's common agenda in research and education, which seeks to make Europe the most competitive…

  4. Doctorate nursing degree in Spain

    PubMed Central

    López-Montesinos, Mª José; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and descriptive study of the process of change being experienced in the Spanish university system over the last decade (2005-2014). OBJECTIVE: To describe the structural changes occurring in Nursing Education in Spain, reaching access to doctoral studies from the European Convergence Process and the subsequent legislative development. METHODOLOGY: Bibliographical review of royal decrees and reference literature on the subject of study and descriptive analysis of the situation. RESULTS: Carries various changes suffered in the curricula of nursing education in the last decade, the legislation of the European Higher Education sets the guidelines for current studies of Masters and Doctorates. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of the Master and Doctorate stages after a basic degree, which is now possible with the new legislation. A formal beginning made of scientific nursing in order to generate their own lines of research led by Doctors of nursing who can integrate in research groups under the same condition as other researcher, yet now, from the nursing discipline itself. PMID:26312628

  5. Questions to ask your child's doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Child's Doctor About Neuroblastoma? Updated March 14, 2104. Cancer.org. www.cancer.org/cancer/neuroblastoma/detailedguide/neuroblastoma-talking-with-doctor . Accessed August 3, ...

  6. Cataracts - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about cataracts; Lens implants - what to ask your doctor ... What is a cataract? How will cataract surgery help my vision? If I have cataracts in both eyes, can I have surgery on ...

  7. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... a tension-type headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical problems can cause headaches? What ...

  8. Radiation therapy - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... my fatigue? When should I call the doctor? Alternative Names What to ask your doctor about radiation therapy References National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people ...

  9. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor Doctors might not detect sleep ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  10. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  11. Taking Medicines Safely: At Your Doctor's Office

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely At Your Doctor's Office Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Download ... Articles Medicines: Use Them Safely / At Your Doctor's Office / Ask Your Pharmacist / Now, It's Your Turn: How ...

  12. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... school people I should tell about my child's concussion? Can my child stay for a full day? ...

  13. Lyme disease - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about Lyme disease; Lyme borreliosis - questions; Bannwarth syndrome - questions ... I am treated with antibiotics? How can my doctor diagnose me with Lyme disease? Can I be ...

  14. From Doctors' Stories to Doctors' Stories, and Back Again.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marcia Day

    2017-03-01

    Stories have always been central to medicine, but during the twentieth century bioscience all but eclipsed narrative's presence in medical practice. In Doctors' Stories, published in 1991, Kathryn Montgomery excavated medicine's narrative foundations and functions to reveal new possibilities for how to conceive and characterize medicine. Physicians' engagement with stories has since flourished, especially through the narrative medicine movement, although in the twenty-first century this has been challenged by the health care industry's business-minded and data-driven clinical systems. But doctors' stories-and Montgomery's text-remain crucial, schooling clinicians in reflection, ethical awareness, and resilience. Physicians who write even short, 55-word reflective stories can hold to humanistic and ethical understandings of patient care and of themselves as healers even as they practice in systematized settings and employ evidence-based expertise. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Advising Doctoral Students in Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Christy Moran; Augustine-Shaw, Donna; Fairbanks, Amanda; Adams-Wright, Gayla

    2016-01-01

    Because almost one half of students enrolled in American doctoral programs do not complete their degrees, the factors that lead to doctoral student attrition need to be identified. Research suggests that the nature of the advisor-advisee relationship contributes to the persistence levels of doctoral students. In this study, we conducted a content…

  16. Hybrid Doctoral Program: Innovative Practices and Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvich, Dori; Manning, JoAnn; McCormick, Kathy; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects on how one mid-Atlantic University innovatively incorporated technology into the development of a hybrid doctoral program in educational leadership. The paper describes a hybrid doctoral degree program using a rigorous design; challenges of reworking a traditional syllabus of record to a hybrid doctoral program; the perceptions…

  17. Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Susan T.

    The data in this report show trends in doctorate awards by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The source of the data is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The SED is conducted annually for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and four…

  18. Reshaping Doctoral Education: International Approaches and Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison, Ed.; Danby, Susan, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The number of doctorates being awarded around the world has almost doubled over the last ten years, propelling it from a small elite enterprise into a large and ever growing international market. Within the context of increasing numbers of doctoral students this book examines the new doctorate environment and the challenges it is starting to face.…

  19. Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Susan T.

    The data presented in this report shows trends in doctorate awards by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The source of the data is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The SED has been conducted annually for the National Science Foundation…

  20. A Framework for Evaluating the Doctoral Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Rob

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for evaluating the doctoral curriculum. Noting that much previous research and evaluation in doctoral education have focused on the outputs of the degree or the supervisory process, the paper identifies the content of the training students receive in particular fields of study, the doctoral curriculum, as in need of…

  1. Invisible Roles of Doctoral Program Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Eva Burns; Grady, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of doctoral program specialists in Big Ten universities. Face-to-face interviews with 20 doctoral program specialists employed in institutions in the Big Ten were conducted. Participants were asked to describe their roles within their work place. The doctoral program specialists reported their…

  2. Policy and Practice in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national study on doctoral education undertaken at a time of new government policies on funding of higher education and doctoral research in particular. The article discusses the overall policy developments in Australia and then examines the impact of policy on practice in doctoral education. Particular focus…

  3. Reshaping Doctoral Education: International Approaches and Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison, Ed.; Danby, Susan, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The number of doctorates being awarded around the world has almost doubled over the last ten years, propelling it from a small elite enterprise into a large and ever growing international market. Within the context of increasing numbers of doctoral students this book examines the new doctorate environment and the challenges it is starting to face.…

  4. Hybrid Doctoral Program: Innovative Practices and Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvich, Dori; Manning, JoAnn; McCormick, Kathy; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects on how one mid-Atlantic University innovatively incorporated technology into the development of a hybrid doctoral program in educational leadership. The paper describes a hybrid doctoral degree program using a rigorous design; challenges of reworking a traditional syllabus of record to a hybrid doctoral program; the perceptions…

  5. The Doctoral Origins of Economics Faculty and the Education of New Economics Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Paul J.; Willis, Rachel A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines doctoral origins of economics faculty training new doctorates in economics. Finds that doctoral origins are highly concentrated, with the top ten schools producing 47% of the faculty at Ph.D.-granting schools, 54% of weighted doctoral-production faculty, and 67% of thesis supervisors at 47 top schools. (DSK)

  6. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities: Summary Report 2000. Survey of Earned Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffer, Thomas B.; Dugoni, Bernard L.; Sanderson, Allen R.; Sederstrom, Scott; Ghadialy, Rashna; Rocque, Peter

    This report presents data on recipients of research doctorates awarded by U.S. universities from July 1, 1999 through June 30, 2000. The information is taken from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, an annual census of new doctoral recipients. The 406 universities in the United States that confer research doctorates awarded a total of 41,368…

  7. The Doctoral Origins of Economics Faculty and the Education of New Economics Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Paul J.; Willis, Rachel A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines doctoral origins of economics faculty training new doctorates in economics. Finds that doctoral origins are highly concentrated, with the top ten schools producing 47% of the faculty at Ph.D.-granting schools, 54% of weighted doctoral-production faculty, and 67% of thesis supervisors at 47 top schools. (DSK)

  8. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities: Survey of Earned Doctorates. Summary Report 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Allen R.; Dugoni, Bernard

    This report presents data on recipients of research doctorates awarded by U.S. universities from July 1996 through June 1997. Among the highlights are: (1) the 382 universities that conferred research doctorates awarded 42,705 doctorates, an increase of 0.7 percent; (2) the number of doctorates awarded by broad field was greatest in the life…

  9. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities: Summary Report, 1998. Survey of Earned Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Allen R.; Dugoni, Bernard; Hoffer, Thomas; Selfa, Lance

    This report presents data about recipients of research doctorates awarded by U.S. universities from July 1, 1997 through June 30, 1998. The information is taken from the 1998 Survey of Earned Doctorates, an annual census of new research doctorate recipients. During 1998, 387 universities in the United States conferred 42,683 doctorates, slightly…

  10. The advertising of doctors' services.

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, D H

    1991-01-01

    Medicine is unique among professions and trades, offering a 'product' which is unlike any other. The consequences for patients of being attracted by misleading information to an inappropriate doctor or service are such as to demand special restrictions on the advertising of doctors' services. Furthermore, health care in the UK is organised around the 'referral system', whereby general practitioners refer patients to specialists when necessary rather than have specialists accept patients on self-referral. But this need not inhibit the provision of helpful factual information to those who need it. Recent policy changes by the General Medical Council considerably broaden the scope for general practitioners to make factual information of their services available to local people, while safeguarding the public against promotional activities which are designed to increase demand for certain kinds of specialist service by playing upon individuals' fears and lack of medical knowledge. PMID:2033629

  11. Positioning doctors for convenience medicine.

    PubMed

    Haley, M

    1984-01-01

    Faced with an increasingly competitive environment, physicians must learn to organize themselves into group practices positioned to perform as the customer expects. To be successful, these new group practices must recruit the kind of physician who will meet the consumer's demands for quality care: convenience, continuity of care, and confidence in the doctor's competence. This article describes how doctors can become more competitive based on my observations as a former consultant with such healthcare companies as Cigna Healthplan, the largest for-profit HMO, and as the current vice president of Operations Planning and Development with Republic Health Corporation, a Dallas-based hospital management company. These observations should help hospital managers learn how to organize their medical staffs to better serve the patient's needs. By repositioning their physician services, hospitals should become better positioned to compete for new patients.

  12. 6. Doctor on the sidelines.

    PubMed

    Verrall, Geoffrey M; Brukner, Peter D; Seward, Hugh G

    2006-03-06

    Effectively managing on-field emergencies is the most important role of the doctor on the sidelines. Pre-event preparation is essential and should include a formulated plan for dealing with emergencies and access to emergency equipment such as a stretcher and a bag and mask. Game day injuries should be assessed by adhering as closely as possible to a normal clinical consultation, with a proper history and examination being performed for all injuries. The athlete with an on-field head injury should be treated as having a concomitant cervical spine injury until proven otherwise. Athletes with any symptoms after head injury should be comprehensively and continuously assessed. Return-to-play decisions are made by balancing the risk of injury recurrence, the potential severity of injury recurrence and the benefits of returning to the field (which are higher at elite than amateur level). There is currently a shortage of doctors willing to cover sports events in Australia, which is partially explained by inadequate remuneration, inadequate facilities provided at venues, inadequate training opportunities in sports medicine, and fear of the medicolegal consequences in taking on the role as a team doctor.

  13. Doctor-Patient Communication: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jennifer Fong; Longnecker, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication is a central clinical function in building a therapeutic doctor-patient relationship, which is the heart and art of medicine. This is important in the delivery of high-quality health care. Much patient dissatisfaction and many complaints are due to breakdown in the doctor-patient relationship. However, many doctors tend to overestimate their ability in communication. Over the years, much has been published in the literature on this important topic. We review the literature on doctor-patient communication. PMID:21603354

  14. Doctor-patient relationship. Islamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed A

    2016-02-01

    The doctor-patient relationship is an intricate concept in which patients voluntarily approach a doctor and become part of a contract by which they tend to abide by doctor's instructions. Over recent decades, this relationship has changed dramatically due to privatization and commercialization of the health sector. A review of the relevant literature in the database of MEDLINE published in English between 1966 and August 2015 was performed with the following keywords: doctor-patient relationship, physician-patient relationship, ethics, and Islam. The Muslim doctor should be familiar with the Islamic teachings on the daily issues faced in his/her practice and the relationship with his/her patients.

  15. The wealth of distinguished doctors: retrospective survey.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C

    2005-12-24

    To assess changes in the wealth of distinguished doctors in the United Kingdom between 1860 and 2001. Retrospective survey. The UK. 980 doctors of sufficient distinction to be included in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and who died between 1860 and 2001. Wealth at death, based on probate records and adjusted relative to average earnings in 2002. The wealth of distinguished doctors declined substantially between 1860 and 2001, and paralleled a decline in the relative income of doctors in general. The wealth of distinguished doctors also declined relative to other groups of distinguished individuals. In the 19th century, distinction in doctors was accompanied by substantial wealth, whereas by the end of the 20th century, the most distinguished doctors were less wealthy than their contemporaries who had achieved national distinction in other areas.

  16. The wealth of distinguished doctors: retrospective survey

    PubMed Central

    McManus, I C

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess changes in the wealth of distinguished doctors in the United Kingdom between 1860 and 2001. Design Retrospective survey. Setting The UK. Participants 980 doctors of sufficient distinction to be included in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and who died between 1860 and 2001. Main outcome measures Wealth at death, based on probate records and adjusted relative to average earnings in 2002. Results The wealth of distinguished doctors declined substantially between 1860 and 2001, and paralleled a decline in the relative income of doctors in general. The wealth of distinguished doctors also declined relative to other groups of distinguished individuals. Conclusions In the 19th century, distinction in doctors was accompanied by substantial wealth, whereas by the end of the 20th century, the most distinguished doctors were less wealthy than their contemporaries who had achieved national distinction in other areas. PMID:16373738

  17. Teaching doctors to treat doctors: medical student peer counselling.

    PubMed

    Spiro, J H; Roenneburg, M; Maly, B J

    1980-01-01

    Physicians' emotional problems need to be recognized and treated. Intervention and prevention in this problem area have been attempted at the Medical College of Wisconsin through a programme of peer counselling designed to teach student physicians how to recognize and treat emotional difficulties faced by their peers. During the 18 months that the programme has been in operation, 20 peer counsellors reported a total 1,185 hours spent in counselling their peers, lending credence to the speculation that doctors will turn to their peers for help if, in medical school, there is acceptance of fallibility and responsiveness on the part of peers.

  18. Our compact with tomorrow's doctors.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jordan J

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, the image of medicine as a caring profession has been badly tarnished by a rash of critical reports in the media. In the face of this negative publicity, do young people still want to be doctors? The author reviews conventional reasons given for the declining applicant pool (e.g., issues of declining income, loss of autonomy, etc.) and posits that an additional reason may be perceptions that doctors no longer command respect and that they are being oppressed by, rather than being guardians of, the health care system. Such views challenge academic medicine to broadcast to the world a realistic picture of the fabulous opportunities and gratifications that lie ahead for the next generation of physicians. However, academic medicine must also address some current realities within medical education, such as the admission process (where at present there is a tendency to overemphasize indices of academic achievement and underemphasize the personal characteristics sought in applicants) and the acculturation process in medical school (which can often dehumanize students and convert idealistic ones into cynics). The author acknowledges that these are tough challenges. He suggests as a first step that leaders of academic medicine prepare and disseminate an explicit statement of their commitments, a kind of compact between teachers and learners of medicine. He outlines these commitments, and states his hope that by fulfilling them, the academic medicine community can make clear that medicine-which at its core is still about the doctor-patient relationship-is a true calling, not just beleaguered occupation.

  19. Doctor on a mountaineering expedition.

    PubMed Central

    A'Court, C. H.; Stables, R. H.; Travis, S.

    1995-01-01

    Doctors are welcome members on mountaineering expeditions to remote areas, but practical advice on how to prepare and what kit to take can be difficult to find. This article is a ragbag of useful advice on diverse topics. It explains the necessary preparation, provides tips for a healthy expedition, and summarises the common disorders encountered at high altitude. The comprehensive drug and equipment lists and first aid kit for climbers were used for the 1992 Everest in winter expedition. They are there to be sacrificed to personal preference and the experience and size of individual expeditions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7767198

  20. Doctoring: a longitudinal generalist curriculum.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, M S; Slavin, S J; Usatine, R

    1994-03-01

    It is clear that no matter what type of national health care reform is adopted, there will be a shift in the care that physicians are asked to provide: from high-tech to patient-centered, from cost-indifferent to cost-conscious, from treatment-focused to prevention-focused. It is critical that physicians be adequately trained to meet these new challenges. The medical education community needs to search for innovative, creative approaches to help our students develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice medicine in the next century. Doctoring is UCLA's approach to such curriculum reform.

  1. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  2. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  3. The ultimate curse: the doctor as patient.

    PubMed Central

    Macnaughton, Jane

    1995-01-01

    Doctors may be thrust into the difficult situation of treating friends and colleagues. A doctor's response to this situation is strongly influenced by his or her emotions and by medical tradition. Such patients may be treated as 'special cases' but the 'special' treatment can backfire and lead to an adverse outcome. Why does this happen and can doctors avoid it happening? These issues are discussed in this commentary on Dr. Crisci's paper, 'The ultimate curse.' PMID:11644744

  4. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Retaining rural doctors: doctors' preferences for rural medical workforce incentives.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhu; Scott, Anthony; McGrail, Matthew; Humphreys, John; Witt, Julia

    2014-11-01

    Many governments have implemented incentive programs to improve the retention of doctors in rural areas despite a lack of evidence of their effectiveness. This study examines rural general practitioners' (GPs') preferences for different types of retention incentive policies using a discrete choice experiment (DCE). In 2009, the DCE was administered to a group of 1720 rural GPs as part of the "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL)" study. We estimate both a mixed logit model and a generalized multinomial logit model to account for different types of unobserved differences in GPs' preferences. Our results indicate that increased level of locum relief incentive, retention payments and rural skills loading leads to an increase in the probability of attracting GPs to stay in rural practice. The locum relief incentive is ranked as the most effective, followed by the retention payments and rural skills loading payments. These findings are important in helping to tailor retention policies to those that are most effective.

  6. Doctor and Patient Questions as a Measure of Doctor-Centredness in UAE Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on a description of consultations conducted in English between doctors and patients of various nationalities in the hospitals of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, specifically the extent to which such consultations are doctor-centered. (Author/VWL)

  7. Doctoral Studies in Romania: Admission Procedures, Social, and Legal Aspects of Doctoral Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miclea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    This contribution presents a concise and up-to-date report of doctoral studies in Romania, with a special emphasis on legal and social aspects. The author also argues that in order to be sustainable, the reform of doctoral studies should be substantiated by the differentiation of universities, reliable post-doctoral programmes, and a substantive…

  8. Sensitising intern doctors to ethical issues in a doctor-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilima D; Mehta, Ritambhara Y; Dave, Kamlesh R

    2017-01-01

    There is a felt need in India to influence the ethical behaviour of doctors by giving students formal education in ethics in medical colleges. Since internship is the interface between learning and independent practice, it is important to sensitise intern doctors to ethical issues in a doctor-patient relationship at this stage.

  9. Doctoral Studies in Romania: Admission Procedures, Social, and Legal Aspects of Doctoral Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miclea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    This contribution presents a concise and up-to-date report of doctoral studies in Romania, with a special emphasis on legal and social aspects. The author also argues that in order to be sustainable, the reform of doctoral studies should be substantiated by the differentiation of universities, reliable post-doctoral programmes, and a substantive…

  10. Challenges to the Doctoral Journey: A Case of Female Doctoral Students from Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bireda, Asamenew Demessie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate some challenges female doctoral students experience in their doctoral journey. The study used a qualitative design and structured interviews. The theoretical framework that guided the study was that of Urie Bronfenbrenner's ecosystemic theory. A purposely selected sample of five female doctoral students from the…

  11. Doctoral Students' Perceived Barriers That Slow the Progress toward Completing a Doctoral Dissertation: A Mixed Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Eunjin; Smith, Rachel N.; Byers, Valerie Tharp; Dickerson, Shirley; McAlister-Shields, Leah; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Benge, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    The non-completion of doctoral degrees has been a concern due to its economic, social, and personal consequences. In the current study, the researchers investigated perceived barriers of select doctoral students in completing their doctoral degrees by utilizing a fully mixed sequential mixed research design. The quantitative and qualitative data…

  12. What Disengages Doctoral Students in the Biological and Environmental Sciences from Their Doctoral Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, V.; Taina, J.; Pyhältö, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causes of student disengagement from their doctoral studies in the biological and environmental sciences. The data came from interviews of 40 doctoral students (male = 15, female = 25) and underwent qualitative analysis for content. Our results showed that doctoral studies provide multiple contexts for disengagement, such…

  13. What Disengages Doctoral Students in the Biological and Environmental Sciences from Their Doctoral Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, V.; Taina, J.; Pyhältö, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causes of student disengagement from their doctoral studies in the biological and environmental sciences. The data came from interviews of 40 doctoral students (male = 15, female = 25) and underwent qualitative analysis for content. Our results showed that doctoral studies provide multiple contexts for disengagement, such…

  14. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  15. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  16. Characteristics of PETE Doctoral Level Institutions: Descriptions of Programs, Faculty and Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, B. Ann; Rikard, G. Linda

    2011-01-01

    The present study of Doctoral PETE programs provided an extensive description of demographic data which included: (a) doctoral program characteristics, (b) faculty, and (c) doctoral graduates. Several data sets from the academic years of 2005-06 and 2008-09 as well as selected summary data from 1996-97 through 2008-09 were used to make comparisons…

  17. On Doctoral Student Development: Exploring Faculty Mentoring in the Shaping of African American Doctoral Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of faculty mentorship in the shaping of African American doctoral student success. A case analysis framework is used to investigate the belief systems that doctoral students held about their doctoral experience. Data collection involved a one-phase semi-structured interview protocol used to gather information…

  18. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  19. Beyond Survival in a Doctoral Program: A Guide for Graduate and Doctoral Students in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Ernest Y.; Montemayor, Joaquin

    A guide to the doctoral studies program in education is presented to lessen the difficulty students often have in interpreting directives about the program. Brief historical information on the doctorate and the dynamics of fund finding are considered. The following areas are addressed: general requirements for the doctorate; graduate school…

  20. Advocacy skills in resident doctors.

    PubMed

    DeCesare, Julie; Jackson, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this project was to study whether a standardised patient clinical encounter learning exercise improved an Obstetrics and Gynaecology (OBGYN) resident's ability to perform patient advocacy, a systems-based practice skill. Case-control study: each of the 12 residents functioned as their own control. Additionally, aggregate data from the programme was reviewed. Twelve residents from a mid-sized OBGYN residency programme performed a standardised patient clinical encounter exercise in March of 2014. As demonstrated by the Assessment for Professional Behavior (APB) 360° evaluation, the overall total scores for the programme on patient advocacy improved, with statistical significance, when analysed by the signed ranked test. Additionally, the residents' self-identified capability to perform advocacy improved after the programme, with statistical significance, when analysed by the signed rank test. A standardised patient clinical encounter, used as a learning exercise, can demonstrate meaningful improvement in the advocacy skills of a resident doctor. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  2. Tips for Talking to Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9#header-section #main-nav, #overlay-menu nav, #mobile-menu, #one-page-nav li .hover-caption{font- ... by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: appointment expectations, communication, doctor's office, examination, family doctor, health history, health ...

  3. Best Practices in Doctoral Retention: Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Judie L.; Balcanoff, Karen K.; Land, Denise; Gogarty, Maurice; Turner, Freda

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students,…

  4. Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Internet Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby KidsHealth > For Parents > Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby Print A A A What's in this ... recommendations. If you've recently moved to a new area, you may not have personal or social ...

  5. David Baines: Rural Doctor, Lecturer, Dancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the career of David Baines, an American Indian doctor who successfully integrates traditional and modern medicine. Describes problems faced by American Indian doctors, the tremendous amount of work involved in medical training, and problems associated with working in rural areas and trying to straddle two opposing cultures when…

  6. The Agile Approach with Doctoral Dissertation Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tengberg, Lars Göran Wallgren

    2015-01-01

    Several research findings conclude that many doctoral students fail to complete their studies within the allowable time frame, in part because of problems related to the research and supervision process. Surveys show that most doctoral students are generally satisfied with their dissertation supervision. However, these surveys also reveal some…

  7. Doctor of Professional Counseling: The Next Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern, Stephen; Cade, Rochelle; Locke, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Professional doctorates have been established in the allied health professions by clinicians seeking the highest levels of independent practice. Allied health professional doctorates include nursing practice (DNP), occupational therapy (OTD), psychology (PsyD), social work (DSW), and marriage and family therapy (DMFT). Lessons learned from the…

  8. Different Types of Doctoral Study Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahenius, Katja; Martinsuo, Miia

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a doctor can be viewed as a highly personal and unique experience, which is why many factors influence the completion or non-completion of the doctoral degree. The attention in previous research has been on the students' characteristics, and the university faculty role in promoting degree progress. Therefore, more research is needed on…

  9. Addressing the Curriculum Problem in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bill

    2012-01-01

    How best to understand the curriculum problem in doctoral research education: that is the question that this paper engages. It begins by noting that curriculum as such is little referenced and inadequately theorised in higher education and certainly in doctoral education, and indeed has been described as a "missing term". The paper then…

  10. Passionate Scholars: Transformative Learning in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Long, Judith; Schapiro, Steven A.; McClintock, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the relationships among student-centered doctoral study for scholar-practitioners, adult development, and transformative learning. In this research study, the authors describe a project that explores an expanded conceptualization of doctoral education that is grounded in an integrative perspective on adult development and on…

  11. The Risky Business of Doctoral Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica; Sanderson, Don; Evans, Terry; Lawson, Alan; Taylor, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Universities are under no less pressure to adopt risk management strategies than other public and private organisations. The risk management of doctoral education is a particularly important issue given that a doctorate is the highest academic qualification a university offers and stakes are high in terms of assuring its quality. However, intense…

  12. Understanding the Experiences of Female Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lorraine; Watson, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from a qualitative study of the impact of gender on the doctoral experience. Eight women who had recently completed or who had almost completed a PhD were interviewed about their experiences. Seven studied part time and one full time. It was found that being a mother had profound implications for doctoral-level…

  13. Different Types of Doctoral Study Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahenius, Katja; Martinsuo, Miia

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a doctor can be viewed as a highly personal and unique experience, which is why many factors influence the completion or non-completion of the doctoral degree. The attention in previous research has been on the students' characteristics, and the university faculty role in promoting degree progress. Therefore, more research is needed on…

  14. European Industrial Doctorates: Marie Curie Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Commission, 2012

    2012-01-01

    European industrial doctorates are joint doctoral training projects funded by the European Union (EU) and open to all research fields. The project brings together an academic participant (university, research institution, etc.) and a company. They have to be established in two different EU Member States or associated countries. Associated partners…

  15. The Risky Business of Doctoral Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica; Sanderson, Don; Evans, Terry; Lawson, Alan; Taylor, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Universities are under no less pressure to adopt risk management strategies than other public and private organisations. The risk management of doctoral education is a particularly important issue given that a doctorate is the highest academic qualification a university offers and stakes are high in terms of assuring its quality. However, intense…

  16. Mentoring and Doctoral Completion in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This investigator provides support to current research findings that mentoring can be a successful factor in doctoral degree completion (Maher, Ford and Thompson, 2004). Of concern to this researcher is the shortage of doctoral degree recipients, whose dissertations reflect special education issues, to meet current educational demands (Smith,…

  17. Current Issues in Social Work Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of doctoral programs in social work is to prepare research-scientists who contribute to knowledge that guides professional practice and educators competent to teach new cohorts of social work practitioners. In grooming stewards of the profession, doctoral programs also must prepare their graduates to support the larger contemporary…

  18. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  19. Doctor of Professional Counseling: The Next Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern, Stephen; Cade, Rochelle; Locke, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Professional doctorates have been established in the allied health professions by clinicians seeking the highest levels of independent practice. Allied health professional doctorates include nursing practice (DNP), occupational therapy (OTD), psychology (PsyD), social work (DSW), and marriage and family therapy (DMFT). Lessons learned from the…

  20. Interdisciplinary Doctoral Research Supervision: A Scoping Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanstone, Meredith; Hibbert, Kathy; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; McKenzie, Pam; Pitman, Allan; Lingard, Lorelei

    2013-01-01

    This scoping literature review examines the topic of interdisciplinary doctoral research supervision. Interdisciplinary doctoral research programs are expanding in response to encouragement from funding agencies and enthusiasm from faculty and students. In an acknowledgement that the search for creative and innovative solutions to complex problems…

  1. David Baines: Rural Doctor, Lecturer, Dancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the career of David Baines, an American Indian doctor who successfully integrates traditional and modern medicine. Describes problems faced by American Indian doctors, the tremendous amount of work involved in medical training, and problems associated with working in rural areas and trying to straddle two opposing cultures when…

  2. Real Estate Doctoral Program Survey, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Robert

    Results of a survey of 15 universities that offer a doctoral program in real estate are presented. A total of 53 full-time faculty teaching real estate were recorded. The universities listed 143 graduates with a doctorate, concentration, or major in real estate. Of these graduates, 127 received their degree prior to 1985. There were 136 male and 7…

  3. Current Issues in Social Work Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of doctoral programs in social work is to prepare research-scientists who contribute to knowledge that guides professional practice and educators competent to teach new cohorts of social work practitioners. In grooming stewards of the profession, doctoral programs also must prepare their graduates to support the larger contemporary…

  4. The Universal Doctor of Pharmacy Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, A. R.; Benedict, L. Kirk

    1975-01-01

    Rationale for the decision by the University of Nebraska College of Pharmacy to offer only the doctor of pharmacy degree (no bachelor's degree) is presented with the recommendation that the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy encourage implementation of the doctoral degree as the sole undergraduate degree in the profession. (JT)

  5. European Industrial Doctorates: Marie Curie Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Commission, 2012

    2012-01-01

    European industrial doctorates are joint doctoral training projects funded by the European Union (EU) and open to all research fields. The project brings together an academic participant (university, research institution, etc.) and a company. They have to be established in two different EU Member States or associated countries. Associated partners…

  6. Rethinking the Australian Doctoral Examination Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiley, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This paper suggests rethinking the doctoral examination process in Australia to enable a closer alignment with the aims of the learning programme. The doctoral examination processes generally aim to assess the candidate's research capability, the quality and originality of the candidate's contribution to knowledge, and to authenticate that the…

  7. A Woman's Guide to Doctoral Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Diana

    This guide is designed to help women undertake and enjoy working for a doctorate as they recognize the rules of the academic game. The situation in the United Kingdom is compared with that of North America and Australia, and the pros and cons of acquiring a Ph.D. and the new professional doctorates are discussed. The chapters are: (1)…

  8. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper. PMID:27417625

  9. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-06-30

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper.

  10. Supporting Doctoral Students and Faculty: The Development of an Annual Doctoral Symposium.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Rebecca M

    The aim of the study was to develop a sustainable annual symposium to support doctoral students in nursing across the state of Georgia. A goal of the nursing profession, highlighted in the Institute of Medicine Future of Nursing report of 2011, is to increase the number of nurses with doctorates. They are needed to fill faculty positions as professors retire and to step into leadership positions as health care systems become more complex. The Georgia Nursing Leadership Coalition developed a Doctoral Symposium in 2014 that has been repeated annually. The Doctoral Symposium gives doctoral students and faculty the opportunity to network, discuss current issues, advance their skills, and (for students) share their work. Approximately 100 people attend each year; costs and attendance fees have been kept low. Lessons learned are provided. The Doctoral Symposium is a sustainable, valuable activity for supporting doctoral students and faculty.

  11. Introduction of a junior doctors' handbook: an essential guide for new doctors

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Daniella; Petrie, Claire; Tully, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    The transition period for new junior doctors is a daunting and challenging time, as vast amounts of information specific to each hospital, ward, and job must be learnt while maintaining patient care standards.[1] In NHS Tayside, Scotland, tips and guidance for each job are informally handed over from previous junior doctors to the next, resulting in an unreliable and unsustainable handover of information. Time must then be spent by new doctors learning the intricacies and practicalities of their new job, rather than spending time focusing on patient care. Our aim was to improve this transition period for new junior doctors to NHS Tayside through the creation and implementation of a junior doctors' handbook, which would provide information and practical advice on day to day life as a junior doctor. We hoped to implement this project by August 2015 to coincide with the arrival of these new doctors to NHS Tayside. Through repeat PDSA cycles we created a sustainable and reliable junior doctors' handbook, containing a centralised hub of information for doctors that was accessible through our health board's website. The junior doctors' handbook has been a highly beneficial resource that has been praised for its detailed information on all aspects of day to day life for doctors in NHS Tayside. Feedback also demonstrated that doctors felt the junior doctors' handbook had improved their efficiency. Our hope is that this project can continue to be developed within our hospital, but also to be used as an idea outside our health board to improve the transition period for new doctors on a wider scale. PMID:26893891

  12. Disaster, stress and the doctor.

    PubMed

    Fain, R M; Schreier, R A

    1989-01-01

    Man is unable to control for the ever-present potential of disaster. In the past practices and procedures have been developed to minimize physical risk and maximize personal safety. However, there has been little awareness of, or attention to, the stress to those involved in the care-giving process to the victims. Medical care-givers are at the forefront of post-disaster intervention. It is necessary to provide training and support for doctors engaged in post-disaster work, especially with regard to the psychosocial consequences for patients, relatives, and the medical team as a group and as individuals. Pre-disaster preparation is suggested as a situational moderator in the prevention or management of extreme strain in medical and paramedical staff. Specifically, social support in the form of team-building and supervisory support and debriefing, use of personality hardiness concepts in selection and training of staff, and general emergency preparedness should form part of a disaster preparation plan. Medical social workers and psychologists can play an important role as facilitators in disaster preparation. The importance of education and increasing awareness of disaster effects on the health team is emphasized.

  13. Changes in teaching delivery by foundation doctors.

    PubMed

    Farikullah, Jasmin; Mirza, Omar

    2015-02-01

    Contributing to the education of students as a junior doctor, with a busy rota, in an ever-evolving health care system can be challenging. A 4-month timetable was organised to fit in with both the commitments of 60 foundation doctors and 120 final-year medical students. Using the already established online undergraduate timetable system, foundation doctors created regular sign-up teaching sessions for students to attend. Foundation doctors had their teaching assessed by senior colleagues, enabling work-based assessments to be completed and mapped to their curriculum. Feedback from both students and foundation doctors was collected using free-text answers and scale ratings. A total of 49 foundation doctors and 70 medical students were involved in the pilot teaching scheme. Using thematic analysis from the feedback, 76 per cent of foundation doctors reported an increased confidence in delivering teaching. In relation to the students, 75 per cent attended regular teaching sessions, 80 per cent found the teaching sessions relevant to their learning and preparation for final examinations, and 97 per cent would recommend this scheme to the next cohort of students. Teaching hospitals should encourage regular undergraduate teaching led by foundation trainees. Incorporating a flexible timetable and ensuring teacher availability can allow the delivery of high-quality teaching that is not only beneficial for the student but also for junior doctors keen to enhance their teaching ability. By being involved in regular teaching, junior doctors are able to build the skills, attitudes and practices of being competent clinical teachers, thereby preparing them to become the educators and trainers of the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Overseas Doctors Training Scheme: failing expectations.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Overseas Doctors Training Scheme needs appraisal. Set up 10 years ago to improve the quality of postgraduate training that overseas (non-European) doctors receive in Britain, the scheme has been popular, but it is questionable how far it has achieved its aims. If Britain is to continue to employ large numbers of overseas doctors in training grades, both through the scheme and through independent arrangements, the apparent mismatch between their expectations and the reality of what Britain offers must be tackled. Images p1629-a PMID:7993422

  15. How to succeed as a junior doctor.

    PubMed

    Azad, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) organised an inaugural 1-day conference, the aim of which was to look into some of the key issues that junior doctors need to address when beginning their careers. The target audience was medical students but a few foundation doctors were also in attendance. The conference also helped to increase RCP engagement with medical students and foundation doctors. The day was co-chaired by Professor Kate Thomas (vice dean, University of Birmingham) and Dr Andrew Macleod and Dr Kanwaljit Sandhu (RCP regional advisors for the West Midlands). © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  16. The Legal Relationship of Doctor and Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, John R.

    1983-01-01

    While doctors working in hospitals have usually been regarded as independent contractors, liable to the patient and for whom the hospital may not be held liable by the patient, some recent cases are beginning to change this assumption, especially where the case is an emergency giving the patient no choice of doctor but the one on duty at the time. These changes have particular implications for the insurance situation, since hospitals are entitled to sue someone on whose behalf they have been found vicariously negligent. As a condition of hospital privileges, they may require evidence of the doctor's insurance protection against legal action. PMID:21283286

  17. The doctor(s) in house: an analysis of the evolution of the television doctor-hero.

    PubMed

    Strauman, Elena C; Goodier, Bethany C

    2011-03-01

    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the "television doctor" by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal of scientifically uncovering and resolving instances of disease. This article examines the implicit and explicit messages in House M.D. and critically analyzes both the show and its lead character in relation to the traditional medical drama genre that highlights the "doctor-hero" as the central character. While at first House seems to completely violate narrative and generic norms, ultimately the program provides a new form that reinforces the presence of the doctor-hero, but highlights House's character as the central figure who is personally and interpersonally problematic but biomedically effective.

  18. Cultural initiation of medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Zsinkó-Szabó, Zoltán; Lázár, Imre

    2013-12-01

    Eighteen years experience of teaching medical anthropology at a Hungarian medical school offers insight into the dynamics of interference between the rationalist epistemological tradition of biomedicine as one of the central paradigms of modernism and the cultural relativism of medical anthropology, as cultural anthropology is considered to be one of the generators of postmodern thinking. Tracing back the informal "prehistory" of our Institute, we can reveal its psychosomatic, humanistic commitment and critical basis as having represented a kind of counterculture compared with the technocrats of state-socialist Hungary's health ideology. The historical change and socio-cultural transition in Hungary after 1989 was accompanied by changes in the medical system as well as in philosophy and in the structure of the teaching of social sciences. The developing pluralism in the medical system together with the pluralism of social ideologies allowed the substitution of the dogmatic Marxist-Leninist framework with the more pragmatic and empiricist behavioral sciences including medical sociology and medical anthropology. The conflict between the initiation function of the hard preclinical training of the first two years, and the reflective, relativistic and critical narrative on "biomedicine as culture bound entity" constructed by medical anthropology during the second year of medical training is discussed. We also submit our fieldwork data gained as a result of a two year investigation period focusing on diverse initiation types of "would be" physicians. The main proportion of our data derives from individual semi structured deep interviews together with focus group interviews carried out with medical students of upper years. Finally, the role of medical anthropology in the "rite of passage" of becoming a medical doctor is summarized, paying attention to their field work reports and the risks and gains in this process.

  19. International doctoral education partnership: the first full-time doctoral program for nurses in china.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Marie T; Liu, Huaping; Li, Zheng; Lu, Chongmei; Hill, Martha N

    2011-01-01

    In July 2008, five nurses graduated from the first full-time doctoral program for nurses in China at Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) in Beijing. The purpose of this article is to describe the doctoral program partnership between the Schools of Nursing at PUMC and Johns Hopkins University (Hopkins) in the United States that led to this historic event. The planning, implementation, evaluation, and early outcomes of the program are described to provide a model for rapidly increasing capacity for doctoral education in nursing in countries without sufficient or any doctoral education in nursing. One of the main objectives of this doctoral program partnership was to transition the Chinese University to an independent doctoral program as rapidly as possible. Lessons learned are presented as well as the next steps for this program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Advancing the profession through doctoral education.

    PubMed

    Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Spolarich, Ann Eshenaur

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education in dental hygiene is necessary to create a cadre of dental hygiene researchers and scholars, and to develop educators who will expand the body of knowledge for the profession. Dental hygienists with advanced degrees will require skill sets that parallel those of other professionals if they are to function productively as credible, equal members of interprofessional teams. Doctorally-prepared dental hygienists will be working as leaders, administrators and researchers, and will be influential in creating models that increase access to care, developing collaborative health care teams and improving health outcomes. The doctorate of philosophy is the terminal graduate degree for any discipline, and is the pinnacle for the profession. This paper explores the development of doctoral degrees for dental hygiene, and encourages educators to develop models for graduate programs based upon considerations presented here.

  1. AMA Physician Select: Online Doctor Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... members must adhere to the AMA's Principles of Medical Ethics. DoctorFinder Usage Verification Type the two words you see in the picture below: Copyright 1995- American Medical Association All rights reserved. Contact Us | Terms of ...

  2. Talking to Your Doctor (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & ... about raising personal subjects (like physical development or sexual health), it's helpful to know that doctors deal with ...

  3. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... gov ® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  4. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... gov® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  5. Constipation - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000214.htm Constipation - what to ask your doctor To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Constipation is when you are passing stools less often ...

  6. Questions for Your Doctor: Your First Visit

    MedlinePlus

    The Testicular Cancer Resource Center Questions for your Doctor: Your First Visit This list of questions is intended to help ... cancer, be happy, but also be aware that testicular cancer is misdiagnosed as epididymitis or something similar almost ...

  7. How Do Doctors Diagnose NAFLD and NASH?

    MedlinePlus

    ... show nodules, or lumps, on your liver. Liver biopsy During a liver biopsy , a doctor will take ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  8. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000222.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  9. Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000223.htm Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor To use the ... enable JavaScript. Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within ...

  10. Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... citing a doctor for nonpayment of certain administrative fees to suspending or revoking his or her license ... not have prepaid health coverage. What are the fees for services? Must they be paid in full ...

  11. The Companion Dissertation: Enriching the Doctoral Experience.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Erin M; Tagher, Catherine Gannon

    2017-09-01

    The completion of a doctoral dissertation has traditionally been an individual journey. Innovative approaches, such as the companion dissertation, are helping to shape doctoral education. The companion dissertation is a collaborative inquiry among two or more doctoral students who share mutual research interests. Lack of innovative approaches to doctoral dissertation completion led to the development of a companion dissertation. Generative leadership, specifically focused on processes that influence interaction, served as a useful framework to support this form of innovation. The companion dissertation process yielded consideration of differing perspectives, richer data, stronger data analysis, and robust research outcomes. Most important, this approach to research fostered student-to-student connectedness, which was essential to dissertation completion. Currently, the attrition rate for PhD students is approximately 30%. Therefore, it becomes imperative to consider innovative approaches to completion of the dissertation process. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(9):564-566.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Heart failure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000224.htm Heart failure - what to ask your doctor To use the ... a pump that moves blood through your body. Heart failure occurs when blood does not move well and ...

  13. Doctor-Patient Relationship in Psychiatry*

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawala, Paresh D.

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the issue of doctor-patient relationship in view of a changing world with special emphasis on mental health professionals. It takes into account transference and counter-transference issues in doctor-patient relationships. It deals with issues pertaining to consent and liabilities, confidentiality and patient protection. Role of a psychiatrist as a leader in the art of communication is touched upon. In the end issues about professional fees and ethics too is dealt with. PMID:25838726

  14. Doctor-patient relationship in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Lakdawala, Paresh D

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the issue of doctor-patient relationship in view of a changing world with special emphasis on mental health professionals. It takes into account transference and counter-transference issues in doctor-patient relationships. It deals with issues pertaining to consent and liabilities, confidentiality and patient protection. Role of a psychiatrist as a leader in the art of communication is touched upon. In the end issues about professional fees and ethics too is dealt with.

  15. Doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Gretchen L; Smith, Michael J; Abate, Marie A; Halverson, Joel

    2012-06-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a major health concern nationwide, with West Virginia having one of the highest prescription drug death rates in the United States. Studies are lacking that compare living subjects with persons who died from drug overdose for evidence of doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances. The study objectives were to compare deceased and living subjects in West Virginia for evidence of prior doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances and to identify factors associated with drug-related death. A secondary data study was conducted using controlled substance, Schedule II-IV, prescription data from the West Virginia Controlled Substance Monitoring Program and drug-related death data compiled by the Forensic Drug Database between July 2005 and December 2007. A case-control design compared deceased subjects 18 years and older whose death was drug related with living subjects for prior doctor and pharmacy shopping. Logistic regression identified factors related to the odds of drug-related death. A significantly greater proportion of deceased subjects were doctor shoppers (25.21% vs. 3.58%) and pharmacy shoppers (17.48% vs. 1.30%) than living subjects. Approximately 20.23% of doctor shoppers were also pharmacy shoppers, and 55.60% of pharmacy shoppers were doctor shoppers. Younger age, greater number of prescriptions dispensed, exposure to opioids and benzodiazepines, and doctor and pharmacy shopping were factors with greater odds of drug-related death. Doctor and pharmacy shopping involving controlled substances were identified, and shopping behavior was associated with drug-related death. Prescription monitoring programs may be useful in identifying potential shoppers at the point of care.

  16. Doctors with dyslexia: strategies and support.

    PubMed

    Locke, Rachel; Alexander, Gail; Mann, Richard; Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha

    2016-10-06

    Looking beyond dyslexia as an individual doctor's issue requires adjusting a working environment to better serve the needs of doctors with dyslexia. With an increasing number of doctors disclosing dyslexia at medical school, how can educators best provide this support? Our research looks at the impact of dyslexia on clinical practice and the coping strategies used by doctors to minimise the effect. Qualitative data were collected from 14 doctors with dyslexia using semi-structured interviews and by survey. 'In situ' demonstration interviews were conducted in order to understand how dyslexia is managed in the workplace from first-hand experience. Employers and educators who have responsibility for meeting the needs of this group were also consulted. Even in cases of doctors who had a diagnosis, they often did not disclose their dyslexia to their employer. Study participants reported having developed individual ways of coping and devised useful 'workarounds'. Support from employers comes in the form of 'reasonable adjustments', although from our data we cannot be sure that such adjustments contribute to an 'enabling' work environment. Supportive characteristics included the opportunity to shadow others and the time and space to complete paperwork on a busy ward. How can educators best provide support [for doctors with dyslexia]? Doctors with dyslexia need to be helped to feel comfortable enough to disclose. Educators need to challenge any negative assumptions that exist as well as promote understanding about the elements that contribute to a positive working environment. As a result of the research there is now practice available for educators to identify evidence-based strategies and resources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  17. SAS doctors career progression survey 2013.

    PubMed

    Oroz, Carlos; Sands, Lorna R; Lee, John

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a national survey of Staff, Associate Specialists and Specialty (SAS) doctors working in sexual health clinics in the UK in 2013 in order to explore their career progression. The aim of the survey was to assess SAS doctors' experience in passing through the thresholds and to gather information about the adherence by SAS doctors and employers to the terms and conditions of service laid out by the new 2008 contract. Out of 185 responders, whom the authors estimate comprise 34% of the total workforce, 159 were on the new contract. Of those, most SAS doctors were women (84%), the majority (67%) worked less than nine programmed activities per week; only a few had intentions to join the consultant grade (15%), and a considerable minority (26%) were older than 54 years of age and likely to retire in the next ten years. The survey showed that most participating SAS doctors had undergone appraisal in the previous 15 months (90%), most had a job planning discussion (83%) with their employer and most had some allocated time for supporting professional activities (86%). However, a significant minority had no appraisal (10%), no job planning discussion (17%) and had no allocated supporting professional activities (14%), which allows time for career development in the specialty. Most SAS doctors, who had the opportunity, had progressed through the thresholds automatically (88%); some experienced difficulties in passing (8%) and only a few did not pass (4%). SAS doctors must ensure that they work together with their employer in order to improve adherence to the terms and conditions of service of the contract, which allow for career progression and benefit both the individual doctors and ultimately service provision.

  18. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys.

    PubMed

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J; Lambert, Trevor W

    2016-04-01

    We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors' comments about working whilst acutely ill. Self-completed questionnaire surveys. United Kingdom. Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor's ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work.

  19. Doctor shopping: a phenomenon of many themes.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2012-11-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments.

  20. Senior doctors' opinions of rational suicide.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Stephen; Price, Annabel; Rayner, Lauren; Owen, Gareth S; Hayes, Richard D; Hotopf, Matthew; Lee, William

    2011-12-01

    The attitudes of medical professionals towards physician assisted dying have been widely discussed. Less explored is the level of agreement among physicians on the possibility of 'rational suicide'-a considered suicide act made by a sound mind and a precondition of assisted dying legislation. To assess attitudes towards rational suicide in a representative sample of senior doctors in England and Wales. A postal survey was conducted of 1000 consultants and general practitioners randomly selected from a commercially available database. The main outcome of interest was level of agreement with a statement about rational suicide. The corrected participation rate was 50%; 363 questionnaires were analysed. Overall 72% of doctors agreed with the possibility of rational suicide, 17% disagreed, and 11% were neutral. Doctors who identified themselves as being more religious were more likely to disagree. Some doctors who disagreed with legalisation of physician assisted suicide nevertheless agreed with the concept of rational suicide. Most senior doctors in England and Wales feel that rational suicide is possible. There was no association with specialty. Strong religious belief was associated with disagreement, although levels of agreement were still high in people reporting the strongest religious belief. Most doctors who were opposed to physician assisted suicide believed that rational suicide was possible, suggesting that some medical opposition is best explained by other factors such as concerns of assessment and protection of vulnerable patients.

  1. Doctor's attire influences perceived empathy in the patient-doctor relationship.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heesu; Lee, Hyeyeon; Chang, Dong-Seon; Kim, Ho-Sun; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether doctors' attire influences the perception of empathy in the patient-doctor relationship during a therapeutic encounter. A total number of 143 patients were divided into four groups when they were consulting a Traditional Korean Medicine doctor. Depending on the group, the same doctor was wearing four different attires--Casual, Suit, Traditional dress, White coat--when having a clinical consultation with the patients. The patients preferred white coat and traditional dress more than other attires, giving highest scores to white coat in competency, trustworthiness and preference of attire and to traditional dress in comfortableness and contentment with the consultation. The "Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE)" score was significantly higher in the "White coat" and "Traditional" groups, compared to the "Casual" and "Suit" groups. The strong association between the patients' preference of doctors' attire and the CARE score indicates that the doctor's attire plays not only an important role for establishing confidence and trustworthiness but also for the perception of empathy in the patient-doctor relationship. The doctor's attire can function as an effective tool of non-verbal communication in order to signal confidence, trust and empathy and establish a good patient-doctor relationship. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [The motivation to become a medical doctor - doctoral students in a formal academic study program compared with those pursuing their doctorate independently].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, M; Dimitriadis, K; Holzer, M; Reincke, M; Fischer, M R

    2011-04-01

    Weight and quality of medical doctoral theses have been discussed in Germany for years. Doctoral study programs in various graduate schools offer opportunities to improve quality of medical doctoral theses. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate distinctions and differences concerning motivation, choice of subject and the dissertation process between doctoral candidates completing the doctoral seminar for doctoral students in the Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich and doctoral candidates doing their doctorate individually. All 4000 medical students of the LMU obtained an online-questionnaire which was completed by 767 students (19 % response rate). The theoretical framework of this study was based upon the Self-Determination-Theory by Deci and Ryan. Doctoral candidates completing the doctoral study program were more intrinsically motivated than doctoral candidates doing their doctorate individually; no difference was found in their extrinsic motivation. In regard to choice of subject and dissertation process the doctoral students in the seminar were distinguished from the individual group by having chosen a more challenging project. They anticipated a demanding dissertation process including conference participation, publishing of papers, etc. Intrinsic motivation correlates positively with choosing a challenging project and a demanding dissertation process. High intrinsic motivation seems to be very important for autonomous scholarly practice. Our results suggest that doctoral study programs have a positive impact on intrinsic motivation and interest in research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Interpersonal perception in the context of doctor-patient relationships: a dyadic analysis of doctor-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Kenny, David A; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Weijden, Trudy van der; Leblanc, Annie; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Légaré, France; Campbell, Craig

    2010-03-01

    Doctor-patient communication is an interpersonal process and essential to relationship-centered care. However, in many studies, doctors and patients are studied as if living in separate worlds. This study assessed whether: 1) doctors' perception of their communication skills is congruent with their patients' perception; and 2) patients of a specific doctor agree with each other about their doctor's communication skills. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three provinces in Canada with 91 doctors and their 1749 patients. Doctors and patients independently completed questions on the doctor's communication skills (content and process) after a consultation. Multilevel modeling provided an estimate of the patient and doctor variance components at both the dyad-level and the doctor-level. We computed correlations between patients' and doctors' perceptions at both levels to assess how congruent they were. Consensus among patients of a specific doctor was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean score of the rating of doctor's skills according to patients was 4.58, and according to doctors was 4.37. The dyad-level variance for the patient was .38 and for the doctor was .06. The doctor-level variance for the patient ratings was .01 and for the doctor ratings, .18. The correlation between both the patients' and the doctors' skills' ratings scores at the dyad-level was weak. At the doctor-level, the correlation was not statistically significant. The ICC for patients' ratings was .03 and for the doctors' ratings .76. Overall, this study suggests that doctors and their patients have a very different perspective of the doctors' communication skills occurring during routine clinical encounters. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Student Perceptions of Nurse Doctorates: Similarities and Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudacek, Sharon; Carpenter, Dona Rinaldi

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 341 doctor of philosophy, 47 doctorate of nursing science, and 13 doctor of education nursing students found that Ph.D. candidates perceived a stronger research preparation, which they would not receive in the other two doctoral programs. They did not perceive the Ph.D. as preparing them to be educators, practitioners, or…

  5. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  6. Some Thoughts on Doctoral Preparation in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reys, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Arguments for significantly improving doctoral programs have long been made, both nationally and internationally. The nature and variety of doctoral programs makes it difficult to single out specific changes that would be equally applicable to every discipline-specific doctoral program. Therefore, this commentary will focus on doctoral programs…

  7. Supporting Doctoral Students in Their Professional Identity Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasanen, Keijo; Korpiaho, Kirsi

    2011-01-01

    Doctoral programmes and education do not necessarily pay enough attention to the professional development of the student. Doctoral students may struggle with an unclear conception of who they can and want to become as a result of their doctoral studies. This paper describes an event that aimed to provide doctoral students with opportunities to…

  8. Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1991. Selected Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    The data presented in this report show trends in doctorate production by science and engineering (S&E) field and recipient characteristics, institutions awarding doctorates, and postgraduation plans of recipients. The data comes from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which is conducted annually. Doctoral degrees such as the Ph.D. or D.Sc. are…

  9. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  10. The Rise of Professional Doctorates: Case Studies of the Doctorate in Education in China, Iceland and Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildy, Helen; Peden, Sanna; Chan, Karyn

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education is going through a period of transition. This transition is evident in the many varieties of doctoral degrees currently offered in higher education institutions worldwide, from the traditional research-based Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to the Professional Doctorate and the New Route PhD. This article reports on a study which…

  11. A signal detection approach to patient-doctor communication and doctor-shopping behaviour among Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Akihito; Tarumi, Kimio; Odamaki, Misato; Nobutomo, Koichi

    2005-12-01

    As one of the factors related to doctor-shopping behaviour (i.e. consulting multiple doctors with regard to the same illness episode), very little has been revealed about the role of doctor explanation. We examined therefore the association between doctor explanation and doctor-shopping behaviour. The subjects were internist-patient pairs in Japan. Signal detection analysis (SDA) was used for the data analysis. Of the 303 patients, 84 patients engaged in doctor shopping (27.7%). The following results were obtained: (1) of the 19 relevant variables, the 'level of doctor explanation: treatment' was the most significant predictor of doctor-shopping behaviour (P < 0.01), and (2) with regard to their subjective evaluations of the sufficiency of their explanations about treatment or testing, the evaluations of the doctors, rather than those of the patient, were significant predictors of doctor-shopping behaviour. These results imply the following: (1) a patient's inability to understand a doctor's explanation about treatment, which results from a large gap between the perceptions of the patient and those of the doctor, is the most significant predictor of doctor-shopping behaviour, and (2) in the context of favourable patient-doctor interactions, when doctors feel their explanations are insufficient, they may be able to prevent doctor-shopping behaviour by providing relatively thorough explanations about treatment.

  12. The Rise of Professional Doctorates: Case Studies of the Doctorate in Education in China, Iceland and Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildy, Helen; Peden, Sanna; Chan, Karyn

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education is going through a period of transition. This transition is evident in the many varieties of doctoral degrees currently offered in higher education institutions worldwide, from the traditional research-based Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to the Professional Doctorate and the New Route PhD. This article reports on a study which…

  13. Reexamining the Structure of Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, James

    2003-01-01

    Considers how Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife" is a model of Edgar Allan Poe's aesthetic of the short story. Examines this work on many levels. Concludes that great writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, challenge readers to find the clues, to connect the dots, to pay attention to the "little details." (SG)

  14. The Criminal Justice Doctorate: A Study of Doctoral Programs in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felkenes, George T.

    Graduates of six institutions were surveyed in an effort to develop a profile of doctoral graduates from institutions that have traditionally offered doctoral programs oriented specifically toward the field of criminal justice. A second research objective was to develop an understanding of the attitudes, frustrations, and utilization patterns of…

  15. The Criminal Justice Doctorate: A Study of Doctoral Programs in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felkenes, George T.

    Graduates of six institutions were surveyed in an effort to develop a profile of doctoral graduates from institutions that have traditionally offered doctoral programs oriented specifically toward the field of criminal justice. A second research objective was to develop an understanding of the attitudes, frustrations, and utilization patterns of…

  16. Child Development and the Coworking of Doctor and Teacher: A Waldorf School Doctor's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnow, Gerald F.

    This paper draws on the nearly 20 years' experiences of a school doctor working with teachers at the Rudolf Steiner School in New York City to describe general principles of assessing child development in relation to educational progress. The paper contrasts the customary role of school doctors (related to conducting physical examinations for…

  17. Persisting Dreams: The Impact of the Doctoral Socialization Process on Latina Post-Doctoral Career Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerband, Yamissette Milagros

    2016-01-01

    Latinas are underrepresented within the professorate and within doctoral programs, particularly within Research Intensive Institutions. This dissertation explores how the doctoral socialization process impacts the pipeline from the Ph.D. to scholarly careers for Latinas in Research universities. Given the low numbers of representation and…

  18. Doctoral Studies in Spain: Changes to Converge with Europe in the Internationalisation of the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramírez, Magdalena Jiménez

    2016-01-01

    In Spain, the organisation of doctoral studies has been substantially modified to come into line with the changes introduced by the agenda of the Bologna process. These changes have been specified in a number of statements by European Ministers of Education, and have required alterations to Spanish doctoral regulations. The aim of these changes…

  19. Persisting Dreams: The Impact of the Doctoral Socialization Process on Latina Post-Doctoral Career Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerband, Yamissette Milagros

    2016-01-01

    Latinas are underrepresented within the professorate and within doctoral programs, particularly within Research Intensive Institutions. This dissertation explores how the doctoral socialization process impacts the pipeline from the Ph.D. to scholarly careers for Latinas in Research universities. Given the low numbers of representation and…

  20. Reexamining the Structure of Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, James

    2003-01-01

    Considers how Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife" is a model of Edgar Allan Poe's aesthetic of the short story. Examines this work on many levels. Concludes that great writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, challenge readers to find the clues, to connect the dots, to pay attention to the "little details." (SG)

  1. Science/Engineering Doctorate Production Increases in 1981; More New Doctorates Seek Nonacademic Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Resources Studies Highlights, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Results of the 1981 Survey of Earned Doctorates, which is conducted by five federal agencies, are summarized. About 95 percent of the annual cohort of recipients of the Ph.D. and similar doctorates respond to the survey questionnaire. The database also includes some information on nonrespondents obtained from public sources; recipients of…

  2. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  3. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  4. Current Perceptions of the Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees in Counselor Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolbert, Jered B.; Brendel, Johnston M.; Gressard, Charles F.

    1997-01-01

    Examines current perceptions regarding the purposes and differences of the doctor of education (EdD) and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees. A survey of program coordinators (N=127) of counselor preparation programs indicate that most coordinators do not differentiate between the two degrees, although those with a decided preference favor the PhD.…

  5. An Appreciative Inquiry into Educational Administration Doctoral Programs: Stories from Doctoral Students at Three Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.; Zepeda, Sally J.; Peters, April L.; Hummel, Crystal; Kruskamp, William H.; San Martin, Teresa; Wynne, Stefanie C.

    2007-01-01

    A case study using appreciate inquiry identified and described the experiences of five educational administration doctoral students representing three universities regarding their doctoral program studies and dissertation process. Data were collected using reflective narratives and the Left Hand Right Hand Column Case Method. Data revealed (a) the…

  6. Researching Doctoral Pedagogy Close up: Design and Action in Two Doctoral Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danby, Susan; Lee, Alison

    2012-01-01

    With growing international interest in diversifying sites for pedagogical work within the doctorate, doctoral programmes of different kinds are being developed in different disciplinary, institutional and national settings. However, little is known about how the pedagogical work of these programmes is designed and enacted, and with what effects.…

  7. Unhappy doctors? A longitudinal study of life and job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors 1994 – 2002

    PubMed Central

    Nylenna, Magne; Gulbrandsen, Pål; Førde, Reidun; Aasland, Olaf G

    2005-01-01

    Background General opinion is that doctors are increasingly dissatisfied with their job, but few longitudinal studies exist. This study has been conducted to investigate a possible decline in professional and personal satisfaction among doctors by the turn of the century. Methods We have done a survey among a representative sample of 1 174 Norwegian doctors in 2002 (response rate 73 %) and compared the findings with answers to the same questions by (most of) the same doctors in 1994 and 2000. The main outcome measures were self reported levels of life satisfaction and job satisfaction according to the Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). Results Most Norwegian doctors are happy. They reported an average life satisfaction of 5.21 in 1994 and 5.32 in 2002 on a scale from 1 (extremely dissatisfied) to 7 (extremely satisfied). Half of the respondents reported a very high level of general life satisfaction (a score of 6 or 7) while only one third said they would have reported this high level of satisfaction five years ago. The doctors thought that they had a higher level of job satisfaction than other comparable professional groups. The job satisfaction scale among the same doctors showed a significant increase from 1994 to 2002. Anaesthesiologists and internists reported a lower and psychiatrists and primary care doctors reported a higher level of job satisfaction than the average. Conclusion Norwegian doctors seem to have enjoyed an increasing level of life and job satisfaction rather than a decline over the last decade. This challenges the general impression of unhappy doctors as a general and worldwide phenomenon. PMID:15943859

  8. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors’ comments about working whilst acutely ill. Design Self-completed questionnaire surveys. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. Results The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor’s ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. Conclusions We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work. PMID:27066264

  9. Do personal computers make doctors less personal?

    PubMed Central

    Rethans, Jan-Joost; Höppener, Paul; Wolfs, George; Diederiks, Jos

    1988-01-01

    Ten months after the installation of a computer in a general practice surgery a postal survey (piloted questionnaire) was sent to 390 patients. The patients' views of their relationship with their doctor after the computer was introduced were compared with their view of their relationship before the installation of the computer. More than 96% of the patients (n=263) stated that contact with their doctor was as easy and as personal as before. Most stated that the computer did not influence the duration of the consultation. Eighty one patients (30%) stated, however, that they thought that their privacy was reduced. Unlike studies of patients' attitudes performed before any actual experience of use of a computer in general practice, this study found that patients have little difficulty in accepting the presence of a computer in the consultation room. Nevertheless, doctors should inform their patients about any connections between their computer and other, external computers to allay fears about a decrease in privacy. PMID:3132287

  10. Gratuity for doctors and medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Adam, G

    1989-06-01

    The habit of giving a gratuity became so frequent at the end of the 1950's that counter-measures were enacted. These have been completely ineffective. Although granting and accepting gratuities is forbidden by law, the wages of doctors have been fixed since 1954, for so long that accepting gratuities has come to be considered part of the wages, even in semi-official comments and in the media. The author is of the opinion that, in view of this anomaly, a fundamental transformation of the health provision system (sickness insurance) is needed. The doctor should be paid according to the number of patients in his or her charge, instead of the mere number of the sick. By transforming the provision of medical care in this way, the giving and accepting of gratuities for doctors could be terminated, not only in law but also in the economy.

  11. [The profile training of aviation doctors].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Lizogub, I N

    2011-11-01

    Authors consider the trends of training doctors in the specialty "physician in aerospace medicine". First level is initial training for faculty training of doctors. The higher level is vocational retraining and advanced training in the departments of postgraduate and further education. It solved the issues of preparation of specialists in various areas of aviation medicine: medical-chairman of the Flight Commission, an expert medical doctor-flight expert committee, a specialist laboratory (Cabinet) of Aviation Medicine, the Medical Director of Aviation (enterprise, organization), etc. The highest level of training is residency. The necessity of legislative consolidation of an independent direction for the organization of training and medical support of aviation operations is proved.

  12. [CanMEDS 2015: better doctors?].

    PubMed

    Borleffs, J C C; Mourits, M J E; Scheele, F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the CanMEDS model, which forms the basis for competency-based learning in both undergraduate and postgraduate training, has been renewed by the introduction of CanMEDS 2015. The most prominent change is the emphasis on leadership skills, which is also reflected by the name change for the role of 'manager' to 'leader'. The addition of milestones provides clearly defined targets for learning and assessment, which facilitates the monitoring of the progression in competence. Furthermore, CanMEDS 2015 strongly focusses on the overall coherence of the separate competencies. CanMEDS, designed as a model that helps to train young doctors to become good doctors, also helps us - the trainers - to become better doctors ourselves.

  13. The practice doctorate: innovation or disruption?

    PubMed

    Chase, Susan K; Pruitt, Rosanne H

    2006-05-01

    Advanced practice nurses, particularly nurse practitioners, have been described as a disruptive innovation. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has proposed that by 2015 all advanced practice nurses be prepared with a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). This article uses critical reflection on published literature to examine the potential difficulties that mandating such a change may present to potential students, practicing advanced practice nurses, colleges of nursing, and doctoral education in general. After considering the pressures in the nursing profession to prepare nurse faculty and reviewing the success of current models of education for advanced practice, we explore in depth the unintended consequences of the AACN recommendation. Implications for academic nursing, curriculum, advanced practice nurses, doctoral education, titling and licensure, economic issues, and the lack of evaluation research are addressed. We recommend abandoning the 2015 deadline for implementation of advanced practice nurse preparation with the DNP.

  14. Improving incident reporting among junior doctors

    PubMed Central

    Hotton, Emily; Jordan, Lesley; Peden, Carol

    2014-01-01

    To ensure systems in hospitals improve to make patient care safer, learning must occur when things go wrong. Incident reporting is one of the commonest mechanisms used to learn from harm events and near misses. Only a relatively small number of incidents that occur are actually reported and different groups of staff have different rates of reporting. Nationally, junior doctors are low reporters of incidents, a finding supported by our local data. We set out to explore the culture and awareness around incident reporting among our junior doctors, and to improve the incident reporting rate within this important staff group. In order to achieve this we undertook a number of work programmes focused on junior doctors, including: assessment of their knowledge, confidence and understanding of incident reporting, education on how and why to report incidents with a focus on reporting on clinical themes during a specific time period, and evaluation of the experience of those doctors who reported incidents. Junior doctors were asked to focus on incident reporting during a one week period. Before and after this focussed week, they were invited to complete a questionnaire exploring their confidence about what an incident was and how to report. Prior to “Incident Reporting Week”, on average only two reports were submitted a month by junior doctors compared with an average of 15 per month following the education and awareness week. This project highlights the fact that using a focussed reporting period and/or specific clinical themes as an education tool can benefit a hospital by promoting awareness of incidents and by increasing incident reporting rates. This can only assist in improving hospital systems, and ultimately increase patient safety. PMID:26734264

  15. Improving junior doctor handover between jobs

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is one of the most important issues in healthcare. In recent years there has been much focus on “Black Wednesday”; the day that Foundation doctors start their first jobs. Great efforts have been made to ensure that patient safety on this day has improved, with the main example being that newly qualified doctors now use some of their free time between medical school and starting their first job to shadow their outgoing counterparts. However, because Foundation doctors start a brand new job approximately every four months for two years, subsequent job changeovers were identified as a time of potential problems and increased patient risk. It is not practical to shadow prior to every job because junior doctors are needed in their current post right up until changeover day, so a simple way to smooth this transition was needed. A handover lunch seemed to be a feasible solution. The day before Foundation doctors change jobs, an hour is dedicated for Foundation Year 1 doctors (F1's) to sit down together over lunch (provided by the mess) and take a formal handover of all relevant information about their forthcoming job and discuss current inpatients. Results showed that 100% of those surveyed mentioned face to face handover as essential, 93.75% said it was either helpful or extremely helpful to have a dedicated time for F1's to handover, and 12.5% said they would not have sought a face to face handover otherwise. Apart from being extremely simple and cheap, it was very popular with the F1's in the trust. It enables effective working from day one and is a great team building activity. PMID:27493740

  16. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sung Uk; Yang, Jeong Hee; Hyun, Joon Seop; Kim, June Hee; Kang, Seok Hoon

    2016-12-01

    Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK) doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE). The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ) items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK) medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%). NK doctors' lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also.

  17. Life Satisfaction and Frequency of Doctor Visits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K.; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information is available about the association between life satisfaction and health care use. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Methods Participants were 6,379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50. Participants were tracked for four years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Results Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a six-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits—after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86 to 0.93). The most satisfied respondents (N=1,121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than the least satisfied (N=182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93 to 0.99). Conclusions Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs. PMID:24336427

  18. Life satisfaction and frequency of doctor visits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high-quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information about the association between life satisfaction and health care use is available. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Participants were 6379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults older than 50 years. Participants were tracked for 4 years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a 6-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits--after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (relative risk = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.86-0.93). The most satisfied respondents (n = 1121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than did the least satisfied (n = 182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (relative risk = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.93-0.99). Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs.

  19. Improving incident reporting among junior doctors.

    PubMed

    Hotton, Emily; Jordan, Lesley; Peden, Carol

    2014-01-01

    To ensure systems in hospitals improve to make patient care safer, learning must occur when things go wrong. Incident reporting is one of the commonest mechanisms used to learn from harm events and near misses. Only a relatively small number of incidents that occur are actually reported and different groups of staff have different rates of reporting. Nationally, junior doctors are low reporters of incidents, a finding supported by our local data. We set out to explore the culture and awareness around incident reporting among our junior doctors, and to improve the incident reporting rate within this important staff group. In order to achieve this we undertook a number of work programmes focused on junior doctors, including: assessment of their knowledge, confidence and understanding of incident reporting, education on how and why to report incidents with a focus on reporting on clinical themes during a specific time period, and evaluation of the experience of those doctors who reported incidents. Junior doctors were asked to focus on incident reporting during a one week period. Before and after this focussed week, they were invited to complete a questionnaire exploring their confidence about what an incident was and how to report. Prior to "Incident Reporting Week", on average only two reports were submitted a month by junior doctors compared with an average of 15 per month following the education and awareness week. This project highlights the fact that using a focussed reporting period and/or specific clinical themes as an education tool can benefit a hospital by promoting awareness of incidents and by increasing incident reporting rates. This can only assist in improving hospital systems, and ultimately increase patient safety.

  20. Short counseling techniques for busy family doctors.

    PubMed

    Poon, V H

    1997-04-01

    To introduce two short counseling skills for busy family doctors: the BATHE technique and the DIG technique. The BATHE technique indicates five areas for questioning patients who require counseling: background, affect, trouble, handling, and empathy. No research on use of the technique has been published. The DIG technique is the author's modification of the BATHE technique. While the efficacy of counseling in general was validated, more research on the effectiveness on these two techniques needs to be done. Since counseling is an integral part of family practice, family doctors will find these techniques useful. Each is easy to learn and takes less than 15 minutes to complete.

  1. [Appropriateness prescribing and doctor's professional responsibility].

    PubMed

    Massoni, F; Simeone, C; Luzi, E; Palla, C; Ricci, S

    2012-07-01

    The public health spending has now reached very significant levels, in this sense, the responsibility of the medical doctor assumes a significant importance in medical law. The aim of this paper is to analyze the profile of responsibilities of the medical doctor in the light of recent case law. The appropriateness of prescribing and risk assessment are, according to the authors, the real test on which to test the skill, prudence and diligence which are called prescribers. Guidelines can be a valuable tool for the professional help, knowing, however, limits application of the recommendations where to be reconciling with the prevailing protection of personal rights of the user.

  2. Nineteenth century medical education for tomorrow's doctors.

    PubMed

    Waterston, S W; Laing, M R; Hutchison, J D

    2007-02-01

    Many of the ideas contained within the GMC's 'Tomorrow's Doctors' could be considered as old ideas reworked for modern medical education. Sir John Struthers, a pioneer in the field of medical education, touched on many of the issues in 'Tomorrow's Doctors' in his writings published over one hundred years ago. The study of the history of medicine, often neglected by members of our profession in the search for new ideas, is not only of interest, but is valuable to current and future medical education. History illustrates the mistakes of the past, but also helps highlight the successes and insights that remain applicable and relevant today.

  3. Running effective meetings: a primer for doctors

    PubMed Central

    O'Dea, N A; de Chazal, P; Saltman, D C; Kidd, M R

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses a series of exercises and practical examples to assist individuals and groups of doctors in training to gain skills in a critical area of management: conducting and participating in effective meetings. Through this paper, readers will be shown how to recognise and manage situations as they occur in meetings to work towards appropriate outcomes. By understanding the elements of conducting a meeting from preparation through to follow up, doctors will be able to conduct and participate more effectively in meetings that arise in their workplaces. PMID:16822922

  4. Doctoral graduates in mental health nursing in Victoria, Australia: the doctoral experience and contribution to scholarship.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Edward, Karen-Leigh; Welch, Tony

    2008-08-01

    The last decade has seen a substantial increase in the number of psychiatric or mental health nurses in Victoria, Australia who hold doctoral qualifications. The literature refers to the importance of scholarship for the professional development and recognition of nursing as a discipline. However, there is a paucity of literature addressing the contribution of nursing doctoral graduates to scholarship in mental health nursing or indeed the broader nursing profession. This paper presents the findings from a survey of psychiatric nurse doctoral graduates currently residing in the State of Victoria. A questionnaire was developed by the authors and distributed to the known doctoral graduates. The main findings demonstrate considerable variation in the discipline and topic of inquiry and in the extent to which doctoral studies had led to dissemination of research findings and engagement in further scholarly activity. The strengthening of mental health nursing knowledge requires scholarship and doctoral graduates are expected to make a major contribution, through research and the dissemination of findings. This paper presents a descriptive overview of doctoral graduates in one State of Australia with a particular focus on research and scholarship.

  5. The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Recognizing a Need or Graying the Line Between Doctor and Nurse?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jason E.

    2008-01-01

    The distinction between doctor and nurse has been historically visible to patients, and the scope of practice for each healthcare provider has been clearly marked by a wall of separation rooted in state law. In fact, even the titles by which these providers have been addressed have remained constant, with the term “doctor” being reserved for reference to physicians. With the advent of the new doctor of nursing practice degree, however, the clear distinction between doctor and nurse is in jeopardy. Moreover, accompanying the push toward a practice doctorate for advanced nursing practice is a call for the expansion of the scope of advanced nursing practice. The urgent questions at hand are the following: First, is a practice doctorate necessary or even appropriate for advanced nursing practice? Second, should the scope of advanced nursing practice be extended at this time? In addition to the increased educational requirements placed on aspiring advanced practice nurses and the associated increase in costs of obtaining the requisite education, requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing risks blurring the line between doctor and nurse and creates a potential for patient confusion. A true need for requiring a practice doctorate for advanced practice nursing has not been demonstrated. Moreover, the states should tread carefully when considering expanded roles for advanced practice nurses to avoid creating conflict within the medical community. Considering the level of qualification of today's medical school applicants, perhaps we should be training more physicians to meet the demand head-on rather than creating a separate practice doctorate to fill the gap. PMID:19099003

  6. Understanding doctors' ethical challenges as role virtue conflicts.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that doctors' ethical challenges can be usefully conceptualised as role virtue conflicts. The hospital environment requires doctors to be simultaneously good doctors, good team members, good learners and good employees. I articulate a possible set of role virtues for each of these four roles, as a basis for a virtue ethics approach to analysing doctors' ethical challenges. Using one junior doctor's story, I argue that understanding doctors' ethical challenges as role virtue conflicts enables recognition of important moral considerations that are overlooked by other approaches to ethical analysis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Patient-doctor relationship: the practice orientation of doctors in Kano.

    PubMed

    Abiola, T; Udofia, O; Abdullahi, A T

    2014-01-01

    Attitude and orientation of doctors to the doctor-patient relationship has a direct influence on delivery of high quality health- care. No study to the knowledge of these researchers has so far examined the practice orientation of doctors in Nigeria to this phenomenon. The aims of this study were to determine the orientation of Kano doctors to the practice of doctor-patient relationship and physicians' related-factors. Participants were doctors working in four major hospitals (i.e., two federal-owned and two state-owned) servicing Kano State and its environs. The Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS) and a socio-demographic questionnaire were completed by the 214 participants. The PPOS has 18 items and measures three parameters of a total score and two dimension of "sharing" and "caring". The mean age of participants was 31.72 years (standard deviation = 0.87), with 22% being females, 40.7% have been practicing for ≥ 6 years and about two-third working in federal-owned health institution. The Cronbach's alpha of total PPOS scores was 0.733 and that of two sub-scale scores of "sharing" and "caring" were 0.659 and 0.546 respectively. Most of the doctors' orientation (92.5%) was towards doctor-centered (i.e., paternalistic) care, majority (75.2%) upheld the view of not sharing much information and control with patients, and showing little interest in psychosocial concerns of patients (i.e., 'caring'=93.0%). Respondents' characteristics that were significantly associated with high doctor 'caring' relationship orientation were being ≥ 30-year-old and practicing for ≥ 6 years. Working in State-owned hospitals was also significantly associated with high doctor "sharing" orientation. This paper demonstrated why patient-centered medical interviewing should be given top priority in medical training in Nigeria, and particularly for federal health institutions saddled with production of new doctors and further training for practicing doctors.

  8. Reshaping Leadership Development through Distance Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the recent creation at a western Canadian university of a distance-delivery Doctor of Education in educational leadership and administration that was developed in response to ongoing requests from the field. A rationale for the design of the program is presented based on the need for national and global graduate study networks…

  9. MFT Doctoral Dissertations: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James

    2013-01-01

    This brief report responds to the relative dearth of information available about MFT doctoral dissertations. A preliminary analysis of one COAMFTE [Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education] program is detailed. Suggestions for future action are offered. (Contains 1 table.)

  10. A New Standard for Measuring Doctoral Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a new standard for measuring graduate programs in the United States. The Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, produced by Academic Analytics, a for-profit company, rates faculty members' scholarly output at nearly 7,300 doctoral programs around the country. It examines the number of book and journal articles published by…

  11. Pleasure, Change and Values in Doctoral Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This article explores pleasure in terms of the values of independent judgement, writerly authority, originality and singularity associated with doctoral study. It also considers how pleasure can be understood as a mode of experience that acts as a force for change. Here, the article takes a broad Deleuzian approach that is concerned with our…

  12. Doctoral Education and Transformative Consumer Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mari, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines why and how transformative consumer research (TCR) can become a relevant perspective in doctoral programs. The article draws selectively from studies published in consumer behavior, marketing, and marketing education that theoretically or empirically address this topic. It discusses the meaning and background of TCR together…

  13. How Six Sigma Methodology Improved Doctors' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafiropoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Six Sigma methodology was used in a District General Hospital to assess the effect of the introduction of an educational programme to limit unnecessary admissions. The performance of the doctors involved in the programme was assessed. Ishikawa Fishbone and 5 S's were initially used and Pareto analysis of their findings was performed. The results…

  14. Examining Dissatisfaction with an Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenby, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background: Online learning community based education is still new. As institutions implement new programs they can encounter learner satisfaction issues. Purpose: To investigate learner unhappiness during the second semester of a new online doctoral program and develop a substantive grounded theory concerning its cause(s). Setting: The Doctorado…

  15. Developing and Implementing an Online Doctoral Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combe, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical reflection of the development and implementation of one of the first online doctoral programs in the UK set up at the University of Northumbria, Newcastle in 2000. Design/methodology/approach: The method adopted for analysis takes the form of a case study. Findings: Effective market research has to be undertaken…

  16. Adapting and Merging Methodologies in Doctoral Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Ronit Ben-Bassat; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how research methodologies were modified and integrated during the doctoral research conducted by the first author under the supervision of the second author. The research project concerned trying to understand why teachers do or don't use "Jeliot", a program animation system designed to facilitate teaching and learning of…

  17. Developing and Implementing an Online Doctoral Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combe, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical reflection of the development and implementation of one of the first online doctoral programs in the UK set up at the University of Northumbria, Newcastle in 2000. Design/methodology/approach: The method adopted for analysis takes the form of a case study. Findings: Effective market research has to be undertaken…

  18. Now & Then: The Long-Distance Doctor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Betsy K.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the mathematics used by Bernard Harris, Jr., the first African American astronaut to walk in space who is also an engineer, physician, medical research scientist, and pioneer space doctor. Includes a mission specialist activity sheet about understanding the magnitude of living in space. (MKR)

  19. Criteria and Instruments for Doctoral Program Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Álvarez-Montero, Francisco; Mojardín-Heráldez, Ambrocio; Audelo-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Graduate studies, and in particular doctoral ones, pursue the development of scientific researchers able to make original contributions in a specific area of knowledge. However, attrition rates indicate that achieving this goal is not easy. The available evidence indicates that there are behavioral factors, positive and negative, that influence…

  20. Becoming Academic: A Reflection on Doctoral Candidacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Higher education policy studies over the last decade have addressed the detrimental effects of neoliberalism, new public managerialism and audit cultures on the nature, organisation, form and meanings of higher education at a macro level. This article addresses the micro-practices through which the author, as doctoral candidate and knowledge…

  1. How can Doctors Improve their Communication Skills?

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Piyush; Kumari, Archana; Chakrawarty, Avinash

    2015-03-01

    The process of curing a patient requires a holistic approach which involves considerations beyond treating a disease. It warrants several skills in a doctor along with technical expertise. Studies have shown that good communication skill in a doctor improve patient's compliance and overall satisfaction. There are certain basic principles of practicing good communication. Patient listening, empathy, and paying attention to the paraverbal and non verbal components of the communication are the important ones that are frequently neglected. Proper information about the nature, course and prognosis of the disease is important. Besides, patients and attendants should always be explained about the necessity and yield of expensive investigations and risks/benefits involved in invasive procedures. One should be extremely cautious while managing difficult encounters and breaking bad news. Formal training of the doctors in improving communication skills is necessary and has proven to improve overall outcome. The authors recommend inclusion of formal training in communication skills in medical curriculum and training of practising doctors in the form of CMEs and CPEs.

  2. Professional Doctorates and Careers: The Spanish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Juan Francisco Canal; Perez, Manuel Antonio Muniz

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses the determining factors weighted by doctoral graduates when choosing their professional careers. In Spain, the analysis of such a group has been traditionally excluded from the empiric studies. On the one hand, the lack of databases made it difficult to see their professional situation, and on the other, a university career…

  3. Student Socialization in Interdisciplinary Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boden, Daniel; Borrego, Maura; Newswander, Lynita K.

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary approaches are often seen as necessary for attacking the most critical challenges facing the world today, and doctoral students and their training programs are recognized as central to increasing interdisciplinary research capacity. However, the traditional culture and organization of higher education are ill-equipped to…

  4. The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jill Alexa

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with 21 US schools of education, the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) has created a network of education faculty who are differentiating the EdD from the PhD in order to better meet the needs of their practitioner-scholar students. Their discussions center on two questions: "What are the knowledge, skills, and…

  5. The Online Doctorate: Flexible, but Credible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghezzi, Patti

    2007-01-01

    Modern school administrators are finding flexible opportunities to pursue doctoral degrees online. Cyber institutions such as Walden University, University of Phoenix and Argosy University--as well as a few traditional universities that have forged into the electronic arena--can accommodate time-strapped educators no matter where they live, as…

  6. The doctor-patient relationship and euthanasia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gary E

    1982-01-01

    The author offers grounds for preferring a `fiduciary' model of the doctor-patient relationship to either an `authoritative' or a `contractual' model. Within this framework he suggests that certain acts of euthanasia could be accommodated not in any way as duties, but as supererogatory acts of kindness to the patient. PMID:7154035

  7. A New Standard for Measuring Doctoral Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a new standard for measuring graduate programs in the United States. The Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, produced by Academic Analytics, a for-profit company, rates faculty members' scholarly output at nearly 7,300 doctoral programs around the country. It examines the number of book and journal articles published by…

  8. Doctoral Programs: Changing High Rates of Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Maroney, Kenneth; Nelson, Kaye W.; Abel, Annette L.; Abel, Holly S.

    2006-01-01

    Attrition of doctoral students is costly to society. This study examines organizational and personal factors that contribute to the number of graduate students leaving their program of study prior to receiving the terminal degree. The authors make suggestions for program modification and present results from a stress-management intervention…

  9. MFT Doctoral Dissertations: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James

    2013-01-01

    This brief report responds to the relative dearth of information available about MFT doctoral dissertations. A preliminary analysis of one COAMFTE [Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education] program is detailed. Suggestions for future action are offered. (Contains 1 table.)

  10. Conceptual Framework for Mentoring Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yob, Iris M.; Crawford, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In the research and professional literature, there are at least four lines of inquiry around mentoring: perceptions of successful mentoring in general, mentoring of doctoral dissertations in particular, mentoring specific to the online environment, and relative importance of mentoring behaviors. In each case, particular qualities that make for…

  11. Completion Mindsets and Contexts in Doctoral Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Pam; Bowden, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Doctoral candidates are now located within a research context of performativity where the push to successfully complete in a timely manner is central. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of completion mindset within a completion context to assist research students and supervisors. Design/methodology/approach: The research was…

  12. Now & Then: The Long-Distance Doctor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Betsy K.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the mathematics used by Bernard Harris, Jr., the first African American astronaut to walk in space who is also an engineer, physician, medical research scientist, and pioneer space doctor. Includes a mission specialist activity sheet about understanding the magnitude of living in space. (MKR)

  13. Response: Training Doctoral Students to Be Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollio, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to begin framing doctoral training for a science of social work. This process starts by examining two seemingly simple questions: "What is a social work scientist?" and "How do we train social work scientists?" In answering the first question, some basic assumptions and concepts about what constitutes a "social work…

  14. Doctoral Dissertations Recently Completed or in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louise

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six doctoral dissertations currently in progress or completed during 1993 that may be of interest to those in the school library media field. Topics include technology; information seeking; literacy; the portrayal of African American males in realistic fiction picture books; and the role of youth services librarians. (KRN)

  15. Toward a More Explicit Doctoral Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Pamela S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to understand the key constructs and processes underlying the mentoring relationships between doctoral students and their mentors. First, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to evaluate the measurement structure underlying the 34-item Ideal Mentor Scale (IMS; Rose, 2003), followed by…

  16. Professional Doctorates and Careers: The Spanish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Juan Francisco Canal; Perez, Manuel Antonio Muniz

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses the determining factors weighted by doctoral graduates when choosing their professional careers. In Spain, the analysis of such a group has been traditionally excluded from the empiric studies. On the one hand, the lack of databases made it difficult to see their professional situation, and on the other, a university career…

  17. Doctoral Dissertations Recently Completed or in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louise

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six doctoral dissertations currently in progress or completed during 1993 that may be of interest to those in the school library media field. Topics include technology; information seeking; literacy; the portrayal of African American males in realistic fiction picture books; and the role of youth services librarians. (KRN)

  18. Research Education Ontologies: Exploring Doctoral Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how research candidate becoming is situated within the contemporary higher education policy context and in investigating alternatives. The idea for the paper arises out of a simple observation: that the Doctorate is a degree in philosophy. What does this observation have to offer for understanding research candidate…

  19. The Curriculum Question in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Ocampo, Gabriela; Kiley, Margaret; Lopes, Amélia; Malcolm, Janice; Menezes, Isabel; Morais, Ricardo; Virtanen, Viivi

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of doctoral education has changed immensely during the last decades. Different transnational policies, different publics, different purposes and different academic careers all contribute to the need for a new understanding of this underresearched field. Our focus is on explicit curriculum analysis to undertake intentional and…

  20. Research Methodologies and the Doctoral Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Gary A.

    1997-01-01

    Doctoral students often select one of four common research methodologies that are popular in the social sciences and education today: positivist; interpretive; ideological; and pragmatic. But choice of methodology also influences the student's choice of course work, membership of dissertation committee, and the form and structure of the…

  1. Criteria and Instruments for Doctoral Program Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Álvarez-Montero, Francisco; Mojardín-Heráldez, Ambrocio; Audelo-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Graduate studies, and in particular doctoral ones, pursue the development of scientific researchers able to make original contributions in a specific area of knowledge. However, attrition rates indicate that achieving this goal is not easy. The available evidence indicates that there are behavioral factors, positive and negative, that influence…

  2. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  3. Talking to Your Doctor (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents for Kids for Teens Search Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... than done. Being examined and questioned about your body can also be ... things you can bear in mind to make it easier: Your doctor's seen it ...

  4. Microbial flora on doctors' white coats.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D; Nye, K; Hollis, P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the level and type of microbial contamination present on the white coats of doctors in order to assess the risk of transmission of pathogenic micro-organisms by this route in a hospital setting. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey of the bacterial contamination of white coats in a general hospital. SETTING--East Birmingham Hospital, an urban general hospital with 800 beds. SUBJECTS--100 doctors of different grades and specialties. RESULTS--The cuffs and pockets of the coats were the most highly contaminated areas. The level of bacterial contamination did not vary with the length of time a coat had been in use, but it increased with the degree of usage by the individual doctor. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from a quarter of the coats examined, more commonly from those belonging to doctors in surgical specialties than medical specialties. Pathogenic Gram negative bacilli and other pathogenic bacteria were not isolated. CONCLUSIONS--White coats are a potential source of cross infection, especially in surgical areas. Scrupulous hand washing should be observed before and after attending patients and it may be advisable to remove the white coat and put on a plastic apron before examining wounds. There is little microbiological reason for recommending a more frequent change of white coat than once a week, nor for excluding the wearing of white coats in non-clinical areas. PMID:1773186

  5. Promoting Team Leadership Skills in Doctoral Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Whetton, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral programs can serve as an optimal opportunity for candidates to engage in tasks and activities to transform them and their schools. The paradigm shifts in such preparation involve moving from sitting and getting to making and taking. Most importantly, it requires building leadership skills and styles necessary to bring about desired change…

  6. The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jill Alexa

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with 21 US schools of education, the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) has created a network of education faculty who are differentiating the EdD from the PhD in order to better meet the needs of their practitioner-scholar students. Their discussions center on two questions: "What are the knowledge, skills, and…

  7. The Evolution of Doctoral Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education in social work is evolving as a major enterprise in American higher education, with more than 80 programs now in place. Committed to providing stewards of the profession, these PhD and DSW programs also are a major impetus for research and are the primary faculty pipeline for the 735 CSWE-accredited professional social work…

  8. Identity Development and Mentoring in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Leigh A.; Burns, Leslie D.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Leigh Hall and Leslie Burns use theories of identity to understand mentoring relationships between faculty members and doctoral students who are being prepared as educational researchers. They suggest that becoming a professional researcher requires students to negotiate new identities and reconceptualize themselves both as people…

  9. Identity Development and Mentoring in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Leigh A.; Burns, Leslie D.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Leigh Hall and Leslie Burns use theories of identity to understand mentoring relationships between faculty members and doctoral students who are being prepared as educational researchers. They suggest that becoming a professional researcher requires students to negotiate new identities and reconceptualize themselves both as people…

  10. Creativity in Doctoral Research: A Reasonable Expectation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargar, Robert R.; Dnan, James K.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the relationships between doctoral students and their research problems under circumstances presently thought to be ideal for creative research endeavor. The article focuses on three contextual perspectives: (1) psychological and primarily affective, (2) theoretical-methodological and primarily cognitive, and (3) institutional. (CT)

  11. The Doctorate in the Nordic Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein; Tvede, Olaf

    1998-01-01

    Overview of research training systems leading to doctoral degrees in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden emphasizes the structure of postgraduate education, administration and funding, number of students, time to degree, completion rates, labor market, and study abroad. Comparisons to U.S., British, German, and French systems suggests a trend…

  12. Response: Training Doctoral Students to Be Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollio, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to begin framing doctoral training for a science of social work. This process starts by examining two seemingly simple questions: "What is a social work scientist?" and "How do we train social work scientists?" In answering the first question, some basic assumptions and concepts about what constitutes a "social work…

  13. Doctoral Education and Transformative Consumer Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mari, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines why and how transformative consumer research (TCR) can become a relevant perspective in doctoral programs. The article draws selectively from studies published in consumer behavior, marketing, and marketing education that theoretically or empirically address this topic. It discusses the meaning and background of TCR together…

  14. A New Look at the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Robert G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A report on recent endeavors to improve the doctoral program in the Spanish department at the University of Connecticut. It also draws upon resolutions of 1972 conferences on graduate study at Wichita State University and the University of Texas. Individualized instruction, improved student-teacher relations and revision of examinations are basic…

  15. The Online Doctorate: Flexible, but Credible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghezzi, Patti

    2007-01-01

    Modern school administrators are finding flexible opportunities to pursue doctoral degrees online. Cyber institutions such as Walden University, University of Phoenix and Argosy University--as well as a few traditional universities that have forged into the electronic arena--can accommodate time-strapped educators no matter where they live, as…

  16. Sex and Discipline Differences in Doctoral Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sells, Lucy W.

    This document presents a series of tables concerning a 1966 study of the Woodrow Wilson Fellows who entered graduate school from 1958 through 1963. At the time of the study, 49% of the fellows had not yet earned the doctorate, and were no longer in school. Among the men, 44% were defined as dropouts, and among the women, 64% were thus defined.…

  17. Doctoral Core Curriculum: A Neglected Challenge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestle, Ruth E.; Wall, Vera J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on integration of home economics at the graduate level; presents a rationale for a core curriculum; describes objectives and delivery of the curriculum; and proposes research needs to evaluate approaches to training doctoral students in an integrated view of home economics. (JOW)

  18. The Changing Career Preferences of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemme, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    Doctoral students, during the course of their training, develop an academic habitus that corresponds to their field of study. They adopt the perspective of the senior members of their discipline, among which their supervisor, and identify themselves to the academic profession. Consequently, the majority envision themselves in academic positions…

  19. Creativity in Doctoral Research: A Reasonable Expectation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargar, Robert R.; Dnan, James K.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the relationships between doctoral students and their research problems under circumstances presently thought to be ideal for creative research endeavor. The article focuses on three contextual perspectives: (1) psychological and primarily affective, (2) theoretical-methodological and primarily cognitive, and (3) institutional. (CT)

  20. Australian orchids and the doctors they commemorate.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2013-01-21

    Botanical taxonomy is a repository of medical biographical information. Such botanical memorials include the names of some indigenous orchids of Australia. By searching reference texts and journals relating to Australian botany and Australian orchidology, as well as Australian and international medical and botanical biographical texts, I identified 30 orchids indigenous to Australia whose names commemorate doctors and other medical professionals. Of these, 24 have names that commemorate a total of 16 doctors who worked in Australia. The doctors and orchids I identified include: doctor-soldiers Richard Sanders Rogers (1862-1942), after whom the Rogers' Greenhood (Pterostylis rogersii) is named, and Robert Brown (1773-1858), after whom the Purple Enamel Orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) is named; navy surgeon Archibald Menzies (1754-1842), after whom the Hare Orchid (Leptoceras menziesii) is named; radiologist Hugo Flecker (1884-1957) after whom the Slender Sphinx Orchid (Cestichis fleckeri) is named; and general medical practitioner Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881-1964), after whom the Kesteven's Orchid (Dendrobium kestevenii) is named. Biographic references in scientific names of plants comprise a select but important library of Australian medical history. Such botanical taxonomy commemorates, in an enduring manner, clinicians who have contributed to biology outside clinical practice.

  1. Understanding Critical Thinking to Create Better Doctors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Zayabalaradjane; Menon, Vikas; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Batmanabane, Gitanjali

    2016-01-01

    Medical students master an enormous body of knowledge, but lack systematic problem solving ability and effective clinical decision making. High profile reports have called for reforms in medical education to create a better generation of doctors who can cope with the system based problems they would encounter in an interdisciplinary and…

  2. Authorial Stance in Thai Students' Doctoral Dissertation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getkham, Kunyarut

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how linguistic devices are used to convey authorial stance in 36 Introduction sections and 36 Discussion sections of doctoral dissertations written in English by Thai students graduated in language education from different universities in the United States during the period 2008 to 2013. It also compares the use of…

  3. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:Oct 4, ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  4. Republished: instigating change: trainee doctors' perspective.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Nassim; Shahaney, Sumera; Martin, Guy; Ahmad, Ahmir; Moghul, Masood

    2013-10-01

    In the 21st century, the core skills of trainee doctors are evolving as clinicians, leaders and innovators. Leadership skills are an essential tool for all doctors and need to be an integral part of their training and learning as set out in the General Medical Council's Good Medical Practice. It is essential to develop these skills at an early stage and continually improve them. A group of junior doctors participated in a pilot programme for leadership with the aim of executing a quality improvement (QI) project. This article describes our experiences of both the course itself and the project undertaken by our group. As part of the process of implementing change, we faced a number of challenges which contributed to our learning. These have been explored as well as potential ways to overcome them to enable the swift and smooth development of future QI projects. Using an example of a QI project looking at handover, this article demonstrates how a trainee doctor can implement their project for both professional and institutional improvement.

  5. Educating Scholars: Doctoral Education in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Zuckerman, Harriet; Groen, Jeffrey A.; Brucker, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the worldwide prestige of America's doctoral programs in the humanities, all is not well in this area of higher education and hasn't been for some time. The content of graduate programs has undergone major changes, while high rates of student attrition, long times to degree, and financial burdens prevail. In response, the Andrew W. Mellon…

  6. Doctoral Programs in Nursing, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY.

    A directory of doctoral programs in nursing lists programs alphabetically by state and institution, indicating private or state control, the name and title of the program administrator, available study emphases, and degree type offered (Ph.D., D.N.S., Ed.D., etc.). Twenty-one programs in 15 states are included. Also listed are federal agencies…

  7. Strains in the nurse-doctor relationship.

    PubMed

    Selmanoff, E D

    1968-03-01

    Many problems and conflicts between nurses and doctors in the hospital stem from the organizational structure of the hospital rather than from the personalities of the individuals involved. Nurses often assert the latter. Understanding these conflicts requires that they be examined in terms of the organizational context within which they occur. To understand the modern American hospital it is useful to view its development. Private practitioners who at one time had cared for patients in their homes shifted the locus of care to the hospital as medical care became more complex in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Three selected aspects of hospital structure that are seen as sources of strain for nurses in their relationship with doctors are: (1) Doctors do not see themselves as full-fledged members of the hospital organization. While nurses, who do, feel bound by the operating rules of the hospital, doctors tend to operate as free agents. There is probably little that nurses can do to reduce this source of strain. (2) The hospital has two lines of authority, administrative and medical, unlike most large-scale organizations which have only one. Nurses are in the former while doctors are in the latter hierarchy. The "influence relationship" between nurses and doctors is largely unarticulated; informally "negotiated" patterns prevail. Nurses can be more aggressive in attempting to develop institutional patterns that are mutually satisfactory to themselves and to doctors and that meet the needs of the hospital as a whole. (3) In the absence of a functioning health team nurses have assumed responsibility, without the requisite authority, for the coordination of patient care. Although this action is for the immediate benefit of patients nurses should realize that it also tends to retard the development of needed organizational changes in the hospital. Nurses generally accept the possibility of changing the personality structure of an individual. They should be

  8. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK) doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE). Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ) items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK) medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%). NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also. PMID:27907983

  9. Private medical education--the doctor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdul Hamid, A K

    2000-08-01

    The Government's decision to drastically and speedily increase the number of doctors in the country needs to be reviewed. The standard and quality of health care does not depend on the number of doctors, but on the improvement of the health care infrastructure. Increasing the number of government medical schools and increasing the intake of students should be done on a need-to basis, with the above perspective in mind. The selection criteria of candidates must not be compromised and the teaching staff must be adequate and experienced. The number of doctors should be gradually increased over the years in tandem with the development of the health care infrastructure and the deployment of doctors must be directed at providing equitable care to the people at all economic levels and geographic locations. The strength of academic staff in existing government medical schools must be upgraded to provide high level of teaching and research, perhaps reinforced with the recruitment of suitably qualified and experienced foreign teachers. The infrastructure of existing government medical schools must be upgraded to cater for the gradual increasing demand for more doctors as the country develops. The selection of candidates for the government medical schools must be based on merit and without undue emphasis on ethnic considerations, for it is only in the arena of fair competitiveness that excellence can be born. The considerations of merit in selection must include assessment of attitude, self-development, moral ethics and reasoning. If the above perspectives are fully appreciated, then there is really no requirement for private medical colleges in Malaysia.

  10. Did you hear the one about the doctor? An examination of doctor jokes posted on Facebook.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew A; Haney, Carol Sue; Weeks, William B; Sirovich, Brenda E; Anthony, Denise L

    2014-02-13

    Social networking sites such as Facebook have become immensely popular in recent years and present a unique opportunity for researchers to eavesdrop on the collective conversation of current societal issues. We sought to explore doctor-related humor by examining doctor jokes posted on Facebook. We performed a cross-sectional study of 33,326 monitored Facebook users, 263 (0.79%) of whom posted a joke that referenced doctors on their Facebook wall during a 6-month observation period (December 15, 2010 to June 16, 2011). We compared characteristics of so-called jokers to nonjokers and identified the characteristics of jokes that predicted joke success measured by having elicited at least one electronic laugh (eg, an LOL or "laughing out loud") as well as the total number of Facebook "likes" the joke received. Jokers told 156 unique doctor jokes and were the same age as nonjokers but had larger social networks (median Facebook friends 227 vs 132, P<.001) and were more likely to be divorced, separated, or widowed (P<.01). In 39.7% (62/156) of unique jokes, the joke was at the expense of doctors. Jokes at the expense of doctors compared to jokes not at the expense of doctors tended to be more successful in eliciting an electronic laugh (46.5% vs 37.3%), although the association was statistically insignificant. In our adjusted models, jokes that were based on current events received considerably more Facebook likes (rate ratio [RR] 2.36, 95% CI 0.97-5.74). This study provides insight into the use of social networking sites for research pertaining to health and medicine, including the world of doctor-related humor.

  11. Did You Hear the One About the Doctor? An Examination of Doctor Jokes Posted on Facebook

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Carol Sue; Weeks, William B; Sirovich, Brenda E; Anthony, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Background Social networking sites such as Facebook have become immensely popular in recent years and present a unique opportunity for researchers to eavesdrop on the collective conversation of current societal issues. Objective We sought to explore doctor-related humor by examining doctor jokes posted on Facebook. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 33,326 monitored Facebook users, 263 (0.79%) of whom posted a joke that referenced doctors on their Facebook wall during a 6-month observation period (December 15, 2010 to June 16, 2011). We compared characteristics of so-called jokers to nonjokers and identified the characteristics of jokes that predicted joke success measured by having elicited at least one electronic laugh (eg, an LOL or “laughing out loud”) as well as the total number of Facebook “likes” the joke received. Results Jokers told 156 unique doctor jokes and were the same age as nonjokers but had larger social networks (median Facebook friends 227 vs 132, P<.001) and were more likely to be divorced, separated, or widowed (P<.01). In 39.7% (62/156) of unique jokes, the joke was at the expense of doctors. Jokes at the expense of doctors compared to jokes not at the expense of doctors tended to be more successful in eliciting an electronic laugh (46.5% vs 37.3%), although the association was statistically insignificant. In our adjusted models, jokes that were based on current events received considerably more Facebook likes (rate ratio [RR] 2.36, 95% CI 0.97-5.74). Conclusions This study provides insight into the use of social networking sites for research pertaining to health and medicine, including the world of doctor-related humor. PMID:24550095

  12. Refractive eye surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about refractive eye surgery; Nearsightedness surgery - what to ask your doctor; LASIK - what to ... Will this surgery help my type of vision problem? Will I still need glasses or contact lenses after the surgery? Will ...

  13. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kidney Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions ... Ask Your Doctor About Kidney Cancer? More In Kidney Cancer About Kidney Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  14. Many Doctors Get Payments from Drug Companies, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164203.html Many Doctors Get Payments From Drug Companies, Study Shows But few patients know about financial ... News) -- Many American doctors receive payments from drug companies, but few patients know about those financial ties, ...

  15. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... your doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Am I at risk for AAA? Men ...

  16. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  17. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi Sarcoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? As you cope with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and ...

  18. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? As you cope with cancer and cancer ... Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  20. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Bile Duct Cancer? It is important to have frank, open ... Doctor About Bile Duct Cancer? More In Bile Duct Cancer About Bile Duct Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  1. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? It is important to have honest, ... Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  2. Major Heart Group Says Doctor-Patient Talks Are Key

    MedlinePlus

    ... are, so clinicians need to assess their patients' health literacy and cognitive skills, and include family and other ... Doctor Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Health Literacy Heart Diseases Talking With Your Doctor About MedlinePlus ...

  3. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  4. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

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  5. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? It is important to have honest, open ... Doctor About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? More In Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  6. Incorporating Health Services Research into Nursing Doctoral Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cheryl Bland; Lusk, Sally L.

    2002-01-01

    Offers a rationale for involvement of nursing doctoral programs in health services research, which examines health care delivery. Presents recommendations of the Re-envisioning the Ph.D. project, which identified problems in doctoral programs. (Contains 46 references.) (SK)

  7. Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor after weight-loss surgery ... perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient - 2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of ...

  8. Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor before weight-loss surgery ... perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient - 2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of ...

  9. Talking With Your Doctor: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor visit (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Shared decision making (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Telehealth (Medical Encyclopedia) ... Make the most of your doctor visit Shared decision making Telehealth When you feel like changing your medicine ...

  10. Diversifying the Pipeline Into Doctoral Nursing Programs: Developing the Doctoral Advancement Readiness Self-Assessment.

    PubMed

    DeWitty, Vernell P; Tabloski, Patricia A; Millett, Catherine M; Hambrick, Marion Evan; Shreffler, Megan; Downing, Christine A; Huerta, Carolina G

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and psychometric analysis of the Doctoral Readiness Self-Assessment for Doctoral Study. This survey was developed as the first step of a Web-based, on-line mentoring platform for nurses who are considering a doctoral degree program. By identifying and anticipating the predictors and barriers of success in doctoral nursing education, including practical (finances, time, geographical restriction) and personal factors (motivation, attitudes, perceived ability to navigate the application process), students are guided through a self-reflective process to determine readiness. Factor analysis revealed that interest, readiness, and support represent 3 distinct factors that may be used for additional analysis to predict future enrollment in doctoral nursing degree programs. The internal reliability analysis revealed that removing 3 items from the 15-item scale increased Cronbach's alpha from 0.75 to 0.80, and these factors explained 51.25% of variance. The self-assessment results can inform faculty's work as they mentor and guide students through the application, admission, and financial support processes for doctoral study.

  11. Arab doctors, evolving society and corruption: a medical student's perspective.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Yassar

    2015-01-01

    Doctors, especially junior doctors, face immense pressure in their day-to-day work. As a result, the rates of depression and anxiety are particularly high in this demanding profession. The pressure, which is compounded by constantly being under societal scrutiny, can unfortunately drive the doctor to breaking point. However, we can help doctors deal with these pressures in a more meaningful way if we make them aware of their wider environment (within a social paradigm) and the implications of their actions.

  12. Focusing on Doctoral Students' Experiences of Engagement in Thesis Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about what inspires students to be involved in their doctoral process and stay persistent when facing challenges. This study explored the nature of students' engagement in the doctoral work. Altogether, 21 behavioural sciences doctoral students from one top-level research community were interviewed. The interview data were…

  13. A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Doctor-Patient Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Margaret

    This study analyzed doctor-patient communication from a sociolinguistic perspective, focusing on two issues: (1) why patients are not more effective in asserting themselves in talking with doctors, and (2) why doctors don't talk more like normal people (i.e., patients). Research on communication in health care contexts is reviewed, looking at such…

  14. Scholarly Productivity and Social Work Doctorates: Patterns among African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiele, Jerome H.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 300 African-American social work faculty concerning their scholarly productivity in terms of published journal articles. Found that African-American social work doctorates publish just as much as do other social work doctorates and that younger age (31-40) for receiving the doctorate is associated with higher publication rates. (KS)

  15. Doctoral Dissertation Research in Rehabilitation Counseling: 2005-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Timothy N.; Zanskas, Stephen A.; Phillips, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Graduates of doctoral level programs are the stewards of their profession. Historically, doctoral dissertation research has been summarized as a service to improve research accessibility, analyze research trends, and suggest potential areas for future inquiry. The current review analyzes 99 doctoral dissertations from recognized rehabilitation…

  16. One University's Approach to Defining and Supporting Professional Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    The changing market for doctorally prepared workers led one institution to examine its overall approach to defining and supporting professional doctorates. After a review of existing scholarship and internal practices, a white paper was created to capture the various ways that these degrees can be distinguished from the academic doctorate (PhD) at…

  17. Perceptions of Mattering in the Doctoral Student and Advisor Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Holly Anne

    2015-01-01

    The advising relationship has been acknowledged as one of the most important factors in doctoral student persistence and attrition. Less researched are psychosocial factors that contribute to doctoral student persistence and completion. Preliminary research including measures of psychosocial factors on doctoral student success found…

  18. Barefoot-Doctors. Occasional Paper No. 77-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Joel

    A description of "barefoot doctors" in the People's Republic of China is presented. These peasant doctors are commune workers who have taken basic courses in medical treatment. Because 80% of the population lives in a rural agricultural setting, and because most doctors and medical services are located in cities, there is a serious need…

  19. Promoting the UK Doctorate: Opportunities and Challenges. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Faye; Metcalfe, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen increased interest in various aspects of the UK doctorate. This report brings together issues arising from national policy developments, the doctoral researcher cohort, the diversification of doctoral level provision in the UK and the development of the third cycle in the Bologna process. Through discussions with key…

  20. Going for the Gold Tassel: Getting a Doctoral Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Clark A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to explain the constructs of doctrine and doctorate to the fire service. The methodology applied the Carnegie Foundation review of the doctorate as the basics for explaining what stewards of the fire service discipline will do with a doctoral degree. Although the fire service is an interdisciplinary occupation, the…

  1. Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1995 Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    This report profiles the demographic and employment characteristics of doctorate-level scientists and engineers in the United States. The data presented were collected through the 1995 Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR). The purpose of the SDR is to estimate the number of people holding research doctorates from U.S. institutions in science and…

  2. Doctoral Dissertation Research in Rehabilitation Counseling: 2008-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Timothy N.; Phillips, Brian N.; Zanskas, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    This article continues the tradition of reviews documenting doctoral rehabilitation research. Doctoral dissertations completed during calendar years 2008-2010 from recognized doctoral rehabilitation programs were identified and reviewed using the same approach used by Tansey, Zanskas, and Phillips. Analysis of 88 dissertations resulted in a…

  3. Looking Back at Doctoral Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Chaya

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a quantitative picture of doctoral education in South Africa up to 2010, from the time the first doctorate was awarded in 1899. It identifies the different institutional profiles and emphases of doctoral graduation in South African universities at various periods of time in the context of economic, political and social…

  4. One University's Approach to Defining and Supporting Professional Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    The changing market for doctorally prepared workers led one institution to examine its overall approach to defining and supporting professional doctorates. After a review of existing scholarship and internal practices, a white paper was created to capture the various ways that these degrees can be distinguished from the academic doctorate (PhD) at…

  5. Doctoral Programs in Special Education: The Nation's Supplier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Pion, Georgine M.; Tyler, Naomi Chowdhuri; Gilmore, Robert

    2003-01-01

    After a systematic national search, 86 special education doctoral programs were found to be active in 1999. Program administrators were surveyed and results indicate most special education doctoral programs are under enrolled, doctoral students' enrollment has declined 30% over the last 20 years, and programs are not highly selective. (Contains…

  6. "Tough Love and Tears": Learning Doctoral Writing in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitchison, Claire; Catterall, Janice; Ross, Pauline; Burgin, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary changes to the doctorate mean student researchers are likely to be expected to write differently, write more and more often, and yet, despite a growing interest in doctoral education, we still know relatively little about the teaching and learning practices of students and supervisors vis-a-vis doctoral writing. This paper draws from…

  7. Purposes, Diversities, and Futures in MFT Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral education in marital and family therapy (MFT) plays a crucial role in the future of the field. In this article, I write about the purposes, diversities, and futures of MFT doctoral education from the perspective of having hired 18 full-time MFT faculty over the last 13 years. I argue that the field needs well-rounded doctoral-level…

  8. Identifying, Characterising and Assessing New Practices in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baschung, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, European doctoral education has principally taken place within the binary relationship of professors and their doctoral students according to the "apprenticeship model." However, in the last one to two decades, this model has been questioned. Governments and higher education institutions (HEIs) reform doctoral education by…

  9. Exploring the Nexus between Research and Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Margot; Evans, Terry; Macauley, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the nexus between doctoral education and research, and developments in how research is organised and funded is of significance as doctoral education is both part of the higher education system for teaching and learning, and part of the research enterprise. Doctoral candidates are both students and effectively early career researchers.…

  10. Perceptions of Mattering in the Doctoral Student and Advisor Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Holly Anne

    2015-01-01

    The advising relationship has been acknowledged as one of the most important factors in doctoral student persistence and attrition. Less researched are psychosocial factors that contribute to doctoral student persistence and completion. Preliminary research including measures of psychosocial factors on doctoral student success found…

  11. Doctoral Dissertation Research in Rehabilitation Counseling: 2008-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Timothy N.; Phillips, Brian N.; Zanskas, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    This article continues the tradition of reviews documenting doctoral rehabilitation research. Doctoral dissertations completed during calendar years 2008-2010 from recognized doctoral rehabilitation programs were identified and reviewed using the same approach used by Tansey, Zanskas, and Phillips. Analysis of 88 dissertations resulted in a…

  12. "Tough Love and Tears": Learning Doctoral Writing in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitchison, Claire; Catterall, Janice; Ross, Pauline; Burgin, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary changes to the doctorate mean student researchers are likely to be expected to write differently, write more and more often, and yet, despite a growing interest in doctoral education, we still know relatively little about the teaching and learning practices of students and supervisors vis-a-vis doctoral writing. This paper draws from…

  13. Identifying, Characterising and Assessing New Practices in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baschung, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, European doctoral education has principally taken place within the binary relationship of professors and their doctoral students according to the "apprenticeship model." However, in the last one to two decades, this model has been questioned. Governments and higher education institutions (HEIs) reform doctoral education by…

  14. Doctoral Dissertation Research in Rehabilitation Counseling: 2005-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Timothy N.; Zanskas, Stephen A.; Phillips, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Graduates of doctoral level programs are the stewards of their profession. Historically, doctoral dissertation research has been summarized as a service to improve research accessibility, analyze research trends, and suggest potential areas for future inquiry. The current review analyzes 99 doctoral dissertations from recognized rehabilitation…

  15. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities: Summary Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Allen R.; Dugoni, Bernard L.; Hoffer, Thomas B.; Myers, Sharon L.

    This is the thirty-third in a series of reports on research doctorates awarded by colleges and universities in the United States. The data presented in this report are from the annual Survey of Earned Doctorates, a census of research doctoral recipients who earned their degrees between July 1, 1998, and June 30, 1999. This survey, conducted since…

  16. The PhD: The Ultimate Nursing Doctorate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Willa L.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses and defines the various types of nursing doctorates and reviews the literature on the history of and trends in doctoral education in the United States. She then considers some of the decisions involved in choosing an appropriate doctoral program. (CH)

  17. Purposes, Diversities, and Futures in MFT Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral education in marital and family therapy (MFT) plays a crucial role in the future of the field. In this article, I write about the purposes, diversities, and futures of MFT doctoral education from the perspective of having hired 18 full-time MFT faculty over the last 13 years. I argue that the field needs well-rounded doctoral-level…

  18. Obstacles to Success--Doctoral Student Attrition in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    The article explores doctoral attrition in South Africa, investigating and comparing the attributions of attrition of doctoral students and PhD programme leaders. The article is based on secondary data analysis of two large studies on doctoral education in South Africa. The main point of the article is that the different understandings of the…

  19. Doctoral Assistants = Critical Friends: A Simple yet Complex Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, John; Laguerre, Fabrice; Moore, Eric; Reedy, Katherine; Rose, Scott; Vickers, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) encourages doctoral candidates volunteering in order to give back and continue their relationship with the university after completing their dissertation. Volunteering can take on many forms, from acting as doctoral assistants to performing the role of critical friends on future doctoral…

  20. The Future of Marketing Scholarship: Recruiting for Marketing Doctoral Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Donna F.; McCarthy, Teresa M.

    2005-01-01

    As demand for business education is rising, the production of business doctorates continues to fall. Between 1995 and 2001, new business doctorates declined 18%, dropping to the lowest point since 1987. In the same time frame, new marketing doctorates dropped by 32%. This article reports the results of a study designed to (1) assess enrollment…

  1. Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about ear tube surgery; Tympanostomy - what to ask your doctor; Myringotomy - what to ask your doctor ... Why does my child need ear tubes? Can we try other treatments? What are the risks of the surgery? Is it safe to wait before getting ear ...

  2. U.S. Community College Professional Staff Seek South African Doctoral Degrees: An Analysis of an International Doctoral Program Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Margaret Vail

    2011-01-01

    Prominent challenges facing contemporary community colleges are enhancing leadership capacity and serving their diverse student populations. While doctoral education constitutes a mainstay strategy for developing community college leaders, community college professionals face constraints accessing doctoral programs. The innovation of an…

  3. U.S. Community College Professional Staff Seek South African Doctoral Degrees: An Analysis of an International Doctoral Program Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Margaret Vail

    2011-01-01

    Prominent challenges facing contemporary community colleges are enhancing leadership capacity and serving their diverse student populations. While doctoral education constitutes a mainstay strategy for developing community college leaders, community college professionals face constraints accessing doctoral programs. The innovation of an…

  4. Jack the Ripper and doctor-identification.

    PubMed

    Shuster, S

    1975-01-01

    It is possible that Jack the Ripper can be understood in terms of doctor-identification borne of one or more terrifying experiences he may have had with doctors during his childhood. The fantasies acted out by this primitive murderer are similar to the fantasies experienced by people who have been surgically traumatized as children. The evidence suggests that the activities of Jack the Ripper resemble the acting-out of a horror story in which he, as the main character, played to the population of London as an actor plays to his audience, through the need to discharge anxiety and regain some kind of emotional balance. When his depredation failed to achieve the desired results for him, the Ripper probably commited suicide.

  5. The Company Doctor: An Endangered Species

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    Company doctors are both managers and clinicians. They are responsible for managing human resources, occupational health professionals, technicians, and clerical staff. They are involved in prevention programs, and are expected to advise management of changes in occupational health, workers' compensation, and human rights legislation. As clinicians, company doctors conduct preplacement and periodic examinations, and provide on-the-job treatment, counselling, and rehabilitation. However, fewer than 10% of Canadian workers are cared for by full-time occupational health physicians, and most workers do not have access to formal, occupational health programs. There is a need for better resources and occupational medical training, particularly for part-time company physicians. Imagesp1936-a PMID:21274207

  6. Medical humanities: a resident doctor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Pauranik, Anvita

    2012-01-01

    The barrage of competitive examinations, overwork, sleep deprivation, and the pressure of expectations all combine to destroy the dreams that resident doctors have when they start medical school. The empathy they had before entering this field fades away, and they eventually become insensitive to their patients. Medical humanities may be the means to halt this trend. Sensitising young minds, using the arts, literature, history and lessons on social issues, may bring about a paradigm shift in these doctors' outlook towards their patients. However, for the humanities to be integrated into medical education, the current curriculum must be modified and made more clinically and socially relevant. Further, the humanities cannot be taught in lecture halls; they need to be integrated into all aspects of medical school. For this, the medical school faculty should be sensitised to, and trained in, humanities education.

  7. Nurses' and doctors' perspectives on slow codes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jacinta

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain nurses' and doctors' perspectives on the practice of slow codes, which are cardiopulmonary resuscitative efforts that are intentionally performed too slowly for resuscitation to occur. A Heideggerian phenomenological study was conducted in 2005, during which data were gathered in the Republic of Ireland from three nurses and two doctors (via unstructured interviews) and analysed using Colaizzi's reductive procedure. Slow codes do occur in Ireland and are intended as beneficent acts. However, slow codes were identified as pointless and undignified when intrusive measures were employed. There is a need for discussion on the topic of slow codes in Ireland, and for aids to cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making to be developed, such as advance directives, communication training, clinical guidelines and an explanatory leaflet for patients and families.

  8. The ethics of doctors and big business.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, P D

    2001-07-16

    Ethically conducted medical treatment puts the healthcare needs of patients first, ahead of profit, but corporations may pressure GPs to act as their agents instead of the patient's agent. The medical profession requires an industrial code outlining the specific conditions needed to maintain high standards of medical practice. Health professional organisations also need a code of conduct. Recent legislation should limit the influence of corporations on doctors: non-medical directors of medical corporations can now be fined or disqualified if they are party to professional misconduct by medical practitioners, and GPs can be prosecuted for offering or accepting pecuniary benefits for referrals. Doctors need to act now to implement systems which protect the public interest and professional standards before the influence of corporatisation becomes pervasive, and leads to increased legislation and regulation of medical practice.

  9. Short counseling techniques for busy family doctors.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, V. H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce two short counseling skills for busy family doctors: the BATHE technique and the DIG technique. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The BATHE technique indicates five areas for questioning patients who require counseling: background, affect, trouble, handling, and empathy. No research on use of the technique has been published. The DIG technique is the author's modification of the BATHE technique. MAIN FINDINGS: While the efficacy of counseling in general was validated, more research on the effectiveness on these two techniques needs to be done. CONCLUSIONS: Since counseling is an integral part of family practice, family doctors will find these techniques useful. Each is easy to learn and takes less than 15 minutes to complete. PMID:9111987

  10. [Consequences of lawsuits on affected doctors].

    PubMed

    Perea-Pérez, B; Santiago-Sáez, A; Labajo-González, E; Albarrán-Juan, M E; Sánchez-Sánchez, J A

    2011-01-01

    To determine the consequences of a judicial claim on the private life and professional practice of affected doctors. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed on the basis of 169 surveys filled out by physicians subjected to a lawsuit in Spain in the period including 2002-2005. The claim produced a bad or very bad personal experience in 98.8%. A total of 85.1% admitted repercussions on family life, 84% made some change in the way they worked, and 57.4% admitted effects on their vocation. There was an unfavorable court ruling in 6%. There were important repercussions on doctors after a lawsuit, both on their private and family life, as well as the way they approach medical practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Reasons for Doctoral Non-Completion: One Non-Completing Doctoral Student's Voice on Limitations in the Academic Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philpott, Carey

    2015-01-01

    Timely completion has recently been an important focus of academic literature on supervising Doctoral students. This paper is a reflection on the academic literature on timely doctoral completion by a former Doctoral student who has been a serial non-completer. This reflection explores whether academics' constructions, reported in the research…

  12. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  13. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  14. The McKnight Doctoral Fellowship Program: Toward a Seamless Approach to the Production of African American Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Marvin P.

    2006-01-01

    The McKnight Doctoral Fellowship Program (MDFP) in Florida addresses the issue of under-representation of African American doctorates by adopting a "seamless" approach in supporting African-Americans pursuing a doctoral degree and beyond. The success of the MDFP suggests a need to reconsider graduate support for minority students that…

  15. The McKnight Doctoral Fellowship Program: Toward a Seamless Approach to the Production of African American Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Marvin P.

    2006-01-01

    The McKnight Doctoral Fellowship Program (MDFP) in Florida addresses the issue of under-representation of African American doctorates by adopting a "seamless" approach in supporting African-Americans pursuing a doctoral degree and beyond. The success of the MDFP suggests a need to reconsider graduate support for minority students that…

  16. Marcel Proust's fictional diseases and doctors.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Marcel Proust (1875-1922), the son and brother of famous physicians, had close and continuous contact with medicine and doctors in connection with chronic asthma, neurasthenia, medical 'tourism', and self-medication. This proximity to medical issues is obvious in his work, particularly his novel In Search of Lost Time, which today is still considered one of the most important literary works ever. In this novel, medicine, patients, and doctors are everywhere, and it can be claimed that while it is often considered to be the great novel of memory, medicine in itself also can be seen as a true character of the story, in which Proust displays surprisingly extensive knowledge. Neurasthenia and asthma (i.e. Proust's diseases), as well as specific neurological disorders, such as stroke, migraine, epilepsy, and dementia, appear in the novel. The disease of the narrator's grandmother remains a piece of anthology, and probably remains the best literary report of a progressive stroke leading to death. Proust also quoted neurological conditions which were virtually unreported in his time, such as phantom limb syndrome and poststroke depression associated with aphasia in Baron Charlus. Doctors are nearly systematically depicted as incompetent and superficial, characteristics which appear to increase with academic titles and glory. The main physician of the novel, Professor Cottard, even ends up writing fake certificates for his rich friend Mrs. Verdurin during World War I so that she can obtain fresh croissants for breakfast, while poor people around her are starving. When called to examine a dying patient, one of the real doctors of the novel, Professor Dieulafoy, says and does nothing except ask for his fees. This defiance and criticism of physicians were indeed those of Proust in real life.

  17. Children of Hippocrates: doctors in Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Boozer, J S

    1980-07-01

    One of the more unexplored yet frightening aspects of the Nazi years in Germany, 1933-45, is the conduct of the doctors during those years. Many of them abandoned the traditional guiding norms for the practice of medicine, archaically expressed in the Hippocratic oath, and proposed, carried out, and cooperated with medical experiments without the consent of subjects and with little promise of any contribution to medical science. Many also participated in research and other medical activities, such as euthanasia and mass sterilization, whose purposes had nothing to do with a contribution to medical knowledge that would eventually save or improve life, but were simply for the manipulation and killing of persons. These activities quickly fell under the control of Nazi ideology, with no protest on the basis of the norms of medical practice by societies of medical doctors and psychiatrists, and with little, albeit costly, protest by individuals. A brief survey of what the Medical case and the Auschwitz trial revealed about the conduct of the doctors raises the question of the status and effectiveness of a professional standard like the Hippocratic oath against the power of the state. This, in turn, raises the question about the basis of the rights of man outside of what is enacted and secured by a nation-state. In facing this question, an appeal is made for the nurture of care about human rights, among professional groups with transnational identities as well as among individuals and voluntary nonprofessional associations among the general citizenry. Finally, a claim is made for specific kinds of social-political responsibilities of doctors in modern society.

  18. Why family doctors should not advertise.

    PubMed

    Hart, J T

    1988-12-01

    Medical care is a form of production of values, but not of commodities. This article argues that advertising as it is normally understood is not appropriate to general practitioner care. Acceptance of advertising by the medical profession would assist in the commercialization of a currently non-commercial relationship between doctors and patients. We should refuse to take this step and accept our responsibility to devise better futures than the market has so far been able to provide.

  19. Junior doctors need training in sickness certification.

    PubMed

    Walters, Gareth; Blakey, Kate; Dobson, Chris

    2010-03-01

    A recent report highlights the need for clear standards of practice regarding working-age health. Despite this, little is known about training or performance of sickness certification by junior doctors in secondary care. To see what sickness certification training had been received by practising hospital postgraduate trainees and establish how confident and knowledgeable they were in this area. We also evaluated the feasibility and face validity of a paper-based educational module. We surveyed 51 junior doctors in a variety of specialties, at all grades. Questions concerned training and practice of sickness certification and assessing capacity for work. A knowledge test regarding formal guidelines, use of forms and self-certification was undertaken, before participants evaluated a 10 min training module. Seventy-nine per cent of participants lacked knowledge in sickness certification, and 55% were not confident to assess capacity for work; 66% had received no training at all and 71% participants followed no guideline. Many could not identify or explain the use of certificates: MED-3 (50 or 71%, respectively), MED-5 (42 or 38%, respectively), MED-10 (0 or 17%, respectively), RM-7 (2 or 6%, respectively) and DS-1500 (6 or 8%, respectively). Majority of participants thought that an educational module could increase knowledge and skill in sickness certification (96%) and in assessing work capacity (74%). Junior doctors are involved in sickness certification, but there is a lack of training at undergraduate and postgraduate level, and many are unaware of formal guidance. The majority of junior doctors are concerned about lack of knowledge in this area and to a lesser extent in assessing patients' capacity to work. A simple educational module could improve confidence, knowledge and skills in sickness certification.

  20. The role of the infection control doctor.

    PubMed

    Daschner, F D

    1988-02-01

    The ideal infection control doctor would be a combination of an infectious disease specialist, microbiologist, epidemiologist, social worker, psychologist, teacher, researcher, antibiotic therapy specialist, policeman, priest, supervisor for housekeeping, architect, partner for the infection control nurse, and who should combine the qualities of Mary Poppins, Sherlock Holmes, Francis von Assisi and Margaret Thatcher. A new role is that of a specialist in environmental pollution by detergents, disinfectants and certain disposables.

  1. The Dual Role of NFL Team Doctors.

    PubMed

    Washington, Marvin

    2016-11-01

    Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, and Christopher Deubert are right in their article "A Proposal to Address NFL Club Doctors' Conflicts of Interest and to Promote Player Trust" that the problem with the medical care rendered to National Football League players is not that the doctors are bad, but that the system in which they provide care is structured badly. We saw some of the problems this system causes last season in what happened to Case Kenum, a quarterback for the Los Angeles Rams who, despite having a possible concussion from a game injury, was allowed to continue to play, with a concussion spotter in the booth and coaches, teammates, seven game officials, and two full training staffs present. From my experience playing in the league from 1989 to 1999, I do not believe that you can eliminate the conflict of interest completely, but I think it can be limited to the point that it does not harm the player. As the structure is now, with the team paying the club doctor, it is impossible to put the players' health and well-being before the team's on-field priorities. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  2. Patients' perspectives on how doctors dress.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, S; Hocken, D B

    2010-01-01

    Infection in hospitals is a serious problem. Attempting to address the spread of infection, many UK National Health Service trusts have adopted a 'bare-below-the-elbows' and tie-less dress-code policy. This followed publication of Department of Health guidelines on staff uniforms in September 2007. Although the potential for colonisation of clothing with pathogens has been investigated, patients' opinions on dress-code and policy change have not. This survey of 75 patients in Great Western Hospital, Swindon, UK, used questionnaires to address this. The survey showed that, although patients did feel that doctors' dress was important, neckties and white coats were not expected. Moreover, surgical scrubs were considered acceptable forms of attire. Problems of identifying doctors and determining their grade were repeatedly raised. Patients were generally unaware of the new dress-code, and few knew anything of its relationship to infection control. This work demonstrates that more 'traditional' dress is not expected. Given the problems of identification and perception of surgical scrubs as suitable, their introduction as a 'uniform for doctors' should be considered. Furthermore, work needs to be done to advertise policy change and increase patient awareness of infection control. Copyright 2009 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Training Doctors for Person-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    English, Jeannine

    2016-03-01

    Person-centered care, in which an individual patient's goals and preferences are treated as paramount, should be the standard throughout the nation. Achieving this ideal will require a change in the culture of health care, and medical schools can play a vital role in helping achieve it. Lack of communication, uncoordinated services, and dealings with sometimes-aloof clinicians and staff all can increase stress and undermine a person's sense of well-being. In a person-centered system, such experiences would be much less common. The cultural shift starts with the idea of "engaging the consumer" rather than "treating the patient." Such engagement requires honoring individuality. The doctor may have a certain way of doing things. But people vary enormously in their values and priorities. They have different goals, different thresholds of pain, different anxieties, different needs for support, different backgrounds, and different resources to draw on. Individuals should feel empowered, aware of their choices, and connected to their health care providers through meaningful communication and understanding. They deserve to feel that their personal dignity and their wishes are a top priority. They should be made to feel that they, along with their caregivers, are members of the care team. This change will benefit not only patients and families but doctors as well. Doctors will benefit from more insight into the individuals they serve, their interactions with consumers and caregivers will be more positive, and the quality of care will improve.

  4. Doctor-patient communication: a historical overview.

    PubMed

    Conti, A A; Gensini, G F

    2008-08-01

    Doctor-patient communication is an issue that is attracting more and more attention within the international scientific community, stimulating an interest involving many different health contexts, from academic to medico-legal ones. In the academic setting, the insertion of health communication courses into the curriculum has been a recent renovation, given that in the past such training was not considered a necessary formative step. In the medico-legal scenario, among the main causes of legal action is an incorrect, incomplete or non-existent transmission of information. Doctor-patient communication is therefore an extremely up-to-date topic, the problematic of which may already be discerned in Western medicine in the so-called Hippocratic Oath. In this paper the historical roots and the evolution through time of doctor-patient communication are discussed, together with the description of the predominant models of communication of the past (the physician-centred and the disease-centred approaches) and of the present (the patient-centred and the person-centred paradigms). Nowadays complete, correct and comprehensible communication is a primary exigency for the physician, for the patient/person and for all the organizational levels of the sanitary system. Every physician and, more in general, every health operator, must therefore learn to communicate effectively in the course of his/her medical training, and must continually refine this capacity during his/her professional career.

  5. Doctors and torture: the police surgeon.

    PubMed

    Burges, S H

    1980-09-01

    Much has been written by many distinguished persons about the philosophical, religious and ethical considerations of doctors and their involvement with torture. What follows will not have the erudition or authority of the likes of St Augustine, Mahatma Gandi, Schopenhauer or Thomas Paine. It represents the views of a very ordinary person; a presumption defended by the submission that many very ordinary persons have been, and will be, instruments for effecting, assisting or condoning the physical or mental anguish of others. As practitioners of medicine, we are particularly vulnerable, since our particular knowledge and our privileged position may be so easily abused--to the detriment of others. Those of us who practice clinical forensic medicine have even greater responsibility by virtue of our daily contact with the enforcement of law, criminal procedure, and the machinations of the judiciary. We are thus particularly well placed to monitor, encourage or discourage the occurrence of evil practices within the community. It is imperative, therefore, that the ordinary doctor should be cognisant of, and be party to, a code of conduct formulated by his peers and having reference to his obligations as a citizen, and doctor, and to his ability to manipulate human activity. Forensic physicians have further discretionary powers as arbiters in the marriage of the art and ethics of healing with the principles and practice of justice.

  6. Doctors and torture: the police surgeon.

    PubMed Central

    Burges, S H

    1980-01-01

    Much has been written by many distinguished persons about the philosophical, religious and ethical considerations of doctors and their involvement with torture. What follows will not have the erudition or authority of the likes of St Augustine, Mahatma Gandi, Schopenhauer or Thomas Paine. It represents the views of a very ordinary person; a presumption defended by the submission that many very ordinary persons have been, and will be, instruments for effecting, assisting or condoning the physical or mental anguish of others. As practitioners of medicine, we are particularly vulnerable, since our particular knowledge and our privileged position may be so easily abused--to the detriment of others. Those of us who practice clinical forensic medicine have even greater responsibility by virtue of our daily contact with the enforcement of law, criminal procedure, and the machinations of the judiciary. We are thus particularly well placed to monitor, encourage or discourage the occurrence of evil practices within the community. It is imperative, therefore, that the ordinary doctor should be cognisant of, and be party to, a code of conduct formulated by his peers and having reference to his obligations as a citizen, and doctor, and to his ability to manipulate human activity. Forensic physicians have further discretionary powers as arbiters in the marriage of the art and ethics of healing with the principles and practice of justice. PMID:7420380

  7. Why are junior doctors reluctant to consult attending physicians?

    PubMed

    Swank, Otto H

    2010-03-01

    A physician performs two tasks: making diagnoses and determining treatments. To reduce medical error, junior doctors are supposed to consult their supervisors when they face uncommon circumstances. However, recent research shows that junior doctors are reluctant to do so. This paper presents a model that explains (i) which junior doctors shy away from consulting; (ii) when junior doctors are reluctant; (iii) the importance of protocols in the medical sector; and (iv) when consulting is a sign of strength or a sign of weakness. Furthermore, I show that encouraging junior doctors to consult by investigating mishaps leads to another distortion: they will give too much weight to own assessments.

  8. Skill set development of doctoral and post-doctoral graduates in life sciences.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, R S

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and post-doctoral training programs at leading research universities in the USA are highly important in generating the much needed knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics for keeping rural and urban economies strong and societies healthy and prosperous. In addition, innovative graduate and post doctoral research programs are the driving engines of the success of U.S. economy and have made the U.S. the most successful model of generating new knowledge in the broader areas of life sciences (and agricultural education, research, and extension). We need to do everything in our power to make these training programs innovative, collaborative, independent, and resourceful so that students are trained in different disciplines making them more flexible within a range of challenges and opportunities. The training programs must empower students to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the society in 21st century and make our students competitive within a global economic system, to improve the health of the nation's economy. If our land grant schools and institutions of higher learning are not preparing doctoral students to be globally competitive scientists to create new knowledge and technologies to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the 21st century, then either we need to redefine the mission of our land grant system or we risk losing our role to serve the public and industry effectively. Doctoral and post doctoral students should be given the needed skills and experiences to prepare them for tenure track faculty jobs at leading US Universities in the 21st century as well as prepare them for the world outside of academia. I would say minimum competency skills are needed as "bare survival skills" for all doctoral students to become successful after obtaining PhD degrees. Today's PhD students will be working in a global but highly competitive, rapidly changing, and complex world. It is no longer enough to be a good

  9. Factors associated with doctors' knowledge on antibiotic use in China.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Wang, Sijie; Yin, Xiaoxv; Bai, Jigeng; Gong, Yanhong; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-03-24

    Misuse of antibiotics by the medical profession is a global concern. Examining doctors' knowledge about antimicrobials will be important in developing strategies to improve antibiotic use. The aim of the study was to survey Chinese doctors' knowledge on antibiotics and reveal the factors associated with their level of knowledge. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shanxi in central China. A total of 761 physicians were surveyed using a structured self-administered questionnaire. A generalized linear regression model was used to identify the factors associated with doctors' knowledge on antibiotic. Based on a full score of 10, the average score for doctors' knowledge on antibiotics was 6.29 (SD = 1.79). Generalized linear regression analysis indicated that doctors who either worked in the internal medicine department, who were chief doctors or who received continuing education on antibiotic, had better knowledge of antibiotics. Compared with doctors working in tertiary hospitals, doctors working in secondary hospitals or primary healthcare facilities had poorer knowledge about antibiotics. Chinese doctors have suboptimal knowledge about antimicrobials. Ongoing education is effective to enhance doctors' knowledge, but the effect remains to be further improved. More targeted interventions and education programs should improve knowledge about antimicrobials, especially for doctors working in primary healthcare institutions.

  10. Appraisal of family doctors: an evaluation study.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Malcolm; Elwyn, Glyn; Wood, Fiona

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appraisal has evolved to become a key component of workforce management. However, it is not clear from existing proposals for appraisal of doctors whether employers, health authorities or primary care organisations should take responsibility for appraisal processes. AIMS: To evaluate the introduction of a pilot peer appraisal system in general practice and to gain insight into the reactions of appraisers and doctors. DESIGN OF STUDY: Semi-structured telephone interviews combined with participant surveys and documentary analysis. SETTING: Five health authorities in Wales. PARTICIPANTS: General practitioners (GPs) appointed as appraisers and volunteer practitioners (doctors). METHOD: Twenty-six appraisers were appointed and given training in the appraisal process, each appraising an average of eight individuals. Appraisers and appraised doctors participated in semi-structured telephone interviews and completed separate participant questionnaires. RESULTS: GPs willingly undertook peer appraisal in a volunteer-based pilot study where participation was recompensed. The majority of participating clinicians were positive, with appraisers reporting the most gain. Appraisers were enthusiastic, provided the process remained non-judgemental and did not threaten or burden their colleagues. Appraised doctors were less enthusiastic but the most significant perceived benefit was the opportunity to reflect on individual performance with a supportive colleague. There were, however, repeated concerns about time, confusion with revalidation and personal development plans, worries about including health and probity queries, and an opinion that the process would be entirely different if conducted with non-volunteers or by representatives of 'management'. CONCLUSION: This study illustrated three fundamental problems for appraisal systems in general practice. First, there is as yet no organisational hierarchy in general practice. Perhaps the aggregation of practices into

  11. Doctors as patients: a systematic review of doctors' health access and the barriers they experience

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Margaret; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Clavarino, Alexandra; Doust, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Background The need to improve doctors' access to health care by reducing the barriers they experience has been regularly described in the literature, yet the barriers experienced are not well defined, despite the volume of expert opinion in this area. Aim To define what is known about doctors' access to health care from the data within the current literature. Design of study A systematic review of studies of doctors' health access. Method A systematic search of MEDLINE® and CINAHL, supplemented by citation searches and searches of the grey literature, identified both quantitative and qualitative studies. Two reviewers used specific criteria for inclusion of studies and quality assessment. The data were tabulated and analysed. Results Twenty-six articles met the inclusion criteria. The paucity of data and the overall poor quality of those data are highlighted. Despite this, many doctors appear to have a GP, but this does not ensure adequate health access. Systemic barriers to healthcare access (long hours and cultural issues) are more significant than individual barriers. Conclusion Expert opinion in this field is supported by poor-quality data. The current knowledge reveals important similarities between doctors and the general population in their healthcare access, especially with mental health issues. Understanding this may help the medical profession to respond to these issues of ‘doctors’ health' more effectively. PMID:18611318

  12. How To Talk to Your Doctor (and Get Your Doctor To Talk to You!). An Educational Workshop on Doctor Patient Communication = Como Hablarle a su Doctor (iY que su doctor le hable a usted!). Un seminario educativo sobre la comunicacion entre el doctor y el paciente.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX.

    This workshop, written in both English and Spanish, focuses on improving communication between physician and patient. In the workshop, the trainers will talk about "building bridges" between patient and doctor by understanding the doctor's role and his/her duty to the patient. According to the workshop, a person's doctor should…

  13. The development of online doctor reviews in China: an analysis of the largest online doctor review website in China.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haijing

    2015-06-01

    Since the time of Web 2.0, more and more consumers have used online doctor reviews to rate their doctors or to look for a doctor. This phenomenon has received health care researchers' attention worldwide, and many studies have been conducted on online doctor reviews in the United States and Europe. But no study has yet been done in China. Also, in China, without a mature primary care physician recommendation system, more and more Chinese consumers seek online doctor reviews to look for a good doctor for their health care concerns. This study sought to examine the online doctor review practice in China, including addressing the following questions: (1) How many doctors and specialty areas are available for online review? (2) How many online reviews are there on those doctors? (3) What specialty area doctors are more likely to be reviewed or receive more reviews? (4) Are those reviews positive or negative? This study explores an empirical dataset from Good Doctor website, haodf.com—the earliest and largest online doctor review and online health care community website in China—from 2006 to 2014, to examine the stated research questions by using descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, and multivariate linear regression. The dataset from the Good Doctor website contained 314,624 doctors across China and among them, 112,873 doctors received 731,543 quantitative reviews and 772,979 qualitative reviews as of April 11, 2014. On average, 37% of the doctors had been reviewed on the Good Doctor website. Gynecology-obstetrics-pediatrics doctors were most likely to be reviewed, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.497 (95% CI 1.461-1.535), and internal medicine doctors were less likely to be reviewed, with an OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.921-0.960), relative to the combined small specialty areas. Both traditional Chinese medicine doctors and surgeons were more likely to be reviewed than the combined small specialty areas, with an OR of 1.483 (95% CI 1.442-1.525) and an OR of 1

  14. [Comparison of British and French expatriate doctors' characteristics and motivations].

    PubMed

    Abbas, R; Carnet, D; D'Athis, P; Fiet, C; Le Breton, G; Romestaing, M; Quantin, C

    2015-02-01

    Migration of medical practitioners is rarely studied despite its importance in medical demography: the objective of this study was to analyze the characteristics and motivations of the French doctors settled in the United Kingdom and of the British doctors settled in France. This cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-completed questionnaire sent to all French doctors practicing in the United Kingdom (in 2005) and all British medicine doctors practicing in France (in 2009). The doctors were identified with official data from the National Medical Councils: 244 French doctors practicing in the United Kingdom and 86 British doctors practicing in France. The questionnaire was specifically developed to determine the reasons of moving to the other country, and the level of satisfaction after expatriation. A total of 98 French doctors (out of 244) and 40 British doctors (out of 86) returned the questionnaire. Respondents were mainly general practitioners with a professional experience of 8 to 9 years. The sex ratio was near 1 for both groups with a majority of women among physicians under 50 years. The motivations were different between groups: French doctors were attracted by the conditions offered at the National Health Service, whereas British doctors were more interested in opportunities for career advancement, joining husband or wife, or favourable environmental conditions. Overall, the respondents considered expatriation as satisfactory: 84% of French doctors, compared with only 58% of British doctors, were satisfied with their new professional situation. This study, the first in its kind, leads to a clearer understanding of the migration of doctors between France and the United Kingdom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The Development of Online Doctor Reviews in China: An Analysis of the Largest Online Doctor Review Website in China

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the time of Web 2.0, more and more consumers have used online doctor reviews to rate their doctors or to look for a doctor. This phenomenon has received health care researchers’ attention worldwide, and many studies have been conducted on online doctor reviews in the United States and Europe. But no study has yet been done in China. Also, in China, without a mature primary care physician recommendation system, more and more Chinese consumers seek online doctor reviews to look for a good doctor for their health care concerns. Objective This study sought to examine the online doctor review practice in China, including addressing the following questions: (1) How many doctors and specialty areas are available for online review? (2) How many online reviews are there on those doctors? (3) What specialty area doctors are more likely to be reviewed or receive more reviews? (4) Are those reviews positive or negative? Methods This study explores an empirical dataset from Good Doctor website, haodf.com—the earliest and largest online doctor review and online health care community website in China—from 2006 to 2014, to examine the stated research questions by using descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, and multivariate linear regression. Results The dataset from the Good Doctor website contained 314,624 doctors across China and among them, 112,873 doctors received 731,543 quantitative reviews and 772,979 qualitative reviews as of April 11, 2014. On average, 37% of the doctors had been reviewed on the Good Doctor website. Gynecology-obstetrics-pediatrics doctors were most likely to be reviewed, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.497 (95% CI 1.461-1.535), and internal medicine doctors were less likely to be reviewed, with an OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.921-0.960), relative to the combined small specialty areas. Both traditional Chinese medicine doctors and surgeons were more likely to be reviewed than the combined small specialty areas, with an OR of 1

  16. Doctor in the lab: what is it like for a doctor to work with scientists?

    PubMed Central

    Jorm, C. M.; Stamford, J. A.; Strunin, L.

    1996-01-01

    As clinical academic medical departments strive to improve the quality of their research, clinicians and scientists are forced into closer liaison. In many cases, clinical departments now have research laboratories directed by "basic scientists" but often staffed, in part at least, by doctors. To someone who has not worked in one, these laboratories may seem uncompromising and forbidding work environments. This article presents a "case report" written from the viewpoints of the doctor, the scientist, and the professor. Images p868-a PMID:8870579

  17. Perceived need and barriers to continuing professional development among doctors.

    PubMed

    Ikenwilo, Divine; Skåtun, Diane

    2014-08-01

    There is growing need for continuing professional development (CPD) among doctors, especially following the recent introduction of compulsory revalidation for all doctors in the United Kingdom (UK). We use unique datasets from two national surveys of non-training grade doctors working in the National Health Service in Scotland to evaluate doctors' perceptions of need and barriers to CPD. We test for differences over time and also examine differences between doctor grades and for other characteristics such as gender, age, contract type and specialty. Doctors expressed the greatest need for CPD in clinical training, management, and information technology. In terms of perceived barriers to CPD, lack of time was expressed as a barrier by the largest proportion of doctors, as was insufficient clinical cover, lack of funding, and remoteness from main education centres. The strength of perceived need for particular CPD activities and the perceived barriers to CPD varied significantly by doctors' job and personal characteristics. An understanding of the perceived needs and barriers to CPD among doctors is an important precursor to developing effective educational and training programmes that cover their professional practice and also in supporting doctors towards successful revalidation.

  18. [Gender patterns in Spanish otolaryngologic doctoral theses].

    PubMed

    Prim-Espada, María Pilar; De Diego-Sastre, Juan Ignacio; Pérez-Fernández, Elia

    2010-01-01

    In last decades women in Spain have a greater access to postgraduate education. The objective of this study was to perform a gender analysis on the Otolaryngology doctoral theses presented in a 25 year-period. The TESEO data base on doctoral theses was searched for theses on Otorhinolaryngology written between 1981 and 2005. As strategy for the research we employed the terms: 1) Otorrinolaringología (Otorhinolaryngology); 2) Cirugía de garganta, nariz y oídos (Ear, nose and throat surgery); 3) Fisiología de la audición (Physiology of hearing); 4) Fisiología del equilibrio (Physiology of balance); 5) Física de la audición (Physics of hearing); and 6) Bioacústica (Bioacoustics). A total of 450 theses (18.0±8.3 theses/year) were found, of which 129 were written by females (28.6%). There was a gender imbalance among authors, with 5.2±3.4 theses/year for women vs. 12.9±6.6 theses/year for men (p=0.0002). Nevertheless, there was a tendency toward equality in the last 10 years (p=0.001). On the other hand, the PhD student's gender was clearly related to the supervisor's gender (p=0.0001). With respect to the main topics in our area (otology, audiology/vestibular diseases, rhinology and pathology of paranasal sinuses and neck diseases), there were no significant differences between males and females (p=0.231). These results indicate a tendency towards equality in the number of men and women successfully completing doctoral studies in Otolaryngology. However, the PhD student's gender is clearly related to the supervisor's gender. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Essential therapeutics skills required of junior doctors.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Mathew J; Abouyannis, Michael; Butt, Tehreem F

    2012-12-01

    Junior doctors are responsible for the majority of in-hospital prescription errors. Little research has explored their confidence to prescribe, or practical therapeutics related tasks which they are required to perform in day-to-day practice. This survey aimed to explore these areas, gather feedback regarding therapeutics teaching at undergraduate level, and to apply findings to undergraduate training at University of Birmingham. Questionnaire-based survey of all first-year postgraduate doctors (PG1) attending teaching hospitals in the Birmingham and Worcester regions towards the end of the PG1 year. Doctors were asked about difficulties in prescribing, satisfaction with undergraduate training, and how frequently they undertook particular tasks pertaining to therapeutics. Qualitative data on suggestions for improving the curriculum were also collected. Difficulties were commonly encountered with prescribing warfarin, controlled drugs and syringe-driven drugs. Most (87.4 %) had been required to administer intravenous medications. Nearly all had prescribed to 'special groups' such as the elderly (100 %) and patients with renal disease (98.3 %). Thirty-seven percent were not satisfied with their undergraduate therapeutics teaching, and many (56.2 %) recommended making teaching more relevant to clinical practice. Many PG1s expressed difficulties in prescribing potentially dangerous medications. Although better than other UK surveys, significant numbers were not satisfied with undergraduate teaching. The strong opinion was for teaching to become more practical and more relevant. Prescriptions which PG1s are commonly asked to write have been described. Findings have guided improvements to undergraduate teaching and assessment in therapeutics at the University of Birmingham, and may offer guidance to other medical schools.

  20. Drugs for the doctor's bag: 2-children.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    In May 2015, DTB published Drugs for the doctor's bag: 1-adults,(1) recognising the fact that there is still a need for some GPs to carry a range of medicines for use in acute situations when on home visits. What to include in the GP's bag is determined by the medical conditions likely to be met; medicines the GP is confident and competent to use; storage requirements and shelf-lives of drugs; ambulance paramedic cover and the proximity of the nearest hospital. Here we suggest medicines that a GP might want to have available for use in an emergency or for the acute treatment of children and adolescents, updating our previous advice(2) and where appropriate we have included the underlying guideline recommendations for their use. The intention is not to imply that every doctor should carry every drug mentioned. Instead, we aim to highlight some of the key treatments and suggest choices in some of the more common clinical scenarios that GPs may have to deal with in everyday practice, which may be prior to referral to secondary care. Each section ends with a list of drug recommendations for the doctor's bag; drugs may be referred to in several sections but are only listed in one section to avoid repetition. The article does not provide recommendations for drugs to be stocked for use in routine clinical practice in the surgery (e.g. for minor surgery) or for drugs to be held by out-of-hours primary care services.(3) Unless otherwise stated, the doses given are from the British National Formulary for children (BNFc).(4). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Enslaved Africans and doctors in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Martia Graham

    2003-03-01

    This interpretation of the relationship between enslavement and American medicine in 19th century South Carolina reveals the intimacy that existed between Africans enslaved in that state and the doctors who practiced and taught there. Enslaved Africans were resourceful and reliable medical figures in the slave community. Their knowledge of medical botany permeated the slave quarters and plantation hospitals and was appropriated into southern medical knowledge. The trajectories of the careers of three South Carolina physicians are tied to their practice around and on the enslaved. The beginnings of gynecological surgery are linked to 1840s experimentation on enslaved African women performed by one of them.

  2. Enslaved Africans and doctors in South Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Martia Graham

    2003-01-01

    This interpretation of the relationship between enslavement and American medicine in 19th century South Carolina reveals the intimacy that existed between Africans enslaved in that state and the doctors who practiced and taught there. Enslaved Africans were resourceful and reliable medical figures in the slave community. Their knowledge of medical botany permeated the slave quarters and plantation hospitals and was appropriated into southern medical knowledge. The trajectories of the careers of three South Carolina physicians are tied to their practice around and on the enslaved. The beginnings of gynecological surgery are linked to 1840s experimentation on enslaved African women performed by one of them. PMID:12749683

  3. San Marcos Astronomical Project and Doctoral Prospectus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    The Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, UNMSM, in Lima, Perú, is the only Peruvian institution working for the peruvian astronomical development as a career since 1970. We are conforming a network with international friend astronomers to invite them as Visiting Lectures to assure the academic level for the future doctoral studies in the UNMSM. The Chancellor of UNMSM has decided that the Astronomical Project is a UNMSM Project, to encourage and advance in this scientific and strategical area, to impulse the modernity of Peru, the major effort will be the building of the San Marcos Astronomical Observatory, with a telescope of 1 meter aperture.

  4. Staying human in the medical family: the unique role of doctor-parents.

    PubMed

    Puddester, Derek G

    2004-10-04

    Issues confronting doctor-parents include the impact of parenting on career choice, special challenges faced by women doctor-parents, leave entitlements, and the unique strengths and challenges of two-doctor families. Experience from one Canadian doctors' health program suggests that unique themes include communication within doctor-families, insight into doctor-parent dynamics, the relationship between doctor-parents and their child's doctor, and potential boundary crossings and violations within the doctor-family. The relationships between medical workforce sustainability, medical human resources, and issues related to doctor-parents need further consideration and analysis.

  5. How Male and Female Doctoral Students Experience Their Doctoral Programs Similarly and Differently.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Wei

    The life and educational experiences of nine male students during their doctoral programs were studied using the narrative tradition of qualitative research with multiple interviews with each participant. Their responses were then compared with those from a similar dissertation study that focused on the experiences of female graduate students from…

  6. Pathways to the Doctorate Degree: A Phenomenological Study of African American Women in Doctorate Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Luciana Janee'

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the number of advanced degree recipients is more than an educational issue; it is also a key social issue. "A college-educated population results in pivotal benefits to society" (The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2004, p. 1). Although African Americans have made steady and notable progress in doctorate degree…

  7. Pathways to the Doctorate Degree: A Phenomenological Study of African American Women in Doctorate Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Luciana Janee'

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the number of advanced degree recipients is more than an educational issue; it is also a key social issue. "A college-educated population results in pivotal benefits to society" (The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2004, p. 1). Although African Americans have made steady and notable progress in doctorate degree…

  8. "Ways of Knowing" in Doctoral Examination: How Examiners Position Themselves in Relation to the Doctoral Candidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovat, Terence

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses ways in which examiners position themselves in relation to doctoral students' knowledge. The epistemological thesis of Habermas is utilized and its well-established connections with the world of formal learning re-stated. Against this conceptual framework, the examiner reports are appraised with a view to identifying the ways…

  9. An Analysis of Doctoral Students' Perceptions of Mentorship during Their Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Klossner, Joanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Mentorship has been established as a key facilitator of professional socialization for athletic trainers into various professional roles. Understanding how current doctoral students are trained to serve in future faculty roles is critical, as there is an increased demand for athletic trainers to serve in this capacity. Objective: Gain an…

  10. An Analysis of Doctoral Students' Perceptions of Mentorship during Their Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Klossner, Joanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Mentorship has been established as a key facilitator of professional socialization for athletic trainers into various professional roles. Understanding how current doctoral students are trained to serve in future faculty roles is critical, as there is an increased demand for athletic trainers to serve in this capacity. Objective: Gain an…

  11. How far does a doctor's 'duty of care' go?

    PubMed

    Torda, A

    2005-05-01

    It is a long-standing tradition in medicine that doctors have an ethical duty to care for all patients who fall within the scope of their skill base. This duty reflects the value system of many doctors and the type of typical dedication to their craft that has long been expected and given. The modern doctor, however, may have other additional roles -- such as those of parent, researcher, business person and many others. What about the duties that accompany these other activities and what if these duties come into conflict with the duty to care for patients? How does a doctor decide how far the duty to care for patients extends? This article explores this question of duty and discusses how the notion of the traditional doctor's duty to care may need to be amended in light of the kinds of lives that doctors now lead.

  12. Moving forward together: the practice doctorate in nursing.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Ann; Carter, Michael; Marion, Lucy; Pohl, Joanne M; Werner, Kathryn E

    2005-09-30

    Societal drivers, as well as trends in education and health care, are advancing the practice doctorate in nursing. For nurse practitioner preparation, the current resurgence of interest in the practice doctorate could precipitate change that mimics the evolution from post-basic certificate to Master's level education. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) is a resource for the study of the practice doctorate relative to quality nurse practitioner education. This article will offer some insights into the movement toward the practice doctorate by describing, from the NP perspective, the societal impetus for change, the historical perspective of NP and doctoral education, the 4 Ws (why, what, where, and when) of the movement, and some of the myths and realities about the practice doctorate.

  13. Issues underlying prevalence of "doctor-shopping" behavior.

    PubMed

    Kasteler, J; Kane, R L; Olsen, D M; Thetford, C

    1976-12-01

    Data were collected on all persons within a sample of upper-and lower-income households who had seen physicians for illness episodes within a year prior to the interview. Forty-eight percent of upper-and 37 percent of lower-income families in the sample had changed doctors because of dissatisfaction with some aspect of the care. Factors related to tendency to shop for doctors in both upper-and lower-income groups were a lack of confidence in doctors' competence, unwillingness of doctors to spend time talking with patients, hostile feelings toward doctors, high cost of services, inconvenience of location and hours, and unfavorable attitudes toward doctors' personal qualities. Hypochondriasis was related to doctorshopping in the upper-income group. Results of this investigation suggest that patients may be becoming more discriminating in their choice of physicians.

  14. Doctorate of nursing practice: blueprint for excellence.

    PubMed

    Sperhac, Arlene M; Clinton, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A great deal of work has been done during the past several years since the American Association of Colleges of Nursing voted in October 2004 to move advanced practice nursing to the doctoral level by 2015. Following the approval, task forces were formed to address curriculum issues and the strategies for transitioning advanced practice nursing education from the master's level to the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP). The DNP curriculum contains content on leadership, management, and other topics that are needed to address some of the issues in the health care system that traditionally have not been included in most master of science in nursing curricula, as well as additional essential content and nurse practitioner competencies. As pediatric nurse practitioners and other advanced practice nurses go forward in their careers, the DNP may have an impact on their role. In this article, the background of the DNP movement, changes in advanced practice nursing education, and the concerns of currently practicing pediatric nurse practitioners prepared at the master's level will be addressed.

  15. Doctors' strikes and mortality: a review.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Solveig Argeseanu; Mitchell, Kristina; Narayan, K M; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-12-01

    A paradoxical pattern has been suggested in the literature on doctors' strikes: when health workers go on strike, mortality stays level or decreases. We performed a review of the literature during the past forty years to assess this paradox. We used PubMed, EconLit and Jstor to locate all peer-reviewed English-language articles presenting data analysis on mortality associated with doctors' strikes. We identified 156 articles, seven of which met our search criteria. The articles analyzed five strikes around the world, all between 1976 and 2003. The strikes lasted between nine days and seventeen weeks. All reported that mortality either stayed the same or decreased during, and in some cases, after the strike. None found that mortality increased during the weeks of the strikes compared to other time periods. The paradoxical finding that physician strikes are associated with reduced mortality may be explained by several factors. Most importantly, elective surgeries are curtailed during strikes. Further, hospitals often re-assign scarce staff and emergency care was available during all of the strikes. Finally, none of the strikes may have lasted long enough to assess the effects of long-term reduced access to a physician. Nonetheless, the literature suggests that reductions in mortality may result from these strikes.

  16. Doctoring as leadership: the power to heal.

    PubMed

    Schei, Edvin

    2006-01-01

    Physician power has been attacked, and tabooed, in legitimate efforts to strengthen patients' rights. Yet the structural and symbolic power wielded by doctors is what makes good and right healing actions possible. Avoiding the power issue contributes to a confusing state, where patient trust is faltering and physicians are uncertain about how to fulfill the doctor's role with the intellectual tools of mere science and technology. I argue that constitutive characteristics of health, illness, and the clinical encounter necessitate a prescriptive and responsible healing agent who is more than a technocrat, an information broker, or a seller. The article proposes clinical leadership as a concept offering practical and ethical direction to clinicians, education, research, and health policy. Leadership presupposes reflective awareness of physicians' structural and symbolic power, and is displayed as discerning, empowering improvisations in critical situations, based on empathy and willingness to learn from patients. The notion of clinical leadership highlights patient vulnerability, medicine's ethical core, and the importance of character development in medical education.

  17. Teaching fellowships for UK foundation doctors.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Teaching Fellowships for junior doctors in their second post-graduate (FY2) year should be considered by medical students and junior doctors in UK. FY2 Teaching Fellowships are available in many foundation schools as part of the UK Academic Foundation Programme. Although programme structures differ between schools, they are designed to allow junior trainees to take time out from clinical practice to develop their teaching skills and gain insights into medication education careers. The advantages of an FY2 teaching fellowship include valuable experience of teaching and formal feedback not available to other trainees; the opportunity to further develop your portfolio; further development of the trainee's own knowledge and skills; the stimulation of working with students. Potential drawbacks to be considered are reduced direct clinical contact; reduced salary; difficulty carrying out education research in the allocated time frame; occasional difficulties establishing the teacher-student relationship while the trainee is at a relatively junior level. Experience of medical education as an FY2 trainee provides a helpful stepping stone whether or not the trainee further pursues education as a career, because the teaching skills are transferable to any specialty, and the unique experience enhances the trainee's confidence as a role model for junior colleagues.

  18. Nursing doctoral program evaluation: Alumni outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sakalys, J A; Stember, M L; Magilvy, J K

    2001-01-01

    Meaningful examination of program outcomes is one of the most challenging tasks facing faculty and administrators involved in the design and delivery of educational programs. This article reports the outcomes for one doctoral program in nursing and elucidates salient conceptual and methodologic issues in educational outcomes research for this discipline. Career development, scholarly productivity, and professional leadership were the foci of this outcomes study. Three instruments were used; data were provided by alumni, graduate faculty, and alumni supervisors. Data analysis techniques included content analysis and descriptive and correlational statistics. Results showed that graduates embarked on diverse career paths with the majority employed in academic institutions. Most graduates reported active involvement in research, publications, presentations, and professional leadership. Employment pattern differences were noted between academic year and summer-only program graduates with associated divergence in career emphasis, research productivity, and job satisfaction. A positive correlation of time since degree conferral with scholarly productivity and professional leadership was noted. Recommendations for future research include refining outcomes, linking process to outcome, using longitudinal designs, and attending to unique nursing student and doctoral program characteristics.

  19. Poets, doctors, and the rhetoric of money.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Nigel; Selden, Nathan R

    2009-01-01

    Greek poets from the archaic and early classical periods frequently depicted doctors alongside political and military leaders and victorious sportsmen. The mythology of ancient physicians found in such sources may give us clues as to how doctors could be viewed and represented by other segments of society, then and now. Pindar's Third Pythian Ode from the first quarter of the 5th century BCE was investigated with reference to other classical sources to understand the contemporary portrayal of ancient physicians. The Greek hero Asclepius is often recognized as the mythical father of surgery. Pindar's portrayal of Asclepius as a heroic but morally flawed physician and surgeon provides clues to the ambivalent role and identity of physicians in the late archaic period. In particular, the primacy of the moral framework surrounding different types of exchange in late archaic society is identified as a key factor influencing the perception of physicians, poets, and other professionals. The portrayal of physicians in ancient poetry and sculpture may inform modern neurosurgery and organized medicine about strategies by which we may best serve our patients and elevate our profession.

  20. [Breaking bad news--information for doctors].

    PubMed

    Kotlinowska, Barbara; Wilusz, Mirosława

    2010-01-01

    The article broaches the subject of breaking bad news. Medical doctors deal with such a problem frequently, not always well-prepared for their role. Obviously, each patient should be treated individually, not only because every disease is a unique case, but also because patients have their own hopes and expectations. In order to conduct a discussion containing bad news, it is worth to base on the scheme presented in the article. Preparation for the meeting is crucial. Besides the fact that it facilitates the dialogue, it also enables presenting information in the right way. Firstly, it is important to listen to the patient carefully, clarify his concerns and then answer all his questions and doubt. Next, if the patient is willing, the doctor should discuss the state of health, possible therapies and prognosis. The end of the talk should consist of appropriate summary and the date of the next meeting. The article emphasize that truth and reliability are extremely significant in contact with a patient. Moreover, it presents the area of information which can be talked about with the family. The authors try to approach the dialogue which contains bad news, reveal various possibility of conducting the discussion and dealing with problems.

  1. [Primary care. Vision of a rural doctor].

    PubMed

    Solar Silva, M A

    1990-07-01

    This article discusses the role of a rural physician in primary health care (PHC). The doctor-patient relationship is the basic method of PHC; it depends on a continuous relationship with the individual's personal and professional life, an on-going relationship that shifts from preventive to curative, ending with the patient's death. The duration of the relationship allows for a diagnosis and cure enabling the doctor to say that "I am not the one who knows more about the disease, but I am the one who knows more about the patient." Medical practice in a rural area can be independent or attached to a hospital, but should include 4 rooms: 1 room as an observation room with a 1-way mirror; 1 room for minor surgery; 1 room as a reception room and 1 room for diagnosis. A PHC chart should include 2 sections, the exterior of the chart with the patient's profile, and the patient's history inside the chart. The medical chart should also include an epidemiological and a social profile as separate charts to be attached to the primary chart. Health education strategies should aim towards making patients independent and not try to change their belief systems. In order to successfully promote and achieve community health care it requires 3 strategies: 1) coordination of all health facilities in the rural areas; 2) financing health activities; and 3) integration with traditional medicine.

  2. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    PubMed

    Nilas, L; Løkkegaard, E C; Laursen, J B; Kling, J; Cortes, D

    2016-08-27

    From 2012-2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, "Internationalization at Home ", offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in English. The majority self-assessed their English proficiency between seven and eight on a 10 unit visual analogue scale, with 10 equivalent to working in Danish, while 15 % rated five or less. However, one-fourth found teaching and writing in English to be twice as difficult than in Danish, and 12 % rated all teaching tasks in English at four or less compared to Danish. The self-assessed need for additional English skills was perceived low. Teaching in English was rated as 30 % more difficult than in Danish, and a significant subgroup of doctors had difficulties in all forms of communication in English, resulting in challenges when introducing international students in non-native English speaking medical departments.

  3. Engaging doctors in the health care revolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas H; Cosgrove, Toby

    2014-06-01

    A health care revolution is under way, and doctors must be part of it. But many are deeply anxious and angry about the transformation, fearing loss of autonomy, respect, and income. Given their resistance, how can health system Leaders engage them in redesigning care? In this article, Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Press Ganey's chief medical officer, and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, describe a framework they've developed for encouraging buy-in. Adapting Max Weber's "typology of motives," and applying behavioral economics and other motivational principles, they describe four tactics leadership must apply in concert: engaging doctors in a noble shared purpose; addressing their economic self-interest; leveraging their desire for respect; and appealing to their sense of tradition. Drawing from experiences at the Mayo Clinic, Geisinger Health System, Partners HealthCare, the Cleveland Clinic, Ascension Health, and others, the authors show how the four motivational levers work together to bring this critical group of stakeholders on board.

  4. Issues and challenges in international doctoral education in nursing.

    PubMed

    Ketefian, Shaké; Davidson, Patricia; Daly, John; Chang, Esther; Srisuphan, Wichit

    2005-09-01

    Education is a driving force in improving the health and welfare of communities globally. Doctoral education of nurses has been identified as a critical factor for provision of leadership in practice, scholarship, research, policy and education. Since the genesis of doctoral education in nursing in the USA in the 1930s, this movement has burgeoned to over 273 doctoral programs in over 30 countries globally. The present article seeks to identify the issues and challenges in nursing doctoral education globally, and those encountered by doctoral program graduates in meeting the challenges of contemporary health care systems. Information was derived from a comprehensive literature review. Electronic databases and the Internet, using the Google search engine, were searched using the key words "doctoral education"; "nursing"; "International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing"; "global health"; "international research collaboration". Doctoral education has been a critical force in developing nurse leaders in education, management, policy and research domains. An absence of consensus in terminology and of accurate minimum data sets precludes comparison and debate across programs. The complexity and dynamism of contemporary globalized communities render significant challenges in the conduct of doctoral programs. Addressing funding issues and faculty shortages are key issues for doctoral programs, especially those in developing countries, to achieve an identity uniquely their own. These challenges can also afford considerable opportunities for discussion, debate and the formulation of innovative and collaborative solutions to advance nursing knowledge and scholarship. In spite of discrete differences between countries and regions, the similarities in the issues facing the development of doctoral programs internationally are more striking than the differences. The harnessing of a global collective to address these issues will likely serve to not only forge the future

  5. Informatics in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Melinda; Wilson, Marisa; Ozbolt, Judy

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, The American Association of Colleges of Nursing approved a new doctoral degree for clinical leaders, the Doctor of Nursing Practice. These new advanced practice leaders will need sophisticated skills in informatics to acquire and use data, information, and knowledge in their roles. This paper proposes a foundational course for all Doctor of Nursing Practice students and some strategies for integrating informatics throughout the curriculum. PMID:18693859

  6. National agenda for advanced practice nursing: the practice doctorate.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide the background and rationale for the practice doctorate in nursing. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing's Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing, approved in October 2004, will be discussed. Outlined are some of the changes that will be needed in education, regulation, and advanced practice. Common questions and concerns that advanced practice nurses have, including titling, salary, and transitioning to the doctor of nursing practice degree, will be addressed.

  7. Smart strategies for doctors and doctors-in-training: heuristics in medicine.

    PubMed

    Wegwarth, Odette; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2009-08-01

    How do doctors make sound decisions when confronted with probabilistic data, time pressures and a heavy workload? One theory that has been embraced by many researchers is based on optimisation, which emphasises the need to integrate all information in order to arrive at sound decisions. This notion makes heuristics, which use less than complete information, appear as second-best strategies. In this article, we challenge this pessimistic view of heuristics. We introduce two medical problems that involve decision making to the reader: one concerns coronary care issues and the other macrolide prescriptions. In both settings, decision-making tools grounded in the principles of optimisation and heuristics, respectively, have been developed to assist doctors in making decisions. We explain the structure of each of these tools and compare their performance in terms of their facilitation of correct predictions. For decisions concerning both the coronary care unit and the prescribing of macrolides, we demonstrate that sacrificing information does not necessarily imply a forfeiting of predictive accuracy, but can sometimes even lead to better decisions. Subsequently, we discuss common misconceptions about heuristics and explain when and why ignoring parts of the available information can lead to the making of more robust predictions. Heuristics are neither good nor bad per se, but, if applied in situations to which they have been adapted, can be helpful companions for doctors and doctors-in-training. This, however, requires that heuristics in medicine be openly discussed, criticised, refined and then taught to doctors-in-training rather than being simply dismissed as harmful or irrelevant. A more uniform use of explicit and accepted heuristics has the potential to reduce variations in diagnoses and to improve medical care for patients.

  8. The quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Siedine K; Klopper, Hester C; Kim, Mi J

    2015-07-09

    The number of doctoral programmes in nursing has multiplied rapidly throughout the world. This has led to widespread concern about nursing doctoral education, specifically with regard to the quality of curricula and faculty, as well as to the availability of appropriate institutional resources. In South Africa, no study of these issues has been conducted at a national level. To explore and describe the quality of nursing doctoral education in South Africa from the perspectives of deans, faculty, doctoral graduates and students. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All deans (N = 15; n = 12), faculty (N = 50; n = 26), doctoral graduates (N = 43; n = 26) and students (N = 106; n = 63) at South African nursing schools that offer a nursing doctoral programme (N = 16; n = 15) were invited to participate. Data were collected by means of structured email-mediated Quality of Nursing Doctoral Education surveys. Overall, the graduate participants scored their programme quality most positively of all the groups and faculty scored it most negatively. All of the groups rated the quality of their doctoral programmes as good, but certain problems related to the quality of resources, students and faculty were identified. These evaluations, by the people directly involved in the programmes, demonstrated significant differences amongst the groups and thus provide valuable baseline data for building strategies to improve the quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa.

  9. Junior doctor training in pleural procedures: a quality survey.

    PubMed

    Aiyappan, V; Munawar, A; Thien, F

    2013-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a common medical condition encountered by doctors. This study was conducted to ascertain the level of junior doctor (physician-in-training) training, knowledge and supervision in the management of pleural effusion. The information was collected with the help of a proforma, from 49 junior medical doctors working in a metropolitan health service. All the doctors who participated in the survey had come across pleural effusion in their practice, but only 67% of doctors had any experience with the procedure of diagnostic thoracentesis. Sixty-seven percent of doctors conveyed that they will refer the majority of cases (75-100%) for radiological-guided thoracentesis. The main reasons for referral for radiologically guided procedure were lack of experience (65%), fear of complications (61%), lack of supervision and guidance (49%), and lack of time (38%). A significant proportion of doctors interviewed (47%) was unaware of the major indications for intercostal tube drainage of parapneumonic effusions. This survey highlights deficiencies in junior doctor knowledge and procedural skills. Junior doctor training should be tailored to increase the 'hands-on' training time and increased patient contact. Senior clinicians should be given sufficient 'protected time' for teaching and training. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. [The virtuous doctor in cinema: the final examination].

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Gustavo

    2014-10-01

    The virtuous doctor has subscribed an oath and by subscribing to this solemn promise, he is committed to live in accordance with the purposes, obligations and virtues established in the medical profession. Cinematic art has shown only a superficial interest in complex aspects of medical profession. An exception is Ingmar Bergman's film "Wild Strawberries", where Professor Isak Borg, a widowed 76-year-old physician, is to be awarded the Doctor Jubilaris degree, 50 years after he received his doctorate at Lund University. During the trip, Isak is forced by a nightmare to reevaluate his professional life as not being a virtuous doctor.

  11. [The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate].

    PubMed

    Kiljander, Toni; Toikka, Jyri; Koskenvuo, Juha; Jaakkola, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate Most doctoral candidates find the public defense of a doctoral thesis an exciting and stressful experience. In this study, Holter recording during the defense was made for four doctoral candidates of the Faculty of Medicine. Maximum heart rate among the subjects was on the average 172 beats/min with a median heart rate of 116 beats/min. Sympathicotonia and release of stress hormones associated with the defense raise the heart rate to levels that may be very high for several hours. This is a risk factor for a coronary event and should be considered, if the doctoral candidate has coronary heart disease, carries risk factors for coronary heart disease, or is an elderly person.

  12. [Kim Pil Soon, a great doctor].

    PubMed

    Park, H W

    1998-01-01

    : giving up his prospective career as a doctor, professor, and hospital administrator. He no longer remained as an ordinary clinician who treats only diseased persons, but transformed himself to the Great Doctor, a time-old ideal type of doctor in the East Asian countries who treats and cures the diseased nation, by dedicating himself to the independence movement.

  13. Working as a doctor when chronically ill or disabled: comments made by doctors responding to UK surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To report a qualitative study of themes doctors raised spontaneously, in a large-scale prospective cohort study covering many aspects of their medical careers, when referring to their own chronic illness or disability. Design Questionnaire survey. Setting UK. Participants Questionnaires were sent one, five and 10 years after graduation to 44,539 doctors who qualified between 1993 and 2012 in the UK: 38,613 questionnaires were returned and 11,859 respondents provided comments made by doctors about their training or work. Main outcome measures The comments of 123 doctors about their own chronic illness or disability. Results Main themes raised included poor support for doctors with chronic illness or disability, delays in and changes to careers (either planned ahead or imposed), the impact of pressure at work, difficulties returning to work after illness, limitations on career choices and inadequate careers advice for doctors with chronic illness or disabilities. Conclusions More needs to be done to ensure that doctors with chronic illness or disability receive appropriate support. Occupational health guidance should be monitored closely, with more support for ill doctors including adjustments to the job, help if needed with morale and mental health, and advice on career options. Further studies should establish the prevalence of long-term health conditions among doctors. PMID:28050260

  14. The master degree: A critical transition in STEM doctoral education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Sheila Edwards

    The need to broaden participation in the nation's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate and graduate programs is currently a matter of national urgency. The small number of women and underrepresented minorities (URM) earning doctoral degrees in STEM is particularly troubling given significant increases in the number of students earning master's degrees since 1990. In the decade between 1990 and 2000, the total number of master's recipients increased by 42%. During this same time period, the number of women earning master's degrees increased by 56%, African Americans increased by 132%, American Indians by 101%, Hispanics by 146%, and Asian Americans by 117% (Syverson, 2003). Growth in underrepresented group education at the master's level raises questions about the relationship between master's and doctoral education. Secondary data analysis of the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) was used to examine institutional pathways to the doctorate in STEM disciplines and transitions from master's to doctoral programs by race and gender. While the study revealed no significant gender differences in pathways, compared to White and Asian American students, URM students take significantly different pathways to the doctorate. URM students are significantly more likely to earn the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees at three different institutions. Their path is significantly more likely to include earning a master's degree en route to the doctorate. Further, URM students are more likely to experience transition between the master's and doctoral degrees, and the transitions are not limited to those who earn master's degrees at master's-only institutions. These findings suggest that earning a master's degree is more often a stepping stone to the doctorate for URM students. Master's degree programs, therefore, have the potential to be a valuable resource for policymakers and graduate programs seeking to increase the diversity of URM students

  15. Health services research doctoral core competencies

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Christopher B; Martin, Diane P; Holve, Erin; Millman, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript presents an initial description of doctoral level core competencies for health services research (HSR). The competencies were developed by a review of the literature, text analysis of institutional accreditation self-studies submitted to the Council on Education for Public Health, and a consensus conference of HSR educators from US educational institutions. The competencies are described in broad terms which reflect the unique expertise, interests, and preferred learning methods of academic HSR programs. This initial set of core competencies is published to generate further dialogue within and outside of the US about the most important learning objectives and methods for HSR training and to clarify the unique skills of HSR training program graduates. PMID:19555485

  16. Do medical doctors respond to economic incentives?

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Leif; Di Tommaso, Maria Laura; Strøm, Steinar

    2013-03-01

    A longitudinal analysis of married physicians labor supply is carried out on Norwegian data from 1997 to 1999. The model utilized for estimation implies that physicians can choose among 10 different job packages which are a combination of part time/full time, hospital/primary care, private/public sector, and not working. Their current choice is influenced by past available options due to a habit persistence parameter in the utility function. In the estimation we take into account the budget constraint, including all features of the tax system. Our results imply that an overall wage increase or less progressive taxation moves married physicians toward full time job packages, in particular to full time jobs in the private sector. But the overall and aggregate labor supply elasticities in the population of employed doctors are rather low compared to previous estimates.

  17. [Doctor patient communication: which skills are effective?].

    PubMed

    Moore, Philippa; Gómez, Gricelda; Kurtz, Suzanne; Vargas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Effective Communication Skills form part of what is being a good doctor. There is a solid evidence base that defines the components of effective communication. This article offers a practical conceptual framework to improve physician patient communication to a professional level of competence. There are six goals that physicians and patients work to achieve through their communication with each other. These are to construct a relationship, structure an interview, start the interview, gather information, explain, plan and close the interview. The outcomes that can be improved with an effective communication and the "first principles" of communication are described. A brief look at the historical context that has influenced our thinking about communication in health care is carried out. Finally, the Calgary Cambridge Guide, an approach for delineating and organizing the specific skills required of an effective communication with patients is described. It is clear from the literature that better communication skills improve patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes.

  18. Junior doctors' preferences for specialty choice.

    PubMed

    Sivey, Peter; Scott, Anthony; Witt, Julia; Joyce, Catherine; Humphreys, John

    2012-12-01

    A number of studies suggest that there is an over-supply of specialists and an under-supply of general practitioners in many developed countries. Previous econometric studies of specialty choice from the US suggest that although income plays a role, other non-pecuniary factors may be important. This paper presents a novel application of a choice experiment to identify the effects of expected future earnings and other attributes on specialty choice. We find the implied marginal wage estimated from our discrete choice model is close to the actual wages of senior specialists, but much higher than those of senior GPs. In a policy simulation we find that increasing GPs' earnings by $50,000, or increasing opportunities for procedural or academic work can increase the number of junior doctors choosing general practice by between 8 and 13 percentage points. The simulation implies an earnings elasticity of specialty choice of 0.95.

  19. Clown doctors: shaman healers of Western medicine.

    PubMed

    Van Blerkom, L M

    1995-12-01

    The Big Apple Circus Clown Care Unit, which entertains children in New York City hospitals, is compared with non-Western healers, especially shamans. There is not only superficial resemblance--weird costumes, music, sleight of hand, puppet/spirit helpers, and ventriloquism--but also similarity in the meanings and functions of their performances. Both clown and shaman violate natural and cultural rules in their performances. Both help patient and family deal with illness. Both use suggestion and manipulation of medical symbols in attempting to alleviate their patients' distress. Just as traditional ethnomedical systems have been integrated with Western medicine in other societies, clown doctors can provide complementary therapy that may enhance the efficacy of medical treatment in developed nations, particularly for children.

  20. Edinburgh doctors and their physic gardens.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2008-12-01

    Edinburgh has had eight physic gardens on different sites since its first one was created by the Incorporation of Barbers and Surgeons in 1656. As the gardens grew in size, they evolved from herb gardens to botanic gardens with small herbaria for the supply of medical herbs. They were intended for the instruction of medical, surgical and apothecary students and, in the case of the physicians, to demonstrate the need for a physicians' college and a pharmacopoeia. Some of the doctors in charge of them were equally famous and influential in botany as in medicine, and while Edinburgh Town Council enjoyed the fame the gardens brought to the city it was parsimonious and slow to support its botanical pioneers. The gardens are celebrated today in the Sibbald Garden within the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

  1. Difficult Doctors, Difficult Patients: Building Empathy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Patricia F; Wescom, Elise; Carlos, Ruth C

    2016-12-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication facilitates the therapeutic relationship, promotes patient physical and mental health, and improves physician satisfaction. Methods of teaching effective communication use a range of techniques, typically combining didactic instruction with simulated communication encounters and reflective discussion. Rarely are patients and physicians exposed to these instructions as colearners. The evidence for the utility of graphic stories, comics, and cartoons to improve patient comprehension and self-regulation is small but encouraging. The authors describe the use of graphic medicine as a teaching tool for engendering empathy from both the physician and the patient for the other during a shared clinical encounter. This use of educational comics in a colearning experience represents a new use of the medium as a teaching tool. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Thomas Bowdler: censor, philanthropist, and doctor.

    PubMed

    Jellineck, E H

    2001-09-29

    A recent biography of the physician William Osler credits him with having generated a verb, to "oslerize", as a synonym for euthanasia. Actually, Osler had been mocking his own impending senescent uselessness at the time of his move from Baltimore to Oxford. That neologism did not last. Two earlier doctors who did make it to the dictionaries in a verbally eponymous way were F A Mesmer and Thomas Bowdler, and Bowdler, at least, would not have liked the recognition. The first use of the verb to "bowdlerise" seems to have been in 1836, with a reference to "names in the writings of the apostles which modern ultrachristians would probably have Bowdlerized". However, Bowdler is better remembered for his cleaning up of the plays of Shakespeare.

  3. Why doctors should care about animal cruelty.

    PubMed

    Sherley, Miranda

    2007-01-01

    Animal cruelty is a significant problem for society, and there are good reasons why doctors should be particularly concerned by it. Increasing evidence for links between animal cruelty and child or spousal abuse is an area of growing concern internationally and of real importance to health professionals. This article aims to raise awareness of the relevance of animal cruelty to medical practice. The links between animal cruelty and human health are discussed broadly and some wider ethical issues raised. Animal cruelty impacts on human health in disparate ways: intentional and unintentional acts of cruelty may reflect underlying mental health problems that need to be addressed. Cruelty within the family setting is an important sentinel for domestic violence and should prompt an assessment for possible child abuse. Furthermore, animal cruelty raises important questions about the nature of empathy, and the type of society that we wish to live in.

  4. A decade of doctoral research in nutrition.

    PubMed

    Keller, H H; Ostbye, T; Edwards, H G; Johnston, C

    1999-09-01

    To describe North American dissertation research in human nutrition from 1986 through 1995. A census collection. The unit of observation was the dissertation abstract submitted to Dissertation Abstracts International for the years 1986 through 1995. Only dissertations written in English with a human nutrition subject code (0570) that lead to a PhD, DrPH, EdD, or ScD at a North American university were included (N = 2,044). Abstracts were reviewed by 2 raters who extracted pertinent data on variables describing the dissertation research (e.g., topic of dissertation, type of sample). Analyses were descriptive. The majority (n = 1,147) of doctoral dissertations were completed by female students. Male students were more likely to study in vitro samples than female students (11% vs 4%) and female students were more likely to study human subjects (64%). Male students tended to have male advisers, although overall male advisers appeared to predominate (34% men, 24% women, 42% unknown or missing). Topic areas for dissertation work reflected gender differences. Popular topics for dissertation research have changed over time; biochemical-, micronutrient-, and obesity-related research decreased and research in development of theoretical constructs and examination of dietary habits of selected groups increased. From 1986 through 1995 there was an increase in the proportion of female doctoral students. Female and male students varied in the type of sample studied, gender of advisers, age group of human subjects, and topics of their dissertations. Universities emphasized different topic areas and methodologies. There appears to have been an increase in areas of applied research (e.g., dietary habits) and a decrease in basic science topic areas (e.g., micronutrients) over the 10-year period examined.

  5. Doctor and pharmacist - back to the apothecary!

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Peterson, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    The Australian National Medicines Policy embodies four tenets: availability, quality, safety and efficacy of medicines; timely access to affordable medicines; quality use of medicines (QUM); and a responsible and viable medicines industry. The promotion of QUM requires a multidisciplinary approach, including contributions from government, the pharmaceutical industry, health professionals, consumers and academia. However, there are significant tensions and unintended effects associated with the multidisciplinary approach, especially with the relationships between prescribers and dispensers of medicines. The general practitioner and the pharmacist share a common ancestor - the apothecary. The separation of dispensing from prescribing, which began in medieval Europe and 19th century England, reframed and confined the patient-doctor relationship to one of diagnosis, prescription and non-drug management. The role of pharmacists was limited to dispensing, though the present trend is for their responsibilities to be widened. Historical antecedents, the contribution of an increasing number of actors to the costs of health care, universal health insurance and an evolving regulatory framework, are among the factors influencing doctor-pharmacist relations. The prescribing and dispensing of medicines must be guided by an ethical clinical governance structure encompassing health professionals, regulators, the pharmaceutical industry and consumers. There must be close monitoring of safety and effectiveness, and promotion of quality use of medicines and improved patient outcomes. Ongoing training and professional development, within and across professional boundaries, is essential to support harmonious and cost-effective inter-professional practice. The approach must be "apothecarial" with complementary roles and responsibilities for the prescriber and dispenser within the patient-clinician therapeutic relationship, and not adversarial.

  6. Medical Professionalism: Conflicting Values for Tomorrow's Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Simon; Barclay, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Background New values and practices associated with medical professionalism have created an increased interest in the concept. In the United Kingdom, it is a current concern in medical education and in the development of doctor appraisal and revalidation. Objective To investigate how final year medical students experience and interpret new values of professionalism as they emerge in relation to confronting dying patients and as they potentially conflict with older values that emerge through hidden dimensions of the curriculum. Methods Qualitative study using interpretative discourse analysis of anonymized student reflective portfolios. One hundred twenty-three final year undergraduate medical students (64 male and 59 female) from the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine supplied 116 portfolios from general practice and 118 from hospital settings about patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Results Professional values were prevalent in all the portfolios. Students emphasised patient-centered, holistic care, synonymous with a more contemporary idea of professionalism, in conjunction with values associated with the ‘old’ model of professionalism that had not be directly taught to them. Integrating ‘new’ professional values was at times problematic. Three main areas of potential conflict were identified: ethical considerations, doctor-patient interaction and subjective boundaries. Students explicitly and implicitly discussed several tensions and described strategies to resolve them. Conclusions The conflicts outlined arise from the mix of values associated with different models of professionalism. Analysis indicates that ‘new’ models are not simply replacing existing elements. Whilst this analysis is of accounts from students within one UK medical school, the experience of conflict between different notions of professionalism and the three broad domains in which this conflict arises are relevant in other areas of medicine and in

  7. Doctoral Accounting Candidates: A Profile of Demographics and Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backmon, Ida Robinson

    1998-01-01

    Presents information on minority doctoral students in accounting, drawing on surveys completed by 47 such students. Outlines demographic characteristics, and identifies respondents' rankings of costs and benefits of pursuing a doctorate in accounting. Most respondents were professionally certified and were interested in academic careers. (SLD)

  8. Doctoral Student Learning and Development: A Shared Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bair, Carolyn R.; Haworth, Jennifer Grant; Sandfort, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Historically, student affairs professionals focused their work almost exclusively on undergraduate students. Doctoral faculty remained focused on the comprehensive needs of doctoral students. However, this situation is changing. Due largely to growth in numbers and diversity of graduate students, student affairs professionals at colleges and…

  9. Introducing the First Hybrid Doctoral Program in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Matthew J.; Zellner, Andrea L.; Roseth, Cary J.; Dickson, Robin K.; Dickson, W. Patrick; Bell, John

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 Michigan State University launched the first hybrid doctoral program in Educational Technology. This 5-year program blends face-to-face and online components to engage experienced, working education professionals in doctoral study. In this paper, we describe the design and evolution of the program as well as the response from students. We…

  10. Examining Doctoral Examination and the Question of the Viva

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovat, Terence; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Fairbairn, Hedy; Kiley, Margaret; Paltridge, Brian; Starfield, Sue

    2015-01-01

    The paper draws on a series of Australian Research Council (ARC) projects aimed at understanding better the process of doctoral examination. The early phase focussed on the Australian doctorate, which functions without a Viva, while the later phase was concerned with comparing the earlier findings with analysis of the United Kingdom (UK) and New…

  11. How To Catch and Keep a Rural Doctor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyal, Digby

    This paper addresses the shortage of physicians providing medical services to rural communities in Queensland, Australia. Queensland is the fastest growing Australian state, but it has the lowest ratio of total doctors to population. Data indicate there may be twice as many patients per rural doctor compared with the city, which represents a…

  12. Work-Based Doctorates: Professional Extension at the Highest Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Carol; Lester, Stan

    2012-01-01

    The growth and evolution of professional doctorates in Australia, the UK and other parts of the English-speaking world has been widely reported and discussed. Recently, forms of doctorate have emerged that are not geared to specific professions or disciplines, and that are used by senior practitioners as vehicles for professional development and…

  13. From medical doctor to medical director: leadership style matters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; Wood, Edward V; Ibram, Ferda

    2015-07-01

    Leadership is a skill to be developed by all doctors from the foundation trainee to the director of the board. This article explores the impact of leadership style on performance and considers techniques to develop doctors' leadership skills and personal effectiveness.

  14. Is imperfection becoming easier to live with for doctors?

    PubMed Central

    Aasland, Olaf G

    2017-01-01

    Objective Being involved in serious patient injury is devastating for most doctors. During the last two decades, several efforts have been launched to improve Norwegian doctors’ coping with adverse events and complaints. Methods The method involved survey to a representative sample of 1792 Norwegian doctors in 2012. The questions on adverse events and its effects were previously asked in 2000. Results Response rate was 71%. More doctors reported to have been involved in episodes with serious patient harm in 2012 (35%) than in 2000 (28%), and more of the episodes were reported as required by law. Doctors below age 50 report better support from colleagues, more collegial retrospective discussion on the event and less patient/family blame. In all, 27% of the doctors had been reported to the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision; 79% of these complaints were rejected; 73% of the doctors who had received a reaction from the health authorities found the reaction reasonable, but almost one out of five practiced more testing and referrals after a complaint and 25% claimed that the complaint had made them into a more fearful doctor. Conclusion Our results indicate that adverse events are being met more openly in 2012 than in 2000, and that coping with imperfection and patient complaints is less devastating for new generations of doctors.

  15. Leveraging Value in Doctoral Student Networks through Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilbeam, Colin; Lloyd-Jones, Gaynor; Denyer, David

    2013-01-01

    UK higher education policy relating to doctoral-level education assumes that student networks provide the basis for informal learning and the acquisition of necessary skills and information. Through semi-structured interviews with 17 doctoral students from a UK management school, this study investigated the value of these networks to students, the…

  16. Signature Pedagogy in California State University Educational Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Charles; Brown-Welty, Sharon; Cohn, Kathleen; Rodriguez, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine signature pedagogies for the education doctorate. Three California State University campuses that have started new Ed.D. programs examine practices that distinguish the education doctoral experience from other professions. Embedded field work, the professional seminar, and the research and writing support…

  17. Motive for Reviewing Higher Education Administration Doctoral Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chukwuemeka, Veronica O.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the research question: "What is the Motive for the Review of Higher Education Administration (HEA) Doctoral Degree Programs? The data derived from a larger study, "Impact of Program Review on Higher Education Administration Doctoral Degree Programs" that documents, through in-depth case studies, the processes faculty and…

  18. Transnational Education: A Case Study of One Professional Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Marnie

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a Doctor of Education program in a transnational setting is contextualized in Australian national policies for international higher education and influences of regionalization and globalization. The doctorate was designed to meet aspirations of professional practitioners in Australia and South East Asia where the School had…

  19. An Investigation of Generic Structures of Pakistani Doctoral Thesis Acknowledgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rofess, Sakander; Mahmood, Muhammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates Pakistani doctoral thesis acknowledgements from genre analysis perspective. A corpus of 235 PhD thesis acknowledgements written in English was taken from Pakistani doctoral theses collected from eight different disciplines. HEC Research Repository of Pakistan was used as a data sources. The theses written by Pakistani…

  20. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  1. The Engaged Dissertation: Exploring Trends in Doctoral Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Audrey J.; Tuchmayer, Jeremy B.; Morin, Shauna M.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which doctoral students are conducting community-engaged scholarship and investigated the characteristics of their degree-granting institutions. The research utilized the most immediate work of doctoral students by examining completed dissertations. Analysis showed which graduate students are pursuing community…

  2. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  3. Assessment of Examinations in Computer Science Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys the examination requirements for attaining degree candidate (candidacy) status in computer science doctoral programs at all of the computer science doctoral granting institutions in the United States. It presents a framework for program examination requirement categorization, and categorizes these programs by the type or types…

  4. Doctoral Students' Identity Positioning in Networked Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koole, Marguerite; Stack, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors explored identity positioning as perceived by doctoral learners in online, networked-learning environments. The study examined two distance doctoral programs at a Canadian university. It was a qualitative study based on methodologies involving open coding and discourse analysis. The social positioning cycle, based on…

  5. Conceptual Frameworks in the Doctoral Research Process: A Pedagogical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Jeanette; Smyth, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to consideration of the role of conceptual frameworks in the doctoral research process. Through reflection on the two authors' own conceptual frameworks for their doctoral studies, a pedagogical model has been developed. The model posits the development of a conceptual framework as a core element of the doctoral…

  6. Personal Commitment, Support and Progress in Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsuo, Miia; Turkulainen, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research on doctoral education has associated study progress with the student's own capabilities and faculty support. The purpose of this study is to investigate how students' personal commitment and various forms of support, as well as their complementary effects, explain progress in doctoral studies. Data were collected by a…

  7. Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities. Summary Report 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syverson, Peter D.

    A brief summary of data, in tables with some narrative, from the Survey of Earned Doctorates during fiscal year 1980 is presented. Both research and applied research doctorates with these degree designations are included: DAS, DArch, DA, DBA, JCD, DCJ, DCrim, EdD, DEng, DESc, ScDE, DEnv, DED, DFA, DF, DGS, DHS (Health and Safety), DHS (Hebrew…

  8. Drivers and Interpretations of Doctoral Education Today: National Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Lesley; Bengtsen, Søren S. E.; del Pilar Gallego Castaño, Liliana; Crossouard, Barbara; Keefer, Jeffrey M.; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, doctoral education has undergone a sea change with several global trends increasingly apparent. Drivers of change include massification and professionalization of doctoral education and the introduction of quality assurance systems. The impact of these drivers, and the forms that they take, however, are dependent on doctoral…

  9. Faculty Perceptions of Common Challenges Encountered by Novice Doctoral Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michelle A.; Feldon, David F.; Timmerman, Briana E.; Chao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Although learning to write for publication is an important outcome of doctoral education, it has received surprisingly little scholarly attention. Within a socialization and supervisor pedagogy framework, this study uses narratives of faculty who regularly write with their doctoral students for publication to expose challenges students commonly…

  10. Annual Report: Doctoral Program Committee, Academic Year 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievrouw, Leah A.; Leazer, Greg; Lynch, Beverly; Abler, Susan; Mediavilla, Cynthia

    This document summarizes the activities of the University of California, Los Angeles's (UCLA's) Department of Library and Information Science (DLIS) Doctoral Program Committee, 1996-97. These activities are organized into two main areas: Operations and Students. Doctoral Program Committee (DPC) operations outlined include: preparing major policy…

  11. Paradigm Devolution: The Twilight of Traditional Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonstrom, Wendy Jean

    2009-01-01

    In this reflection, the author proposes that doctoral education is currently undergoing paradigm devolution. Her perspective is that of a doctoral student, specifically a full-time graduate student working towards a Ph.D. in adult education. This fall semester marks her last of coursework, and she finds herself searching to make meaning of the…

  12. Political Transformation and Research Methodology in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Chaya

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between political change and epistemologies and methodologies employed at doctorate level. It does so by analysing the range of topics, questions and methodologies used by doctoral students at the University of Pretoria's Faculty of Education between 1985 and 2005--a time-frame that covers the decade before and…

  13. Original Knowledge, Gender and the Word's Mythology: Voicing the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Using mythology as a generative matrix, this article investigates the relationship between knowledge, words, embodiment and gender as they play out in academic writing's voice and, in particular, in doctoral voice. The doctoral thesis is defensive, a performance seeking admittance into discipline scholarship. Yet in finding its scholarly voice,…

  14. Learning Networks and the Journey of "Becoming Doctor"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn; Mewburn, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Scholars such as Kamler and Thompson argue that identity formation has a key role to play in doctoral learning, particularly the process of thesis writing. This article builds on these insights to address other sites in which scholarly identity is performed within doctoral candidature. Drawing on actor-network theory, the authors examine the role…

  15. Doctors in ancient Greek and Roman rhetorical education.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Craig A

    2013-10-01

    This article collects and examines all references to doctors in rhetorical exercises used in ancient Greek and Roman schools in the Roman Empire. While doctors are sometimes portrayed positively as philanthropic, expert practitioners of their divinely sanctioned art, they are more often depicted as facing charges for poisoning their patients.

  16. Personal Commitment, Support and Progress in Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsuo, Miia; Turkulainen, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research on doctoral education has associated study progress with the student's own capabilities and faculty support. The purpose of this study is to investigate how students' personal commitment and various forms of support, as well as their complementary effects, explain progress in doctoral studies. Data were collected by a…

  17. Understanding, Embracing and Reflecting upon the Messiness of Doctoral Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveed, Arif; Sakata, Nozomi; Kefallinou, Anthoula; Young, Sara; Anand, Kusha

    2017-01-01

    This Forum issue discusses the centrality of the fieldwork in doctoral research. The inevitability of researchers' influence and of their values apparent during and after their fieldwork calls for a high degree of reflexivity. Since the standard methodology textbooks do not sufficiently guide on addressing such challenges, doctoral researchers go…

  18. A New Degree and Exam Create "Doctor Nurses," Irking Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    For years, advanced-practice nurses have struggled for greater autonomy from doctors while physician groups have fought back, trying to protect what they see as their turf. This article reports that a new degree and a new certification test are blurring those boundaries even further. The test, and the "doctor of nursing practice" degree it…

  19. Personal Study Planning in Doctoral Education in Industrial Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahenius, K.; Martinsuo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The duration of doctoral studies has increased in Europe. Personal study planning has been considered as one possible solution to help students in achieving shorter study times. This study investigates how doctoral students experience and use personal study plans in one university department of industrial engineering. The research material…

  20. Knowledge Management in Doctoral Education toward Knowledge Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamou, Adamantia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role and the scope of knowledge management (KM) in doctoral education, in the emerging knowledge economy (KE) context, and the recommendation of a framework for KM in doctoral education. Design/Methodology/Approach: An extended literature analysis was contacted to elaborate the role and the…