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Sample records for documented cardiac arrhythmias

  1. Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.; Wiens, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    The impact of low-level carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency in patients with ischemic heart disease has not been thoroughly studied. The issue is of concern because of the potential proarrhythmic effect of carbon monoxide in patients with ischemic heart disease. We studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. By using appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria, subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study to determine the effects of carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency at rest, during exercise, and during ambulatory activities. The carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. The carbon monoxide exposure protocol produced target levels in 60 minutes, and the levels were maintained for an additional 90 minutes to provide adequate time to assess the impact of carbon monoxide on the frequency of ventricular ectopic beats. The data on total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were analyzed for seven specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide or air exposure; (3) during a two-hour rest period; (4) during an exercise period; (5) during an exercise recovery period; (6) six hours after carbon monoxide or air exposure; and (7) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity.

  2. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias.

  3. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias.

  4. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  5. [Psychosomatic aspects of cardiac arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Emotional stress facilitates the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. The prevalence of anxiety and depression is increased in cardiac patients as compared to the normal population. The risk of cardiovascular mortality is enhanced in patients suffering from depression. Comorbid anxiety disorders worsen the course of cardiac arrhythmias. Disturbance of neurocardiac regulation with predominance of the sympathetic tone is hypothesized to be causative for this. The emotional reaction to cardiac arrhythmias is differing to a large extent between individuals. Emotional stress may result from coping with treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias may influence each other in the sense of a vicious circle. Somatoform cardiac arrhythmias are predominantly of psychogenic origin. Instrumental measures and frequent contacts between physicians and patients may facilitate disease chronification. The present review is dealing with the multifaceted relationships between cardiac arrhythmias and emotional stress. The underlying mechanisms and corresponding treatment modalities are discussed.

  6. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  7. Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias. Research report, August 1987-July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.

    1992-09-01

    The authors studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. Subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study; the carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. Total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were measured for four specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide exposure; (3) six hours after carbon monoxide exposure; and (4) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity. During steady-state conditions at rest, the number of ventricular ectopic beats per hour was 115 + or - 153 (SD) for room air exposure (0.7% carboxyhemoglobin), 121 + or - 171 for the lower carbon monoxide exposure (3.2% carboxyhemoglobin), and 94 + or - 129 for the higher carbon monoxide exposure (5.1% carboxyhemoglobin). The frequency of complex ventricular ectopy was not altered at the levels of carbon monoxide studied. Secondary analysis of the impact of carbon monoxide on ventricular ectopic beat frequency stratified by baseline ejection fraction, baseline ventricular ectopic beat frequency, and exercise-induced ST-segment changes did not indicate an effect of carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias. However, patients with symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias and symptomatic myocardial ischemia were excluded from the present study.

  8. Psychological aspects of cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J J; Paskewitz, D A; Gimbel, K S; Thomas, S A

    1977-05-01

    A review of data from a wide spectrum of research studies suggests that psychological-emotional factors can significantly influence and alter the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia. While the existing data are, in many cases, difficult to interpret because of theoretical and methodological problems, sufficient evidence does exist to warrant a concerted investigation into the total involvement of psychological factors in cardiac arrhythmia.

  9. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  10. Systems biology and cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Andrew A; Roden, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    During the past few years, the development of effective, empirical technologies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias has exceeded the pace at which detailed knowledge of the underlying biology has accumulated. As a result, although some clinical arrhythmias can be cured with techniques such as catheter ablation, drug treatment and prediction of the risk of sudden death remain fairly primitive. The identification of key candidate genes for monogenic arrhythmia syndromes shows that to bring basic biology to the clinic is a powerful approach. Increasingly sophisticated experimental models and methods of measurement, including stem cell-based models of human cardiac arrhythmias, are being deployed to study how perturbations in several biologic pathways can result in an arrhythmia-prone heart. The biology of arrhythmia is largely quantifiable, which allows for systematic analysis that could transform treatment strategies that are often still empirical into management based on molecular evidence. PMID:23101717

  11. Systems biology and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Grace, Andrew A; Roden, Dan M

    2012-10-27

    During the past few years, the development of effective, empirical technologies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias has exceeded the pace at which detailed knowledge of the underlying biology has accumulated. As a result, although some clinical arrhythmias can be cured with techniques such as catheter ablation, drug treatment and prediction of the risk of sudden death remain fairly primitive. The identification of key candidate genes for monogenic arrhythmia syndromes shows that to bring basic biology to the clinic is a powerful approach. Increasingly sophisticated experimental models and methods of measurement, including stem cell-based models of human cardiac arrhythmias, are being deployed to study how perturbations in several biologic pathways can result in an arrhythmia-prone heart. The biology of arrhythmia is largely quantifiable, which allows for systematic analysis that could transform treatment strategies that are often still empirical into management based on molecular evidence.

  12. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  13. Stochastic Aspects of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerma, Claudia; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Guevara, Michael; Glass, Leon

    2007-07-01

    Abnormal cardiac rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias) often display complex changes over time that can have a random or haphazard appearance. Mathematically, these changes can on occasion be identified with bifurcations in difference or differential equation models of the arrhythmias. One source for the variability of these rhythms is the fluctuating environment. However, in the neighborhood of bifurcation points, the fluctuations induced by the stochastic opening and closing of individual ion channels in the cell membrane, which results in membrane noise, may lead to randomness in the observed dynamics. To illustrate this, we consider the effects of stochastic properties of ion channels on the resetting of pacemaker oscillations and on the generation of early afterdepolarizations. The comparison of the statistical properties of long records showing arrhythmias with the predictions from theoretical models should help in the identification of different mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) metabolism and cardiac arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, D.M.; Man, R.Y.K.; Arthur, G.; Choy, P.C.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of LPC in the production of cardiac arrhythmias in isolated mammalian hearts has been well-documented. Cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by the accumulation of the lysolipid in the cardiac membrane. When isolated rat hearts were perfused in 10 ..mu..M LPC for 10 min, severe arrhythmias were observed in all experiments. In isolated guinea pig hearts that were perfused under identical conditions, the development of severe arrhythmias was never observed, and mild arrhythmias were produced in less than 50% of the hearts used. When the hearts of both species were perfused with (/sup 14/C-palmitate)-LPC, the labellings found in the microsomal fractions (expressed in mg protein) were similar. However, a higher amount of labelled LPC (2-fold) was found in rat heart microsomes, whereas a higher amount of labelled fatty acid was located in the guinea pig heart microsomes. Determination of lysophospholipase activities in these microsomal fractions revealed that the specific activity of the enzyme was much higher in the guinea pig heart than the rat heart. The authors conclude that the differential effect of LPC-induced arrhythmias between the rat and guinea pig heart may be a direct result of the lysophospholipase activities in these hearts. The ability to catabolize LPC more rapidly in the guinea pig heart may decrease the accumulation of LPC in the membrane, and hence, reduce the production of arrhythmias.

  15. [Cardiac arrhythmias: Diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Waldmann, V; Marijon, E

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias, with, on top of the list, atrial fibrillation, are frequent conditions and any physician might have to get involved at any stage of patient care (from diagnosis to treatment), without always having the opportunity to immediately refer to the cardiologist. The aim of this review is to present a summary of pathophysiology, clinical and electrocardiographic presentations, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for the main cardiac arrhythmias. Supra-ventricular tachycardias (atrial fibrillation and flutter, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardias) and ventricular tachycardias will be consecutively presented and discussed.

  16. Cardiac arrhythmias in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Hardarson, T; Jonsson, S

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in a group of relatives of patients who had come to necropsy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Another aim of the study was to assess the validity of an interventricular septal thickness of 1.3 cm or more, measured by echocardiography, as a diagnostic criterion of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy among relatives of cases proven at necropsy. Fifty close relatives of eight deceased patients were examined. By the above definition 22 relatives had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 28 did not. A comparison of the prevalence and types of cardiac arrhythmias, as shown by 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, was made between the two groups and a third apparently healthy group of 40 people. The patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed a significant increase in supraventricular extrasystoles/24 hours, supraventricular arrhythmias, high grade ventricular arrhythmia, and the number of patients with more than 10 ventricular extrasystoles every 24 hours when compared with the other groups. There was no significant difference between normal relatives and controls. The prevalence and types of arrhythmia in these patients were similar to those found by other investigators using different diagnostic criteria. These results support the contention that these patients do indeed have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and suggest that all close relatives of necropsy proven cases should be examined by echocardiography and subsequently by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring if the interventricular septal thickness is 1.3 more. PMID:7201843

  17. Cardiac Arrhythmias: Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Du-Guan

    2015-11-01

    The cardiac arrhythmia is characterized by irregular rhythm of heartbeat which could be either too slow (<60 beats/min) or too fast (>100 beats/min) and can happen at any age. The use of pacemaker and defibrillators devices has been suggested for heart arrhythmias patients. The antiarrhythmic medications have been reported for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats. The diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of cardiac arrhythmias as well as the radiofrequency ablation, tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, arterial fibrillation, and recent research on the genetics of cardiac arrhythmias have been described here.

  18. Cardiac arrhythmias misdiagnosed as epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, N; Southall, D P

    1985-01-01

    A mother and three children presenting with syncope induced by exercise and emotion were diagnosed as epileptic. They, and three symptom free children, showed frequent ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias on ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. Three died before the correct diagnosis of disordered sympathetic innervation of the heart was made, but episodes of syncope and cardiac arrhythmias in the survivors have been successfully treated by propranolol. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3970569

  19. Update in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    García-Bolao, Ignacio; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco; Bazan, Victor; Berruezo, Antonio; Alcalde, Oscar; Leal del Ojo, Juan; Acosta, Juan; Martínez Sellés, Manuel; Mosquera, Ignacio

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the main advances in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published between 2013 and 2014. Special attention is given to the interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias, and on advances in cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, with particular reference to the elderly patient.

  20. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope.

  1. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope. PMID:24774592

  2. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  3. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms “Long QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Short QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Brugada Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia” (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  4. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full.

  5. Behavioral influences on cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Stress can trigger both ventricular and atrial arrhythmias, as evidenced by epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies, through its impact on autonomic activity. Chronic stress also increases vulnerability to arrhythmias. Novel therapies aimed at decreasing the psychological and physiological response to stress may decrease arrhythmia frequency and improve quality of life.

  6. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiator having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may be used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  7. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  9. Ranolazine Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Pulford, Brian R; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Ranolazine is an antianginal medication originally granted approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for therapeutic use in 2006. Since its introduction into the U.S. market, there have been multiple trials and clinical case reports that demonstrate ranolazine may be effective in the prevention and treatment of both atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, including postoperative atrial fibrillation following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. More recently, the combination of dronedarone with ranolazine has demonstrated in initial studies to have a synergistic effect in the reduction of burden of atrial fibrillation. This article will review the basic pharmacology of ranolazine, the studies demonstrating use of ranolazine in atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, the limitations to the use of ranolazine as antiarrhythmic therapy, and explore the synergistic effect with other agents in the suppression of arrhythmias. PMID:27358212

  10. Gene therapy to treat cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Bongianino, Rossana; Priori, Silvia G

    2015-09-01

    Gene therapy to treat electrical dysfunction of the heart is an appealing strategy because of the limited therapeutic options available to manage the most-severe cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and asystole. However, cardiac genetic manipulation is challenging, given the complex mechanisms underlying arrhythmias. Nevertheless, the growing understanding of the molecular basis of these diseases, and the development of sophisticated vectors and delivery strategies, are providing researchers with adequate means to target specific genes and pathways involved in disorders of heart rhythm. Data from preclinical studies have demonstrated that gene therapy can be successfully used to modify the arrhythmogenic substrate and prevent life-threatening arrhythmias. Therefore, gene therapy might plausibly become a treatment option for patients with difficult-to-manage acquired arrhythmias and for those with inherited arrhythmias. In this Review, we summarize the preclinical studies into gene therapy for acquired and inherited arrhythmias of the atria or ventricles. We also provide an overview of the technical advances in the design of constructs and viral vectors to increase the efficiency and safety of gene therapy and to improve selective delivery to target organs.

  11. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  12. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Feit, L R

    2001-05-01

    The diagnosis and management of fetal cardiac arrhythmias requires complex skills and knowledge, and has had a great impact on the care of infants with congenital heart disease and their families. Optimal benefits will be derived from a thoughtful team approach, with skillful internal communication, and especially when parental involvement is encouraged in the decision making process. PMID:11392955

  13. Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Thomas; Fox, Henrik; Gaddam, SaiPrassad; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2015-07-01

    Over the past few years sleep-disordered breathing has been identified as an important factor in arrhythmogenesis and a potential target of therapy to prevent cardiac arrhythmias in selected patients. In this review we highlight the role of obstructive sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes respiration in the pathophysiology of arrhythmias, address their clinical effect in supraventricular and ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and in conduction disturbances, and address the role of current treatment options for sleep-disordered breathing in the primary and secondary prevention of arrhythmic events.

  14. Effect of female sex on cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Gowd, B M Pampana; Thompson, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    We performed a systematic literature review to examine the effect of female sex on cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmias. Women have faster resting heart rates yet longer QTc intervals. Women also have shorter PR and QRS intervals; these are presumed to be due to the small heart size of women and hormonal effects on ion channels. Women are two times more likely to experience atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia than men. In contrast to atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia, accessory-pathway-mediated atrial arrhythmias are less common in women, and women have more concealed and fewer manifest accessory pathways. Supraventricular tachycardia in women varies with the menstrual cycle and is more frequent in the luteal phase and inversely correlated with estrogen levels. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is less prevalent in women, but the absolute number of women with AF is higher because AF prevalence increases with age and women live longer. Also, complications of AF are greater in women. Women are generally less prone to ventricular arrhythmias, but they comprise a higher percentage of symptomatic subjects with congenital long QT syndrome and are more often affected by drugs that prolong the QT. Women are less prone to arrhythmias during pregnancy although they commonly complain of palpitations, which are sometimes related to the increase in heart rate during pregnancy. Clinicians should explore the relationship of arrhythmias to the menstrual cycle in female patients and should know that the menstrual cycle may affect the induction of arrhythmias during electrophysiological testing. Clinicians should also be aware that the arrhythmia and the result of clinical trials examining arrhythmia treatment may have different implications in women than in men.

  15. Sarcolemmal KATP channel modulators and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Baczkó, I; Husti, Z; Lang, V; Leprán, I; Light, P E

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause underlying 1) the development of ventricular fibrillation that results in sudden cardiac death and 2) atrial fibrillation that can lead to heart failure and stroke. Current pharmacological agents for the treatment of ventricular and atrial arrhythmias exhibit limited effectiveness and many of these agents can cause serious adverse effects - including the provocation of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels (sarcK(ATP)) couple cellular metabolism to membrane excitability in a wide range of tissues. In the heart, sarcK(ATP) are activated during metabolic stress including myocardial ischemia, and both the opening of sarcK(ATP) and mitochondrial K(ATP) channels protect the ischemic myocardium via distinct mechanisms. Myocardial ischemia leads to a series of events that promote the generation of arrhythmia substrate eventually resulting in the development of life-threatening arrhythmias. In this review, the possible mechanisms of the anti- and proarrhythmic effects of sarcK(ATP) modulation as well as the influence of pharmacological K(ATP) modulators are discussed. It is concluded that in spite of the significant advances made in this field, the possible cardiovascular therapeutic utility of current sarcK(ATP) channel modulators is still hampered by the lack of chamber-specific selectivity. However, recent insights into the chamber-specific differences in the molecular composition of sarcKATP in addition to already existing cardioselective sarcK(ATP) channel modulators with sarcK(ATP) isoform selectivity holds the promise for the future development of pharmacological strategies specific for a variety of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  16. Bifurcation theory and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Stepanyan, Hayk; Mandel, William J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review two types of dynamic behaviors defined by the bifurcation theory that are found to be particularly useful in describing two forms of cardiac electrical instabilities that are of considerable importance in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. The first is action potential duration (APD) alternans with an underlying dynamics consistent with the period doubling bifurcation theory. This form of electrical instability could lead to spatially discordant APD alternans leading to wavebreak and reentrant form of tachyarrhythmias. Factors that modulate the APD alternans are discussed. The second form of bifurcation of importance to cardiac arrhythmogenesis is the Hopf-homoclinic bifurcation that adequately describes the dynamics of the onset of early afterdepolarization (EAD)-mediated triggered activity (Hopf) that may cause ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF respectively). The self-termination of the triggered activity is compatible with the homoclinic bifurcation. Ionic and intracellular calcium dynamics underlying these dynamics are discussed using available experimental and simulation data. The dynamic analysis provides novel insights into the mechanisms of VT/VF, a major cause of sudden cardiac death in the US.

  17. Pharmacotherapy of cardiac arrhythmias--basic science for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Shu, Juan; Zhou, Jun; Patel, Chinmay; Yan, Gan-Xin

    2009-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occur in approximately 5.3% of the population and contribute substantially to morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological therapy still remains the major approach in management of patients with nearly every form of cardiac arrhythmia. Effective and safe management of cardiac arrhythmias with antiarrhythmic drugs requires understanding of basic mechanisms for various cardiac arrhythmias, clinical diagnosis of an arrhythmia and identification of underlying cardiac diseases, pharmacokinetics, and antiarrhythmic properties of each individual antiarrhythmic drug. Most cardiac arrhythmias occur via one of the two mechanisms: abnormal impulse formation and reentry or both. Antiarrhythmic drugs primarily work via influencing cardiac automaticity or triggered activity or by their effects on effective refractoriness of cardiac cells. Proarrhythmic effects of antiarrhythmic drugs are also briefly discussed in this review article.

  18. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  19. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  20. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2013-10-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management. This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  1. Heart-brain interactions in cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Taggart, P; Critchley, H; Lambiase, P D

    2011-05-01

    This review examines current knowledge of the effects of higher brain centres and autonomic control loops on the heart with particular relevance to arrhythmogenesis. There is now substantial evidence that higher brain function (cortex), the brain stem and autonomic nerves affect cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmia, and that these may function as an interactive system. The roles of mental stress and emotion in arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death are no longer confined to the realms of anecdote. Advances in molecular cardiology have identified cardiac cellular ion channel mutations conferring vulnerability to arrhythmic death at the myocardial level. Indeed, specific channelopathies such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome are selectively sensitive to either sympathetic or vagal stimulation. There is increasing evidence that afferent feedback from the heart to the higher centres may affect efferent input to the heart and modulate the cardiac electrophysiology. The new era of functional neuroimaging has identified the central neural circuitry in this brain-heart axis. Since precipitants of sudden fatal arrhythmia are frequently environmental and behavioural, central pathways translating stress into autonomic effects on the heart might be considered as therapeutic targets. These brain-heart interactions help explain the apparent randomness of sudden cardiac events and provide new insights into future novel therapies to prevent sudden death.

  2. Fractals analysis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammed

    2005-09-01

    Heart rhythms are generated by complex self-regulating systems governed by the laws of chaos. Consequently, heart rhythms have fractal organization, characterized by self-similar dynamics with long-range order operating over multiple time scales. This allows for the self-organization and adaptability of heart rhythms under stress. Breakdown of this fractal organization into excessive order or uncorrelated randomness leads to a less-adaptable system, characteristic of aging and disease. With the tools of nonlinear dynamics, this fractal breakdown can be quantified with potential applications to diagnostic and prognostic clinical assessment. In this paper, I review the methodologies for fractal analysis of cardiac rhythms and the current literature on their applications in the clinical context. A brief overview of the basic mathematics of fractals is also included. Furthermore, I illustrate the usefulness of these powerful tools to clinical medicine by describing a novel noninvasive technique to monitor drug therapy in atrial fibrillation.

  3. A vertical approach to cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1987-10-01

    Study of cardiac arrhythmia may be pursued vertically, as up the rungs of a ladder, from symptom to ECG, to EPS, to local lesion, to intracellular metabolism and to alterations of the latter and their effects on charge-transfer by ions across the cell membrane. Raised intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations are responses to normal physiological controls, and highly abnormal ECGs occur in normal people under stress without progressing to life threatening arrhythmias, yet do so in susceptible individuals. Conversely, appropriate stimulation can precipitate ventricular fibrillation in normal myocardium. Selective stimulation of different types of adrenoceptor has differing electrophysiological effects. Beta 1-adrenoceptors increase contraction and calcium current, and shorten action potential duration (APD) by increasing potassium conductance. Beta 2-adrenoceptors do not increase calcium entry, but shorten APD by stimulating electrogenic Na/K pumping, alpha-adrenoceptors prolong contractions and lengthen APD. It is suggested that the tachycardia, extrasystoles and shortening of APD occurring in response to adrenergic stimuli and hypoxia, are accessory factors, not primary causes, in the development of arrhythmias, and constitute a danger when there is an appropriate anatomical substrate for re-entry. Serious arrhythmias are of multifactorial origin, of which "calcium overload" is but one, not proven to be a frequent one.

  4. Cancer chemotherapy and cardiac arrhythmias: a review.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Delpón, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular toxicity is a potential complication of cancer chemotherapy (CC) that increases the morbidity and mortality of cancer patients. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported as an adverse effect of many chemotherapeutic drugs, including novel targeted therapies. The relationship between chemotherapy and arrhythmias has not been well-established and the proarrhythmogenic mechanisms remain uncertain as they can be the result of a direct electrophysiological effect or of changes in cardiac structure and function, including myocardial ischaemia and heart failure, which create an arrhythmogenic substrate. In this review we summarise available evidence of proarrhythmia induced by CC, discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this adverse effect and emphasise the importance of cardiac monitoring for the early diagnosis, intervention and surveillance of those patients more susceptible to develop proarrhythmia in an attempt to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Oncologists should be fully aware of proarrhythmia and the close collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists would result in a better cardiovascular assessment, risk stratification, cardiac monitoring and treatment during CC and during the follow-up. The final objective is to understand the mechanisms of proarrhythmia and evaluate its real incidence and clinical relevance so as to select the safest and most effective treatment for cancer patients.

  5. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  6. Acute emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ziegelstein, Roy C

    2007-07-18

    Episodes of acute emotional stress can have significant adverse effects on the heart. Acute emotional stress can produce left ventricular contractile dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, or disturbances of cardiac rhythm. Although these abnormalities are often only transient, their consequences can be gravely damaging and sometimes fatal. Despite the many descriptions of catastrophic cardiovascular events in the setting of acute emotional stress, the anatomical substrate and physiological pathways by which emotional stress triggers cardiovascular events are only now being characterized, aided by the advent of functional neuroimaging. Recent evidence indicates that asymmetric brain activity is particularly important in making the heart more susceptible to ventricular arrhythmias. Lateralization of cerebral activity during emotional stress may stimulate the heart asymmetrically and produce areas of inhomogeneous repolarization that create electrical instability and facilitate the development of cardiac arrhythmias. Patients with ischemic heart disease who survive an episode of sudden cardiac death in the setting of acute emotional stress should receive a beta-blocker. Nonpharmacological approaches to manage emotional stress in patients with and without coronary artery disease, including social support, relaxation therapy, yoga, meditation, controlled slow breathing, and biofeedback, are also appropriate to consider and merit additional investigation in randomized trials.

  7. Classification of cardiac arrhythmias using competitive networks.

    PubMed

    Leite, Cicilia R M; Martin, Daniel L; Sizilio, Glaucia R A; Dos Santos, Keylly E A; de Araujo, Bruno G; Valentim, Ricardo A M; Neto, Adriao D D; de Melo, Jorge D; Guerreiro, Ana M G

    2010-01-01

    Information generated by sensors that collect a patient's vital signals are continuous and unlimited data sequences. Traditionally, this information requires special equipment and programs to monitor them. These programs process and react to the continuous entry of data from different origins. Thus, the purpose of this study is to analyze the data produced by these biomedical devices, in this case the electrocardiogram (ECG). Processing uses a neural classifier, Kohonen competitive neural networks, detecting if the ECG shows any cardiac arrhythmia. In fact, it is possible to classify an ECG signal and thereby detect if it is exhibiting or not any alteration, according to normality. PMID:21096338

  8. Basic Cardiac Electrophysiology and Common Drug-induced Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aimee; Pickham, David

    2016-09-01

    Drugs can be a double-edged sword, providing the benefit of symptom alleviation and disease modification but potentially causing harm from adverse cardiac arrhythmic events. Proarrhythmia is the ability of a drug to cause an arrhythmia, the number one reason for drugs to be withdrawn from the patient. Drug-induced arrhythmias are defined as the production of de novo arrhythmias or aggravation of existing arrhythmias, as a result of previous or concomitant pharmacologic treatment. This review summarizes normal cardiac cell and tissue functioning and provides an overview of drugs that effect cardiac repolarization and the adverse effects of commonly administered antiarrhythmics. PMID:27484663

  9. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  10. Fetal Arrhythmias Associated with Cardiac Rhabdomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F; Cuneo, Bettina; Wiggins, Delonia; Gotteiner, Nina; Wakai, Ronald T

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary heart tumors in fetuses are rare and mainly represent rhabdomyomas. The tumors have a variable expression and can be associated with arrhythmias, including both wide and narrow QRS tachycardia. Although multiple Doppler techniques exist to assess fetal heart rhythm, it can be difficult to record precise electrophysiological pathologies in fetal life. Objective Investigations defining precise electrophysiological diagnosis were performed using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Methods In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used to investigate electrophysiologic rhythm patterns in a series of 10 fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas. Results The mean gestational age of the fetuses was 28.6 weeks (SD ± 4.7 weeks). The multiple rhabdomyomas were mainly located in the right and left ventricles as well as around the AV groove. Arrhythmias or conduction abnormalities were diagnosed in all 10 patients, although only six of them were referred due to that indication. Remarkably, 80% (8/10) had associated Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation. In addition, we found prominent p waves in four fetuses. Conclusion In fetuses with rhabdomyomas, a disease where rhythm pathology is common, precise electrophysiological diagnosis can now be made by fMCG. fMCG is complimentary to echocardiography for rhythm assessment, and can detect conduction abnormalities that are not possible to diagnose prenatally with M-mode or pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Risk factor assessment using fMCG can support pregnancy management and post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:24333285

  11. Ethanol for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schurmann, Paul; Peñalver, Jorge; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol infusion was an early mode of ablative treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. Its initial descriptions involved coronary intra-arterial delivery, targeting arrhythmogenic substrates in drug-refractory ventricular tachycardia or the atrioventricular node. Largely superseded by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and other contact-based technologies as a routine ablation strategy, intracoronary arterial ethanol infusion remains as an alternative option in the treatment of ventricular tachycardia when conventional ablation fails. Arrhythmic foci that are deep-seated in the myocardium may not be amenable to catheter ablation from either the endocardium or the epicardium by RFA, but they can be targeted by an ethanol infusion. Recent findings Recently, we have explored ethanol injection through cardiac venous systems, in order to avoid the risks of complications and limitations of coronary arterial instrumentation. Vein of Marshall ethanol infusion is being studied as an adjunctive procedure in ablation of atrial fibrillation, and coronary venous ethanol infusion for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion Ethanol ablation remains useful as a bail-out technique for refractory cases to RFA, or as an adjunctive therapy that may improve the efficacy of catheter ablation procedures. PMID:26049378

  12. Cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengfei; Song, Haibo; Yang, Pingliang; Xie, Huiqi; Kang, Y James

    2011-06-01

    Chloral hydrate has been long used as a safe sedative and hypnotic drug in humans. However, reports on its cardiovascular adverse effects have been published from time to time. The present study was undertaken to use Rhesus monkeys as a model to define the dose regiment of chloral hydrate at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced and the consequences of the cardiac events. Male Rhesus monkeys of 2-3 years old were intravenously infused with chloral hydrate starting at 50 mg/kg with an increasing increment of 25 mg/kg until the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a traditional up-and-down dosing procedure was applied to define a single dose level at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced. The data obtained showed that when the sequentially escaladed dose reached 125 mg/kg, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in all monkeys tested. The single effective dose to cause cardiac arrhythmias calculated from the crossover analysis was 143 ± 4 mg/kg. This value would be equivalent to 68.6 ± 1.9 mg/kg for children and 46.4 ± 1.3 mg/kg for adults in humans. Under either multiple or single dose condition, cardiac arrhythmias did not occur before 40 min after the onset of anesthesia induced by chloral hydrate. Cardiac arrhythmias were recovered without help at the end of the anesthesia in most cases, but also continued after the regain of consciousness in some cases. The cardiac arrhythmias were accompanied with compromised cardiac function including suppressed fractional shortening and ejection fraction. This study thus suggests that cautions need to be taken when chloral hydrate is used above certain levels and beyond a certain period of anesthesia, and cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate need to be closely monitored because compromised cardiac function may occur simultaneously. In addition, patients with cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate should be monitored even after they are recovered from the anesthesia.

  13. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Fatima Dumas; Leite, Renata Pimentel; Storti, Luciana Julio; Bittencourt, Lia Azeredo; Poyares, Dalva; Castro, Laura de Siqueira; Tufik, Sergio; de Paola, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart®) system. Results A total of 767 participants (461 men) with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat) was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001). After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample. PMID:25252161

  14. Role of the autonomic nervous system in modulating cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mark J; Zipes, Douglas P

    2014-03-14

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis. Decades of research has contributed to a better understanding of the anatomy and physiology of cardiac autonomic nervous system and provided evidence supporting the relationship of autonomic tone to clinically significant arrhythmias. The mechanisms by which autonomic activation is arrhythmogenic or antiarrhythmic are complex and different for specific arrhythmias. In atrial fibrillation, simultaneous sympathetic and parasympathetic activations are the most common trigger. In contrast, in ventricular fibrillation in the setting of cardiac ischemia, sympathetic activation is proarrhythmic, whereas parasympathetic activation is antiarrhythmic. In inherited arrhythmia syndromes, sympathetic stimulation precipitates ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death except in Brugada and J-wave syndromes where it can prevent them. The identification of specific autonomic triggers in different arrhythmias has brought the idea of modulating autonomic activities for both preventing and treating these arrhythmias. This has been achieved by either neural ablation or stimulation. Neural modulation as a treatment for arrhythmias has been well established in certain diseases, such as long QT syndrome. However, in most other arrhythmia diseases, it is still an emerging modality and under investigation. Recent preliminary trials have yielded encouraging results. Further larger-scale clinical studies are necessary before widespread application can be recommended.

  15. Cardiac arrhythmias during exercise testing in healthy men.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, E. F.; Owen, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Clinically healthy male executives who participate in a long-term physical conditioning program have demonstrated cardiac arrhythmia during and after periodic ergometric testing at submaximal and maximal levels. In 1,385 tests on 248 subjects, it was found that 34% of subjects demonstrated an arrhythmia at some time and 13% of subjects developed arrhythmia on more than one test. Premature systoles of ventricular origin were most common, but premature systoles of atrial origin, premature systoles of junctional origin, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block, wandering pacemaker, and pre-excitation were also seen. Careful post-test monitoring and pulse rate regulated training sessions are suggested for such programs.

  16. [Arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Misaki, Takuro; Fukahara, Kazuaki

    2004-07-01

    The success of the radiofrequency catheter ablation procedure for most types of supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia largely eliminated the role of surgical therapy of arrhythmias. However, there remains a subset of arrhythmia patients in whom urgent surgical treatments are required. In this review we mention recent developments of the urgent surgical treatment for arrhythmias. In cases with complete atrioventricular (AV) block and ventricular fibrillation which associated with sudden death, temporary cardiac pacing and cardiac defibrillation using direct current (DC) cardioversion must be immediately induced and followed by implantation of permanent cardiac pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), if necessary. In addition to usual cardiac pacing therapy, novel pacing therapy has been developed recently for the patients with symptomatic heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) using biventricular pacing is an emerging therapy for improvement of cardiac function in patients with heart failure in association with intraventricular conduction delay. To prevent the sudden death in patients with heart failure, biventricular pacing combined with ICD are also implanted and its efficacy are reported. With the exception of the pacing therapy, curative surgical treatments are limited in drug-refractory atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia after myocardial infarction requiring Dor's type operation. In any case surgical treatment must be performed promptly and suitably with lower invasive methods. PMID:15362552

  17. Cardiac troponin T mutations promote life-threatening arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Céline; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-12-01

    Mutations in contractile proteins in heart muscle can cause anatomical changes that result in cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, a conundrum has existed because mutations in one such contractile protein, a so-called Ca2+ sensor troponin T (TnT), can promote ventricular rhythm disturbances even in the absence of hypertrophy or fibrosis. Thus, these mutations must enhance abnormal electrophysiological events via alternative means. In this issue of the JCI, Baudenbacher et al. report a novel mechanism to explain this puzzle (see the related article beginning on page 3893). They show that a selected TnT mutation in the adult mouse heart can markedly increase the sensitivity of cardiac muscle myofilaments to Ca2+ and enhance the susceptibility to arrhythmia, even in the absence of anatomical deformities. As these same mutations can cause some forms of arrhythmias in humans, these findings are of both basic and translational significance. PMID:19033655

  18. Role of adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Rahul; Pouliopoulos, Jim; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Kovoor, Pramesh

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue is present in normal healthy individuals. It is a unique fat depot that, under physiologic conditions, plays a cardioprotective role. However, excess epicardial adipose tissue has been shown to be associated with prevalence and severity of atrial fibrillation. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and myotonic dystrophy, fibrofatty infiltration of the myocardium is associated with ventricular arrhythmias. In the ovine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy, the presence of intramyocardial adipose or lipomatous metaplasia has been associated with increased propensity to ventricular tachycardia. These observations suggest a role of adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias. In this article, we review the role of cardiac adipose tissue in various cardiac arrhythmias and discuss the possible pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  19. Cardiac arrhythmias in hypokalemic periodic paralysis: Hypokalemia as only cause?

    PubMed

    Stunnenberg, Bas C; Deinum, Jaap; Links, Thera P; Wilde, Arthur A; Franssen, Hessel; Drost, Gea

    2014-09-01

    It is unknown how often cardiac arrhythmias occur in hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) and if they are caused by hypokalemia alone or other factors. This systematic review shows that cardiac arrhythmias were reported in 27 HypoPP patients. Cases were confirmed genetically (13 with an R528H mutation in CACNA1S, 1 an R669H mutation in SCN4A) or had a convincing clinical diagnosis of HypoPP (13 genetically undetermined) if reported prior to the availability of genetic testing. Arrhythmias occurred during severe hypokalemia (11 patients), between attacks at normokalemia (4 patients), were treatment-dependent (2 patients), or unspecified (10 patients). Nine patients died from arrhythmia. Convincing evidence for a pro-arrhythmogenic factor other than hypokalemia is still lacking. The role of cardiac expression of defective skeletal muscle channels in the heart of HypoPP patients remains unclear. Clinicians should be aware of and prevent treatment-induced cardiac arrhythmia in HypoPP.

  20. Controlled Exposures to Air Pollutants and Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Simon J.; Hunter, Amanda J.; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Bosson, Jenny A.; Unosson, Jon; Barath, Stefan; Lundbäck, Magnus; Cassee, Flemming R.; Donaldson, Ken; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Newby, David E.; Mills, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have reported associations between air pollution exposure and increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Exposure to air pollutants can influence cardiac autonomic tone and reduce heart rate variability, and may increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly in susceptible patient groups. Objectives: We investigated the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias during and after controlled exposure to air pollutants in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: We analyzed data from 13 double-blind randomized crossover studies including 282 participants (140 healthy volunteers and 142 patients with stable coronary heart disease) from whom continuous electrocardiograms were available. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was recorded for each exposure and study population. Results: There were no increases in any cardiac arrhythmia during or after exposure to dilute diesel exhaust, wood smoke, ozone, concentrated ambient particles, engineered carbon nanoparticles, or high ambient levels of air pollution in either healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusions: Acute controlled exposure to air pollutants did not increase the short-term risk of arrhythmia in participants. Research employing these techniques remains crucial in identifying the important pathophysiological pathways involved in the adverse effects of air pollution, and is vital to inform environmental and public health policy decisions. Citation: Langrish JP, Watts SJ, Hunter AJ, Shah AS, Bosson JA, Unosson J, Barath S, Lundbäck M, Cassee FR, Donaldson K, Sandström T, Blomberg A, Newby DE, Mills NL. 2014. Controlled exposures to air pollutants and risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Environ Health Perspect 122:747–753; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307337 PMID:24667535

  1. 78 FR 36787 - Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia... the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug Development Without...

  2. Computational approaches to understand cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Byron N.; Yang, Pei-Chi; Behrens, Steven B.; Moreno, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. These impulses spread throughout the cardiac muscle to manifest as electrical waves in the whole heart. Regularity of electrical waves is critically important since they signal the heart muscle to contract, driving the primary function of the heart to act as a pump and deliver blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. For more than 50 years, mathematically based models of cardiac electrical activity have been used to improve understanding of basic mechanisms of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical function. Computer-based modeling approaches to understand cardiac activity are uniquely helpful because they allow for distillation of complex emergent behaviors into the key contributing components underlying them. Here we review the latest advances and novel concepts in the field as they relate to understanding the complex interplay between electrical, mechanical, structural, and genetic mechanisms during arrhythmia development at the level of ion channels, cells, and tissues. We also discuss the latest computational approaches to guiding arrhythmia therapy. PMID:22886409

  3. Reduction in dynamin-2 is implicated in ischaemic cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Xie, Duanyang; Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Hong; Huang, Jian; Li, Changming; Liu, Yi; Lv, Fei; The, Erlinda; Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Tianyou; Wang, Shiyi; Chen, Jinjin; Pan, Lei; Yu, Zuoren; Liang, Dandan; Zhu, Weidong; Zhang, Yuzhen; Li, Li; Peng, Luying; Li, Jun; Chen, Yi-Han

    2014-10-01

    Ischaemic cardiac arrhythmias cause a large proportion of sudden cardiac deaths worldwide. The ischaemic arrhythmogenesis is primarily because of the dysfunction and adverse remodelling of sarcolemma ion channels. However, the potential regulators of sarcolemma ion channel turnover and function in ischaemic cardiac arrhythmias remains unknown. Our previous studies indicate that dynamin-2 (DNM2), a cardiac membrane-remodelling GTPase, modulates ion channels membrane trafficking in the cardiomyocytes. Here, we have found that DNM2 plays an important role in acute ischaemic arrhythmias. In rat ventricular tissues and primary cardiomyocytes subjected to acute ischaemic stress, the DNM2 protein and transcription levels were markedly down-regulated. This DNM2 reduction was coupled with severe ventricular arrhythmias. Moreover, we identified that the down-regulation of DNM2 within cardiomyocytes increases the action potential amplitude and prolongs the re-polarization duration by depressing the retrograde trafficking of Nav1.5 and Kir2.1 channels. These effects are likely to account for the DNM2 defect-induced arrhythmogenic potentials. These results suggest that DNM2, with its multi-ion channel targeting properties, could be a promising target for novel antiarrhythmic therapies.

  4. Cardiac arrhythmias in space. Role of vagotonia.

    PubMed

    Leguay, G; Seigneuric, A

    1981-07-01

    Rhythm disorders observed in space have always been minor but they are not unfrequent. They include: ventricular or supra-ventricular extrasystoles, nodal arrhythmias, auriculo-ventricular conduction disorders. There are several etiopathogenetic hypotheses: a strict selection must permit its elimination of an underlying heart disease; the potassium deficiency is often advanced but its role is not certain; the role of catecholamines is also discussed; the role of hypervagotony is extensively analysed as great clinical and electro-cardiographic evidence speaks for it. It can induce disorders which are more serious than those observed so far, particularly fibrillation or intermittent atrial flutter; weightlessness itself could partly condition the vagotonic state; and the effects of fluid shifts are also discussed from this point of view. The possible therapies for various atrial, nodal, ventricular disorders are reviewed, with greater detail for vagal atrial arrhythmias. PMID:11542963

  5. Cardiac arrhythmia in refrigerator repairmen exposed to fluorocarbons.

    PubMed

    Edling, C; Ohlson, C G; Ljungkvist, G; Oliv, A; Söderholm, B

    1990-03-01

    A field study of 89 refrigerator repairmen was carried out to ascertain whether occupational exposure to fluorocarbons induces cardiac arrhythmia. The concentrations of fluorocarbons in the breathing zones and the heart activity were recorded simultaneously. Most cooling systems contained FC 12 or FC 22. The highest level recorded in one minute was 14,000 ppm and the highest time weighted level during eight hours was 280 ppm. Two types of arrhythmia were recorded, ectopic beats and sudden bradycardia. A within subject comparison design was applied and the main parameter was the difference in arrhythmia frequencies between exposed and unexposed periods. No appreciable differences between exposed and unexposed periods and no consistent dose effect relations were observed, although subjects in the medium exposure category showed a difference of borderline significance (Wilcoxon's test: p = 0.05, one tailed). The frequencies of arrhythmia when unexposed were somewhat higher than previously reported. Misclassification of the exposure and the possible confounding effect of physical workload and psychological strain may have obscured a causal relation and therefore a minor effect cannot be ruled out. The results do not support the notion that fluorocarbons induce cardiac arrhythmia in occupationally exposed refrigerator repairmen.

  6. Cardiac arrhythmia in refrigerator repairmen exposed to fluorocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Edling, C; Ohlson, C G; Ljungkvist, G; Oliv, A; Söderholm, B

    1990-01-01

    A field study of 89 refrigerator repairmen was carried out to ascertain whether occupational exposure to fluorocarbons induces cardiac arrhythmia. The concentrations of fluorocarbons in the breathing zones and the heart activity were recorded simultaneously. Most cooling systems contained FC 12 or FC 22. The highest level recorded in one minute was 14,000 ppm and the highest time weighted level during eight hours was 280 ppm. Two types of arrhythmia were recorded, ectopic beats and sudden bradycardia. A within subject comparison design was applied and the main parameter was the difference in arrhythmia frequencies between exposed and unexposed periods. No appreciable differences between exposed and unexposed periods and no consistent dose effect relations were observed, although subjects in the medium exposure category showed a difference of borderline significance (Wilcoxon's test: p = 0.05, one tailed). The frequencies of arrhythmia when unexposed were somewhat higher than previously reported. Misclassification of the exposure and the possible confounding effect of physical workload and psychological strain may have obscured a causal relation and therefore a minor effect cannot be ruled out. The results do not support the notion that fluorocarbons induce cardiac arrhythmia in occupationally exposed refrigerator repairmen. PMID:2328227

  7. Small Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias and up-regulation of SK channels in heart failure (HF) in animal models and human HF. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both anti-arrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review will provide an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and to serve as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic target in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible pro-arrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations. PMID:25956967

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias and conduction defects in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Alessandra; Meune, Christophe; Gordon, Jessica; Chung, Lorinda; Proudman, Susanna; Assassi, Shervin; Nikpour, Mandana; Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S; Khanna, Dinesh; Lafyatis, Robert; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Distler, Oliver; Allanore, Yannick

    2014-07-01

    Signs and symptoms of arrhythmias or conduction defects are frequently reported in patients with SSc. These rhythm disorders may have several origins (i.e., related to primary heart involvement, pericardial disease, valvular regurgitation or pulmonary arterial hypertension) and may negatively affect the overall prognosis of these patients. It is therefore important to identify patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias with a complete cardiological evaluation and to identify the underlying heart disease, including SSc-related myocardial involvement. In addition, some therapeutic options in SSc patients may differ from those recommended in other populations.

  9. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  10. Ambulatory Cardiac Monitoring for Discharged Emergency Department Patients with Possible Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Donald; Sattar, Ayesha; Drigalla, Dorian; Higgins, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many emergency department (ED) patients have symptoms that may be attributed to arrhythmias, necessitating outpatient ambulatory cardiac monitoring. Consensus is lacking on the optimal duration of monitoring. We describe the use of a novel device applied at ED discharge that provides continuous prolonged cardiac monitoring. Methods We enrolled discharged adult ED patients with symptoms of possible cardiac arrhythmia. A novel, single use continuous recording patch (Zio®Patch) was applied at ED discharge. Patients wore the device for up to 14 days or until they had symptoms to trigger an event. They then returned the device by mail for interpretation. Significant arrhythmias are defined as: ventricular tachycardia (VT) ≥4 beats, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) ≥4 beats, atrial fibrillation, ≥3 second pause, 2nd degree Mobitz II, 3rd degree AV Block, or symptomatic bradycardia. Results There were 174 patients were enrolled and all mailed back their devices. The average age was 52.2 (± 21.0) years, and 55% were female. The most common indications for device placement were palpitations 44.8%, syncope 24.1% and dizziness 6.3%. Eighty-three patients (47.7%) had ≥1 arrhythmias and 17 (9.8%) were symptomatic at the time of their arrhythmia. Median time to first arrhythmia was 1.0 days (IQR 0.2–2.8) and median time to first symptomatic arrhythmia was 1.5 days (IQR 0.4–6.7). 93 (53.4%) of symptomatic patients did not have any arrhythmia during their triggered events. The overall diagnostic yield was 63.2% Conclusion The Zio®Patch cardiac monitoring device can efficiently characterize symptomatic patients without significant arrhythmia and has a higher diagnostic yield for arrhythmias than traditional 24–48 hour Holter monitoring. It allows for longer term monitoring up to 14 days. PMID:24672611

  11. Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complex cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, L.; Courtemanche, M.; Shrier, A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Periodic stimulation of a nonlinear cardiac oscillator in vitro gives rise to complex dynamics that is well described by one-dimensional finite difference equations. As stimulation parameters are varied, a large number of different phase-locked and chaotic rhythms is observed. Similar rhythms can be observed in the intact human heart when there is interaction between two pacemaker sites. Simplified models are analyzed, which show some correspondence to clinical observations.

  12. Arrhythmia as a cardiac manifestation in MELAS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tamara; Craigen, William J; Moore, Ryan; Czosek, Richard; Jefferies, John L

    2015-09-01

    A 44-year-old female with a diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome had progressive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) on echocardiogram. A Holter monitor demonstrated episodes of non-sustained atrial tachycardia, a finding not been previously described in this population. This unique case of MELAS syndrome demonstrates the known associated cardiac manifestation of LVH and the new finding of atrial tachycardia which may represent the potential for subclinical arrhythmia in this population.

  13. Acute cardiac arrhythmias following surgery for congenital heart disease: mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and management.

    PubMed

    Payne, Linda; Zeigler, Vicki L; Gillette, Paul C

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on the management of those cardiac arrhythmias most commonly seen in the immediate postoperative period. They include ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, atrial flutter, junctional ectopic tachycardia, bradycardia, and atrioventricular block. The mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias are reviewed followed by a brief overview of the predominant acute arrhythmias, tools used for the diagnostic evaluation of these arrhythmias, management strategies, and, finally, nursing considerations.

  14. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies.

  15. Statistical Versus Individual Forecasting Of Life-Threatening Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Meyerfeldt, Udo; Ziehmann, Christine; Schirdewan, Alexander; Kurths, Jürgen

    2002-07-01

    Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT) as fatal cardiac arrhythmias are the main factors triggering sudden cardiac death. The objective of this investigation is to find early signs of sustained VT in patients with an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). These devices are able to safeguard patients by returning their hearts to a normal rhythm via strong defibrillatory shocks; additionally, they are able to store at least 1000 beat-to-beat intervals immediately before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia. We study these 1000 beat-to-beat intervals of 63 chronic heart failure ICD patients before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia and at a control time, i.e. without VT event. To characterize these rather short data sets, we calculate heart rate variability (HRV) parameters from time and frequency domain, from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates. We find that no linear parameter shows significant differences in HRV between the VT and the control time series. However, the nonlinear parameters detected a significant increase in short phases with low variability before the onset of VT (p<0.05, for time series with less than 10% ectopy). Finally, we are investigating whether these results may lead to individual predictions of VT.

  16. Catheter microwave ablation therapy for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C

    1999-01-01

    This article describes three microwave catheter antennas for percutaneous cardiac ablation. A particular design feature of these antennas is that there is no reflected microwave current from the antenna flowing up the transmission line. Thus, it minimizes heating of the coaxial cable. The power reflection coefficients are very low (4% or less) in phantom equivalent materials. These antennas can also serve as bipolar electrodes for sensing endocardiac electrograms. Our studies in dogs, during both cardiopulmonary bypass and closed-chest operations via the femoral vein, have shown microwave energy greater than 200 joules (J) delivered to the heart through a split-tip dipole catheter antenna can produce irreversible block of the heart rhythms. This energy was achieved either by increasing the delivered power from 20 to 40 watts or by increasing the treatment duration from 7 to 11 s (210 to 330 J per application). It produced an endocardium temperature of about 65 degrees C. We found that the percutaneous, transcatheter microwave system is capable of inducing AV blocks consistently in dogs using the flexible, curved tip, split-tip catheter antenna. In addition, our studies have shown that the width and height of SAR distributions for cap-choke and split-tip catheter antennas are similar for the same antenna length. The cap-slot design had a much longer SAR distribution compared to the others. Moreover, a longer (4 mm) split-tip antenna can also induce larger lesions. These results suggest that it could be possible to ablate a ventricular tachycardia focus using the 4 mm split-tip as well as the cap-slot microwave catheter antennas. PMID:10334721

  17. Cardiac arrhythmia in Wilson's disease: An oversighted and overlooked entity!

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bhupender Kumar; Wadhwa, Ankur; Singh, Richa; Gupta, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a multisystem disorder which manifests with hepatic, neurological, musculoskeletal, hematological, renal, and cardiac symptoms. The hepatic and neurological manifestations often overshadow the other system involvement including cardiac symptoms and signs, which may prove fatal. We report a case of a young female who presented with progressive parkinsonian features and dystonia for around 4 months followed 2 months later by the complaint of episodes of light-headedness. She was diagnosed to have Wilson's disease based on the presence of Kayser–Fleischer ring and laboratory parameters of copper metabolism. Electrocardiography of the patient incidentally revealed 2nd degree Mobitz type-1 atrioventricular block explaining her episodes of light-headedness. She was started on penicillamine and trihexyphenidyl. The heart block improved spontaneously. Cardiac autonomic function tests including blood pressure response to standing and heart rate response to standing were observed to be normal. We review the literature on cardiac manifestations of Wilson's disease and emphasize that patients with Wilson's disease should be assessed for cardiac arrhythmia and cardiac dysfunction as these may have therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:27695244

  18. Cardiac arrhythmia in Wilson's disease: An oversighted and overlooked entity!

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bhupender Kumar; Wadhwa, Ankur; Singh, Richa; Gupta, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a multisystem disorder which manifests with hepatic, neurological, musculoskeletal, hematological, renal, and cardiac symptoms. The hepatic and neurological manifestations often overshadow the other system involvement including cardiac symptoms and signs, which may prove fatal. We report a case of a young female who presented with progressive parkinsonian features and dystonia for around 4 months followed 2 months later by the complaint of episodes of light-headedness. She was diagnosed to have Wilson's disease based on the presence of Kayser–Fleischer ring and laboratory parameters of copper metabolism. Electrocardiography of the patient incidentally revealed 2nd degree Mobitz type-1 atrioventricular block explaining her episodes of light-headedness. She was started on penicillamine and trihexyphenidyl. The heart block improved spontaneously. Cardiac autonomic function tests including blood pressure response to standing and heart rate response to standing were observed to be normal. We review the literature on cardiac manifestations of Wilson's disease and emphasize that patients with Wilson's disease should be assessed for cardiac arrhythmia and cardiac dysfunction as these may have therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  19. Cardiac ultrasonography in structural abnormalities and arrhythmias. Recognition and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M M; Silverman, N H; Villegas, M

    1993-01-01

    Fetal cardiac ultrasonography has become an important tool in the evaluation of fetuses at risk for cardiac anomalies. It can both guide prenatal treatment and assist the management and timing of delivery. We recommend that a fetal echocardiogram be done when there is a family history of congenital heart disease; maternal disease that may affect the fetus; a history of maternal drug use, either therapeutic or illegal; evidence of other fetal abnormalities; or evidence of fetal hydrops. The optimal timing of evaluation is 18 to 22 weeks' gestation. An entire range of structural cardiac defects can be visualized prenatally, including atrioventricular septal defect, ventricular septal defect, cardiomyopathy, ventricular outlet obstruction, and complex cardiac defects. The outcome for a fetus with a recognized abnormality is unfavourable, with less than 50% surviving the neonatal period. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias are also a common occurrence, 15% in the series described here. Premature atrial or ventricular contractions are most commonly seen and usually require no treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia can result in hydrops and require in utero treatment to prevent fetal demise. Complete heart block, particularly in association with structural heart disease, has a poor prognosis for fetal survival. Images PMID:8236970

  20. Putting cocaine use and cocaine-associated cardiac arrhythmias into epidemiological and clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2010-01-01

    This is the first article in a series of three articles on cocaine-related cardiac arrhythmias, following on from the 2008 British Pharmacological Society Winter Meeting Clinical Section Symposium entitled ‘Cocaine induced cardiac arrhythmias – from ion channel to clinical treatment’. We will summarize the epidemiology of cocaine use across the world and in particular will focus on UK, Europe and US use prevalence data. We will discuss the acute cardiac and non-cardiac toxicity associated with cocaine and highlight the lack of data on the true UK prevalence of acute cocaine toxicity and on the incidence of cocaine-related cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:20573079

  1. Detection and Prevention of Cardiac Arrhythmias During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.; Liszka, Kathy J.; York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    There have been reports suggesting that long-duration space flight might lead to an increased risk of potentially serious heart rhythm disturbances. If space flight does, in fact, significantly decrease cardiac electrical stability, the effects could be catastrophic, potentially leading to sudden cardiac death. It will be important to determine the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in order to prepare for long-term manned lunar and interplanetary missions and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Electrical alternans affecting the ST segment and T-wave have been demonstrated to be common among patients at increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias. Subtle electrical alternans on the ECG may serve as a noninvasive marker of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. We are studying indices of electrical instability in the heart for long term space missions by non-invasively measuring microvolt level T-wave alternans in a reduced gravity environment. In this investigation we are using volunteer subjects on the KC-135 aircraft as an initial study of the effect of electrical adaptation of the heart to microgravity. T-wave alternans will be analyzed for heart rate variability and QT restitution curve plotting will be compared for statistical significance.

  2. Role of CaMKII in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism in vertebrates for the regulation of signaling. With regard to the cardiovascular system, phosphorylation of myocyte targets is critical for the regulation of excitation contraction coupling, metabolism, intracellular calcium regulation, mitochondrial activity, transcriptional regulation, and cytoskeletal dynamics. In fact, pathways that tune protein kinase signaling have been a mainstay for cardiovascular therapies for the past 60 years. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase with numerous roles in human physiology. Dysfunction in CaMKII-based signaling has been linked with a host of cardiovascular phenotypes including heart failure and arrhythmia, and CaMKII levels are elevated in human and animal disease models of heart disease. While nearly a decade has been invested in targeting CaMKII for the treatment of heart failure and arrhythmia phenotypes, to date, approaches to target the molecule for antiarrhythmic benefit have been unsuccessful for reasons that are still not entirely clear, although (1) lack of compound specificity and (2) the multitude of downstream targets are likely contributing factors. This review will provide an update on current pathways regulated by CaMKII with the goal of illustrating potential upstream regulatory mechanisms and downstream targets that may be modulated for the prevention of cardiac electrical defects. While the review will cover multiple aspects of CaMKII dysfunction in cardiovascular disease, we have given special attention to the potential of CaMKII-associated late Na(+) current as a novel therapeutic target for cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:25577293

  3. Role of CaMKII in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism in vertebrates for the regulation of signaling. With regard to the cardiovascular system, phosphorylation of myocyte targets is critical for the regulation of excitation contraction coupling, metabolism, intracellular calcium regulation, mitochondrial activity, transcriptional regulation, and cytoskeletal dynamics. In fact, pathways that tune protein kinase signaling have been a mainstay for cardiovascular therapies for the past 60 years. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase with numerous roles in human physiology. Dysfunction in CaMKII-based signaling has been linked with a host of cardiovascular phenotypes including heart failure and arrhythmia, and CaMKII levels are elevated in human and animal disease models of heart disease. While nearly a decade has been invested in targeting CaMKII for the treatment of heart failure and arrhythmia phenotypes, to date, approaches to target the molecule for antiarrhythmic benefit have been unsuccessful for reasons that are still not entirely clear, although (1) lack of compound specificity and (2) the multitude of downstream targets are likely contributing factors. This review will provide an update on current pathways regulated by CaMKII with the goal of illustrating potential upstream regulatory mechanisms and downstream targets that may be modulated for the prevention of cardiac electrical defects. While the review will cover multiple aspects of CaMKII dysfunction in cardiovascular disease, we have given special attention to the potential of CaMKII-associated late Na(+) current as a novel therapeutic target for cardiac arrhythmia.

  4. Aconitine "challenge" test reveals a single whole-body exposure to diesel exhaust increases cardiac arrhythmia risk in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between cardiac electrical dysfunction, arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electri...

  5. Management of cocaine-induced cardiac arrhythmias due to cardiac ion channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I; Hoffman, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine use is common in many areas of the world, particularly the United States and Western Europe. Toxicity following the use of cocaine is associated with a wide range of clinical features. In this review, we will focus on the cocaine-associated cardiac arrhythmias and, in particular, some of the controversies in their etiology and management. Cocaine can produce arrhythmias either through the production of myocardial ischemia or as a direct result of ion channel alterations. Excessive catecholamines, combined with sodium and potassium channel blockades, give rise to a wide variety of supra-ventricular and ventricular rhythms. The animal and human evidence for ion channel dysfunction is reviewed, and the effects of catecholamines are followed from the cardiac action potential to the development of arrhythmias. Finally, theoretical constructs are combined with existing evidence to develop a rational treatment strategy for patients with cocaine-induced cardiac arrhythmias. In particular, we review the evidence concerning the controversies relating to the use of lidocaine in comparison with sodium bicarbonate, in terms of QRS prolongation secondary to sodium channel blockade.

  6. Ventricular Arrhythmias in Apparently Normal Hearts: Who Needs an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator?

    PubMed

    Tan, Alex Y; Ellenbogen, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia is often considered a benign form of ventricular arrhythmia in patients without apparent structural heart disease. However, a subset of patients may develop malignant ventricular arrhythmias and present with syncope and sudden cardiac arrest. Survivors of cardiac arrest are candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). The indications for ICDs in patients with less than a full-blown cardiac arrest presentation but with electrocardiographically high-risk ectopy features remain uncertain. This article addresses some of the uncertainties and pitfalls in ICD risk stratification in this patient group and explores potential mechanisms for malignant conversion of benign premature ventricular complexes to sustained arrhythmia. PMID:27521094

  7. Ventricular Arrhythmias in Apparently Normal Hearts: Who Needs an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator?

    PubMed

    Tan, Alex Y; Ellenbogen, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia is often considered a benign form of ventricular arrhythmia in patients without apparent structural heart disease. However, a subset of patients may develop malignant ventricular arrhythmias and present with syncope and sudden cardiac arrest. Survivors of cardiac arrest are candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). The indications for ICDs in patients with less than a full-blown cardiac arrest presentation but with electrocardiographically high-risk ectopy features remain uncertain. This article addresses some of the uncertainties and pitfalls in ICD risk stratification in this patient group and explores potential mechanisms for malignant conversion of benign premature ventricular complexes to sustained arrhythmia.

  8. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    A change in the heart's normal electrical conduction system can result in an arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat. An arrhythmia can be an abnormally slow heartbeat, or an abnormally fast heartbeat. In ...

  9. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats ... is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and ...

  10. Exact coherent structures: from fluid turbulence to cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Roman; Marcotte, Christopher; Byrne, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Ventricular fibrillation, a life threatening cardiac arrhythmia, is an example of spatiotemporally chaotic state dominated by multiple interacting spiral waves. Recent studies of weak fluid turbulence suggest that spatiotemporal chaos in general can be understood as a walk among exact unstable regular solutions (exact coherent states, ECS) of nonlinear evolution equations. Several classes of ECS are believed to play a dominant role; most typically these are equilibria and periodic orbits or relative equilibria and relative periodic orbits for systems with global continuous symmetries. Numerical methods originally developed in the context of fluid turbulence can also be applied to models of cardiac dynamics which possess translational and rotational symmetries and, indeed, allowed us to identify relative equilibria and periodic orbits describing isolated spirals with, respectively, fixed and drifting cores. In order to find regular solutions featuring multiple interacting spirals a new approach is required that takes into consideration the dynamics of slowly drifting cores associated with local, rather than global, symmetries. We describe how local symmetries can be reduced and more general types of ECS computed that dominate spiral wave chaos in models of cardiac tissue.

  11. A Case for Pharmacogenomics in Management of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Kandoi, Gaurav; Nanda, Anjali; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Disorders of the cardiac rhythm are quite prevalent in clinical practice. Though the variability in drug response between individuals has been extensively studied, this information has not been widely used in clinical practice. Rapid advances in the field of pharmacogenomics have provided us with crucial insights on inter-individual genetic variability and its impact on drug metabolism and action. Technologies for faster and cheaper genetic testing and even personal genome sequencing would enable clinicians to optimize prescription based on the genetic makeup of the individual, which would open up new avenues in the area of personalized medicine. We have systematically looked at literature evidence on pharmacogenomics markers for anti-arrhythmic agents from the OpenPGx consortium collection and reason the applicability of genetics in the management of arrhythmia. We also discuss potential issues that need to be resolved before personalized pharmacogenomics becomes a reality in regular clinical practice. PMID:22557843

  12. Role of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Haruaki

    2014-05-01

    The sarcolemmal adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) (sarcKATP) channel in the heart is a hetero-octamer comprising the pore-forming subunit Kir6.2 and the regulatory subunit sulfonylurea receptor SUR2A. By functional analysis of genetically engineered mice lacking sarcKATP channels, the pathophysiological roles of the K(+) channel in the heart have been extensively evaluated. Although mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channel is proposed to be an important effector for the protection of ischemic myocardium and the inhibition of ischemia/reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias, the molecular identity of mitoKATP channel has not been established. Although selective sarcKATP-channel blockers can prevent ischemia/reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias by inhibiting the action potential shortening in the acute phase, the drugs may aggravate the ischemic damages due to intracellular Ca(2+) overload. The sarcKATP channel is also mandatory for optimal adaptation to hemodynamic stress such as sympathetic activation. Dysfunction of mutated sarcKATP channels in atrial cells may lead to electrical instability and atrial fibrillation. Recently, it has been proposed that the gain-of-function mutation of cardiac Kir6.1 channel can be a pathogenic substrate for J wave syndromes, a cause of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation as early repolarization syndrome or Brugada syndrome, whereas loss of function of the channel mutations can underlie sudden infant death syndrome. However, precise role of Kir6.1 channels in cardiac cells remains to be defined and further study may be needed to clarify the role of Kir6.1 channel in the heart. PMID:24367007

  13. Noninvasive Cardiac Screening in Young Athletes With Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Steriotis, Alexandros Klavdios; Nava, Andrea; Rigato, Ilaria; Mazzotti, Elisa; Daliento, Luciano; Thiene, Gaetano; Basso, Cristina; Corrado, Domenico; Bauce, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze using noninvasive cardiac examinations a series of young athletes discovered to have ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) during the preparticipation screening program for competitive sports. One hundred forty-five athletes (mean age 17 ± 5 years) were evaluated. The study protocol included electrocardiography (ECG), exercise testing, 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, 24-hour Holter monitoring, signal-averaged ECG, and in selected cases contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results of ECG were normal in most athletes (85%). VAs were initially detected prevalently during exercise testing (85%) and in the remaining cases on ECG and Holter monitoring. Premature ventricular complexes disappeared during exercise in 56% of subjects. Premature ventricular complexes during Holter monitoring averaged 4,700 per day, predominantly monomorphic (88%), single, and/or in couplets (79%). The most important echocardiographic findings were mitral valve prolapse in 29 patients (20%), congenital heart disease in 4 (3%), and right ventricular regional kinetic abnormalities in 5 (3.5%). On cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, right ventricular regional kinetic abnormalities were detected in 9 of 30 athletes and were diagnostic of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in only 1 athlete. Overall, 30% of athletes were judged to have potentially dangerous VAs. In asymptomatic athletes with prevalently normal ECG, most VAs can be identified by adding an exercise test during preparticipation screening. In conclusion, cardiac screening with noninvasive examinations remains a fundamental tool for the identification of a possible pathologic substrate and for the characterization of electrical instability. PMID:23219000

  14. Intra-beat Scaling Properties of Cardiac Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Eduardo; Lerma, Claudia; Echeverría, Juan C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2008-02-01

    We applied detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to characterize the intra-beat scaling dynamics of electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings from the PhysioNet Sudden Cardiac Death Holter Database. The main finding of this contribution is that, in such recordings involving different types of arrhythmias; the ECG waveform, besides showing a less-random intra-beat dynamics, becomes more regular during bigeminy, ventricular tachycardia (VT) or even atrial fibrillation (AFIB) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) despite the appearance of erratic traces. Thus, notwithstanding that these cardiac rhythm abnormalities are generally considered as irregular and some of them generated by random impulses or wavefronts, the intra-beat scaling properties suggest that regularity dominates the underlying mechanisms of arrhythmias. Among other explanations, this may result from shorted or restricted -less complex- pathways of conduction of the electrical activity within the ventricles.

  15. Cardiac arrhythmias during occupational exposure to fluorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Antti-Poika, M; Heikkilä, J; Saarinen, L

    1990-02-01

    The effects of occupational exposure to chlorodifluoromethane (FC 22) and dichlorodifluoromethane (FC 12) on cardiac rhythm were examined. The subjects were six men who repaired refrigerators (age 31-56, mean 46 years) and a control group of six plumbers (age 29-54, mean 45 years). Ambulatory electrocardiograms (ECG) were recorded for 24 hours on the day of exposure and on a control day. The ECG tapes were automatically analysed with a Reynolds pathfinder 3 apparatus and all aberrant complexes recorded by the machine were checked. One person read all the tapes without knowing whether or not they were recorded during exposure. The number of ventricular ectopic beats were compared between the day of exposure and the control day and with the tape of the control. In addition, the number of ventricular ectopic beats during exposure was compared with the number occurring during the rest of the day. The concentrations of fluorocarbons were measured in four instances. High peak concentrations of fluorocarbons (1300-10,000 cm3/m3) were measured during refrigerator repair work. No clear connection between fluorocarbons and cardiac arrhythmia was found, although one subject had several ventricular ectopic beats which may have been connected with exposure.

  16. Cardiac arrhythmias during occupational exposure to fluorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Antti-Poika, M; Heikkilä, J; Saarinen, L

    1990-01-01

    The effects of occupational exposure to chlorodifluoromethane (FC 22) and dichlorodifluoromethane (FC 12) on cardiac rhythm were examined. The subjects were six men who repaired refrigerators (age 31-56, mean 46 years) and a control group of six plumbers (age 29-54, mean 45 years). Ambulatory electrocardiograms (ECG) were recorded for 24 hours on the day of exposure and on a control day. The ECG tapes were automatically analysed with a Reynolds pathfinder 3 apparatus and all aberrant complexes recorded by the machine were checked. One person read all the tapes without knowing whether or not they were recorded during exposure. The number of ventricular ectopic beats were compared between the day of exposure and the control day and with the tape of the control. In addition, the number of ventricular ectopic beats during exposure was compared with the number occurring during the rest of the day. The concentrations of fluorocarbons were measured in four instances. High peak concentrations of fluorocarbons (1300-10,000 cm3/m3) were measured during refrigerator repair work. No clear connection between fluorocarbons and cardiac arrhythmia was found, although one subject had several ventricular ectopic beats which may have been connected with exposure. PMID:2310718

  17. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space. PMID:24211993

  18. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space.

  19. Detection and Prevention of Cardiac Arrhythmias During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.; Liszka, Kathy J.; York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    There have been reports suggesting that long-duration space flight might lead to an increased risk of potentially serious heart rhythm disturbances. If space flight does, in fact, significantly decrease cardiac electrical stability, the effects could be catastrophic, potentially leading to sudden cardiac death. It will be important to determine the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in order to prepare for long-term manned lunar and interplanetary missions and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Our hypothesis is that prolonged exposure to microgravity will alter T wave alternans measurements, decrease heart rate variance, increase QT dispersion, decrease heart rate recovery and alter QT restitution curve. A recently published study has shown that long duration spaceflights prolong cardiac conduction and repolarization. They concluded that long duration flight is associated with QT interval prolongation and may increase arrhythmia susceptibility. We propose using computer technology as a noninvasive clinical tool to detect and study clinically significant TWA during standard exercise testing using electrode systems specifically adapted for the purpose of obtaining and measuring TWA. A population of approximately 15 healthy men and 5 healthy women subjects, representative of the astronaut cohort will be asked to voluntarily participate in this study. Their blood pressure and ECG/TWA will be measured pre-flight and in-flight. Prior to flight, subjects will be asked to participate in an orientation session. Still photos will be taken of the skin where the conductive gel is used for the multi-segment sensors. Photos will be recorded preflight, immediately postflight, and several times during the proceeding week until it has been determined that any skin reaction has disappeared or that no rash is present and will not appear.

  20. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with a liquid protein diet for the treatment of obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Lantigua, R.A.; Amatruda, J.M.; Biddle, T.L.; Forbes, G.B.; Lockwood, D.H.

    1980-09-25

    Our data demonstrate that a liquid protein diet is frequently associated with potentially life-threatening arrhythmias that are not detected on routine electrocardiography. Several studies of metabolic balance failed to reveal a cause for these arrhythmias. We recommended that the use of liquid protein diets should be terminated pending further investigation of the causes and prevention of the cardiac toxicity.

  1. Proton pump inhibitor use is not associated with cardiac arrhythmia in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kenneth P; Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G; Feng, Mengling; Celi, Leo A; Malley, Brian E; Danziger, John

    2015-07-01

    Hypomagnesemia can lead to cardiac arrythmias. Recently, observational data have linked chronic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure to hypomagnesemia. Whether PPI exposure increases the risk for arrhythmias has not been well studied. Using a large, single-center inception cohort of critically ill patients, we examined whether PPI exposure was associated with admission electrocardiogram readings of a cardiac arrhythmia in more than 8000 patients. There were 25.4% PPI users, whereas 6% were taking a histamine 2 antagonist. In all, 14.0% had a cardiac arrhythmia. PPI use was associated with an unadjusted risk of arrhythmia of 1.15 (95% CI,1.00-1.32; P =.04) and an adjusted risk of arrhythmia of 0.91 (95% CI, 0.77-1.06; P =.22). Among diuretic users (n = 2476), PPI use was similarly not associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. In summary, in a large cohort of critically ill patients, PPI exposure is not associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia.

  2. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Implications of Renal Failure for Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marin, Francisco; Prostran, Milica S; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has numerous complex interactions with the heart, including shared risk factors (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.) and mutual amplification of morbidity and mortality. Both cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause various alterations in cardiovascular system, metabolic homeostasis and autonomic nervous system that may facilitate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Also, pre-existent or incident cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) may accelerate the progression of CKD. Patients with CKD may experience various cardiac rhythm disturbances including sudden cardiac death. Contemporary management of cardiac arrhythmias includes the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), catheter ablation and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Importantly, AADs are not used only as the principal treatment strategy, but also as an adjunct therapy in combination with CIEDs, to facilitate their effects or to minimize inappropriate device activation in selected patients. Along with their principal antiarrhythmic effect, AADs may also induce cardiac arrhythmias and the risk for such proarrhythmic effect(s) is particularly increased in patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function or in the setting of electrolyte imbalance. Moreover, CKD itself can induce profound alterations in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs including AADs, thus facilitating the drug accumulation and increased exposure. Hence, the use of AADs in patients with CKD may be challenging. In this review article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of arrhythmogenesis in patients with CKD with special emphasis on the complexity of pharmacokinetics and risk for proarrhythmias when using AADs in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and CKD.

  3. Exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in horses: Review of the literature and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Navas de Solis, C

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in equine athletes during and immediately after exercise. Many of these rhythm variations are not clinically relevant. In horses, a link between different exercising arrhythmias and poor performance or between exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is strongly suspected but not fully understood or proven. SCD during races or competitions is rare, but has catastrophic consequences for the safety of the human partner and public perceptions of welfare during equestrian sports. This review summarises current knowledge of equine exercise arrhythmias and their implications in SCD and compares existing principles and recommendations for equine subjects with those for human athletes. PMID:27156002

  4. Exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in horses: Review of the literature and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Navas de Solis, C

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in equine athletes during and immediately after exercise. Many of these rhythm variations are not clinically relevant. In horses, a link between different exercising arrhythmias and poor performance or between exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is strongly suspected but not fully understood or proven. SCD during races or competitions is rare, but has catastrophic consequences for the safety of the human partner and public perceptions of welfare during equestrian sports. This review summarises current knowledge of equine exercise arrhythmias and their implications in SCD and compares existing principles and recommendations for equine subjects with those for human athletes.

  5. Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias for Holter Monitoring Services

    PubMed Central

    Lorga Filho, Adalberto; Cintra, Fatima Dumas; Lorga, Adalberto; Grupi, Cesar José; Pinho, Claudio; Moreira, Dalmo Antonio Ribeiro; Sobral Filho, Dario C.; de Brito, Fabio Sandoli; Kruse, José Claudio Lupi; Neto, José Sobral

    2013-01-01

    Background There are innumerous indicators to assure the quality of a service. However, medical competence and the proper performance of a procedure determine its final quality. The Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias recommends minimum parameters necessary to guarantee the excellence of ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring services. Objective To recommend minimum medical competences and the information required to issue a Holter monitoring report. Methods This study was grounded in the concept of evidence-based medicine and, when evidence was not available, the opinion of a writing committee was used to formulate the recommendation. That committee consisted of professionals with experience on the difficulties of the method and management in providing services in that area. Results The professional responsible for the Holter monitoring analysis should know cardiovascular pathologies and have consistent formation on electrocardiography, including cardiac arrhythmias and their differential diagnoses. The report should be written in a clear and objective way. The minimum parameters that comprise a Holter report should include statistics of the exam, as well as quantification and analysis of the rhythm disorders observed during monitoring. Conclusion Ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring should be performed by professionals knowledgeable about electrocardiographic analysis, whose report should comprise the minimum parameters mentioned in this document. PMID:24030077

  6. Aconitine Challenge Test Reveals a Single Exposure to Air Pollution Causes Increased Cardiac Arrhythmia Risk in Hypertensive Rats - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  7. Unveiling specific triggers and precipitating factors for fatal cardiac events in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and their latent forms, are at risk for fatal arrhythmias. These diseases are typically associated with genetic mutations that perturb cardiac ionic currents. The analysis of cardiac events by genotype-phenotype correlation studies has revealed that fatal arrhythmias in some genotypes are triggered by physical or emotional stress, and those in the others are more likely to occur during sleep or at rest. Thus, the risk stratification and management of affected patients differ strikingly according to the genetic variant of the inherited arrhythmia syndrome. Risk stratification may be further refined by considering the precipitating factors, such as drugs, bradycardia, electrolyte disturbances, fever, and cardiac memory. Moreover, an increasing number of studies imply that the susceptibility of fatal arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndrome or takotsubo cardiomyopathy is at least partly ascribed to the genetic variants causing inherited arrhythmia syndromes. In this article, we review the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics and genotype-phenotype correlations in inherited arrhythmia syndromes and consider the triggers and precipitating factors for fatal arrhythmias in these disorders. Further studies to explore the triggers and precipitating factors specific to the genotypes and diseases are needed for better clinical management. PMID:25925977

  8. Unveiling specific triggers and precipitating factors for fatal cardiac events in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and their latent forms, are at risk for fatal arrhythmias. These diseases are typically associated with genetic mutations that perturb cardiac ionic currents. The analysis of cardiac events by genotype-phenotype correlation studies has revealed that fatal arrhythmias in some genotypes are triggered by physical or emotional stress, and those in the others are more likely to occur during sleep or at rest. Thus, the risk stratification and management of affected patients differ strikingly according to the genetic variant of the inherited arrhythmia syndrome. Risk stratification may be further refined by considering the precipitating factors, such as drugs, bradycardia, electrolyte disturbances, fever, and cardiac memory. Moreover, an increasing number of studies imply that the susceptibility of fatal arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndrome or takotsubo cardiomyopathy is at least partly ascribed to the genetic variants causing inherited arrhythmia syndromes. In this article, we review the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics and genotype-phenotype correlations in inherited arrhythmia syndromes and consider the triggers and precipitating factors for fatal arrhythmias in these disorders. Further studies to explore the triggers and precipitating factors specific to the genotypes and diseases are needed for better clinical management.

  9. An Expert System Based on Fisher Score and LS-SVM for Cardiac Arrhythmia Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Ersen

    2013-01-01

    An expert system having two stages is proposed for cardiac arrhythmia diagnosis. In the first stage, Fisher score is used for feature selection to reduce the feature space dimension of a data set. The second stage is classification stage in which least squares support vector machines classifier is performed by using the feature subset selected in the first stage to diagnose cardiac arrhythmia. Performance of the proposed expert system is evaluated by using an arrhythmia data set which is taken from UCI machine learning repository. PMID:23861726

  10. Iron sufficient to cause hepatic fibrosis and ascites does not cause cardiac arrhythmias in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Lana; Davis, John M; Patterson, Jon; Johnson, Abby L; Bohart, George; Olivier, N Bari; Schwartz, Kenneth A

    2009-10-01

    Chronic iron overload associated with hereditary hemochromatosis or repeated red cell transfusions is known to cause cardiac failure. Cardiac arrhythmias have been incidentally noted in patients with iron overload, but they are often dismissed as being related to comorbid conditions. Studies with anesthetized iron-loaded gerbils using short recordings suggest a role for iron in the development of arrhythmias. Our goal was to characterize iron-induced arrhythmias in the chronically instrumented, untethered, telemetered gerbil. Electrocardiograms were recorded for 10 s every 30 min for approximately 6 months in iron-loaded (n=23) and control (n=8) gerbils. All gerbils in both groups showed evidence of frequent sinus arrhythmia. There was no difference in heart rate, electrocardiographic parameters, or number of arrhythmias per minute between groups. Gerbils rarely showed significant arrhythmias. Body weight and heart weight were not significantly different between groups, whereas liver weight increased with increasing iron dose in the treated group. Cardiac and hepatic iron concentrations were significantly increased in iron-loaded gerbils. Eight of 14 gerbils loaded to 6.2 g/kg body weight developed ascites. We conclude that an iron load sufficient to cause clinical liver disease does not cause cardiac arrhythmias in the gerbil model of iron overload.

  11. Interventional and surgical treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Koyak, Zeliha; de Groot, Joris R; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2010-12-01

    Arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, mortality and hospital admission in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). The etiology of arrhythmias in this population is often multifactorial and includes electrical disturbances as part of the underlying defect, surgical intervention or hemodynamic abnormalities. Despite the numerous existing arrhythmia management tools including drug therapy, pacing and ablation, management of arrhythmias in adults with CHD remains difficult and challenging. Owing to improvement in mapping and ablation techniques, ablation and arrhythmia surgery are being performed more frequently in adults with CHD. However, there is little information on the long-term results of these treatment strategies. The purpose of this article is therefore to review the available data on nonpharmacological treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with CHD and to give an overview of the available data on the early and late outcomes of these treatment strategies.

  12. Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Yi; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmogenesis is thought to be a common cause of sudden cardiac death following myocardial infarction (MI). Nerve remodeling as a result of MI is known to be an important genesis of life-threatening arrhythmias. It is hypothesized that neural modulation might serve as a therapeutic option of malignant arrhythmias. In fact, left stellectomy or β-blocker therapy is shown to be effective in the prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and sudden cardiac death (SCD) after MI both in patients and in animal models. Results from decades of research already evidenced a positive relationship between abnormal nerve density and ventricular arrhythmias after MI. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac sympathetic rejuvenation and mechanisms related to sympathetic hyperinnervation and arrhythmogenesis after MI and analyzed the potential therapeutic implications of nerve sprouting modification for ventricular arrhythmias and SCD control. PMID:26793403

  13. Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Yi; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmogenesis is thought to be a common cause of sudden cardiac death following myocardial infarction (MI). Nerve remodeling as a result of MI is known to be an important genesis of life-threatening arrhythmias. It is hypothesized that neural modulation might serve as a therapeutic option of malignant arrhythmias. In fact, left stellectomy or β-blocker therapy is shown to be effective in the prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and sudden cardiac death (SCD) after MI both in patients and in animal models. Results from decades of research already evidenced a positive relationship between abnormal nerve density and ventricular arrhythmias after MI. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac sympathetic rejuvenation and mechanisms related to sympathetic hyperinnervation and arrhythmogenesis after MI and analyzed the potential therapeutic implications of nerve sprouting modification for ventricular arrhythmias and SCD control. PMID:26793403

  14. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  15. Sympathetic restraint of respiratory sinus arrhythmia: implications for vagal-cardiac tone assessment in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Myers, C. W.; Halliwill, J. R.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Clinicians and experimentalists routinely estimate vagal-cardiac nerve traffic from respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, evidence suggests that sympathetic mechanisms may also modulate respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Our study examined modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia by sympathetic outflow. We measured R-R interval spectral power in 10 volunteers that breathed sequentially at 13 frequencies, from 15 to 3 breaths/min, before and after beta-adrenergic blockade. We fitted changes of respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power with a damped oscillator model: frequency-dependent oscillations with a resonant frequency, generated by driving forces and modified by damping influences. beta-Adrenergic blockade enhanced respiratory sinus arrhythmia at all frequencies (at some, fourfold). The damped oscillator model fit experimental data well (39 of 40 ramps; r = 0.86 +/- 0.02). beta-Adrenergic blockade increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia by amplifying respiration-related driving forces (P < 0.05), without altering resonant frequency or damping influences. Both spectral power data and the damped oscillator model indicate that cardiac sympathetic outflow markedly reduces heart period oscillations at all frequencies. This challenges the notion that respiratory sinus arrhythmia is mediated simply by vagal-cardiac nerve activity. These results have important implications for clinical and experimental estimation of human vagal cardiac tone.

  16. Combination of opium smoking and hypercholesterolemia augments susceptibility for lethal cardiac arrhythmia and atherogenesis in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Najafipour, Hamid; Joukar, Siyavash

    2012-09-01

    Opium consumption is increasing in some eastern societies, where it is grown. We investigated the effect of opium smoking on plasma atherogenic index and incidence of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, i.e. ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in rabbits. Animals were divided into two-, normo- and hyper-cholesterolemic main groups fed with normal or high cholesterol diet prior and during short-term and long-term exposure to opium smoke. Then, isoproterenol (3mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce cardiac ischemia and animals were followed for 3h for counting of lethal arrhythmia incidence. Long-term opium smoking significantly increased the plasma atherogenic index. In ischemic hearts, opium smoking along with hypercholesterolemia significantly enhanced the incidence of fatal arrhythmia. This vulnerability was not mediated by changes in QT interval. These data suggest that opium smoking, especially in hypercholesterolemic conditions, can be a predisposing factor for atherogenesis and lethal arrhythmia.

  17. The role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with cardiac arrhythmias: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Chen, Jian; Dobreanu, Dan; Madrid, Antonio Hernandez; Tilz, Roland; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias is increasingly complex because of continuous technological advance and multifaceted clinical conditions associated with ageing of the population, the presence of co-morbidities and the need for polypharmacy. The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association Scientific Initiatives Committee survey was to provide an insight into the role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Forty-eight centres from 18 European countries replied to the Web-based questionnaire. The presence of an Arrhythmia Team was reported by 44% of the respondents, whereas 17% were not familiar with this term. Apart from the electrophysiologist, health professionals who should belong to such teams, according to the majority of the respondents, include a clinical cardiologist, a nurse, a cardiac surgeon, a heart failure specialist, a geneticist, and a geriatrician. Its main activity should be dedicated to the management of patients with complex clinical conditions or refractory or inherited forms of arrhythmias. When present, the Arrhythmia Team was considered helpful by 95% of respondents; the majority of centres (79%) agreed that it should be implemented. The Arrhythmia Team seems to be connected to important expectations in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. The efficacy of such an integrated and multidisciplinary approach should be encouraged and tested in clinical practice.

  18. Severity of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias correlates with intensity of sleep apnea in men.

    PubMed

    Szaboova, E; Holoubek, D; Tomori, Z; Szabo, P; Donic, V; Stancak, B

    2013-01-01

    Various cardiac arrhythmias frequently occur in patients with sleep apnea, but complex analysis of the relationship between their severity and the probable arrhythmogenic risk factors is conflicting. The question is what cardiovascular risk factors and how strongly they are associated with the severity of cardiac arrhythmias in sleep apnea. Adult males (33 with and 16 without sleep apnea), matched for cardiovascular co-morbidity were studied by polysomnography with simultaneous ECG monitoring. Arrhythmia severity was evaluated for each subject by a special 7-degree scoring system. Laboratory, clinical, echocardiographic, carotid ultrasonographic, ambulatory blood pressure, and baroreflex sensitivity values were also assessed. Moderate sleep apnea patients had benign, but more exaggerated cardiac arrhythmias than control subjects (2.53 ± 2.49 vs. 1.13 ± 1.64 degrees of cumulative severity, p < 0.05). We confirmed strong correlations between the arrhythmia severity and known arrhythmogenic risk factors (left ventricular ejection fraction and dimensions, right ventricular diameter, baroreflex sensitivity, carotid intima-media thickness, age, previous myocardial infarction, and also apnea-hypopnea index). In multivariate modelling only the apnea-hypopnea index indicating the sleep apnea intensity remained highly significantly correlated with the cumulative arrhythmia severity (beta = 0.548, p < 0.005). In conclusion, sleep apnea modifying cardiovascular risk factors and structures or functions provoked various nocturnal arrhythmias. The proposed scoring system allowed a complex analysis of the contribution of various triggers to arrhythmogenesis and confirmed the apnea-hypopnea index as an independent risk for nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia severity in sleep apnea.

  19. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  20. [Updated ESC guideline: innovations for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and recommendations for prevention of sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Eckardt, L; Deneke, T

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death is an update of the former 2006 European/American guidelines. This new consensus document gives a detailed overview on prevention and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This includes detailed discussion of channelopathies and various cardiomyopathies. Gaps in evidence are identified and also discussed. DNA analysis and postmortem assessment in sudden cardiac death victims is for the first time part of these new recommendations. In addition, for the first time recommendations on subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and the wearable defibrillator are given. The guidelines strengthen the role of ICD therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death although data used as the basis for these recommendations are 10-15 years old and patients' characteristics including therapeutic options have changed during that time. Systematic reassessment of left ventricular function 6-12 weeks after infarction is also included as a new recommendation. The role of catheter ablation in electrical storm and for those presenting with a first episode of sustained ventricular tachycardia has also been upgraded in the new guidelines. Hopefully, the new guidelines will reach not only cardiologists and help to improve patient care, but also contribute to reducing the high number sudden cardiac deaths in Europe. PMID:27581243

  1. The past, the present, and the future of cardiac arrhythmia ablation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Jason G; Rivard, Léna; Macle, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    The development and evolution of percutaneous catheter ablation for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias has advanced significantly since the early days of direct current shock ablation, and in parallel with an increasing understanding about arrhythmia mechanisms. Because of the ever-changing landscape that is cardiac electrophysiology, the purpose of this review is to discuss the future of invasive arrhythmia management within the context of the history and contemporary practice of this cardiac subspecialty. Topics of discussion include: (1) the evolution of ablation technologies from direct current shock and radiofrequency to alternative energy sources such as cryothermal ablation; (2) the use and development of nonfluoroscopic navigation systems; (3) the progression of ablation toolsets and modalities; and (4) the advancement of ablation strategies and techniques, including ablation of complex atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias tailored to the individual patient.

  2. Protective effects of isorhynchophylline on cardiac arrhythmias in rats and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gan, Runtao; Dong, Guo; Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Xu; Fu, Songbin; Yang, Shusen

    2011-09-01

    As one important constituent extracted from a traditional Chinese medicine, Uncaria Rhynchophylla Miq Jacks, isorhynchophylline has been used to treat hypertension, epilepsy, headache, and other illnesses. Whether isorhynchophylline protects hearts against cardiac arrhythmias is still incompletely investigated. This study was therefore aimed to examine the preventive effects of isorhynchophylline on heart arrhythmias in guinea pigs and rats and then explore their electrophysiological mechanisms. In vivo, ouabain and calcium chloride were used to establish experimental arrhythmic models in guinea pigs and rats. In vitro, the whole-cell patch-lamp technique was used to study the effect of isorhynchophylline on action potential duration and calcium channels in acutely isolated guinea pig and rat cardiomyocytes. The dose of ouabain required to induce cardiac arrhythmias was much larger in guinea pigs administered with isorhynchophylline. Additionally, the onset time of cardiac arrhythmias induced by calcium chloride was prolonged, and the duration was shortened in rats pretreated with isorhynchophylline. The further study showed that isorhynchophylline could significantly decrease action potential duration and inhibit calcium currents in isolated guinea pig and rat cardiomyocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, isorhynchophylline played a remarkably preventive role in cardiac arrhythmias through the inhibition of calcium currents in rats and guinea pigs.

  3. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  4. Sympathetic cardiac hyperinnervation and atrial autonomic imbalance in diet-induced obesity promote cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Hasan, Wohaib; Streiff, Cole T; Houle, Jennifer C; Woodward, William R; Giraud, George D; Brooks, Virginia L; Habecker, Beth A

    2013-11-15

    Obesity increases the risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that obesity-induced cardiac sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation promotes the development of arrhythmic events. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275 g), fed a high-fat diet (33% kcal/fat), diverged into obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) groups and were compared with rats fed normal chow (13% kcal/fat; CON). In vitro experiments showed that both OR and OP rats exhibited hyperinnervation of the heart and high sympathetic outgrowth compared with CON rats, even though OR rats are not obese. Despite the hyperinnervation and outgrowth, we showed that, in vivo, OR rats were less susceptible to arrhythmic events after an intravenous epinephrine challenge compared with OP rats. On examining total and stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter levels in an ex vivo system, we demonstrate that atrial acetylcholine content and release were attenuated in OP compared with OR and CON groups. OP rats also expressed elevated atrial norepinephrine content, while norepinephrine release was suppressed. These findings suggest that the consumption of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overt obesity, stimulates sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation of the heart. However, normalized cardiac parasympathetic nervous system control may protect the heart from arrhythmic events.

  5. Next Generation Sequencing for the Diagnosis of Cardiac Arrhythmia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, Steven A.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes are collectively associated with substantial morbidity, yet our understanding of the genetic architecture of these conditions remains limited. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing have led to the commercialization of genetic testing now widely available in clinical practice. In particular, next generation sequencing allows the large-scale and rapid assessment of entire genomes. Although next generation sequencing represents a major technological advance, it has introduced numerous challenges with respect to the interpretation of genetic variation, and has opened a veritable floodgate of biological data of unknown clinical significance to practitioners. In this review, we discuss current genetic testing indications for inherited arrhythmia syndromes, broadly outline characteristics of next generation sequencing techniques, and highlight challenges associated with such testing. We further summarize future directions that will be necessary to address to enable the widespread adoption of next generation sequencing in the routine management of patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes. PMID:25625719

  6. Functional interaction between charged nanoparticles and cardiac tissue: a new paradigm for cardiac arrhythmia?

    PubMed Central

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Korchev, Yuri E; Lab, Max J; Tetley, Teresa D; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effect of surface charge of therapeutic nanoparticles on sarcolemmal ionic homeostasis and the initiation of arrhythmias. Materials & methods Cultured neonatal rat myocytes were exposed to 50 nm-charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles and examined using a combination of hopping probe scanning ion conductance microscopy, optical recording of action potential characteristics and patch clamp. Results Positively charged, amine-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects and induced large-scale damage to cardiomyocyte membranes leading to calcium alternans and cell death. By contrast, negatively charged, carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles (NegNPs) were not overtly cytotoxic but triggered formation of 50–250-nm nanopores in the membrane. Cells exposed to NegNPs revealed pro-arrhythmic events, such as delayed afterdepolarizations, reduction in conduction velocity and pathological increment of action potential duration together with an increase in ionic current throughout the membrane, carried by the nanopores. Conclusion The utilization of charged nanoparticles is a novel concept for targeting cardiac excitability. However, this unique nanoscopic investigation reveals an altered electrophysiological substrate, which sensitized the heart cells towards arrhythmias. PMID:23140503

  7. Fetal cardiac arrhythmia detection and in utero therapy

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Janette F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    The human fetal heart develops arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in response to ischemia, inflammation, electrolyte disturbances, altered load states, structural defects, inherited genetic conditions, and many other causes. Yet sinus rhythm is present without altered rate or rhythm in some of the most serious electrophysiological diseases, which makes detection of diseases of the fetal conduction system challenging in the absence of magnetocardiographic or electrocardiographic recording techniques. Life-threatening changes in QRS or QT intervals can be completely unrecognized if heart rate is the only feature to be altered. For many fetal arrhythmias, echocardiography alone can assess important clinical parameters for diagnosis. Appropriate treatment of the fetus requires awareness of arrhythmia characteristics, mechanisms, and potential associations. Criteria to define fetal bradycardia specific to gestational age are now available and may allow detection of ion channelopathies, which are associated with fetal and neonatal bradycardia. Ectopic beats, once thought to be entirely benign, are now recognized to have important pathologic associations. Fetal tachyarrhythmias can now be defined precisely for mechanism-specific therapy and for subsequent monitoring of response. This article reviews the current and future diagnostic techniques and pharmacologic treatments for fetal arrhythmia. PMID:20418904

  8. Severe hypoglycemia-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmias are mediated by sympathoadrenal activation.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Chen, Y Stefanie; VanderWeele, Jennifer; Jethi, Krishan; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-10-01

    For people with insulin-treated diabetes, severe hypoglycemia can be lethal, though potential mechanisms involved are poorly understood. To investigate how severe hypoglycemia can be fatal, hyperinsulinemic, severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dL) clamps were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with simultaneous electrocardiogram monitoring. With goals of reducing hypoglycemia-induced mortality, the hypotheses tested were that: 1) antecedent glycemic control impacts mortality associated with severe hypoglycemia; 2) with limitation of hypokalemia, potassium supplementation could limit hypoglycemia-associated deaths; 3) with prevention of central neuroglycopenia, brain glucose infusion could prevent hypoglycemia-associated arrhythmias and deaths; and 4) with limitation of sympathoadrenal activation, adrenergic blockers could prevent hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmic deaths. Severe hypoglycemia-induced mortality was noted to be worsened by diabetes, but recurrent antecedent hypoglycemia markedly improved the ability to survive an episode of severe hypoglycemia. Potassium supplementation tended to reduce mortality. Severe hypoglycemia caused numerous cardiac arrhythmias including premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and high-degree heart block. Intracerebroventricular glucose infusion reduced severe hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmias and overall mortality. β-Adrenergic blockade markedly reduced cardiac arrhythmias and completely abrogated deaths due to severe hypoglycemia. Under conditions studied, sudden deaths caused by insulin-induced severe hypoglycemia were mediated by lethal cardiac arrhythmias triggered by brain neuroglycopenia and the marked sympathoadrenal response.

  9. Non-Linear Dynamics of Cardiac Alternans: Subcellular to Tissue-Level Mechanisms of Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Gaeta, Stephen A.; Christini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans is a rhythm disturbance of the heart in which rapid stimulation elicits a beat-to-beat alternation in the duration of action potentials and magnitude of intracellular calcium transients in individual cardiac myocytes. Although this phenomenon has been identified as a potential precursor to dangerous reentrant arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, significant uncertainty remains regarding its mechanism and no clinically practical means of halting its occurrence or progression currently exists. Cardiac alternans has well-characterized tissue, cellular, and subcellular manifestations, the mechanisms and interplay of which are an active area of research. PMID:22783195

  10. A client/server system for remote diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Tong, D A; Gajjala, V; Widman, L E

    1995-01-01

    Health care practitioners are often faced with the task of interpreting complex heart rhythms from electrocardiograms (ECGs) produced by 12-lead ECG machines, ambulatory (Holter) monitoring systems, and intensive-care unit monitors. Usually, the practitioner caring for the patient does not have specialized training in cardiology or in ECG interpretation; and commercial programs that interpret 12-lead ECGs have been well-documented in the medical literature to perform poorly at analyzing cardiac rhythm. We believe that a system capable of providing comprehensive ECG interpretation as well as access to online consultations will be beneficial to the health care system. We hypothesized that we could develop a client-server based telemedicine system capable of providing access to (1) an on-line knowledge-based system for remote diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias and (2) an on-line cardiologist for real-time interactive consultation using readily available resources on the Internet. Furthermore, we hypothesized that Macintosh and Microsoft Windows-based personal computers running an X server could function as the delivery platform for the developed system. Although we were successful in developing such a system that will run efficiently on a UNIX-based work-station, current personal computer X server software are not capable of running the system efficiently.

  11. Hindlimb unloading results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alters left ventricular connexin 43 expression

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Matthew K.; Welliver, Kathryn C.; Jepson, Amanda J.; Garnett, Emily R.

    2013-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) is a well-established animal model of cardiovascular deconditioning. Previous data indicate that HU results in cardiac sympathovagal imbalance. It is well established that cardiac sympathovagal imbalance increases the risk for developing cardiac arrhythmias. The cardiac gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) is predominately expressed in the left ventricle (LV) and ensures efficient cell-to-cell electrical coupling. In the current study we wanted to test the hypothesis that HU would result in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alter the expression and/or phosphorylation of LV-Cx43. Electrocardiographic data using implantable telemetry were obtained over a 10- to 14-day HU or casted control (CC) condition and in response to a sympathetic stressor using isoproterenol administration and brief restraint. The arrhythmic burden was calculated using a modified scoring system to quantify spontaneous and provoked arrhythmias. In addition, Western blot analysis was used to measure LV-Cx43 expression in lysates probed with antibodies directed against the total and an unphosphorylated form of Cx43 in CC and HU rats. HU resulted in a significantly greater total arrhythmic burden during the sympathetic stressor with significantly more ventricular arrhythmias occurring. In addition, there was increased expression of total LV-Cx43 observed with no difference in the expression of unphosphorylated LV-Cx43. Specifically, the increased expression of LV-Cx43 was consistent with the phosphorylated form. These data taken together indicate that cardiovascular deconditioning produced through HU results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and increased expression of phosphorylated LV-Cx43. PMID:23302960

  12. Hindlimb unloading results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alters left ventricular connexin 43 expression.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Julia A; Henry, Matthew K; Welliver, Kathryn C; Jepson, Amanda J; Garnett, Emily R

    2013-03-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) is a well-established animal model of cardiovascular deconditioning. Previous data indicate that HU results in cardiac sympathovagal imbalance. It is well established that cardiac sympathovagal imbalance increases the risk for developing cardiac arrhythmias. The cardiac gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) is predominately expressed in the left ventricle (LV) and ensures efficient cell-to-cell electrical coupling. In the current study we wanted to test the hypothesis that HU would result in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and alter the expression and/or phosphorylation of LV-Cx43. Electrocardiographic data using implantable telemetry were obtained over a 10- to 14-day HU or casted control (CC) condition and in response to a sympathetic stressor using isoproterenol administration and brief restraint. The arrhythmic burden was calculated using a modified scoring system to quantify spontaneous and provoked arrhythmias. In addition, Western blot analysis was used to measure LV-Cx43 expression in lysates probed with antibodies directed against the total and an unphosphorylated form of Cx43 in CC and HU rats. HU resulted in a significantly greater total arrhythmic burden during the sympathetic stressor with significantly more ventricular arrhythmias occurring. In addition, there was increased expression of total LV-Cx43 observed with no difference in the expression of unphosphorylated LV-Cx43. Specifically, the increased expression of LV-Cx43 was consistent with the phosphorylated form. These data taken together indicate that cardiovascular deconditioning produced through HU results in increased predisposition to cardiac arrhythmias and increased expression of phosphorylated LV-Cx43.

  13. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Congenital Deafness with Cardiac Arrhythmias: The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Richard A.; Macdonald, Dick, II

    1980-01-01

    The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, affecting 0.3 percent of congenitally deaf persons, consists of severe cardiac arrhythmias and sensorineural hearing loss. The authors recommend that every congenitally deaf child with suspicious symptoms receive an electrocardiogram and that professionals who work with deaf children not only inform…

  15. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  16. Cardiac arrhythmias the first month after acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Kim; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Malmqvist, Lasse; Ballegaard, Martin; Krassioukov, Andrei; Hansen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Kruse, Anders; Welling, Karen-Lise; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular complications including cardiac arrest and arrhythmias remain a clinical challenge in the management of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Still, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the characteristics of arrhythmias in patients with acute traumatic SCI. The aim of this prospective observational study was to investigate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrests in patients with acute traumatic SCI. Methods As early as possible after SCI 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed. Additional Holter recordings were performed 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained shortly after SCI and at 4 weeks. Results Thirty patients were included. Bradycardia (heart rate (HR) <50 b.p.m.) was present in 17–35% of the patients with cervical (C1–C8) SCI (n = 24) within the first 14 days. In the following 14 days, the occurrence was 22–32%. Bradycardia in the thoracic (Th1–Th12) SCI group (n = 6) was present in 17–33% during the observation period. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. The mean minimum HR was significantly lower in the cervical group compared with the thoracic group both on 12-lead ECGs obtained shortly after SCI (P = 0.030) and at 4 weeks (P = 0.041). Conclusion Many patients with cervical SCI experience arrhythmias such as bradycardia, sinus node arrest, supraventricular tachycardia, and more rarely cardiac arrest the first month after SCI. Apart from sinus node arrests and limited bradycardia, no arrhythmias were seen in patients with thoracic SCI. Standard 12-lead ECGs will often miss the high prevalence these arrhythmias have. PMID:24559419

  17. Pharmacy Students’ Performance and Perceptions in a Flipped Teaching Pilot on Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Eric J.; Lopes, Ingrid; Rajagopalan, Vanishree

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To implement the flipped teaching method in a 3-class pilot on cardiac arrhythmias and to assess the impact of the intervention on academic performance and student perceptions. Design. An intervention group of 101 first-year pharmacy students, who took the class with the flipped teaching method, were supplied with prerecorded lectures prior to their 3 classes (1 class in each of the following subjects: basic sciences, pharmacology, and therapeutics) on cardiac arrhythmias. Class time was focused on active-learning and case-based exercises. Students then took a final examination that included questions on cardiac arrhythmias. The examination scores of the intervention group were compared to scores of the Spring 2011 control group of 105 first-year students who took the class with traditional teaching methods. An online survey was conducted to assess student feedback from the intervention group. Assessment. The mean examination scores of the intervention group were significantly higher than the mean examination scores of the control group for the cardiac arrhythmia classes in pharmacology (with 89.6 ± 2.0% vs 56.8 ± 2.2%, respectively) and therapeutics (89.2 ± 1.4% vs 73.7 ± 2.1%, respectively). The survey indicated higher student satisfaction for flipped classes with highly rated learning objectives, recordings, and in-class activities. Conclusion. Use of the flipped teaching method in a 3-class pilot on cardiac arrhythmias improved examination scores for 2 of the 3 classes (pharmacology and therapeutics). Student satisfaction was influenced by the quality of the learning objectives, prerecorded lectures, and inclass active-learning activities. PMID:25657372

  18. Incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in asymptomatic hereditary hemochromatosis subjects with C282Y homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Tripodi, Dorothy J; Zalos, Gloria; Bolan, Charles D; Yau, Yu-Ying; Leitman, Susan F; Waclawiw, Myron A; Rosing, Douglas R

    2012-03-15

    It is not well known whether systemic iron overload per se in hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is associated with cardiac arrhythmias before other signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disease occur. In the present study, we examined the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia in cardiac asymptomatic subjects with HH (New York Heart Association functional class I) and compared it to that in age- and gender-matched normal volunteers. The 42 subjects with HH and the 19 normal control subjects were recruited through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored "Heart Study of Hemochromatosis." They completed 48-hour Holter electrocardiography ambulatory monitoring at the baseline evaluation. The subjects with HH were classified as newly diagnosed (group A) and chronically treated (group B) subjects. All subjects with HH had C282Y homozygosity, and the normal volunteers lacked any HFE gene mutations known to cause HH. Although statistically insignificant, the incidence of ventricular and supraventricular ectopy tended to be greater in the combined HH groups than in the controls. Supraventricular ectopy was more frequently noted in group B compared to in the controls (ectopy rate per hour 11.1 ± 29.9 vs 1.5 ± 3.5, p < 0.05, using the Kruskal-Wallis test). No examples of heart block, other than first-degree atrioventricular node block, were seen in any of the subjects. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was not significantly reduced after 6 months of intensive iron removal therapy in the group A subjects. No life-threatening arrhythmias were observed in our subjects with HH. In conclusion, our data suggest that the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is, at most, marginally increased in asymptomatic subjects with HH. A larger clinical study is warranted to further clarify our observation.

  19. Incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in asymptomatic hereditary hemochromatosis subjects with C282Y homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Tripodi, Dorothy J; Zalos, Gloria; Bolan, Charles D; Yau, Yu-Ying; Leitman, Susan F; Waclawiw, Myron A; Rosing, Douglas R

    2012-03-15

    It is not well known whether systemic iron overload per se in hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is associated with cardiac arrhythmias before other signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disease occur. In the present study, we examined the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia in cardiac asymptomatic subjects with HH (New York Heart Association functional class I) and compared it to that in age- and gender-matched normal volunteers. The 42 subjects with HH and the 19 normal control subjects were recruited through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored "Heart Study of Hemochromatosis." They completed 48-hour Holter electrocardiography ambulatory monitoring at the baseline evaluation. The subjects with HH were classified as newly diagnosed (group A) and chronically treated (group B) subjects. All subjects with HH had C282Y homozygosity, and the normal volunteers lacked any HFE gene mutations known to cause HH. Although statistically insignificant, the incidence of ventricular and supraventricular ectopy tended to be greater in the combined HH groups than in the controls. Supraventricular ectopy was more frequently noted in group B compared to in the controls (ectopy rate per hour 11.1 ± 29.9 vs 1.5 ± 3.5, p < 0.05, using the Kruskal-Wallis test). No examples of heart block, other than first-degree atrioventricular node block, were seen in any of the subjects. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was not significantly reduced after 6 months of intensive iron removal therapy in the group A subjects. No life-threatening arrhythmias were observed in our subjects with HH. In conclusion, our data suggest that the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is, at most, marginally increased in asymptomatic subjects with HH. A larger clinical study is warranted to further clarify our observation. PMID:22196777

  20. Postoperative Arrhythmias after Cardiac Surgery: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  1. New directions in cardiac arrhythmia management: present challenges and future solutions.

    PubMed

    Nattel, Stanley; Andrade, Jason; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Dyrda, Katia; Mondesert, Blandine; Khairy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major contributor to population morbidity and mortality. Enormous advances in arrhythmia management have occurred over the 60 years since the founding of the Montreal Heart Institute, but important challenges remain. The purpose of this article is to identify the areas of cardiac arrhythmia therapy that need improvement and to discuss the evolving approaches that promise solutions. Challenges in diagnosis, detection, and risk-stratification include difficulties in separating benign from high-risk syncope and pinpointing the underlying causes, the detection of silent atrial fibrillation in patients at risk of stroke, and inadequate identification of sudden-death risk. Implantable devices are limited by the need for battery and device replacements, device complications like infection and dysfunction, and lead complications like fracture, infection, or displacement. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy, although widely used, is plagued by a very limited range of available agents, supply issues, insufficient efficacy, and significant adverse effect risk. Health economic concerns include the high cost of new technologies, challenges in establishing cost effectiveness, and restrictive practices of government or third-party payers. Major improvements in arrhythmia management can be expected from new discoveries and technological developments in genetics, innovative diagnostic tools for arrhythmia monitoring, imaging and analysis, new approaches to antiarrhythmic drug development, biological therapies, and continuing improvement in implantable device technology like further miniaturization, leadless technology, and use of novel energy sources. As exciting as the developments in arrhythmia management have been in the past, we can look forward to exponential improvement in our ability to manage arrhythmia patients in the near future.

  2. Small-conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ channels and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-08-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and, hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, the SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias, and upregulation of SK channels in heart failure in animal models and in human heart failure. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both antiarrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review provides an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and serves as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible proarrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors in the heart: a potential locus for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wei, Eric Q; Barnett, Adam S; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Hennessey, Jessica A

    2011-10-01

    The four fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs; FGF11-FGF14) are intracellular proteins that bind and modulate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Although FHFs have been well studied in neurons and implicated in neurologic disease, their role in cardiomyocytes was unclear until recently. This review discusses the expression profile and function of FHFs in mouse and rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Recent data show that FGF13 is the predominant FHF in the murine heart, directly binds the cardiac VGSC α subunit, and is essential for normal cardiac conduction. FHF loss-of-function mutations may be unrecognized causes of cardiac arrhythmias, such as long QT and Brugada syndromes.

  4. Central Sympathetic Inhibition: a Neglected Approach for Treatment of Cardiac Arrhythmias?

    PubMed

    Cagnoni, Francesca; Destro, Maurizio; Bontempelli, Erika; Locatelli, Giovanni; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. Overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of comorbidities related to AF such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, obesity, insulin resistance, and obstructive sleep apnea. Methods that reduce sympathetic drive, such as centrally acting sympatho-inhibitory agents, have been shown to reduce the incidence of spontaneous or induced atrial arrhythmias, suggesting that neuromodulation may be helpful in controlling AF. Moxonidine acts centrally to reduce activity of the SNS, and clinical trials indicate that this is associated with a decreased AF burden in hypertensive patients with paroxysmal AF and reduced post-ablation recurrence of AF in patients with hypertension who underwent pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Furthermore, device-based approaches to reduce sympathetic drive, such as renal denervation, have yielded promising results in the prevention and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. In light of these recent findings, targeting elevated sympathetic drive with either pharmacological or device-based approaches has become a focus of clinical research. Here, we review the data currently available to explore the potential utility of sympatho-inhibitory therapies in the prevention and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

  5. Reentrant excitation as a cause of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wit, A L; Cranefield, P F

    1978-07-01

    Mechanisms that cause reentry were defined in rings of tissue cut from jellyfish as early as 1906 by Mayer. The concepts were developed by Mines and Garrey during the next 10 years. Lewis then tried to demonstrate that reentry caused atrial flutter. Lewis, Garrey, and later Moe also proposed that atrial fibrillation was caused by reentry. Rosenblueth provided additional experimental evidence that reentry could cause atrial arrhythmias after crushing the intercaval bridge of atrial muscle. Recent studies by Allessie using microelectrodes have provided detailed evidence for reentry in atrial tissue. Mines in 1913 also proposed that reentry could occur in the AV node. Scherf then introduced the concept of functional longitudinal dissociation as a cause of return extrasystoles and this was later shown to happen in the node by Moe and his colleagues. Reentry can also occur between atria and ventricles utilizing accessory connecting pathways. Schmitt and Erlanger in 1913 were the first to do experiments which indicated that reentry can also occur in the ventricles. Subsequently it was shown that reentry can occur in Purkinje fiber bundles. Reentry in ventricular muscle may also cause some of the arrhythmias that occur after myocardial infarction.

  6. The role of acute hyperinsulinemia in the development of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Drimba, László; Döbrönte, Róbert; Hegedüs, Csaba; Sári, Réka; Di, Yin; Németh, Joseph; Szilvássy, Zoltán; Peitl, Barna

    2013-05-01

    Patients with perturbed metabolic control are more prone to develop cardiac rhythm disturbances. The main purpose of the present preclinical study was to investigate the possible role of euglycemic hyperinsulinemia in development of cardiac arrhythmias. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia was induced in conscious rabbits equipped with a right ventricular pacemaker electrode catheter by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp (HEGC) applying two different rates of insulin infusion (5 and 10 mIU/kg/min) and variable rate of glucose infusion to maintain euglycemia (5.5 ± 0.5 mmol/l). The effect of hyperinsulinemia on cardiac electrophysiological parameters was continuously monitored by means of 12-lead surface ECG recording. Arrhythmia incidence was determined by means of programmed electrical stimulation (PES). The possible role of adrenergic activation was investigated by determination of plasma catecholamine levels and intravenous administration of a beta adrenergic blocking agent, metoprolol. All of the measurements were performed during the steady-state period of HEGC and subsequent to metoprolol administration. Both 5 and 10 mIU/kg/min insulin infusion prolonged significantly QTend, QTc, and Tpeak-Tend intervals. The incidence of ventricular arrhythmias generated by PES was increased significantly by euglycemic hyperinsulinemia and exhibited linear relationship to plasma levels of insulin. No alteration on plasma catecholamine levels could be observed; however, metoprolol treatment restored the prolonged QTend, QTc, and Tpeak-Tend intervals and significantly reduced the hyperinsulinemia-induced increase of arrhythmia incidence. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia can exert proarrhythmic effect presumably due to the enhancement of transmural dispersion of repolarization. Metoprolol treatment may be of benefit in hyperinsulinemia associated with increased incidence of cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Control of Cardiac Arrhythmia by Nonlinear Spatiotemporal Delayed Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroujeni, Forough Rezaei; Vasegh, Nastaran; Sedigh, Ali Khaki

    The dynamic feedback control of the cardiac pacing interval has been widely used to suppress alternans. In this paper, temporally and spatially suppressing the alternans for cardiac tissue consisting of a one-dimensional chain of cardiac units is investigated. The model employed is a nonlinear partial difference equation. The model's fixed points and their stability conditions are determined, and bifurcations and chaos phenomenon have been studied by numerical simulations. The main objective of this paper is to stabilize the unstable fixed point of the model. The proposed approach is nonlinear spatiotemporal delayed feedback, and the appropriate interval for controller feedback gain is calculated using the linear stability analysis. It is proven that the proposed approach is robust with respect to all bifurcation parameter variations. Also, set point tracking is achieved by employing delayed feedback with an integrator. Finally, simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  8. Implantable Defibrillators for Secondary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Cardiac Surgery Patients With Perioperative Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nageh, Maged F.; Kim, John J.; Chen, Lie‐Hong; Yao, Janis F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized studies of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) have excluded sudden cardiac death survivors who had revascularization before or after an arrhythmic event. To evaluate the role of ICD and the effects of clinical variables including degree of revascularization, we studied cardiac surgery patients who had an ICD implanted for sustained perioperative ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results The electronic database for Southern California Kaiser Foundation hospitals was searched for patients who had cardiac surgery between 1999 and 2005 and an ICD implanted within 3 months of surgery. One hundred sixty‐four patients were identified; 93/164 had an ICD for sustained pre‐ or postoperative ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation requiring resuscitation. Records were reviewed for the following: presenting arrhythmia, ejection fraction, and degree of revascularization. The primary end point was total mortality (TM) and/or appropriate ICD therapy (ICD‐T), and secondary end points are TM and ICD‐T. During the mean follow up of 49 months, the primary endpoint of TM+ICD‐T and individual end points of TM and ICD‐T were observed in 52 (56%), 35 (38%), and 28 (30%) patients, respectively, with 55% of TM, and 23% of ICD‐T occurring within 2 years of implant. In multivariate risk analysis, none of the following was associated with any of the end points: incomplete revascularization, presenting ventricular arrhythmia, and timing of arrhythmias. Conclusion Our data supports the recent guidelines for ICD in this cohort of patients, as the presence of irreversible substrate and triggers of ventricular arrhythmias, cannot be reliably excluded even with complete revascularization. Further studies are needed to understand this complex group of patients. PMID:25146702

  9. Cardiac sodium channel palmitoylation regulates channel availability and myocyte excitability with implications for arrhythmia generation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zifan; Xiao, Yucheng; Meng, Jingwei; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.5) play an essential role in regulating cardiac electric activity by initiating and propagating action potentials in the heart. Altered Nav1.5 function is associated with multiple cardiac diseases including long-QT3 and Brugada syndrome. Here, we show that Nav1.5 is subject to palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification. Palmitoylation increases channel availability and late sodium current activity, leading to enhanced cardiac excitability and prolonged action potential duration. In contrast, blocking palmitoylation increases closed-state channel inactivation and reduces myocyte excitability. We identify four cysteines as possible Nav1.5 palmitoylation substrates. A mutation of one of these is associated with cardiac arrhythmia (C981F), induces a significant enhancement of channel closed-state inactivation and ablates sensitivity to depalmitoylation. Our data indicate that alterations in palmitoylation can substantially control Nav1.5 function and cardiac excitability and this form of post-translational modification is likely an important contributor to acquired and congenital arrhythmias. PMID:27337590

  10. Online cardiac arrhythmia classification by means of circle maps analysis implemented on an intelligent miniaturized sensor.

    PubMed

    Schiek, Michael; Schlösser, Mario; Schnitzer, Andreas; Ying, Hong

    2008-01-01

    The intermittent occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias like e.g. atrial fibrillation hampers their diagnosis and hence the treatment. Since persons suffering from atrial fibrillation are known to have a remarkable increased risk of stroke the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is a matter of great importance. Easy and comfortable to use long term ECG recording systems capable of online arrhythmia classification might help to solve this problem. We developed an intelligent, miniaturized, and wireless networking sensor which allows lossless local data recordings up to 4 GB. With its outer dimensions of 20mm per rim and less than 15g of weight including the Lithium-Ion battery our modular designed sensor node is thoroughly capable of up to eight channel recordings with 8 kHz sample rate each and provides sufficient computational power for online digital signal processing. For online arrhythmia classification we will record one ECG channel and 3-axis accelerometer data with 512 Hz each, the later being used for activity classification based artifact identification. We adapted our recently developed circle maps analysis of short term heart rate variation to run on this miniaturized intelligent sensor powered by the Texas Instruments MSP430 microcontroller derivate F1611. With this configuration we started to evaluate the cardiac arrhythmia classification in long term ECG recordings. PMID:19162988

  11. Cardiac arrhythmia detection using combination of heart rate variability analyses and PUCK analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahananto, Faizal; Igasaki, Tomohiko; Murayama, Nobuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents cardiac arrhythmia detection using the combination of a heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and a "potential of unbalanced complex kinetics" (PUCK) analysis. Detection performance was improved by adding features extracted from the PUCK analysis. Initially, R-R interval data were extracted from the original electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and were cut into small segments and marked as either normal or arrhythmia. HRV analyses then were conducted using the segmented R-R interval data, including a time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and nonlinear analysis. In addition to the HRV analysis, PUCK analysis, which has been implemented successfully in a foreign exchange market series to characterize change, was employed. A decision-tree algorithm was applied to all of the obtained features for classification. The proposed method was tested using the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and had an overall classification accuracy of 91.73%. After combining features obtained from the PUCK analysis, the overall accuracy increased to 92.91%. Therefore, we suggest that the use of a PUCK analysis in conjunction with HRV analysis might improve performance accuracy for the detection of cardiac arrhythmia.

  12. Distributive shock, cardiac arrhythmias and multiple organ failure following surgery of a fourth ventricular epidermoid.

    PubMed

    Bercker, Sven; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Laudi, Sven; Renner, Christof

    2016-03-31

    A 33-years-old male patient presented with cardiac arrhythmias, acute shock and multiple organ dysfunction after the surgical removal of a massive epidermoid posterior to the brainstem. The patient initially presented with paraesthesia along the right C6 dermatome due to a big tumour at the brain stem. Surgical removal was performed without adverse events and he was transferred to our intensive care unit (ICU) immediately after the operation. Though initially showing a stable postsurgical course he developed cardiac arrhythmias and a state of acute distributive shock with consecutive multi organ failure. Extensive diagnostic measures could not identify a specific cause for this rapid deterioration. However, under carefully monitored symptomatic therapy the patient improved quickly, was extubated 72 h after admission and discharged from the ICU 6 days later. The follow-up did not show any persisting neurological deficits and no evidence of a residual tumour in the MRI-study.

  13. Electrocardiographic Presentation, Cardiac Arrhythmias, and Their Management in β-Thalassemia Major Patients.

    PubMed

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; Papa, Andrea Antonio; Nigro, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    Beta-thalassemia major (β-TM) is a genetic hemoglobin disorder characterized by an absent synthesis of globin chains that are essential for hemoglobin formation, causing chronic hemolytic anemia. Clinical management of thalassemia major consists in regular long-life red blood cell transfusions and iron chelation therapy to remove iron introduced in excess with transfusions. Iron deposition in combination with inflammatory and immunogenic factors is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in these patients. Heart failure and arrhythmias, caused by myocardial siderosis, are the most important life-limiting complications of iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients. Cardiac complications are responsible for 71% of global death in the beta-thalassemia major patients. The aim of this review was to describe the most frequent electrocardiographic abnormalities and arrhythmias observed in β-TM patients, analyzing their prognostic impact and current treatment strategies.

  14. Renal denervation for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias: state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Hilbert, Sebastian; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinberg, Jonathan S; Bollmann, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    It has now been more than a quarter of a century since modulation of the sympathetic nervous system was proposed for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias of different origins. But it has also been some time since some of the early surgical attempts have been abandoned. With the development of ablation techniques, however, new approaches and targets have been recently introduced that have revolutionized our way of thinking about sympathetic modulation. Renal nerve ablation technology is now being successfully used for the treatment of resistant hypertension, but the indication spectrum might broaden and new therapeutic options might arise in the near future. This review focuses on the possible impact of renal sympathetic system modulation on cardiac arrhythmias, the current evidence supporting this approach, and the ongoing trials of this method in electrophysiological laboratories. We will discuss the potential roles that sympathetic modulation may play in the future.

  15. Cardiac Mechano-Gated Ion Channels and Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Peyronnet, Rémi; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Kohl, Peter

    2016-01-22

    Mechanical forces will have been omnipresent since the origin of life, and living organisms have evolved mechanisms to sense, interpret, and respond to mechanical stimuli. The cardiovascular system in general, and the heart in particular, is exposed to constantly changing mechanical signals, including stretch, compression, bending, and shear. The heart adjusts its performance to the mechanical environment, modifying electrical, mechanical, metabolic, and structural properties over a range of time scales. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially and are, thus, maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Although mechanosensitivity of heart rhythm has been described in the medical literature for over a century, its molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Thanks to modern biophysical and molecular technologies, the roles of mechanical forces in cardiac biology are being explored in more detail, and detailed mechanisms of mechanotransduction have started to emerge. Mechano-gated ion channels are cardiac mechanoreceptors. They give rise to mechano-electric feedback, thought to contribute to normal function, disease development, and, potentially, therapeutic interventions. In this review, we focus on acute mechanical effects on cardiac electrophysiology, explore molecular candidates underlying observed responses, and discuss their pharmaceutical regulation. From this, we identify open research questions and highlight emerging technologies that may help in addressing them.

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes as models for cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Maaike; Mummery, Christine L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Verkerk, Arie O.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In younger patients, the majority of sudden cardiac deaths have an underlying Mendelian genetic cause. Over the last 15 years, enormous progress has been made in identifying the distinct clinical phenotypes and in studying the basic cellular and genetic mechanisms associated with the primary Mendelian (monogenic) arrhythmia syndromes. Investigation of the electrophysiological consequences of an ion channel mutation is ideally done in the native cardiomyocyte (CM) environment. However, the majority of such studies so far have relied on heterologous expression systems in which single ion channel genes are expressed in non-cardiac cells. In some cases, transgenic mouse models have been generated, but these also have significant shortcomings, primarily related to species differences. The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) has generated much interest since it presents an opportunity to generate patient- and disease-specific cell lines from which normal and diseased human CMs can be obtained These genetically diverse human model systems can be studied in vitro and used to decipher mechanisms of disease and identify strategies and reagents for new therapies. Here, we review the present state of the art with respect to cardiac disease models already generated using IPSC technology and which have been (partially) characterized. Human iPSC (hiPSC) models have been described for the cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including LQT1, LQT2, LQT3-Brugada Syndrome, LQT8/Timothy syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In most cases, the hiPSC-derived cardiomyoctes recapitulate the disease phenotype and have already provided opportunities for novel insight into cardiac pathophysiology. It is expected that the lines will be useful in the development of pharmacological agents for the management of these disorders. PMID

  17. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  18. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node (SAN) dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart. Subsequently, these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system. Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias. For example, SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker. On the other hand, conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies, including defibrillation and tissue ablation. However, drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects. Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias, even with well developed technology, still face inadequacies, limitations, hardware complications, and other challenges. Therefore, scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy. In particular, cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart, cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac arrhythmias. This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field. PMID:22783301

  19. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis. PMID:26379761

  20. A Real-Time Cardiac Arrhythmia Classification System with Wearable Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wei, Hongxing; Chen, Youdong; Tan, Jindong

    2012-01-01

    Long term continuous monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) in a free living environment provides valuable information for prevention on the heart attack and other high risk diseases. This paper presents the design of a real-time wearable ECG monitoring system with associated cardiac arrhythmia classification algorithms. One of the striking advantages is that ECG analog front-end and on-node digital processing are designed to remove most of the noise and bias. In addition, the wearable sensor node is able to monitor the patient's ECG and motion signal in an unobstructive way. To realize the real-time medical analysis, the ECG is digitalized and transmitted to a smart phone via Bluetooth. On the smart phone, the ECG waveform is visualized and a novel layered hidden Markov model is seamlessly integrated to classify multiple cardiac arrhythmias in real time. Experimental results demonstrate that the clean and reliable ECG waveform can be captured in multiple stressed conditions and the real-time classification on cardiac arrhythmia is competent to other workbenches. PMID:23112746

  1. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest.

    PubMed

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis.

  2. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C

    2015-12-31

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease for treatment of arrhythmias.

  3. Arrhythmias and Cardiac Bedside Monitoring in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sherri L

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac physiology is unique in neonates and infants; there are several physiologic changes that occur in the first weeks of life. Important changes can be captured on the bedside monitor and provide vital data in a noninvasive way to providers. The importance of diligent observation cannot be overstated. Bedside monitoring has improved in the last decade, which has enhanced the ability to detect changes in heart rates and rhythms. The purpose here is to review cardiac physiology, describe those arrhythmias able to be observed on bedside monitors, and highlight heart rate changes that can be early signs of sepsis. PMID:27484664

  4. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:26729106

  5. Sudden infant death syndrome caused by cardiac arrhythmias: only a matter of genes encoding ion channels?

    PubMed

    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Campuzano, Oscar; Cesar, Sergi; Iglesias, Anna; Fernandez, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome is the unexpected demise of a child younger than 1 year of age which remains unexplained after a complete autopsy investigation. Usually, it occurs during sleep, in males, and during the first 12 weeks of life. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the death is unknown, and the lethal episode is considered multifactorial. However, in cases without a conclusive post-mortem diagnosis, suspicious of cardiac arrhythmias may also be considered as a cause of death, especially in families suffering from any cardiac disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review current understanding of sudden infant death, focusing on genetic causes leading to lethal cardiac arrhythmias, considering both genes encoding ion channels as well as structural proteins due to recent association of channelopathies and desmosomal genes. We support a comprehensive analysis of all genes associated with sudden cardiac death in families suffering of infant death. It allows the identification of the most plausible cause of death but also of family members at risk, providing cardiologists with essential data to adopt therapeutic preventive measures in families affected with this lethal entity.

  6. Carbon monoxide exposure enhances arrhythmia after cardiac stress: involvement of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    André, Lucas; Gouzi, Fares; Thireau, Jérôme; Meyer, Gregory; Boissiere, Julien; Delage, Martine; Abdellaoui, Aldja; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacampagne, Alain; Obert, Philippe; Reboul, Cyril; Fauconnier, Jérémy; Hayot, Maurice; Richard, Sylvain; Cazorla, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Arrhythmias following cardiac stress are a key predictor of death in healthy population. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous pollutant promoting oxidative stress and associated with hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and cardiac mortality. We investigated the effect of chronic CO exposure on the occurrence of arrhythmic events after a cardiac stress test and the possible involvement of related oxidative stress. Wistar rats exposed chronically (4 weeks) to sustained urban CO pollution presented more arrhythmic events than controls during recovery after cardiac challenge with isoprenaline in vivo. Sudden death occurred in 22% of CO-exposed rats versus 0% for controls. Malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of lipid peroxidation, was increased in left ventricular tissue of CO-exposed rats. Cardiomyocytes isolated from CO-exposed rats showed higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (measured with MitoSox Red dye), higher diastolic Ca(2+) resulting from SR calcium leak and an higher occurrence of irregular Ca(2+) transients (measured with Indo-1) in comparison to control cells after a high pacing sequence. Acute treatment with a ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine, 20 mmol/L, 1 h) prevented this sequence of alterations and decreased the number of arrhythmic cells following high pacing. Chronic CO exposure promotes oxidative stress that alters Ca(2+) homeostasis (through RYR2 and SERCA defects) and thereby mediates the triggering of ventricular arrhythmia after cardiac stress that can lead to sudden death.

  7. Potassium-channel mutations and cardiac arrhythmias--diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Giudicessi, John R; Ackerman, Michael J

    2012-01-31

    The coordinated generation and propagation of action potentials within cardiomyocytes creates the intrinsic electrical stimuli that are responsible for maintaining the electromechanical pump function of the human heart. The synchronous opening and closing of cardiac Na(+), Ca(2+), and K(+) channels corresponds with the activation and inactivation of inward depolarizing (Na(+) and Ca(2+)) and outward repolarizing (K(+)) currents that underlie the various phases of the cardiac action potential (resting, depolarization, plateau, and repolarization). Inherited mutations in pore-forming α subunits and accessory β subunits of cardiac K(+) channels can perturb the atrial and ventricular action potential and cause various cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and familial atrial fibrillation. In this Review, we summarize the current understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie K(+)-channel-mediated arrhythmia syndromes. We also describe translational advances that have led to the emerging role of genetic testing and genotype-specific therapy in the diagnosis and clinical management of individuals who harbor pathogenic mutations in genes that encode α or β subunits of cardiac K(+) channels.

  8. Electrical heart disease: Genetic and molecular basis of cardiac arrhythmias in normal structural hearts.

    PubMed

    Farwell, David; Gollob, Michael H

    2007-08-01

    Purely electrical heart diseases, defined by the absence of any structural cardiac defects, are responsible for a large number of sudden, unexpected deaths in otherwise healthy, young individuals. These conditions include the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and the short QT syndrome. Collectively, these conditions have been referred to as channelopathies. Ion channels provide the molecular basis for cardiac electrical activity. These channels have specific ion selectivity and are responsible for the precise and timely regulation of the passage of charged ions across the cell membrane in myocytes, and the summation of their activity in cardiac muscle defines the surface electrocardiogram. Impairment in the flow of these ions in heart cells may mean the difference between a normal, prosperous life and the tragedy of a sudden, unexpected death due to ventricular arrhythmia. The present paper reviews the current clinical and molecular understanding of the electrical diseases of the heart associated with sudden cardiac death.

  9. Challenges of genetic testing in adolescents with cardiac arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lilian Liou; Stolerman, Marina; Walsh, Christine; Wasserman, David; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2012-03-01

    The ability to sequence individual genomes is leading to the identification of an increasing number of genetic risk factors for serious diseases. Knowledge of these risk factors can often provide significant medical and psychological benefit, but also raises complex ethical and social issues. This paper focuses on one area of rapid progress: the identification of mutations causing long QT syndrome and other cardiac channel disorders, which can explain some previously unexplained deaths in infants (SIDS) and children and adults (SUDS) and prevent others from occurring. This genetic knowledge, discovered posthumously in many cases, has implications for clinical care for surviving family members who might carry the same mutations. The information obtained from genetic testing, in the context of personal and family history, can guide individually tailored interventions that reduce risk and save lives. At the same time, obtaining and disclosing genetic information raises difficult issues about confidentiality and decision making within families. We draw on the experience of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cardiogenetics, which has played a leading role in the genetic diagnosis and clinical management of cardiac channel diseases, to explore some of the challenging ethical questions arising in affected families with adolescent children. We focus on the related issues of (1) family confidentiality, privacy and disclosure and (2) adolescent decision making about genetic risk, and argue for the value of interdisciplinary dialogue with affected families in resolving these issues.

  10. Challenges of genetic testing in adolescents with cardiac arrhythmia syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lilian Liou; Stolerman, Marina; Walsh, Christine; Wasserman, David; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2011-01-01

    The ability to sequence individual genomes is leading to the identification of an increasing number of genetic risk factors for serious diseases. Knowledge of these risk factors can often provide significant medical and psychological benefit, but also raises complex ethical and social issues. This paper focuses on one area of rapid progress: the identification of mutations causing long QT syndrome and other cardiac channel disorders, which can explain some previously unexplained deaths in infants (SIDS) and children and adults (SUDS) and prevent others from occurring. This genetic knowledge, discovered posthumously in many cases, has implications for clinical care for surviving family members who might carry the same mutations. The information obtained from genetic testing, in the context of personal and family history, can guide individually tailored interventions that reduce risk and save lives. At the same time, obtaining and disclosing genetic information raises difficult issues about confidentiality and decision making within families. We draw on the experience of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cardiogenetics, which has played a leading role in the genetic diagnosis and clinical management of cardiac channel diseases, to explore some of the challenging ethical questions arising in affected families with adolescent children. We focus on the related issues of (1) family confidentiality, privacy and disclosure and (2) adolescent decision making about genetic risk, and argue for the value of interdisciplinary dialogue with affected families in resolving these issues. PMID:21955955

  11. Non-invasive cardiac mapping in clinical practice: Application to the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Rémi; Shah, Ashok J; Hocini, Mélèze; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Cochet, Hubert; Sacher, Frédéric; Bear, Laura; Duchateau, Josselin; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) started to demonstrate its efficiency in clinical settings. The initial application to localize focal ventricular arrhythmias such as ventricular premature beats was probably the easiest to challenge and validates the concept. Our clinical experience in using this non-invasive mapping technique to identify the sources of electrical disorders and guide catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats) and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) is described here.

  12. The pioneering work of George Mines on cardiac arrhythmias: groundbreaking ideas that remain influential in contemporary cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Martin; Nattel, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    George Mines was a pioneering physiologist who, despite an extremely short period of professional activity and only primitive experimental methodology, succeeded in formulating concepts that continue to be of great influence today. Here, we review some of his most important discoveries and their impact on contemporary concepts and clinical practice. Mines' greatest contribution was his conceptualization and characterization of circus movement reentry. His observations and ideas about the basis for cardiac reentrant activity underlie how we understand and manage a wide range of important clinical rhythm disturbances today. The notions he introduced regarding the influence of premature extrastimuli on reentry (termination, resetting and entrainment) are central to contemporary assessment of arrhythmia mechanisms in clinical electrophysiology laboratories and modern device therapy of cardiac tachyarrhythmias. Refinements of his model of reentry have led to sophisticated biophysical theories of the mechanisms underlying cardiac fibrillation. His seminal observations on the influence of electrolyte derangements and autonomic tone on the heart are relevant to our understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of arrhythmias caused by cardiac pathology. In this era of advanced technology, it is important to appreciate that ideas of lasting impact come from great minds and do not necessarily require great tools.

  13. Cardiac BIN1 folds T-tubule membrane, controlling ion flux and limiting arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Hong, TingTing; Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cho, Hee Cheol; Kalashnikova, Mariya; Sun, Baiming; Zhang, Hao; Bhargava, Anamika; Grabe, Michael; Olgin, Jeffrey; Gorelik, Julia; Marbán, Eduardo; Jan, Lily Y; Shaw, Robin M

    2014-06-01

    Cardiomyocyte T tubules are important for regulating ion flux. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a T-tubule protein associated with calcium channel trafficking that is downregulated in failing hearts. Here we find that cardiac T tubules normally contain dense protective inner membrane folds that are formed by a cardiac isoform of BIN1. In mice with cardiac Bin1 deletion, T-tubule folding is decreased, which does not change overall cardiomyocyte morphology but leads to free diffusion of local extracellular calcium and potassium ions, prolonging action-potential duration and increasing susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also found that T-tubule inner folds are rescued by expression of the BIN1 isoform BIN1+13+17, which promotes N-WASP-dependent actin polymerization to stabilize the T-tubule membrane at cardiac Z discs. BIN1+13+17 recruits actin to fold the T-tubule membrane, creating a 'fuzzy space' that protectively restricts ion flux. When the amount of the BIN1+13+17 isoform is decreased, as occurs in acquired cardiomyopathy, T-tubule morphology is altered, and arrhythmia can result. PMID:24836577

  14. Human sinus arrhythmia as an index of vagal cardiac outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The human central vagal mechanisms were investigated by measuring the intervals between heartbeats during controlled breathing (at breathing intervals of 2.5-10 s and nominal tidal volumes of 1000 and 1500 ml) in six young men and women. It was found that as the breathing interval increased, the longest heart periods became longer, the shortest heart periods became shorter, and the peak-valley P-P intervals increased asymptotically. Peak-valley intervals also increased in proportion to tidal volume, although this influence was small. The phase angles between heart period changes and respiration were found to vary as linear functions of breathing interval. Heart period shortening began in inspiration at short breathing intervals and in expiration at long breathing intervals, while heart period lengthening began in early expiration at all breathing intervals studied. It is concluded that a close relationship exists between variations of respiratory depth and interval and the quantity, periodicity, and timing of vagal cardiac outflow in conscious humans. The results indicate that at usual breathing rates, phasic respiration-related changes of vagal motoneuron activity begin in expiration, progress slowly, and are incompletely expressed at fast breathing ratges.

  15. Automatic recognition of cardiac arrhythmias based on the geometric patterns of Poincaré plots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Guo, Tianci; Xi, Bin; Fan, Yang; Wang, Kun; Bi, Jiacheng; Wang, Ying

    2015-02-01

    The Poincaré plot emerges as an effective tool for assessing cardiovascular autonomic regulation. It displays nonlinear characteristics of heart rate variability (HRV) from electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings and gives a global view of the long range of ECG signals. In the telemedicine or computer-aided diagnosis system, it would offer significant auxiliary information for diagnosis if the patterns of the Poincaré plots can be automatically classified. Therefore, we developed an automatic classification system to distinguish five geometric patterns of the Poincaré plots from four types of cardiac arrhythmias. The statistics features are designed on measurements and an ensemble classifier of three types of neural networks is proposed. Aiming at the difficulty to set a proper threshold for classifying the multiple categories, the threshold selection strategy is analyzed. 24 h ECG monitoring recordings from 674 patients, which have four types of cardiac arrhythmias, are adopted for recognition. For comparison, Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers with linear and Gaussian kernels are also applied. The experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the extracted features and the better performance of the designed classifier. Our study can be applied to diagnose the corresponding sinus rhythm and arrhythmia substrates disease automatically in the telemedicine and computer-aided diagnosis system.

  16. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator Treatment in a Child with Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Ju; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new treatment for refractory heart failure. However, most patients with heart failure treated with CRT are adults, middle-aged or older with idiopathic or ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. We treated a 12-year-old boy, who was transferred after cardiac arrest, with dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle-branch block, and ventricular tachycardia. We performed cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). After CRT-D, left ventricular ejection fraction improved from 22% to 44% assessed by echocardiogram 1 year postoperatively. On electrocardiogram, QRS duration was shortened from 206 to 144 ms. The patient’s clinical symptoms also improved. For pediatric patients with refractory heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia, CRT-D could be indicated as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:27525239

  17. Diagnostic value of magnetocardiography in coronary artery disease and cardiac arrhythmias: a review of clinical data.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Joey S W; Leithäuser, Boris; Park, Jai-Wun; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2013-09-01

    Despite the availability of several advanced non-invasive diagnostic tests such as echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging, electrocardiography (ECG) remains as the most widely used diagnostic technique in clinical cardiology. ECG detects electrical potentials that are generated by cardiac electrical activity. In addition to electrical potentials, the same electrical activity of the heart also induces magnetic fields. These extremely weak cardiac magnetic signals are detected by a non-invasive, contactless technique called magnetocardiography (MCG), which has been evaluated in a number of clinical studies for its usefulness in diagnosing heart diseases. We reviewed the basic principles, history and clinical data on the diagnostic role of MCG in coronary artery disease and cardiac arrhythmias.

  18. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator Treatment in a Child with Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Ju; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new treatment for refractory heart failure. However, most patients with heart failure treated with CRT are adults, middle-aged or older with idiopathic or ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. We treated a 12-year-old boy, who was transferred after cardiac arrest, with dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle-branch block, and ventricular tachycardia. We performed cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). After CRT-D, left ventricular ejection fraction improved from 22% to 44% assessed by echocardiogram 1 year postoperatively. On electrocardiogram, QRS duration was shortened from 206 to 144 ms. The patient's clinical symptoms also improved. For pediatric patients with refractory heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia, CRT-D could be indicated as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:27525239

  19. Cardiac arrhythmias as the initial manifestation of adult primary Sjögren's syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liang, Minrui; Bao, Liwen; Xiong, Nanqing; Jin, Bo; Ni, Huanchun; Zhang, Jinjin; Zou, Hejian; Luo, Xinping; Li, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Two middle-aged female patients presenting with heart palpitation and electrocardiogram revealed complex cardiac arrhythmias. A review of systems was positive for dry mouth and transient arthralgia, while laboratory and instrumental tests enabled us to make the diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Cardiac electrophysiology revealed atrioventricular node dysfunction and impaired intraventricular conduction. Prednisone therapy induced a significant improvement in symptoms and electrocardiographic readings. The diagnosis of pSS should be considered in a patient presenting with complex cardiac arrhythmias.

  20. Alk7 Depleted Mice Exhibit Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Are Predisposed to Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shaozhen; Cao, Hong; Hu, He; Wang, Xin; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK7) in regulating cardiac electrophysiology. Here, we showed that Alk7-/- mice exhibited prolonged QT intervals in telemetry ECG recordings. Furthermore, Langendorff-perfused Alk7-/- hearts had significantly longer action potential duration (APD) and greater incidence of ventricular arrhythmia (AV) induced by burst pacing. Using whole-cell patch clamp, we found that the densities of repolarizing K+ currents Ito and IK1 were profoundly reduced in Alk7-/- ventricular cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, the expression of Kv4.2 (a major subunit of Ito carrying channel) and KCHIP2 (a key accessory subunit of Ito carrying channel), was markedly decreased in Alk7-/- hearts. These findings suggest that endogenous expression of ALK7 is necessary to maintain repolarizing K+ currents in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and finally prevent action potential prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:26882027

  1. Ranolazine: Electrophysiologic Effect, Efficacy, and Safety in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shenasa, Mohammad; Assadi, Hamid; Heidary, Shahriar; Shenasa, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Ranolazine is currently approved as an antianginal agent in patients with chronic angina (class IIA). Ranolazine exhibits antiarrhythmic effects that are related to its multichannel blocking effect, predominantly inhibition of late sodium (late INa) current and the rapid potassium rectifier current (IKr), as well as ICa, late ICa, and INa-Ca. It also suppresses the early and delayed after depolarizations. Ranolazine is effective in the suppression of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias (off-label use) without significant proarrhythmic effect. Currently, ongoing trials are evaluating the efficacy and safety of ranolazine in patients with cardiac arrhythmias; preliminary results suggest that ranolazine, when used alone or in combination with dronedarone, is safe and effective in reducing atrial fibrillation. Ranolazine is not currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an antiarrhythmic agent. PMID:27261835

  2. Can we protect from malignant arrhythmias by modulation of cardiac cell-to-cell coupling?

    PubMed

    Tribulova, Narcis; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Benova, Tamara; Viczenczova, Csilla

    2015-01-01

    Defects in intercellular coupling in the heart play a key role in the initiation and persistence of malignant arrhythmias. Such disorders result from abnormal expression and distribution of connexins, the major constituents of cardiac gap junction channels. The alterations of myocardial connexin are well established as a consistent feature of both human and animal heart disease and aging. Following these facts, the modulation of connexin mediated intercellular coupling is suggested as a new antiarrhythmic approach. This review provides recent data supporting this concept. It can be challenging for the development of new antiarrhythmic drugs. Moreover, findings point out the implication of some endogenous compounds in protection from life-threatening arrhythmias via preservation of myocardial connexin. PMID:25732099

  3. [Pharmacotherapy of cardiac arrhythmias in women--what do we know, do we have a choice?].

    PubMed

    Klocek, Marek; Skrzek, Agnieszka; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents basic epidemiological, electrophysiological and therapeutical differences of cardiac arrhythmias depended on gender. Inadequate sinus tachycardia, orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia are more common in women as well as prolongation of QT interval and proarrhythmic phenomenon (especially torsade de pointes). Atrial fibrillation, although significantly less common in women, is more onerous, therapeutic aims are worse to achieve and outcomes are less favourable than in men. European guidelines do not recommend different pharmacological treatement of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias in relation to gender. Older antyarrhythmic drugs (beta-adrenolytics, amiodarone, sotalol) and as well as newer ones (dronedarone, ivabradine, vernakalant and ranolazine) seem to have the same influence on arrthythmias both in men and women, althouth their long-term safety may be different and depend on influence on QT interval. The paper presents the state of the art of antiarrhythmic drugs that might be prefered among woman in different clinical situations.

  4. [The use of helium-neon laser in drug-resistant cardiac arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Gel'fgat, E B; Abdullaev, R F; Babaev, Z M; Musabekov, S Sh

    1992-02-01

    Out of 85 patients with cardiac arrhythmias in the presence of chronic coronary heart disease, 28 who were resistant to ethacisine and allapinine were included into the study. They had frequent and persistent arrhythmias. The patients were divided into 2 groups: (1) the patients receiving intravenous He-Ne laser therapy in combination with one of the above drugs; (n = 17) and (2) those taking He-Ne laser therapy alone (n = 11). The efficacy of the therapies were controlled by 24-hour monitoring. An antiarrhythmic effect was more frequently observed when He-Ne laser was combined with one of the above drugs than when it was given alone (67.4 and 36.3%, respectively). PMID:1527940

  5. Cardiac arrhythmias in obstructive sleep apnea (from the Akershus Sleep Apnea Project).

    PubMed

    Namtvedt, Silje K; Randby, Anna; Einvik, Gunnar; Hrubos-Strøm, Harald; Somers, Virend K; Røsjø, Helge; Omland, Torbjørn

    2011-10-15

    Increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias has been reported in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but this may not be generalizable to patients from the general population with a milder form of the condition. The aim of this study was to assess the association between cardiac arrhythmias and OSA of mainly mild and moderate severity. In total, 486 subjects (mean age 49 years, 55% men) recruited from a population-based study in Norway underwent polysomnography for OSA assessment and Holter recordings for arrhythmia assessment. Of these, 271 patients were diagnosed with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥5, median AHI 16.8, quartiles 1 to 3 8.9 to 32.6). Mean nadir oxygen saturations were 82% and 89% in patients with and without OSA, respectively. Ventricular premature complexes (≥5/hour) were more prevalent in subjects with OSA compared to subjects without OSA (median AHI 1.4, quartiles 1 to 3 0.5 to 3.0) during the night (12.2% vs 4.7%, p = 0.005) and day (14% vs 5.1%, p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis after adjusting for relevant confounders, AHI was independently associated with an increased prevalence of ventricular premature complexes at night (odds ratio per 1-U increase of log-transformed AHI 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p = 0.008) and during the day (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.8, p = 0.035). In conclusion, the prevalence of ventricular premature complexes is increased in middle-aged patients with mainly mild or moderate OSA, suggesting an association between OSA and ventricular arrhythmias even in mild OSA.

  6. ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulators and cardiac arrhythmias: an update.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Danina M; Kiss, Loránd; Jost, Norbert; Baczko, István

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia and heart failure-related cardiac arrhythmias, both atrial (e.g., atrial fibrillation) and ventricular (e.g., malignant tachyarrhythmias) represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the progress made in the last decade in understanding their pathophysiological mechanisms there is still an unmet need for safer and more efficacious pharmacological treatment, especially when considering the drawbacks and complications of implantable devices. Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium channels located in the sarcolemmal membrane (sarcKATP) and the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP) have emerged as crucial controllers of several key cellular functions. In the past three decades a tremendous amount of research led to their structural and functional characterization unveiling both a protective role in cardiac adaptive responses to metabolic stress and a seemingly paradoxical role in promoting as well as protecting against atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. On the other hand, several KATP inhibitors have emerged as potential ischemia selective antiarrhythmic drugs. In this respect, cardioselective, chamber specific and combined sarcKATP and mitoKATP modulators currently represent a promising field for drug development.

  7. Remodeling of cardiac passive electrical properties and susceptibility to ventricular and atrial arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Dhein, Stefan; Seidel, Thomas; Salameh, Aida; Jozwiak, Joanna; Hagen, Anja; Kostelka, Martin; Hindricks, Gerd; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated electrical activation of the heart is essential for the maintenance of a regular cardiac rhythm and effective contractions. Action potentials spread from one cell to the next via gap junction channels. Because of the elongated shape of cardiomyocytes, longitudinal resistivity is lower than transverse resistivity causing electrical anisotropy. Moreover, non-uniformity is created by clustering of gap junction channels at cell poles and by non-excitable structures such as collagenous strands, vessels or fibroblasts. Structural changes in cardiac disease often affect passive electrical properties by increasing non-uniformity and altering anisotropy. This disturbs normal electrical impulse propagation and is, consequently, a substrate for arrhythmia. However, to investigate how these structural changes lead to arrhythmias remains a challenge. One important mechanism, which may both cause and prevent arrhythmia, is the mismatch between current sources and sinks. Propagation of the electrical impulse requires a sufficient source of depolarizing current. In the case of a mismatch, the activated tissue (source) is not able to deliver enough depolarizing current to trigger an action potential in the non-activated tissue (sink). This eventually leads to conduction block. It has been suggested that in this situation a balanced geometrical distribution of gap junctions and reduced gap junction conductance may allow successful propagation. In contrast, source-sink mismatch can prevent spontaneous arrhythmogenic activity in a small number of cells from spreading over the ventricle, especially if gap junction conductance is enhanced. Beside gap junctions, cell geometry and non-cellular structures strongly modulate arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The present review elucidates these and other implications of passive electrical properties for cardiac rhythm and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25404918

  8. Downregulation of connexin43 by microRNA-130a in cardiomyocytes results in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Osbourne, Appledene; Calway, Tyler; Broman, Michael; McSharry, Saoirse; Earley, Judy; Kim, Gene H

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as critical regulators of diverse physiological and pathological processes; however, studies of miRNAs and arrhythmogenesis remain sparse. Connexin43 (Cx43), a major cardiac gap junction protein, has elicited great interest in its role in arrhythmias. Additionally, Cx43 was a potential target for miR-130a as predicted by several computational algorithms. This study investigates the effect of miR-130a overexpression in the adult heart and its effect on cardiac rhythm. Using a cardiac-specific inducible system, transgenic mice demonstrated both atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. We performed ventricular-programmed electrical stimulation and found that the αMHC-miR130a mice developed sustained ventricular tachycardia beginning 6weeks after overexpression. Western blot analysis demonstrated a steady decline in Cx43 after 2weeks of overexpression with over a 90% reduction in Cx43 levels by 10weeks. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed a near complete loss of Cx43 throughout the heart. To validate Cx43 as a direct target of miR-130a, we performed in vitro target assays in 3T3 fibroblasts and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, both known to endogenously express miR-130a. Using a luciferase reporter fused to the 3'UTR of Cx43, we found a 52.9% reduction in luciferase activity in 3T3 cells (p<0.0001) and a 47.6% reduction in HL-1 cells (p=0.0056) compared to controls. Addition of an antisense miR-130a inhibitor resulted in a loss of inhibitory activity of the Cx43 3'UTR reporter. We have identified an unappreciated role for miR-130a as a direct regulator of Cx43. Overexpression of miR-130a may contribute importantly to gap junction remodeling and to the pathogenesis of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  9. Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Canziani, M E; Saragoça, M A; Draibe, S A; Barbieri, A; Ajzen, H

    1993-01-01

    In order to evaluate the risk factors for the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias (VA) in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), we studied 47 patients by echocardiography, dipyridamole-thallium tests, and biochemical profile. We observed that the group with VA had a greater cardiac mass index dependent only on an increased left ventricular internal diameter. Septum and posterior wall thickness, as well as biochemical variables, were not associated with the presence of VA in CAPD patients. In addition, altered myocardial perfusion was not associated with VA in these patients. PMID:8399625

  10. Children and Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ...

  11. Treating Arrhythmias in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ...

  12. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  13. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-06-15

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure.

  14. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged <65 (1.08 % [0.17, 2.00 %]) than among those aged ≥65 (1.02 % [0.06, 1.99 %]). Cardiac arrest was inversely related with temperature (1.61 % [0.46, 2.79 %]), while other cardiac arrhythmias depended more on the change in DTR (4.72 % [0.37, 9.26 %]). These findings provide evidence that low-temperature and elevated DTR influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  15. The pathology and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias: focus on atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Constanze; Kisselbach, Jana; Schweizer, Patrick A; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequently encountered sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Effective treatment of AF still remains an unmet medical need. Treatment of AF is based on drug therapy and ablative strategies. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is limited by a relatively high recurrence rate and proarrhythmic side effects. Catheter ablation suppresses paroxysmal AF in the majority of patients without structural heart disease but is more difficult to achieve in patients with persistent AF or with concomitant cardiac disease. Stroke is a potentially devastating complication of AF, requiring anticoagulation that harbors the risk of bleeding. In search of novel treatment modalities, targeted pharmacological treatment and gene therapy offer the potential for greater selectivity than conventional small-molecule or interventional approaches. This paper summarizes the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying AF. Established drug therapy and interventional treatment of AF is reviewed, and emerging clinical and experimental therapeutic approaches are highlighted. PMID:21490945

  16. Cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms in rats with heart failure induced by pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Stones, Rachel; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Benson, Alan P.; Yang, Zhaokang; Cassan, Cecile; Gilbert, Stephen H.; Saint, David A.; Cazorla, Olivier; Steele, Derek S.; Bernus, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension provokes right heart failure and arrhythmias. Better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these arrhythmias is needed to facilitate new therapeutic approaches for the hypertensive, failing right ventricle (RV). The aim of our study was to identify the mechanisms generating arrhythmias in a model of RV failure induced by pulmonary hypertension. Rats were injected with monocrotaline to induce either RV hypertrophy or failure or with saline (control). ECGs were measured in conscious, unrestrained animals by telemetry. In isolated hearts, electrical activity was measured by optical mapping and myofiber orientation by diffusion tensor-MRI. Sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ handling was studied in single myocytes. Compared with control animals, the T-wave of the ECG was prolonged and in three of seven heart failure animals, prominent T-wave alternans occurred. Discordant action potential (AP) alternans occurred in isolated failing hearts and Ca2+ transient alternans in failing myocytes. In failing hearts, AP duration and dispersion were increased; conduction velocity and AP restitution were steeper. The latter was intrinsic to failing single myocytes. Failing hearts had greater fiber angle disarray; this correlated with AP duration. Failing myocytes had reduced sarco(endo)plasmic reticular Ca2+-ATPase activity, increased sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+-release fraction, and increased Ca2+ spark leak. In hypertrophied hearts and myocytes, dysfunctional adaptation had begun, but alternans did not develop. We conclude that increased electrical and structural heterogeneity and dysfunctional sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ handling increased the probability of alternans, a proarrhythmic predictor of sudden cardiac death. These mechanisms are potential therapeutic targets for the correction of arrhythmias in hypertensive, failing RVs. PMID:22427523

  17. Cardiac Arrhythmia: In vivo screening in the zebrafish to overcome complexity in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Calum A.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Cardiac arrhythmias remain a major challenge for modern drug discovery. Clinical events are paroxysmal, often rare and may be asymptomatic until a highly morbid complication. Target selection is often based on limited information and though highly specific agents are identified in screening, the final efficacy is often compromised by unanticipated systemic responses, a narrow therapeutic index and substantial toxicities. Areas covered in this review Our understanding of complexity of arrhythmogenesis has grown dramatically over the last two decades, and the range of potential disease mechanisms now includes pathways previously thought only tangentially involved in arrhythmia. This review surveys the literature on arrhythmia mechanisms from 1965 to the present day, outlines the complex biology underlying potentially each and every rhythm disturbance, and highlights the problems for rational target identification. The rationale for in vivo screening is described and the utility of the zebrafish for this approach and for complementary work in functional genomics is discussed. Current limitations of the model in this setting and the need for careful validation in new disease areas are also described. What the reader will gain An overview of the complex mechanisms underlying most clinical arrhythmias, and insight into the limits of ion channel conductances as drug targets. An introduction to the zebrafish as a model organism, in particular for cardiovascular biology. Potential approaches to overcoming the hurdles to drug discovery in the face of complex biology including in vivo screening of zebrafish genetic disease models. Take home message In vivo screening in faithful disease models allows the effects of drugs on integrative physiology and disease biology to be captured during the screening process, in a manner agnostic to potential drug target or targets. This systematic strategy bypasses current gaps in our understanding of disease biology

  18. LV Dyssynchrony Is Helpful in Predicting Ventricular Arrhythmia in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Chuan; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Chiang, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Wan-Yu; Huang, Jin-Long; Hung, Guang-Uei; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For patients with coronary artery disease, larger scar burdens are associated with higher risk of ventricular arrhythmia. Left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony is associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to assess the values of LV dyssynchrony and myocardial scar assessed by myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) in predicting the development of ventricular arrhythmia in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-two patients (16 males, mean age: 66 ± 13) with irreversible ischemic cardiomyopathy received cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) for at least 12 months were enrolled for MPS. Quantitative parameters, including LV dyssynchrony with phase standard deviation (phase SD) and bandwidth, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and scar (% of total areas), were generated by Emory Cardiac Toolbox. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) recorded in the CRT device during follow-up were used as the reference standard of diagnosing ventricular arrhythmia. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed for determining the independent predictors of VT/VF and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used for generating the optimal cut-off values for predicting VT/VF. Nine (41%) of the 22 patients developed VT/VF during the follow-up periods. Patients with VT/VF had significantly lower LVEF, larger scar, larger phase SD, and larger bandwidth (all P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed LVEF and bandwidth were independent predictors of VT/VF. ROC curve analysis showed the areas under the curves were 0.71 and 0.83 for LVEF and bandwidth, respectively. The optimal cut-off values were <36% and > 139° for LVEF and bandwidth, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 100%, 39%, 53%, and 100%, respectively, for LVEF; and were 78%, 92%, 88%, and 86%, respectively, for bandwidth. LV

  19. A Field Study of the Effects of Traffic Noise on Heart Rate and Cardiac Arrhythmia During Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, N. L.; Ingham, P.; Tran, K.; Hunyor, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that traffic noise could increase heart rate, and the frequency or severity of cardiac arrhythmias in susceptible people while asleep. Physiological indicators of sleep, electrocardiograph, and respiration and blood oxygen saturation were monitored continuously overnight in seven elderly men living on a busy road. Continuous recordings of the noise outdoors, at the facade, and indoors in the bedrooms, and video recordings of the traffic were made, simultaneously with the physiological measurements. LAeq, LAmax, LApk , LA90, LA10 and LA1 were measured in each 20 s interval, and noise events exceeding 70 dB(A) outdoors and 50 dB(A) indoors for 2 s or longer were logged. Between 03:00 and 05:00 hours, 65% of the traffic consisted of heavy vehicles. With windows open slightly, indoor and outdoor noise exceeded all local, and internationally recommended criteria for adequate sleep by a wide margin. Cardiac arrhythmia occurred during sleep in four of the men. Heart rate and frequency of cardiac arrhythmia were not correlated with indoor LAeq , LApk or LA1, in stage 2, stage 4 and REM sleep. Two of the four subjects with cardiac arrhythmia showed a significant association ( p < 0·05), predominantly in stage 4 sleep, between single indoor noise events and the frequency of cardiac ectopic beats 20-40 s later.

  20. Genetic and forensic implications in epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmias: a case series.

    PubMed

    Partemi, Sara; Vidal, Monica Coll; Striano, Pasquale; Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Pezzella, Marianna; Elia, Maurizio; Parisi, Pasquale; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Casellato, Susanna; Giordano, Lucio; Mastrangelo, Massimo; Pietrafusa, Nicola; Striano, Salvatore; Zara, Federico; Bianchi, Amedeo; Buti, Daniela; La Neve, Angela; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Oliva, Antonio; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 3% of the world's population, and sudden death is a significant cause of death in this population. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) accounts for up to 17% of all these cases, which increases the rate of sudden death by 24-fold as compared to the general population. The underlying mechanisms are still not elucidated, but recent studies suggest the possibility that a common genetic channelopathy might contribute to both epilepsy and cardiac disease to increase the incidence of death via a lethal cardiac arrhythmia. We performed genetic testing in a large cohort of individuals with epilepsy and cardiac conduction disorders in order to identify genetic mutations that could play a role in the mechanism of sudden death. Putative pathogenic disease-causing mutations in genes encoding cardiac ion channel were detected in 24% of unrelated individuals with epilepsy. Segregation analysis through genetic screening of the available family members and functional studies are crucial tasks to understand and to prove the possible pathogenicity of the variant, but in our cohort, only two families were available. Despite further research should be performed to clarify the mechanism of coexistence of both clinical conditions, genetic analysis, applied also in post-mortem setting, could be very useful to identify genetic factors that predispose epileptic patients to sudden death, helping to prevent sudden death in patients with epilepsy.

  1. [Electrical cardioversion in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy--case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Marciniak, Beata; Kudlicki, Janusz; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczukz, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is estimated et 1.2 per 1000 pregnancies, usually in the third trimester and 50% of them are asymptomatic. They may appear for the first time in pregnancy or have a recurring character An important risk factor related to their appearance is the presence of structural heart disease, which complicates < 1% of pregnancies. Generally the symptoms are mild and the treatment is not necessary but in some cases pharmacotherapy is necessary Pharmacotherapy must be a compromise between the potentially adverse effects of drugs on the fetus and the beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system of the mother. Due to the development of cardiac surgery many women with heart defects reach reproductive age and become pregnant. Therefore this problem will be faced more and more often in clinical practice. In addition to pharmacological methods some cardiac arrhythmias may require urgent, life-saving procedures. External electrical cardioversion is associated with the application of certain amount of energy via two electrodes placed on the thorax. It is used to treat hemodynamically unstable supraventricular tachycardias, including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Also in hemodynamically stable patients in whom drug therapy was ineffective elective electrical cardioversion can be use to convert cardiac arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. We present a case of a 33 years old patient with congenital heart disease surgically corrected in childhood who had first incident of atrial flutter in pregnancy. Arrhytmia occured in 26th week of gestation. The patient was hemodynamically stable and did not approve electrical cardioversion as a method of treatment therefore pharmacotherapy was started. Heart rate was controled with metoprolol and digoxin, warfarin was used to anticoagulation. Calcium and potassium were also given. Described therapy did not convert atrial flutter to sinus rhythm therefore in 33rd week of gestation after patient's approval

  2. Pathogenesis of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias in Mecp2 Mutant Mice: Implication for Therapy in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Mark D.; Wang, Tiannan; Mike, Elise; Herrera, Jose; Beavers, David L.; Huang, Teng-Wei; Ward, Christopher S.; Skinner, Steven; Percy, Alan K.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (MECP2) in which 26% of deaths are sudden and of unknown cause. To explore the hypothesis that these deaths may be due to cardiac dysfunction, we characterized the electrocardiograms (ECGs) in 379 people with Rett syndrome and found that 18.5% show prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc), indicating a repolarization abnormality that can predispose to the development of an unstable fatal cardiac rhythm. Male mice lacking MeCP2 function, Mecp2Null/Y, also have prolonged QTc and show increased susceptibility to induced ventricular tachycardia. Female heterozygous null mice, Mecp2Null/+, show an age-dependent prolongation of QTc associated with ventricular tachycardia and cardiac-related death. Genetic deletion of MeCP2 function in only the nervous system was sufficient to cause long QTc and ventricular tachycardia, implicating neuronally-mediated changes to cardiac electrical conduction as a potential cause of ventricular tachycardia in Rett syndrome. The standard therapy for prolonged QTc in Rett syndrome, β-adrenergic receptor blockers, did not prevent ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. To determine whether an alternative therapy would be more appropriate, we characterized cardiomyocytes from Mecp2Null/Y mice and found increased persistent sodium current, which was normalized when cells were treated with the sodium channel-blocking anti-seizure drug phenytoin. Treatment with phenytoin reduced both QTc and sustained ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. These results demonstrate that cardiac abnormalities in Rett syndrome are secondary to abnormal nervous system control, which leads to increased persistent sodium current. Our findings suggest that treatment in people with Rett syndrome would be more effective if it targeted the increased persistent sodium current in order to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:22174313

  3. Ambient particulate air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia in a panel of older adults in Steubenville, Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, S E; Suh, H H; Coull, B A; Schwartz, J; Stone, P H; Gold, D R

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Ambient particulate air pollution has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Pathways by which particles may act involve autonomic nervous system dysfunction or inflammation, which can affect cardiac rate and rhythm. The importance of these pathways may vary by particle component or source. In an eastern US location with significant regional pollution, the authors examined the association of air pollution and odds of cardiac arrhythmia in older adults. Methods Thirty two non‐smoking older adults were evaluated on a weekly basis for 24 weeks during the summer and autumn of 2000 with a standardised 30 minute protocol that included continuous electrocardiogram measurements. A central ambient monitoring station provided daily concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5, sulfate, elemental carbon) and gases. Sulfate was used as a marker of regional pollution. The authors used logistic mixed effects regression to examine the odds of having any supraventricular ectopy (SVE) or ventricular ectopy (VE) in association with increases in air pollution for moving average pollutant concentrations up to 10 days before the health assessment. Results Participant specific mean counts of arrhythmia over the protocol varied between 0.1–363 for SVE and 0–350 for VE. The authors observed odds ratios for having SVE over the length of the protocol of 1.42 (95% CI 0.99 to 2.04), 1.70 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.57), and 1.78 (95% CI 0.95 to 3.35) for 10.0 μg/m3, 4.2 μg/m3, and 14.9 ppb increases in five day moving average PM2.5, sulfate, and ozone concentrations respectively. The other pollutants, including elemental carbon, showed no effect on arrhythmia. Participants reporting cardiovascular conditions (for example, previous myocardial infarction or hypertension) were the most susceptible to pollution induced SVE. The authors found no association of pollution with VE. Conclusion Increased levels of ambient sulfate and ozone may increase

  4. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L. Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  5. Aging is a primary risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias: disruption of intracellular Ca2+ regulation as a key suspect.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Fiona; Lancaster, Matthew K; Jones, Sandra A

    2011-08-01

    Aging is an inevitable time-dependent progression associated with a functional decline of the cardiovascular system even in 'healthy' individuals. Age positively correlates with an increasing risk of cardiac problems including arrhythmias. Not only the prevalence but also the severity of arrhythmias escalates with age. The reasons for this are multifactorial but dysregulation of intracellular calcium within the heart is likely to play a key role in initiating and perpetuating these life-threatening events. We now know that several aspects of cardiac calcium regulation significantly change with advancing age - changes that could produce electrical instability. Further development of knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these changes will allow us to reduce what currently is an inevitable increase in the incidence of arrhythmias in the elderly.

  6. Cell–cell junction remodeling in the heart: Possible role in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias?

    PubMed Central

    Mezzano, Valeria; Sheikh, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Anchoring Cell–cell junctions (desmosomes, fascia adherens) play crucial roles in maintaining mechanical integrity of cardiac muscle cells and tissue. Genetic mutations and/or loss of critical components in these macromolecular structures are increasingly being associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies; however, their specific roles have been primarily attributed to effects within the working (ventricular) cardiac muscle. Growing evidence also points to a key role for anchoring Cell–cell junction components in cardiac muscle cells of the cardiac conduction system. This is not only evidenced by the molecular and ultra-structural presence of anchoring cell junctions in specific compartments/structures of the cardiac conduction system (sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node, His-Purkinje system), but also because conduction system-related arrhythmias can be found in humans and mouse models of cardiomyopathies harboring defects and/or mutations in key anchoring Cell–cell junction proteins. These studies emphasize the clinical need to understand the molecular and cellular role(s) for anchoring Cell–cell junctions in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias. This review will focus on (i) experimental findings that underline an important role for anchoring Cell–cell junctions in the cardiac conduction system, (ii) insights regarding involvement of these structures in age-related cardiac remodeling of the conduction system, (iii) summarizing available genetic mouse models that can target cardiac conduction system structures and (iv) implications of these findings on future therapies for arrhythmogenic heart diseases. PMID:22227473

  7. Cardiac arrhythmia induced by genetic silencing of 'funny' (f) channels is rescued by GIRK4 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Mesirca, Pietro; Alig, Jacqueline; Torrente, Angelo G; Müller, Jana Christina; Marger, Laurine; Rollin, Anne; Marquilly, Claire; Vincent, Anne; Dubel, Stefan; Bidaud, Isabelle; Fernandez, Anne; Seniuk, Anika; Engeland, Birgit; Singh, Jasmin; Miquerol, Lucile; Ehmke, Heimo; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Nargeot, Joel; Wickman, Kevin; Isbrandt, Dirk; Mangoni, Matteo E

    2014-08-21

    The mechanisms underlying cardiac automaticity are still incompletely understood and controversial. Here we report the complete conditional and time-controlled silencing of the 'funny' current (If) by expression of a dominant-negative, non-conductive HCN4-channel subunit (hHCN4-AYA). Heart-specific If silencing caused altered [Ca(2+)]i release and Ca(2+) handling in the sinoatrial node, impaired pacemaker activity and symptoms reminiscent of severe human disease of pacemaking. The effects of If silencing critically depended on the activity of the autonomic nervous system. We were able to rescue the failure of impulse generation and conduction by additional genetic deletion of cardiac muscarinic G-protein-activated (GIRK4) channels in If-deficient mice without impairing heartbeat regulation. Our study establishes the role of f-channels in cardiac automaticity and indicates that arrhythmia related to HCN loss-of-function may be managed by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of GIRK4 channels, thus offering a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of heart rhythm diseases.

  8. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac arrhythmias in the adult: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lazzerini, P E; Capecchi, P L; Laghi-Pasini, F

    2010-09-01

    It is well established that the passive trans-placental passage of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies from mother to foetus is associated with the risk to develop an uncommon syndrome named neonatal lupus (NLE), where the congenital heart block represents the most severe clinical feature. Recent evidence demonstrated that also adult heart, classically considered invulnerable to the anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, may represent a target of the arrhythmogenicity of these autoantibodies. In particular, the prolongation of the QTc interval appears the most frequent abnormality observed in adults with circulating anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, with some data suggesting an association with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias, also life threatening. Moreover, even though the association between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and conduction disturbances is undoubtedly less evident in adults than in infants, from the accurate dissection of the literature data the possibility arises that sometimes also the adult cardiac conduction tissue may be affected by such antibodies. The exact arrhythmogenic mechanisms involved in foetus/newborns and adults, respectively, have not been completely clarified as yet. However, increasing evidence suggests that anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may trigger rhythm disturbances through an inhibiting cross-reaction with several cardiac ionic channels, particularly the calcium channels (L-type and T-type), but also the potassium channel hERG, whose different expression and involvement in the cardiac electrophysiology during lifespan might account for the occurrence of age-related differences.

  9. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac arrhythmias in the adult: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lazzerini, P E; Capecchi, P L; Laghi-Pasini, F

    2010-09-01

    It is well established that the passive trans-placental passage of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies from mother to foetus is associated with the risk to develop an uncommon syndrome named neonatal lupus (NLE), where the congenital heart block represents the most severe clinical feature. Recent evidence demonstrated that also adult heart, classically considered invulnerable to the anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, may represent a target of the arrhythmogenicity of these autoantibodies. In particular, the prolongation of the QTc interval appears the most frequent abnormality observed in adults with circulating anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, with some data suggesting an association with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias, also life threatening. Moreover, even though the association between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and conduction disturbances is undoubtedly less evident in adults than in infants, from the accurate dissection of the literature data the possibility arises that sometimes also the adult cardiac conduction tissue may be affected by such antibodies. The exact arrhythmogenic mechanisms involved in foetus/newborns and adults, respectively, have not been completely clarified as yet. However, increasing evidence suggests that anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may trigger rhythm disturbances through an inhibiting cross-reaction with several cardiac ionic channels, particularly the calcium channels (L-type and T-type), but also the potassium channel hERG, whose different expression and involvement in the cardiac electrophysiology during lifespan might account for the occurrence of age-related differences. PMID:20696018

  10. KCNE genetics and pharmacogenomics in cardiac arrhythmias: much ado about nothing?

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels respond to changes in membrane potential with conformational shifts that either facilitate or stem the movement of charged ions across the cell membrane. This controlled movement of ions is particularly important for the action potentials of excitable cells such as cardiac myocytes, and therefore essential for timely beating of the heart. Inherited mutations in ion channel genes and in the genes encoding proteins that regulate them can cause lethal cardiac arrhythmias either by direct channel disruption or by altering interactions with therapeutic drugs, the best-understood example of both these scenarios being Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Unsurprisingly, mutations in the genes encoding ion channel pore-forming α subunits underlie the large majority (~90%) of identified cases of inherited LQTS. Given that inherited LQTS is comparatively rare in itself (~0.04% of the US population), is pursuing study of the remaining known and unknown LQTS-associated genes subject to the law of diminishing returns? Here, with a particular focus on the KCNE family of single transmembrane domain K+ channel ancillary subunits, the significance to cardiac pharmacogenetics of ion channel regulatory subunits is discussed. PMID:23272793

  11. Low dialysate potassium concentration: an overrated risk factor for cardiac arrhythmia?

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J Gary

    2015-01-01

    Serum potassium concentrations rise with dietary potassium intake between dialysis sessions and are often at hyperkalemic levels by the next session. Conversely, potassium concentrations fall during each hemodialysis, and sometimes reach hypokalemic levels by the end. Low potassium dialysate, which rapidly decreases serum potassium and often brings it to hypokalemic levels, is almost universally considered a risk factor for life-threatening arrhythmias. While there is little doubt about the threat of lethal arrhythmias due to hyperkalemia, convincing evidence for the danger of low potassium dialysate and rapid or excess potassium removal has not been forthcoming. The original report of more frequent ventricular ectopy in early dialysis that was improved by reducing potassium removal has received very little confirmation from subsequent studies. Furthermore, the occurrence of ventricular ectopy during dialysis does not appear to predict mortality. Studies relating sudden deaths to low potassium dialysate are countered by studies with more thorough adjustment for markers of poor health. Dialysate potassium concentrations affect the excursions of serum potassium levels above or below the normal range, and have the potential to influence dialysis safety. Controlled studies of different dialysate potassium concentration and their effect on mortality and cardiac arrests have not been done. Until these results become available, I propose interim guidelines for the setting of dialysate potassium levels that may better balance risks and benefits.

  12. Rapidly detecting disorder in rhythmic biological signals: A spectral entropy measure to identify cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniczenko, Phillip P. A.; Lee, Chiu Fan; Jones, Nick S.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the use of a running measure of power spectrum disorder to distinguish between the normal sinus rhythm of the heart and two forms of cardiac arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. This spectral entropy measure is motivated by characteristic differences in the power spectra of beat timings during the three rhythms. We plot patient data derived from ten-beat windows on a “disorder map” and identify rhythm-defining ranges in the level and variance of spectral entropy values. Employing the spectral entropy within an automatic arrhythmia detection algorithm enables the classification of periods of atrial fibrillation from the time series of patients’ beats. When the algorithm is set to identify abnormal rhythms within 6s , it agrees with 85.7% of the annotations of professional rhythm assessors; for a response time of 30s , this becomes 89.5%, and with 60s , it is 90.3%. The algorithm provides a rapid way to detect atrial fibrillation, demonstrating usable response times as low as 6s . Measures of disorder in the frequency domain have practical significance in a range of biological signals: the techniques described in this paper have potential application for the rapid identification of disorder in other rhythmic signals.

  13. Ciprofloxacin and the risk for cardiac arrhythmias: culprit delicti or watching bystander?

    PubMed

    Haring, Bernhard; Bauer, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    Torsades de pointes (Tdp) is a polymorphic form of ventricular tachycardia and a life-threatening event. A variety of non-cardiovascular drugs, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, have been shown to possess arrhythmogenic properties. However, only 25 cases of ventricular tachycardia associated with the use of ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin have been reported in the United States between 1996 and 2000, with ciprofloxacin being involved in two cases. Thus, it has been argued that the arrhythmogenic property of ciprofloxacin may derive from its interaction with other potentially arrhythmogenic drugs. We report: (i) a case of torsades de pointes (Tdp) associated with oral ciprofloxacin in a patient with concomitant risk factors and (ii) a review of the literature on pharmacokinetic interactions involving ciprofloxacin resulting in cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Cardiac Purkinje fibers and arrhythmias; The GK Moe Award Lecture 2015.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Penelope A; Dun, Wen; Robinson, Richard B

    2016-05-01

    Purkinje fibers/cells continue to be a focus of arrhythmologists. Here we review several new ideas that have emerged in the literature and fold them into important new points. These points include the following: some proteins in Purkinje cells are specific to Purkinjes; pacemaker function in Purkinje may be similar to that of the sinus node cell; sink-source concerns about tracts/sheets of Purkinje fibers; role of Ito in arrhythmias; and genetic lesions in Purkinjes and their high impact on cardiac rhythm. Although new ideas about the remodeled Purkinje cell are not the focus of this review, one can easily imagine how Purkinjes and their function may be altered in diseased hearts. PMID:26775142

  15. [Treatment of a patient with refractory cardiac arrhythmias using stellate ganglion block. Access by the classical and ultrasound-guided approach].

    PubMed

    Mata Francisco, N C; Gómez Pesquera, E; Ruiz López, N; Álvarez López, J C; Jorge-Monjas, P

    2014-10-01

    Stellate ganglion block is a technique that is often used by anesthesiologists for the treatment of complex regional pain syndromes of the upper extremity. This technique interrupts cardiac sympathetic innervation and has been proposed as treatment for refractory arrhythmias. We present the case of a patient with arrhythmias that were refractory to pharmacological treatment, and were finally treated by continuous stellate ganglion block. Left stellate ganglion is a lynchpin of cardiac arrhythmias due to being a structure where the majority of postganglion sympathetic fibers responsible for preferentially innervating the atriventricular node, bundle of His and ventricular mass are originated, fundamentals in the origin and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias.

  16. Single-Nucleotide Variations in Cardiac Arrhythmias: Prospects for Genomics and Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Abunimer, Ayman; Smith, Krista; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Lam, Phuc; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a large contributor to causes of early death in developed countries. Some of these conditions, such as sudden cardiac death and atrial fibrillation, stem from arrhythmias—a spectrum of conditions with abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Genome-wide association studies can identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs) that may predispose individuals to developing acquired forms of arrhythmias. Through manual curation of published genome-wide association studies, we have collected a comprehensive list of 75 SNVs associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Ten of the SNVs result in amino acid changes and can be used in proteomic-based detection methods. In an effort to identify additional non-synonymous mutations that affect the proteome, we analyzed the post-translational modification S-nitrosylation, which is known to affect cardiac arrhythmias. We identified loss of seven known S-nitrosylation sites due to non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs). For predicted nitrosylation sites we found 1429 proteins where the sites are modified due to nsSNV. Analysis of the predicted S-nitrosylation dataset for over- or under-representation (compared to the complete human proteome) of pathways and functional elements shows significant statistical over-representation of the blood coagulation pathway. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis displays statistically over-represented terms related to muscle contraction, receptor activity, motor activity, cystoskeleton components, and microtubule activity. Through the genomic and proteomic context of SNVs and S-nitrosylation sites presented in this study, researchers can look for variation that can predispose individuals to cardiac arrhythmias. Such attempts to elucidate mechanisms of arrhythmia thereby add yet another useful parameter in predicting susceptibility for cardiac diseases. PMID:24705329

  17. Hybrid access to atria via the Guiraudon Universal Cardiac Introducer for arrhythmia ablation after total cavopulmonary derivation.

    PubMed

    Guiraudon, Gérard M; Jones, Douglas L; Bainbridge, Daniel; Cohen, Laurence; Lecompte, Yves; Hidden-Lucet, Françoise; Frank, Robert; Pavie, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report the first use of a new platform, the Guiraudon Universal Cardiac Introducer (GUCI), in humans for accessing the left atrium for catheter-based ablations in patients with resistant atrial arrhythmias after total cavopulmonary derivation. The GUCI was originally designed for intracardiac access for closed, beating instrumental intracardiac surgery.The patient was a 29-year-old man with problematic atrial arrhythmias resistant to antiarrhythmic drugs because of severe uncontrolled bradycardia and because his pacemaker was explanted for infection.The GUCI was attached to the left atrial appendage via an anterior left thoracotomy. The GUCI was modified to accommodate introduction and manipulation of multiple catheters. This allowed electrophysiologists to perform catheter-based exploration and ablation. A DDD pacemaker was implanted, with an atrial endocardial lead introduced via the GUCI cuff and a ventricular epicardial lead.Postoperative atrial arrhythmias were controlled using amiodarone and atrial pacing. At the 12-month follow-up, the patient was arrhythmia- and drug-free and returned to full employment.This new access offers an additional new alternative atrial access to treat resistant arrhythmia after total cavopulmonary derivation. The current state-of-the-art makes patient selection difficult and uncomfortable for the surgeons because of incomplete preoperative electrophysiological data, such as a return to the beginning of surgery for arrhythmia; however, more cumulative experience with intraoperative electrophysiological data and new mapping technologies should address these limitations.

  18. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  19. Magnetocardiograms in clinical medicine: unique information on cardiac ischemia, arrhythmias, and fetal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satsuki; Yamaguchi, Iwao

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac diseases are the leading cause of death in population. Diagnostic tests to detect cardiac dysfunction at an early stage of the disease are desirable. The major focus has been centered on tests evaluating the perfusion of the heart with imaging techniques or detecting alterations in electrical or mechanical function of the heart. The heart generates magnetic fields that can be detected by body surface mapping utilizing super conducting quantum interference device sensors giving magnetocardiograms (MCGs). The advantages of MCG over traditional electrocardiograms (ECGs) are increased sensitivity to small signals and lack of conductivity in body tissues, presentation of direct component signals and primary currents. This review will highlight the basic principles and recent advantages of MCGs, and the application of MCG in clinical diagnosis, especially in cases whose ECGs are non-diagnostic or not specific, such as detecting baseline shift in ischemic heart disease, noninvasive His potential recording, detection of arrhythmic mechanism defining reentrant circuits vs non reentrant mechanism, diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias and prolongation of QT interval. Areas of future basic and clinical research are also discussed. PMID:15704657

  20. The cardiac connexome: Non-canonical functions of connexin43 and their role in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Delmar, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Connexin43 is the major component of gap junctions, an anatomical structure present in the cardiac intercalated disc that provides a low-resistance pathway for direct cell-to-cell passage of electrical charge. Recent studies have shown that in addition to its well-established function as an integral membrane protein that oligomerizes to form gap junctions, Cx43 plays other roles that are independent of channel (or perhaps even hemi-channel) formation. This article discusses non-canonical functions of Cx43. In particular, we focus on the role of Cx43 as a part of a protein interacting network, a connexome, where molecules classically defined as belonging to the mechanical junctions, the gap junctions and the sodium channel complex, multitask and work together to bring about excitability, electrical and mechanical coupling between cardiac cells. Overall, viewing Cx43 as a multi-functional protein, beyond gap junctions, opens a window to better understand the function of the intercalated disc and the pathological consequences that may result from changes in the abundance or localization of Cx43 in the intercalated disc subdomain. PMID:26673388

  1. Disclosing Genetic Information to Family Members About Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmias: An Obligation or a Choice?

    PubMed

    Vavolizza, Rick D; Kalia, Isha; Erskine Aaron, Kathleen; Silverstein, Louise B; Barlevy, Dorit; Wasserman, David; Walsh, Christine; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2015-08-01

    Inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, present clinical as well as ethical, legal, and social challenges. Many individuals who carry a deleterious mutation are largely asymptomatic and therefore may not be diagnosed until after the occurrence of a personal or family member's cardiac event. The familial nature of inherited genetic information raises numerous ethical, legal, and social issues regarding the sharing of genetic information, particularly when an individual found to carry a deleterious mutation refuses to disclose his or her results to at-risk family members who could benefit from life-saving treatments. This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences with genetic testing for individuals (n = 50) with a personal or family history of cardiac events or sudden death. Unstructured in-person focus groups or interviews were conducted for each participant in the study. The recordings of these interviews were transcribed verbatim and subsequently analyzed and coded. Participants' comments regarding sharing of genetic information centered around four main themes: (1) motivation to disclose; (2) extent of disclosure; (3) effect of disclosure on family dynamics; and (4) reasons for not sharing genetic information. The majority of individuals believed that affected individuals are obligated to disclose genetic information to family members. In the era of personalized medicine, the disclosure of genetic information provides individuals the opportunities to learn about the genetics, disease characteristics, and treatment options in order to reduce morbidity and mortality in themselves and their family members. Further research is necessary to identify and explore the barriers to sharing genetic information with at-risk family members. PMID:25400212

  2. Prolonged Hypoxia Increases Survival Even in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Showing Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Renate; Bauer, Ines; Ramalingam, Anil; Egg, Margit; Schwerte, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tolerance towards hypoxia is highly pronounced in zebrafish. In this study even beneficial effects of hypoxia, specifically enhanced survival of zebrafish larvae, could be demonstrated. This effect was actually more pronounced in breakdance mutants, which phenotypically show cardiac arrhythmia. Breakdance mutants (bre) are characterized by chronically reduced cardiac output. Despite an about 50% heart rate reduction, they become adults, but survival rate significantly drops to 40%. Normoxic bre animals demonstrate increased hypoxia inducible factor 1 a (Hif-1α) expression, which indicates an activated hypoxic signaling pathway. Consequently, cardiovascular acclimation, like cardiac hypertrophy and increased erythrocyte concentration, occurs. Thus, it was hypothesized, that under hypoxic conditions survival might be even more reduced. When bre mutants were exposed to hypoxic conditions, they surprisingly showed higher survival rates than under normoxic conditions and even reached wildtype values. In hypoxic wildtype zebrafish, survival yet exceeded normoxic control values. To specify physiological acclimation, cardiovascular and metabolic parameters were measured before hypoxia started (3 dpf), when the first differences in survival rate occurred (7 dpf) and when survival rate plateaued (15 dpf). Hypoxic animals expectedly demonstrated Hif-1α accumulation and consequently enhanced convective oxygen carrying capacity. Moreover, bre animals showed a significantly enhanced heart rate under hypoxic conditions, which reached normoxic wildtype values. This improvement in convective oxygen transport ensured a sufficient oxygen and nutrient supply and was also reflected in the significantly higher mitochondrial activity. The highly optimized energy metabolism observed in hypoxic zebrafish larvae might be decisive for periods of higher energy demand due to organ development, growth and increased activity. However, hypoxia increased survival only during a short period of

  3. Disclosing Genetic Information to Family Members about Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmias: An Obligation or a Choice?

    PubMed Central

    Vavolizza, Rick D.; Kalia, Isha; Aaron, Kathleen Erskine; Silverstein, Louise B.; Barlevy, Dorit; Wasserman, David; Walsh, Christine; Marion, Robert W.; Dolan, Siobhan M.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, present clinical as well as ethical, legal, and social challenges. Many individuals who carry a deleterious mutation are largely asymptomatic and therefore may not be diagnosed until after the occurrence of a personal or family member’s cardiac event. The familial nature of inherited genetic information raises numerous ethical, legal, and social issues regarding the sharing of genetic information, particularly when an individual found to carry a deleterious mutation refuses to disclose his or her results to at-risk family members who could benefit from life-saving treatments. This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences with genetic testing for individuals (n= 50) with a personal or family history of cardiac events or sudden death. Unstructured in-person focus groups or interviews were conducted for each participant in the study. The recordings of these interviews were transcribed verbatim and subsequently analyzed and coded. Participants’ comments regarding sharing of genetic information centered around four main themes: (1) motivation to disclose; (2) extent of disclosure; (3) effect of disclosure on family dynamics; and (4) reasons for not sharing genetic information. The majority of individuals believed that affected individuals are obligated to disclose genetic information to family members. In the era of personalized medicine, the disclosure of genetic information provides individuals the opportunities to learn about the genetics, disease characteristics, and treatment options in order to reduce morbidity and mortality in themselves and their family members. Further research is necessary to identify and explore the barriers to sharing genetic information with at-risk family members. PMID:25400212

  4. Nonischemic Left Ventricular Scar as a Substrate of Life-Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death in Competitive Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rigato, Ilaria; De Lazzari, Manuel; Susana, Angela; Niero, Alice; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Migliore, Federico; Rizzo, Stefania; Giorgi, Benedetta; De Conti, Giorgio; Sarto, Patrizio; Serratosa, Luis; Patrizi, Giampiero; De Maria, Elia; Pelliccia, Antonio; Basso, Cristina; Schiavon, Maurizio; Bauce, Barbara; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Background— The clinical profile and arrhythmic outcome of competitive athletes with isolated nonischemic left ventricular (LV) scar as evidenced by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance remain to be elucidated. Methods and Results— We compared 35 athletes (80% men, age: 14–48 years) with ventricular arrhythmias and isolated LV subepicardial/midmyocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (group A) with 38 athletes with ventricular arrhythmias and no LGE (group B) and 40 healthy control athletes (group C). A stria LGE pattern with subepicardial/midmyocardial distribution, mostly involving the lateral LV wall, was found in 27 (77%) of group A versus 0 controls (group C; P<0.001), whereas a spotty pattern of LGE localized at the junction of the right ventricle to the septum was respectively observed in 11 (31%) versus 10 (25%; P=0.52). All athletes with stria pattern showed ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant right bundle branch block morphology, 13 of 27 (48%) showed ECG repolarization abnormalities, and 5 of 27 (19%) showed echocardiographic hypokinesis of the lateral LV wall. The majority of athletes with no or spotty LGE pattern had ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant left bundle branch block morphology and no ECG or echocardiographic abnormalities. During a follow-up of 38±25 months, 6 of 27 (22%) athletes with stria pattern experienced malignant arrhythmic events such as appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock (n=4), sustained ventricular tachycardia (n=1), or sudden death (n=1), compared with none of athletes with no or LGE spotty pattern and controls. Conclusions— Isolated nonischemic LV LGE with a stria pattern may be associated with life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden death in the athlete. Because of its subepicardial/midmyocardial location, LV scar is often not detected by echocardiography. PMID:27390211

  5. Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuping; Liu, Yu; Hu, Yuling; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Tian, Jinhui; Ding, Guowu; Wang, Shigong

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to assess the transient association between air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia. Five databases were searched for studies investigating the association between daily increases in air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and arrhythmia hospitalization or arrhythmia mortality. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes were analyzed via a random-effects model and reported as relative risk and 95% confidence interval. 25 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria and 23 contributed to the meta-analysis. Arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality were associated with increases in PM2.5 (RR = 1.015 per 10 μg/m3, 95% CI: 1.006–1.024), PM10 (RR = 1.009 per 10 μg/m3, 95% CI: 1.004–1.014), carbon monoxide (RR = 1.041 per 1 ppm, 95% CI: 1.017–1.065), nitrogen dioxide (RR = 1.036 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.020–1.053), and sulfur dioxide (RR = 1.021 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.003–1.039), but not ozone (RR = 1.012 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 0.997–1.027). Both particulate and gaseous components, with the exception of ozone, have a temporal association with arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality. Compared with Europe and North America, a stronger association was noted in Asia. PMID:27367707

  6. Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuping; Liu, Yu; Hu, Yuling; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Tian, Jinhui; Ding, Guowu; Wang, Shigong

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to assess the transient association between air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia. Five databases were searched for studies investigating the association between daily increases in air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and arrhythmia hospitalization or arrhythmia mortality. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes were analyzed via a random-effects model and reported as relative risk and 95% confidence interval. 25 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria and 23 contributed to the meta-analysis. Arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality were associated with increases in PM2.5 (RR = 1.015 per 10 μg/m³, 95% CI: 1.006-1.024), PM10 (RR = 1.009 per 10 μg/m³, 95% CI: 1.004-1.014), carbon monoxide (RR = 1.041 per 1 ppm, 95% CI: 1.017-1.065), nitrogen dioxide (RR = 1.036 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.020-1.053), and sulfur dioxide (RR = 1.021 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.003-1.039), but not ozone (RR = 1.012 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 0.997-1.027). Both particulate and gaseous components, with the exception of ozone, have a temporal association with arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality. Compared with Europe and North America, a stronger association was noted in Asia. PMID:27367707

  7. Particles Alter Diesel Exhaust Gases-Induced Hypotension, Cardiac Arrhythmia,Conduction Disturbance, and Autonomic Imbalance in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that acute exposures to vehicular traffic and particulate matter (PM) air pollution are key causes of fatal cardiac arrhythmia, especially in those with preexisting cardiovascular disease. Researchers point to electrophysiologic dysfunction and auto...

  8. Development of a patch type embedded cardiac function monitoring system using dual microprocessor for arrhythmia detection in heart disease patient.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongwon; Noh, Hyung Wook; Lee, I B; Jung, Ji-Wook; Song, Yoonseon; Lee, Sooyeul; Kim, Seunghwan

    2012-01-01

    A patch type embedded cardiac function monitoring system was developed to detect arrhythmias such as PVC (Premature Ventricular Contraction), pause, ventricular fibrillation, and tachy/bradycardia. The overall system is composed of a main module including a dual processor and a Bluetooth telecommunication module. The dual microprocessor strategy minimizes power consumption and size, and guarantees the resources of embedded software programs. The developed software was verified with standard DB, and showed good performance.

  9. Investigation of mechanisms and non-pharmacological therapy of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vago, Hajnalka

    apply effectively biatrial pacemaker and biatrial cardioverter defibrillator for the prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the majority of patients frequency of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation decreased significantly due to biatrial stimulation or combined pharmacological and resynchronisation therapy. Parasymphathetic cardiac neurostimulation is a promising new non-pharmacological treatment option in certain types of arrhythmias. In our clinical study we were able to stimulate cardiac parasympathetic nerves innervating atrioventricular node achieving ventricular rate control during atrial tachyarrhythmias with chronically implanted coronary sinus lead. In our study biventricular pacemakers and cardioverter defibrillators were applied successfully in the treatment of drug refractory congestive heart failure combined with inter- and/or intraventricular conduction disturbances. AV sequential left sided chronic pacing using a single lead located in the coronary sinus has not been previously reported. Left sided DDD pacing was effective chronically in the improvement of the functional stage of patient suffering from congestive heart disease combined with left bundle branch block and binodal disease. Parallel with the investigation of pathomechanism of life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias and the most common, clinically relevant atrial fibrillation due to recent technical development, we were able to support nonpharmacological therapeutic modalities, gaining popularity in clinical management, with novel observations.

  10. Impact of Cardiac Arrhythmia on Velocity Quantification by ECG gated Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Markl, Michael; Fluckiger, Jacob; Lee, Daniel C.; Ng, Jason; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically investigate the impact of beat-to-beat variations on ECG gated multi-beat flow imaging with phase contrast (PC) MRI based on real time in-vivo TEE data in patients with known arrhythmia. Methods Real-time 2D Doppler transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed in five patients with atrial fibrillation (4 male, age=64±8.7 years). TEE data provided real-time left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) flow velocities in consecutive cardiac cycles with different RR-interval durations. PC-MRI acquisitions were simulated from the TEE velocity measures by constructing time-resolved k-space data for segmented sampling schemes typically used for ECG gated 2D PC MRI. Each simulation was repeated 100 times to minimize effects from data that may be weighted to a particular beat in the center of k-space. The resulting LA and LV velocities were compared to the average TEE velocities and data from individual cardiac cycles. Results Despite beat-to-beat variations velocities in TEE data, ECG gated flow imaging with MRI could reproduce persistent average LA and LV mean velocities within 7.0–7.4% compared to TEE. Conclusions PC-MRI velocity measurements in patients with varying R-R interval durations are not significantly different from time-averaged real-time velocity data for a typical segmented k-space data acquisition schemes. Though beat-to-beat variations in atrial velocities that were observed with TEE cannot be detected with ECG gated multi-beat PC MRI, it can reliably assess average flow patterns across multiple beats PMID:25978593

  11. The role of late I Na in development of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Nesterenko, Vladislav; Shryock, John C; Rajamani, Sridharan; Song, Yejia; Belardinelli, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Late I Na is an integral part of the sodium current, which persists long after the fast-inactivating component. The magnitude of the late I Na is relatively small in all species and in all types of cardiomyocytes as compared with the amplitude of the fast sodium current, but it contributes significantly to the shape and duration of the action potential. This late component had been shown to increase in several acquired or congenital conditions, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and heart failure, or due to mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the α-subunit of the sodium channel, as well as in channel-interacting proteins, including multiple β subunits and anchoring proteins. Patients with enhanced late I Na exhibit the type-3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) characterized by high propensity for the life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), as well as for atrial fibrillation. There are several distinct mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis due to abnormal late I Na, including abnormal automaticity, early and delayed after depolarization-induced triggered activity, and dramatic increase of ventricular dispersion of repolarization. Many local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic agents have a higher potency to block late I Na as compared with fast I Na. Several novel compounds, including ranolazine, GS-458967, and F15845, appear to be the most selective inhibitors of cardiac late I Na reported to date. Selective inhibition of late I Na is expected to be an effective strategy for correcting these acquired and congenital channelopathies.

  12. Effect of Continued Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Ventricular Arrhythmias After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Schleifer, John William; Mookadam, Farouk; Kransdorf, Evan P; Nanda, Udai; Adams, Jonathon C; Cha, Stephen; Pajaro, Octavio E; Steidley, David Eric; Scott, Robert L; Carvajal, Tomas; Saadiq, Rayya A; Srivathsan, Komandoor

    2016-08-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces ventricular arrhythmia (VA) burden in some patients with heart failure, but its effect after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is unknown. We compared VA burden in patients with CRT devices in situ who underwent LVAD implantation and continued CRT (n = 39) to those who had CRT turned off before discharge (n = 26). Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks were significantly reduced in patients with continued CRT (1.5 ± 2.7 shocks per patient vs 5.5 ± 9.3 with CRT off, p = 0.014). There was a nonsignificant reduction in cumulative VA episodes per patient with CRT continued at discharge (42 ± 105 VA per patient vs 82 ± 198 with CRT off, p = 0.29). On-treatment analysis by whether CRT was on or off identified a significantly lower burden of VA (17 ± 1 per patient-year CRT on vs 37 ± 1 per patient-year CRT off, p <0.0001) and ICD shocks (1.2 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT on vs 1.7 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT off, p = 0.018). In conclusion, continued CRT is associated with significantly reduced ICD shocks and VA burden after LVAD implantation. PMID:27328958

  13. Characterization of 2 genetic variants of Na(v) 1.5-arginine 689 found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Jousset, Florian; Kucera, Jan P; Shestak, Anna; Makarov, Leonid M; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-09-01

    Hundreds of genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene coding for the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Na(v) 1.5, have been described in patients with cardiac channelopathies as well as in individuals from control cohorts. The aim of this study was to characterize the biophysical properties of 2 naturally occurring Na(v) 1.5 variants, p.R689H and p.R689C, found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and in control individuals. In addition, this study was motivated by the finding of the variant p.R689H in a family with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in children. When expressed in HEK293 cells, most of the sodium current (I(Na)) biophysical properties of both variants were indistinguishable from the wild-type (WT) channels. In both cases, however, an ∼2-fold increase of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive late I(Na) was observed. Action potential simulations and reconstruction of pseudo-ECGs demonstrated that such a subtle increase in the late I(Na) may prolong the QT interval in a nonlinear fashion. In conclusion, despite the fact that the causality link between p.R689H and the phenotype of the studied family cannot be demonstrated, this study supports the notion that subtle alterations of Na(v) 1.5 variants may increase the risk for cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT.

  15. Splicing misregulation of SCN5A contributes to cardiac-conduction delay and heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Freyermuth, Fernande; Rau, Frédérique; Kokunai, Yosuke; Linke, Thomas; Sellier, Chantal; Nakamori, Masayuki; Kino, Yoshihiro; Arandel, Ludovic; Jollet, Arnaud; Thibault, Christelle; Philipps, Muriel; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Udd, Bjarne; Day, John W.; Duboc, Denis; Wahbi, Karim; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Deryckere, François; Kimura, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Ishiura, Shoichi; Lacroix, Vincent; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Navratil, Vincent; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Horie, Minoru; Imoto, Keiji; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Swanson, Maurice S.; de Munain, Adolfo Lopez; Inada, Shin; Itoh, Hideki; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ashihara, Takashi; Wang, Eric; Zimmer, Thomas; Furling, Denis; Takahashi, Masanori P.; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats that sequester muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, leading to alternative splicing changes. Cardiac alterations, characterized by conduction delays and arrhythmia, are the second most common cause of death in DM. Using RNA sequencing, here we identify novel splicing alterations in DM heart samples, including a switch from adult exon 6B towards fetal exon 6A in the cardiac sodium channel, SCN5A. We find that MBNL1 regulates alternative splicing of SCN5A mRNA and that the splicing variant of SCN5A produced in DM presents a reduced excitability compared with the control adult isoform. Importantly, reproducing splicing alteration of Scn5a in mice is sufficient to promote heart arrhythmia and cardiac-conduction delay, two predominant features of myotonic dystrophy. In conclusion, misregulation of the alternative splicing of SCN5A may contribute to a subset of the cardiac dysfunctions observed in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:27063795

  16. Splicing misregulation of SCN5A contributes to cardiac-conduction delay and heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Freyermuth, Fernande; Rau, Frédérique; Kokunai, Yosuke; Linke, Thomas; Sellier, Chantal; Nakamori, Masayuki; Kino, Yoshihiro; Arandel, Ludovic; Jollet, Arnaud; Thibault, Christelle; Philipps, Muriel; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Udd, Bjarne; Day, John W; Duboc, Denis; Wahbi, Karim; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Deryckere, François; Kimura, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Ishiura, Shoichi; Lacroix, Vincent; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Navratil, Vincent; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Horie, Minoru; Imoto, Keiji; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Swanson, Maurice S; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Inada, Shin; Itoh, Hideki; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ashihara, Takashi; Wang, Eric; Zimmer, Thomas; Furling, Denis; Takahashi, Masanori P; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats that sequester muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, leading to alternative splicing changes. Cardiac alterations, characterized by conduction delays and arrhythmia, are the second most common cause of death in DM. Using RNA sequencing, here we identify novel splicing alterations in DM heart samples, including a switch from adult exon 6B towards fetal exon 6A in the cardiac sodium channel, SCN5A. We find that MBNL1 regulates alternative splicing of SCN5A mRNA and that the splicing variant of SCN5A produced in DM presents a reduced excitability compared with the control adult isoform. Importantly, reproducing splicing alteration of Scn5a in mice is sufficient to promote heart arrhythmia and cardiac-conduction delay, two predominant features of myotonic dystrophy. In conclusion, misregulation of the alternative splicing of SCN5A may contribute to a subset of the cardiac dysfunctions observed in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:27063795

  17. Short-term forecasting of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias based on symbolic dynamics and finite-time growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Ziehmann, Christine; Kurths, Jürgen; Meyerfeldt, Udo; Schirdewan, Alexander; Voss, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT-VF) as fatal cardiac arrhythmias are the main factors triggering sudden cardiac death. The objective of this study is to find early signs of sustained VT-VF in patients with an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). These devices are able to safeguard patients by returning their hearts to a normal rhythm via strong defibrillatory shocks; additionally, they store the 1000 beat-to-beat intervals immediately before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia. We study these 1000 beat-to-beat intervals of 17 chronic heart failure ICD patients before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia and at a control time, i.e., without a VT-VF event. To characterize these rather short data sets, we calculate heart rate variability parameters from the time and frequency domain, from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates. We find that neither the time nor the frequency domain parameters show significant differences between the VT-VF and the control time series. However, two parameters from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates discriminate significantly both groups. These findings could be of importance in algorithms for next generation ICD's to improve the diagnostics and therapy of VT-VF.

  18. Neuraxial Modulation for Refractory Ventricular Arrhythmias: Value of Thoracic Epidural Anesthesia and Surgical Left Cardiac Sympathetic Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Tara; Vaseghi, Marmar; Michowitz, Yoav; Sankhla, Vineet; Shah, Mandar; Swapna, Nalla; Boyle, Noel G.; Mahajan, Aman; Narasimhan, Calambur; Lokhandwala, Yash; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2010-01-01

    Background Reducing sympathetic output to the heart from the neuraxis can protect against ventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) and left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD) in the management of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with structural heart disease (SHD). Methods and Results Clinical data of 14 patients (age 25-75 years, 54.2±16.6 yrs,(mean±SD) 13 males) who underwent TEA, LCSD, or both, to control ventricular tachycardia (VT) refractory to medical therapy and catheter ablation were reviewed.12 patients were in VT storm and 2 patients experienced recurrent VT despite maximal medical therapy and catheter ablation procedures. Total number of therapies per patient prior to either procedure ranged from 5 to 202 (median of 24, 25th and 75th percentile of 5 and 56). Eight patients underwent TEA and 9 patients underwent LCSD (3 patients had both procedures). No major procedural complications occurred. After initiation of TEA, 6 patients had a large (≥80%) decrease in VT burden. Post LCSD, 3 patients had no further VT, 2 patients had recurrent VT which either resolved within 24 hours or responded to catheter ablation, and 4 patients continued to have recurrent VT. Nine out of 14 patients survived to hospital discharge (1 TEA alone, 3 TEA/LCSD combined, 4 LCSD alone), one of whom underwent an urgent cardiac transplantation (TEA alone). Conclusion Initiation of TEA and LCSD in patients with refractory VT was associated with a subsequent decrease in arrhythmia burden in 6 out of 8 (75%- CI 51% to 91%) and 5 out of 9 (56%- CI 34% to 75%) patients, respectively. These data suggest that TEA and LCSD may be effective additions to the management of refractory ventricular arrhythmias in SHD when other treatment modalities have failed and/or may serve as a bridge to more definitive therapy. PMID:20479150

  19. Short-term effects of fine particulate air pollution on emergency room visits for cardiac arrhythmias: a case-crossover study in Taipei.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between fine particles (PM₂.₅) levels and number of emergency room (ER) visits for cardiac arrhythmias in Taipei, Taiwan. ER visits for cardiac arrhythmias and ambient air pollution data for Taipei were obtained for the period 2006-2010. The relative risk (RR) of ER visits was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single-pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased numbers of ER cardiac arrhythmia visits were significantly associated with PM₂.₅ on both warm days (>23°C) and cool days (< 23°C), with an interquartile range rise associated with a 10% (95% CI = -15%) and 4% (95% CI = 0-8%) elevation in number of ER visits for cardiac arrhythmias, respectively. In the two-pollutant models, PM₂.₅ levels remained significant after inclusion of sulfur dioxide (SO₂) or ozone (O₃) on both warm and cool days. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM₂.₅ increase the risk of number of ER visits for cardiac arrhythmias.

  20. Dipyridamole-thallium tests are predictive of severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Saragoca, M.A.; Canziani, M.E.; Gil, M.A.; Castiglioni, M.L.; Cassiolato, J.L.; Barbieri, A.; Lima, V.C.; Draibe, S.A.; Martinez, E.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In a population of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and a high prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) undergoing chronic hemodialysis, the authors investigated the association between the results of dipyridamole-thallium tests (DTTs) and the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. They observed a positive significant association between positive DTTs and the occurrence of severe forms of ventricular arrhythmias. A significant association was also observed between the presence of severe LVH and the occurrence of severe ventricular arrhythmias. However, no association was found between the presence of LVH and the positivity of the DTT. As most of their patients with positive DTTs had unimpaired coronary circulations, they conclude that positive DTTs, although falsely indicative of impaired myocardial blood supply, does have an important clinical relevance, indicating increased risk of morbidity (and, possibly, mortality) due to ventricular arrhythmias in a population of CRF patients submitted to chronic renal function replacement program.

  1. Arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in elite athletes. American College of Cardiology, 16th Bethesda Conference.

    PubMed

    Garson, A

    1998-01-01

    With the recent high visibility deaths of Hank Gathers and Reggie Lewis, two nationally recognized elite basketball players due to cardiovascular disease and arrhythmias, our awareness of the most optimal ways to manage athletes with known arrhythmias has become heightened. In making medical decisions we physicians come to rely in large measure on data, in addition to clinical acumen and experience. Unfortunately, we are at a disadvantage with respect to athletes since previously published data on the natural history and outcome of such individuals with known arrhythmias are sparse. Furthermore, the tragedies of Lewis, Gathers, Pete Maravich and others are also poignant reminders that the denominator of this equation is not defined and that we do not really know precisely how many athletes experience important arrhythmias, nor their relation to sports activity. In the decade since the 16th Bethesda Conference, an American College of Cardiology sponsored consensus panel that developed standards and recommendations for the disqualification from competition of athletes with known cardiovascular disease, little new data have been developed to make objective decisions in these areas (including arrhythmias) much easier. Nevertheless, while such decision-making in athletes involves situations that are relatively rare, the consequences of misjudgement are substantial. Unfortunately, to complicate matters, even if the precise likelihood of sudden death for a given athlete with arrhythmias were known, many (if not most) professional and elite college athletes might still regard any risk as acceptable and withdrawal from formal competition as highly unacceptable from a financial and psychological standpoint. In this review, consideration will be given to the state of our medical knowledge in these areas. Many controversies persist with regard to arrhythmias, most notably for the athlete who has Wolff-Parkinson-White, mitral valve prolapse, myocarditis, or complex ventricular

  2. A single exposure to acrolein desensitizes baroreflex responsiveness and increases cardiac arrhythmias in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Mehdi S; Griggs, Jennifer; Winsett, Darrell W; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Ledbetter, Allen; Costa, Daniel L; Farraj, Aimen K

    2014-03-01

    Short-term exposure to air pollutants has been linked to acute cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Even in the absence of overt signs or symptoms, pollutants can cause subtle disruptions to internal compensatory mechanisms, which maintain homeostatic balance in response to various environmental and physiological stressors. We hypothesized that a single exposure to acrolein, a ubiquitous gaseous air pollutant, would decrease the sensitivity of baroreflex (BRS), which maintains blood pressure by altering heart rate (HR), modify cardiac electrophysiological properties and increase arrhythmia in rats. Wistar-Kyoto normotensive (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats implanted with radiotelemeters and a chronic jugular vein catheter were tested for BRS using phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside 2 days before and 1 h after whole-body exposure to 3 ppm acrolein (3 h). HR and electrocardiogram (ECG) were continuously monitored for the detection of arrhythmia in the pre-exposure, exposure and post-exposure periods. Whole-body plethysmography was used to continuously monitor ventilation in conscious animals. SH rats had higher blood pressure, lower BRS and increased frequency of AV block as evidence by non-conducted p-waves when compared with WKY rats. A single exposure to acrolein caused a decrease in BRS and increased incidence of arrhythmia in both WKY and SH rats. There were minimal ECG differences between the strains, whereas only SH rats experienced irregular breathing during acrolein. These results demonstrate that acrolein causes immediate cardiovascular reflexive dysfunction and persistent arrhythmia in both normal and hypertensive animals. As such, homeostatic imbalance may be one mechanism by which air pollution increases risk 24 h after exposure, particularly in people with underlying cardiovascular disease.

  3. Catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias: A 14-year experience with 5330 consecutive patients at the Quebec Heart Institute, Laval Hospital

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Gilles E; Philippon, François; Champagne, Jean; Blier, Louis; Molin, Franck; Côté, Jean-Marc; Nault, Isabelle; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Gilbert, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    radiofrequency ablation is safe and effective, supporting ablation therapy as a first-line therapy for the majority of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:17932590

  4. LV Dyssynchrony Is Helpful in Predicting Ventricular Arrhythmia in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Chuan; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Chiang, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Wan-Yu; Huang, Jin-Long; Hung, Guang-Uei; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Ji

    2016-02-01

    For patients with coronary artery disease, larger scar burdens are associated with higher risk of ventricular arrhythmia. Left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony is associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to assess the values of LV dyssynchrony and myocardial scar assessed by myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) in predicting the development of ventricular arrhythmia in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-two patients (16 males, mean age: 66 ± 13) with irreversible ischemic cardiomyopathy received cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) for at least 12 months were enrolled for MPS. Quantitative parameters, including LV dyssynchrony with phase standard deviation (phase SD) and bandwidth, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and scar (% of total areas), were generated by Emory Cardiac Toolbox. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) recorded in the CRT device during follow-up were used as the reference standard of diagnosing ventricular arrhythmia. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed for determining the independent predictors of VT/VF and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used for generating the optimal cut-off values for predicting VT/VF. Nine (41%) of the 22 patients developed VT/VF during the follow-up periods. Patients with VT/VF had significantly lower LVEF, larger scar, larger phase SD, and larger bandwidth (all P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed LVEF and bandwidth were independent predictors of VT/VF. ROC curve analysis showed the areas under the curves were 0.71 and 0.83 for LVEF and bandwidth, respectively. The optimal cut-off values were <36% and > 139° for LVEF and bandwidth, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 100%, 39%, 53%, and 100%, respectively, for LVEF; and were 78%, 92%, 88%, and 86%, respectively, for bandwidth. LV

  5. Cardiac arrhythmia is the primary response of embryonic Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) exposed to crude oil during weathering.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Carls, Mark G; Day, Heather L; Sloan, Catherine A; Bolton, Jennie L; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-01-01

    Teleost embryos develop a syndrome characterized by edema when exposed to water that weathers substrates contaminated with crude oil. Previous studies using zebrafish demonstrated that crude oil exposure causes cardiogenic edema, and that the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered crude oils (tricyclic fluorenes, dibenzothiophenes, and phenanthrenes) are cardiotoxic, causing arrhythmia through a pathway that does not require activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We demonstrate here for Pacific herring, a species impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, that the developing heart is the primary target of crude oil exposure. Herring embryos exposed to the effluent of oiled gravel columns developed dose-dependent edema and irregular cardiac arrhythmia soon afterthe heartbeat was established. At a dose that produced cardiac dysfunction in 100% of exposed embryos, tissue levels of tricyclic PAHs were below 1 micromol/kg, suggesting a specific, high affinity target in the heart. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanism of tricyclic PAH cardiotoxicity, the development of biomarkers for the effects of PAH exposure in fish, and understanding the long-term impacts of oil spills and other sources of PAH pollution in aquatic environments. PMID:19209607

  6. Cardiac arrhythmia is the primary response of embryonic Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) exposed to crude oil during weathering.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Carls, Mark G; Day, Heather L; Sloan, Catherine A; Bolton, Jennie L; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-01-01

    Teleost embryos develop a syndrome characterized by edema when exposed to water that weathers substrates contaminated with crude oil. Previous studies using zebrafish demonstrated that crude oil exposure causes cardiogenic edema, and that the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered crude oils (tricyclic fluorenes, dibenzothiophenes, and phenanthrenes) are cardiotoxic, causing arrhythmia through a pathway that does not require activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We demonstrate here for Pacific herring, a species impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, that the developing heart is the primary target of crude oil exposure. Herring embryos exposed to the effluent of oiled gravel columns developed dose-dependent edema and irregular cardiac arrhythmia soon afterthe heartbeat was established. At a dose that produced cardiac dysfunction in 100% of exposed embryos, tissue levels of tricyclic PAHs were below 1 micromol/kg, suggesting a specific, high affinity target in the heart. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanism of tricyclic PAH cardiotoxicity, the development of biomarkers for the effects of PAH exposure in fish, and understanding the long-term impacts of oil spills and other sources of PAH pollution in aquatic environments.

  7. Next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Steven A; Ellinor, Patrick T

    2015-05-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes are collectively associated with substantial morbidity, yet our understanding of the genetic architecture of these conditions remains limited. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing have led to the commercialization of genetic testing now widely available in clinical practice. In particular, next-generation sequencing allows the large-scale and rapid assessment of entire genomes. Although next-generation sequencing represents a major technological advance, it has introduced numerous challenges with respect to the interpretation of genetic variation and has opened a veritable floodgate of biological data of unknown clinical significance to practitioners. In this review, we discuss current genetic testing indications for inherited arrhythmia syndromes, broadly outline characteristics of next-generation sequencing techniques, and highlight challenges associated with such testing. We further summarize future directions that will be necessary to address to enable the widespread adoption of next-generation sequencing in the routine management of patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes. PMID:25625719

  8. Examining the role of TRPA1 in air pollution-induced cardiac arrhythmias and autonomic imbalance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe how air pollution causes cardiac arrhythmogenesis through sensory irritation in the airways. Time-series studies show the risk of adverse cardiac events increases significantly in the hours to days after expos...

  9. Recommendations Regarding Dietary Intake and Caffeine and Alcohol Consumption in Patients With Cardiac Arrhythmias: What Do You Tell Your Patients To Do or Not To Do?

    PubMed Central

    Glatter, Kathryn A.; Myers, Richard; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement The etiology of arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation is multifactorial. Most arrhythmias are associated with comorbid illnesses like hypertension, diabetes, thyroid disease, or advanced age. Although it is tempting to blame a stimulant like caffeine as a trigger for arrhythmias, the literature does not support this idea. There is no real benefit to having patients with arrhythmias limit their caffeine intake. Caffeine is a vasoactive substance that also may promote the release of norepinephrine and epinephrine. However, acute ingestion of caffeine (as coffee or tea) does not cause atrial fibrillation. Even patients suffering a myocardial infarction do not have an increased incidence of ventricular or other arrhythmias after ingesting several cups of coffee. Large epidemiologic studies have also failed to find a connection between the amount of coffee/caffeine used and the development of arrhythmias. As such, it does not make sense to suggest that patients with palpitations, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, or supraventricular tachycardia, abstain from caffeine use. Energy drinks are a new phenomenon on the beverage market, with 30-50 % of young adults and teens using them regularly. Energy drinks are loaded with caffeine, sugar, and other chemicals that can stimulate the cardiac system. There is an increasing body of mainly anecdotal case reports describing arrhythmias or even sudden death triggered by exercise plus using energy drinks. Clearly, there must be more study in this area, but it is wise to either limit or avoid their use in patients with arrhythmias. Moderate to heavy alcohol use seems to be associated with the development of atrial fibrillation. The term “holiday heart” was coined back in 1978, to describe patients who had atrial fibrillation following binge alcohol use. Thus, it is reasonable to recommend to patients with arrhythmias that they limit their alcohol use, although unfortunately this treatment will likely not

  10. Influence of electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Motoyuki; Mizutani, Noboru; Waseda, Katsuhisa

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices to electromagnetic interference in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car [High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST)]. During the study, cardiac devices were connected to a phantom model that had similar characteristics to the human body. Three pacemakers from three manufacturers and one implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were evaluated in and around the magnetically levitated vehicle. The system is based on a normal conductive system levitated by the attractive force of magnets and propelled by a linear induction motor without wheels. The magnetic field strength at 40 cm from the vehicle in the nonlevitating state was 0.12 mT and that during levitation was 0.20 mT. The magnetic and electric field strengths on a seat close to the variable voltage/variable frequency inverter while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.13 mT, 2.95 V/m and 0.04 mT, 0.36 V/m, respectively. Data recorded on a seat close to the reactor while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.09 mT, 2.45 V/m and 0.05 mT, 1.46 V/m, respectively. Measured magnetic and electric field strengths both inside and outside the linear motor car were too low to result in device inactivation. No sensing, pacing, or arrhythmic interactions were noted with any pacemaker or ICD programmed in either bipolar and unipolar configurations. In conclusion, our data suggest that a permanent programming change or a device failure is unlikely to occur and that the linear motor car system is probably safe for patients with one of the four implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices used in this study under the conditions tested.

  11. The effects of B0, B20 and B100 soy biodiesel exhaust on aconitine-induced cardiac arrhythmia in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONTEXT: Diesel exhaust (DE) has been shown to increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Although biodiesel has been proposed as a "safer" alternative to diesel, it is still uncertain whether it actually poses less threat.OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that exposure to pure or 20% so...

  12. Wideband Arrhythmia-Insensitive-Rapid (AIR) Pulse Sequence for Cardiac T1 mapping without Image Artifacts induced by ICD

    PubMed Central

    Hong, KyungPyo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wall, T. Scott; Drakos, Stavros G.; Kim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a wideband arrhythmia-insensitive-rapid (AIR) pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without image artifacts induced by implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Methods We developed a wideband AIR pulse sequence by incorporating a saturation pulse with wide frequency bandwidth (8.9 kHz), in order to achieve uniform T1 weighting in the heart with ICD. We tested the performance of original and “wideband” AIR cardiac T1 mapping pulse sequences in phantom and human experiments at 1.5T. Results In 5 phantoms representing native myocardium and blood and post-contrast blood/tissue T1 values, compared with the control T1 values measured with an inversion-recovery pulse sequence without ICD, T1 values measured with original AIR with ICD were considerably lower (absolute percent error >29%), whereas T1 values measured with wideband AIR with ICD were similar (absolute percent error <5%). Similarly, in 11 human subjects, compared with the control T1 values measured with original AIR without ICD, T1 measured with original AIR with ICD was significantly lower (absolute percent error >10.1%), whereas T1 measured with wideband AIR with ICD was similar (absolute percent error <2.0%). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of a wideband pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without significant image artifacts induced by ICD. PMID:25975192

  13. Incidence and Factors Predicting Skin Burns at the Site of Indifferent Electrode during Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Hussain; Finta, Bohuslav; Rind, Jubran

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) has become a mainstay for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Skin burns at the site of an indifferent electrode patch have been a rare, serious, and likely an underreported complication of RFA. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of skin burns in cardiac RFA procedures performed at one institution. Also, we wanted to determine the factors predicting skin burns after cardiac RFA procedures at the indifferent electrode skin pad site. Methods. A retrospective case control study was performed to compare the characteristics in patients who developed skin burns in a 2-year period. Results. Incidence of significant skin burns after RFA was 0.28% (6/2167). Four of the six patients were female and all were Caucasians. Four controls for every case were age and sex matched. Burn patients had significantly higher BMI, procedure time, and postprocedure pain, relative to control subjects (p < 0.05, one-tailed testing). No one in either group had evidence of dispersive pad malattachment. Conclusions. Our results indicate that burn patients had higher BMI and longer procedure times compared to control subjects. These findings warrant further larger studies on this topic. PMID:27213077

  14. The power of exercise-induced T-wave alternans to predict ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implanted cardiac defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Burattini, Laura; Man, Sumche; Sweene, Cees A

    2013-01-01

    The power of exercise-induced T-wave alternans (TWA) to predict the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias was evaluated in 67 patients with an implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD). During the 4-year follow-up, electrocardiographic (ECG) tracings were recorded in a bicycle ergometer test with increasing workload ranging from zero (NoWL) to the patient's maximal capacity (MaxWL). After the follow-up, patients were classified as either ICD_Cases (n = 29), if developed ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation, or ICD_Controls (n = 38). TWA was quantified using our heart-rate adaptive match filter. Compared to NoWL, MaxWL was characterized by faster heart rates and higher TWA in both ICD_Cases (12-18 μ V vs. 20-39 μ V; P < 0.05) and ICD_Controls (9-15 μ V vs. 20-32 μ V; P < 0.05). Still, TWA was able to discriminate the two ICD groups during NoWL (sensitivity = 59-83%, specificity = 53-84%) but not MaxWL (sensitivity = 55-69%, specificity = 39-74%). Thus, this retrospective observational case-control study suggests that TWA's predictive power for the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias could increase at low heart rates.

  15. Effect of early bisoprolol administration on ventricular arrhythmia and cardiac death in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Edd; Zheng, Sean; Nabeebaccus, Adam; O'Gallagher, Kevin; Stewart, Adrian; Webb, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of early oral beta blockade in patients presenting with acute non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods We retrospectively identified 890 consecutive patients presenting with NSTEMI to a single UK centre from 2012 to 2014. Included patients all received standardised antiplatelet therapy plus low-dose oral bisoprolol (1.25–2.5 mg) within 4 h (mean 2.2±1.36; ‘Early Group’) or within 5–24 h (mean 15.4±5.7; ‘Late Group’) of presentation. Patients were followed up for the duration of hospital stay with the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE—defined as ventricular arrhythmia, cardiac death or repeat infarction) set as the primary outcome. Multivariate logistic regression models analysed early versus late bisoprolol administration and adjusted for potential confounders. Results 399 patients were included. Of the patient parameters, only the GRACE score was significantly different between the early (n=99, GRACE 164.5±29.6) and late (n=300, GRACE 156.7±31.4) groups (p=0.033). The early group had significantly fewer ventricular arrhythmias (1 vs 20, p=0.034), cardiac deaths (0 vs 13, p=0.044) and consequently MACE (1 vs 27, p=0.005) than the late group. After adjusting for the confounders of pulse, blood pressure, smoking and creatinine, logistic regression analysis identified early bisoprolol administration as protective for ventricular arrhythmia (p=0.038, OR 0.114, CI 0.015 to 0.885) and MACE (p=0.011, OR 0.064, CI 0.008 to 0.527). There was one episode of symptomatic bradycardia in the late group. Conclusions This study suggests that low-dose oral bisoprolol administered to patients with NSTEMI within 4 h of admission may be protective and lead to reduced inpatient MACE. PMID:27326220

  16. Safe Oral Triiodo-L-Thyronine Therapy Protects from Post-Infarct Cardiac Dysfunction and Arrhythmias without Cardiovascular Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhang, Youhua; Ojamaa, Kaie; Chen, Yue-feng; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pol, Christine J.; Saunders, Debra; Balasubramanian, Krithika; Towner, Rheal A.; Gerdes, A. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence suggests that thyroid hormones (THs) are beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. We have shown that 3 days of triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) treatment in myocardial infarction (MI) rats increased left ventricular (LV) contractility and decreased myocyte apoptosis. However, no clinically translatable protocol is established for T3 treatment of ischemic heart disease. We hypothesized that low-dose oral T3 will offer safe therapeutic benefits in MI. Methods and Results Adult female rats underwent left coronary artery ligation or sham surgeries. T3 (~6 μg/kg/day) was available in drinking water ad libitum immediately following MI and continuing for 2 month(s) (mo). Compared to vehicle-treated MI, the oral T3-treated MI group at 2 mo had markedly improved anesthetized Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based LV ejection fraction and volumes without significant negative changes in heart rate, serum TH levels or heart weight, indicating safe therapy. Remarkably, T3 decreased the incidence of inducible atrial tachyarrhythmias by 88% and improved remodeling. These were accompanied by restoration of gene expression involving several key pathways including thyroid, ion channels, fibrosis, sympathetic, mitochondria and autophagy. Conclusions Low-dose oral T3 dramatically improved post-MI cardiac performance, decreased atrial arrhythmias and cardiac remodeling, and reversed many adverse changes in gene expression with no observable negative effects. This study also provides a safe and effective treatment/monitoring protocol that should readily translate to humans. PMID:26981865

  17. Real-Time Cardiac Arrhythmia Detection Using WOLA Filterbank Analysis of EGM Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Hamid; Brennan, Robert L.; So, Simon

    2007-12-01

    Novel methods of cardiac rhythm detection are proposed that are based on time-frequency analysis by a weighted overlap-add (WOLA) oversampled filterbank. Cardiac signals are obtained from intracardiac electrograms and decomposed into the time-frequency domain and analyzed by parallel peak detectors in selected frequency subbands. The coherence (synchrony) of the subband peaks is analyzed and employed to detect an optimal peak sequence representing the beat locations. By further analysis of the synchrony of the subband beats and the periodicity and regularity of the optimal beat, various possible cardiac events (including fibrillation, flutter, and tachycardia) are detected. The Ann Arbor Electrogram Library is used to evaluate the proposed detection method in clean and in additive noise. The evaluation results show that the method never misses any episode of fibrillation or flutter in clean or in noise and is robust to far-field R-wave interference. Furthermore, all other misclassification errors were within the acceptable limits.

  18. Acute and Chronic Changes and Predictive Value of Tpeak-Tend for Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Cong; Hua, Wei; Cai, Chi; Ding, Li-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Min; Fan, Xiao-Han; Zhao, Yun-Zi; Zhang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prolongation of the Tpeak-Tend (TpTe) interval as a measurement of transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) is an independent risk factor for chronic heart failure mortality. However, the cardiac resynchronization therapy's (CRT) effect on TDR is controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate CRTs acute and chronic effects on repolarization dispersion. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between TpTe changes and ventricular arrhythmia. Methods: The study group consisted of 101 patients treated with CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D). According to whether TpTe was shortened, patients were grouped at immediate and 1-year follow-up after CRT, respectively. The echocardiogram index and ventricular arrhythmia were observed and compared in these subgroups. Results: For all patients, TpTe slightly increased immediately after CRT-D implantation, and then decreased at the 1-year follow-up (from 107 ± 23 to 110 ± 21 ms within 24 h, to 94 ± 24 ms at 1-year follow-up, F = 19.366, P < 0.001). No significant difference in the left ventricular reverse remodeling and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) episodes between the TpTe immediately shortened and TpTe immediately nonshortened groups. However, patients in the TpTe at 1-year shorten had a higher rate of the left ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling (65% vs. 44%, χ2 = 4.495, P = 0.038) and less VT/VF episodes (log-rank test, χ2 = 10.207, P = 0.001) compared with TpTe 1-year nonshortened group. TpTe immediately after CRT-D independently predicted VT/VF episodes at 1-year follow-up (hazard ratio [HR], 1.030; P = 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with TpTe shortened at 1-year after CRT had a higher rate of LV reverse remodeling and less VT/VF episodes. The acute changes of TpTe after CRT have minimal value on mechanical reverse remodeling and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:27625093

  19. Derivation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells to Heritable Cardiac Arrhythmias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Inherited Cardiac Arrythmias; Long QT Syndrome (LQTS); Brugada Syndrome (BrS); Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT); Early Repolarization Syndrome (ERS); Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (AC, ARVD/C); Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM); Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM); Muscular Dystrophies (Duchenne, Becker, Myotonic Dystrophy); Normal Control Subjects

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of CHF6001, an Inhaled PDE4 Inhibitor, on Cardiac Repolarization and Cardiac Arrhythmias in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Antonio; Compagnoni, Anna; Nandeuil, Anne; Maison-Blanche, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multicomponent condition characterized by airway inflammation and associated to comorbidities, including cardiovascular diseases. Among anti-inflammatory agents in development for COPD, the phosphodiesterase inhibitors administrated by inhalation have the potential for increased efficacy and reduced systemic side effects. CHF6001 is an inhaled PDE4 inhibitor with proven anti-inflammatory properties in animal models. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was aimed to demonstrate its cardiovascular safety and tolerability in healthy male volunteers with normal electrocardiogram and cardiac parameters. Single and multiple ascending doses (7 days of administration) of CHF6001 were administered. Three electrocardiograms were recorded at several pharmacokinetic time points and at each time points, postdose heart rate, QRS and PR intervals, and presence of arrhythmia were evaluated. In single ascending dose, QTcF intervals did not increase more than 30 milliseconds from the baseline, all heart rate was between 45 and 100 bpm, and no statistically significant differences were observed in PR and QRS intervals. In multiple ascending dose, cardiac parameters did not differ significantly from baseline. In the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis, no medically or clinically significant changes were found. Further studies are ongoing to demonstrate that CHF6001 is safe and well tolerated in COPD patients as well.

  1. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of radix stephaniae tetrandrae. II. Myocardial infarct, arrhythmias, coronary arterial flow and heart rate in the isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Yu, X C; Wu, S; Wang, G Y; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The primary purpose of the present study was to compare the cardioprotective effects of the extract from radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST) and its individual compounds, tetrandrine (Tet) and fanchinoline (Fan). Secondly, we also compared the cardiac effects of the individual compounds and the RST extract with those of verapamil, a classical Ca2+ channel blocker. The Langendorff isolated perfused rat heart preparation was used. Regional ischaemia and reperfusion was employed to induce myocardial infarct and arrhythmia. Infarct, arrhythmia, heart rate and coronary artery flow were determined in hearts treated with vehicle, RST extract, Tet, Fan, or verapamil. It was found that RST extract, of which only 9% was Tet, and Tet alone produced equally potent ameliorating effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion without further inhibiting ischaemia-reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow. Fan had no effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion; but it induced S-T segment elevation and further reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow during ischaemia. Verapamil also ameliorated the effects of ischaemia and reperfusion on arrhythmia and infarct. It should be noted that 1 microM verapamil, that produced comparable effects on infarct and arrhythmia to the RST extract and Tet, further inhibited heart rate during ischaemia. The results indicate that the RST extract produces equally potent cardioprotective and anti-arrhythmic effects as Tet alone. Both RST extract and Tet may be better choices for the treatment of arrhythmia and infarct induced by myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion than the classical Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil as they do not further reduce heart rate during ischaemia. PMID:11432452

  2. A case-crossover analysis of particulate air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Rich, Kira E; Petkau, John; Vedal, Sverre; Brauer, Michael

    2004-06-01

    We investigated the relationship between air pollution and incidence of cardiac arrhythmia in a study of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Thirty-four patients (ages 15-85 yr, 80% male) with ICDs residing in the Vancouver, Canada, area were included in the analyses, representing all patients attending the 2 ICD clinics in the study region who had recorded at least 1 ICD discharge during the 14 February to 31 December 2000 study period. Air pollutant (PM(2.5), PM(10), SO(4)(2-), elemental carbon [EC], organic carbon [OC], O(3), SO(2), NO(2), and CO) concentrations on days for which ICD discharges were observed ("case days") were compared to concentrations on control days in case-crossover analyses. Control days were selected symmetrically, 7 days before and after each case day. ICD discharges occurring within 72 h of 1 another were grouped and considered as 1 discharge event. Temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, rainfall, and wind speed were included simultaneously as covariates. Sensitivity analyses examined the effect of grouping ICD discharges, of including meteorological variables, and of excluding discharges that were considered inappropriate by a cardiologist. As in previous studies, mean concentrations and interquartile ranges of air pollutants in Vancouver were low (e.g., PM(2.5) mean = 8.2 microg/m(3)). Although in general there were no statistically significant results, there were trends that might indicate associations between pollutants and ICD discharges. Odds ratios (OR) were consistently higher in summer than in winter (e.g., lag 0 per interquartile range increase in EC: 1.09 [0.86-1.37] vs. 0.61 [0.31-1.18]) and, in general, the highest ORs were observed for same-day effects. The one major exception was the observation of high ORs for ozone in winter (e.g., lag 1: 2.27 [0.67-7.66]). While an OR of 1.55 (0.51-4.70) was observed in summer at lag 0 for PM(10), no indications of positive associations were

  3. Mitochondria and Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential to providing ATP thereby satisfying the energy demand of the incessant electrical activity and contractile action of cardiac muscle. Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction can adversely impact cardiac electrical functioning by impairing the intracellular ion homeostasis and membrane excitability through reduced ATP production and excessive reactive oxidative species (ROS) generation, resulting in increased propensity to cardiac arrhythmias. In this review, the molecular mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to cardiac arrhythmias are discussed with an emphasis on the impact of increased mitochondrial ROS on the cardiac ion channels and transporters that are critical to maintaining normal electromechanical functioning of the cardiomyocytes. The potential of using mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as a novel anti-arrhythmia therapy is highlighted. PMID:24713422

  4. Biological therapies for cardiac arrhythmias: can genes and cells replace drugs and devices?

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac rhythm disorders reflect failures of impulse generation and/or conduction. With the exception of ablation methods that yield selective endocardial destruction, present therapies are nonspecific and/or palliative. Progress in understanding the underlying biology opens up prospects for new alternatives. This article reviews the present state of the art in gene- and cell-based therapies to correct cardiac rhythm disturbances. We begin with the rationale for such approaches, briefly discuss efforts to address aspects of tachyarrhythmia, and review advances in creating a biological pacemaker to cure bradyarrhythmia. Insights gained bring the field closer to a paradigm shift away from devices and drugs, and toward biologics, in the treatment of rhythm disorders. PMID:20203316

  5. Is respiratory sinus arrhythmia a good index of cardiac vagal tone in exercise?

    PubMed

    Casadei, B; Moon, J; Johnston, J; Caiazza, A; Sleight, P

    1996-08-01

    To assess the relative roles of neural and nonneural mechanisms in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) at rest and during exercise (steady-state supine cycle ergometry at 25% of peak oxygen uptake), we studied 10 healthy men (mean age 21 +/- 1 yr) before (control) and during ganglion blockade (GB) with trimetaphan camsylate (3-5 mg/min i.v.). GB was confirmed by the abolition of the reflex bradycardia in response to intravenous phenylephrine and of the blood pressure rise with the cold pressor test. RSA was calculated from the power of the spectral component of the R-R interval variability centered at the breathing frequency. GB decreased but did not abolish RSA. At rest, this nonneural component of RSA was negligible, accounting for < 1% of the control RSA. During GB, exercise did not affect RSA significantly. However, because control RSA was decreased by exercise, the proportion of nonneural RSA increased by 32% (range from 17 to 75%). These results indicate that as the vagal tone decreases with exercise, an increasing proportion of RSA is due to nonneural mechanisms. PMID:8872618

  6. Cardiac Arrhythmias Classification Method Based on MUSIC, Morphological Descriptors, and Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad R.; Kadkhodamohammadi, A. Rahim

    2009-12-01

    An electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification scheme based on multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, morphological descriptors, and neural networks is proposed for discriminating nine ECG beat types. These are normal, fusion of ventricular and normal, fusion of paced and normal, left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, premature ventricular concentration, atrial premature contraction, paced beat, and ventricular flutter. ECG signal samples from MIT-BIH arrhythmia database are used to evaluate the scheme. MUSIC algorithm is used to calculate pseudospectrum of ECG signals. The low-frequency samples are picked to have the most valuable heartbeat information. These samples along with two morphological descriptors, which deliver the characteristics and features of all parts of the heart, form an input feature vector. This vector is used for the initial training of a classifier neural network. The neural network is designed to have nine sample outputs which constitute the nine beat types. Two neural network schemes, namely multilayered perceptron (MLP) neural network and a probabilistic neural network (PNN), are employed. The experimental results achieved a promising accuracy of 99.03% for classifying the beat types using MLP neural network. In addition, our scheme recognizes NORMAL class with 100% accuracy and never misclassifies any other classes as NORMAL.

  7. Use of an Implantable Loop Recorder in a Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) to Monitor Cardiac Arrhythmias and Assess the Effects of Acupuncture and Laser Therapy.

    PubMed

    Magden, Elizabeth R; Sleeper, Meg M; Buchl, Stephanie J; Jones, Rebekah A; Thiele, Erica J; Wilkerson, Gregory K

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in captive chimpanzees and is often associated with myocardial fibrosis, which increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In this case report, we present a 36-y-old male chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) diagnosed with frequent ventricular premature complexes (VPC). We placed a subcutaneous implantable loop recorder for continual ECG monitoring to assess his arrhythmias without the confounding effects of anesthetics. During his initial treatment with the antiarrhythmia medication amiodarone, he developed thrombocytopenia, and the drug was discontinued. After reviewing other potential therapies for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, we elected to try acupuncture and laser therapy in view of the positive results and the lack of adverse side effects reported in humans. We used 2 well-known cardiac acupuncture sites on the wrist, PC6 (pericardium 6) and HT7 (heart 7), and evaluated the results of the therapy by using the ECG recordings from the implantable loop recorder. Although periodic increases in the animal's excitement level introduced confounding variables that caused some variation in the data, acupuncture and laser therapy appeared to decrease the mean number of VPC/min in this chimpanzee.

  8. Use of an Implantable Loop Recorder in a Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) to Monitor Cardiac Arrhythmias and Assess the Effects of Acupuncture and Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Magden, Elizabeth R; Sleeper, Meg M; Buchl, Stephanie J; Jones, Rebekah A; Thiele, Erica J; Wilkerson, Gregory K

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in captive chimpanzees and is often associated with myocardial fibrosis, which increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In this case report, we present a 36-y-old male chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) diagnosed with frequent ventricular premature complexes (VPC). We placed a subcutaneous implantable loop recorder for continual ECG monitoring to assess his arrhythmias without the confounding effects of anesthetics. During his initial treatment with the antiarrhythmia medication amiodarone, he developed thrombocytopenia, and the drug was discontinued. After reviewing other potential therapies for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, we elected to try acupuncture and laser therapy in view of the positive results and the lack of adverse side effects reported in humans. We used 2 well-known cardiac acupuncture sites on the wrist, PC6 (pericardium 6) and HT7 (heart 7), and evaluated the results of the therapy by using the ECG recordings from the implantable loop recorder. Although periodic increases in the animal's excitement level introduced confounding variables that caused some variation in the data, acupuncture and laser therapy appeared to decrease the mean number of VPC/min in this chimpanzee. PMID:26884410

  9. [State-of-the-art and prospects of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities].

    PubMed

    Steklov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of provision of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities showed that the available means and workforce are sufficient for the purpose. In order to facilitate access to high-tech medical aid it is necessary to equip arrhythmologic departments with up-to-date-instruments and set up cabinets of electrocardiostimulation in regional (naval) hospitals for implantation of temporary and permanent pacemakers. A program is pending for education (primary specialization) and advanced training of specialists in clinical cardiac electrophysiology, interventional and surgical arrhythmology.

  10. Effect of regional differences in cardiac cellular electrophysiology on the stability of ventricular arrhythmias: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Richard H.; Holden, Arun V.

    2003-01-01

    Re-entry is an important mechanism of cardiac arrhythmias. During re-entry a wave of electrical activation repeatedly propagates into recovered tissue, rotating around a rod-like filament. Breakdown of a single re-entrant wave into multiple waves is believed to underlie the transition from ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation. Several mechanisms of breakup have been identified including the effect of anisotropic conduction in the ventricular wall. Cells in the inner and outer layers of the ventricular wall have different action potential durations (APD), and support re-entrant waves with different periods. The aim of this study was to use a computational approach to study twisting and breakdown in a transmural re-entrant wave spanning these regions, and examine the relative role of this effect and anisotropic conduction. We used a simplified model of action potential conduction in the ventricular wall that we modified so that it supported stable re-entry in an anisotropic model with uniform APD. We first examined the effect of regional differences on breakdown in an isotropic model with transmural differences in APD, and found that twisting of the re-entrant filament resulted in buckling and breakdown during the second cycle of re-entry. We found that breakdown was amplified in the anisotropic model, resulting in complex activation in the region of longest APD. This study shows that regional differences in cardiac electrophysiology are a potentially important mechanism for destabilizing re-entry and may act synergistically with other mechanisms to mediate the transition from ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation.

  11. Effects of Acupuncture at the Yintang and the Chengjiang Acupoints on Cardiac Arrhythmias and Neurocardiogenic Syncope in Emergency First Aid.

    PubMed

    Fabrin, Saulo; Soares, Nayara; Pezarezi Yoshimura, Daiana; Hallak Regalo, Simone Cecilio; Donizetti Verri, Edson; de Freitas Vianna, Jacqueline Rodrigues; Gatti Regueiro, Eloisa Maria; Torres da Silva, Josie Resende

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of YinTang and ChengJiang acupoints on patients with cardiac arrhythmia and neurocardiogenic syncope in emergency first aid. A 45 year old woman underwent acupuncture. She had a previous history of a valvuloplasty for rheumatic disease and two acute myocardial infarctions, followed by four catheterizations and an angioplasty. Needling of the YinTang acupoint and stimulation of the ChengJiang acupoint through acupressure were performed for 20 minutes soon after syncope and during tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, and precordial pain, without any effect on peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) or the glycemic index. Data were analyzed comparatively by using the following parameters at rest, during syncope, and at 1 minute and 10 minutes after an emergency acupuncture procedure: blood pressure; heart rate; SpO2; and respiratory rate. We found that acupuncture at YinTang and ChenJiang acupoints induced cardiovascular responses, increased the limits of the body's homeostasis, and normalized the patient's condition in the case of syncope. Acupuncture using a combination of ChengJiang and YinTang acupoints had an immediate effect on the autonomic nervous system and on maintaining homeostasis and energy balance in the body. Although this technique was effective, the patient was still referred to the Emergency Room.

  12. Effects of Acupuncture at the Yintang and the Chengjiang Acupoints on Cardiac Arrhythmias and Neurocardiogenic Syncope in Emergency First Aid.

    PubMed

    Fabrin, Saulo; Soares, Nayara; Pezarezi Yoshimura, Daiana; Hallak Regalo, Simone Cecilio; Donizetti Verri, Edson; de Freitas Vianna, Jacqueline Rodrigues; Gatti Regueiro, Eloisa Maria; Torres da Silva, Josie Resende

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of YinTang and ChengJiang acupoints on patients with cardiac arrhythmia and neurocardiogenic syncope in emergency first aid. A 45 year old woman underwent acupuncture. She had a previous history of a valvuloplasty for rheumatic disease and two acute myocardial infarctions, followed by four catheterizations and an angioplasty. Needling of the YinTang acupoint and stimulation of the ChengJiang acupoint through acupressure were performed for 20 minutes soon after syncope and during tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, and precordial pain, without any effect on peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) or the glycemic index. Data were analyzed comparatively by using the following parameters at rest, during syncope, and at 1 minute and 10 minutes after an emergency acupuncture procedure: blood pressure; heart rate; SpO2; and respiratory rate. We found that acupuncture at YinTang and ChenJiang acupoints induced cardiovascular responses, increased the limits of the body's homeostasis, and normalized the patient's condition in the case of syncope. Acupuncture using a combination of ChengJiang and YinTang acupoints had an immediate effect on the autonomic nervous system and on maintaining homeostasis and energy balance in the body. Although this technique was effective, the patient was still referred to the Emergency Room. PMID:26896074

  13. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing. PMID:24783482

  14. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  15. Implications of the Turing completeness of reaction-diffusion models, informed by GPGPU simulations on an XBox 360: cardiac arrhythmias, re-entry and the Halting problem.

    PubMed

    Scarle, Simon

    2009-08-01

    In the arsenal of tools that a computational modeller can bring to bare on the study of cardiac arrhythmias, the most widely used and arguably the most successful is that of an excitable medium, a special case of a reaction-diffusion model. These are used to simulate the internal chemical reactions of a cardiac cell and the diffusion of their membrane voltages. Via a number of different methodologies it has previously been shown that reaction-diffusion systems are at multiple levels Turing complete. That is, they are capable of computation in the same manner as a universal Turing machine. However, all such computational systems are subject to a limitation known as the Halting problem. By constructing a universal logic gate using a cardiac cell model, we highlight how the Halting problem therefore could limit what it is possible to predict about cardiac tissue, arrhythmias and re-entry. All simulations for this work were carried out on the GPU of an XBox 360 development console, and we also highlight the great gains in computational power and efficiency produced by such general purpose processing on a GPU for cardiac simulations.

  16. Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Cardiac Nerves on Atrial Arrhythmia in Experimental Pulmonary Artery Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingyan; Deng, Hongping; Jiang, Xuejun; Dai, Zixuan; Wang, Xiaozhan; Wang, Xule; Guo, Zongwen; Hu, Wei; Yu, Shengbo; Yang, Bo; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2015-11-01

    Atrial arrhythmia, which includes atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL), is common in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), who often have increased sympathetic nerve activity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that autonomic nerves play important roles in vulnerability to AF/AFL in PAH. The atrial effective refractory period and AF/AFL inducibility at baseline and after anterior right ganglionated plexi ablation were determined during left stellate ganglion stimulation or left renal sympathetic nerve stimulation in beagle dogs with or without PAH. Then, sympathetic nerve, β-adrenergic receptor densities and connexin 43 expression in atrial tissues were assessed. The sum of the window of vulnerability to AF/AFL was increased in the right atrium compared with the left atrium at baseline in the PAH dogs but not in the controls. The atrial effective refractory period dispersion was increased in the control dogs, but not in the PAH dogs, during left stellate ganglion stimulation. The voltage thresholds for inducing AF/AFL during anterior right ganglionated plexi stimulation were lower in the PAH dogs than in the controls. The AF/AFL inducibility was suppressed after ablation of the anterior right ganglionated plexi in the PAH dogs. The PAH dogs had higher sympathetic nerve and β1-adrenergic receptor densities, increased levels of nonphosphorylated connexin 43, and heterogeneous connexin 43 expression in the right atrium when compared with the control dogs. The anterior right ganglionated plexi play important roles in the induction of AF/AFL. AF/AFL induction was associated with right atrium substrate remodeling in dogs with PAH.

  17. Cardiac arrhythmias and degradation into chaotic behavior prevention using feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzelac, Ilija; Sidorov, Veniamin; Wikswo, John; Gray, Richard

    2012-02-01

    During normal heart rhythm, cardiac cells behave as a set of oscillators with a distribution of phases but with the same frequency. The heart as a dynamical system in a phase space representation can be modeled as a set of oscillators that have closed overlapping orbits with the same period. These orbits are not stable and in the case of disruption of the cardiac rhythm, such as due to premature beats, the system will have a tendency to leave its periodic unstable orbits. If these orbits become attracted to phase singularities, their disruption may lead to chaotic behavior, which appears as a life-threating ventricular fibrillation. By using closed-loop feedback in the form of an adjustable defibrillation shock, any drift from orbits corresponding to the normal rhythm can be corrected by forcing the system to maintain its orbits. The delay through the feedback network coincides with the period of normal heart beats. To implement this approach we developed a 1 kW arbitrary waveform voltage-to-current converter with a 1 kHz bandwidth driven by a photodiode system that records an optical electrocardiogram and provides a feedback signal in real time. Our goal is to determine whether our novel method to defibrillate the heart will require much lower energies than are currently utilized in single shock defibrillators.

  18. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, Jean; Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one-dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 106 simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  19. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Bragard, Jean Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one–dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 10{sup 6} simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  20. Cardiac Repolarization Instability during Psychological Stress in Patients with Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Abisse, Saddam S.; Lampert, Rachel; Burg, Mattew; Soufer, Robert; Shusterman, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Changes in the autonomic nervous system activity (ANS) are a major trigger of life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTA). Mental arithmetic, a condition administered in a laboratory setting, can provide insight into the ANS effects on cardiac physiology. We examined the responses of cardiac repolarization to laboratory-induced psychological stressors in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) with the objective of identifying the indices that differentiate patients with and without subsequent VTA in follow-up. Methods Continuous ECG signals were recorded using 3 standard bipolar (Holter) leads in 56 patients (age: 63.6±11.9, female: 12%, LVEF: 32.3±11) with ICDs during mental arithmetic. The patients were separated into those with subsequent VTA during 3–4 years of follow-up (Group 1: N=9 pts) and those without VTA (Group 2: N=47 pts). Changes in repolarization (QT-interval, mean T-wave amplitude (Tamp), and T-wave area (Tarea) were analyzed during 5min of baseline, stress and recovery. The temporal instability of Tamp and Tarea was examined using the range (Δ) and variance (σ2) of beat-to-beat variations of the corresponding parameters. Results There were no significant differences in HR between the two groups at baseline (61 vs. 63 bpm, p=0.97), during stress (64 vs. 65 bpm, p=0.40), and recovery (62 vs. 61 bpm, p= 0.88). However, during mental stress and post-stress recovery ΔTamp was almost 2-fold greater in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (111 (57–203)) vs. 68 (44–94) μV p=0.04, respectively). Changes in QT-intervals were also greater in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (p=0.02). Conclusion Among patients with ICDs, changes of T-wave amplitude after psychological stress were greater in those with subsequent arrhythmic events. This might signal proarrhythmic repolarization response and help identify patients who would benefit the most from ICD implantation and proactive management. PMID:21920534

  1. Significance of classifying antiarrhythmic actions since the cardiac arrhythmia suppression trial.

    PubMed

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1991-02-01

    The Cardiac Antiarrhythmic Suppression Trial (CAST) showed flecainide and encainide induced excess mortality compared with placebo. Labeling drugs as Class 1C is based on clinical observations, comprising measurements of the electrocardiographic parameters QRS. H-V and J-T intervals and of effective refractory period (ERP) as follows: 1--(QRS) wide, 2--(HV) long, 3--(ERP) unchanged, 4--(JT) unchanged. In vitro electrophysiology helped to explain the clinical findings. Flecainide and encainide rendered Na channels as nonconducting, but F and E were only slowly released from the channels after repolarization. At any given drug concentration, a proportion of total channels were eliminated, and the steady-state proportion increased at rising heart rate. It is not proven that the properties that lead to classification of a drug as 1C were those that caused excess deaths in the CAST. The proarrhythmic tendency of 1C drugs can be reduced by beta-blockade, and the mechanisms of adrenergic arrhythmogenicity are discussed. Propafenone is both a 1C drug and a beta-blocker, and its pharmacologic profile is reviewed to illustrate how it resembles and differs from flecainide and encainide. Some features of the CAST are assessed with particular reference to the extent to which conclusions drawn from the results may be justifiably extrapolated to other drugs classified as 1C.

  2. Calcium signalling microdomains and the t-tubular system in atrial mycoytes: potential roles in cardiac disease and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Trafford, Andrew W; Clarke, Jessica D; Richards, Mark A; Eisner, David A; Dibb, Katharine M

    2013-05-01

    The atria contribute 25% to ventricular stroke volume and are the site of the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF). The initiation of contraction in the atria is similar to that in the ventricle involving a systolic rise of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). There are, however, substantial inter-species differences in the way systolic Ca(2+) is regulated in atrial cells. These differences are a consequence of a well-developed and functionally relevant transverse (t)-tubule network in the atria of large mammals, including humans, and its virtual absence in smaller laboratory species such as the rat. Where T-tubules are absent, the systolic Ca(2+) transient results from a 'fire-diffuse-fire' sequential recruitment of Ca(2+) release sites from the cell edge to the centre and hence marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity of systolic Ca(2+). Conversely, the well-developed T-tubule network in large mammals ensures a near synchronous rise of [Ca(2+)](i). In addition to synchronizing the systolic rise of [Ca(2+)](i), the presence of T-tubules in the atria of large mammals, by virtue of localization of the L-type Ca(2+) channels and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger antiporters on the T-tubules, may serve to, respectively, accelerate changes in the amplitude of the systolic Ca(2+) transient during inotropic manoeuvres and lower diastolic [Ca(2+)](i). On the other hand, the presence of T-tubules and hence wider cellular distribution of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger may predispose the atria of large mammals to Ca(2+)-dependent delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs); this may be a determining factor in why the atria of large mammals spontaneously develop and maintain AF. PMID:23386275

  3. Changes in heart rate, arrhythmia frequency, and cardiac biomarker values in horses during recovery after a long-distance endurance ride.

    PubMed

    Flethøj, Mette; Kanters, Jørgen K; Haugaard, Maria M; Pedersen, Philip J; Carstensen, Helena; Balling, Johanne D; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Buhl, Rikke

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmia frequency as well as changes in cardiac biomarker values and their association with heart rate in horses before and after an endurance ride. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 28 Arabian horses competing in a 120- or 160-km endurance ride. PROCEDURES ECG recordings were obtained from each horse before (preride) and after (recovery) an endurance ride to evaluate changes in heart rate and the SD of normal R-R intervals (SDNN) during the initial 12 hours of recovery. Frequencies of supraventricular and ventricular premature complexes before and after the ride were evaluated. Blood samples were obtained before the ride and twice during recovery. Hematologic analyses included measurement of serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity. RESULTS Heart rate was significantly increased and SDNN was decreased during the recovery versus preride period. Frequency of ventricular premature complexes increased during recovery, albeit not significantly, whereas frequency of supraventricular premature complexes was not significantly different between preride and recovery periods. Serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity were significantly increased in the recovery versus preride period. No associations were identified between cardiac biomarkers and velocity, distance, or mean heart rate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Heart rate increased and SDNN decreased in horses after completion of an endurance ride. These and other cardiac changes suggested that prolonged exercise such as endurance riding might have cardiac effects in horses. Additional studies are needed to clarify the clinical relevance of the findings.

  4. How are European patients at risk of malignant arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death identified and informed about their risk profile: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sciaraffia, Elena; Todd, Derick; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of screening of patients of risk of ventricular arrhythmias and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) in European countries. A systematic screening programme existed in the majority of centres and was organized by a multidisciplinary dedicated team or by an activity programme of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or heart failure clinics. In particular, high-risk subgroups of patients with ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy ICD implantation are considered strongly indicated within 90 days of myocardial revascularization or initial diagnosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging appears as an important tool to better characterize the left ventricular arrhythmogenic substrate in patients at risk of SCD.

  5. [New diagnostic tools for arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Teres, C; Burri, H

    2015-05-27

    Cardiac arrhythmias are common conditions that often manifest themselves intermittently, thus complicating their diagnosis, particularly in the ambulatory setting. Recently, technological advances have facilitated public access to health applications and devices. This article reviews the available technologies and analyses their usefulness for the diagnosis of arrhythmias in the context of everyday clinical practice.

  6. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) ... due to medicine) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  7. αB-Crystallin R120G variant causes cardiac arrhythmias and alterations in the expression of Ca(2+) -handling proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qibin; Sanbe, Atsushi; Zhang, Xingwei; Liu, Jun-Ping; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    Mutations of αB-crystallin (CryαB), a small heat shock protein abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscles, are known to cause desmin-related myopathies. The CryαB R120G allele has been linked to a familial desminopathy and, in transgenic mice, causes a sudden death at about 28 weeks of age. To investigate the mechanisms of the sudden cardiac arrest of CryαB R120G transgenic mice, we prepared protein samples from left ventricular tissues of two different age groups (10 and 28 weeks) and examined Ca(2+) -handling proteins. Expression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) 2, phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2 and calsequestrin 2 was significantly decreased in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In addition, low heart rate variability, including heart rate, total power and low frequency, was observed and continuous electrocardiogram monitoring revealed cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, atrioventricular block and atrial flutter, in 28-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In contrast, expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like protein, inositol requirement 1 and X-box binding protein 1 were increased significantly in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαBR120G transgenic mice, suggesting that the CryαBR120G transgenic mice exhibit increased ER stress compared with wild-type mice. Together, the data suggest that the CryαB R120G dominant variant induces ER stress and impairs Ca(2+) regulation, leading to ageing-related cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias and decreased autonomic tone with shortened lifespan.

  8. Neuronal Na+ Channels Are Integral Components of Pro-arrhythmic Na+/Ca2+ Signaling Nanodomain That Promotes Cardiac Arrhythmias During β-adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Radwański, Przemysław B.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Veeraraghavan, Rengasayee; Brunello, Lucia; Liu, Bin; Belevych, Andriy E.; Unudurthi, Sathya D.; Makara, Michael A.; Priori, Silvia G.; Volpe, Pompeo; Armoundas, Antonis A.; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.; Knollmann, Bjorn C.; Mohler, Peter J.; Hund, Thomas J.; Györke, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac arrhythmias are a leading cause of death in the US. Vast majority of these arrhythmias including catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) are associated with increased levels of circulating catecholamines and involve abnormal impulse formation secondary to aberrant Ca2+ and Na+ handling. However, the mechanistic link between β-AR stimulation and the subcellular/molecular arrhythmogenic trigger(s) remains elusive. Methods and Results We performed functional and structural studies to assess Ca2+ and Na+ signaling in ventricular myocyte as well as surface electrocardiograms in mouse models of cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2)-associated CPVT. We demonstrate that a subpopulation of Na+ channels (neuronal Na+ channels; nNav) that colocalize with RyR2 and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) are a part of the β-AR-mediated arrhythmogenic process. Specifically, augmented Na+ entry via nNav in the settings of genetic defects within the RyR2 complex and enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)-mediated SR Ca2+ refill is both an essential and a necessary factor for the arrhythmogenesis. Furthermore, we show that augmentation of Na+ entry involves β-AR-mediated activation of CAMKII subsequently leading to nNav augmentation. Importantly, selective pharmacological inhibition as well as silencing of Nav1.6 inhibit myocyte arrhythmic potential and prevent arrhythmias in vivo. Conclusion These data suggest that the arrhythmogenic alteration in Na+/Ca2+ handling evidenced ruing β-AR stimulation results, at least in part, from enhanced Na+ influx through nNav. Therefore, selective inhibition of these channels and Nav1.6 in particular can serve as a potential antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:27747307

  9. TRPA1 and Sympathetic Activation Contribute to Increased Risk of Triggered Cardiac Arrhythmias in Hypertensive Rats Exposed to Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W.; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diesel exhaust (DE), which is emitted from on- and off-road sources, is a complex mixture of toxic gaseous and particulate components that leads to triggered adverse cardiovascular effects such as arrhythmias. Objective: We hypothesized that increased risk of triggered arrhythmias 1 day after DE exposure is mediated by airway sensory nerves bearing transient receptor potential (TRP) channels [e.g., transient receptor potential cation channel, member A1 (TRPA1)] that, when activated by noxious chemicals, can cause a centrally mediated autonomic imbalance and heightened risk of arrhythmia. Methods: Spontaneously hypertensive rats implanted with radiotelemeters were whole-body exposed to either 500 μg/m3 (high) or 150 μg/m3 (low) whole DE (wDE) or filtered DE (fDE), or to filtered air (controls), for 4 hr. Arrhythmogenesis was assessed 24 hr later by continuous intravenous infusion of aconitine, an arrhythmogenic drug, while heart rate (HR) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored. Results: Rats exposed to wDE or fDE had slightly higher HRs and increased low-frequency:high-frequency ratios (sympathetic modulation) than did controls; ECG showed prolonged ventricular depolarization and shortened repolarization periods. Rats exposed to wDE developed arrhythmia at lower doses of aconitine than did controls; the dose was even lower in rats exposed to fDE. Pretreatment of low wDE–exposed rats with a TRPA1 antagonist or sympathetic blockade prevented the heightened sensitivity to arrhythmia. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a single exposure to DE increases the sensitivity of the heart to triggered arrhythmias. The gaseous components appear to play an important role in the proarrhythmic response, which may be mediated by activation of TRPA1, and subsequent sympathetic modulation. As such, toxic inhalants may partly exhibit their toxicity by lowering the threshold for secondary triggers, complicating assessment of their risk. PMID:21377951

  10. TRPA1 and Sympathetic Activation contribute to increased risk of triggered cardiac arrhythmias in hypertensive rats exposed to diesel exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background -Diesel exhaust (DE), which is emitted from on-and off-road sources, is a complex mixture of toxic gaseous and particulate components that results in adverse cardiovascular effects. Arrhythmias, which are often triggered in the hours and days following exposure, are on...

  11. [Maternal arrhythmias during pregnancy. Practical review].

    PubMed

    Kornacewicz-Jach, Zdzisława; Peregud-Pogorzelska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is accompanied by a variety of cardiovascular changes in normal women, and these changes can increased incidence of maternal cardiac arrhythmias. Supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias reguiring treatment are rarely seen during pregnancy in healthy women. Structural cardiac defects or residual defects after repair may contribute to the occurrence of clinically relevant arrhythmias. Arrhythmias during pregnancy include a wide spectrum. The most common are simple ventricular and atrial ectopy, sinusal tachycardia and supraventricular tachycardia. The foetus may suffer both haemodynamic alternations and adverse effects of the treatment (teratogenic risk, foetal growth and development). The management of arrhythmias in pregnant women is similar to that taken in patients who are not pregnant.

  12. Changes in heart rate, arrhythmia frequency, and cardiac biomarker values in horses during recovery after a long-distance endurance ride.

    PubMed

    Flethøj, Mette; Kanters, Jørgen K; Haugaard, Maria M; Pedersen, Philip J; Carstensen, Helena; Balling, Johanne D; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Buhl, Rikke

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmia frequency as well as changes in cardiac biomarker values and their association with heart rate in horses before and after an endurance ride. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 28 Arabian horses competing in a 120- or 160-km endurance ride. PROCEDURES ECG recordings were obtained from each horse before (preride) and after (recovery) an endurance ride to evaluate changes in heart rate and the SD of normal R-R intervals (SDNN) during the initial 12 hours of recovery. Frequencies of supraventricular and ventricular premature complexes before and after the ride were evaluated. Blood samples were obtained before the ride and twice during recovery. Hematologic analyses included measurement of serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity. RESULTS Heart rate was significantly increased and SDNN was decreased during the recovery versus preride period. Frequency of ventricular premature complexes increased during recovery, albeit not significantly, whereas frequency of supraventricular premature complexes was not significantly different between preride and recovery periods. Serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity were significantly increased in the recovery versus preride period. No associations were identified between cardiac biomarkers and velocity, distance, or mean heart rate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Heart rate increased and SDNN decreased in horses after completion of an endurance ride. These and other cardiac changes suggested that prolonged exercise such as endurance riding might have cardiac effects in horses. Additional studies are needed to clarify the clinical relevance of the findings. PMID:27074612

  13. Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes (SADS) Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... SADS Foundation and John Hopkins Hospital Division of Cardiology are hosting a family support and educational meeting ... Baltimore/DC area families with cardiac arrhythmias. Sports Cardiology & Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the Young Conference 01/ ...

  14. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmias Exclusively Using Electroanatomic Mapping: A Series of Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Leonardo Martins; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Ronsoni, Rafael; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz

    2013-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is a treatment that can cure various cardiac arrhythmias. Fluoroscopy is used to locate and direct catheters to areas that cause arrhythmias. However, fluoroscopy has several risks. Electroanatomic mapping (EAM) facilitates three-dimensional imaging without X-rays, which reduces risks associated with fluoroscopy. Objective We describe a series of patient cases wherein cardiac arrhythmia ablation was exclusively performed using EAM. Methods Patients who presented with cardiac arrhythmias that were unresponsive to pharmacological therapy were prospectively selected between March 2011 and March 2012 for arrhythmia ablation exclusively through EAM. Patients with indications for a diagnostic electrophysiology study and ablation of atrial fibrillation, left atrial tachyarrhythmias as well as hemodynamically unstable ventricular arrhythmia were excluded. We documented the procedure time, success rate and complications as well as whether fluoroscopy was necessary during the procedure. Results In total, 11 patients were enrolled in the study, including seven female patients (63%). The mean age of the patients was 50 years (SD ±16.5). Indications for the investigated procedures included four cases (35%) of atrial flutter, three cases (27%) of pre-excitation syndrome, two cases (19%) of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and two cases (19%) of ventricular extrasystoles. The mean procedure duration was 86.6 min (SD ± 26 min). Immediate success (at discharge) of the procedure was evident for nine patients (81%). There were no complications during the procedures. Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of performing an arrhythmia ablation exclusively using EAM with satisfactory results. PMID:23877742

  15. Hexabromocyclododecane exposure induces cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia by inhibiting miR-1 expression via up-regulation of the homeobox gene Nkx2.5.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meifang; Wu, Di; Wang, Chonggang; Guo, Zhizhun; Li, Bowen; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2016-01-25

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants. Although studies have reported that HBCD can cause a wide range of toxic effects on animals including humans, limited information can be found about its cardiac toxicity. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to HBCD at low concentrations of 0, 2, 20 and 200 nM. The results showed that HBCD exposure could induce cardiac hypertrophy and increased deposition of collagen. In addition, disordered calcium (Ca(2+)) handling was observed in H9C2 rat cardiomyocyte cells exposed to HBCD. Using small RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative PCR, HBCD exposure was shown to induce significant changes in the miRNA expression profile associated with the cardiovascular system. Further findings indicated that miR-1, which was depressed by Nkx2.5, might play a fundamental role in mediating cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia via its target genes Mef2a and Irx5 after HBCD treatment. HBCD exposure induced an arrhythmogenic disorder, which was triggered by the imbalance of Ryr2, Serca2a and Ncx1 expression, inducing Ca(2+) overload in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and high Ca(2+)-ATPase activities in the H9C2 cells. PMID:26476318

  16. Cardioprotective activity of alcoholic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers in calcium chloride-induced cardiac arrhythmia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Kishore, Kunal; Sharma, Divya; Srinivasan, B.P; Agarwal, Shyam Sunder; Sharma, Ashok; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Gaur, Samir; Jatav, Vijay Singh

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the antiarrhythmic activity of alcoholic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (T. cordifolia) in CaCl2 induced arrhythmia. CaCl2 (25 mg/kg) was administered by intravenous infusion (iv) to produce arrhythmia in rats. The animals were then treated with T. cordifolia extract (150, 250, and 450 mg/kg) and verapamil (5 mg/kg,iv). Lead II electrocardiogram was monitored. Plasma calcium, sodium and potassium levels were measured. In CaCl2 induced arrhythmia, heart rate was decreased by 41.10%, T. cordifolia at 150, 300, and 450 mg/kg decreased the heart rate by 26.30%, 29.16%, and 38.29%, respectively, and verapamil reduced the heart rate by 9.70% compared to the normal group. The PQRST waves were normalized and atrial and ventricular fibrillation was controlled in rats treated with verapamil and T. cordifolia. CaCl2 increased calcium and sodium levels and decreased potassium levels in blood. T. cordifolia dose-dependently decreased calcium and sodium levels and increased potassium levels. Hence, T. cordifolia can be used in antiarrhythmic clinical settings and beneficial in atrial and ventricular fibrillation and flutter and may be indicated in ventricular tachyarrhythmia. PMID:23554702

  17. [Arrhythmias from swallowing].

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, V; Mondillo, S; Faglia, S; D'Aprile, N; De Luca, G; Kristodhullu, A; Corba, E

    1992-01-01

    We describe the case of a 51-year old, non cardiopathic patient, with recurrent attacks of supraventricular tachycardia induced by swallowing. In the existing literature we found several descriptions of hypokinetic arrhythmias, easily explained by a mechanism of vagal inhibition. The cases of predominantly hyperkinetic arrhythmias, however, are much less common. In these patients the origin of the disease seems to be due to sympathetic oesophageal fibers and superior and medium cardiac nerves. In the present case, as in the others reported in the literature, the drug of choice seems to be Amiodarone which appears to be the most effective in preventing tachyarrhythmias caused by swallowing.

  18. [2 newborn infants with severe arrhythmia caused by hyperkalemia].

    PubMed

    Maclaine Pont, J; Hack, W W; Sobotka-Plojhar, M; Ekkelkamp, S

    1987-02-01

    Two newborn infants with ventricular arrhythmias secondary to hyperkalaemia are presented. One child also showed a decreased serum calcium concentration. There is scanty literature concerning the often life threatening cardiac arrhythmias due to hyperkalaemia in the newborn infants. Treatment of the cardiac arrhythmias require intravenous calcium gluconat and sodium bicarbonate infusion beside lowering the serum potassium level in the usual way.

  19. Genetics of inherited primary arrhythmia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Danna A; Gollob, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    A sudden unexplained death is felt to be due to a primary arrhythmic disorder when no structural heart disease is found on autopsy, and there is no preceding documentation of heart disease. In these cases, death is presumed to be secondary to a lethal and potentially heritable abnormality of cardiac ion channel function. These channelopathies include congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, and short QT syndrome. In certain cases, genetic testing may have an important role in supporting a diagnosis of a primary arrhythmia disorder, and can also provide prognostic information, but by far the greatest strength of genetic testing lies in the screening of family members, who may be at risk. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic genetic and molecular pathophysiology of the primary inherited arrhythmia disorders, and to outline a rational approach to genetic testing, management, and family screening. PMID:26425105

  20. [Alcohol and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Jurisch, D; Neef, M; Hagendorff, A

    2016-09-01

    The effects of alcohol on induction of arrhythmias is dose-dependent, independent of preexisting cardiovascular diseases or heart failure and can affect otherwise healthy subjects. While the probability of atrial fibrillation increases with the alcohol dosage, events of sudden cardiac death are less frequent with low and moderate consumption but occur more often in heavy drinkers with alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Men are first affected at higher dosages of alcohol but women can suffer from arrhythmias at lower dosages. Thromboembolisms and ischemic stroke can occur less often at lower dosages of alcohol; however, hemorrhagic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage are increased with higher alcohol dosages. Recognizable protective mechanisms of alcohol with respect to cardiovascular diseases only occur with lower amounts of alcohol of less than 10 g per day. Underlying mechanisms explain these controversial effects. Specific therapeutic options for alcohol-related arrhythmias apart from abstinence from alcohol consumption are not known. PMID:27582366

  1. Prediction of fatal or near-fatal cardiac arrhythmia events in patients with depressed left ventricular function after an acute myocardial infarction†

    PubMed Central

    Huikuri, Heikki V.; Raatikainen, M.J. Pekka; Moerch-Joergensen, Rikke; Hartikainen, Juha; Virtanen, Vesa; Boland, Jean; Anttonen, Olli; Hoest, Nis; Boersma, Lucas V.A.; Platou, Eivind S.; Messier, Marc D.; Bloch-Thomsen, Poul-Erik

    2009-01-01

    Aims To determine whether risk stratification tests can predict serious arrhythmic events after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 0.40). Methods and results A total of 5869 consecutive patients were screened in 10 European centres, and 312 patients (age 65 ± 11 years) with a mean LVEF of 31 ± 6% were included in the study. Heart rate variability/turbulence, ambient arrhythmias, signal-averaged electrocardiogram (SAECG), T-wave alternans, and programmed electrical stimulation (PES) were performed 6 weeks after AMI. The primary endpoint was ECG-documented ventricular fibrillation or symptomatic sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). To document these arrhythmic events, the patients received an implantable ECG loop-recorder. There were 25 primary endpoints (8.0%) during the follow-up of 2 years. The strongest predictors of primary endpoint were measures of heart rate variability, e.g. hazard ratio (HR) for reduced very-low frequency component (<5.7 ln ms2) adjusted for clinical variables was 7.0 (95% CI: 2.4–20.3, P < 0.001). Induction of sustained monomorphic VT during PES (adjusted HR = 4.8, 95% CI, 1.7–13.4, P = 0.003) also predicted the primary endpoint. Conclusion Fatal or near-fatal arrhythmias can be predicted by many risk stratification methods, especially by heart rate variability, in patients with reduced LVEF after AMI. PMID:19155249

  2. Computers and clinical arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Knoebel, S B; Lovelace, D E

    1983-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are ubiquitous in normal and abnormal hearts. These disorders may be life-threatening or benign, symptomatic or unrecognized. Arrhythmias may be the precursor of sudden death, a cause or effect of cardiac failure, a clinical reflection of acute or chronic disorders, or a manifestation of extracardiac conditions. Progress is being made toward unraveling the diagnostic and therapeutic problems involved in arrhythmogenesis. Many of the advances would not be possible, however, without the availability of computer technology. To preserve the proper balance and purposeful progression of computer usage, engineers and physicians have been exhorted not to work independently in this field. Both should learn some of the other's trade. The two disciplines need to come together to solve important problems with computers in cardiology. The intent of this article was to acquaint the practicing cardiologist with some of the extant and envisioned computer applications and some of the problems with both. We conclude that computer-based database management systems are necessary for sorting out the clinical factors of relevance for arrhythmogenesis, but computer database management systems are beset with problems that will require sophisticated solutions. The technology for detecting arrhythmias on routine electrocardiograms is quite good but human over-reading is still required, and the rationale for computer application in this setting is questionable. Systems for qualitative, continuous monitoring and review of extended time ECG recordings are adequate with proper noise rejection algorithms and editing capabilities. The systems are limited presently for clinical application to the recognition of ectopic rhythms and significant pauses. Attention should now be turned to the clinical goals for detection and quantification of arrhythmias. We should be asking the following questions: How quantitative do systems need to be? Are computers required for the detection of

  3. High-throughput cardiac safety evaluation and multi-parameter arrhythmia profiling of cardiomyocytes using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Kristin H; Lewis, Gregory F; Gay, Elaine A; Sellgren, Katelyn L; Grego, Sonia

    2015-10-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) recording extracellular field potentials of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) provide a rich data set for functional assessment of drug response. The aim of this work is the development of a method for a systematic analysis of arrhythmia using MEAs, with emphasis on the development of six parameters accounting for different types of cardiomyocyte signal irregularities. We describe a software approach to carry out such analysis automatically including generation of a heat map that enables quick visualization of arrhythmic liability of compounds. We also implemented signal processing techniques for reliable extraction of the repolarization peak for field potential duration (FPD) measurement even from recordings with low signal to noise ratios. We measured hiPS-CM's on a 48 well MEA system with 5minute recordings at multiple time points (0.5, 1, 2 and 4h) after drug exposure. We evaluated concentration responses for seven compounds with a combination of hERG, QT and clinical proarrhythmia properties: Verapamil, Ranolazine, Flecainide, Amiodarone, Ouabain, Cisapride, and Terfenadine. The predictive utility of MEA parameters as surrogates of these clinical effects were examined. The beat rate and FPD results exhibited good correlations with previous MEA studies in stem cell derived cardiomyocytes and clinical data. The six-parameter arrhythmia assessment exhibited excellent predictive agreement with the known arrhythmogenic potential of the tested compounds, and holds promise as a new method to predict arrhythmic liability. PMID:26232523

  4. Recommendations and cardiological evaluation of athletes with arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hoogsteen, J.; Bennekers, J.H.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Hemel, N.M.; Wilde, A.A.M.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Gorgels, A.P.M.; Smeets, J.L.R.M.; Hauer, R.N.W.; Jordaens, J.L.M.; Schalij, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Besides the consensus meeting in Amersfoort in 1988 and the Bethesda conference in 1994 recommendations are not available in the Netherlands for screening and evaluation of athletes with cardiac arrhythmias. Guidelines for competitive athletes with cardiac arrhythmias in the United States and Italy were published in 2000. In 1998 Estes et al. published the most important opinions on sudden cardiac death, screening and evaluation of athletes and arrhythmias. This study addresses the physiological and morphological consequences of athletic training, cardiac pathology and risk stratification for sudden cardiac death. Recommendations for competitive athletes with cardiovascular abnormalities, arrhythmias and proposals for specific protocols are given. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:25696317

  5. Dual optical recordings for action potentials and calcium handling in induced pluripotent stem cell models of cardiac arrhythmias using genetically encoded fluorescent indicators.

    PubMed

    Song, LouJin; Awari, Daniel W; Han, Elizabeth Y; Uche-Anya, Eugenia; Park, Seon-Hye E; Yabe, Yoko A; Chung, Wendy K; Yazawa, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    Reprogramming of human somatic cells to pluripotency has been used to investigate disease mechanisms and to identify potential therapeutics. However, the methods used for reprogramming, in vitro differentiation, and phenotyping are still complicated, expensive, and time-consuming. To address the limitations, we first optimized a protocol for reprogramming of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes into pluripotency using single lipofection and the episomal vectors in a 24-well plate format. This method allowed us to generate multiple lines of integration-free and feeder-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from seven patients with cardiac diseases and three controls. Second, we differentiated human iPSCs derived from patients with Timothy syndrome into cardiomyocytes using a monolayer differentiation method. We found that Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes showed slower, irregular contractions and abnormal calcium handling compared with the controls. The results are consistent with previous reports using a retroviral method for reprogramming and an embryoid body-based method for cardiac differentiation. Third, we developed an efficient approach for recording the action potentials and calcium transients simultaneously in control and patient cardiomyocytes using genetically encoded fluorescent indicators, ArcLight and R-GECO1. The dual optical recordings enabled us to observe prolonged action potentials and abnormal calcium handling in Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes. We confirmed that roscovitine rescued the phenotypes in Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes and that these findings were consistent with previous studies using conventional electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging with dyes. The approaches using our optimized methods and dual optical recordings will improve iPSC applicability for disease modeling to investigate mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias and to test potential therapeutics.

  6. Teaching cardiac electrophysiology modeling to undergraduate students: laboratory exercises and GPU programming for the study of arrhythmias and spiral wave dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bartocci, Ezio; Singh, Rupinder; von Stein, Frederick B; Amedome, Avessie; Caceres, Alan Joseph J; Castillo, Juan; Closser, Evan; Deards, Gabriel; Goltsev, Andriy; Ines, Roumwelle Sta; Isbilir, Cem; Marc, Joan K; Moore, Diquan; Pardi, Dana; Sadhu, Sandeep; Sanchez, Samuel; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, Anoopa; Rogers, Joshua; Wolinetz, Aron; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Zhao, Kai; Filipski, Andrew B; Gilmour, Robert F; Grosu, Radu; Glimm, James; Smolka, Scott A; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Clarke, Edmund M; Griffeth, Nancy; Fenton, Flavio H

    2011-12-01

    As part of a 3-wk intersession workshop funded by a National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing award, 15 undergraduate students from the City University of New York(1) collaborated on a study aimed at characterizing the voltage dynamics and arrhythmogenic behavior of cardiac cells for a broad range of physiologically relevant conditions using an in silico model. The primary goal of the workshop was to cultivate student interest in computational modeling and analysis of complex systems by introducing them through lectures and laboratory activities to current research in cardiac modeling and by engaging them in a hands-on research experience. The success of the workshop lay in the exposure of the students to active researchers and experts in their fields, the use of hands-on activities to communicate important concepts, active engagement of the students in research, and explanations of the significance of results as the students generated them. The workshop content addressed how spiral waves of electrical activity are initiated in the heart and how different parameter values affect the dynamics of these reentrant waves. Spiral waves are clinically associated with tachycardia, when the waves remain stable, and with fibrillation, when the waves exhibit breakup. All in silico experiments were conducted by simulating a mathematical model of cardiac cells on graphics processing units instead of the standard central processing units of desktop computers. This approach decreased the run time for each simulation to almost real time, thereby allowing the students to quickly analyze and characterize the simulated arrhythmias. Results from these simulations, as well as some of the background and methodology taught during the workshop, is presented in this article along with the programming code and the explanations of simulation results in an effort to allow other teachers and students to perform their own demonstrations, simulations, and studies.

  7. Cardiac Overexpression of Constitutively Active Galpha q Causes Angiotensin II Type1 Receptor Activation, Leading to Progressive Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Naoko; Kashihara, Toshihide; Shimojo, Hisashi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Nakada, Tsutomu; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Mende, Ulrike; Taira, Eiichi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Sanbe, Atsushi; Hirose, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Transgenic mice with transient cardiac expression of constitutively active Galpha q (Gαq-TG) exhibt progressive heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias after the initiating stimulus of transfected constitutively active Gαq becomes undetectable. However, the mechanisms are still unknown. We examined the effects of chronic administration of olmesartan on heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia in Gαq-TG mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Olmesartan (1 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was chronically administered to Gαq-TG from 6 to 32 weeks of age, and all experiments were performed in mice at the age of 32 weeks. Chronic olmesartan administration prevented the severe reduction of left ventricular fractional shortening, and inhibited ventricular interstitial fibrosis and ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in Gαq-TG. Electrocardiogram demonstrated that premature ventricular contraction (PVC) was frequently (more than 20 beats/min) observed in 9 of 10 vehicle-treated Gαq-TG but in none of 10 olmesartan-treated Gαq-TG. The collected QT interval and monophasic action potential duration in the left ventricle were significantly shorter in olmesartan-treated Gαq-TG than in vehicle-treated Gαq-TG. CTGF, collagen type 1, ANP, BNP, and β-MHC gene expression was increased and olmesartan significantly decreased the expression of these genes in Gαq-TG mouse ventricles. The expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 3 and 6 channel and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) proteins but not angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor was increased in Gαq-TG ventricles compared with NTG mouse ventricles. Olmesartan significantly decreased TRPC6 and tended to decrease ACE expressions in Gαq-TG. Moreover, it increased AT1 receptor in Gαq-TG. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation plays an important role in the development of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia in Gαq-TG mouse model of heart failure

  8. History of arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Janse, M J; Rosen, M R

    2006-01-01

    A historical overview is given on the techniques to record the electrical activity of the heart, some anatomical aspects relevant for the understanding of arrhythmias, general mechanisms of arrhythmias, mechanisms of some specific arrhythmias and nonpharmacological forms of therapy. The unravelling of arrhythmia mechanisms depends, of course, on the ability to record the electrical activity of the heart. It is therefore no surprise that following the construction of the string galvanometer by Einthoven in 1901, which allowed high-fidelity recording of the body surface electrocardiogram, the study of arrhythmias developed in an explosive way. Still, papers from McWilliam (1887), Garrey (1914) and Mines (1913, 1914) in which neither mechanical nor electrical activity was recorded provided crucial insights into re-entry as a mechanism for atrial and ventricular fibrillation, atrioventricular nodal re-entry and atrioventricular re-entrant tachycardia in hearts with an accessory atrioventricular connection. The components of the electrocardiogram, and of extracellular electrograms directly recorded from the heart, could only be well understood by comparing such registrations with recordings of transmembrane potentials. The first intracellular potentials were recorded with microelectrodes in 1949 by Coraboeuf and Weidmann. It is remarkable that the interpretation of extracellular electrograms was still controversial in the 1950s, and it was not until 1962 that Dower showed that the transmembrane action potential upstroke coincided with the steep negative deflection in the electrogram. For many decades, mapping of the spread of activation during an arrhythmia was performed with a "roving" electrode that was subsequently placed on different sites on the cardiac surface with a simultaneous recording of another signal as time reference. This method could only provide reliable information if the arrhythmia was strictly regular. When multiplexing systems became available in

  9. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise.

  10. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  11. NASPE expert consensus document: use of i.v. (conscious) sedation/analgesia by nonanesthesia personnel in patients undergoing arrhythmia specific diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Bubien, R S; Fisher, J D; Gentzel, J A; Murphy, E K; Irwin, M E; Shea, J B; Dick, M; Ching, E; Wilkoff, B L; Benditt, D G

    1998-02-01

    Use of IV (Conscious) Sedation/Analgesia by Nonanesthesia Personnel in Patients Undergoing Arrhythmia Specific Diagnostic, Therapeutic, and Surgical Procedures. This article is intended to inform practitioners, payers, and other interested parties of the opinion of the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (NASPE) concerning evolving areas of clinical practice or technologies or both, that are widely available or are new to the practice community. Expert consensus documents are so designated because the evidence base and experience with the technology or clinical practice are not yet sufficiently well developed, or rigorously controlled trials are not yet available that would support a more definitive statement. This article has been endorsed by the American College of Cardiology, October 1997. PMID:9507538

  12. Metabolic Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Liu, Man; Sturdy, Megan; Gao, Ge; Varghese, Susan T.; Sovari, Ali A.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD) and add to the current heart failure (HF) health crisis. Nevertheless, the pathological processes underlying arrhythmias are unclear. Arrhythmic conditions are associated with systemic and cardiac oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In excitable cardiac cells, ROS regulate both cellular metabolism and ion homeostasis. Increasing evidence suggests that elevated cellular ROS can cause alterations of the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5), abnormal Ca2+ handling, changes of mitochondrial function, and gap junction remodeling, leading to arrhythmogenesis. This review summarizes our knowledge of the mechanisms by which ROS may cause arrhythmias and discusses potential therapeutic strategies to prevent arrhythmias by targeting ROS and its consequences. PMID:21978629

  13. SU-C-303-06: Treatment Planning Study for Non-Invasive Cardiac Arrhythmia Ablation with Scanned Carbon Ions in An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, A; Constantinescu, A; Prall, M; Kaderka, R; Durante, M; Graeff, C; Lehmann, H I; Takami, M; Packer, D L; Lugenbiel, P; Thomas, D; Richter, D; Bert, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Scanned carbon ion beams might offer a non-invasive alternative treatment for cardiac arrhythmia, which are a major health-burden. We studied the feasibility of this procedure in an animal model. The underlying treatment planning and motion mitigation strategies will be presented. Methods: The study was carried out in 15 pigs, randomly distributed to 3 target groups: atrioventricular node (AVN, 8 animals with 25, 40, and 55 Gy target dose), left ventricular free-wall (LV, 4 animals with 40 Gy) and superior pulmonary vein (SPV, 3 animals with 40 Gy). Breathing motion was suppressed by repeated enforced breathholds at end exhale. Cardiac motion was mitigated by an inhomogeneous rescanning scheme with up to 15 rescans. The treatment planning was performed using the GSI in-house software TRiP4D on cardiac-gated 4DCTs, applying a range-considering ITV based on an extended CTV. For AVN and SPV isotropic 5 mm margins were applied to the CTV, while for the LV 2mm+2% range margins were used. The opposing fields for AVN and LV targets were optimized independently (SFUD), while SPV treatments were optimized as IMPT deliveries, including dose restrictions to the radiosensitive AVN. Results: Median value of D{sub 95} over all rescanning simulations was 99.1% (AVN), 98.0% (SPV) and 98.3% (LV) for the CTV and 94.7% (AVN) and 92.7% (SPV) for the PTV, respectively. The median D{sub 5}-D{sub 95} was improved with rescanning compared to unmitigated delivery from 13.3 to 6.5% (CTV) and from 23.4 to 11.6% (PTV). ICRP dose limits for aorta, trachea, esophagus and skin were respected. The maximal dose in the coronary arteries was limited to 30 Gy. Conclusion: We demonstrated the feasibility of a homogeneous dose delivery to different cardiac structures in a porcine model using a time-optimized inhomogeneous rescanning scheme. The presented treatment planning strategies were applied in a pig study with the analysis ongoing. Funding: This work was supported in part by the

  14. An evaluation of potential signals for ventricular arrhythmia and cardiac arrest with dolasetron, ondansetron, and granisetron in the fda combined spontaneous reporting system/adverse event reporting system

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Frederick M.; Coop, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. The PRR, used as a parameter to detect a potential signal within the database, was 3.23, 1.31, and 1.13 for dolasetron, ondansetron, and granisetron, respectively. The number of observed ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrests was ∼3-fold higher with dolasetron compared with the expected value (calculated by dividing the individual agent's total number of events reported by the proportion of adverse events for all agents combined). The results for dolasetron fulfilled the criteria we used to define a potential signal. Conclusions: This analysis detected a potential signal for ventricular arrhythmiasand cardiac arrest with dolasetron, but not with ondansetron or granisetron. However, there are limitations of a PRR analysis, which include only measuring cases that have been reported, providing relative frequencies instead of actual rates, and not providing information on the severity of adverse events or causal relationships. In addition, our analysis does not include consideration of concomitant medications, and only 2 search terms were used. Errors in identifying potential signals may also include confounding factors, such as the underlying disease, potential confusion with reporting under trade and generic names, and potential multiple reporting of the same case. PMID:24790242

  15. Iron-Sensitive Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Patients with Chronic Myocardial Infarction: Early Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cokic, Ivan; Kali, Avinash; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Yee, Raymond; Tang, Richard; Tighiouart, Mourad; Wang, Xunzhang; Jackman, Warren S.; Chugh, Sumeet S.; White, James A.; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent canines studies have shown that iron deposition within chronic myocardial infarction (CMI) influences the electrical behavior of the heart. To date, the link between the iron deposition and malignant ventricular arrhythmias (mVA) in humans with CMI is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS CMI patients (n=94) who underwent late-gadolinium-enhanced CMR prior to ICD implantation for primary and secondary prevention were retrospectively analyzed. The predictive values of hypointense cores (HIC) in balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) images and conventional CMR and ECG mVA parameters for the prediction of primary combined outcome (appropriate ICD therapy, survived cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death) were studied. The use of HIC within CMI on bSSFP as a marker of iron deposition was validated in a canine MI model (n=18). Nineteen patients met the study criteria with events occurring at a median of 249 (interquartile range (IQR) of 540) days after ICD placement. Of the 19 patients meeting the primary endpoint, 18 were classified as HIC+, while only 1 was HIC−. Among the cohort in whom the primary endpoint was not met, there were 28 HIC+ and 47 HIC− patients. ROC analysis demonstrated an additive predictive value of HIC for mVAs with an increased AUC to 0.87 when added to LVEF (LVEF alone 0.68). Both CMR and histological validation studies performed in canines demonstrated that HIC regions in bSSFP images within CMI likely result from iron depositions. CONCLUSIONS Hypointense cores within CMI on bSSFP CMR can be used as a marker of iron deposition and yields incremental information toward improved prediction of mVA. PMID:26259581

  16. Non-Invasive Drosophila ECG Recording by Using Eutectic Gallium-Indium Alloy Electrode: A Feasible Tool for Future Research on the Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hung; Tzeng, Te-Hsuen; Huang, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yu-Hao; Chang, Yi-Chung; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Wu, June-Tai; Lee, Hsiu-Hsian; Lai, Po-Jung; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Cheng, Ya-Chen; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2014-01-01

    on the molecular mechanism involved in cardiac arrhythmia, as well as research related to drug screening and development. PMID:25226390

  17. Absence of triadin, a protein of the calcium release complex, is responsible for cardiac arrhythmia with sudden death in human

    PubMed Central

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Cacheux, Marine; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Fauconnier, Jeremy; Brocard, Julie; Denjoy, Isabelle; Durand, Philippe; Guicheney, Pascale; Kyndt, Florence; Leenhardt, Antoine; Le Marec, Hervé; Lucet, Vincent; Mabo, Philippe; Probst, Vincent; Monnier, Nicole; Ray, Pierre F.; Santoni, Elodie; Trémeaux, Pauline; Lacampagne, Alain; Fauré, Julien; Lunardi, Joël; Marty, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmogenic disease so far related to mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) or the cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Because mutations in RYR2 or in CASQ2 are not retrieved in all CPVT cases, we searched for mutations in the physiological protein partners of RyR2 and CSQ2 in a large cohort of CPVT patients with no detected mutation in these two genes. Based on a candidate gene approach, we focused our investigations on triadin and junctin, two proteins that link RyR2 and CSQ2. Mutations in the triadin (TRDN) and in the junctin (ASPH) genes were searched in a cohort of 97 CPVT patients. We identified three mutations in triadin which cosegregated with the disease on a recessive mode of transmission in two families, but no mutation was found in junctin. Two TRDN mutations, a 4 bp deletion and a nonsense mutation, resulted in premature stop codons; the third mutation, a p.T59R missense mutation, was further studied. Expression of the p.T59R mutant in COS-7 cells resulted in intracellular retention and degradation of the mutant protein. This was confirmed after in vivo expression of the mutant triadin in triadin knock-out mice by viral transduction. In this work, we identified TRDN as a new gene responsible for an autosomal recessive form of CPVT. The mutations identified in the two families lead to the absence of the protein, thereby demonstrating the importance of triadin for the normal function of the cardiac calcium release complex in humans. PMID:22422768

  18. Weather-induced ischemia and arrhythmia in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation: another difference between men and women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Alexandra; Schuh, Angela; Maetzel, Friedrich-Karl; Rückerl, Regina; Breitner, Susanne; Peters, Annette

    2008-07-01

    Given the accumulating evidence that people with underlying heart disease are a particularly vulnerable group for triggers like changing meteorological parameters, the objective of this longitudinal study was to analyze the influence of weather parameters on blood pressure, arrhythmia and ischemia in cardiovascular patients. A panel study with repeated measurements was conducted in a rehabilitation clinic in Timmendorfer Strand (Baltic Sea, Germany) with 872 cardiovascular patients. Heart rate, blood pressure and electrocardiography changes were measured during repeated bicycle ergometries. Generalized Estimating Equations were used for regression analyses of immediate, delayed and cumulative influences of the daily measured meteorological data. For men, a decrease in air temperature and in water vapor pressure doubled the risk of ST-segment depression during ergometry [odds ratio (OR) for 1 day delay: 1.88 (1.24; 2.83) for air temperature] with a delay of 1-2 days. For women, an increase of their heart rate before the start of the ergometry [same day: 4.36 beats/min (0.99; 7.74) for air temperature] and a 2- to 3-fold higher risk for ventricular ectopic beats [1 day delay: OR 2.43 (1.17; 5.05) for air temperature] was observed with an increase in temperature and water vapor pressure in almost all analyzed time-windows. The study indicates that meteorological parameters can induce changes in heart function which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events especially in susceptible, diseased individuals. The observed effect on ST-segment depression could be a link between the association of weather changes and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  19. Sevoflurane-induced arrhythmia in healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Santos, João; Santos, Vera; Gago, Paula; Cortez-Dias, Nuno

    2016-11-01

    Inhalatory anesthetic agents are frequently used for anesthesia maintenance. Sevoflurane is considered one of the safest regarding its cardiac effects. We report a case of a cardiac arrhythmia induced by sevoflurane in an otherwise healthy adult and discuss sevoflurane's cardiac effects. PMID:27687440

  20. Toll-like receptor 4 activation promotes cardiac arrhythmias by decreasing the transient outward potassium current (Ito) through an IRF3-dependent and MyD88-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Monnerat-Cahli, Gustavo; Alonso, Hiart; Gallego, Monica; Alarcón, Micaela Lopez; Bassani, Rosana A; Casis, Oscar; Medei, Emiliano

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are one of the main causes of death worldwide. Several studies have shown that inflammation plays a key role in different cardiac diseases and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) seem to be involved in cardiac complications. In the present study, we investigated whether the activation of TLR4 induces cardiac electrical remodeling and arrhythmias, and the signaling pathway involved in these effects. Membrane potential was recorded in Wistar rat ventricle. Ca(2+) transients, as well as the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICaL) and the transient outward K(+) current (Ito), were recorded in isolated myocytes after 24 h exposure to the TLR4 agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 μg/ml). TLR4 stimulation in vitro promoted a cardiac electrical remodeling that leads to action potential prolongation associated with arrhythmic events, such as delayed afterdepolarization and triggered activity. After 24 h LPS incubation, Ito amplitude, as well as Kv4.3 and KChIP2 mRNA levels were reduced. The Ito decrease by LPS was prevented by inhibition of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), but not by inhibition of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4) or nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Extrasystolic activity was present in 25% of the cells, but apart from that, Ca(2+) transients and ICaL were not affected by LPS; however, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) activity was apparently increased. We conclude that TLR4 activation decreased Ito, which increased AP duration via a MyD88-independent, IRF3-dependent pathway. The longer action potential, associated with enhanced Ca(2+) efflux via NCX, could explain the presence of arrhythmias in the LPS group.

  1. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  2. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Seema R; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Watkin, Levi B; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S; Coe, Bradley P; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H B; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M; Hanchard, Neil A; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Yang, Yaping

    2016-02-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3-9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3-9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4-6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3-9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations.

  3. Antipsychotic Drugs and the Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmia and/or Sudden Cardiac Death: A Nation‐wide Case‐Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi‐Shin; Tsai, Yu‐Ting; Tsai, Hui‐Ju

    2015-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics have been linked to prolongation of the QT interval. However, little is known about the risk of ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) associated with individual antipsychotic drug use. This study was designed to investigate the association between specific antipsychotic drugs and the risk of VA and/or SCD. Methods and Results We conducted a case‐crossover study using a nation‐wide population‐based sample obtained from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 17 718 patients with incident VA and/or SCD were enrolled. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to examine the effects of antipsychotic drug use on the risk of VA/SCD during various case and control time windows of 7, 14, and 28 days. The effect of the potency of a human ether‐à‐go‐go‐related gene (hERG) potassium channel blockade was also assessed. Antipsychotic drug use was associated with a 1.53‐fold increased risk of VA and/or SCD. Antipsychotic drugs with increased risk included clothiapine, haloperidol, prochlorperazine, thioridazine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and sulpiride. The association was significantly higher among those with short‐term use. Antipsychotics with a high potency of the hERG potassium channel blockade had the highest risk of VA and/or SCD. Conclusion Use of antipsychotic drugs is associated with an increased risk of VA and/or SCD. Careful evaluations of the risks and benefits of antipsychotic treatment are highly recommended. PMID:25713294

  4. Ventricular arrhythmias: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Schleifer, J William; Srivathsan, Komandoor

    2013-11-01

    The management of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation in the cardiac intensive care unit can be complex. These arrhythmias have many triggers, including ischemia, sympathetic stimulation, and medication toxicities, as well as many different substrates, ranging from ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies to rare genetic conditions such as Brugada syndrome and long QT syndrome. Different settings, such as congenital heart disease, postoperative ventricular arrhythmias, and ventricular assist devices, increase the complexity of management. This article reviews the variety of situations and cardiac conditions that give rise to ventricular arrhythmias, focusing on inpatient management strategies.

  5. Non-Invasive Assessment of Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias During Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Alterations Team is currently conducting studies to determine what alterations in hemodynamic regulation result from sixteen days of simulated microgravity exposure in normal human subjects. In this project we make additional measurements on these same study subjects in order to determine whether there is an increase in susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias resulting from simulated microgravity exposure. Numerous anecdotal and documented reports from the past 30 years suggest that the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias among astronauts is increased during space flight. For example, documented runs of ventricular tachycardia have been recorded from crew members of Skylab and Mir, there was much attention given by the lay press to Mir Commander Vasily Tslbliyev's complaints of heart rhythm irregularities in July of 1997, and cardiovascular mechanisms may have been causal in the recent death of an experimental primate shortly after return from space. In 1986, a Mir cosmonaut, Alexander Laveikin, was brought home and replaced with an alternate cosmonaut as a result of cardiac dysrhythmias that began during extravehicular activity. Furthermore, at a joint NASA/NSBRI workshop held in January 1998, cardiac arrhythmias were identified as the highest priority cardiovascular risk to a human Mars mission. Despite the evidence for the risk of a potentially lethal arrhythmia resulting from microgravity exposure, the effects of space flight and the associated physiologic stresses on cardiac conduction processes are not known, and an increase in cardiac susceptibility to arrhythmias has never been quantified. In this project, we are determining whether simulated space flight increases the risk of developing life-threatening heart rhythm disturbances such as sustained ventricular tachycardia (defined as ventricular tachycardia lasting at least 30 seconds or resulting in hemodynamic collapse) and ventricular fibrillation. We are obtaining measures of

  6. Mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Kléber, A G

    1991-01-01

    The most important ventricular arrhythmias, the ventricular tachycardias (VTs) and ventricular fibrillations (VFs), are thought to underlie the majority of cases of sudden cardiac death. In ischemic heart disease, they can be divided into several pathophysiological entities: (a) arrhythmias occurring during the acute reversible phase of ischemia, (b) arrhythmias taking place during reperfusion of acutely ischemic myocardium, (c) arrhythmias occurring 24-72 h after acute infarction, and (d) arrhythmias associated with chronic infarction. In all three settings, the mechanisms sustaining ventricular arrhythmias need to be distinguished from initiating mechanisms. With the exception of the 24-72-h stage, these arrhythmias are sustained by circus movement with reentry: the electrophysiological determinants of circus movements at a cellular level and, consequently, the appearance of the circulating wave fronts, differ according to the ischemic phase. In acute ischemia, multiple circulating waves, with somewhat large diameters, change their vortexes from beat to beat. In chronic infarction, the location of the stable circuits with elongated central zones of block are closely related to myocardial fiber architecture and probably to scar tissue. These differences indicate that (a) in acute ischemia, the conduction disturbances are mainly determined by the development of inexcitability at the level of cardiac membranes; and (b) in chronic infarction, the site of conduction block and the pivoting points of the wave fronts are determined by impairment of electrical cell-to-cell coupling. In contrast to the mechanisms sustaining VT and VF, the initiating mechanisms are less well defined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1723111

  7. Ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, K M; Wyse, D G

    1988-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death claims thousands of Canadians annually. Ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation account for up to 85% of these deaths. Identifying the patients at risk remains a major challenge. Those who have recurrent ventricular tachycardia or have been resuscitated from ventricular fibrillation are generally considered to be at highest risk. Although ventricular premature beats in the absence of previous ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation are not helpful in identifying such patients in most cases, they can indicate increased risk for sudden cardiac death in the presence of a structural cardiac abnormality, particularly recent myocardial infarction; however, the need for treatment in such cases is speculative and is being investigated. Treatment is mandatory for survivors of an episode of ventricular fibrillation and those with recurrent sustained ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia. The approach to management is either invasive or noninvasive. Selection of an antiarrhythmic agent is facilitated by knowledge of some basic electrophysiologic features of the heart and of the classification of antiarrhythmic drugs. However, drug therapy has to be individualized on the basis of efficacy, left ventricular function and adverse effects or potential adverse effects of the drug. Amiodarone therapy or nonpharmacologic therapy should be considered if a suitable antiarrhythmic agent cannot be found. PMID:3284626

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Updated:Sep 2,2016 Do ... Risk for Arrhythmia • Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Arrhythmia • Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Introduction Medications Ablation Devices for ...

  9. Mechanisms of Arrhythmias and Conduction Disorders in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Mahek; Strunets, Anton; Shen, Win-Kuang; Jahangir, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Aging is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias, which contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The frequency of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachyarrhythmia, is projected to increase as the population ages, greatly impacting health care resource utilization. Several clinical factors associated with the risk of arrhythmias have been identified in the population, yet the molecular bases for the increased predisposition to arrhythmogenesis in the elderly are not fully understood. Therefore, only limited therapeutic strategies directed at pathophysiological processes that enhance cardiac vulnerability to arrhythmias are available. This is further compounded by the paucity of outcome studies providing evidence on which optimal management guidelines can be formulated for the very elderly. This review highlights the epidemiology of cardiac dysrhythmias, changes incardiac structure and function associated with aging, and the basis for arrhythmogenesis in the elderly, the understanding of which is critical to formulate preventive strategies. PMID:23101571

  10. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in pediatric patients with supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L A; Lobban, J H; Schmidt, S B

    1995-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of foci leading to abnormal cardiac rhythms is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice in the management of arrhythmias in adults. This report reviews our initial experience with RF ablation in the pediatric population. PMID:8533398

  11. How Are Arrhythmias Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some arrhythmias are treated with a jolt of electricity to the heart. This type of treatment is ... senses a dangerous ventricular arrhythmia, it sends an electric shock to the heart to restore a normal ...

  12. Emerging concepts in the pharmacogenomics of arrhythmias: ion channel trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Harkcom, William T; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2010-01-01

    Continuous, rhythmic beating of the heart requires exquisite control of expression, localization and function of cardiac ion channels – the foundations of the cardiac myocyte action potential. Disruption of any of these processes can alter the shape of the action potential, predisposing to cardiac arrhythmias. These arrhythmias can manifest in a variety of ways depending on both the channels involved and the type of disruption (i.e., gain or loss of function). As much as 1% of the population of developed countries is affected by cardiac arrhythmia each year, and a detailed understanding of the mechanism of each arrhythmia is crucial to developing and prescribing the proper therapies. Many of the antiarrhythmic drugs currently on the market were developed before the underlying cause of the arrhythmia was known, and as a result lack specificity, causing side effects. The majority of the available drugs target the conductance of cardiac ion channels, either by blocking or enhancing current through the channel. In recent years, however, it has become apparent that specific targeting of ion channel conductance may not be the most effective means for treatment. Here we review increasing evidence that suggests defects in ion channel trafficking play an important role in the etiology of arrhythmias, and small molecule approaches to correct trafficking defects will likely play an important role in the future of arrhythmia treatment. PMID:20670193

  13. Psychological Distress and Arrhythmia: Risk Prediction and Potential Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, James; Whang, William

    2014-01-01

    The connection between the heart and the brain has long been anecdotally recognized but systematically studied only relatively recently. Cardiac arrhythmias, especially sudden cardiac death, remain a major public health concern and there is mounting evidence that psychological distress plays a critical role as both a predictor of high-risk cardiac substrate and as an inciting trigger. The transient, unpredictable nature of emotions and cardiac arrhythmias have made their study challenging, but evolving technologies in monitoring and imaging along with larger epidemiological data sets have encouraged more sophisticated studies examining this relationship. Here we review the research on psychological distress including anger, depression and anxiety on cardiac arrhythmias, insights into proposed mechanisms, and potential avenues for future research. PMID:23621968

  14. Sick sinus syndrome in a patient with extensive cardiac lipomatosis (sinus node dysfunction in lipomatosis).

    PubMed

    Kadmon, Ehud; Paz, Rami; Kusniec, Jairo; Strasberg, Boris

    2010-04-01

    We present a case of a 45-year-old man with an incidental and longstanding diagnosis of extensive mediastinal and cardiac lipomatosis. Along the years, he had experienced various arrhythmias, mainly bradyarrhythmias, mostly asymptomatic. Recently after documenting a sinus pause of 6 seconds and runs of nonsustained ventricular tachycardias, he underwent an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator. There are many reports of cardiac lipomatosis in the literature, including reports of related ventricular arrhythmias, some of which are fatal. (PACE 2010; 513-515).

  15. Teaching Cardiac Electrophysiology Modeling to Undergraduate Students: Laboratory Exercises and GPU Programming for the Study of Arrhythmias and Spiral Wave Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartocci, Ezio; Singh, Rupinder; von Stein, Frederick B.; Amedome, Avessie; Caceres, Alan Joseph J.; Castillo, Juan; Closser, Evan; Deards, Gabriel; Goltsev, Andriy; Ines, Roumwelle Sta.; Isbilir, Cem; Marc, Joan K.; Moore, Diquan; Pardi, Dana; Sadhu, Sandeep; Sanchez, Samuel; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, Anoopa; Rogers, Joshua; Wolinetz, Aron; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Zhao, Kai; Filipski, Andrew B.; Gilmour, Robert F., Jr.; Grosu, Radu; Glimm, James; Smolka, Scott A.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Clarke, Edmund M.; Griffeth, Nancy; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a 3-wk intersession workshop funded by a National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing award, 15 undergraduate students from the City University of New York collaborated on a study aimed at characterizing the voltage dynamics and arrhythmogenic behavior of cardiac cells for a broad range of physiologically relevant conditions…

  16. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Arrhythmia by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sovari, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies for arrhythmia using ion channel blockade, catheter ablation, or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator have limitations, and it is important to search for new antiarrhythmic therapeutic targets. Both atrial fibrillation and heart failure, a condition with increased arrhythmic risk, are associated with excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are several possible ways for ROS to induce arrhythmia. ROS can cause focal activity and reentry. ROS alter multiple cardiac ionic currents. ROS promote cardiac fibrosis and impair gap junction function, resulting in reduced myocyte coupling and facilitation of reentry. In order to design effective antioxidant drugs for treatment of arrhythmia, it is essential to explore the molecular mechanisms by which ROS exert these arrhythmic effects. Activation of Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II, c-Src tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, and abnormal splicing of cardiac sodium channels are among the recently discovered molecular mechanisms of ROS-induced arrhythmia. PMID:26981310

  17. Evidence Based Review: Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Brown, Angela K.; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Levine, Benjamin; Summers, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Very little research has systematically evaluated the prevalence (or potential risk) of cardiac arrhythmias during space flight. There are several observational reports of non life-threatening but potentially concerning arrhythmias. At least two potential risk factors for arrhythmias have been reported either during or immediately after space flight: cardiac atrophy and a prolonged QTc interval. The potential severity of the mission impact of a serious arrhythmia requires that a systematic evaluation be conducted of the risk of arrhythmia due to space flight.

  18. Race contributes to beta-blocker efficacy in pediatric patients with arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Taylor, BreAnn; Moffett, Brady S; Krenek, Michele; Valdes, Santiago O; Kim, Jeffrey

    2014-04-01

    In African-American (AA) adults, β-blockers (BB) have been reported to be less efficacious treating cardiac disease compared with whites (CAUC). This has been attributed to genetic polymorphisms of β-receptors. It is unknown if racial differences affect response to BB in pediatric patients with arrhythmias. AA and CAUC ≤ 18 years of age were included if they underwent treadmill stress testing while receiving metoprolol, atenolol, nadolol, or carvedilol. Patient demographics, resting heart rate (HR), maximum HR, and BB variables were collected. CAUC patients were matched on a 2:1 basis by age and sex to AA patients. Patients were blunted if HR was <90 % of maximum predicted HR for same-age patients on a modified Bruce protocol treadmill stress test. Long-term follow-up for breakthrough arrhythmias was documented. 78 patients were included (26 AA, 52 CAUC). No differences were noted in demographics, medication dose, BB or arrhythmia type, or baseline, maximal, or % HR change (p = not significant [NS]). On univariate analysis, fewer AA achieved a blunted HR during treadmill testing compared with CAUC (65 vs. 86%, p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, AA were less likely to have an HR blunted by BB (OR 0.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.04-0.75, p = 0.02) compared with CAUC. During the 1-year follow-up period, AA trended toward having one (58 vs. 40%, p = 0.14) or multiple instances (38 vs. 26%, p = 0.26) of breakthrough arrhythmia on cardiac Holter monitor testing. Race appears to affect the efficacy of BB therapy in pediatric patients with arrhythmias. Future studies to identify genetic polymorphisms in this patient subset are necessary.

  19. Remote Arrhythmia Monitoring System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Liszka, Kathy J.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Telemedicine is taking a step forward with the efforts of team members from the NASA Glenn Research Center, the MetroHealth campus of Case Western University, and the University of Akron. The Arrhythmia Monitoring System is a completed, working test bed developed at Glenn that collects real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) signals from a mobile or homebound patient, combines these signals with global positioning system (GPS) location data, and transmits them to a remote station for display and monitoring. Approximately 300,000 Americans die every year from sudden heart attacks, which are arrhythmia cases. However, not all patients identified at risk for arrhythmias can be monitored continuously because of technological and economical limitations. Such patients, who are at moderate risk of arrhythmias, would benefit from technology that would permit long-term continuous monitoring of electrical cardiac rhythms outside the hospital environment. Embedded Web Technology developed at Glenn to remotely command and collect data from embedded systems using Web technology is the catalyst for this new telemetry system (ref. 1). In the end-to-end system architecture, ECG signals are collected from a patient using an event recorder and are transmitted to a handheld personal digital assistant (PDA) using Bluetooth, a short-range wireless technology. The PDA concurrently tracks the patient's location via a connection to a GPS receiver. A long distance link is established via a standard Internet connection over a 2.5-generation Global System for Mobile Communications/General Packet Radio Service (GSM/GPRS)1 cellular, wireless infrastructure. Then, the digital signal is transmitted to a call center for monitoring by medical professionals.

  20. Perinatal Arrhythmias: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Janette F.; Cheulkar, Bageshree; Wichman, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    The final common pathway to death in all of us is an arrhythmia, yet we still know far too little about the contribution of conduction abnormalities and arrhythmias to the compromised states of the human fetus. At no other time in the human life cycle is the human being at more risk of unexplained and unexpected death than during the prenatal period. The risk of sudden death from 20 to 40 weeks gestation is 6 to 12 deaths/1000 fetuses/year. This is equal to, and in some ethnic groups HIGHER, than the risk of death in the adult population with known coronary artery disease over the same time frame (6 to 12 deaths/1000 patients/year). Because only a small percentage of the United States population is pregnant each year, because fetal demise is not often acknowledged through public displays such as funerals, and finally because fetal death is culturally accepted to a much greater extent than it should be, this critically important area of women’s healthcare has not had the technological advances that have been seen in adult cardiac intensive care and other areas of medicine. Fetal cardiac deaths may be preventable and the diseases that lead to these deaths are often treatable, especially if the sophistication of our modern ICU’s could somehow be translated to the prenatal monitoring arena. PMID:18063110

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  2. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  3. Anger and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Although anecdotal evidence has long suggested links between emotion and ventricular arrhythmia, more recent studies have prospectively demonstrated the arrhythmogenic effects of anger, as well as mechanisms underlying these effects. Recent findings Epidemiological studies reveal that psychological stress increases sudden death, as well as arrhythmias, in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, in populations during emotionally devastating disasters such as earthquake or war. Diary-based studies confirm that anger and other negative emotions can trigger potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Anger alters electrophysiological properties of the myocardium, including T-wave alternans, a measure of heterogeneity of repolarization, suggesting one mechanistic link between emotion and arrhythmia. Pilot studies of behavioral interventions have shown promise in decreasing arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Summary Anger and other strong emotions can trigger polymorphic, potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in vulnerable patients. Through autonomic changes including increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal, anger leads to increases in heterogeneity of repolarization as measured by T-wave alternans, known to be associated with arrhythmogenesis, as well as increasing inducibility of arrhythmia. Further delineation of mechanisms linking anger and arrhythmia, and of approaches to decrease the detrimental effects of anger and other negative emotions on arrhythmogenesis, are important areas of future investigation. PMID:19864944

  4. [Clinical significance of arrhythmia in patients with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Lazutin, V K; Nychkina, T N; Litvintsev, V P; Iakovlev, S V; Boĭko, S E

    1991-04-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias were studied in patients with essential hypertension in relation to their myocardial function. It was found that the arrhythmias occurring in the early period of the disease (borderline hypertension, Stage I hypertension) were primarily functional and affected the course of the disease and hemodynamics to a small degree. The life-threatening arrhythmias recorded in early hypertension were more commonly caused by mitral prolapse. The duration and severity of hypertension, development of left ventricular myocardial hypertrophy, myocardial fiber distension in relative heart failure play a decisive role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with Stage II hypertensive disease. It is essential to make comprehensive clinical and instrumental studies to clarify the genesis of the arrhythmic syndrome and to correctly choose the management policy in these patients.

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  6. Overview of fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shardha; Strasburger, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Though fetal arrhythmias account for a small proportion of referrals to a fetal cardiologist, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review outlines the current literature with regard to the diagnosis and, in brief, some management strategies in fetal arrhythmias. Recent findings Advances in echocardiography have resulted in significant improvements in our ability to elucidate the mechanism of arrhythmia at the bedside. At the same time, fetal magnetocardiography is broadening our understanding of mechanisms of arrhythmia especially as it pertains to ventricular arrhythmias and congenital heart block. It provides a unique window to study electrical properties of the fetal heart, unlike what has been available to date. Recent reports of bedside use of fetal ECG make it a promising new technology. The underlying mechanisms resulting in immune-mediated complete heart block in a small subset of ‘at-risk’ fetuses is under investigation. Summary There have been great strides in noninvasive diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias. However, we still need to improve our knowledge of the electromechanical properties of the fetal heart as well as the mechanisms of arrhythmia to further improve outcomes. Multiinstitutional collaborative studies are needed to help answer some of the questions regarding patient, drug selection and management algorithms. PMID:18781114

  7. Carbon monoxide and lethal arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, J.P.; Schwartz, P.J.; Vanoli, E.; Stramba-Badiale, M.; De Ferrari, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of acute exposure to carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias was studied in a previously described chronically maintained animal model of sudden cardiac death. In 60 percent of dogs with a healed anterior myocardial infarction, the combination of mild exercise and acute myocardial ischemia induces ventricular fibrillation. The events in this model are highly reproducible, thus allowing study by internal control analysis. Dogs that develop ventricular fibrillation during the test of exercise and acute myocardial ischemia are considered at high risk for sudden death and are defined as 'susceptible'; dogs that survive the test without a fatal arrhythmia are considered at low risk for sudden death and are defined as 'resistant.' In the current study, the effects of carboxyhemoglobin levels ranging from 5 to 15 percent were tested in resistant and susceptible dogs. A trend toward higher heart rates was observed at all levels of carboxyhemoglobin, although significant differences were observed only with 15 percent carboxyhemoglobin. This trend was observed at rest and during exercise in both resistant and susceptible dogs. In resistant animals, in which acute myocardial ischemia is typically associated with bradycardia even under the control condition, this reflex response occurred earlier and was augmented after exposure to carbon monoxide. This effect may depend on the increased hypoxic challenge caused by carbon monoxide, and thus on an augmentation of the neural reflex activation or a sensitization of the sinus node to acetylcholine induced by hypoxia. In both resistant and susceptible dogs, carbon monoxide exposure induced a worsening of ventricular arrhythmias in a minority of cases. This worsening was not reproducible in subsequent trials. These data indicate that acute exposure to carbon monoxide is seldom arrhythmogenic in dogs that have survived myocardial infarction. (Abstract Truncated)

  8. Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saurabh; Tedrow, Usha B; Triedman, John K

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major source of morbidity and mortality in adults with CHD. A multidisciplinary approach in a center specializing in the care of ACHD is most likely to have the expertise needed provide this care. Knowledge of the underlying anatomy, mechanism of arrhythmia, and potential management strategies is critical, as well as access and expertise in the use of advanced imaging and ablative technologies. Future challenges in management include refining the underlying mechanism and putative ablation targets for catheter ablation of AF, an arrhythmia rapidly rising in prevalence in this population.

  9. Classification of arrhythmia using hybrid networks.

    PubMed

    Haseena, Hassan H; Joseph, Paul K; Mathew, Abraham T

    2011-12-01

    Reliable detection of arrhythmias based on digital processing of Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals is vital in providing suitable and timely treatment to a cardiac patient. Due to corruption of ECG signals with multiple frequency noise and presence of multiple arrhythmic events in a cardiac rhythm, computerized interpretation of abnormal ECG rhythms is a challenging task. This paper focuses a Fuzzy C- Mean (FCM) clustered Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) and Multi Layered Feed Forward Network (MLFFN) for the discrimination of eight types of ECG beats. Parameters such as fourth order Auto Regressive (AR) coefficients along with Spectral Entropy (SE) are extracted from each ECG beat and feature reduction has been carried out using FCM clustering. The cluster centers form the input of neural network classifiers. The extensive analysis of Massachusetts Institute of Technology- Beth Israel Hospital (MIT-BIH) arrhythmia database shows that FCM clustered PNNs is superior in cardiac arrhythmia classification than FCM clustered MLFFN with an overall accuracy of 99.05%, 97.14%, respectively.

  10. Sinus Node and Atrial Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    John, Roy M; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-05-10

    Although sinus node dysfunction (SND) and atrial arrhythmias frequently coexist and interact, the putative mechanism linking the 2 remain unclear. Although SND is accompanied by atrial myocardial structural changes in the right atrium, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disease of variable interactions between left atrial triggers and substrate most commonly of left atrial origin. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the development and progression of SND and AF. Although some patients manifest SND as a result of electric remodeling induced by periods of AF, others develop progressive atrial structural remodeling that gives rise to both conditions together. The treatment strategy will thus vary according to the predominant disease phenotype. Although catheter ablation will benefit patients with predominantly AF and secondary SND, cardiac pacing may be the mainstay of therapy for patients with predominant fibrotic atrial cardiomyopathy. This contemporary review summarizes current knowledge on sinus node pathophysiology with the broader goal of yielding insights into the complex relationship between sinus node disease and atrial arrhythmias.

  11. Perinatal arrhythmias -- diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Moura, Cláudia; Vieira, António; Guimarães, Hercília; Areias, José Carlos

    2002-01-01

    We did a retrospective analysis of the clinical files of 26 neonates with arrhythmia born during the period between January 1994 and February 1999. Fourteen (53.8%) of the neonates were male and 16 (61.5%) had prenatal diagnosis. Four (15.3%) had associated congenital heart disease. Twenty-one (80.7%) had abnormal rhythm and five (19.2%) had cardiac conduction disorder. Digoxin was the therapy of first choice to restore normal rhythm, used in 66.6% of the patients, followed by adenosine (16.6%) and electrical cardioversion (16.6%). An epicardial pacemaker was used in two of the three neonates with complete atrioventricular (AV) block. One neonate died due to cerebral hemorrhage. All the neonates were discharged in a clinically stable condition and 16 (88.8%) of them were medicated with digoxin. In a follow-up period that varied from 0 to 71 months (mean of 30.8 months), two patients had an episode of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) after treatment withdrawal. Perinatal arrhythmias, although uncommon, can be life-threatening, and hence we consider our experience with these situations worth presenting.

  12. Devices for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart an electric shock (as with a defibrillator ). For people with recurrent arrhythmias, medical devices such as a pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) can help by continuously monitoring the heart's ...

  13. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4) due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Anna; Straub, Volker; McCann, Liza J; Seelow, Dominik; Varon, Raymonda; Barresi, Rita; Schulze, Anne; Lucke, Barbara; Lützkendorf, Susanne; Karbasiyan, Mohsen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Spuler, Simone; Schuelke, Markus

    2010-03-01

    We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4) of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin) as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT). PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  14. Laboratory Markers of Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death continues to be a major public health problem. Ventricular arrhythmia is a main cause of sudden cardiac death. The present review addresses the links between renal function tests, several laboratory markers, and ventricular arrhythmia risk in patients with renal disease, undergoing or not hemodialysis or renal transplant, focusing on recent clinical studies. Therapy of hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia should be an emergency and performed simultaneously under electrocardiographic monitoring in patients with renal failure. Serum phosphates and iron, PTH level, renal function, hemoglobin and hematocrit, pH, inflammatory markers, proteinuria and microalbuminuria, and osmolarity should be monitored, besides standard 12-lead ECG, in order to prevent ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. PMID:24982887

  15. Chronic Arrhythmias in the Setting of Heterotaxy: Differences between Right and Left Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Willes, Richard J; Kovach, Joshua R; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    So-called heterotaxy affects lateralization of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Congenital malformations may be present in one of several organ systems. Cardiac involvement includes both structural and conduction abnormalities. Data regarding arrhythmias in heterotaxy come from case reports and small case series. We pooled available data to further characterize arrhythmias in heterotaxy. A systematic review of the literature for manuscripts describing arrhythmias in heterotaxy patients was conducted. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Ovid were searched. Studies describing arrhythmias in patients with heterotaxy were included if they were in English and presented characteristics of the arrhythmias. Arrhythmia characteristics were abstracted and are presented as pooled data. Freedom from arrhythmia by age was then analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 19 studies with 121 patients were included in the pooled analysis. Those with right isomerism were found to be more likely to have atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia, junctional tachycardia, and ventricular tachycardia. Those with left isomerism were more likely to have atrioventricular block, intraventricular conduction delay, sick sinus syndrome, and atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia. Median age of onset for all arrhythmias was 4 years with no difference by specific arrhythmia or isomerism. Those with right and left isomerism are at risk for different arrhythmias but are likely to develop arrhythmias at the same age. Those with left isomerism are more likely to require pacemaker placement due to atrioventricular block. Understanding these differences allows for focused surveillance of development of these arrhythmias. PMID:26219620

  16. Chronic Arrhythmias in the Setting of Heterotaxy: Differences between Right and Left Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Willes, Richard J; Kovach, Joshua R; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    So-called heterotaxy affects lateralization of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Congenital malformations may be present in one of several organ systems. Cardiac involvement includes both structural and conduction abnormalities. Data regarding arrhythmias in heterotaxy come from case reports and small case series. We pooled available data to further characterize arrhythmias in heterotaxy. A systematic review of the literature for manuscripts describing arrhythmias in heterotaxy patients was conducted. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Ovid were searched. Studies describing arrhythmias in patients with heterotaxy were included if they were in English and presented characteristics of the arrhythmias. Arrhythmia characteristics were abstracted and are presented as pooled data. Freedom from arrhythmia by age was then analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 19 studies with 121 patients were included in the pooled analysis. Those with right isomerism were found to be more likely to have atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia, junctional tachycardia, and ventricular tachycardia. Those with left isomerism were more likely to have atrioventricular block, intraventricular conduction delay, sick sinus syndrome, and atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia. Median age of onset for all arrhythmias was 4 years with no difference by specific arrhythmia or isomerism. Those with right and left isomerism are at risk for different arrhythmias but are likely to develop arrhythmias at the same age. Those with left isomerism are more likely to require pacemaker placement due to atrioventricular block. Understanding these differences allows for focused surveillance of development of these arrhythmias.

  17. Loperamide Induced Life Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Bodar, Vijaykumar; Singh, Sharanjit; Frumkin, William; Mangla, Aditya; Doshi, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is over-the-counter antidiarrheal agent acting on peripherally located μ opioid receptors. It is gaining popularity among drug abusers as opioid substitute. We report a case of a 46-year-old male that was presented after cardiac arrest. After ruling out ischemia, cardiomyopathy, pulmonary embolism, central nervous system pathology, sepsis, and other drug toxicity, we found out that patient was using around 100 mg of Loperamide to control his chronic diarrhea presumably because of irritable bowel syndrome for last five years and consumed up to 200 mg of Loperamide daily for last two days before the cardiac arrest. We hypothesize that the patient's QTc prolongation and subsequent cardiac arrest are due to Loperamide toxicity. Patient experienced gradual resolution of tachyarrhythmia and gradual decrease in QTc interval during hospitalization which supports the evidence of causal relationship between Loperamide overdose and potentially fatal arrhythmias. It also provided the clue that patient may have congenital long QT syndrome which was unmasked by Loperamide causing ventricular arrhythmias. This case adds one more pearl in the literature to support that Loperamide overdose related cardiac toxicity does exist and it raises concerns over Loperamide abuse in the community. PMID:27547470

  18. Loperamide Induced Life Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Ankit; Bodar, Vijaykumar; Malekzadegan, Mohammad; Singh, Sharanjit; Frumkin, William; Mangla, Aditya; Doshi, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is over-the-counter antidiarrheal agent acting on peripherally located μ opioid receptors. It is gaining popularity among drug abusers as opioid substitute. We report a case of a 46-year-old male that was presented after cardiac arrest. After ruling out ischemia, cardiomyopathy, pulmonary embolism, central nervous system pathology, sepsis, and other drug toxicity, we found out that patient was using around 100 mg of Loperamide to control his chronic diarrhea presumably because of irritable bowel syndrome for last five years and consumed up to 200 mg of Loperamide daily for last two days before the cardiac arrest. We hypothesize that the patient's QTc prolongation and subsequent cardiac arrest are due to Loperamide toxicity. Patient experienced gradual resolution of tachyarrhythmia and gradual decrease in QTc interval during hospitalization which supports the evidence of causal relationship between Loperamide overdose and potentially fatal arrhythmias. It also provided the clue that patient may have congenital long QT syndrome which was unmasked by Loperamide causing ventricular arrhythmias. This case adds one more pearl in the literature to support that Loperamide overdose related cardiac toxicity does exist and it raises concerns over Loperamide abuse in the community. PMID:27547470

  19. Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Lorna; Lewandowski, Carol

    This workbook, designed for workplace literacy courses, contains materials for a course on documentation. The six sessions of the course cover the following topics: (1) general principles of procedure writing; (2) principles of clear communication (clarity, audience, visuals) and identification of systems types, accounts, and customer requests;…

  20. Advances in Modeling Ventricular Arrhythmias: from Mechanisms to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A.; Boyle, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Modern cardiovascular research has increasingly recognized that heart models and simulation can help interpret an array of experimental data and dissect important mechanisms and interrelationships, with developments rooted in the iterative interaction between modeling and experimentation. This article reviews the progress made in simulating cardiac electrical behavior at the level of the organ and, specifically, in the development of models of ventricular arrhythmias and fibrillation, as well as their termination (defibrillation). The ability to construct multi-scale models of ventricular arrhythmias, representing integrative behavior from the molecule to the entire organ, has enabled mechanistic inquiry into the dynamics of ventricular arrhythmias in the diseased myocardium, in understanding drug-induced pro-arrhythmia, and in the development of new modalities for defibrillation, to name a few. In this article we also review the initial use of ventricular models of arrhythmia in personalized diagnosis, treatment planning, and prevention of sudden cardiac death. Implementing individualized cardiac simulations at the patient bedside is poised to become one of the most thrilling examples of computational science and engineering approaches in translational medicine. PMID:24375958

  1. Human cardiac systems electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis: iteration of experiment and computation.

    PubMed

    Holzem, Katherine M; Madden, Eli J; Efimov, Igor R

    2014-11-01

    Human cardiac electrophysiology (EP) is a unique system for computational modelling at multiple scales. Due to the complexity of the cardiac excitation sequence, coordinated activity must occur from the single channel to the entire myocardial syncytium. Thus, sophisticated computational algorithms have been developed to investigate cardiac EP at the level of ion channels, cardiomyocytes, multicellular tissues, and the whole heart. Although understanding of each functional level will ultimately be important to thoroughly understand mechanisms of physiology and disease, cardiac arrhythmias are expressly the product of cardiac tissue-containing enough cardiomyocytes to sustain a reentrant loop of activation. In addition, several properties of cardiac cellular EP, that are critical for arrhythmogenesis, are significantly altered by cell-to-cell coupling. However, relevant human cardiac EP data, upon which to develop or validate models at all scales, has been lacking. Thus, over several years, we have developed a paradigm for multiscale human heart physiology investigation and have recovered and studied over 300 human hearts. We have generated a rich experimental dataset, from which we better understand mechanisms of arrhythmia in human and can improve models of human cardiac EP. In addition, in collaboration with computational physiologists, we are developing a database for the deposition of human heart experimental data, including thorough experimental documentation. We anticipate that accessibility to this human heart dataset will further human EP computational investigations, as well as encourage greater data transparency within the field of cardiac EP.

  2. Human cardiac systems electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis: iteration of experiment and computation

    PubMed Central

    Holzem, Katherine M.; Madden, Eli J.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2014-01-01

    Human cardiac electrophysiology (EP) is a unique system for computational modelling at multiple scales. Due to the complexity of the cardiac excitation sequence, coordinated activity must occur from the single channel to the entire myocardial syncytium. Thus, sophisticated computational algorithms have been developed to investigate cardiac EP at the level of ion channels, cardiomyocytes, multicellular tissues, and the whole heart. Although understanding of each functional level will ultimately be important to thoroughly understand mechanisms of physiology and disease, cardiac arrhythmias are expressly the product of cardiac tissue—containing enough cardiomyocytes to sustain a reentrant loop of activation. In addition, several properties of cardiac cellular EP, that are critical for arrhythmogenesis, are significantly altered by cell-to-cell coupling. However, relevant human cardiac EP data, upon which to develop or validate models at all scales, has been lacking. Thus, over several years, we have developed a paradigm for multiscale human heart physiology investigation and have recovered and studied over 300 human hearts. We have generated a rich experimental dataset, from which we better understand mechanisms of arrhythmia in human and can improve models of human cardiac EP. In addition, in collaboration with computational physiologists, we are developing a database for the deposition of human heart experimental data, including thorough experimental documentation. We anticipate that accessibility to this human heart dataset will further human EP computational investigations, as well as encourage greater data transparency within the field of cardiac EP. PMID:25362174

  3. Evaluating the Safety of Intraoperative Antiarrhythmics in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Rachel S; Moffett, Brady S; Hall, Stuart; Kim, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occurring during the intraoperative period for cardiac surgery have been associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Several antiarrhythmics have been utilized for the management of intraoperative arrhythmias. These antiarrhythmic medications can cause undesirable adverse outcomes in the intensive care setting. The incidence and treatment of adult intraoperative arrhythmias have been studied. In addition, the prevalence, risk factors, and optimal treatment of pediatric postoperative arrhythmias have also been studied. However, the literature has not been published on intraoperative antiarrhythmia treatment during pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of intraoperative antiarrhythmic medications utilized in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. This was a retrospective review of all patients who received an intraoperative antiarrhythmic in the cardiovascular operating room at Texas Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they underwent cardiovascular surgery from November 2008 to July 2013 and were excluded if antiarrhythmics were given intraoperatively for other indications (i.e., esmolol for hypertension) or if patients were older than 18 years of age. Safety of antiarrhythmic treatment was determined by the absence or presence of adverse events. Control or recurrence of the arrhythmia was analyzed as a secondary measure to help determine antiarrhythmic efficacy. A total of 45 patients were identified (53.3 % male). Patients were a median of 0.52 years at the time of surgery. Primary surgery types were tetralogy of Fallot repair (n = 6; 13.3 %) and ventricular septal defect closure (n = 5, 11.1 %). Thirty-one patients (68.9 %) had documented adverse events after the administration of antiarrhythmics. Most of these adverse events occurred after the administration of amiodarone (n = 16; 51.6 %) followed by esmolol (n = 15; 48.4 %). Fifty-one percent of the arrhythmias resolved in the operating

  4. Risk assessment of ventricular arrhythmia using new parameters based on high resolution body surface potential mapping

    PubMed Central

    Fereniec, Malgorzata; Stix, Gunter; Kania, Michal; Mroczka, Tomasz; Janusek, Dariusz; Maniewski, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The effective screening of myocardial infarction (MI) patients threatened by ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an important issue in clinical practice, especially in the process of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy recommendation. This study proposes new parameters describing depolarization and repolarization inhomogeneity in high resolution body surface potential maps (HR BSPM) to identify MI patients threatened by VT. Material/Methods High resolution ECGs were recorded from 64 surface leads. Time-averaged HR BSPMs were used. Several parameters for arrhythmia risk assessment were calculated in 2 groups of MI patients: those with and without documented VT. Additionally, a control group of healthy subjects was studied. To assess the risk of VT, the following parameters were proposed: correlation coefficient between STT and QRST integral maps (STT_QRST_CORR), departure index of absolute value of STT integral map (STT_DI), and departure index of absolute value of T-wave shape index (TSI_DI). These new parameters were compared to known parameters: QRS width, QT interval, QT dispersion, Tpeak-Tend interval, total cosines between QRS complex and T wave, and non-dipolar content of QRST integral maps. Results STT_DI, TSI_DI, STT_QRST_CORR, QRS width, and QT interval parameters were statistically significant (p≤0.05) in arrhythmia risk assessment. The highest sensitivity was found for the STT_DI parameter (0.77) and the highest specificity for TSI_DI (0.79). Conclusions Arrhythmia risk is demonstrated by both abnormal spatial distribution of the repolarization phase and changed relationship between depolarization and repolarization phases, as well as their prolongation. The proposed new parameters might be applied for risk stratification of cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:21358612

  5. Perioperative management of antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary stents undergoing cardiac and non-cardiac surgery: a consensus document from Italian cardiological, surgical and anaesthesiological societies.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Roberta; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona; Bramucci, Ezio; Castiglioni, Battistina; De Servi, Stefano; Lettieri, Corrado; Lettino, Maddalena; Piccaluga, Emanuela; Savonitto, Stefano; Trabattoni, Daniela; Capodanno, Davide; Buffoli, Francesca; Parolari, Alessandro; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Biglioli, Federico; Valdatta, Luigi; Droghetti, Andrea; Bozzani, Antonio; Setacci, Carlo; Ravelli, Paolo; Crescini, Claudio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Scarone, Pietro; Francetti, Luca; D'Angelo, Fabio; Gadda, Franco; Comel, Andrea; Salvi, Luca; Lorini, Luca; Antonelli, Massimo; Bovenzi, Francesco; Cremonesi, Alberto; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Guagliumi, Giulio

    2014-05-01

    Optimal perioperative antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary stents undergoing surgery still remains poorly defined and a matter of debate among cardiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists. Surgery represents one of the most common reasons for premature antiplatelet therapy discontinuation, which is associated with a significant increase in mortality and major adverse cardiac events, in particular stent thrombosis. Clinical practice guidelines provide little support with regard to managing antiplatelet therapy in the perioperative phase in the case of patients with non-deferrable surgical interventions and/or high haemorrhagic risk. Moreover, a standard definition of ischaemic and haemorrhagic risk has never been determined. Finally, recommendations shared by cardiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists are lacking. The present consensus document provides practical recommendations on the perioperative management of antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary stents undergoing surgery. Cardiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists have contributed equally to its creation. On the basis of clinical and angiographic data, the individual thrombotic risk has been defined. All surgical interventions have been classified according to their inherent haemorrhagic risk. A consensus on the optimal antiplatelet regimen in the perioperative phase has been reached on the basis of the ischaemic and haemorrhagic risk. Aspirin should be continued perioperatively in the majority of surgical operations, whereas dual antiplatelet therapy should not be withdrawn for surgery in the case of low bleeding risk. In selected patients at high risk for both bleeding and ischaemic events, when oral antiplatelet therapy withdrawal is required, perioperative treatment with short-acting intravenous glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (tirofiban or eptifibatide) should be taken into consideration.

  6. Seizures following hippocampal kindling induce QT interval prolongation and increased susceptibility to arrhythmias in rats.

    PubMed

    Bealer, Steven L; Little, Jason G

    2013-07-01

    The prolonged seizures of status epilepticus produce chronic arrhythmogenic changes in cardiac function. This study was designed to determine if repeated, self-limiting seizures administered to kindled rats induce similar cardiac dysfunction. Multiple seizures administered to rats following hippocampal kindling resulted in cardiac QT interval prolongation and increased susceptibility to experimental arrhythmias. These data suggest that multiple, self-limiting seizures of intractable epilepsy may have cardiac effects that can contribute to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP).

  7. Computer-assisted education system for arrhythmia (CAESAR).

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M; Inoue, M; Fukunami, M; Ishikawa, K; Inada, H; Abe, H

    1984-08-01

    A computer-assisted education system for arrhythmia (CAESAR) was developed for students to acquire the ability to logically diagnose complicated arrhythmias. This system has a logical simulator of cardiac rhythm using a mathematical model of the impulse formation and conduction system of the heart. A simulated arrhythmia (ECG pattern) is given on a graphic display unit with simulated series of the action potential of five pacemaker centers and the "ladder diagram" of impulse formation and conduction, which show the mechanism of that arrhythmia. For the purpose of the evaluation of this system, 13 medical students were given two types of tests concerning arrhythmias before and after 2-hr learning with this system. The scores they obtained after learning increased significantly from 73.3 +/- 11.9 to 93.2 +/- 3.0 (P less than 0.001) in one test and from 47.2 +/- 17.9 to 64.9 +/- 19.6 (P less than 0.001) in another one. These results proved that this CAI system is useful and effective for training ECG interpretation of arrhythmias.

  8. QT interval dispersion: a non-invasive marker of susceptibility to arrhythmia in patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias?

    PubMed Central

    Pye, M.; Quinn, A. C.; Cobbe, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess QT interval dispersion on the surface electrocardiogram in patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias. DESIGN--A retrospective and prospective blinded controlled study of patients referred for investigation of ventricular arrhythmias at a tertiary cardiac centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS--89 consecutive patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias due to chronic ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy, or ventricular tachycardia (VT) in a normal heart. 32 patients did not meet the inclusion criteria; therefore 57 patients were compared with a control group of 40 patients with myocardial disease but no history of arrhythmias and 12 normal controls with no myocardial disease. Standard 12 lead electrocardiograms were enlarged, the QT intervals for each lead measured, and QT dispersion calculated. RESULTS--There was a significantly greater mean QT dispersion (77 ms) in patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias compared with the control group (38 ms, p < 0.01). This held for all groups; after myocardial infarction VT (82 (22) ms v control 38 (10) ms; p < 0.01), dilated cardiomyopathy VT (76 (18) ms v control 40 (11) ms, p < 0.01), and normal heart VT (65 (7) ms v control 32 (8), p < 0.05). There was also a greater QT dispersion in patients with impaired left ventricular function and VT, with a correlation between left ventricular function and QT dispersion in patients with VT (r = 0.56, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION--QT interval dispersion may be a further non-invasive marker of susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:8043329

  9. [Arrhythmias in athlets (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, H; Jungmann, H

    1978-10-20

    380 athletes in optimal performance were examinated within 10 years between 2 and 13 times (average: 4 times): ECG were taken at rest, during breathing tests and under maximal physical load by ergometry. 88 (23.2%) of them showed arrhythmias, 32 in the same examination different forms of premature beats. All kinds of arrhythmias were seen except atrial flatter, total av-block and paroxysmal tachycardias. Breathing tests provoked most of arrhythmias followed by the recovery after maximal physical load. Follow-up studies and clinical examinations proved that in 86 sportsmen these arrhythmias were not a symptom of heart disease. Only in 2 athletes heart injury could not be excluded. But in nearly 50% extracardial inflammations, like tonsillitis, bronchitis etc., were found. It is discussed that bradycardia and vagotonia of the highly trained sportsmen cause the arrhythmias. This vagotonia is intensified by breathing tests. But arrhythmias found in athletes should cause an examination for other chronical sicknesses. PMID:703672

  10. Dual-mode Continuous Arrhythmias Telemonitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amien, Magdi B. M.; Lin, Jiarui

    Coronary artery disease still remains the main cause of death. The existence of silent myocardial isocheim emphasized the need for All-day real-time monitoring. Therefore patient monitoring during normal activity has become increasingly important as a standard preventive craniological procedure for detection of cardiac Arrhythmias, transient ischemic episodes and silent myocardial ischemia. This paper deals the design and implementation of a Dual-mode, (700 m) Wireless Real-time Arrhythmias monitoring and Auto-warning System. The system consists of slave node, and master node with a PC-based Application user interface. The system operates at the license-free open frequency band 915 MHZ. The slave node is a DSP-based smart board carried by the patient; it acquires two channels of full-spectrum ECG, stores samples on a Flash memory capable of handling 1GBits of data, compress and transmits a digitally-processed cardiac heart signal each time with detected QRS synchronous pulses as transmission data packet. The master node is responsible for receiving, decompressing, and analyzing the transmitted data packets. The SRWF-501F915 integrated module realizes the data transmitting and receiving. The developed system can be configured as master-slave or Stand-Alone topology.

  11. Why Arrhythmia Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed heart disease. The time and mode of death are unexpected. It occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear. The term "massive heart attack" is often mistakenly used to describe sudden cardiac arrest. While a heart attack may cause ...

  12. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders.

  13. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:26118041

  14. Dysfunction in the βII Spectrin-Dependent Cytoskeleton Underlies Human Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sakima A.; Sturm, Amy C.; Curran, Jerry; Kline, Crystal F.; Little, Sean C.; Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Long, Victor P.; Makara, Michael; Polina, Iuliia; Hughes, Langston D.; Webb, Tyler R.; Wei, Zhiyi; Wright, Patrick; Voigt, Niels; Bhakta, Deepak; Spoonamore, Katherine G.; Zhang, Chuansheng; Weiss, Raul; Binkley, Philip F.; Janssen, Paul M.; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S.; Sun, Mingzhai; Ma, Jianjie; Dobrev, Dobromir; Zhang, Mingjie; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Vatta, Matteo; Rasband, Matthew N.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The cardiac cytoskeleton plays key roles in maintaining myocyte structural integrity in health and disease. In fact, human mutations in cardiac cytoskeletal elements are tightly linked with cardiac pathologies including myopathies, aortopathies, and dystrophies. Conversely, the link between cytoskeletal protein dysfunction in cardiac electrical activity is not well understood, and often overlooked in the cardiac arrhythmia field. Methods and Results Here, we uncover a new mechanism for the regulation of cardiac membrane excitability. We report that βII spectrin, an actin-associated molecule, is essential for the post-translational targeting and localization of critical membrane proteins in heart. βII spectrin recruits ankyrin-B to the cardiac dyad, and a novel human mutation in the ankyrin-B gene disrupts the ankyrin-B/βII spectrin interaction leading to severe human arrhythmia phenotypes. Mice lacking cardiac βII spectrin display lethal arrhythmias, aberrant electrical and calcium handling phenotypes, and abnormal expression/localization of cardiac membrane proteins. Mechanistically, βII spectrin regulates the localization of cytoskeletal and plasma membrane/sarcoplasmic reticulum protein complexes that include the Na/Ca exchanger, RyR2, ankyrin-B, actin, and αII spectrin. Finally, we observe accelerated heart failure phenotypes in βII spectrin-deficient mice. Conclusions Our findings identify βII spectrin as critical for normal myocyte electrical activity, link this molecule to human disease, and provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying cardiac myocyte biology. PMID:25632041

  15. Optical mapping system for visualizing arrhythmias in isolated mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robyn; Nygren, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Optical mapping has become an important technique in the study of cardiac electrophysiology, especially in terms of investigating the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias. The increasing availability of transgenic mice as models for cardiovascular disease is driving the need for instrumentation suitable for the study of electrical activity in the mouse heart. In this paper we evaluate our optical mapping system's ability to clearly record induced arrhythmic activity in an isolated mouse atrial preparation. Preliminary results indicate that the signal quality is high enough that individual optically recorded action potentials can be discerned in many pixels, even without post-processing for noise removal. The optical mapping video is clear enough for general observations regarding the patterns of electrical propagation during arrhythmic behaviour. The induced arrhythmias appear to have a regular pattern of activity, and are likely best classified as atrial tachycardias.

  16. Arrhythmias in patients with hypereosinophilia: a comparison of patients with and without Löffler's endomyocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J.; Davies, J.; Goodwin, J. F.; Spry, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    About one third of patients with Löffler's endomyocardial disease have abnormal electrocardiograms and some develop arrhythmias and die suddenly. To assess the significance of these findings, continuous ambulatory ECG monitoring was performed for 48 hr on 6 patients with acute or chronic forms of Löffler's endomyocardial disease, and the types and frequencies of arrhythmias were compared with recordings from 6 other patients with equally high blood eosinophil counts who did not have clinically evident cardiac disease. It was hoped that this would show whether arrhythmias were related to high blood eosinophil counts, cardiac injury or other factors. Three of the patients with endomyocardial disease had multiple ventricular extrasystoles with episodes of ventricular arrhythmias and occasional supraventricular arrhythmias which had not been detected with conventional ECGs. These abnormalities did not occur in 2 of the patients with acute endomyocardial lesions who died, nor were they found in patients who did not have congestive cardiac failure or in the control patients. Rhythm disturbances appeared to be most closely related to the development of cardiac failure and they resolved after successful cardiac surgery. Multiple ventricular extrasystoles and arrhythmias occurring in these patients with Löffler's endomyocardial disease are probably due to metabolic changes in the heart associated with cardiac failure and mechanical changes related to valvular dysfunction rather than a direct effect of the eosinophils themselves on the heart. PMID:7267492

  17. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  18. Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The first six months after a heart attack is a particularly high-risk period for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease . ...

  19. Genetic and toxicologic investigation of Sudden Cardiac Death in a patient with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC) under cocaine and alcohol effects.

    PubMed

    Cittadini, Francesca; De Giovanni, Nadia; Alcalde, Mireia; Partemi, Sara; Carbone, Arnaldo; Campuzano, Oscar; Brugada, Ramon; Oliva, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine and alcohol toxicity is well known, especially when simultaneously abused. These drugs perform both acute and chronic harmfulness, with significant cardiac events such as ventricular arrhythmias, tachycardia, systemic hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, ventricular hypertrophy, and acute coronary syndrome. The present report refers about a patient who died after a documented episode of psychomotor agitation followed by cardiac arrest. At the autopsy investigation, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) was diagnosed and confirmed by postmortem molecular analysis revealing a mutation in the DSG2 gene. Postmortem toxicological analysis demonstrated a recent intake of cocaine, and the death was attributed to cardiac arrhythmias. The detection of cocaine and cocaethylene in hair samples proved chronic simultaneous intake of cocaine and alcohol at least in the last month. The authors discuss the role of these drugs and genetic predisposition of the ARVC in causing the death of the patient. PMID:25399050

  20. Mechanisms of Sudden Cardiac Death: Oxidants and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Kyle, John W.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmia is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Deranged cardiac metabolism and abnormal redox state during cardiac diseases foment arrhythmogenic substrates through direct or indirect modulation of cardiac ion channel/transporter function. This review presents current evidence on the mechanisms linking metabolic derangement and excessive oxidative stress to ion channel/transporter dysfunction that predisposes to ventricular arrhythmias and SCD. As conventional anti-arrhythmic agents aiming at ion channels have proven challenging to use, targeting arrhythmogenic metabolic changes and redox imbalance may provide novel therapeutics to treat or prevent life-threatening arrhythmias and SCD. PMID:26044249

  1. Double hazards of ischemia and reperfusion arrhythmias in a patient with variant angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingzhu; Yang, Xiangjun

    2015-01-01

    Variant angina pectoris, also called Prinzmetal's angina, is a syndrome caused by vasospasms of the coronary arteries. It can lead to myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, atrioventricular block and even sudden cardiac death. We report the case of a 53 year-old male patient with recurrent episodes of chest pain and arrhythmias in the course of related variant angina pectoris. It is likely that the reperfusion following myocardial ischemia was responsible for the ventricular fibrillation while the ST-segment returned to the baseline. This case showed that potential lethal arrhythmias could arise due to variant angina pectoris. It also indicated that ventricular fibrillation could be self-terminated.

  2. Ventricular repolarization markers for predicting malignant arrhythmias in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Torres, Yaniel; Carmona-Puerta, Raimundo; Katholi, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cardiac arrhythmias which result in sudden cardiac death may be present in individuals apparently healthy or be associated with other medical conditions. The way to predict their appearance represents a challenge for the medical community due to the tragic outcomes in most cases. In the last two decades some ventricular repolarization (VR) markers have been found to be useful to predict malignant cardiac arrhythmias in several clinical conditions. The corrected QT, QT dispersion, Tpeak-Tend, Tpeak-Tend dispersion and Tp-e/QT have been studied and implemented in clinical practice for this purpose. These markers are obtained from 12 lead surface electrocardiogram. In this review we discuss how these markers have demonstrated to be effective to predict malignant arrhythmias in medical conditions such as long and short QT syndromes, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, acute myocardial ischemia, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity and highly trained athletes. Also the main pathophysiological mechanisms that explain the arrhythmogenic predisposition in these diseases and the basis for the VR markers are discussed. However, the same results have not been found in all conditions. Further studies are needed to reach a global consensus in order to incorporate these VR parameters in risk stratification of these patients. PMID:26301231

  3. [Ryanodine receptor, calcium leak and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Rueda, Angélica; de Alba-Aguayo, David R; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2014-01-01

    The participation of the ionic Ca(2+) release channel/ryanodine receptor in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling is well known since the late '80s, when various seminal papers communicated its purification for the first time and its identity with the "foot" structures located at the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition to its main role as the Ca(2+) channel responsible for the transient Ca(2+) increase that activates the contractile machinery of the cardiomyocytes, the ryanodine receptor releases Ca(2+) during the relaxation phase of the cardiac cycle, giving rise to a diastolic Ca(2+) leak. In normal physiological conditions, diastolic Ca(2+) leak regulates the proper level of luminal Ca(2+), but in pathological conditions it participates in the generation of both, acquired and hereditary arrhythmias. Very recently, several groups have focused their efforts into the development of pharmacological tools to control the altered diastolic Ca(2+) leak via ryanodine receptors. In this review, we focus our interest on describing the participation of cardiac ryanodine receptor in the diastolic Ca(2+) leak under physiological or pathological conditions and also on the therapeutic approaches to control its undesired exacerbated activity during diastole.

  4. Low vagally-mediated heart rate variability and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias in rats bred for high anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, Luca; Trombini, Mimosa; Graiani, Gallia; Madeddu, Denise; Quaini, Federico; Landgraf, Rainer; Neumann, Inga D; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2014-04-10

    In humans, there is a documented association between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Putative underlying mechanisms may include an impairment of the autonomic nervous system control of cardiac function. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize cardiac autonomic modulation and susceptibility to arrhythmias in genetic lines of rats that differ largely in their anxiety level. To reach this goal, electrocardiographic recordings were performed in high-anxiety behavior (HAB, n=10) and low-anxiety behavior (LAB, n=10) rats at rest, during stressful stimuli and under autonomic pharmacological manipulations, and analyzed by means of time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability. During resting conditions, HAB rats displayed a reduced heart rate variability, mostly in terms of lower parasympathetic (vagal) modulation compared to LAB rats. In HAB rats, this relatively low cardiac vagal control was associated with smaller heart rate responsiveness to acute stressors compared to LAB counterparts. In addition, beta-adrenergic pharmacological stimulation induced a larger incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in HABs compared to LABs. At sacrifice, a moderate increase in heart-body weight ratio was observed in HAB rats. We conclude that high levels of anxiety-related behavior in rats are associated with signs of i) impaired autonomic modulation of heart rate (low vagally-mediated heart rate variability), ii) poor adaptive heart rate responsiveness to stressful stimuli, iii) increased arrhythmia susceptibility, and iv) cardiac hypertrophy. These results highlight the utility of the HAB/LAB model for investigating the mechanistic basis of the comorbidity between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Arrhythmias in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Edward P

    2002-12-01

    Improved surgical outcome for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has created a rapidly expanding population of adolescents and young adult survivors. Cardiac arrhythmias are a common late sequelae of this form of heart disease. Effective treatment requires clear understanding of the underlying anatomic defect as well as the specific surgical interventions. Intraatrial reentrant tachycardia (IART) is the most common and difficult arrhythmia encountered in these patients. Traditional IART treatment with medication has been largely unsuccessful, but radiofrequency ablation has emerged in recent years as a promising option for many patients. The availability of three-dimensional mapping systems and irrigated-tip ablation catheters has improved acute success rates for IART to better than 90%. Postablation recurrence of IART still remains problematic for patients who have undergone the Fontan operation, in which case atrial maze surgery may be considered. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is seen in a smaller number of CHD patients, most notably those with tetralogy of Fallot or aortic stenosis. The adoption of implantable defibrillator (ICD) therapy for these patients has improved outcome. Owing to their complex anatomy, the CHD population presents unique challenges during both catheterization and device implant. Multicenter study of this unique patient group is needed in order to develop more objective treatment guidelines.

  6. Use of an implantable loop recorder in the investigation of arrhythmias in adult captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Lammey, Michael L; Jackson, Raven; Ely, John J; Lee, D Rick; Sleeper, Meg M

    2011-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general, and cardiac arrhythmias specifically, is common in great apes. However, the clinical significance of arrhythmias detected on short-duration electrocardiograms is often unclear. Here we describe the use of an implantable loop recorder to evaluate cardiac rhythms in 4 unanesthetized adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), 1 with a history of possible syncope and 3 with the diagnosis of multiform ventricular ectopy (ventricular premature complexes) and cardiomyopathy. The clinical significance of ventricular ectopy was defined further by using the implantable loop recorder. Arrhythmia was ruled out as a cause of collapse in the chimpanzee that presented with possible syncope because the implantable loop recorder demonstrated normal sinus rhythm during a so-called syncopal event. This description is the first report of the use of an implantable loop recorder to diagnose cardiac arrhythmias in an unanesthetized great ape species. PMID:21819684

  7. Use of an Implantable Loop Recorder in the Investigation of Arrhythmias in Adult Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Lammey, Michael L; Jackson, Raven; Ely, John J; Lee, D Rick; Sleeper, Meg M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general, and cardiac arrhythmias specifically, is common in great apes. However, the clinical significance of arrhythmias detected on short-duration electrocardiograms is often unclear. Here we describe the use of an implantable loop recorder to evaluate cardiac rhythms in 4 unanesthetized adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), 1 with a history of possible syncope and 3 with the diagnosis of multiform ventricular ectopy (ventricular premature complexes) and cardiomyopathy. The clinical significance of ventricular ectopy was defined further by using the implantable loop recorder. Arrhythmia was ruled out as a cause of collapse in the chimpanzee that presented with possible syncope because the implantable loop recorder demonstrated normal sinus rhythm during a so-called syncopal event. This description is the first report of the use of an implantable loop recorder to diagnose cardiac arrhythmias in an unanesthetized great ape species. PMID:21819684

  8. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  9. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients.

  10. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients. PMID:27598028

  11. Computational rabbit models to investigate the initiation, perpetuation, and termination of ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Boyle, Patrick M; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-07-01

    Current understanding of cardiac electrophysiology has been greatly aided by computational work performed using rabbit ventricular models. This article reviews the contributions of multiscale models of rabbit ventricles in understanding cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms. This review will provide an overview of multiscale modeling of the rabbit ventricles. It will then highlight works that provide insights into the role of the conduction system, complex geometric structures, and heterogeneous cellular electrophysiology in diseased and healthy rabbit hearts to the initiation and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmia. Finally, it will provide an overview on the contributions of rabbit ventricular modeling on understanding the mechanisms underlying shock-induced defibrillation. PMID:27334789

  12. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  13. Channelopathies - Emerging Trends in The Management of Inherited Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  14. An ECG analysis interactive training system for understanding arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Yvon; Sinteff, Jean-Paul; Siregar, Pridi; Julen, Nathalie; Hannouche, Frédéric; Rio, Stéphane; Le Beux, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The ECG remains a daily diagnostic tool for the detection of numerous cardiovascular diseases. Our goal was to use a computerized qualitative model (QM) of heart in order to build cases of simple arrhythmias dedicated to initial and more advanced medical teaching. The original QM is able to generate videograms of many cardiac disturbances. A Flash player is used to view ECG, synchronous Lewis diagram and chromatic 2D cardiac animation of a specific case. OAAT is a standardized 18 yes/no answers questionnaire which allows the learner to diagnose five main types of arrhythmias that can be compared with normal sinus rhythm (NSR) analysis. This new tool has been recently used by medical students during practical sessions. Based on medical reasoning learning on NSR video and upon trying to recognize an abnormal cardiac rhythm, all users can reach the 100% winning score since they can perform as many attempts as they like. We believe that unlimited case review with questionnaire answering, ECG and Lewis diagram replay and step-by-step visualization of the abnormal propagation of the cardiac impulse on the 2D heart videos are a highly efficient means to help students understand even complex arrhythmic mechanisms.

  15. An ECG analysis interactive training system for understanding arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Yvon; Sinteff, Jean-Paul; Siregar, Pridi; Julen, Nathalie; Hannouche, Frédéric; Rio, Stéphane; Le Beux, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The ECG remains a daily diagnostic tool for the detection of numerous cardiovascular diseases. Our goal was to use a computerized qualitative model (QM) of heart in order to build cases of simple arrhythmias dedicated to initial and more advanced medical teaching. The original QM is able to generate videograms of many cardiac disturbances. A Flash player is used to view ECG, synchronous Lewis diagram and chromatic 2D cardiac animation of a specific case. OAAT is a standardized 18 yes/no answers questionnaire which allows the learner to diagnose five main types of arrhythmias that can be compared with normal sinus rhythm (NSR) analysis. This new tool has been recently used by medical students during practical sessions. Based on medical reasoning learning on NSR video and upon trying to recognize an abnormal cardiac rhythm, all users can reach the 100% winning score since they can perform as many attempts as they like. We believe that unlimited case review with questionnaire answering, ECG and Lewis diagram replay and step-by-step visualization of the abnormal propagation of the cardiac impulse on the 2D heart videos are a highly efficient means to help students understand even complex arrhythmic mechanisms. PMID:19745450

  16. A single exposure to particulate or gaseous air pollution increases the risk of aconitine-induced cardiac arrythmia in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  17. Correlating perceived arrhythmia symptoms and QoL in the elderly with Heart Failure in an urban clinic: A prospective, single center study

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R.; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To determine the relationship between quality of life (QoL) and perceived self reported symptoms in an elderly, ambulatory, urban population living with heart failure (HF). Background While arrhythmias in the elderly with HF are well documented, the association between perceived arrhythmia symptoms and QoL is not well defined. Design Prospective, cross sectional single center study. Methods A single-center, prospective study was conducted with HF patients recruited from an urban outpatient cardiology clinic in the United States. Fifty-seven patients completed a baseline QoL survey with 42 of these completing the 6-month follow-up survey. QoL was evaluated with the SF-36v2™ and frequency of symptoms with the Atrial Fibrillation Severity Scale. Subjects wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor (LifeStar AF Express®) for 2-weeks to document arrhythmias. Data analysis utilized Spearman’s rank correlation and logistic regression. Results Baseline and 6-month QoL measures did not correlate with recorded arrhythmias. However, perceptions of diminished general health correlated significantly with symptoms of exercise intolerance, lightheadedness/dizziness, palpitations, and chest pain/pressure. By multivariable logistic regression, more severe perceived arrhythmic, symptoms of exercise intolerance, and lightheadedness/dizziness were independently associated with diminished QoL. Conclusion QoL was significantly worse in patients with perceptions of severe arrhythmic episodes and in those whose symptoms of dizziness and exercise intolerance. Relevance to clinical practice The findings of this study indicate that symptomatic HF patients suffer from poor QoL and that interventions are needed to improve QoL and decrease symptom severity. Nurses who care for HF patients play an essential role in symptom evaluation and management and could significantly improve overall QoL in these patients by carefully evaluating symptomatology and testing interventions and

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    PubMed

    Knollmann, Björn C

    2013-03-15

    This article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic insight has been gained? What is the evidence that would support using iPSC-CM to personalize antiarrhythmic drug therapy? The review also discusses the pros and cons of using the iPSC-CM technology for modeling specific genetic arrhythmia disorders, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada Syndrome, or Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia.

  19. Cardiac electrophysiology in mice: a matter of size

    PubMed Central

    Kaese, Sven; Verheule, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, mouse models have become a popular instrument for studying cardiac arrhythmias. This review assesses in which respects a mouse heart is a miniature human heart, a suitable model for studying mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in humans and in which respects human and murine hearts differ. Section I considers the issue of scaling of mammalian cardiac (electro) physiology to body mass. Then, we summarize differences between mice and humans in cardiac activation (section II) and the currents underlying the action potential in the murine working myocardium (section III). Changes in cardiac electrophysiology in mouse models of heart disease are briefly outlined in section IV, while section V discusses technical considerations pertaining to recording cardiac electrical activity in mice. Finally, section VI offers general considerations on the influence of cardiac size on the mechanisms of tachy-arrhythmias. PMID:22973235

  20. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts - Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, Sharmila D.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Problem Definition: To evaluate NASA s current standards and practices related to atrial arrhythmias in astronauts, Space Medicine s Advanced Projects Section at the Johnson Space Center was tasked with organizing a summit to discuss the approach to atrial arrhythmias in the astronaut cohort. Since 1959, 11 cases of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, or supraventricular tachycardia have been recorded among active corps crewmembers. Most of the cases were paroxysmal, although a few were sustained. While most of the affected crewmembers were asymptomatic, those slated for long-duration space flight underwent radiofrequency ablation treatment to prevent further episodes of the arrhythmia. The summit was convened to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, to identify gaps in knowledge, and to propose relevant research initiatives. Summit Meeting Objectives: The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together a panel of six cardiologists, including nationally and internationally renowned leaders in cardiac electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space flight cardiovascular physiology. The primary objectives of the summit discussions were to evaluate cases of atrial arrhythmia in the astronaut population, to understand the factors that may predispose an individual to this condition, to understand NASA s current capabilities for screening, diagnosis, and treatment, to discuss the risks associated with treatment of crewmembers assigned to long-duration missions or extravehicular activities, and to discuss recommendations for prevention or management of future cases. Summary of Recommendations: The summit panel s recommendations were grouped into seven categories: Epidemiology, Screening, Standards and Selection, Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Manifesting Preflight, Atrial Fibrillation during Flight, Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation, and Future Research

  1. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  2. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  3. Method and apparatus for the guided ablative therapy of fast ventricular arrhythmia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Barley, Maya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and apparatus for guiding ablative therapy of abnormal biological electrical excitation. The excitation from the previous excitatory wave is significant at the beginning of the next excitation. In particular, it is designed for treatment of fast cardiac arrhythmias. Electrical signals are acquired from recording electrodes, and an inverse dipole method is used to identify the site of origin of an arrhythmia. The location of the tip of an ablation catheter is similarly localized from signals acquired from the recording electrodes while electrical pacing energy is delivered to the tip of the catheter close to or in contact with the cardiac tissue. The catheter tip is then guided to the site of origin of the arrhythmia, and ablative radio frequency energy is delivered to its tip to ablate the site.

  4. Sudden cardiac death secondary to antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sicouri, Serge; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A number of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are known to increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Based largely on a concern over QT prolongation and the development of life-threatening arrhythmias, a number of antipsychotic drugs have been temporarily or permanently withdrawn from the market or their use restricted. Some antidepressants and antipsychotics have been linked to QT prolongation and the development of Torsade de pointes arrhythmias, whereas others have been associated with a Brugada syndrome phenotype and the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. This review examines the mechanisms and predisposing factors underlying the development of cardiac arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death, associated with antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs in clinical use. PMID:18324881

  5. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  6. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  7. Behavioral Inhibition, Heart Period, and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia: An Attachment Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson-Hinde, Joan; Marshall, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Examined interrelations among behavioral inhibition (BI), cardiac activity, and attachment status in 4.5-year olds. Found that only Secure children showed predicted relationship between low BI and high heart period (HP) or respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Increases in HP from assessment during separation from mother to assessment three minutes after…

  8. Relationship of ventricular arrhythmias to the angiographically and scintigraphically estimated extent of ventricular damage late after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Huikuri, H.V.; Korhonen, U.R.; Linnaluoto, M.K.; Takkunen, J.T.

    1987-03-01

    In order to study the quantitative relationship of ventricular arrhythmias to myocardial damage and ischemia, 61 patients with a previous myocardial infarction (at least 6 months previously) were studied by 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring, cardiac catheterization, and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Thirty-five patients (57%) had no ectopic beats or only infrequent, unifocal ones and 26 patients (43%) had complex ventricular arrhythmias. Left ventricular function was lower in the latter, but the number of diseased vessels did not differ in the two groups. The reduction of thallium activity in the infarct area was more marked in patients with complex arrhythmias. Multiple thallium defects were not more common in arrhythmia patients, however. These data support the view that complex ventricular arrhythmias are more closely related to the severity of ventricular damage than the presence of myocardial ischemia remote to the area of previous infarction.

  9. Incidence Of Supraventricular Arrhythmias During Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Abhishek; Hogan, William J.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Buadi, Francis K.; Dingli, David; Dispenzieri, Angela; Gastineau, Dennis A.; Gertz, Morie A.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Inwards, David J.; Johnston, Patrick B.; Lacy, Martha Q.; Litzow, Mark R.; Micallef, Ivana N.; Porrata, Luis F.; Kumar, Shaji K.

    2013-01-01

    Arrhythmias, especially supraventricular arrhythmias, often complicate the clinical course during autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT). We undertook this study to determine the incidence and risk factors for cardiac arrhythmias during AHCT. The study included 983 patients who underwent AHCT between August 2006 and December 2010 at a single institution, and in whom all the relevant medical records were available for review. The median age was 58 years (range; 19–77); 61% were male. AHCT was done for plasma cell disorders in 58% patients and for lymphoma or leukemia in the remaining. Overall, 92 (9.4%) patients developed a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia at a median of 9 days post transplant (range; 0, 18) and with a median duration of <1 day (range; <1 to 17 days). Atrial fibrillation (AF) was the most common and seen in 71 (7%) patients, followed by atrial flutter and supraventricular tachycardia in 12 (1%) and 8 (1%) patients respectively. In multivariate analysis, age > 63 years, presence of premature supraventricular complexes or Atrio-ventricular conduction delay on pre-transplant ECG, and history of any prior arrhythmia increased the risk of arrhythmia. Development of arrhythmia resulted in longer outpatient follow up after AHCT, with the median follow-up for those developing an arrhythmia of 22 days compared with 19 days for the rest; P < 0.001. In conclusion, 9% of patients undergoing ASCT develop supraventricular arrhythmias post transplant and this risk is elevated among the older patients, those with a prior history of arrhythmias, and those with pre-transplant ECG abnormalities. PMID:23747600

  10. Proposition of novel classification approach and features for improved real-time arrhythmia monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Heo, Jeong; Park, Kwang Suk; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmia refers to a group of conditions in which the heartbeat is irregular, fast, or slow due to abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Some types of arrhythmia such as ventricular fibrillation may result in cardiac arrest or death. Thus, arrhythmia detection becomes an important issue, and various studies have been conducted. Additionally, an arrhythmia detection algorithm for portable devices such as mobile phones has recently been developed because of increasing interest in e-health care. This paper proposes a novel classification approach and features, which are validated for improved real-time arrhythmia monitoring. The classification approach that was employed for arrhythmia detection is based on the concept of ensemble learning and the Taguchi method and has the advantage of being accurate and computationally efficient. The electrocardiography (ECG) data for arrhythmia detection was obtained from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database (n=48). A novel feature, namely the heart rate variability calculated from 5s segments of ECG, which was not considered previously, was used. The novel classification approach and feature demonstrated arrhythmia detection accuracy of 89.13%. When the same data was classified using the conventional support vector machine (SVM), the obtained accuracy was 91.69%, 88.14%, and 88.74% for Gaussian, linear, and polynomial kernels, respectively. In terms of computation time, the proposed classifier was 5821.7 times faster than conventional SVM. In conclusion, the proposed classifier and feature showed performance comparable to those of previous studies, while the computational complexity and update interval were highly reduced. PMID:27318329

  11. [Emergency treatment of arrhythmias in neonates and infants].

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Wesselhoeft, H; Eigster, G

    1983-11-01

    Emergency treatment of cardiac arrhythmias was required in 41 newborn and infants aged two days to 9 months (mean 77 days) from July 1977 until September 1981. Heart defects were present in 27 (65.8%). Invasive electrophysiological studies were performed in all patients. The different types of arrhythmias were: bradyarrhythmias in 9 (21.9%): bradycardia to cardiac arrest (5), congenital complete AV-block (3), postoperative complete AV-block (1). Tachyarrhythmias in 32 patients (78.1%): reentry through accessory connections (21), congenital atrial flutter (6), ventricular flutter/fibrillation (3), and AV-nodal tachycardia (2). Overdrive atrial or ventricular stimulation with a consecutive series of 15-20 impulses of 5-10 Volts abolished arrhythmic attacks in 22 patients including 4 in whom prior digitalization had no effect. In two other patients overdrive pacing achieved sinus rhythm only after i.v. Propafenon. In 4 further patients 36.2 to 63.8 mg/m2 i.v. Propafenon and in 4 other patients DC synchronized cardioversion with 1 to 3 Wsec/kg restored a normal heart rate. The 3 patients with congenital complete heart block died, one despite permanent pacing. Oral Propafenon therapy with 300 mg/m2 die in three divided doses following emergency therapy of tachyarrhythmias was discontinued in patients without arrhythmias after 1 year on drug therapy. There was no relapse after a mean follow-up period of 1.9 years. Only patients with congestive heart failure due to cardiac defects needed additional digitalisation. Thus, in our experience antiarrhythmic drug therapy with Propafenon was more effective in this age group than digitalization. PMID:6664346

  12. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  13. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  14. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  15. In vitro arrhythmia generation by mild hypothermia: a pitchfork bifurcation type process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Binbin; Jacquir, Sabir; Laurent, Gabriel; Binczak, Stéphane; Pont, Oriol; Yahia, Hussein

    2015-03-01

    The neurological damage after cardiac arrest presents a huge challenge for hospital discharge. Therapeutic hypothermia (34 °C - 32 °C) has shown its benefits in reducing cerebral oxygen demand and improving neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. However, it can have many adverse effects, among them cardiac arrhythmia generation which represents an important part (up to 34%, according different clinical studies). A monolayer cardiac culture is prepared with cardiomyocytes from a newborn rat, directly on a multi-electrode array, which allows the acquisition of the extracellular potential of the culture. The temperature range is 37 °C - 30 °C-37 °C, representing the cooling and rewarming process of therapeutic hypothermia. Experiments showed that at 35 °C, the acquired signals are characterized by period-doubling phenomenon, compared with signals at other temperatures. Spiral waves, commonly considered to be a sign of cardiac arrhythmia, are observed in the reconstructed activation map. With an approach from nonlinear dynamics, phase space reconstruction, it is shown that at 35 °C, the trajectories of these signals formed a spatial bifurcation, even trifurcation. Another transit point is found between 30 °C-33 °C, which agreed with other clinical studies that induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest should not fall below 32 °C. The process of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest can be represented by a pitchfork bifurcation type process, which could explain the different ratios of arrhythmia among the adverse effects after this therapy. This nonlinear dynamic suggests that a variable speed of cooling/rewarming, especially when passing 35 °C, would help to decrease the ratio of post-hypothermia arrhythmia and then improve the hospital output. PMID:25690526

  16. In vitro arrhythmia generation by mild hypothermia: a pitchfork bifurcation type process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Binbin; Jacquir, Sabir; Laurent, Gabriel; Binczak, Stéphane; Pont, Oriol; Yahia, Hussein

    2015-03-01

    The neurological damage after cardiac arrest presents a huge challenge for hospital discharge. Therapeutic hypothermia (34 °C - 32 °C) has shown its benefits in reducing cerebral oxygen demand and improving neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. However, it can have many adverse effects, among them cardiac arrhythmia generation which represents an important part (up to 34%, according different clinical studies). A monolayer cardiac culture is prepared with cardiomyocytes from a newborn rat, directly on a multi-electrode array, which allows the acquisition of the extracellular potential of the culture. The temperature range is 37 °C - 30 °C-37 °C, representing the cooling and rewarming process of therapeutic hypothermia. Experiments showed that at 35 °C, the acquired signals are characterized by period-doubling phenomenon, compared with signals at other temperatures. Spiral waves, commonly considered to be a sign of cardiac arrhythmia, are observed in the reconstructed activation map. With an approach from nonlinear dynamics, phase space reconstruction, it is shown that at 35 °C, the trajectories of these signals formed a spatial bifurcation, even trifurcation. Another transit point is found between 30 °C-33 °C, which agreed with other clinical studies that induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest should not fall below 32 °C. The process of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest can be represented by a pitchfork bifurcation type process, which could explain the different ratios of arrhythmia among the adverse effects after this therapy. This nonlinear dynamic suggests that a variable speed of cooling/rewarming, especially when passing 35 °C, would help to decrease the ratio of post-hypothermia arrhythmia and then improve the hospital output.

  17. The role of pharmacotherapy in the prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Phillip A; Sieg, Adam; Gass, Jennifer Ann; Rajapreyar, Indranee

    2016-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a significant threat to the survival of patients with heart failure. Long-term cardiac remodeling predisposes these patients to develop malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Permanent implantable and temporary external defibrillators remain a mainstay for the prevention of sudden cardiac death in this population. For decades, researchers have attempted to identify reliable drug therapies to avoid such arrhythmias; however, to date, success has been inconsistent. This review aims to explore the evidence defining the role of drug therapies for direct and indirect suppression of arrhythmias that may cause sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. PMID:27003591

  18. Arrhythmia Management in the Elderly-Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillators and Prevention of Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Manian, Usha; Gula, Lorne J

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview of arrhythmia management in elderly patients as it pertains to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy and prevention of sudden death. Treatment of arrhythmia in elderly patients is fraught with challenges pertaining to goals of care and patient frailty. With an ever increasing amount of technology available, realistic expectations of therapy need to balance quality and quantity of life. The ICD is an important treatment option for selected patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. However, the incidence of sudden death as a percentage of all-cause mortality decreases with age. Studies have reported that 20% of elderly patients might die within 1 year of an episode of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but most because of nonarrhythmic causes. This illustrates the 'sudden cardiac death paradox,' with a great proportion of death in elderly patients, even those at risk for ventricular arrhythmias, attributable to medical conditions that cannot be addressed by an ICD. We discuss current practices in ICD therapy in elderly patients, existing evidence from registries and clinical trials, approaches to risk stratification, and important ethical considerations. Although the decision on whether ICD insertion is appropriate in the elderly population remains an area of uncertainty from an evidence-based and ethical perspective, we offer insight on potential clinical and research strategies for this growing population. PMID:27568872

  19. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12.

  20. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12. PMID:11429613

  1. Emergency therapy of maternal and fetal arrhythmias during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Atrial premature beats are frequently diagnosed during pregnancy (PR); supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) (atrial tachycardia, AV-nodal reentrant tachycardia, circus movement tachycardia) is less frequently diagnosed. For acute therapy, electrical cardioversion with 50–100 J is indicated in all unstable patients (pts). In stable SVT, the initial therapy includes vagal maneuvers to terminate tachycardias. For short-term management, when vagal maneuvers fail, intravenous adenosine is the first choice drug and may safely terminate the arrhythmia. Ventricular premature beats are also frequently present during PR and benign in most of the pts; however, malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias (sustained ventricular tachycardia [VT], ventricular flutter [VFlut] or ventricular fibrillation [VF]) may occur. Electrical cardioversion is necessary in all pts who are in hemodynamically unstable situation with life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In hemodynamically stable pts, initial therapy with ajmaline, procainamide or lidocaine is indicated. In pts with syncopal VT, VF, VFlut or aborted sudden death, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is indicated. In pts with symptomatic bradycardia, a pacemaker can be implanted using echocardiography at any stage of PR. The treatment of the pregnant patient with cardiac arrhythmias requires important modifications of the standard practice of arrhythmia management. The goal of therapy is to protect the patient and fetus through delivery, after which chronic or definitive therapy can be administered. PMID:20606792

  2. Genetics and epigenetics of arrhythmia and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Duygu, Burcu; Poels, Ella M.; da Costa Martins, Paula A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the end stage of several pathological cardiac conditions including myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension. Various molecular and cellular mechanisms are involved in the development of HF. At the molecular level, the onset of HF is associated with reprogramming of gene expression, including downregulation of the alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) gene and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase genes and reactivation of specific fetal cardiac genes such as atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide. These deviations in gene expression result in structural and electrophysiological changes, which eventually progress to HF. Cardiac arrhythmia is caused by altered conduction properties of the heart, which may arise in response to ischemia, inflammation, fibrosis, aging or from genetic factors. Because changes in the gene transcription program may have crucial consequences as deteriorated cardiac function, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the process has become a priority in the field. In this context, various studies besides having identified different DNA methylation patterns in HF patients, have also focused on specific disease processes and their underlying mechanisms, also introducing new concepts such as epigenomics. This review highlights specific genetic mutations associated with the onset and progression of HF, also providing an introduction to epigenetic mechanisms such as histone modifications, DNA methylation and RNA-based modification, and highlights the relation between epigenetics, arrhythmogenesis and HF. PMID:24198825

  3. Phosphodiesterase 4B in the cardiac L-type Ca²⁺ channel complex regulates Ca²⁺ current and protects against ventricular arrhythmias in mice.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Jérôme; Richter, Wito; Mika, Delphine; Castro, Liliana R V; Abi-Gerges, Aniella; Xie, Moses; Scheitrum, Colleen; Lefebvre, Florence; Schittl, Julia; Mateo, Philippe; Westenbroek, Ruth; Catterall, William A; Charpentier, Flavien; Conti, Marco; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2011-07-01

    β-Adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) enhance cardiac contractility by increasing cAMP levels and activating PKA. PKA increases Ca²⁺-induced Ca²⁺ release via phosphorylation of L-type Ca²⁺ channels (LTCCs) and ryanodine receptor 2. Multiple cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate local cAMP concentration in cardiomyocytes, with PDE4 being predominant for the control of β-AR-dependent cAMP signals. Three genes encoding PDE4 are expressed in mouse heart: Pde4a, Pde4b, and Pde4d. Here we show that both PDE4B and PDE4D are tethered to the LTCC in the mouse heart but that β-AR stimulation of the L-type Ca²⁺ current (ICa,L) is increased only in Pde4b-/- mice. A fraction of PDE4B colocalized with the LTCC along T-tubules in the mouse heart. Under β-AR stimulation, Ca²⁺ transients, cell contraction, and spontaneous Ca²⁺ release events were increased in Pde4b-/- and Pde4d-/- myocytes compared with those in WT myocytes. In vivo, after intraperitoneal injection of isoprenaline, catheter-mediated burst pacing triggered ventricular tachycardia in Pde4b-/- mice but not in WT mice. These results identify PDE4B in the CaV1.2 complex as a critical regulator of ICa,L during β-AR stimulation and suggest that distinct PDE4 subtypes are important for normal regulation of Ca²⁺-induced Ca²⁺ release in cardiomyocytes.

  4. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  5. Unique Association of Rare Cardiovascular Disease in an Athlete With Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Santomauro, V.; Contursi, M.; Dellegrottaglie, S.; Borsellino, G.

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are a leading cause of non-elegibility to competitive sport. The failure to detect a significant organic substrate in the initial stage of screening does not preclude the identification of structural pathologies in the follow-up by using advanced imaging techniques. Here we report the case of a senior athlete judged not elegible because an arrhythmia with the morphology consistent with the origin of the left ventricle, in which subsequent execution of a cardiac MR and a thoracic CT scan has allowed the identification of an unique association between an area of myocardial damage, probable site of origine of the arrhythma, and a rare aortic malformation. PMID:26535189

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  7. GENE THERAPIES FOR ARRHYTHMIAS IN HEART FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Fadi G.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we review recent advances in our understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms in the failing heart. We focus on changes in repolarization, conduction, and intracellular calcium cycling because of their importance to the vast majority of clinical arrhythmias in heart failure. We highlight recent efforts to combat arrhythmias using gene-based approaches that target ion channel, gap junction, and calcium cycling proteins. We further discuss the advantages and limitations associated with individual approaches. PMID:24566976

  8. [Recommendations for sports participation in patients with arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Milliez, P; Haggui, A; Maltret, A; Leenhardt, A

    2006-11-01

    Nowadays, sports are a wonderful mean for social success, and the high-level athlete is the symbol of a perfect hygiene of life. Despite this, the occurrence of unexplained sudden death (SD) is not exceptional, especially during training and competition. In this context, it is important to intensify medical controls for these athletes, especially in a very early phase, in order to detect subjects at risk. In case of detection of a cardiac disease prone to cardiovascular or arrhythmic event, the practice of any high-level sportive activity or even any sustained sportive activity must be forbidden without hesitation, with the aim of protecting these subjects. Even though a total interdiction of sports practice can be a tough decision to be accepted, it should prevail on the dramatic consequences of sudden death. Physicians' responsibility issues in the screening and management of competition or leisure-time sportsmen are of high importance since in case of sudden death, the physician and the medical community liabilities can be considered. As a consequence, the medical community set up recommendations on the screening, treatment and even interdiction of sportive activity for athletes, which should also be applied to leisure-time sportsmen. In the first part of this article, the different causes (especially the arrhythmia-related) of sudden death occurring in sportsmen are reviewed. In the second part, the recommendations on practice of high-level sports in case of arrhythmia or genetic arrhythmic cardiac disease are summarized. PMID:17181039

  9. [Cardiac rhabdomyoma surgically treated with success. Review of literature].

    PubMed

    Cigarroa López, José Angel; García Jiménez, Yoloxóchitl; Yáñez Gutiérrez, Lucelly; Jiménez Arteaga, Santiago; Martínez Sánchez, Arturo; Ortegón Cardeña, José; Gómez, Felipe David; Sánchez Soberanes, Agustín; López Gallegos, Diana; Riera-Kinkel, Carlos; Alva Espinosa, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The primary cardiac tumors are inusual, the incidence varies in all the ages between 0.005 to 0.05%. In pediatrics patients the incidence is 0.27%. The more frequent tumors during the childhood are the cardiac rhabdomyomas. These tumors are considered benigns. The clinical expression is wide, in the most the cases, the patients are asymptomatic and are detected by murmurs. In the prenatal age are manifested by arrhythmias or hydrops fetalis. The neonates and children may be show cardiac arrhythmias, low cardiac index and sudden cardiac death. The association with tuberous sclerosis had been reported in 81%. We present a neonate with cardiac rhabdomyoma diagnosed in the newborn period when he was asymptomatic, however in the follow-up he developed cardiac failure by obstruction in the out flow tract of the right ventricle. He underwent open cardiac surgery to resect the obstruction. Five months after surgery, the patient remain asymptomatic.

  10. The use of external event monitoring (web-loop) in the elucidation of symptoms associated with arrhythmias in a general population

    PubMed Central

    Epifanio, Hindalis Ballesteros; Katz, Marcelo; Borges, Melania Aparecida; Corrêa, Alessandra da Graça; Cintra, Fátima Dumas; Grinberg, Rodrigo Leandro; Ludovice, Ana Cristina Pinotti Pedro; Valdigem, Bruno Pereira; da Silva, Nilton José Carneiro; Fenelon, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Objective To correlate arrhythmic symptoms with the presence of significant arrhythmias through the external event monitoring (web-loop). Methods Between January and December 2011, the web-loop was connected to 112 patients (46% of them were women, mean age 52±21 years old). Specific arrhythmic symptoms were defined as palpitations, pre-syncope and syncope observed during the monitoring. Supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter or fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, pauses greater than 2 seconds or advanced atrioventricular block were classified as significant arrhythmia. The association between symptoms and significant arrhythmias were analyzed. Results The web-loop recorded arrhythmic symptoms in 74 (66%) patients. Of these, in only 14 (19%) patients the association between symptoms and significant cardiac arrhythmia was detected. Moreover, significant arrhythmia was found in 11 (9.8%) asymptomatic patients. There was no association between presence of major symptoms and significant cardiac arrhythmia (OR=0.57, CI95%: 0.21-1.57; p=0.23). Conclusion We found no association between major symptoms and significant cardiac arrhythmia in patients submitted to event recorder monitoring. Event loop recorder was useful to elucidate cases of palpitations and syncope in symptomatic patients. PMID:25295448

  11. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... done to look at heart function: Coronary angiography ECG (electrocardiogram) Echocardiogram A special test, called an electrophysiology ... through the middle Heart, front view Atrioventricular block, ECG tracing Normal heart rhythm Bradycardia Ventricular tachycardia Conduction ...

  12. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... a heart function test, like an electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) . continue What's a Normal Heart Rate? Heart rate ... suspected, the doctor will probably recommend an ECG/EKG to measure the heart's electrical activity. There's nothing ...

  13. Arrhythmia Associated with Buprenorphine and Methadone Reported to the Food and Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Kao, David P; Haigney, Mark CP; Mehler, Philip S; Krantz, Mori J

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the relative frequency of reporting of adverse events involving ventricular arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, QTc prolongation, or torsade de pointes to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) between buprenorphine and methadone. Design Retrospective pharmacoepidemiologic study Setting Adverse drug events spontaneously reported to the FDA between 1969-June 2011 originating in 196 countries (71% events from the US). Cases Adverse event cases mentioning methadone (n=14,915) or buprenorphine (n=7,283) were evaluated against all other adverse event cases (n= 4,796,141). Measurements The primary outcome was the composite of ventricular arrhythmia or cardiac arrest. The secondary outcome was the composite of QTc prolongation or torsade de pointes. The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) was used to identify disproportionate reporting defined as a PRR>2, χ2 error>4, with ≥3 cases. Findings There were 132 (1.8%) ventricular arrhythmia/cardiac arrest and 19 (0.3%) QTc prolongation/torsade de pointes cases associated with buprenorphine compared with 1729 (11.6%) ventricular arrhythmia/cardiac arrest and 390 (2.6%) QTc prolongation/torsade de pointes cases involving methadone. PRRs associated with buprenorphine were not significant for ventricular arrhythmia/cardiac arrest (1.1 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9–1.3, χ2=1.2) or QTc prolongation/torsade de pointes (1.0 95% CI 0.7–1.9, χ2=0.0006), but were for methadone (7.2 95% CI 6.9–7.5, χ2=9160; 10.6 95% CI 9.7–11.8, χ2=3305, respectively). Conclusion In spontaneously reported adverse events, methadone is associated with disproportionate reporting of cardiac arrhythmias, whereas buprenorphine is not. Although these findings probably reflect clinically relevant differences, a causal connection cannot be presumed and disproportionality analysis cannot quantify absolute risk per treatment episode. Population-based studies to definitively quantify differential incidence rates are warranted. PMID:26075588

  14. The developmental basis of adult arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation as a paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Sunil; MacRae, Calum A.

    2013-01-01

    Normal cardiac rhythm is one of the most fundamental physiologic phenomena, emerging early in the establishment of the vertebrate body plan. The developmental pathways underlying the patterning and maintenance of stable cardiac electrophysiology must be extremely robust, but are only now beginning to be unraveled. The step-wise emergence of automaticity, AV delay and sequential conduction are each tightly regulated and perturbations of these patterning events is now known to play an integral role in pediatric and adult cardiac arrhythmias. Electrophysiologic patterning within individual cardiac chambers is subject to exquisite control and is influenced by early physiology superimposed on the underlying gene networks that regulate cardiogenesis. As additional cell populations migrate to the developing heart these too bring further complexity to the organ, as it adapts to the dynamic requirements of a growing organism. A comprehensive understanding of the developmental basis of normal rhythm will inform not only the mechanisms of inherited arrhythmias, but also the differential regional propensities of the adult heart to acquired arrhythmias. In this review we use atrial fibrillation as a generalizable example where the various factors are perhaps best understood. PMID:24062689

  15. [Dual atrioventricular nodal conduction and arrhythmia with severe hemodynamic alterations during liver retransplantation].

    PubMed

    Zaballos, M; Jimeno, C; Jiménez, C; Fraile, J R; Almendral; García de Lucas, E

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a man who developed tachycardia caused by atrioventricular reentry related to dual nodal conduction during liver retransplantation. The hemodynamic alterations were severe. Arrhythmia and altered cardiac conduction are potential complications of liver transplantation. The development of tachyarrhythmias--atrial fibrillation as well as episodes of supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia and bradycardia--have been described. Such arrhythmias tend to occur particularly during reperfusion of the graft. Risk factors implicated are the severe ion imbalances, acid-base imbalance, and hypothermia that accompany the reperfusion of a new organ. A review of the possible pathogenic and etiological mechanisms that lead to arrhythmia in patients with end-stage liver disease is provided.

  16. Effect of global cardiac ischemia on human ventricular fibrillation: insights from a multi-scale mechanistic model of the human heart.

    PubMed

    Kazbanov, Ivan V; Clayton, Richard H; Nash, Martyn P; Bradley, Chris P; Paterson, David J; Hayward, Martin P; Taggart, Peter; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2014-11-01

    Acute regional ischemia in the heart can lead to cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (VF), which in turn compromise cardiac output and result in secondary global cardiac ischemia. The secondary ischemia may influence the underlying arrhythmia mechanism. A recent clinical study documents the effect of global cardiac ischaemia on the mechanisms of VF. During 150 seconds of global ischemia the dominant frequency of activation decreased, while after reperfusion it increased rapidly. At the same time the complexity of epicardial excitation, measured as the number of epicardical phase singularity points, remained approximately constant during ischemia. Here we perform numerical studies based on these clinical data and propose explanations for the observed dynamics of the period and complexity of activation patterns. In particular, we study the effects on ischemia in pseudo-1D and 2D cardiac tissue models as well as in an anatomically accurate model of human heart ventricles. We demonstrate that the fall of dominant frequency in VF during secondary ischemia can be explained by an increase in extracellular potassium, while the increase during reperfusion is consistent with washout of potassium and continued activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels. We also suggest that memory effects are responsible for the observed complexity dynamics. In addition, we present unpublished clinical results of individual patient recordings and propose a way of estimating extracellular potassium and activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels from these measurements. PMID:25375999

  17. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  18. Risk of arrhythmia induced by psychotropic medications: a proposal for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Fanoe, Søren; Kristensen, Diana; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf; Toft, Egon; Nielsen, Jimmi; Videbech, Poul; Pehrson, Steen; Bundgaard, Henning

    2014-05-21

    Several drugs used in the treatment of mental diseases are associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). A general cause-relationship between the intake of these drugs and SCD is unattainable, but numerous case reports of drug-induced malignant arrhythmia and epidemiological studies, associating the use of specific drugs with SCD, strongly support the presence of an increased risk. Whereas the absolute risk of drug-induced life-threatening arrhythmia may be relatively low, even small increments in risk of SCD may have a major health impact considering that millions of patients are treated with psychotropics. In subgroups of pre-disposed patients, e.g. patients with cardiac diseases or other co-morbidities, the elderly or patients treated with other negatively interacting drugs, the absolute risk of drug-induced arrhythmia may be considerable. On the other hand, several of the major mental disorders are associated with a large risk of suicide if untreated. The observed risk of malignant arrhythmia associated with treatment with psychotropic drugs calls for clinical guidelines integrating the risk of the individual drug and other potentially interacting risk factors. In this review, data from various authorities on the risk of arrhythmia associated with psychotropic medications were weighted and categorized into three risk categories. Additionally, we suggest a clinically applicable algorithm to reduce the risk of malignant arrhythmia in patients to be treated with psychotropic medications. The algorithm integrates the risk categories of the individual drugs and pre-disposing risk factors and suggests a prudent follow-up for patients with an increased risk. We believe this clinically manageable guideline might improve safety in the many and rapidly increasing number of patients on psychotropic drugs.

  19. Mechanoelectrical remodeling and arrhythmias during progression of hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongwei; Chemaly, Elie R.; Lee, Ahyoung; Kho, Changwon; Hadri, Lahouaria; Hajjar, Roger J.; Akar, Fadi G.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a clear association between left ventricular (LV) mechanical dysfunction in end-stage heart failure and the incidence of arrhythmias, the majority of sudden cardiac deaths occur at earlier stages of disease development. The mechanisms by which structural, mechanical, and molecular alterations predispose to arrhythmias at the tissue level before the onset of LV dysfunction remain unclear. In a rat model of pressure overload hypertrophy (PoH) produced by ascending aortic banding, we correlated mechanical and structural changes measured in vivo with key electrophysiological changes measured ex vivo in the same animals. We found that action potential prolongation, a hallmark of electrical remodeling at the tissue level, is highly correlated with changes in LV wall thickness but not mechanical function. In contrast, conduction delays are not predicted by either mechanical or structural changes during disease development. Moreover, disrupted Cx43 phosphorylation at intermediate (increased) and late (decreased) stages of PoH are associated with moderate and severe conduction delays, respectively. Interestingly, the level of interaction between Cx43 and the cytoskeletal protein ZO-1 is exclusively decreased at the late stage of PoH. Closely coupled action potentials consistent with afterdepolarization-mediated triggered beats were readily observed in 6 of 15 PoH hearts but never in controls. Similarly, PoH (8/15) but not control hearts exhibited sustained episodes of ventricular tachycardia after rapid stimulation. The initiation and early maintenance of arrhythmias in PoH were formed by rapid and highly uniform activation wavefronts emanating from sites distal to the former site of stimulation. In conclusion, repolarization but not conduction delays are predicted by structural remodeling in PoH. Cx43 phosphorylation is disrupted at intermediate (increased) and late (decreased) stages, which are associated with conduction delays. Dephosphorylation of Cx43 is

  20. Effect of prophylaxis of magnesium sulfate for reduction of postcardiac surgery arrhythmia: Randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Naghipour, Bahman; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Shadvar, Kamran; Bilehjani, Eissa; Khabaz, Ashkan Heyat; Fakhari, Solmaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arrhythmia is a common complication after heart surgery and is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Aims: This study aimed to study the effect of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) for reduction of postcardiac surgery arrhythmia. Setting and Design: This study is performed in the cardiac operating room and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Shahid Madani Hospital of Tabriz (Iran) between January 1, 2014, and September 30, 2014. This study is a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: In Group 1 (group magnesium [Mg]), eighty patients received 30 mg/kg MgSO4 in 500 cc normal saline and in Group 2 (group control), eighty patients received 500 cc normal saline alone. Statistical Analysis: The occurrence of arrhythmia was compared between groups by Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. In addition, surgical time, length of ICU stay, and length of hospital stay were compared by independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference in the incidence of arrhythmia between two groups (P = 0.037). The length of ICU stay was 3.4 ± 1.4 and 3.73 ± 1.77 days in group MgSO4 and control group, respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between two groups (P = 0.2). Conclusion: Mg significantly decreases the incidence of all type of postcardiac surgery arrhythmia and hospital length of stay at patients undergo cardiac surgery. We offer prophylactic administration of Mg at patients undergo cardiac surgery. PMID:27716697

  1. Irreversible Electroporation Near the Heart: Ventricular Arrhythmias Can Be Prevented With ECG Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Deodhar, Ajita; Dickfeld, Timm; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Gónen, Mithat; Rubinsky, Boris; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Irreversible electroporation is a nonthermal ablative tool that uses direct electrical pulses to create irreversible membrane pores and cell death. The ablation zone is surrounded by a zone of reversibly increased permeability; either zone can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Our purpose was to establish a safety profile for the use of irreversible electroporation close to the heart. MATERIALS and METHODS The effect of unsynchronized and synchronized (with the R wave on ECG) irreversible electroporation in swine lung and myocardium was studied in 11 pigs. Twelve lead ECG recordings were analyzed by an electrophysiologist for the presence of arrhythmia. Ventricular arrhythmias were categorized as major events. Minor events included all other dysrhythmias or ECG changes. Cardiac and lung tissue was submitted for histopathologic analysis. Electrical field modeling was performed to predict the distance from the applicators over which cells show electroporation-induced increased permeability. RESULTS At less than or equal to 1.7 cm from the heart, fatal (major) events occurred with all unsynchronized irreversible electroporation. No major and three minor events were seen with synchronized irreversible electroporation. At more than 1.7 cm from the heart, two minor events occurred with only unsynchronized irreversible electroporation. Electrical field modeling correlates well with the clinical results, revealing increased cell membrane permeability up to 1.7 cm away from the applicators. Complete lung ablation without intervening live cells was seen. No myocardial injury was seen. CONCLUSION Unsynchronized irreversible electroporation close to the heart can cause fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Synchronizing irreversible electroporation pulse delivery with absolute refractory period avoids significant cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21343484

  2. Overexpression of the transcription factor Hand1 causes predisposition towards arrhythmia in mice.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, Ross A; Zuberi, Zia; Gomes, John; Orford, Robert; Dupays, Laurent; Felkin, Leanne E; Clark, James E; Magee, Anthony I; Ehler, Elisabeth; Birks, Emma J; Barton, Paul J R; Tinker, Andrew; Mohun, Timothy J

    2009-07-01

    Elevated levels of the cardiac transcription factor Hand1 have been reported in several adult cardiac diseases but it is unclear whether this change is itself maladaptive with respect to heart function. To test this possibility, we have developed a novel, inducible transgenic system, and used it to overexpress Hand1 in adult mouse hearts. Overexpression of Hand1 in the adult mouse heart leads to mild cardiac hypertrophy and a reduction in life expectancy. Treated mice show no significant fibrosis, myocyte disarray or congestive heart failure, but have a greatly reduced threshold for induced ventricular tachycardia, indicating a predisposition to cardiac arrhythmia. Within 48 h, they show a significant loss of connexin43 protein from cardiac intercalated discs, with increased intercalated disc beta-catenin expression at protein and RNA levels. These changes are sustained during prolonged Hand1 overexpression. We propose that cardiac overexpression of Hand1 offers a useful mouse model of arrhythmogenesis and elevated HAND1 may provide one of the molecular links between the failing heart and arrhythmia.

  3. Torsade de pointes as a reperfusion arrhythmia following intravenous thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tekur, Venkatesh

    2013-12-01

    Many types of cardiac arrhythmias have been noted following acute myocardial infarction. Polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias (polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation) related to an acute myocardial infarction generally strike during the hyperacute phase, are clearly related to ischaemia and are not associated with a long QT interval time. Pause-dependent Torsade de pointes has been reported following acute myocardial infarction and this arrhythmia generally occurs 3-11 days after the onset of acute myocardial infarction and none has been reported during the hyperacute phase. Torsade de pointes - a specific ventricular tachycardia with specific characteristics has been described in hypokalemia, hypomagnesaemia, during Quinidine therapy, and while using phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants. It is reported following liquid protein diet, brady-arrhythmias [especially III° AV Block], sick-sinus syndromes. Torsade de pointes either pause-dependent or pause-independent occurring directly as a reperfusion arrhythmia during intravenous thrombolytic therapy has not been reported in the literature to the best of the authors knowledge. Here, an episode of Torsade de pointes as a direct consequence of reperfusion following thrombolytic therapy in a patient of acute myocardial infarction is described. PMID:24653589

  4. Arrhythmia management after device removal.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmic management is needed after removal of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Patients completely dependent on CIEDs need temporary device back-up until new CIEDs are implanted. Various methods are available for device back-up, and the appropriate management varies among patients. The duration from CIED removal to implantation of a new CIED also differs among patients. Temporary pacing is needed for patients with bradycardia, a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) or catheter ablation is needed for patients with tachyarrhythmia, and sequential pacing is needed for patients dependent on cardiac resynchronization therapy. The present review focuses on arrhythmic management after CIED removal. PMID:27588151

  5. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  6. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics.

  7. Hyperinsulinism in a child presenting with cardiac ischemia and bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Al-Fayyadh, Majid; Bulbul, Ziad; Al Maneea, Waleed; Abbas, Bassam Bin

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy referred to our service with suspected sinus node dysfunction. In addition to the arrhythmia, he had moderate mitral valve regurgitation and depressed ventricular function during a hypoglycemic episode. Cardiac abnormalities resolved with glucose infusion. We believe that hypoglycemia was responsible for the cardiac manifestations and it should be considered in unexplained rhythm disturbances or ischemia.

  8. Cardiac Na Channels: Structure to Function.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, K R; Clancy, C E

    2016-01-01

    Heart rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. Opening of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel initiates cellular depolarization and the propagation of an electrical action potential that promotes coordinated contraction of the heart. The regularity of these contractile waves is critically important since it drives the primary function of the heart: to act as a pump that delivers blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. Perturbations to NaV1.5 may alter the structure, and hence the function, of the ion channel and are associated downstream with a wide variety of cardiac conduction pathologies, such as arrhythmias. PMID:27586288

  9. Role of Cholinergic Innervation and RGS2 in Atrial Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Douglas L.; Tuomi, Jari M.; Chidiac, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The heart receives sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent innervation as well as the ability to process information internally via an intrinsic cardiac autonomic nervous system (ICANS). For over a century, the role of the parasympathetics via vagal acetylcholine release was related to controlling primarily heart rate. Although in the late 1800s shown to play a role in atrial arrhythmia, the myocardium took precedence from the mid-1950s until in the last decade a resurgence of interest in the autonomics along with signaling cascades, regulators, and ion channels. Originally ignored as being benign and thus untreated, recent emphasis has focused on atrial arrhythmia as atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia seen by the general practitioner. It is now recognized to have significant mortality and morbidity due to resultant stroke and heart failure. With the aging population, there will be an unprecedented increased burden on health care resources. Although it has been known for more than half a century that cholinergic stimulation can initiate AF, the classical concept focused on the M2 receptor and its signaling cascade including RGS4, as these had been shown to have predominant effects on nodal function (heart rate and conduction block) as well as contractility. However, recent evidence suggests that the M3 receptor may also playa role in initiation and perpetuation of AF and thus RGS2, a putative regulator of the M3 receptor, may be a target for therapeutic intervention. Mice lacking RGS2 (RGS2−/−), were found to have significantly altered electrophysiological atrial responses and were more susceptible to electrically induced AF. Vagally induced or programmed stimulation-induced AF could be blocked by the selective M3R antagonist, darifenacin. These results suggest a potential surgical target (ICANS) and pharmacological targets (M3R, RGS2) for the management of AF. PMID:22754542

  10. Mathematical model of cellular basis for the respiratory sinus arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Dexter, F; Rudy, Y; Levy, M N; Bruce, E N

    1991-05-21

    The respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is a vagally mediated oscillation in cardiac cycle length at the frequency of breathing. We developed a mathematical model that predicted the temporal and frequency dependence of the RSA. We used the mathematical model to examine the underlying cellular basis for the RSA at the level of the sinus node. We alternated efferent vagal activity between a low and a high frequency at the frequency of breathing. This oscillation caused the rate of acetylcholine (ACh) release to oscillate between a low and a high rate at the frequency of breathing. ACh degradation followed linear pharmacokinetics for physiological concentrations of ACh. Therefore, the concentration of ACh in neuroeffector junctions of the sinus node oscillated at the frequency of breathing. Membrane potential responded rapidly to changes in the concentration of ACh relative to the rate of ACh degradation. Thus, the time course of the RSA depended on the rate of ACh degradation. Membrane potential oscillated at several integer multiples of frequency of breathing and at various higher frequencies, which were integer multiples of the frequency of breathing and the frequencies of firing of the sinus node. However, computing cardiac cycle length from membrane potential eliminated the higher frequencies. Therefore, cardiac cycle length oscillated at several integer multiples of the frequency of breathing, but not at these higher frequencies.

  11. Convulsive Syncope Induced by Ventricular Arrhythmia Masquerading as Epileptic Seizures: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sabu, John; Regeti, Kalyani; Mallappallil, Mary; Kassotis, John; Islam, Hamidul; Zafar, Shoaib; Khan, Rafay; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Kanta, Romana; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla; Nai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    It is important but difficult to distinguish convulsive syncope from epileptic seizure in many patients. We report a case of a man who presented to emergency department after several witnessed seizure-like episodes. He had a previous medical history of systolic heart failure and automated implantable converter defibrillator (AICD) in situ. The differential diagnoses raised were epileptic seizures and convulsive syncope secondary to cardiac arrhythmia. Subsequent AICD interrogation revealed ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (v-tach/fib). Since convulsive syncope and epileptic seizure share many similar clinical features, early diagnosis is critical for choosing the appropriate management and preventing sudden cardiac death in patients with presumed epileptic seizure. PMID:27429683

  12. High level of oxygen treatment causes cardiotoxicity with arrhythmias and redox modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Panguluri, Siva K.; Bennett, Eric S.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia exposure in mice leads to cardiac hypertrophy and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel remodeling. Because redox balance of pyridine nucleotides affects Kv function and hyperoxia alters cellular redox potential, we hypothesized that hyperoxia exposure leads to cardiac ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the electrical changes and redox abnormalities caused by 72 h hyperoxia treatment in mice. Cardiac repolarization changes were assessed by acquiring electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac action potentials (AP). Biochemical assays were employed to identify the pyridine nucleotide changes, Kv1.5 expression and myocardial injury. Hyperoxia treatment caused marked bradycardia, arrhythmia and significantly prolonged (ms) the, RR (186.2 ± 10.7 vs. 146.4 ± 6.2), PR (46.8 ± 3.1 vs. 39.3 ± 1.6), QRS (10.8 ± 0.6 vs. 8.5 ± 0.2), QTc (57.1 ± 3.5 vs. 40 ± 1.4) and JT (13.4 ± 2.1 vs. 7.0 ± 0.5) intervals, when compared with normoxia group. Hyperoxia treatment also induced significant increase in cardiac action potential duration (APD) (ex-APD{sub 90}; 73.8 ± 9.5 vs. 50.9 ± 3.1 ms) and elevated levels of serum markers of myocardial injury; cardiac troponin I (TnI) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Hyperoxia exposure altered cardiac levels of mRNA/protein expression of; Kv1.5, Kvβ subunits and SiRT1, and increased ratios of reduced pyridine nucleotides (NADH/NAD and NADPH/NADP). Inhibition of SiRT1 in H9C2 cells using Splitomicin resulted in decreased SiRT1 and Kv1.5 expression, suggesting that SiRT1 may mediate Kv1.5 downregulation. In conclusion, the cardiotoxic effects of hyperoxia exposure involve ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. - Highlights: • Hyperoxia treatment leads to arrhythmia with prolonged QTc and action potential duration. • Hyperoxia treatment alters cardiac pyridine nucleotide [NAD(P)H/NAD(P)] levels. • SiRT1 and Kv1.5 are co

  13. Sports-Related Sudden Cardiac Injury or Death.

    PubMed

    Greene, Elizabeth Anne; Punnoose, Ann

    2015-12-01

    Symptoms such as syncope and chest pain, especially if they are accompanied by palpitations or occur with exercise in any combination, require cardiac evaluation before adolescent athletes are allowed to return to the sports field. Some life-threatening conditions will likely be associated with a family history of HCM or LQTS, but the family history may not be discovered at the first medical visit. A family history of CPVT, for example, is hard to elicit unless this diagnosis has already been established in an affected family member. The keys will be the timing of symptoms and the documentation of arrhythmia with exercise. The ECG at baseline in CPVT may be deceptively normal. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is progressive, so evaluation during early childhood may be negative. Long QT syndrome may not always result in an abnormal ECG, even in genetically positive individuals. A high index of suspicion is needed to make these diagnoses, especially if the family history is not available.

  14. The importance of non-uniformities in mechano-electric coupling for ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac mechanical and electrical activities are tightly linked through an intra-cardiac regulatory loop (mechano-electric coupling). This connection is essential for normal heart function and auto-regulation. In diseases associated with altered myocardial mechanical properties or function, however, feedback from the mechanical environment to the origin and spread of excitation can result in deadly cardiac arrhythmias. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias, especially, are encountered in cardiac diseases associated with volume and pressure overload or changes in tissue mechanics. Little is known about the influence of changes in mechano-electric coupling on cardiac rhythm in these settings or the potential therapeutic benefit of its manipulation. Improved understanding may be central to explaining the origin of arrhythmias that occur with these pathologies and to the development of novel mechanics-based therapies. The present review explores the potential role of mechano-electric coupling in ventricular arrhythmogenesis, with a focus on the importance of non-uniformity in mechanical function for the induction and sustenance of ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

  15. [Research progress of quantitative analysis for respiratory sinus arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Sun, Congcong; Zhang, Zhengbo; Wang, Buqing; Liu, Hongyun; Ang, Qing; Wang, Weidong

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is known as fluctuations of heart rate associated with breathing. It has been increasingly used as a noninvasive index of cardiac vagal tone in psychophysiological research recently. Its analysis is often influenced or distorted by respiratory parameters, posture and action, etc. This paper reviews five methods of quantification, including the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), peak valley RSA (pvRSA), cosinor fitting, spectral analysis, and joint timing-frequency analysis (JTFA). Paced breathing, analysis of covariance, residua method and msRSA per liter tidal volume are adjustment strategies of measurement and analysis of RSA in this article as well. At last, some prospects of solutions of the problems of RSA research are given.

  16. Intermittent short ECG recording is more effective than 24-hour Holter ECG in detection of arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients report symptoms of palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for 24-hour Holter ECG, although the sensitivity for detecting relevant arrhythmias is comparatively low. Intermittent short ECG recording over a longer time period might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of 24-hour Holter ECG with intermittent short ECG recording over four weeks to detect relevant arrhythmias in patients with palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Methods Design: prospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Setting: Clinical Physiology, University Hospital. Patients: 108 consecutive patients referred for ambiguous palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Interventions: All individuals underwent a 24-hour Holter ECG and additionally registered 30-second handheld ECG (Zenicor EKG® thumb) recordings at home, twice daily and when having cardiac symptoms, during 28 days. Main outcome measures: Significant arrhythmias: atrial fibrillation (AF), paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrioventricular (AV) block II–III, sinus arrest (SA), wide complex tachycardia (WCT). Results 95 patients, 42 men and 53 women with a mean age of 54.1 years, completed registrations. Analysis of Holter registrations showed atrial fibrillation (AF) in two patients and atrioventricular (AV) block II in one patient (= 3.2% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 1.1–8.9]). Intermittent handheld ECG detected nine patients with AF, three with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and one with AV-block-II (= 13.7% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 8.2–22.0]). There was a significant difference between the two methods in favour of intermittent ECG with regard to the ability to detect relevant arrhythmias (P = 0.0094). With Holter ECG, no symptoms were registered during any of the detected arrhythmias. With intermittent ECG, symptoms were registered during half of the arrhythmia

  17. VANADIUM EXPOSURE ALTERS SPONTANEOUS BEAT RATE AND GENE EXPRESSION OF CULTURED CARDIAC MYOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recent toxicological studies report PM-induced changes in a number of cardiac parameters, including heart rate variability, arrhythmias, repolarization, and internal defib...

  18. Testing the burden of rare variation in arrhythmia-susceptibility genes provides new insights into molecular diagnosis for Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Scouarnec, Solena; Karakachoff, Matilde; Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Bonnaud, Stéphanie; Portero, Vincent; Duboscq-Bidot, Laëtitia; Daumy, Xavier; Simonet, Floriane; Teusan, Raluca; Baron, Estelle; Violleau, Jade; Persyn, Elodie; Bellanger, Lise; Barc, Julien; Chatel, Stéphanie; Martins, Raphaël; Mabo, Philippe; Sacher, Frédéric; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Kyndt, Florence; Schmitt, Sébastien; Bézieau, Stéphane; Le Marec, Hervé; Dina, Christian; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Probst, Vincent; Redon, Richard

    2015-05-15

    The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare heritable cardiac arrhythmia disorder associated with ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the SCN5A gene have been causally related to BrS in 20-30% of cases. Twenty other genes have been described as involved in BrS, but their overall contribution to disease prevalence is still unclear. This study aims to estimate the burden of rare coding variation in arrhythmia-susceptibility genes among a large group of patients with BrS. We have developed a custom kit to capture and sequence the coding regions of 45 previously reported arrhythmia-susceptibility genes and applied this kit to 167 index cases presenting with a Brugada pattern on the electrocardiogram as well as 167 individuals aged over 65-year old and showing no history of cardiac arrhythmia. By applying burden tests, a significant enrichment in rare coding variation (with a minor allele frequency below 0.1%) was observed only for SCN5A, with rare coding variants carried by 20.4% of cases with BrS versus 2.4% of control individuals (P = 1.4 × 10(-7)). No significant enrichment was observed for any other arrhythmia-susceptibility gene, including SCN10A and CACNA1C. These results indicate that, except for SCN5A, rare coding variation in previously reported arrhythmia-susceptibility genes do not contribute significantly to the occurrence of BrS in a population with European ancestry. Extreme caution should thus be taken when interpreting genetic variation in molecular diagnostic setting, since rare coding variants were observed in a similar extent among cases versus controls, for most previously reported BrS-susceptibility genes.

  19. Genetic etiology and evaluation of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Dolmatova, Elena; Mahida, Saagar; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A

    2013-08-01

    A wide range of inherited syndromes can result in ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). The natural histories of inherited arrhythmia syndromes are highly variable and current risk stratification techniques are limited. Thus, the management of these conditions can be difficult and often involves a combination of risk assessment, lifestyle modification, cardiac interventions, counselling, and family screening. Recent advances in high throughput sequencing have enabled routine testing in patients with a high clinical index of suspicion for an inherited arrhythmia condition, and cascade screening in relatives of mutation carriers. Given the complexity in screening and data interpretation that has been introduced by recent genomic advances, individuals with inherited arrhythmia syndromes are encouraged to seek care at specialized centers with cardiovascular genetics expertise. In this review, we discuss the etiologies of SCD syndromes and discuss strategies for the evaluation of patients at risk for SCD with a focus on the role of genetic testing and family screening. PMID:23812838

  20. Cardiac involvement in hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hemochromatosis or primary iron-overload cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially preventable cause of heart failure. This is initially characterized by diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias and in later stages by dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis of iron overload is established by elevated transferrin saturation (>55%) and elevated serum ferritin (>300 ng/mL). Genetic testing for mutations in the HFE (high iron) gene and other proteins, such as hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor, and ferroportin, should be performed if secondary causes of iron overload are ruled out. Patients should undergo comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate their systolic and diastolic function. Newer modalities like strain imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography hold promise for earlier detection of cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with measurement of T2* relaxation times can help quantify myocardial iron overload. In addition to its value in diagnosis of cardiac iron overload, response to iron reduction therapy can be assessed by serial imaging. Therapeutic phlebotomy and iron chelation are the cornerstones of therapy. The average survival is less than a year in untreated patients with severe cardiac impairment. However, if treated early and aggressively, the survival rate approaches that of the regular heart failure population.

  1. Arrhythmia recognition and classification using combined linear and nonlinear features of ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Elhaj, Fatin A; Salim, Naomie; Harris, Arief R; Swee, Tan Tian; Ahmed, Taqwa

    2016-04-01

    Arrhythmia is a cardiac condition caused by abnormal electrical activity of the heart, and an electrocardiogram (ECG) is the non-invasive method used to detect arrhythmias or heart abnormalities. Due to the presence of noise, the non-stationary nature of the ECG signal (i.e. the changing morphology of the ECG signal with respect to time) and the irregularity of the heartbeat, physicians face difficulties in the diagnosis of arrhythmias. The computer-aided analysis of ECG results assists physicians to detect cardiovascular diseases. The development of many existing arrhythmia systems has depended on the findings from linear experiments on ECG data which achieve high performance on noise-free data. However, nonlinear experiments characterize the ECG signal more effectively sense, extract hidden information in the ECG signal, and achieve good performance under noisy conditions. This paper investigates the representation ability of linear and nonlinear features and proposes a combination of such features in order to improve the classification of ECG data. In this study, five types of beat classes of arrhythmia as recommended by the Association for Advancement of Medical Instrumentation are analyzed: non-ectopic beats (N), supra-ventricular ectopic beats (S), ventricular ectopic beats (V), fusion beats (F) and unclassifiable and paced beats (U). The characterization ability of nonlinear features such as high order statistics and cumulants and nonlinear feature reduction methods such as independent component analysis are combined with linear features, namely, the principal component analysis of discrete wavelet transform coefficients. The features are tested for their ability to differentiate different classes of data using different classifiers, namely, the support vector machine and neural network methods with tenfold cross-validation. Our proposed method is able to classify the N, S, V, F and U arrhythmia classes with high accuracy (98.91%) using a combined support

  2. Characterization of antiarrhythmic drugs by alternating current induced arrhythmias in isolated heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Borchard, U; Bösken, R; Greeff, K

    1982-04-01

    A new method for inducing arrhythmias or asystolia by the application of a 50 HZ alternating current (ac) to electrically driven heart preparations has been developed and applied to isolated left atria and right ventricular papillary muscles of the guinea-pig. An increase in driving frequency from 1 to 3 HZ effects a significant reduction of the threshold of ac-arrhythmia in guinea-pig papillary muscles but no change in atria. A decrease in temperature from 31 degrees C to 25 degrees C and an increase in [Ca2+]0 from 1.25 to 5 mmol/l elevates threshold for ac-arrhythmia and -asystolia. The fast sodium channel inhibitors quinidine, carticaine and benzylamino-5,6-dihydro-8,9-dimethoxy-imidazo-5,1-a-isoquinoline hydrochloride (HE-36) increase threshold of ac-arrhythmia in left atria and papillary muscles, whereas the slow channel inhibitor verapamil is ineffective in concentrations up to 6 mumol/l. Threshold of ac-arrhythmia is elevated by quinidine predominantly in papillary muscles. Carticaine and HE-36 are effective in left atria and papillary muscles to almost the same extent. Threshold of ac-asystolia is increased mainly in papillary muscles by quinidine and HE-36; carticaine produces a similar increase in left atria and papillary muscles. Verapamil even leads to a decrease in threshold predominantly in papillary muscles. It is concluded that model arrhythmias induced by alternating current are brought about mainly by an increase in Na+-conductance of cardiac cell membranes. The negative chronotropic potency in right atria occurs in the sequence verapamil greater than quinidine greater than carticane approximately HE-36. The negative inotropic potency in papillary muscle occurs in the same sequence but HE-36 increases force of contraction.

  3. Noninvasive low-frequency electromagnetic stimulation of the left stellate ganglion reduces myocardial infarction-induced ventricular arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Songyun; Zhou, Xiaoya; Huang, Bing; Wang, Zhuo; Zhou, Liping; Wang, Menglong; Yu, Lilei; Jiang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic stimulation has been widely used in autonomic disorders in the past few decades, but few studies has been done in cardiac diseases. Recently, studies showed that low-frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) might suppress atrial fibrillation by mediating the cardiac autonomic nervous system. In the present study, the effect of LF-EMF stimulation of left stellate ganglion (LSG) on LSG neural activity and ventricular arrhythmia has been studied in an acute myocardium infarction canine model. It is shown that LF-EMF stimulation leads to a reduction both in the neural activity of LSG and in the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. The obtained results suggested that inhibition of the LSG neural activity might be the causal of the reduction of ventricular arrhythmia since previous studies have shown that LSG hyperactivity may facilitate the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. LF-EMF stimulation might be a novel noninvasive substitute for the existing implant device-based electrical stimulation or sympathectomy in the treatment of cardiac disorders. PMID:27470078

  4. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  5. Changes underlying arrhythmia in the transgenic heart overexpressing Refsum disease gene-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Byung Chul; Kim, Jae Ha; Ahn, Young Keun; Lee, Hyang Sim; Baik, Yung Hong; Kim, Kyung Keun

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we identified a novel neuron-specific protein (PAHX-AP1) that binds to Refsum disease gene product (PAHX), and we developed transgenic (TG) mice that overexpress heart-targeted PAHX-AP1. These mice have atrial tachycardia and increased susceptibility to aconitine-induced arrhythmia. This study was undertaken to elucidate the possible changes in ion channels underlying the susceptibility to arrhythmia in these mice. RT-PCR analyses revealed that the cardiac expression of adrenergic beta(1)-receptor (ADRB1) was markedly lower, whereas voltage-gated potassium channel expression (Kv2.1) was higher in PAHX-AP1 TG mice compared with non-TG mice. However, the expression of voltage-sensitive sodium and calcium channels, and muscarinic receptor was not significantly different. Propranolol pretreatment, a non-specific beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, blocked aconitine-induced arrhythmia in non-TG mice, but not in PAHX-AP1 TG mice. Our results indicate that, in the PAHX-AP1 TG heart, the modulation of voltage-gated potassium channel and ADRB1 expression seem to be important in the electrophysiological changes associated with altered ion channel functions, but ADRB1 is not involved in the greater susceptibility to aconitine-induced arrhythmia.

  6. Use of Whole Exome Sequencing for the Identification of Ito-Based Arrhythmia Mechanism and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Amy C; Kline, Crystal F; Glynn, Patric; Johnson, Benjamin L; Curran, Jerry; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S D; Binkley, Philip F; Janssen, Paul M L; Weiss, Raul; Raman, Subha V; Fowler, Steven J; Priori, Silvia G; Hund, Thomas J; Carnes, Cynthia A; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Background Identified genetic variants are insufficient to explain all cases of inherited arrhythmia. We tested whether the integration of whole exome sequencing with well-established clinical, translational, and basic science platforms could provide rapid and novel insight into human arrhythmia pathophysiology and disease treatment. Methods and Results We report a proband with recurrent ventricular fibrillation, resistant to standard therapeutic interventions. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a variant in a previously unidentified exon of the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein-6 (DPP6) gene. This variant is the first identified coding mutation in DPP6 and augments cardiac repolarizing current (Ito) causing pathological changes in Ito and action potential morphology. We designed a therapeutic regimen incorporating dalfampridine to target Ito. Dalfampridine, approved for multiple sclerosis, normalized the ECG and reduced arrhythmia burden in the proband by >90-fold. This was combined with cilostazol to accelerate the heart rate to minimize the reverse-rate dependence of augmented Ito. Conclusions We describe a novel arrhythmia mechanism and therapeutic approach to ameliorate the disease. Specifically, we identify the first coding variant of DPP6 in human ventricular fibrillation. These findings illustrate the power of genetic approaches for the elucidation and treatment of disease when carefully integrated with clinical and basic/translational research teams. PMID:26015324

  7. Disordered myocardial Ca(2+) homeostasis results in substructural alterations that may promote occurrence of malignant arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Tribulova, N; Knezl, V; Szeiffova Bacova, B; Egan Benova, T; Viczenczova, C; Gonçalvesova, E; Slezak, J

    2016-09-19

    We aimed to determine the impact of Ca(2+)-related disorders induced in intact animal hearts on ultrastructure of the cardiomyocytes prior to occurrence of severe arrhythmias. Three types of acute experiments were performed that are known to be accompanied by disturbances in Ca(2+) handling. Langedorff-perfused rat or guinea pig hearts subjected to K(+)-deficient perfusion to induce ventricular fibrillation (VF), burst atrial pacing to induce atrial fibrillation (AF) and open chest pig heart exposed to intramyocardial noradrenaline infusion to induce ventricular tachycardia (VT). Tissue samples for electron microscopic examination were taken during basal condition, prior and during occurrence of malignant arrhythmias. Cardiomyocyte alterations preceding occurrence of arrhythmias consisted of non-uniform sarcomere shortening, disruption of myofilaments and injury of mitochondria that most likely reflected cytosolic Ca(2+) disturbances and Ca(2+) overload. These disorders were linked with non-uniform pattern of neighboring cardiomyocytes and dissociation of adhesive junctions suggesting defects in cardiac cell-to-cell coupling. Our findings identified heterogeneously distributed high [Ca(2+)](i)-induced subcellular injury of the cardiomyocytes and their junctions as a common feature prior occurrence of VT, VF or AF. In conclusion, there is a link between Ca(2+)-related disorders in contractility and coupling of the cardiomyocytes pointing out a novel paradigm implicated in development of severe arrhythmias. PMID:27643936

  8. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this article, we will review their molecular identities and biophysical properties. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:27261823

  9. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis.

  10. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26926267

  11. Symmetrical compression distance for arrhythmia discrimination in cloud-based big-data services.

    PubMed

    Lillo-Castellano, J M; Mora-Jiménez, I; Santiago-Mozos, R; Chavarría-Asso, F; Cano-González, A; García-Alberola, A; Rojo-Álvarez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The current development of cloud computing is completely changing the paradigm of data knowledge extraction in huge databases. An example of this technology in the cardiac arrhythmia field is the SCOOP platform, a national-level scientific cloud-based big data service for implantable cardioverter defibrillators. In this scenario, we here propose a new methodology for automatic classification of intracardiac electrograms (EGMs) in a cloud computing system, designed for minimal signal preprocessing. A new compression-based similarity measure (CSM) is created for low computational burden, so-called weighted fast compression distance, which provides better performance when compared with other CSMs in the literature. Using simple machine learning techniques, a set of 6848 EGMs extracted from SCOOP platform were classified into seven cardiac arrhythmia classes and one noise class, reaching near to 90% accuracy when previous patient arrhythmia information was available and 63% otherwise, hence overcoming in all cases the classification provided by the majority class. Results show that this methodology can be used as a high-quality service of cloud computing, providing support to physicians for improving the knowledge on patient diagnosis.

  12. [On evaluating occupational fitness in railway workers with ventricular arrhythmias after coronary arteries stenting].

    PubMed

    Muraseyeva, E V; Gorokhova, S G; Prigorovskaya, T S; Pfaf, V F

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied prospects of work capacity preserving after coronary stenting in IHD and cardiac arrhythmias. Examination covered 158 railway workers underwent complete endovascular revascularization of myocardium for coronary stenosis; all of them had ventricular arrhythmias before coronary surgery. Findings are that in long-term period (in 16 months in average) after coronary stenting, grade I and III ventricular extrasystoles disappeared in 77.8 and 54.5% of cases respectively, but only in 11.9% of grade IV ventricular extrasystoles cases. Ventricular extrasystoles remained unchanged in 44.3% of cases. Reliable relationships were seen between unchanged grade IV ventricular extrasystoles and body weight index (OR = 5.49, 95% CI: 0.87-34.67), general cholesterol level (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.06-2.69), low density lipoproteins (OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.00-2.76) and left ventricular ejection function lower 45% (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.14-2.27), exertion ventricular extrasystoles before myocardium revascularization (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.78-5.41). That necessitates correction of the mentioned risk factors of cardiac arrhythmias for restored work capacity. PMID:27396143

  13. [On evaluating occupational fitness in railway workers with ventricular arrhythmias after coronary arteries stenting].

    PubMed

    Muraseyeva, E V; Gorokhova, S G; Prigorovskaya, T S; Pfaf, V F

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied prospects of work capacity preserving after coronary stenting in IHD and cardiac arrhythmias. Examination covered 158 railway workers underwent complete endovascular revascularization of myocardium for coronary stenosis; all of them had ventricular arrhythmias before coronary surgery. Findings are that in long-term period (in 16 months in average) after coronary stenting, grade I and III ventricular extrasystoles disappeared in 77.8 and 54.5% of cases respectively, but only in 11.9% of grade IV ventricular extrasystoles cases. Ventricular extrasystoles remained unchanged in 44.3% of cases. Reliable relationships were seen between unchanged grade IV ventricular extrasystoles and body weight index (OR = 5.49, 95% CI: 0.87-34.67), general cholesterol level (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.06-2.69), low density lipoproteins (OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.00-2.76) and left ventricular ejection function lower 45% (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.14-2.27), exertion ventricular extrasystoles before myocardium revascularization (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.78-5.41). That necessitates correction of the mentioned risk factors of cardiac arrhythmias for restored work capacity.

  14. Symmetrical compression distance for arrhythmia discrimination in cloud-based big-data services.

    PubMed

    Lillo-Castellano, J M; Mora-Jiménez, I; Santiago-Mozos, R; Chavarría-Asso, F; Cano-González, A; García-Alberola, A; Rojo-Álvarez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The current development of cloud computing is completely changing the paradigm of data knowledge extraction in huge databases. An example of this technology in the cardiac arrhythmia field is the SCOOP platform, a national-level scientific cloud-based big data service for implantable cardioverter defibrillators. In this scenario, we here propose a new methodology for automatic classification of intracardiac electrograms (EGMs) in a cloud computing system, designed for minimal signal preprocessing. A new compression-based similarity measure (CSM) is created for low computational burden, so-called weighted fast compression distance, which provides better performance when compared with other CSMs in the literature. Using simple machine learning techniques, a set of 6848 EGMs extracted from SCOOP platform were classified into seven cardiac arrhythmia classes and one noise class, reaching near to 90% accuracy when previous patient arrhythmia information was available and 63% otherwise, hence overcoming in all cases the classification provided by the majority class. Results show that this methodology can be used as a high-quality service of cloud computing, providing support to physicians for improving the knowledge on patient diagnosis. PMID:25823046

  15. Subdiaphragmatic murine electrophysiological studies: sequential determination of ventricular refractoriness and arrhythmia induction.

    PubMed

    Gutstein, David E; Danik, Stephan B; Sereysky, Jedd B; Morley, Gregory E; Fishman, Glenn I

    2003-09-01

    Programmed electrical stimulation (PES) is a crucial aspect of the evaluation of the risk of arrhythmias in cardiac patients and provides a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of arrhythmia in experimental models. Whereas PES in the mouse is well characterized, the procedures allowing for follow-up studies in the same animal have not been developed. In this report, we describe a novel subdiaphragmatic approach that allows for repeat electrophysiological studies in the mouse. Under inhaled anesthesia, PES was performed in 36 wild-type mice via a stimulating electrode introduced through an epigastric incision and placed directly into the diaphragmatic surface of the heart. The procedure was repeated 7 days later. Ventricular effective refractory periods (VERP) did not change significantly between the initial and follow-up trials. Chronic treatment with amiodarone, however, was associated with a 70% prolongation in VERP from initial to follow-up studies (P < or = 0.001). In addition, PES of a genetically modified strain with sudden cardiac death, the connexin43 conditional knockout mouse consistently induced lethal polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Thus sequential PES in mice is feasible with the use of a subdiaphragmatic approach, yields reproducible VERP values, and can be used to follow pharmacologically induced changes in VERP and identify mice at risk of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:12750061

  16. Temporal abstraction and inductive logic programming for arrhythmia recognition from electrocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Carrault, G; Cordier, M-O; Quiniou, R; Wang, F

    2003-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to cardiac arrhythmia recognition from electrocardiograms (ECGs). ECGs record the electrical activity of the heart and are used to diagnose many heart disorders. The numerical ECG is first temporally abstracted into series of time-stamped events. Temporal abstraction makes use of artificial neural networks to extract interesting waves and their features from the input signals. A temporal reasoner called a chronicle recogniser processes such series in order to discover temporal patterns called chronicles which can be related to cardiac arrhythmias. Generally, it is difficult to elicit an accurate set of chronicles from a doctor. Thus, we propose to learn automatically from symbolic ECG examples the chronicles discriminating the arrhythmias belonging to some specific subset. Since temporal relationships are of major importance, inductive logic programming (ILP) is the tool of choice as it enables first-order relational learning. The approach has been evaluated on real ECGs taken from the MIT-BIH database. The performance of the different modules as well as the efficiency of the whole system is presented. The results are rather good and demonstrate that integrating numerical techniques for low level perception and symbolic techniques for high level classification is very valuable.

  17. Cardiac Monitoring in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Zègre-Hemsey, Jessica K; Garvey, J Lee; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Patients present to the emergency department (ED) with a wide range of complaints and ED clinicians are responsible for identifying which conditions are life threatening. Cardiac monitoring strategies in the ED include, but are not limited to, 12-lead electrocardiography and bedside cardiac monitoring for arrhythmia and ischemia detection as well as QT-interval monitoring. ED nurses are in a unique position to incorporate cardiac monitoring into the early triage and risk stratification of patients with cardiovascular emergencies to optimize patient management and outcomes. PMID:27484661

  18. [Sudden cardiac death in individuals with normal hearts: an update].

    PubMed

    González-Melchor, Laila; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) is a tragic event and a world-wide health problem. Every year, near 4-5 million people experience SD. SD is defined as the death occurred in 1h after the onset of symptoms in a person without previous signs of fatality. It can be named "recovered SD" when the case received medical attention, cardiac reanimation effective defibrillation or both, surviving the fatal arrhythmia. Cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases characterized by abnormal ion channel function due to genetic mutations in ion channel genes, providing increased susceptibility to develop cardiac arrhythmias and SD. Usually the death occurs before 40 years of age and in the autopsy the heart is normal. In this review we discuss the main cardiac channelopathies involved in sudden cardiac death along with current management of cases and family members that have experienced such tragic event.

  19. [Sudden cardiac death in individuals with normal hearts: an update].

    PubMed

    González-Melchor, Laila; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) is a tragic event and a world-wide health problem. Every year, near 4-5 million people experience SD. SD is defined as the death occurred in 1h after the onset of symptoms in a person without previous signs of fatality. It can be named "recovered SD" when the case received medical attention, cardiac reanimation effective defibrillation or both, surviving the fatal arrhythmia. Cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases characterized by abnormal ion channel function due to genetic mutations in ion channel genes, providing increased susceptibility to develop cardiac arrhythmias and SD. Usually the death occurs before 40 years of age and in the autopsy the heart is normal. In this review we discuss the main cardiac channelopathies involved in sudden cardiac death along with current management of cases and family members that have experienced such tragic event. PMID:25128006

  20. Ventricular arrhythmias in competitive athletes: risk stratification with T-wave alternans

    PubMed Central

    INAMA, GIUSEPPE; PEDRINAZZI, CLAUDIO; DURIN, ORNELLA; NANETTI, MASSIMILIANO; DONATO, GIORGIO; PIZZI, RITA

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of our study is to evaluate the role of TWA to stratify the risk of sudden cardiac death in athletes (Ath) with complex ventricular arrhythmias (VA), and to document a possible correlation between TWA and electrophysiological testing (EES) results. Methods: We studied 43 Ath with VA (31 M, mean age 34 ± 12 years). In all cases a cardiological evaluation was performed, including TWA and EES. The patients were evaluated during a follow-up of 25 ± 22 months. The end-point was the occurrence of sudden death or malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT). Results: TWA was negative in 28 Ath (65%), positive in 8 (19%) and indeterminate in 7 (16%). All subjects with negative TWA did not show induction of VT at EES, with significant correlation between negative TWA and negative EES (p<0.001). All Ath with positive TWA also had VT induced by a EES, but without significant correlation between positive TWA and positive EES. In 2 Ath with undetermined TWA (29%) VT were induced at EES. Our data did not show significant correlation between indeterminate TWA and positive or negative EES. However, logistic regression analysis showed significant correlation between abnormal TWA test (positive or indeterminate) and inducibility of VT at EES (p<0.001). During follow-up we observed a significant difference in end-point occurrence between Ath with negative or positive TWA and between Ath with negative or positive EES. Conclusion: TWA confirm its role as a simple and non-invasive test, and it seems useful for prognostic stratification of Ath with VA. PMID:21977276

  1. Enhanced self-termination of re-entrant arrhythmias as a pharmacological strategy for antiarrhythmic action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanidi, O. V.; Bailey, A.; Biktashev, V. N.; Clayton, R. H.; Holden, A. V.

    2002-09-01

    Ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias generated by high frequency, irregular spatio-temporal electrical activity. Re-entrant propagation has been demonstrated as a mechanism generating these arrhythmias in computational and in vitro animal models of these arrhythmias. Re-entry can be idealised in homogenous isotropic virtual cardiac tissues as spiral and scroll wave solutions of reaction-diffusion equations. A spiral wave in a bounded medium can be terminated if its core reaches a boundary. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients are sometimes observed to spontaneously self-terminate. One possible mechanism for self-termination of a spiral wave is meander of its core to an inexcitable boundary. We have previously proposed the hypothesis that the spatial extent of meander of a re-entrant wave in the heart can be directly related to its probability of self-termination, and so inversely related to its lethality. Meander in two-dimensional virtual ventricular tissues based on the Oxsoft family of cell models, with membrane excitation parameters simulating the inherited long Q-T syndromes has been shown to be consistent with this hypothesis: the largest meander is seen in the syndrome with the lowest probability of death per arrhythmic episode. Here we extend our previous results to virtual tissues based on the Luo-Rudy family of models. Consistent with our hypothesis, for both families of models, whose different ionic mechanisms produce different patterns of meander, the LQT virtual tissue with the larger meander simulates the syndrome with the lower probability of death per episode. Further, we search the parameter space of the repolarizing currents to find their conductance parameter values that give increased meander of spiral waves. These parameters may provide targets for antiarrhythmic drugs designed to act by increasing the likelihood of self-termination of re-entrant arrhythmias.

  2. The cardiomyocyte molecular clock, regulation of Scn5a, and arrhythmia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Elizabeth A; Lefta, Mellani; Zhang, Xiping; Bartos, Daniel C; Feng, Han-Zhong; Zhao, Yihua; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Jin, Jian-Ping; Esser, Karyn A; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-05-15

    The molecular clock mechanism underlies circadian rhythms and is defined by a transcription-translation feedback loop. Bmal1 encodes a core molecular clock transcription factor. Germline Bmal1 knockout mice show a loss of circadian variation in heart rate and blood pressure, and they develop dilated cardiomyopathy. We tested the role of the molecular clock in adult cardiomyocytes by generating mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1). ECG telemetry showed that cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1(-/-)) in adult mice slowed heart rate, prolonged RR and QRS intervals, and increased episodes of arrhythmia. Moreover, isolated iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts were more susceptible to arrhythmia during electromechanical stimulation. Examination of candidate cardiac ion channel genes showed that Scn5a, which encodes the principle cardiac voltage-gated Na(+) channel (Na(V)1.5), was circadianly expressed in control mouse and rat hearts but not in iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts. In vitro studies confirmed circadian expression of a human Scn5a promoter-luciferase reporter construct and determined that overexpression of clock factors transactivated the Scn5a promoter. Loss of Scn5a circadian expression in iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts was associated with decreased levels of Na(V)1.5 and Na(+) current in ventricular myocytes. We conclude that disruption of the molecular clock in the adult heart slows heart rate, increases arrhythmias, and decreases the functional expression of Scn5a. These findings suggest a potential link between environmental factors that alter the cardiomyocyte molecular clock and factors that influence arrhythmia susceptibility in humans.

  3. Observational Cohort Study of Ventricular Arrhythmia in Adults with Marfan Syndrome Caused by FBN1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhzadeh, Sara; Keyser, Britta; Rybczynski, Meike; Sondermann, Claudia; Detter, Christian; Steven, Daniel; Robinson, Peter N.; Berger, Jürgen; Schmidtke, Jörg; Blankenberg, Stefan; Willems, Stephan; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Hoffmann, Boris A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Marfan syndrome is associated with ventricular arrhythmia but risk factors including FBN1 mutation characteristics require elucidation. Methods and Results We performed an observational cohort study of 80 consecutive adults (30 men, 50 women aged 42±15 years) with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations. We assessed ventricular arrhythmia on baseline ambulatory electrocardiography as >10 premature ventricular complexes per hour (>10 PVC/h), as ventricular couplets (Couplet), or as non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (nsVT), and during 31±18 months of follow-up as ventricular tachycardia (VT) events (VTE) such as sudden cardiac death (SCD), and sustained ventricular tachycardia (sVT). We identified >10 PVC/h in 28 (35%), Couplet/nsVT in 32 (40%), and VTE in 6 patients (8%), including 3 with SCD (4%). PVC>10/h, Couplet/nsVT, and VTE exhibited increased N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide serum levels(P<.001). All arrhythmias related to increased NT-proBNP (P<.001), where PVC>10/h and Couplet/nsVT also related to increased indexed end-systolic LV diameters (P = .024 and P = .020), to moderate mitral valve regurgitation (P = .018 and P = .003), and to prolonged QTc intervals (P = .001 and P = .006), respectively. Moreover, VTE related to mutations in exons 24–32 (P = .021). Kaplan–Meier analysis corroborated an association of VTE with increased NT-proBNP (P<.001) and with mutations in exons 24–32 (P<.001). Conclusions Marfan syndrome with causative FBN1 mutations is associated with an increased risk for arrhythmia, and affected persons may require life-long monitoring. Ventricular arrhythmia on electrocardiography, signs of myocardial dysfunction and mutations in exons 24–32 may be risk factors of VTE. PMID:24349050

  4. High level of oxygen treatment causes cardiotoxicity with arrhythmias and redox modulation.

    PubMed

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C; Panguluri, Siva K; Bennett, Eric S; Kolliputi, Narasaiah; Tipparaju, Srinivas M

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia exposure in mice leads to cardiac hypertrophy and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel remodeling. Because redox balance of pyridine nucleotides affects Kv function and hyperoxia alters cellular redox potential, we hypothesized that hyperoxia exposure leads to cardiac ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the electrical changes and redox abnormalities caused by 72h hyperoxia treatment in mice. Cardiac repolarization changes were assessed by acquiring electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac action potentials (AP). Biochemical assays were employed to identify the pyridine nucleotide changes, Kv1.5 expression and myocardial injury. Hyperoxia treatment caused marked bradycardia, arrhythmia and significantly prolonged (ms) the, RR (186.2 ± 10.7 vs. 146.4 ± 6.2), PR (46.8 ± 3.1 vs. 39.3 ± 1.6), QRS (10.8 ± 0.6 vs. 8.5 ± 0.2), QTc (57.1 ± 3.5 vs. 40 ± 1.4) and JT (13.4 ± 2.1 vs. 7.0 ± 0.5) intervals, when compared with normoxia group. Hyperoxia treatment also induced significant increase in cardiac action potential duration (APD) (ex-APD90; 73.8 ± 9.5 vs. 50.9 ± 3.1 ms) and elevated levels of serum markers of myocardial injury; cardiac troponin I (TnI) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Hyperoxia exposure altered cardiac levels of mRNA/protein expression of; Kv1.5, Kvβ subunits and SiRT1, and increased ratios of reduced pyridine nucleotides (NADH/NAD & NADPH/NADP). Inhibition of SiRT1 in H9C2 cells using Splitomicin resulted in decreased SiRT1 and Kv1.5 expression, suggesting that SiRT1 may mediate Kv1.5 downregulation. In conclusion, the cardiotoxic effects of hyperoxia exposure involve ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. PMID:25447406

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  6. Genetically engineered SCN5A mutant pig hearts exhibit conduction defects and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Park, David S; Cerrone, Marina; Morley, Gregory; Vasquez, Carolina; Fowler, Steven; Liu, Nian; Bernstein, Scott A; Liu, Fang-Yu; Zhang, Jie; Rogers, Christopher S; Priori, Silvia G; Chinitz, Larry A; Fishman, Glenn I

    2015-01-01

    SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the major cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with conduction disease and ventricular fibrillation (VF); however, the mechanisms that link loss of sodium channel function to arrhythmic instability remain unresolved. Here, we generated a large-animal model of a human cardiac sodium channelopathy in pigs, which have cardiac structure and function similar to humans, to better define the arrhythmic substrate. We introduced a nonsense mutation originally identified in a child with Brugada syndrome into the orthologous position (E558X) in the pig SCN5A gene. SCN5A(E558X/+) pigs exhibited conduction abnormalities in the absence of cardiac structural defects. Sudden cardiac death was not observed in young pigs; however, Langendorff-perfused SCN5A(E558X/+) hearts had an increased propensity for pacing-induced or spontaneous VF initiated by short-coupled ventricular premature beats. Optical mapping during VF showed that activity often began as an organized focal source or broad wavefront on the right ventricular (RV) free wall. Together, the results from this study demonstrate that the SCN5A(E558X/+) pig model accurately phenocopies many aspects of human cardiac sodium channelopathy, including conduction slowing and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias.

  7. Hemodynamic effects of encainide in patients with ventricular arrhythmia and poor ventricular function

    SciTech Connect

    Sami, M.H.; Derbekyan, V.A.; Lisbona, R.

    1983-09-01

    Gated cardiac scanning was used to evaluate the hemodynamic effects of encainide in 19 patients (1 woman) with complex ventricular arrhythmia and depressed left ventricular (LV) function (ejection fraction less than 45%). Patients were 36 to 80 years old (average 61). All were candidates for long-term encainide therapy after having failed with currently available antiarrhythmics. Sixty-three percent had congestive heart failure before they received encainide. All were evaluated in the hospital before encainide therapy by a gated cardiac scan performed at least 3 days after discontinuing all antiarrhythmic drugs. Patients received oral encainide in doses of 75 to 200 mg. Gated cardiac scans were repeated 1 to 2 weeks later when an 80% reduction in frequency of premature ventricular complexes was observed on a 24-hour Holter recording. No patient had worsening of congestive heart failure during encainide therapy. Encainide did not significantly affect ejection fraction, which averaged 22 +/- 10% before and 25 +/- 14% (SD) after encainide (difference not significant (NS)). Other hemodynamic variables, including heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume and end-diastolic volume, remained unchanged during encainide therapy. Digoxin blood levels in 10 patients averaged 1.04 +/- 0.43 before and 1.22 +/- 0.47 mg/ml (NS) during encainide therapy. Thus, encainide given orally in clinically effective doses does not appear to have significant hemodynamic effects in patients with ventricular arrhythmia and depressed LV function.

  8. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27591449

  9. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27590654

  10. Recommendations and cardiological evaluation of athletes with arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hoogsteen, J.; Bennekers, J.H.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Hemel, N.M.; Wilde, A.A.M.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Gorgels, A.P.M.; Smeets, J.L.R.M.; Hauer, R.N.W.; Jordaens, J.L.M.; Schalij, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Confronted with a competitive or recreational athlete, the physician has to discriminate between benign, paraphysiological and pathological arrhythmias. Benign arrhythmias do not represent a risk for SCD, nor do they induce haemodynamic consequences during athletic activities. These arrhythmias are not markers for heart disease. Paraphysiological arrhythmias are related to athletic performance. Long periods of endurance training induce changes in rhythm, conduction and repolarisation. These changes are fully reversible and disappear when the sport is terminated. Pathological arrhythmias have haemodynamic consequences and express disease, such as sick sinus syndrome, cardiomyopathy or inverse consequences of physical training. Arrhythmias can be classified as bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias. Conduction disorders can be seen in fast as well as in slow arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:25696329

  11. Robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Antoine; Guichard, Jean Baptiste; Roméyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Gerbay, Antoine; Isaaz, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency treatment represents the first choice of treatment for arrhythmias, in particular complex arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation, due to the greater benefit/risk ratio compared to antiarrhythmic drugs. However, complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation require long procedures with additional risks such as X-ray exposure or serious complications such as tamponade. Given this context, the treatment of arrhythmias using robotic magnetic navigation entails a technique well suited to complex arrhythmias on account of its efficacy, reliability, significant reduction in X-ray exposure for both patient and operator, as well as a very low risk of perforation. As ongoing developments will likely improve results and procedure times, this technology will become one of the most modern technologies for treating arrhythmias. Based on the literature, this review summarizes the advantages and limitations of robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias.

  12. Robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Antoine; Guichard, Jean Baptiste; Roméyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Gerbay, Antoine; Isaaz, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency treatment represents the first choice of treatment for arrhythmias, in particular complex arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation, due to the greater benefit/risk ratio compared to antiarrhythmic drugs. However, complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation require long procedures with additional risks such as X-ray exposure or serious complications such as tamponade. Given this context, the treatment of arrhythmias using robotic magnetic navigation entails a technique well suited to complex arrhythmias on account of its efficacy, reliability, significant reduction in X-ray exposure for both patient and operator, as well as a very low risk of perforation. As ongoing developments will likely improve results and procedure times, this technology will become one of the most modern technologies for treating arrhythmias. Based on the literature, this review summarizes the advantages and limitations of robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias. PMID:27698569

  13. Pathophysiology and clinical management of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Nabeel; Steckman, David A; Sauer, William H; Judson, Marc A

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by formation of granulomas in the heart, resulting in conduction disturbances, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and ventricular dysfunction. The presentation of cardiac sarcoidosis ranges from asymptomatic with an abnormal imaging scan, to palpitations, syncope, symptoms of congestive heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis has not been standardized, but the presence of cardiac symptoms on medical history and physical examination, and an abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG), Holter monitoring, or echocardiogram has been shown to be highly sensitive for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis. A signal-averaged ECG might also have a role in screening for cardiac sarcoidosis in asymptomatic patients. Although endomyocardial biopsies are highly specific for the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis, procedural yield is very low and appropriate findings on cardiac MRI or PET are, therefore, often used as diagnostic surrogates. Treatment for cardiac sarcoidosis usually involves immunosuppressive therapy, particularly corticosteroids. Additional therapy might be required, depending on the clinical presentation, including implantation of an internal defibrillator, antiarrhythmic agents, and catheter ablation.

  14. Increased Nonconducted P-Wave Arrhythmias after a Single Oil Fly Ash Inhalation Exposure in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W.; Hazari, Mehdi S.; Carll, Alex P.; Rowan, William H.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Cascio, Wayne E.; Costa, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Exposure to combustion-derived fine particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality especially in individuals with cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. PM inhalation causes several adverse changes in cardiac function that are reflected in the electrocardiogram (ECG), including altered cardiac rhythm, myocardial ischemia, and reduced heart rate variability (HRV). The sensitivity and reliability of ECG-derived parameters as indicators of the cardiovascular toxicity of PM in rats are unclear. Objective We hypothesized that spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats are more susceptible to the development of PM-induced arrhythmia, altered ECG morphology, and reduced HRV than are Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, a related strain with normal blood pressure. Methods We exposed rats once by nose-only inhalation for 4 hr to residual oil fly ash (ROFA), an emission source particle rich in transition metals, or to air and then sacrificed them 1 or 48 hr later. Results ROFA-exposed SH rats developed nonconducted P-wave arrhythmias but no changes in ECG morphology or HRV. We found no ECG effects in ROFA-exposed WKY rats. ROFA-exposed SH rats also had greater pulmonary injury, neutrophil infiltration, and serum C-reactive protein than did ROFA-exposed WKY rats. Conclusions These results suggest that cardiac arrhythmias may be an early sensitive indicator of the propensity for PM inhalation to modify cardiovascular function. PMID:19479011

  15. POPDC1S201F causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The Popeye domain–containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane–localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of