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Sample records for dodecyl benzene sulfonic

  1. Inhibition of mild steel corrosion by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and sodium oleate in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; Han, K.N.; Guan, Y.C.

    1998-08-01

    Inhibition of mild steel corrosion by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (C{sub 12}H{sub 25}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SO{sub 3}Na [SDBS]) and sodium oleate (CH{sub 3}[CH{sub 2}]{sub 7}CH{double_bond}CH[CH{sub 2}]{sub 7}COONa) in acidic solutions was investigated using a potentiostat, a lock-in amplifier, a contact angle goniometer, A fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, and an ultraviolet (UV)/visible spectrophotometer. In the presence of the organic inhibitors, the corrosion rate was reduced significantly, Anionic SDBS was adsorbed on the positively charged mild steel surface through the electrostatic attraction. However, for sodium oleate, the soluble oleic acid (CH{sub 3}[CH{sub 2}]{sub 7}CH{double_bond}CH[CH]{sub 7}COOH) chemisorbed on the steel surface at the first stage. Then, insoluble colloid adsorbed on the chemisorbed surface through van der Waals forces.

  2. Evaluation of linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid as a teat dip in a commercial dairy.

    PubMed

    Pankey, J W; Boddie, R L; Philpot, W N

    1984-06-01

    A postmilking teat dip containing 1.94% linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid was evaluated for approximately 6 mo on a commercial dairy farm that milked an average of 75 cows. Sixteen Staphylococcus aureus infections were diagnosed, 12 in the undipped control quarters and 4 in the dipped. Incidence of intramammary infection with Staphylococcus aureus was reduced 68.1%. Seventy-five infections were diagnosed as micrococci, 42 in control and 33 in the dipped group, a 23.6% reduction. A total of 37 Corynebacterium sp. infections were diagnosed, 21 and 16 in control and dipped groups, a 25.8% reduction. Teat skin condition did not change during the study. PMID:6747046

  3. Aqueous stability and mobility of C₆₀ complexed by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate surfactant.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianjia; Yuan, Yue; Wang, Hongyu; Liang, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Surfactant complexation may have significant effects on the environmental behavior of nano-particles. In order to understand the ecological exposure of nano-materials, it is important to determine the stability and mobility of surfactant-complexed nano-materials in aqueous systems. In this study, the aggregation and transport of C60 complexed by the surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) were investigated. It was found that SDBS-complexed C60 had a ζ-potential of -49.5 mV under near-neutral pH conditions and remained stable during an aging period of 15 days. It had a critical coagulation concentration of 550 mmol/L for NaCl, which was higher than common natural colloids and many kinds of raw nano-materials, and was comparable to those of many kinds of surface-modified nano-materials. SDBS enhanced the stability of C60 colloid; however, at the same time, it also enhanced the colloidal particle aggregation rate. Much higher mobility was found for SDBS-complexed C60 than C60 colloid. Increase in ionic strength, Ca(2+) concentration or Al(3+) concentration decreased the mobility. In general, SDBS-complexed C60 had high stability and mobility. PMID:27090698

  4. Simultaneous determination of ofloxacin and gatifloxacin on cysteic acid modified electrode in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenfen; Gu, Shuqing; Ding, Yaping; Li, Li; Liu, Xiao

    2013-02-01

    A novel cysteic acid modified carbon paste electrode (cysteic acid/CPE) based on electrochemical oxidation of L-cysteine was developed to simultaneously determine ofloxacin and gatifloxacin in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS). Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) indicated that L-cysteine was oxidated to cysteic acid. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammograms (CV) indicated that cysteic acid was successfully modified on electrode. The large peak separation (116 mV) between ofloxacin and gatifloxacin was obtained on cysteic acid/CPE while only one oxidation peak was found on bare electrode. And the peak currents increased 5 times compared to bare electrode. Moreover, the current could be further enhanced in the presence of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate. The differential pulse voltammograms (DPV) exhibited that the oxidation peak currents were linearly proportional to their concentrations in the range of 0.06-10 μM for ofloxacin and 0.02-200 μM for gatifloxacin, and the detection limits of ofloxacin and gatifloxacin were 0.02 μM and 0.01 μM (S/N=3), respectively. This proposed method was successfully applied to determine ofloxacin and gatifloxacin in pharmaceutical formulations and human serum samples.

  5. Positional isomers of linear sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate: solubility, self-assembly, and air/water interfacial activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Guo; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2006-10-10

    Commercial linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (ABS) are a very important class of anionic surfactants that are employed in a wide variety of applications, especially those involving wetting and detergency. Linear ABS surfactants generally consist of a complex mixture of different chain lengths and positional isomers. This diversity and level of complexity makes it difficult to develop fundamental structure-property correlations for the commercial surfactants. In this work, six monodisperse headgroup positional isomers of sodium para-dodecyl benzene sulfonate (Na-x-DBS, x = 1-6) have been studied. The influence of headgroup position and added electrolyte (NaCl) on the solubility and self-assembly (micellar and vesicular aggregation and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behavior) in the temperature range from 10 to 90 degrees C have been investigated. Additionally, the air-aqueous solution interfacial adsorption at 25 (no added NaCl) and 50 degrees C (from 0 to 1.0 M added NaCl) has been examined. The observed physicochemical behavior is interpreted in terms of local molecular packing constraints, and in the case of the lyotropic liquid crystalline behavior global aggregate packing constraints as well.

  6. Impact of model perfume molecules on the self-assembly of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig; Grillo, Isabelle

    2013-03-12

    The impact of two model perfumes with differing degrees of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, linalool (LL) and phenylethanol (PE), on the solution structure of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate, LAS-6, has been studied by small angle neutron scattering, SANS. For both types of perfume molecules, complex phase behavior is observed. The phase behavior depends upon the concentration, surfactant/perfume composition, and type of perfume. The more hydrophilic perfume PE promotes the formation of more highly curved structures. At relatively low surfactant concentrations, small globular micelles, L1, are formed. These become perfume droplets, L(sm), stabilized by the surfactant at much higher perfume solution compositions. At higher surfactant concentrations, the tendency of LAS-6 to form more planar structures is evident. The more hydrophobic linalool promotes the formation of more planar structures. Combined with the greater tendency of LAS-6 to form planar structures, this results in the planar structures dominating the phase behavior for the LAS-6/linalool mixtures. For the LAS-6/linalool mixture, the self-assembly is in the form of micelles only at the lowest surfactant and perfume concentrations. Over most of the concentration-composition space explored, the structures are predominantly lamellar, L(α), or vesicle, L(v), or in the form of a lamellar/micellar coexistence. At low and intermediate amounts of LL, a significantly different structure is observed, and the aggregates are in the form of small, relatively monodisperse vesicles (i.e., nanovesicles), L(sv).

  7. Adsorption mechanism of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate on carbon blacks by adsorption isotherm and zeta potential determinations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yapei; Lu, Pei; Li, Caiting; Fan, Xiaopeng; Wen, Qingbo; Zhan, Qi; Shu, Xin; Xu, Tieliang; Zeng, Guangming

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant solutions were propounded to remove fine and hydrophobic carbon black particles from coal-fired flue gas. The adsorption mechanisms between sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, an anionic surfactant) and carbon black particles in suspension were investigated. The influence of inorganic salt (NaCl) was also considered. As results showed, hydrophobic interactions contributed to the strong adsorption between SDBS and carbon black particles in the absence of NaCl, and adding NaCl affected the adsorption process. The adsorption amount of SDBS significantly increased when NaCl was added into the SDBS solution; however, when SDBS was in low concentration, the amount of adsorbed SDBS, which was responsible for the shift of zeta potentials, varied little under different concentrations of NaCl. This indicated that the adsorption of SDBS was mainly caused by hydrophobic interaction and Na+ could not change the adsorption of SDBS on adsorption site when SDBS was in low concentration. Moreover, the adsorbed SDBS and Na+ were retained in the Stern layer. PMID:23530331

  8. An Evaluation of a Teat Dip with Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid in Preventing Bovine Mammary Gland Infection from Experimental Exposure to Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, D. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Brooks, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teat dip with dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (1.94%) for the prevention of intramammary infections was determined in cows experimentally challenged with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. The infection rates with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus were 62.5% and 75% in undipped quarters, 12.5% and 21.5% in dipped quarters with a reduction rate of 80% and 71% respectively. The significance of some findings in relation to mastitis control are discussed. PMID:17422110

  9. Determination of Protein by Fluorescence Enhancement of Curcumin in Lanthanum-Curcumin-Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonate-Protein System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yunfeng; Wang, Mingyin; Sun, Lina; Tang, Bo; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    We found that the fluorescence intensity of the lanthanum (La(3+))-curcumin (CU) complex can be highly enhanced by proteins in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulphonate (SDBS). Based on this finding, a new fluorimetric method for the determination of protein was developed. Under optimized conditions, the enhanced intensities of fluorescence are quantitatively in proportion to the concentrations of proteins in the range 0.0080-20.0 g mL(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 0.00080-20.0 g mL(-1) for human serum albumin (HSA) with excitation of 425 nm, and 0.00020-20.0 g mL(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 0.00080-20.0 g mL(-1)for human serum albumin (HSA) with excitation of 280 nm, while corresponding qualitative detection limits (S/N 3) are as low as 5.368, 0.573, 0.049, 0.562 g mL(-1), respectively. Study on reaction mechanism reveals that proteins can bind with La(3+), CU and SDBS through self-assembling function with electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interaction and van der Waals forces, etc. The proteins form a supermolecular association with multilayer structure, in which La(3+)-CU is clamped between BSA and SDBS. The unique high fluorescence enhancement of CU is resulted through synergic effects of favorable hydrophobic microenvironment provided by BSA and SDBS, and efficient intermolecular energy transfer among BSA, SDBS and CU. In energy transfer process, La(3+) plays a crucial role because it not only shortens the distance between SDBS and CU, but also acts as a "bridge" for transferring the energy from BSA to CU.

  10. Electrochemical determination of atropine at multi-wall carbon nanotube electrode based on the enhancement effect of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Dar, Riyaz Ahmad; Brahman, Pradeep Kumar; Tiwari, Sweety; Pitre, Krishna Sadashiv

    2012-03-01

    Herein, a new electrochemical method was described for the determination of atropine based on the enhancement effect of an anionic surfactant: sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS). In pH 10.5 tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide as supporting electrolyte and in the presence of 0.4×10(-4)M SDBS, atropine yields a well-defined and sensitive oxidation peak at the multi-wall carbon nanotube electrode (MWCNTE). Compared with that in the absence of SDBS, the oxidation peak current of atropine remarkably increases in the presence of SDBS. The experimental parameters, such as supporting electrolyte, concentration of SDBS, and accumulation time, were optimized for atropine determination. The oxidation peak current is proportional to the concentration of atropine over the range from 3.98 ng/ml to 27.23 ng/ml. The detection limit is 0.449 ng/ml after 2 min of accumulation. This new voltammetric method was successfully used to determine atropine in Indian traditional medicine (seeds and leaves of Datura stramonium) with satisfactory recoveries. The developed method was also used for the analysis of atropine in pharmaceutical formulation of ophthalmic solution (eye drop). The relative standard deviations of intraday and interday analyses for atropine were 0.67% and 0.86% respectively (n=3) for the accumulation time of 120 s. PMID:22118893

  11. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  16. Activated-sludge nitrification in the presence of linear and branched-chain alkyl benzene sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Baillod, C R; Boyle, W C

    1968-01-01

    The effects of biodegradable linear alkyl benzene sulfonate and branched-chain alkyl benzene sulfonate detergents on activated-sludge nitrification were investigated by administering a synthetic waste containing up to 23 mg of each detergent per liter to eight bench-scale, batch, activated-sludge units. It was found that both detergents tended to promote complete oxidation of ammonia to nitrate, whereas control units produced approximately equal amounts of nitrite and nitrate. Various hypotheses are offered to explain the phenomenon.

  17. SOLVENT-FREE FACILE SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL α-TOSYLOXY β-KETO SULFONES USING [HYDROXY(TOSYLOXY)IODO]BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A facile, general and high yielding protocol for the synthesis of novel α-tosyloxy β-keto sulfones is described utilizing relatively non-toxic, [hydroxy(tosyloxy)iodo]benzene, under solvent-free conditions at room temperature.

  18. Interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates: A molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Yu; Wei, Ning; Wang, Ce; Zhou, He; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Lu

    2015-11-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to analyze orientations of sodium branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates molecules at nonane/water interface, which is helpful to design optimal surfactant structures to achieve ultralow interfacial tension (IFT). Through the two dimensional density profiles, monolayer collapses are found when surfactant concentration continues to increase. Thus the precise scope of monolayer is certain and orientation can be analyzed. Based on the simulated results, we verdict the interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates at the oil-water interface, and discuss the effect of hydrophobic tail structure on surfactant assignment. Bigger hydrophobic size can slow the change rate of surfactant occupied area as steric hindrance, and surfactant meta hydrophobic tails have a stronger tendency to stretch to the oil phase below the collapsed concentration. Furthermore, an interfacial model with reference to collapse, increasing steric hindrance and charge repulsive force between interfacial surfactant molecules, responsible for effecting of surfactant concentration and structure has been supposed.

  19. Benzene-1,3,5-triyl tris­(methane­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal, Domingo; Aguirre, Gerardo; Vargas, Berenice

    2010-01-01

    In the mol­ecule of the title compound, C9H12O9S3, the two methanesulfonate groups re located one above and one below the ring plane. The C—O—S angle range is 119.3 (2)–121.1 (2)°. This conformation is different from that of the benzene analog 1,2,5-tris­(p-toluene­sulfonate), which is a three-legged ‘table’ with all fragments of the p-toluene­sulfonate on top of the benzene ring. In the crystal, the supra­molecular aggregation is completed by the presence of C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21580584

  20. Effect of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate in skin of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala): observations with scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, V.; Chawla, G.; Kumar, V.; Lal, H.; Viswanathan, P.N.

    1987-04-01

    Pathomorphological changes in the skin was noticed under the scanning electron microscope in fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) exposed to 0.005 ppm (25% of the LC50) concentration to linear alkyl benzene sulfonate. The epithelial cells present in the epidermis of the skin were found to secrete more mucus with linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) than did controls. The presence or deposition of mucus on the surface of skin indicated likely molecular interaction between constituents of mucus and LAS.

  1. Effect of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate in skin of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala): observations with scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Misra, V; Chawla, G; Kumar, V; Lal, H; Viswanathan, P N

    1987-04-01

    Pathomorphological changes in the skin was noticed under the scanning electron microscope in fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) exposed to 0.005 ppm (25% of the LC50) concentration to linear alkyl benzene sulfonate. The epithelial cells present in the epidermis of the skin were found to secrete more mucus with linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) than did controls. The presence or deposition of mucus on the surface of skin indicated likely molecular interaction between constituents of mucus and LAS.

  2. Pathomorphological changes in gills of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) by linear alkyl benzene sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, V.; Lal, H.; Chawla, G.; Viswanathan, P.N.

    1985-12-01

    Fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) exposed to 0.005 ppm (25% of LC50) concentration to detergents (linear alkyl benzene sulfonate) showed marked behavioral changes and distorted appearance of primary and secondary lamellae along with damage to gill epithelium under scanning electron microscopy at various magnifications. Mucosal cells of gills were found to secrete mucus showing primary reactions for membrane damage leading to dysfunction in respiration and osmoregulation.

  3. Combined effects of cadmium and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate on Lemna minor L.

    PubMed

    Singh, J; Chawla, G; Naqvi, S H; Viswanathan, P N

    1994-03-01

    : The effects of 0.1 ppm cadmium and 0.005% linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) on the uptake and metabolic incorporation of (14)C glycine by Lemna minor L., after 2, 24 and 48 h were studied for antagonistic/synergistic effects. Combined exposure was found to decrease the (14)C incorporation into proteins, DNA, RNA and phospholipids, to a greater extent than individual exposure. The presence of LAS increased the uptake of (109)Cd in the plants.

  4. Pathomorphological changes in gills of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) by linear alkyl benzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Misra, V; Lal, H; Chawla, G; Viswanathan, P N

    1985-12-01

    Fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) exposed to 0.005 ppm (25% of LC50) concentration to detergents (linear alkyl benzene sulfonate) showed marked behavioral changes and distorted appearance of primary and secondary lamellae along with damage to gill epithelium under scanning electron microscopy at various magnifications. Mucosal cells of gills were found to secrete mucus showing primary reactions for membrane damage leading to dysfunction in respiration and osmoregulation.

  5. N-(4-Meth-oxy-benzo-yl)benzene-sulfon-amide.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasa, S; Nanjundaswamy, M S; Madankumar, S; Lokanath, N K; Suresha, E; Suchetan, P A

    2014-02-01

    In the title compound, C14H13NO4S, the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 69.81 (1)°; the dihedral angle between the planes defined by the S-N-C=O segment of the central chain and the sulfonyl benzene ring is 74.91 (1)°. In the crystal, the mol-ecules are linked by weak N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into C(4) chains running along [100]. The mol-ecules in adjacent chains are linked by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions, generating R 2 (2) (16) dimeric pairs. Weak C-H⋯π inter-actions connect the double chains into (001) sheets.

  6. Ammonium 4-meth­oxy­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Sebastián; Doctorovich, Fabio; Baggio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The mol­ecular structure of the title compound, NH4 +·C7H7O4S−, is featureless [the methoxy C atom deviating 0.173 (6) Å from the phenyl mean plane] with inter­atomic distances and angles in the expected ranges. The main feature of inter­est is the packing mode. Hydro­philic (SO3 and NH4) and hydro­phobic (PhOCH3) parts in the structure segregate, the former inter­acting through a dense hydrogen-bonding scheme, leading to a well connected two-dimensional structure parallel to (100) and the latter hydro­phobic groups acting as spacers for an inter­planar separation of c/2 = 10.205 (2) Å. In spite of being aligned along [110], the benzene rings stack in a far from parallel fashion [viz. consecutive ring centers determine a broken line with a 164.72 (12)° zigzag angle], thus preventing any possible π–π inter­action. PMID:22798885

  7. Anaerobic digestion of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates: biodegradation kinetics and metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    García, M T; Campos, E; Ribosa, I; Latorre, A; Sánchez-Leal, J

    2005-09-01

    In the present work the effect of the alkyl chain length and the position of the sulfophenyl substituent of the linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) on their anaerobic biodegradability have been investigated. Degradation kinetics of the linear alkyl benzene sulfonates homologues, 2phiC10LAS, 2phiC12LAS and 2phiC14LAS, have been studied. It has been also investigated the effect of the isomer type on the degradation rate of the LAS molecule through the comparative study of the 2phiC10LAS and 5phiC10LAS isomers. Batch anaerobic biodegradation tests were performed using sludge from the anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant as microorganisms source. Ultimate biodegradation was evaluated from the biogas production whereas primary biodegradation was determined by specific analysis of the surfactant. LAS homologues and isomers showed a negligible primary biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, analysis of sulfophenyl carboxilates (SPC) by LC-MS indicated a low and constant level of these LAS degradation metabolites over the test period. These data are consistent with a minimal transformation of the LAS parent molecule in the anaerobic digesters. On the other hand, the addition of the shortest alkyl chain length homologues, decyl and dodecylbenzene sulfonates, reduces the biogas production whereas the most hydrophobic homologue, the tetradecylbenzene sulfonate, enhances the biogas production. This LAS homologue seems to increase the availability of organic compounds sorbed on the anaerobic sludge promoting their biodegradation.

  8. Capillary electrochromatography with polyacrylamide monolithic stationary phases having bonded dodecyl ligands and sulfonic acid groups: evaluation of column performance with alkyl phenyl ketones and neutral moderately polar pesticides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; El Rassi, Z

    2001-08-01

    In this report, we describe the preparation of porous polyacrylamide-based monolithic columns via vinyl polymerization. These monoliths possess in their structures bonded dodecyl ligands and sulfonic acid groups. While the sulfonic acid groups are meant to support the electroosmotic flow (EOF) necessary for moving the mobile phase through the monolithic capillary, the dodecyl ligands are introduced to provide the nonpolar sites for chromatographic retention. However, incorporating the sulfonic acid groups in the monoliths does not only support the EOF but also exhibit hydrophilic interaction with moderately polar compounds such as urea herbicides and carbamates insecticides. Consequently, mixed-mode (reversed-phase/normal phase) retention behavior is observed with neutral and moderately polar pesticides. The amount of sulfonic acid group in the monolith can be conveniently adjusted by changing the amount of vinylsulfonic acid added to the polymerization reaction. Optimum EOF velocity and adequate chromatographic retention are obtained when 15% vinylsulfonic acid is added to the reaction mixture. Under these conditions, rapid separation and high plate counts reaching greater than 400000 plates/m are readily obtained.

  9. Effect of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate on germination of spores of the aquatic fern Ceratopteris thalictroides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Devi, S. )

    1989-07-01

    Validity of fern spore germination bioassays for the effects of environmental pollution was established by many researchers. Some workers studied the phytotoxicity of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) on the spores of Diplazium esculentum and observed that LAS levels above 0.001% are toxic to fern spores. Water pollution due to synthetic detergents has been increasing continuously during the last few years due to their extensive use in domestic life, agriculture and industry. These detergents are among the most common pollutants responsible for water pollution. In view of this fact, the phytotoxicity of LAS on germination of an aquatic fern Ceratopteris thalictroides spores was studied. However, in these studies, only germination pattern was taken as index and no observations were made on the developmental stages.

  10. Genotoxic effects of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate, sodium pentachlorophenate and dichromate on Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Shen, Y

    1992-01-01

    DNA in macro- and micronuclei of Tetrahymena pyriformis treated with linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) and sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP-Na) were determined by microspectrophotometry. The effects on rate of formation of macronuclear DNA extrusion bodies were also studied. We found DNA content of micronuclei in 0.14 ppm LAS and 0.9 ppb PCP-Na was lower than in that of the control, and LAS was able to increase the formation rate of macronuclear DNA extrusion bodies (the formation rate was 54% in 11.3 ppm LAS and 25.6% in 16.7 ppm dichromate). We concluded that 0.14 ppm LAS (below the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration) was genotoxic, whereas 0.014 ppm LAS was not. Dichromate 0.05 ppm and 0.9 ppb PCP-Na, equal to and below the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration, respectively, were potentially genotoxic.

  11. Crystal structure of phenyl 2,4,5-tri­chloro­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Sean; Staples, Richard J.; Biros, Shannon M.; Ngassa, Felix N.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, C12H7Cl3O3S, was synthesized via a nucleophilic substitution reaction between phenol and 2,4,5-tri­chloro­benzene­sulfonyl chloride. The two aryl rings are oriented gauche to one another around the sulfonate S—O bond, with a C—S—O—C torsion angle of −70.68 (16)°, and the two rings are inclined to one another by 72.40 (7)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked via various C—Cl⋯π inter­actions, forming ribbons propagating along [100]. Neighboring ribbons are linked by a weak C—Cl⋯π inter­action, forming layers parallel to (010). PMID:27308043

  12. Hydrazine-1,2-diium bis-(3-carb-oxy-4-hy-droxy-benzene-sulfonate) tetra-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Devipriya; Venkatesh, Ranjithkumar; Sundararajan, Vairam

    2011-05-01

    Reaction of 5-sulfosalicylic acid with hydrazine hydrate at pH = 1 results in the formation of the title hydrated salt, 0.5N(2)H(6) (2+)·C(7)H(5)O(6)S(-)·2H(2)O. The hydrazinium dications lie on centres of inversion. They are located between 3-carb-oxy-4-hy-droxy-benzene-sulfonate anions, forming inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with sulfonate ions and water mol-ecules of crystallisation. Further intra- and inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are observed in the crystal structure. PMID:21754532

  13. Use of esters of sulfonic acids as anti-sludge agents during the acidizing of formations containing sludging crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, J.R.; McDougall, L.A.

    1984-04-10

    An anti-sludge agent useful for acid stimulated hydrocarbon containing formations is an ester of sulfonic acid, e.g. monoethoxylated dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid, preferably used in combination with from 0.1 to 2 parts by weight of a surfactant.

  14. Chemical and microbial community analysis during aerobic biostimulation assays of non-sulfonated alkyl-benzene-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pascual, Eulàlia; Jiménez, Nuria; Vidal-Gavilan, Georgina; Viñas, Marc; Solanas, A M

    2010-10-01

    A chemical and microbial characterization of lab-scale biostimulation assays with groundwater samples taken from an industrial site in which the aquifer had been contaminated by linear non-sulfonate alkyl benzenes (LABs) was carried out for further field-scale bioremediation purposes. Two lab-scale biodegradability assays were performed, one with a previously obtained gas-oil-degrading consortium and another with the native groundwater flora. Results for the characterization of the groundwater microbial population of the site revealed the presence of an important LAB-degrading microbial population with a strong degrading capacity. Among the microorganisms identified at the site, the detection of Parvibaculum lavamentivorans, which have been described in other studies as alkyl benzene sulfonates degraders, is worth mentioning. Incubation of P. lavamentivorans DSMZ13023 with LABs as reported in this study shows for the first time the metabolic capacity of this strain to degrade such compounds. Results from the biodegradation assays in this study showed that the indigenous microbial population had a higher degrading capacity than the gas-oil-degrading consortium, indicating the strong ability of the native community to adapt to the presence of LABs. The addition of inorganic nutrients significantly improved the aerobic biodegradation rate, achieving levels of biodegradation close to 90%. The results of this study show the potential effectiveness of oxygen and nutrients as in situ biostimulation agents as well as the existence of a complex microbial community that encompasses well-known hydrocarbon- and LAS-degrading microbial populations in the aquifer studied.

  15. Crystal structure of piperazine-1,4-diium bis­(4-amino­benzene­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Sathesh; Ranjith, S.; Sudhakar, S.; Srinivasan, P.; Ponnuswamy, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C4H12N2 2+·2C6H6NO3S−, consists of half a piperazindiium dication, located about an inversion centre, and a 4-amino­benzene­sulfonate anion. The piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the cations and anions are linked via N—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional framework. Within the framework there are C—H⋯π inter­actions and the N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of R 4 4(22) and R 3 4(13) ring motifs. PMID:26870510

  16. Crystal structure of 2-benzene-sulfon-amido-3-hy-droxy-propanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Nabila; Mushtaq, Misbah; Danish, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Raza, Muhammad Asam

    2015-11-01

    In the title compound, C9H11NO5S, the O=S=O plane of the sulfonyl group is twisted at a dihedral angle of 52.54 (16)° with respect to the benzene ring. The dihedral angle between the carb-oxy-lic acid group and the benzene ring is 49.91 (16)°. In the crystal, C-H⋯O, N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into (001) sheets. PMID:26594589

  17. Integration of aquatic fate and ecological responses to linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) in model stream ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Belanger, S E; Bowling, J W; Lee, D M; LeBlanc, E M; Kerr, K M; McAvoy, D C; Christman, S C; Davidson, D H

    2002-06-01

    An integrated model stream ecosystem fate and effect study of dodecyl linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (C(12)LAS) was performed in the summer and fall of 1996. The study addressed responses of periphytic microbes, immature benthic fauna including abundance, drift, and emergence of adult insects in a 56-day exposure. Exposures ranged from 126 to 2978 microg/L and were continuously presented in a single-pass, flow-through test system. Microbial heterotrophs acclimated to C(12)LAS exposure quickly (14 days) and biodegraded C(12)LAS at all concentrations. Blue-green algae responded by increasing in abundance with increasing C(12)LAS concentration. Invertebrates responded by increased drift and reduced benthic abundances at concentrations exceeding 293 microg/L. Emergence at 927 microg/L also declined relative to the control. Adverse responses for mayflies and chironomids were indicated using univariate statistical techniques. Multivariate techniques indicated these taxa plus mollusks, aquatic worms, caddisflies, and stoneflies were impaired at some concentrations. Bioavailability of C(12)LAS was investigated in streams as a function of the total suspended solid load in the water column driven by local weather and watershed patterns. A continuous bioavailability model indicated exposure was reduced by an average of 8.5+/-8.9%. A model ecosystem no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) was concluded to be 293 microg/L based on measured water column exposure and adjusted to 268 microg/L by the bioavailability model. A literature review of 13 available model ecosystem studies was conducted and NOEC conclusions were adjusted by a structure-activity relationship to a dodecyl chain length (sulfophenyl position and distribution being ignored due to lack of information in the reviewed studies). Lentic studies (n=7) were found to have higher NOECs than lotic studies (n=6) and were more variable. Mean NOECs+/-SD for all studies, lentic studies only, and lotic studies only were 3320

  18. Benzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 02 / 001F TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BENZENE ( NONCANCER EFFECTS ) ( CAS No . 71 - 43 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) October 2002 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed

  19. (E)-4-[4-(Diethyl-amino)-benzyl-idene-ammonio]-benzene-sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Ruanwas, Pumsak; Chantrapromma, Suchada; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2012-07-01

    The title compound, C(17)H(20)N(2)O(3)S, synthesised from sulfanilic acid and 4-diethyl-amino-benzaldehyde, crystallized out as a zwitterion with the central N atom protonated. The zwitterion exists in an E conformation with respect to the C=N double bond. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 37.57 (5)°. In the crystal, the zwitterions are linked into a tape along the a axis by N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure is further stabilized by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions and π-π inter-actions with a centroid-centroid distance of 3.8541 (6) Å. An O⋯O [2.8498 (11) Å] short contact is present.

  20. A Porous Aromatic Framework Constructed from Benzene Rings Has a High Adsorption Capacity for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qin; Zhao, Changwei; Liu, Guixia; Ren, Hao

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost and easily constructed porous aromatic framework (PAF-45) was successfully prepared using the Scholl reaction. PAF-45 was, for the first time, used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Systematic experiments were performed to determine the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS and to characterize the kinetics of the adsorption process. The adsorption of PFOS onto PAF-45 reached equilibrium in 30 min, and the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS was excellent (5847 mg g−1 at pH 3). The amount of PFOS adsorbed by PAF-45 increased significantly as the cation (Na+, Mg2+, or Fe3+) concentration increased, which probably occurred because the cations enhanced the interactions between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and the positively charged PAF-45 surface. The cations Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+ were found to form complexes with PFOS anions in solution. Density functional theory was used to identify the interactions between PFOS and Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+. We expect that materials of the same type as PAF-45 could be useful adsorbents for removing organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and contaminated surface water. PMID:26843015

  1. Inhibition of biogas production by alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) in a screening test for anaerobic biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Teresa; Campos, Encarna; Dalmau, Manel; Illán, Patricia; Sánchez-Leal, Joaquin

    2006-02-01

    The effect of the inoculum source on the digestion of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) under anaerobic conditions has been investigated. The potential for primary and ultimate LAS biodegradation of anaerobic sludge samples obtained from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of different geographical locations was studied applying a batch test system. It was found that only 4-22% of the LAS added to the batch anaerobic digesters was primarily transformed suggesting a poor primary degradation of the LAS molecule in anaerobic discontinuous systems. Regarding ultimate biodegradation, the addition of LAS to the batch anaerobic digesters caused a reduction on the extent of biogas production. Significant differences in the inhibition extent of the biogas production were observed (4-26%) depending on the sludge used as inoculum. Effect of the surfactant on the anaerobic microorganisms was correlated with its concentration in the aqueous phase. Sorption of LAS on anaerobic sludge affects its toxicity by depletion of the available fraction of the surfactant. LAS content on sludge was related to the total amount of calcium and magnesium extractable ions. The presence of divalent cations promote the association of LAS with anaerobic sludge reducing its bioavailability and the extent of its inhibitory effect on the biogas production. PMID:16453170

  2. A Porous Aromatic Framework Constructed from Benzene Rings Has a High Adsorption Capacity for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qin; Zhao, Changwei; Liu, Guixia; Ren, Hao

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost and easily constructed porous aromatic framework (PAF-45) was successfully prepared using the Scholl reaction. PAF-45 was, for the first time, used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Systematic experiments were performed to determine the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS and to characterize the kinetics of the adsorption process. The adsorption of PFOS onto PAF-45 reached equilibrium in 30 min, and the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS was excellent (5847 mg g‑1 at pH 3). The amount of PFOS adsorbed by PAF-45 increased significantly as the cation (Na+, Mg2+, or Fe3+) concentration increased, which probably occurred because the cations enhanced the interactions between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and the positively charged PAF-45 surface. The cations Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+ were found to form complexes with PFOS anions in solution. Density functional theory was used to identify the interactions between PFOS and Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+. We expect that materials of the same type as PAF-45 could be useful adsorbents for removing organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and contaminated surface water.

  3. N,N′-Bis(2-amino­benz­yl)ethane-1,2-diaminium bis­(4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Garza Rodríguez, Luis Ángel; Bernès, Sylvain; Elizondo Martínez, Perla; Nájera Martínez, Blanca; Rodríguez de Luna, Sara L.

    2011-01-01

    The title salt, C16H24N4 2+·2C7H7O3S−, crystallizes with the dication situated on an inversion center and the anion in a general position. The cation contains two ammonium and two free amine groups, and the observed conformation for the chain linking the benzene rings is different from that found in the free tetra­amine and in the fully protonated tetra­amine. All amine and ammonium H atoms of the cation form hydrogen bonds with eight symmetry-related anions, using the sulfonate O atoms as acceptors. This arrangement for the ions precludes any π–π contacts between benzene rings in the crystal. PMID:22199748

  4. 2-Amino-5-methyl­pyridinium 3-carb­oxy-4-hy­droxy­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Hemamalini, Madhukar; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C6H9N2 +·C7H5O6S−, contains two crystallographically independent 2-amino-5-methylpyridinium cations and two sulfosalicylate anions. In the crystal structure, the sulfonate group of each 3-carb­oxy-4-hy­droxy­benzene­sulfonate anion inter­acts with the corresponding 2-amino-5-methyl­pyridinium cation via a pair of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming an R 2 2(8) ring motif. The ionic units are linked by N—H⋯O, O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, the crystal structure is stabilized by π–π inter­actions between the benzene and pyridine rings [centroid–centroid distances = 3.5579 (8) and 3.8309 (8) Å]. There are also intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds in the anions, which generate S(6) ring motifs. PMID:21588438

  5. Syntheses and crystal structures of benzene-sulfonate and -carboxylate copper polymers and their application in the oxidation of cyclohexane in ionic liquid under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Susanta; Ribeiro, Ana P C; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2016-09-21

    The syntheses, crystal structures and catalytic activities of the polymers derived from 2-(2-pyridylmethyleneamino)benzenesulfonic acid (HL), viz. [CuL(H2tma)]n (1) and [{Cu2L2(H2pma)}·(8H2O)]n (2) [H3tma = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic (trimesic) acid and H4pma = benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic (pyromellitic) acid], are presented. Despite the comparable combinations and compositions of ligands (sulfonate and carboxylate) in these two polymers the bridging moiety in 1 is sulfonate while in 2 it is carboxylate. Complexes 1 and 2 act as catalysts in the peroxidative oxidation of cyclohexane under mild conditions using either the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [bmim][PF6] or acetonitrile as the solvent. The ionic liquid medium leads to increases in the yields and in the turnover numbers, achieved in shorter reaction times in comparison with those when using the conventional acetonitrile solvent. A simple recycling of the catalysts in the ionic liquid medium is achieved without loss of activity and selectivity.

  6. Syntheses and crystal structures of benzene-sulfonate and -carboxylate copper polymers and their application in the oxidation of cyclohexane in ionic liquid under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Susanta; Ribeiro, Ana P C; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2016-09-21

    The syntheses, crystal structures and catalytic activities of the polymers derived from 2-(2-pyridylmethyleneamino)benzenesulfonic acid (HL), viz. [CuL(H2tma)]n (1) and [{Cu2L2(H2pma)}·(8H2O)]n (2) [H3tma = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic (trimesic) acid and H4pma = benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic (pyromellitic) acid], are presented. Despite the comparable combinations and compositions of ligands (sulfonate and carboxylate) in these two polymers the bridging moiety in 1 is sulfonate while in 2 it is carboxylate. Complexes 1 and 2 act as catalysts in the peroxidative oxidation of cyclohexane under mild conditions using either the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [bmim][PF6] or acetonitrile as the solvent. The ionic liquid medium leads to increases in the yields and in the turnover numbers, achieved in shorter reaction times in comparison with those when using the conventional acetonitrile solvent. A simple recycling of the catalysts in the ionic liquid medium is achieved without loss of activity and selectivity. PMID:27529408

  7. Lateral phase separation gives multiple lamellar phases in a "binary" surfactant/water system: the phase behavior of sodium alkyl benzene sulfonate/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Richards, Claire; Tiddy, Gordon J T; Casey, Siobhan

    2007-01-16

    We have examined the structure of the lamellar phase (Lalpha) that coexists with a micellar solution (L1) for a commercial sodium alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) mixed with water. The surfactant is a mixture containing C10-C13 alkyl chains, having all positional isomers of the benzene sulfonate group present except the 1-isomer. Unusually for ionic surfactants, the difference in compositions between the coexisting L1 and Lalpha phases is large (L1 = approximately 20 wt % LAS; Lalpha = approximately 65 wt %). The main technique employed was X-ray diffraction, supplemented by optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). At ambient temperatures, the lamellar phase gives a single diffraction pattern with the main reflection (d) at approximately 32.5 A, whatever the composition. However, above 40 degrees C, the diffraction peak becomes broader and moves to higher d values. At higher temperatures still, several distinct and different diffraction peaks are observed, differing in detail according to composition. The largest d values (approximately 42-4 A) are observed for the lowest LAS concentrations, while the largest number of separate reflections (five) occurs for samples with approximately 44-50% LAS, both at the highest temperatures. Although there are some differences in the data between heating and cooling cycles, the d values return to the original value at low temperature. There are no observable transitions in DSC, nor is there any heterogeneity in the lamellar phase observable by microscopy. The data clearly indicate that there is some lateral separation of the different LAS isomers within the bilayers, which results in the formation of local lamellar regions having different surfactant compositions. This lateral phase separation may arise from the presence of an (electrostatic) attractive interaction, which gives rise to an upper consolute loop within the lamellar phase region of a pure LAS isomer. Similar mechanisms may occur in biological

  8. 40 CFR 721.1225 - Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-, poly-propene derivatives, sulfonated, po-tas-sium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... releases of the substance are subject to an EPA Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) under 40 CFR part 721 which...) (where N = 25 ppb). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance estimated to... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1225 - Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-, poly-propene derivatives, sulfonated, po-tas-sium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... releases of the substance are subject to an EPA Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) under 40 CFR part 721 which...) (where N = 25 ppb). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance estimated to... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-,...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1225 - Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-, poly-propene derivatives, sulfonated, po-tas-sium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... releases of the substance are subject to an EPA Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) under 40 CFR part 721 which...) (where N = 25 ppb). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance estimated to... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-,...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1225 - Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-, poly-propene derivatives, sulfonated, po-tas-sium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... releases of the substance are subject to an EPA Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) under 40 CFR part 721 which...) (where N = 25 ppb). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance estimated to... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1225 - Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-, poly-propene derivatives, sulfonated, po-tas-sium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... releases of the substance are subject to an EPA Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) under 40 CFR part 721 which...) (where N = 25 ppb). The requirement of 40 CFR 721.91(a)(4) that the amount of the substance estimated to... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-,...

  13. Synthesis and properties of novel sulfonated polybenzimidazoles from disodium 4,6-bis(4-carboxyphenoxy)benzene-1,3-disulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Li; Xu, Hongjie; Guo, Xiaoxia; Fang, Jianhua; Fang, Liang; Yin, Jie

    2011-03-01

    A series of sulfonated polybenzimidazoles (SPBIs) with varied ion exchange capacities (IECs) have been synthesized by random condensation copolymerization of a new sulfonated dicarboxylic acid monomer 4,6-bis(4-carboxyphenoxy)benzene-1,3-disulfonate (BCPOBDS-Na), 4,4‧-dicarboxydiphenyl ether (DCDPE) and 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine (DAB) in Eaton's reagent at 140 °C. Most of the SPBIs show good solubility in polar aprotic organic solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) reveals that the SPBIs have excellent thermal stability (desulfonation temperatures (on-set) > 370 °C). The SPBI membranes show good mechanical properties of which tensile strength, elongation at break, and storage modulus are in the range of 89-96 MPa, 12-42%, and 2.4-3.1 GPa, respectively. Moreover, the SPBI membranes exhibit phosphoric acid (PA) uptake in the range of 180-240% (w/w) in 85 wt% PA at 50 °C, while high mechanical properties (13-20 MPa) are maintained. The SPBI membrane with 240% (w/w) PA uptake displays fairly high proton conductivity (37.3 mS cm-1) at 0% relative humidity at 170 °C. The fuel cell fabricated with the PA-doped SPBI membrane (PA uptake = 240% (w/w)) displays good performance with the highest output power density of 0.58 W cm-2 at 170 °C with hydrogen-oxygen gases under ambient pressure without external humidification.

  14. Use of dynamic simulation to assess the behaviour of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates and their biodegradation intermediates (sulfophenylcarboxylic acids) in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Luque, E.; González-Mazo, E.; Forja, J. M.; Gómez-Parra, A.

    2009-02-01

    Dynamic laboratory simulation of processes affecting chemical species in their transit through estuaries is a very useful tool to characterize these littoral systems. To date, laboratory studies concerning biodegradation and sorption (onto suspended particulate matter) of LAS in an estuary are scarce. For this reason, a dynamic automated estuarine simulator has been employed to carry out different experiments in order to assess the biodegradability of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) and their biodegradation intermediates (sulfophenylcarboxylic acids, SPCs) using environmentally representative LAS concentrations in estuaries by a continuous injection of LAS into the system. During the experiments, a great affinity of LAS for the solid phase has been found, as well as an increased adsorption in line with increased chain length. On the other hand, the presence of SPCs with chain length between 6 and 13 carbon atoms was detected. Accumulation and persistence of medium chain length SPCs (C 6-C 8) along the experiments show that their degradation constitutes the limiting step for the process of LAS mineralization. In the final zone of the simulated estuarine system, the levels of SPCs were below the limits of detection. Thus, the disappearance of SPCs indicated that LAS biodegradation had been completed along the estuary. Similar results have been described for different Iberian littoral ecosystems. Therefore, the simulator employed in this research appears to be a useful tool to anticipate the behaviour of a xenobiotic chemical in its transit through littoral systems with different salinity gradients.

  15. Absorption characteristic of paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Peng; Yu, Jun; Asenso, James; Ma, Yong; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    1. Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) was synthesized to improve the poor oral absorption of paeoniflorin (Pae). 2. This study was performed to investigate the absorptive behavior and mechanism of CP-25 in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats, using Pae as a control. 3. The results showed that intestinal absorption of CP-25 was neither segmental nor sex dependent. However, the main segment of intestine that absorbed Pae was the duodenum. Furthermore, passive transport was confirmed to be the main absorption pattern of CP-25. More importantly, the absorption of CP-25 was much higher than Pae in the small intestine. 4. Among the ABC transporter inhibitors, the absorption rate of Pae increased in the presence of P-gp inhibitors verapamil and GF120918, which indicated that Pae was a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), however, such was not observed in the presence of breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Finally, the ABC transporter inhibitors did not have any significant impact on CP-25 as demonstrated in the parallel studies. 5. CP-25 could improve the poor absorption of Pae, which may be attributed to both the lipid solubility enhancement and its resistance to P-gp-mediated efflux. PMID:26711120

  16. Absorption characteristic of paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Peng; Yu, Jun; Asenso, James; Ma, Yong; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    1. Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) was synthesized to improve the poor oral absorption of paeoniflorin (Pae). 2. This study was performed to investigate the absorptive behavior and mechanism of CP-25 in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats, using Pae as a control. 3. The results showed that intestinal absorption of CP-25 was neither segmental nor sex dependent. However, the main segment of intestine that absorbed Pae was the duodenum. Furthermore, passive transport was confirmed to be the main absorption pattern of CP-25. More importantly, the absorption of CP-25 was much higher than Pae in the small intestine. 4. Among the ABC transporter inhibitors, the absorption rate of Pae increased in the presence of P-gp inhibitors verapamil and GF120918, which indicated that Pae was a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), however, such was not observed in the presence of breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Finally, the ABC transporter inhibitors did not have any significant impact on CP-25 as demonstrated in the parallel studies. 5. CP-25 could improve the poor absorption of Pae, which may be attributed to both the lipid solubility enhancement and its resistance to P-gp-mediated efflux.

  17. 2-Methyl-3-(2-methyl­phen­yl)-4-oxo-3,4-dihydro­quinazolin-8-yl 4-bromo­benzene-1-sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    El-Azab, Adel S.; Abdel-Aziz, Alaa A.-M.; Ng, Seik Weng; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2012-01-01

    The title mol­ecule, C22H17BrN2O4S, has a twisted U shape, the dihedral angle between the quinazolin-4-one and bromo­benzene ring systems being 46.25 (8)°. In order to avoid steric clashes with adjacent substituents on the quinazolin-4-one ring, the N-bound tolyl group occupies an orthogonal position [dihedral angle = 89.59 (8)°]. In the crystal, mol­ecules are connected into a three-dimensional architecture by C—H⋯O inter­actions, with the ketone O atom accepting two such bonds and a sulfonate O atom one. PMID:22412636

  18. Primary biodegradation of linear alkyltoluene and alkylbenzene sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Satish, S

    1989-01-01

    Studies on the primary biodegradation of linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate, linear dodecyltoluene sulfonate, linear C(10-14) benzene sulfonate, linear C(10-14) toluene sulfonate, commercial samples of linear C(10-14) benzene sulfonate and branched dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DDBS) were carried out using a microbial culture developed from garden soil. Results show that linear alkyl toluene (LAT) is as degradable as linear alkylbenzene (LAB) in 7 days. However, a slower rate of degradation was noted with LAT. Various distributions of the positional isomers of the phenyl ring in the alkane chain of C(10-14) LAB showed no change in the pattern of primary biodegradation.

  19. Crystal structure of zwitterionic 2-[bis-(2-meth-oxy-phen-yl)phosphanium-yl]-4-methyl-benzene-sulfonate monohydrate di-chloro-methane monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyang; Feng, Ge; Filatov, Alexander S; Jordan, Richard F

    2016-02-01

    In the title compound, C21H21O5PS·H2O·CH2Cl2, the phospho-nium-sulfonate zwitterion has the acidic H atom located on the P atom rather than the sulfonate group. The S-O bond lengths [1.4453 (15)-1.4521 (14) Å] are essentially equal. In the crystal, the water mol-ecules bridge two zwitterions via Owater-H⋯Osulfonate hydrogen bonds into a centrosymmetric dimer. The dimers are further linked by weak CAr-yl-H⋯Osulfonate hydrogen bonds into chains extending along [100]. The PH(+) group is not involved in inter-molecular inter-actions. PMID:26958395

  20. 2-[(E)-2-(4-Eth­oxy­phen­yl)ethen­yl]-1-methyl­quinolinium 4-fluoro­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Kobkeatthawin, Thawanrat; Ruanwas, Pumsak; Quah, Ching Kheng; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2014-01-01

    In the structure of the title salt, C20H20NO+·C6H4FO3S−, the 4-(eth­oxy­phen­yl)ethenyl unit is disordered over two positions with a refined site-occupancy ratio of 0.610 (6):0.390 (6). The cation is nearly planar, the dihedral angle between the quinolinium and benzene rings being 6.7 (4) and 1.7 (7)° for the major and minor components, respectively. The eth­oxy group is essentially coplanar with the benzene ring [C—O—C—Cmethy = 177.1 (8) and 177.8 (12)° for the major and minor components, respectively]. In the crystal, cations and anions are linked into chains along the b-axis direction by C—H⋯Osulfon­yl weak inter­actions. These chains are further connected into sheets parallel to (001) by C—H⋯Osulfon­yl weak inter­actions. The chains are also stacked along the a axis through π–π inter­actions involving the quinolinium and benzene rings [centroid–centroid distances = 3.636 (5) Å for the major component and 3.800 (9) Å for the minor component]. C—H⋯π inter­actions are also present. PMID:24526963

  1. (E)-2-[4-(Di­ethyl­amino)­styr­yl]-1-methyl­quinolin-1-ium 4-chloro­benzene­sulfonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Kaewmanee, Narissara; Boonnak, Nawong; Quah, Ching Kheng; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title hydrated salt, C22H25N2 +·C6H4ClO3S−·H2O, comprises two 2-[4-(di­ethyl­amino)­styr­yl]-1-methyl­quinolin-1-ium cations, two 4-chloro­benzene­sul­fon­ate anions and two solvent water mol­ecules. One ethyl group of both cations displays disorder over two positions in a 0.659 (2):0.341 (2) ratio in one mol­ecule and in a 0.501 (2):0.499 (2) ratio in the other. The sulfonate group of one anion is also disordered over two positions in a 0.893 (7):0.107 (7) ratio. The dihedral angle between the mean plane of the quinolinium ring system and that of benzene ring is 10.57 (18)° in one cation and 14.4 (2)° in the other. In the crystal, cations, anions and water mol­ecules are linked into chains along the [010] direction by O—H⋯Osulfonate hydrogen bonds, together with weak C—H⋯Osulfonate and C—H⋯Cl inter­actions. The cations are stacked by π–π inter­actions, with centroid–centroid distances in the range 3.675 (2)–4.162 (3) Å. PMID:24826116

  2. (E)-2-[4-(Di­ethyl­amino)­styr­yl]-1-methyl­quinolinium 4-fluoro­benzene­sulfonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Kaewmanee, Narissara; Chanawanno, Kullapa; Boonnak, Nawong; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2013-01-01

    In the title hydrated molecular salt, C22H25N2 +·C6H4FO3S−·H2O, the cation displays whole mol­ecule disorder over two sets of sites in a 0.780 (5):0.220 (5) ratio. The quinolinium ring system is essentially planar, with r.m.s. deviations of 0.0162 and 0.0381 Å for the major and minor disorder components, respectively. The dihedral angles between the mean plane of the quinolinium ring system and the benzene ring are 5.1 (3) and 7.7 (11)°, respectively, for the major and minor components in the cation. In the crystal, cations, anions and water mol­ecules are linked into chains along [010] by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and are further connected into a three-dimensional network by weak C—H⋯O and C—H⋯F inter­actions. In addition, π–π inter­actions with centroid–centroid distances of 3.634 (3), 3.702 (5) and 3.838 (5) Å are observed. PMID:24098203

  3. PtCu substrates subjected to AC and DC electric fields in a solution of benzene sulfonic acid-phenol as novel batteries and their use in glucose biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammam, Malika; Fransaer, Jan

    2013-11-01

    We describe how bi-metal PtCu connected wires, immersed in a solution of benzene sulfonic acid (BSA)-phenol (P) or 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS)-phenol (P), then subjected to simultaneous alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) electric fields generate power. We discovered that PtCu substrate covered by the deposit containing (BSA-PP-Pt-Cu), abbreviated as PtCu(BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) electrode, plays the role of a substantial anode and cathode. The latter was related to the formation of micro-batteries in the deposited film (BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) that are able to take or deliver electrons from the deposited Pt and Cu, respectively. PP-BSA plays probably the role of bridge for proton conduction in the formed micro-batteries. The power density of the fuel cell (FC)-based PtCu(BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) anode and PtCu(BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) cathode in phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4 at room temperature reaches ˜10.8 μW mm-2. Addition of enzymes, glucose oxidase at the anode and laccase at the cathode and, replacement of BSA by ABTS at the cathode in the deposited films increases the power density to 13.3 μW mm-2. This new procedure might be of great relevance for construction of a new generation of FCs operating at mild conditions or boost the power outputs of BFCs and make them suitable for diverse applications.

  4. Elongational flow of solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) and sulfonated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Smitter, L M; Ruiz, J C; Torres, M E; Müller, A J; Sáez, A E

    2002-07-15

    In this work, the elongational flow behavior of aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was studied in the presence of sulfonated surfactants. The technique of opposed-jets flow was used to generate an elongational flow field in which pressure drops were measured as a function of strain rates. The surfactants used were sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and an alpha-olefin sulfonate (AOS). Solutions of PEO and other flexible polymers exhibit extension thickening in opposed-jets flow due to the formation of transient networks of entangled molecules. This effect is present at concentrations below the static coil overlap concentration, due to the changes in molecular conformation induced by the flow. When SDBS or AOS are added to PEO solutions at low concentrations, the extension thickening weakens due to an increase in PEO intramolecular interactions that lead to coil contraction. This occurs until the surfactant concentration is close to the critical aggregation concentration reported in the literature. Further addition of surfactant induces the formation of intermolecular interactions as the PEO molecules are expanded by the electrostatic repulsion between attached micellar aggregates, with an associated strengthening of extension thickening. Intramolecular effects were not seen beyond a specific PEO concentration.

  5. Aldicarb sulfone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aldicarb sulfone ; CASRN 1646 - 88 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  6. Benzene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta, GA. Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  7. Crystal structure of zwitterionic 2-[bis­(2-meth­oxy­phen­yl)phosphanium­yl]-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate monohydrate di­chloro­methane monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyang; Feng, Ge; Filatov, Alexander S.; Jordan, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    In the title compound, C21H21O5PS·H2O·CH2Cl2, the phospho­nium–sulfonate zwitterion has the acidic H atom located on the P atom rather than the sulfonate group. The S—O bond lengths [1.4453 (15)–1.4521 (14) Å] are essentially equal. In the crystal, the water mol­ecules bridge two zwitterions via Owater—H⋯Osulfonate hydrogen bonds into a centrosymmetric dimer. The dimers are further linked by weak CAr­yl—H⋯Osulfonate hydrogen bonds into chains extending along [100]. The PH+ group is not involved in inter­molecular inter­actions. PMID:26958395

  8. 1-Methyl-4-[(E)-2-(3-hy­droxy-4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethen­yl]pyridinium 4-bromo­benzene­sulfonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Ruanwas, Pumsak; Jindawong, Boonwasana; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2013-01-01

    In the title hydrated salt, C15H16NO2 +·C6H4BrO3S−·H2O, the cation exists in an E conformation with respect to the ethenyl bond and is almost planar, with a dihedral angle of 2.62 (12)° between the planes of the pyridinium and benzene rings. The meth­oxy substituent deviates slightly from the plane of its attached benzene ring [Cmeth­yl—O—C—C torsion angle = −11.6 (6)°]. In the crystal, the cations, anion and water mol­ecules are linked together into chains along [010] by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak C—H⋯O inter­actions. There is a short Br⋯O contact [3.029 (2) Å]. The crystal structure also features C—H⋯π inter­actions involving the benzene ring of the anion. PMID:24454073

  9. Properties of polypyrrole doped with alkylbenzene sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, Lasse; Skaarup, Steen; West, Keld; Mazur, Tanja; Joergensen, Ole; Rasmussen, Helle D.

    2001-07-01

    Conducting polymers such as polypyrrole (PPy) doped with large anionic detergents have high stability in aqueous systems. PPy can be reversibly oxidised and reduced electrochemically. The redox change of PPy is accompanied by a change in volume of the polymer. This is partly ascribed to take-up of ions and solvent molecules. This volume change can be used as a polymer actuator (artificial muscle) working in a narrow voltage range (less than 1 V). The properties of the PPy polymer are largely determined by the dopant ions and also by the deposition conditions and the substrate. A free-standing 10 micrometers thick film is prepared electrochemically at a constant current from an aqueous solution of pyrrole and sodium alkylbenzene sulfonate. The mechanical properties of the film (tensile strength and Young's modulus) and the reversible linear elongation between the oxidised and reduced states are measured. Alkylbenzene sulfonates with alkyl chain lengths between 1 and 22 carbon atoms are used as dopant anion. The films made with the different anions have highly different properties and are here compared to outline the influence of the size of the anion. A maximum in linear elongation is found for p-(n-octyl)benzene sulfonate and in conductivity for p-(n-butyl)benzene sulfonate.

  10. 2-[(E)-2-(4-Hy­droxy-3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethen­yl]-1-methylpyridinium 4-bromo­benzene­sulfonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Boonnak, Nawong; Jindawong, Boonwasana; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2013-01-01

    The title salt crystallized as the monohydrate C15H16NO2 +·C6H4BrSO3 −·H2O. The cation exists in an E conformation with respect to the ethynyl bond and is essentially planar, with a dihedral angle of 6.52 (14)° between the pyridinium and the benzene rings. The hy­droxy and meth­oxy substituents are coplanar with the benzene ring to which they are attached, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0116 (3) Å for the nine non-H atoms [Cmeth­yl—O—C—C torsion angle = −0.8 (4)°]. In the crystal, the cations and anions are stacked by π–π inter­actions, with centroid–centroid distances of 3.7818 (19) and 3.9004 (17) Å. The cations, anions and water mol­ecules are linked by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak C—H⋯O inter­actions, forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:24454267

  11. Crystal structure of high-spin tetra­aqua­bis­(2-chloro­pyrazine-κN 4)iron(II) bis­(4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Bohdan O.; Shylin, Sergii I.; Dechert, Sebastian; Malysheva, Maria L.; Gural‘skiy, Il‘ya A.

    2015-01-01

    The title salt, [FeII(C4H3ClN2)2(H2O)4](C7H7O3S)2, contains a complex cation with point group symmetry 2/m. The high-spin FeII cation is hexa­coordinated by four symmetry-related water and two N-bound 2-chloro­pyrazine mol­ecules in a trans arrangement, forming a distorted FeN2O4 octa­hedron. The three-dimensional supra­molecular structure is supported by inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the complex cations and tosyl­ate anions, and additional π–π inter­actions between benzene and pyrazine rings. The methyl H atoms of the tosyl­ate anion are equally disordered over two positions. PMID:26279865

  12. Proton Conduction in Sulfonated Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Monoliths with Hierarchical Pore Structure.

    PubMed

    von der Lehr, Martin; Seidler, Christopher F; Taffa, Dereje H; Wark, Michael; Smarsly, Bernd M; Marschall, Roland

    2016-09-28

    Porous organic-inorganic hybrid monoliths with hierarchical porosity exhibiting macro- and mesopores are prepared via sol-gel process under variation of the mesopore size. Organic moieties in the pore walls are incorporated by substituting up to 10% of the silicon precursor tetramethylorthosilicate with bisilylated benzene molecules. After functionalization with sulfonic acid groups, the resulting sulfonated hybrid monoliths featuring a bimodal pore structure are investigated regarding proton conduction depending on temperature and relative humidity. The hierarchical pore system and controlled mesopore design turn out to be crucial for sulfonation and proton conduction. These sulfonated hybrid hierarchical monoliths containing only 10% organic precursor exhibit higher proton conduction at different relative humidities than sulfonated periodic mesoporous organosilica made of 100% bisilylated precursors exhibiting solely mesopores, even with a lower concentration of sulfonic acid groups. PMID:27598017

  13. Proton Conduction in Sulfonated Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Monoliths with Hierarchical Pore Structure.

    PubMed

    von der Lehr, Martin; Seidler, Christopher F; Taffa, Dereje H; Wark, Michael; Smarsly, Bernd M; Marschall, Roland

    2016-09-28

    Porous organic-inorganic hybrid monoliths with hierarchical porosity exhibiting macro- and mesopores are prepared via sol-gel process under variation of the mesopore size. Organic moieties in the pore walls are incorporated by substituting up to 10% of the silicon precursor tetramethylorthosilicate with bisilylated benzene molecules. After functionalization with sulfonic acid groups, the resulting sulfonated hybrid monoliths featuring a bimodal pore structure are investigated regarding proton conduction depending on temperature and relative humidity. The hierarchical pore system and controlled mesopore design turn out to be crucial for sulfonation and proton conduction. These sulfonated hybrid hierarchical monoliths containing only 10% organic precursor exhibit higher proton conduction at different relative humidities than sulfonated periodic mesoporous organosilica made of 100% bisilylated precursors exhibiting solely mesopores, even with a lower concentration of sulfonic acid groups.

  14. Sulfonated polyphenylene polymers

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Christopher J.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Hickner, Michael A.

    2007-11-27

    Improved sulfonated polyphenylene compositions, improved polymer electrolyte membranes and nanocomposites formed there from for use in fuel cells are described herein. The improved compositions, membranes and nanocomposites formed there from overcome limitations of Nafion.RTM. membranes.

  15. Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat hyperkalemia (increased amounts of potassium in the body). Sodium polystyrene sulfonate is in a class of medications called potassium-removing agents. It works by removing excess potassium ...

  16. Atomistic Simulation of Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xujun; Marchi, Massimo; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi; Abel, Stéphane

    2016-04-19

    Solubilization of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene (NAP, 2-benzene-ring PAH) and pyrene (PYR, 4-benzene-ring PAH), into a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle was studied through all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that NAP as well as PYR could move between the micelle shell and core regions, contributing to their distribution in both regions of the micelle at any PAH concentration. Moreover, both NAP and PYR prefer to stay in the micelle shell region, which may arise from the greater volume of the micelle shell, the formation of hydrogen bonds between NAP and water, and the larger molecular volume of PYR. The PAHs are able to form occasional clusters (from dimer to octamer) inside the micelle during the simulation time depending on the PAH concentration in the solubilization systems. Furthermore, the micelle properties (i.e., size, shape, micelle internal structure, alkyl chain conformation and orientation, and micelle internal dynamics) are found to be nearly unaffected by the solubilized PAHs, which is irrespective of the properties and concentrations of PAHs.

  17. Biochemical toxicity of benzene.

    PubMed

    Rana, S V S; Verma, Yeshvandra

    2005-04-01

    Human exposure to benzene in work environment is a global occupational health problem. After inhalation or absorption, benzene targets organs viz. liver, kidney, lung, heart and brain etc. It is metabolized mainly in the liver by cytochrome P450 multifunctional oxygenase system. Benzene causes haematotoxicity through its phenolic metabolites that act in concert to produce DNA strand breaks, chromosomal damage, sister chromatid exchange, inhibition of topoisomerase II and damage to mitotic spindle. The carcinogenic and myelotoxic effects of benzene are associated with free radical formation either as benzene metabolites or lipid peroxidation products. Benzene oxide and phenol have been considered as proheptons. Liver microsomes play an important role in biotransformation of benzene whereas in kidney, it produces degenerative intracellular changes. Cohort studies made in different countries suggest that benzene induces multiple myeloma in petrochemical workers. Though extensive studies have been performed on its toxicity, endocrinal disruption caused by benzene remains poorly known. Transgenic cytochrome P450 IIE1 mice may help in understanding further toxic manifestations of benzene.

  18. Thermodynamic studies of 1-dodecanol and SDS in aqueous solutions. [Sodium dodecyl sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Ogino, K.

    1981-03-01

    The behavior of 1-dodecanol in SDS micellar solutions has been studied by electrophotocolorimetry, twin differential conduction-type microcalorimetry, and polarization microscopy. The relation between the amount of 1-dodecanol added and the heat evolved during the mixing of 1-dodecanol with SDS solutions is discontinuous. In the solubilization region, the heat of mixing of 1-dodecanol with the SDS solutions increases with increasing extent of the penetration of 1-dodecanol into the palisade layer of SDS micelles, but the change in entropy decreases. But beyond the limit of solubilization, the heat of mixing decreases. This decrease is due to the endothermic change caused by the interaction between the 1-dodecanol outside the SDS micelles and water, and also to iceberg formation. With further addition of 1-dodecanol, the heat of mixing is increased; this is attributed to the formation of a complex and/or a liquid crystal of molar ratio of 2:1 of SDS to 1-dodecanol. 20 references.

  19. The toxicology of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1993-01-01

    Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a series of phenolic and ring-opened products and their conjugates. The mechanism of benzene-induced aplastic anemia appears to involve the concerted action of several metabolites acting together on early stem and progenitor cells, as well as on early blast cells, such as pronormoblasts and normoblasts to inhibit maturation and amplification. Benzene metabolites also inhibit the function of microenvironmental stromal cells necessary to support the growth of differentiating and maturing marrow cells. The mechanism of benzene-induced leukemogenesis is less well understood. Benzene and its metabolites do not function well as mutagens but are highly clastogenic, producing chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, and micronuclei. Benzene has been shown to be a multi-organ carcinogen in animals. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that benzene is a human leukemogen. There is need to better define the lower end of the dose-response curve for benzene as a human leukemogen. The application of emerging methods in biologically based risk assessment employing pharmacokinetic and mechanistic data may help to clarify the uncertainties in low-dose risk assessment. PMID:8354177

  20. Benzene release. status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.; Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-11-04

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

  1. Field-amplified sample stacking and nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis determination of complex mixtures of polar aromatic sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio; Cela, Rafael

    2002-02-01

    Nonaqueous CE and field-amplified sample stacking have been used in the determination of complex mixtures of polar aromatic sulfonates (AS; mainly benzene- and naphthalenesulfonates) of environmental concern. The analytical procedure consists of an on-column aqueous sample enrichment, followed by the nonaqueous electrophoretic determination of stacked aromatic sulfonates. Various organic solvents were used as separation medium, acetonitrile and N-methylformamide gave the best results. Optimum capillary electrophoresis separation is obtained with ammonium acetate (25 mM) dissolved in N-methylformamide-methanol (90:10) as background electrolyte. This combined method was applied to the analysis of surface water samples spiked with selected aromatic sulfonates derivatives.

  2. Facts about Benzene

    MedlinePlus

    ... of benzene from tobacco smoke, gas stations, motor vehicle exhaust, and industrial emissions. Indoor air generally contains ... to anemia. Also, it can damage the immune system by changing blood levels of antibodies and causing ...

  3. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  4. Perfume interactions with sodium dodecyl sulphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Behan, J M; Perring, K D

    1987-12-01

    Synopsis Vapour phase concentrations of aroma chemicals above a model shampoo system containing sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) have been measured using headspace gc methodology. It was shown that, to a first approximation, headspace concentrations were directly related to the phase volumes ratio (water/SDS), and that this could be rationalized in terms of simple partitioning. The headspace behaviour of the same materials dissolved in water and in diethyl phthalate was also investigated with a view to understanding the effect of the medium on the perfume 'profile'. The octanol/water partition coefficient was identified as a potentially useful parameter in this connection. Since the phase structures of the surfactant systems were not known, the results for all the materials were expressed in terms of 'apparent activity coefficients', calculated from headspace concentrations and mole fractions. It was found that, to a first approximation, the headspace concentration of benzyl acetate above these surfactant systems was directly proportional to the phase volumes ratio (water/SDS), and that this could be rationalized in terms of a simple partition model. It was clear, however, that a more sophisticated model would require data on the surfactant/perfume component interaction in the absence of water-such data could be more conveniently obtained using liquid analogues of SDS.

  5. Effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate of polyphenoloxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.M.; Flurkey, W.H. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the enzymatic and physical characteristics of purified broad bean polyphenoloxidase (PPO) were examined. A sigmoidal increase in PPO activation was observed with increasing SDS concentrations. Half maximal activation occurred at .9 mM SDS well below the CMC of 3.5 mM. No apparent changes in the Km for catechol, pH optimum, of I{sub 50} for tropolone were observed in the presence vs absence of SDS. Thermal inactivation and binding of {sup 14}C dopa increased in the presence of SDS. Analytical ultracentrifugation and HPLC-SEC indicated that SDS did not change the apparent size of the PPO under nondenaturing conditions. Scanning fluorescence spectroscopy showed an increase in intrinsic trp/tyr fluorescence at approximately the same concentration in which SDS activation began. Further addition of SDS caused a large increase in intrinsic fluorescence. These results suggest the SDS causes an apparent conformational change induced by SDS binding which leads to enzyme activation.

  6. Bis(3-amino-phen-yl) sulfone acetonitrile solvate.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wei; Li, Fang-Shi; Yu, Da-Sheng; Lu, Chui; Zhu, Jin-Na

    2008-05-21

    In the sulfone mol-ecule of the title compound, C(12)H(12)N(2)O(2)S·C(2)H(3)N, the two benzene rings are oriented at a dihedral angle of 80.69 (3)°. Weak intra-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of two five-membered rings, which both have envelope conformations. In the crystal structure, inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules.

  7. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  8. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As...

  9. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As...

  10. Crystal structure of (9S,10S)-10-eth­oxy-9-hy­droxy-6,6,9-trimethyl-3-pentyl-7,8,9,10-tetra­hydro-6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-yl 4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Waseem; Galal, Ahmed; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Carvalho, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    In the structure of the title compound, C30H40O6S, the cyclo­hexene and heterocyclic rings are linked by a double bond. The cyclo­hexene ring has a half-chair conformation (the methyl­ene group adjacent to the hy­droxy substituent lies above the remaining atoms) and the hy­droxy and eth­oxy groups have equatorial and bis­ectional dispositions, respectively. The heterocyclic ring has an envelope conformation (with the CMe2 C atom being the flap). The dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 53.88 (10)°. A long intra­molecular C—H⋯S inter­action is noted. In the mol­ecular packing, hy­droxy-O—H⋯O(sulfonate) hydrogen bonds lead to a helical chain along [010]. Connections between chains are of the type methyl-C—H⋯O(sulfonate) and lead to supra­molecular layers that lie parallel to (001). The studied crystal was an inversion twin. PMID:26870509

  11. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  12. Bis[2-(2-pyridylmethyl­eneamino)benzene­sulfonato-κ3 N,N′,O]cadmium(II) dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Ou-Yang, Miao; Huang, Xue-Ren; Zhang, Yun-Liang; Jiang, Yi-Min

    2008-01-01

    The title complex, [Cd(Paba)2]·2H2O or [Cd(C12H9N2O3S)2]·2H2O, was synthesized by the reaction of the potassium salt of 2-(2-pyridylmethyl­eneamino)benzene­sulfonic acid (PabaK) with CdCl2·2.5H2O in methanol. The CdII atom lies on a crystallographic twofold axis and is coordinated by four N atoms and two O atoms from two deprotonated tridentate 2-(2-pyridylmethyl­eneamino)benzene­sulfonate ligands in a slightly distorted octa­hedral environment. There are extensive hydrogen bonds of the type O—H⋯O between the uncoordinated water molecules and the sulfonate O atoms, through which the complex forms a layered structure parallel to (001). PMID:21580899

  13. Reaction of Lithium Diethylamide with an Alkyl Bromide and Alkyl Benzenesulfonate: Origins of Alkylation, Elimination, and Sulfonation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lekha; Ramírez, Antonio; Collum, David B.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of NMR, kinetic, and computational methods are used to examine reactions of lithium diethylamide in tetrahydrofuran (THF) with n-dodecyl bromide and n-octyl benzenesulfonate. The alkyl bromide undergoes competitive SN2 substitution and E2 elimination in proportions independent of all concentrations except for a minor medium effect. Rate studies show that both reactions occur via trisolvated-monomer-based transition structures. The alkyl benzenesulfonate undergoes competitive SN2 substitution (minor) and N-sulfonation (major) with N-sulfonation promoted at low THF concentrations. The SN2 substitution is shown to proceed via a disolvated monomer suggested computationally to involve a cyclic transition structure. The dominant N-sulfonation follows a disolvated-dimer-based transition structure suggested computationally to be a bicyclo[3.1.1] form. The differing THF and lithium diethylamide orders for the two reactions explain the observed concentration-dependent chemoselectivities. PMID:21077695

  14. Thermal stability of sulfonated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Audibert, A.; Argillier, J.F.

    1995-11-01

    Polyacrylamides which are used in oil applications i.e. polymer flooding and water based muds, are hydrolyzed versus time and temperature. This leads to a lack of tolerance towards electrolyte contamination and to a rapid degradation inducing a loss of their properties. Modifications of polyacrylamide structure have been proposed to postpone their thermal stability to higher temperatures. Monomers such as acrylamido methylpropane sulfonate (AMPS) or sulfonated styrene/maleic anhydride can be used to prevent acrylamide comonomer from hydrolysis. The aim of this work is to study under controlled conditions, i.e. anaerobic atmosphere, neutral pH, the stability of sulfonated polymers in order to distinguish between hydrolysis and radical degradation reactions. It has been observed that up to 100 C, the AMPS group is stable and protects the acrylamide function from hydrolysis up to 80%. At higher temperature, even the hydrolysis of the AMPS group occurs, giving acrylate and {beta},{beta} dimethyl taurine, with a kinetics that depends on temperature and time. Degradation in terms of molecular weight then occurs indicating that it follows a radical decarboxylation reaction. It can be limited either by the use of free radical scavenger or when the polymer is in the presence of a mineral phase such as bentonite. These results provide valuable data for the determination of the limits of use of sulfonated copolymers and guidelines for optimizing chemical structure of sulfonated polymers used in water based formulation, in particular to enhance their thermal stability.

  15. Simulation and pre-feasibility analysis of the production process of alpha-methyl ester sulfonates (alpha-MES).

    PubMed

    Martínez, Daniel; Orozco, Gustavo; Rincón, Sandra; Gil, Iván

    2010-11-01

    alpha-Methyl esters sulfonates (alpha-MES) are anionic surfactants that are derived from biorenewable resources, offering interesting environmental and chemical properties for application in the detergent industry. A simulation of their production process was conducted using a commercial production process currently used for palm oil. Results, prices of raw materials were submitted to economic analysis, and final MES price was compared with available data for linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) prices. The results for substances properties and product streams obtained from simulation were reliable in agreement to real values. It was found that increasing methyl ester national price by 20%, 50% and the equivalent to linear alkyl benzene price, the final price of alpha-methyl ester sulfonates was lower than the current price of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates. The capital cost and payout period for a production capacity of 49,000tons of surfactant per year were obtained. Results indicate that the process is economically feasible and can be applied to palm oil-based industries in Colombia.

  16. Simulation and pre-feasibility analysis of the production process of alpha-methyl ester sulfonates (alpha-MES).

    PubMed

    Martínez, Daniel; Orozco, Gustavo; Rincón, Sandra; Gil, Iván

    2010-11-01

    alpha-Methyl esters sulfonates (alpha-MES) are anionic surfactants that are derived from biorenewable resources, offering interesting environmental and chemical properties for application in the detergent industry. A simulation of their production process was conducted using a commercial production process currently used for palm oil. Results, prices of raw materials were submitted to economic analysis, and final MES price was compared with available data for linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) prices. The results for substances properties and product streams obtained from simulation were reliable in agreement to real values. It was found that increasing methyl ester national price by 20%, 50% and the equivalent to linear alkyl benzene price, the final price of alpha-methyl ester sulfonates was lower than the current price of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates. The capital cost and payout period for a production capacity of 49,000tons of surfactant per year were obtained. Results indicate that the process is economically feasible and can be applied to palm oil-based industries in Colombia. PMID:20637602

  17. Characterization of a sodium dodecyl sulphate-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 from Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Halmi, M I E; Hussin, W S W; Aqlima, A; Syed, M A; Ruberto, L; MacCormack, W P; Shukor, M Y

    2013-11-01

    A bacterium capable of biodegrading surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was isolated from Antarctic soil. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Growth characteristic studies showed that the bacterium grew optimally at 10 degrees C, 7.25 pH, 1 g l(-1) SDS as a sole carbon source and 2 g l(-1) ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source. Growth was completely inhibited at 5 g l(-1) SDS. At a tolerable initial concentration of 2 g l(-1), approximately 90% of SDS was degraded after an incubation period of eight days. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibition with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate was 0.372 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant (Ks) and inhibition constant (Ki), were 0.094% and 11.212 % SDS, respectively. Other detergent tested as carbon sources at 1 g l(-1) was Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 (methyl oleate), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), benzethonium chloride, and benzalkonium chloride showed Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 and the anionic SDBS supported growth with the highest growth exhibited by SDBS. PMID:24555340

  18. Profiling sulfonate ester stability: identification of complementary protecting groups for sulfonates

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfonation is prized for its ability to impart water-solubility to hydrophobic molecules such as dyes. This modification is usually performed as a final step, since sulfonated molecules are poorly soluble in most organic solvents, which complicates their synthesis and purification. This work compares the intrinsic lability of different sulfonate esters, identifying new sulfonate protecting groups and mild, selective cleavage conditions. PMID:20515067

  19. Benzene oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Highly reduced sediments from San Diego Bay, Calif., that were incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions metabolized benzene within 55 days when they were exposed initially to I ??M benzene. The rate of benzene metabolism increased as benzene was added back to the benzene-adapted sediments. When a [14C]benzene tracer was included with the benzene added to benzene-adapted sediments, 92% of the added radioactivity was recovered as 14CO2. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited benzene uptake and production of 14CO2 from [14C]benzene. Benzene metabolism stopped when the sediments became sulfate depleted, and benzene uptake resumed when sulfate was added again. The stoichiometry of benzene uptake and sulfate reduction was consistent with the hypothesis that sulfate was the principal electron acceptor for benzene oxidation. Isotope trapping experiments performed with [14C]benzene revealed that there was no production of such potential extracellular intermediates of benzene oxidation as phenol, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, cyclohexane, catechol, and acetate. The results demonstrate that benzene can be oxidized in the absence of O2, with sulfate serving as the electron acceptor, and suggest that some sulfate reducers are capable of completely oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide without the production of extracellular intermediates. Although anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to chelated Fe(III) has been documented previously, the study reported here provides the first example of a natural sediment compound that can serve as an electron acceptor for anaerobic benzene oxidation.

  20. Surface modification of hydroxyapatite. Part I. Dodecyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Borum-Nicholas, L; Wilson, O C

    2003-09-01

    The influence of esterification reactions on the surface chemistry and colloid stability of hydroxyapatite (HAP) was studied by aging nanophase HAP in dodecyl alcohol at elevated temperatures (115 degrees C and 190 degrees C). The esterified HAP particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance infra-red Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), thermal gravimetric analysis, sedimentation time studies, and electrophoretic mobility (mu) measurements in water and ethyl alcohol. DRIFTS analysis revealed that the HAP surface was modified by dodecyl groups based on the appearance of C-H stretch vibrational modes at 2962, 2930, and 2860cm(-1). Dodecyl alcohol modified HAP exhibited a larger TGA mass loss upon heating (up to 4.8%) compared to untreated HAP (2.5-3.2wt%). Sedimentation studies revealed the following stability trends: HAP dispersed in water was approximately the same as esterified HAP in water (a few hours) dodecyl groups.

  1. Assimilation of benzene carbon through multiple trophic levels traced by different stable isotope probing methodologies.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Felipe; Jechalke, Sven; Bombach, Petra; Franchini, Alessandro G; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2011-08-01

    The flow of benzene carbon along a food chain consisting of bacteria and eukaryotes, including larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae), was evaluated by total lipid fatty acids (TLFAs)-, amino acid- and protein-stable isotope probing (SIP). A coconut-fibre textile, colonized by a benzene-degrading biofilm, was sampled in a system established for the remediation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX)-polluted groundwater and incubated with (12)C- and [(13)C(6)]-benzene (>99 at.%) in a batch-scale experiment for 2-8 days. After 8 days, Chironomus sp. larvae were added to study carbon flow to higher trophic levels. Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry of TLFA showed increased isotope ratios in the (13)C-benzene-incubated biofilm. A higher (13)C-enrichment was observed in TLFAs, indicative of Gram-negative bacteria than for Gram-positive. Fatty acid indicators of eukaryotes showed significant (13)C-incorporation, but to a lower extent than bacterial indicators. Fatty acids extracted from larvae feeding on (13)C-biofilm reached an isotopic ratio of 1.55 at.%, illustrating that the larvae feed, to some extent, on labelled biomass. No (13)C-incorporation was detectable in larval proteins after their separation by sodium-dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analysis by nano-liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry. The flow of benzene-derived carbon could be traced in a food web consisting of bacteria and eukaryotes.

  2. Sulfone cosurfactants in enhanced oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-04

    A surfactant system useful for oil recovery consisting essentially of a NaCl, a hydrocarbon sulfonate surfactant, such as a petroleum sulfonate, and a cosurfactant such as a sulfone or sulfolane derivative. In another embodiment, a C/sub 1/ to C/sub 8/ alcohol is additionally present as a cosurfactant.

  3. BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS AS BIOMARKERS OF BENZENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene is known to be hematotoxic and carcinogenic in animals and humans. While metabolism is required for toxicity, the identity of the ultimate carcinogen(s) remains unknown. Benzene oxide (BO) is the first and most abundant of the metabolites, but very little is known about...

  4. Safety assessment of xylene sulfonic acid, toluene sulfonic acid, and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Hill, Ronald; Liebler, Daniel; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2011-12-01

    Xylene sulfonic acid, toluene sulfonic acid, and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes used in cosmetics as surfactants, hydrotropes, were reviewed in this safety assessment. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to these ingredients. The panel concluded that xylene sulfonic acid and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentrations as described in this safety assessment, when formulated to be nonirritating.

  5. Hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, M. )

    1989-07-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene exposure has been well known for a century. Benzene causes leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, etc. The clinical and hematologic picture of aplastic anemia resulting from benzene exposure is not different from classical aplastic anemia; in some cases, mild bilirubinemia, changes in osmotic fragility, increase in lactic dehydrogenase and fecal urobilinogen, and occasionally some neurological abnormalities are found. Electromicroscopic findings in some cases of aplastic anemia with benzene exposure were similar to those observed by light microscopy. Benzene hepatitis-aplastic anemia syndrome was observed in a technician with benzene exposure. Ten months after occurrence of hepatitis B, a severe aplastic anemia developed. The first epidemiologic study proving the leukemogenicity of benzene was performed between 1967 and 1973 to 1974 among shoe workers in Istanbul. The incidence of leukemia was 13.59 per 100,000, which is a significant increase over that of leukemia in the general population. Following the prohibition and discontinuation of the use of benzene in Istanbul, there was a striking decrease in the number of leukemic shoe workers in Istanbul. In 23.7% of the series, consisting of 59 leukemic patients with benzene exposure, there was a preceding pancytopenic period. Furthermore, a familial connection was found in 10.2% of them. The 89.8% of the series showed the findings of acute leukemia. The possible factors that may determine the types of leukemia in benzene toxicity are discussed. The possible role of benzene exposure is presented in the development of malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and lung cancer.

  6. Benzene upgrading reformer integration

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a continuous process for providing an integrated product recovery system for a primary catalytic hydrocarbon reforming reactor and a secondary catalytic olefins oligomerization-alkylation reactor. It comprises: withdrawing reformer effluent from primary reformer reactor; separating in a primary separation zone the reformer effluent into a primary overhead stream comprising noncondensible light paraffins and a primary bottoms stream comprising C{sub 6} to C{sub 8} aromatic hydrocarbons; withdrawing oligomerization effluent from secondary oligomerization-alkylation reactor; separating in a secondary separation zone the oligomerization effluent into a secondary overhead stream; adding the primary bottoms stream and the secondary bottoms stream to the fractionation column; withdrawing from the top of the fractionation column a stream comprising C{sub 4} {minus} hydrocarbons; withdrawing from the bottom of the fractionation column a stream comprising C{sub 5} + hydrocarbons; adding the C{sub 5} + hydrocarbon stream to the reboiler unit; withdrawing from the reboiler unit a vapor stream comprising benzene and a liquid stream comprising C{sub 5} + hydrocarbons boiling in the gasoline range; adding at least a portion of the vapor stream comprising benzene to the secondary catalytic olefins oligomerization-alkylation reactor; and adding a light olefins feedstream.

  7. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfone ; CASRN 98 - 57 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  8. Coarse graining of polystyrene sulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perahia, Dvora; Agrawal, Anupriya; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-03-01

    Capturing large length scales in soft matter while retaining atomistic properties is imperative to computational studies. Here we develop a new coarse-grained model for polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) that often serves as a model system because of its narrow molecular weight distribution and defined degree of sulfonation. Four beads are used to represent polymer where the backbone, the phenyl group, and the sulfonated group are each represented by a different bead and the fourth one represents counterion, which is sodium in our case. Initial atomistic simulations of PSS melt with sulfonation levels of 2-10%, with a dielectric constant ɛ = 1 revealed a ``locked'' phase where motion of the polymer is limited. Dielectric constant of ɛ = 5 was used to accelerate the dynamics. Bonded interactions were obtained using Boltzmann inversion on the bonded distributions extracted from atomistic simulation. Non-bonded interaction of polystyrene monomer was taken from our previous work and potential of mean force was used as the initial guess for interaction of the ionic beads. This set of potential was subsequently iterated to get a good match with radial distribution functions. This potential and its transferability across dielectric constants and temperatures will be presented. Grant DE-SC007908.

  9. Phycotoxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, G.; Viswanathan, P.N.; Devi, S.

    1988-04-01

    Dose- and time-dependent effects of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate, a major component of synthetic detergent, to the blue-green alga Nostoc muscorum, were studied under laboratory conditions. Toxicity was evident, at doses above 0.001%, from the decrease in biomass, heterocyst number, and protein content and pathomorphological alterations.

  10. Process for sulfonation of gas oils

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, R. C.

    1980-12-23

    A process for the production of oil-soluble sulfonates from a gas oil such as a vacuum gas oil. Water-soluble sulfonic acids are separated from the effluent of the sulfonation zone, and the remainder of the effluent is then passed through a saponification zone to produce oil-soluble sulfonates which are then recovered. The remaining hydrocarbons are fractionated, with the resultant heavy fraction being passed through a reforming zone to produce additional aromatics which are then recycled to the sulfonation zone.

  11. Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

  12. Syntheses, characterizations and crystal structures of two new lead(II) amino and carboxylate-sulfonates with a layered and a pillared layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yan-Ping; Mao, Jiang-Gao; Song, Jun-Ling

    2004-03-01

    Reactions of lead(II) acetate with m-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (H L1) and 5-sulfoisophthalic acid (H 3L2) afforded two new lead(II) sulfonates, Pb( L1) 21 and Pb 2( L2)( μ3-OH)(H 2O) 2. In compound 1, the lead(II) ion is eight-coordinated by two sulfonate groups bidentately, two sulfonate groups unidentately and two amino groups from six ligands. Each L1 ligand is tetradentate and bridges with three Pb(II) ions. The interconnection of the Pb(II) ions via bridging sulfonate ligands resulted in <100> and <200> layers. In compound 2, one Pb(II) ion is six-coordinated by a carboxylate group bidentately, by two carboxylate groups unidentately, by a sulfonate oxygen atom and by an OH anion, whereas the other one is six-coordinated by a bidentate chelating carboxylate group, two μ3-OH anions, a sulfonate oxygen atom and an aqua ligand. The interconnection of irregular PbO 6 polyhedra via carboxylate-sulfonate ligands resulted in the formation of a pillared layered structure with the 2D layer being formed; the lead(II) ions, hydroxyl groups, carboxylate and sulfonate groups and the benzene ring as the pillar agent.

  13. Law and regulation of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Feitshans, I L

    1989-01-01

    OSHA has created final benzene regulations after extensive rulemakings on two occasions, 1978 and 1987. These standards have been the subject of extensive litigation for nearly 20 years. This article examines in detail the conceptual underpinnings of the Benzene Case, (which was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1980) in light of U.S. administrative law precedents that have set limits upon administrative discretion under the test for "substantial evidence" and the "hard look doctrine." This article also addresses recent developments in the wake of the Benzene Case and their implications for benzene regulations following the "significant risk" doctrine in that case. This article briefly describes other national, regional, and international laws governing the use of benzene. This article concludes that the revisions of the benzene regulation and subsequent rulemaking provide substantial evidence of scientific underpinnings for regulatory action and that laws from other nations reflect an international consensus that occupational exposure to benzene is a proper subject of regulation. Such regulations and policies are therefore likely to withstand scrutiny and remain enforceable as widely accepted norms. PMID:2792048

  14. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1995-12-19

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

  15. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

  16. Copolymers of fluorinated polydienes and sulfonated polystyrene

    DOEpatents

    Mays, Jimmy W.; Gido, Samuel P.; Huang, Tianzi; Hong, Kunlun

    2009-11-17

    Copolymers of fluorinated polydienes and sulfonated polystyrene and their use in fuel cell membranes, batteries, breathable chemical-biological protective materials, and templates for sol-gel polymerization.

  17. Complexation between dodecyl sulfate surfactant and zein protein in solution.

    PubMed

    Ruso, Juan M; Deo, Namita; Somasundaran, P

    2004-10-12

    Interactions between sodium dodecyl sulfate and zein protein, a model system for the understanding of the effect of surfactants on skin, were investigated using a range of techniques involving UV-vis spectroscopy, TOC (total organic carbon analysis), electrophoresis, and static and dynamic light scattering. Zein protein was solubilized by SDS. The adsorption of SDS onto insoluble protein fraction caused the zeta potential of the complex to become more negative. From these values, we calculated the Gibbs energy of absorption, which decreases when the SDS concentration is raised. Finally the structure of the complex, based on the analysis by static and dynamic light scattering, is proposed to be rod like.

  18. Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s with phosphine oxide moieties: a promising material for proton exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lingchao; Xiao, Guyu; Yan, Deyue

    2010-06-01

    Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s with phosphine oxide moieties (sPESPO) were achieved by polycondensation of bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide with 3,3'-disulfonate-4,4'-difluorodiphenyl sulfone (SFDPS) and 4-fluorophenyl sulfone (FPSF). Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s (sPES) were also synthesized by polymerization of 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol with SFDPS and FPSF for comparison. The comparative study demonstrates that the sPESPO ionomers exhibit strong intermolecular interactions and high oxidative stability because of the phosphine oxide groups. Furthermore, the sPESPO membrane and the sPES membrane with an equal ion exchange capacity show much different nanophase separation morphology. As a result, the former shows better properties than the latter. The sPESPO membranes exhibit excellent overall properties. For instance, the sPESPO membrane, with a disulfonation degree of 45%, exhibits high thermal and oxidative stability. Moreover, it shows a water uptake of 30.8% and a swelling ratio of 15.8% as well as a proton conductivity of 0.087 S/cm at 80 degrees C.

  19. Phase II metabolism of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Schrenk, D; Orzechowski, A; Schwarz, L R; Snyder, R; Burchell, B; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Bock, K W

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic metabolism of benzene is thought to be a prerequisite for its bony marrow toxicity. However, the complete pattern of benzene metabolites formed in the liver and their role in bone marrow toxicity are not fully understood. Therefore, benzene metabolism was studied in isolated rodent hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes released benzene-1,2-dihydrodiol, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CT), phenol (PH), trans-trans-muconic acid, and a number of phase II metabolites such as PH sulfate and PH glucuronide. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) markedly increased PH glucuronide formation while PH sulfate formation was decreased. Likewise, V79 cells transfected with the 3-MC-inducible rat UGT1.6 cDNA showed a considerable rate of PH and HQ glucuronidation. In addition to inducing glucuronidation of phenols, 3-MC treatment (reported to protect rats from the myelotoxicity of benzene) resulted in a decrease of hepatic CYP2E1. In contrast, pretreatment of rats with the CYP2E1-inducer isopropanol strongly enhanced benzene metabolism and the formation of phenolic metabolites. Mouse hepatocytes formed much higher amounts of HQ than rat hepatocytes and considerable amounts of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB) sulfate and HQ sulfate. In conclusion, the protective effect of 3-MC in rats is probably due to a shift from the labile PH sulfate to the more stable PH glucuronide, and to a decrease in hepatic CYP2E1. The higher susceptibility of mice toward benzene may be related to the high rate of formation of the myelotoxic metabolite HQ and the semistable phase II metabolites HQ sulfate and THB sulfate. Images Figure 4. PMID:9118891

  20. ITP Filtrate Benzene Removal Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    Existing ITP filtrate hold tanks may provide sufficient capacity and residence time to strip dissolved benzene from the incoming filtrate using nitrogen sparging in the bottom of the old tanks. This is based on equilibrium supported by late Wash test data using aged washed slurry. Theoretical considerations indicate that benzene stripping will be more difficult from the ITP unwashed high salt filtrates due to reduced mass transfer. Therefore experimental sparging data is needed to quantify the theoretical effects.Foaming limits which dictate allowable sparging rate will also have to be established. Sparging in the hold tanks will require installation of sintered metal spargers, and possibly stirrers and foam monitoring/disengagement equipment. The most critical sparging needs are at the start of the precipitation/concentration cycle, when the filtrate flux rate is the highest,and at the end of wash cycle where Henry`s equilibrium constant falls off,requiring more gas to sparge the dissolved benzene. With adequate recycle (for proper distribution) or sparging in the old tanks, the 30 inch column could be used for the complete ITP process. A courser packing would reduce back pressure while enabling benzene stripping. The Late Wash Tests indicate adequate benzene stripping even at reduced gas flow. This will require experimental verification under ITP conditions. Using the 30 in. column vs 18 in. during the wash cycle will enhance stripping without need for additional sparging provided the minimum flow requirements are met.

  1. Benzene pollution from gasoline usage.

    PubMed

    Foo, S C

    1991-04-01

    Local gasolines contain benzene ranging from 1.8 to 3.7% and their use can lead to significant exposure to benzene. Gasoline station attendants were found to be exposed to short-term exposure levels (STEL) of 0.064-179 ppm. Their 8-h time-weighted averaged (TWA) exposure ranged from 0.028 to 0.71 ppm. For motorcar service mechanics, TWA exposure levels ranged from 0.014 to 1.7 ppm. The exposure of drivers of gasoline delivery tankers ranged from 0.08 to 2.37 ppm for personal TWA exposure over the whole workshift. For local people not occupationally exposed to gasoline or other benzene-containing volatile chemicals, exposure from the ambient environment ranged from 0.0023 to 0.027 ppm. Gasoline usage also contributed to the contamination of surface water with benzene. Benzene levels in water samples taken from drains leading from gasoline stations were between 1.1 and 40.4 micrograms l-1.

  2. Oil recovery method utilizing an alkylarylpoxyalkylene sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, D.R.

    1984-08-14

    An alkylarylpolyalkoxyalkylene sulfonate alone or combined with a water soluble petroleum sulfonate surfactant is dissolved in water to form an effective surfactant fluid that is stable in high salinity environments. The surfactant fluid is injected into an underground petroleum-containing reservoir in an enhanced oil recovery process.

  3. Adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium dodecyl phosphate on aluminum, studied by QCM-D, XPS, and AAS.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Philip M; Palmqvist, Anders E C; Holmberg, Krister

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption of two anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecyl phosphate (SDP), at surfaces of aluminum and aluminum oxide has been studied by means of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). It was shown that more SDP than SDS binds to the surface and that SDP prevents dissolution of aluminum in water whereas SDS does not. This was not obvious, since the adsorption isotherms of the two surfactants to aluminum pigment powder are quite similar, as shown in an earlier work. The decreased aluminum dissolution with SDP compared to SDS was explained by the formation of a more compact protective layer with less permeability on the aluminum surface with SDP than with SDS. This is explained by differences in complexing ability between the surfactants and the aluminum pigment surface. While SDP is expected to form an inner-sphere complex with aluminum, leading to a lower accessibility of aluminum sites to water, SDS is likely to form a weaker outer-sphere complex.

  4. Allergic contact dermatitis from dodecyl maleamic acid in Curad adhesive plastic bandages.

    PubMed

    Heskel, N S; Samour, C M; Storrs, F J

    1982-12-01

    Two patients, who developed eczematous eruptions beneath Curad-brand medical adhesive plastic bandages, were found to have allergic contact dermatitis to N-dodecyl maleamic acid. N-dodecyl maleamic acid is a monomer used in the production of the adhesive in Curad bandages. Our patients were also sensitive to several closely related chemical compounds. We discuss the chemical requisite for allergenicity of these compounds. These are the first documented cases of allergic contact dermatitis from dodecyl maleamic acid.

  5. Thermodynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate partitioning into lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Anmin; Ziegler, André; Steinbauer, Bernhard; Seelig, Joachim

    2002-09-01

    The partition equilibria of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and lithium dodecyl sulfate between water and bilayer membranes were investigated with isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic methods (light scattering, (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance) in the temperature range of 28 degrees C to 56 degrees C. The partitioning of the dodecyl sulfate anion (DS(-)) into the bilayer membrane is energetically favored by an exothermic partition enthalpy of Delta H(O)(D) = -6.0 kcal/mol at 28 degrees C. This is in contrast to nonionic detergents where Delta H(O)(D) is usually positive. The partition enthalpy decreases linearly with increasing temperature and the molar heat capacity is Delta C(O)(P) = -50 +/- 3 cal mol(-1) K(-1). The partition isotherm is nonlinear if the bound detergent is plotted versus the free detergent concentration in bulk solution. This is caused by the electrostatic repulsion between the DS(-) ions inserted into the membrane and those free in solution near the membrane surface. The surface concentration of DS(-) immediately above the plane of binding was hence calculated with the Gouy-Chapman theory, and a strictly linear relationship was obtained between the surface concentration and the extent of DS(-) partitioning. The surface partition constant K describes the chemical equilibrium in the absence of electrostatic effects. For the SDS-membrane equilibrium K was found to be 1.2 x 10(4) M(-1) to 6 x 10(4) M(-1) for the various systems and conditions investigated, very similar to data available for nonionic detergents of the same chain length. The membrane-micelle phase diagram was also studied. Complete membrane solubilization requires a ratio of 2.2 mol SDS bound per mole of total lipid at 56 degrees C. The corresponding equilibrium concentration of SDS free in solution is C (sat)(D,F) approximately 1.7 mM and is slightly below the critical micelles concentration (CMC) = 2.1 mM (at 56 degrees C and 0.11 M buffer). Membrane saturation occurs at

  6. Correlating electronic structure and chemical durability of sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Jimmy; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2015-04-01

    Many different proton-conducting polymeric materials have been developed for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The development of perfluorosulfonic acid-based, polymer electrolyte membranes (PFSA-PEMs) was followed by aromatic hydrocarbon-based PEMs (HC-PEMs), which allow for tailored design and optimization of their molecular structures. Although many new PFSA-PEMs and HC-PEMs have shown promising proton conductivity and thermal stability, chemical degradation of these materials in an oxidizing environment remains a significant technical barrier in PEMFC development. Here, we used accelerated degradation tests and electronic structure analysis to examine the chemical stability of sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPES) copolymers, a highly thermally stable HC-PEM. HOMO levels, the presence of main chain-protecting steric groups, and HOMO-LUMO location along the main chain have significant effects on the chain scission modes and degradation rate of SPES copolymers. Rational design of HC-PEMs to suppress midpoint scission can open many opportunities in the development of highly robust polymer electrolytes for fuel cell and other energy storage applications.

  7. The Solubility of Phenylborate Compounds in Benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    The original goal of this scoping study was to determine if the solubility of sodium and potassium tetraphenylborates in benzene was sufficiently large to justify designing and performing kinetic studies on a benzene-phase catalytic reaction.

  8. Complexation between sodium dodecyl sulfate and amphoteric polyurethane nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Shifeng; Lin, Ouya; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie

    2007-09-27

    The complexation between negatively charged sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and positively charged amphoteric polyurethane (APU) self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) containing nonionic hydrophobic segments is studied by dynamic light scattering, pyrene fluorescent probing, zeta-potential, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the present paper. With increasing the mol ratio of SDS to the positive charges on the surface of APU NPs, the aqueous solution of APU NPs presents precipitation at pH 2, around stoichiometric SDS concentration, and then the precipitate dissociates with excess SDS to form more stable nanoparticles of ionomer complexes. Three stages of the complexation process are clearly shown by the pyrene I1/I3 variation of the complex systems, which only depends on the ratio of SDS/APU, and demonstrate that the process is dominated by electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic aggregation.

  9. Complexation between sodium dodecyl sulfate and amphoteric polyurethane nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Shifeng; Lin, Ouya; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie

    2007-09-27

    The complexation between negatively charged sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and positively charged amphoteric polyurethane (APU) self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) containing nonionic hydrophobic segments is studied by dynamic light scattering, pyrene fluorescent probing, zeta-potential, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the present paper. With increasing the mol ratio of SDS to the positive charges on the surface of APU NPs, the aqueous solution of APU NPs presents precipitation at pH 2, around stoichiometric SDS concentration, and then the precipitate dissociates with excess SDS to form more stable nanoparticles of ionomer complexes. Three stages of the complexation process are clearly shown by the pyrene I1/I3 variation of the complex systems, which only depends on the ratio of SDS/APU, and demonstrate that the process is dominated by electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic aggregation. PMID:17803299

  10. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  11. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  12. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  13. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  14. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  15. Aromatic sulfide/sulfone polymer production

    SciTech Connect

    Scoggins, L.E.; Hoover, K.C.; Shang, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a process for the production of aromatic sulfide/sulfone polymer. It comprises: contacting at least one lactam, at least one alkali metal hydrosulfide, water, and at least one base selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides and mixtures of alkali metal hydroxides with alkali metal carbonates under reaction conditions of time and temperature sufficient to produce a mixture containing a complex which comprises the at least one alkali metal hydrosulfide and contacting the mixture produced with a least one dihaloaromatic sulfone under polymerization conditions for a period of time sufficient to form an aromatic sulfide/sulfone polymer.

  16. The Alkaline Hydrolysis of Sulfonate Esters: Challenges in Interpreting Experimental and Theoretical Data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonate ester hydrolysis has been the subject of recent debate, with experimental evidence interpreted in terms of both stepwise and concerted mechanisms. In particular, a recent study of the alkaline hydrolysis of a series of benzene arylsulfonates (Babtie et al., Org. Biomol. Chem.10, 2012, 8095) presented a nonlinear Brønsted plot, which was explained in terms of a change from a stepwise mechanism involving a pentavalent intermediate for poorer leaving groups to a fully concerted mechanism for good leaving groups and supported by a theoretical study. In the present work, we have performed a detailed computational study of the hydrolysis of these compounds and find no computational evidence for a thermodynamically stable intermediate for any of these compounds. Additionally, we have extended the experimental data to include pyridine-3-yl benzene sulfonate and its N-oxide and N-methylpyridinium derivatives. Inclusion of these compounds converts the Brønsted plot to a moderately scattered but linear correlation and gives a very good Hammett correlation. These data suggest a concerted pathway for this reaction that proceeds via an early transition state with little bond cleavage to the leaving group, highlighting the care that needs to be taken with the interpretation of experimental and especially theoretical data. PMID:24279349

  17. Characterizing hydrocarbon sulfonates and utilization of hydrocarbon sulfonates in oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Glinsmann, G.R.; Hedges, J.H.

    1982-05-18

    A method for determining the average equivalent weight of hydrocarbon sulfonates and the optimal salinity and unique salinity of surfactant systems containing such hydrocarbon sulfonates is based on the discovery that the average equivalent weights of hydrocarbon sulfonates vary inversely and linearly as the optimal salinities and unique salinities of surfactant systems containing such hydrocarbon sulfonates vary. Methods of preparing surfactant systems for the displacement of oil from subterranean reservoirs and for the displacement of oil from subterranean reservoirs, based on the above-mentioned relationships, are also disclosed.

  18. Chlorine resistant desalination membranes based on directly sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, James E.; Park, Ho Bum; Freeman, Benny D.

    2011-10-04

    The present invention provides a membrane, kit, and method of making a hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer membrane. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer membrane includes a hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer includes one or more hydrophilic monomers having a sulfonated polyarylsulfone monomer and a second monomer and one or more hydrophobic monomers having a non-sulfonated third monomer and a fourth monomer. The sulfonated polyarylsulfone monomer introduces a sulfonate into the hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer prior to polymerization.

  19. Direct methanol fuel cell performance using sulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers as electrolytes.

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T. A. , Jr.; Zelenay, P.; Hickner, M.; Wang, F.; McGrath, James E.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2001-01-01

    Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers are a new series of sulfonic acid containing polymers that have shown promise as fuel cell electrolytes. Here, we report on direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance of this class of polymers at sulfonation levels ranging from 40 to 60% (monomer basis). The DMFC performance of these polymers is compared to that of Nafion 117, the long standing standard in fuel cell testing. These polymers show a higher selectivity for protons over methanol for all the sulfonation levels tested, with the 40% sulfonated polymer showing 2.5 times the selectivity of Nafion. While the higher sulfonated forms (50 and 60%) did show a higher selectivity, only the lower sulfonation levels (40 and 45%) have shown improved performance in DMFC testing. The results of these experiments will be discussed in terms of the relevant test conditions, and experimentally determined membrane properties. The relevant DMFC properties of these polymers will be discussed in terms of sulfonation level and compared to those of Nafion 117.

  20. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  1. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  2. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  3. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  4. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  10. Synthesis of sulfonate analogs of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Kihira, K; Mikami, T; Ikawa, S; Okamoto, A; Yoshii, M; Miki, S; Mosbach, E H; Hoshita, T

    1992-04-01

    Sulfonate analogs of C23 and C24 bile acids were synthesized from norcholic, norchenodeoxycholic, norursodeoxycholic, nordeoxycholic, norhyodeoxycholic, cholic, deoxycholic, hyodeoxycholic, and lithocholic acids. The principal reactions used were (1) reduction of the bile acids with NaBH4 to the corresponding bile alcohols, (2) selective tosylation of the terminal hydroxyl group, (3) iodination of the tosyl esters with NaI, and (4) treatment of the iodides with Na2SO3 to form the sulfonate analogs of the bile acids. The sulfonate analogs showed polarity similar to that of taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography. The carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data for the sulfonate analogs were tabulated.

  11. Crystal structure of zwitterionic bisimidazolium sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohmoto, Shigeo; Okuyama, Shinpei; Yokota, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Keiki; Masu, Hyuma; Azumaya, Isao

    2012-05-01

    Crystal structures of three zwitterionic bisimidazolium salts 1-3 in which imidazolium sulfonate moieties were connected with aromatic linkers, p-xylylene, 4,4'-dimethylenebiphenyl, and phenylene, respectively, were examined. The latter two were obtained as hydrates. An S-shaped molecular structure in which the sulfonate moiety was placed on the imidazolium ring was observed for 1. A helical array of hydrated water molecules was obtained for 2 while a linear array of hydrated water molecules was observed for 3.

  12. 2,2,2-Trifluoro­ethyl 4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Song; Shi, Ya-Bin; He, Fei-Fei; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2010-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, C9H9F3O3S, inter­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules along the c-axis direction. Also present are slipped π–π stacking inter­actions between phenyl­ene rings, with perpendicular inter­planar distances of 3.55 (2) Å and centroid–centroid distances of 3.851 (2) Å. PMID:21588977

  13. Terrestrial risk assessment for linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) in sludge-amended soils.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, W; Feijtel, T

    1998-03-01

    A comparison of the estimated environmental concentration and the effect concentrations (in the laboratory or field) in the receiving compartment form the basis of environmental risk assessments. This paper reviews processes that critically influence the fate of LAS in the terrestrial environment. Concentrations of LAS in sludge are quite high due to sorption to primary sludge, precipitation of Ca and Mg-salts of LAS, and lack of biodegradation under anaerobic digestion. This implies that when sludge is applied to soil e.g. as a fertilizer, considerable amounts of this important surfactant may enter the terrestrial environment. Influence of aerobic situations on LAS concentrations during sludge storage needs further research to allow incorporation into the risk assessment. Aerobic biodegradation in soil is considered the most important removal mechanism of LAS loading to the terrestrial environment through sludge-amendment. Sorption plays a role in determining the residence time of a chemical in the soil, hereby enabling more time for biodegradation to occur. In addition, sorption may affect the expression of effects of surfactants towards benthic and soil dwelling organisms and plants. Another factor that needs further attention is the form of LAS in the environment, which is not similar to the commercial material applied in detergents. The differential sorption and biodegradation of the LAS components lead to a shift in the alkyl chain length (homologue), and phenylisomer distribution towards increased hydrophobicity. Also, occurrence of Ca/Mg-salts in the environment versus the Na-salt for the commercial material critically impacts the extrapolation of effects data obtained in lab studies (mostly performed with the commercial material) to the field. The literature data were used in combination with strategies and methods provided by the European Union Technical Guidance Document in support of risk assessment of new and notified substances (1996) for the prediction of environmental concentrations of LAS entering the soil system through sludge applications. Soil biodegradation is an essential, necessary element for the PEC-calculations of LAS. The initial realistic worst case assessment presented indicates no human health risks exists with indirect exposure to LAS through either food or drinking water. Also, current LAS use does not pose a risk to terrestrial organisms such as plants and invertebrates.

  14. 3-Fluoro­anilinium 4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Jasinski, Jerry P.; Golen, James A.; Praveen, A. S.; Yathirajan, H. S.; Narayana, B.

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title salt, C6H7FN+·C7H7O3S−, the components are linked into chains along [010] via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Further stabilization is is provided by weak π–π stacking inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.7156 (12) Å. PMID:22219956

  15. Bacterial dehalorespiration with chlorinated benzenes.

    PubMed

    Adrian, L; Szewzyk, U; Wecke, J; Görisch, H

    2000-11-30

    Chlorobenzenes are toxic, highly persistent and ubiquitously distributed environmental contaminants that accumulate in the food chain. The only known microbial transformation of 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB) and higher chlorinated benzenes is the reductive dechlorination to lower chlorinated benzenes under anaerobic conditions observed with mixed bacterial cultures. The lower chlorinated benzenes can subsequently be mineralized by aerobic bacteria. Here we describe the isolation of the oxygen-sensitive strain CBDB1, a pure culture capable of reductive dechlorination of chlorobenzenes. Strain CBDB1 is a highly specialized bacterium that stoichiometrically dechlorinates 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (TCB), 1,2,4-TCB, 1,2,3,4-TeCB, 1,2,3,5-TeCB and 1,2,4,5-TeCB to dichlorobenzenes or 1,3,5-TCB. The presence of chlorobenzene as an electron acceptor and hydrogen as an electron donor is essential for growth, and indicates that strain CBDB1 meets its energy needs by a dehalorespiratory process. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain CBDB1, Dehalococcoides ethenogenes and several uncultivated bacteria form a new bacterial cluster, of which strain CBDB1 is the first, so far, to thrive on a purely synthetic medium.

  16. Bioremediation of chlorinated benzene compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, P.C.; Rhodes, S.H.; Guerin, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    In early 1994, investigations at a pharmaceutical manufacturing site revealed extensive areas of soil contaminated with chlorinated benzenes. The soil was a heavy clay and contained chlorobenzene (CB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (referred to in this paper as DCB), and small amounts of 1,3- and 1,4-dichlorobenzene and other solvents. The soil was bioremediated in a pilot-scale treatment using an ex situ process with various inorganic and organic amendments. Approximately 90% of the DCB mass present in the soil was removed over a period of 2 to 3 weeks. Up to 100-fold increases in both total heterotrophs and specific degraders were observed. Residual concentrations of chlorinated benzenes were generally below detection limits. Adding organic matter did not appear to significantly enhance the treatment efficiency. Mass balance calculations applied to the treatment indicated that less than 5% of the chlorinated benzenes were removed by volatilization. Evidence was obtained that approximately 90% of the DCB was removed by biodegradation in these pilot-scale trials. Laboratory shake flask trials were conducted which confirmed that the soils in the pilot-scale treatment contained microorganisms capable of mineralizing CB and DCB.

  17. Effect of intercalated aromatic sulfonates on uptake of aromatic compounds from aqueous solutions by modified Mg-Al layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kameda, Tomohito; Yamazaki, Takashi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2010-06-15

    In this study, we utilized Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Mg-Al LDH) modified by intercalation with three aromatic sulfonates-2,7-naphthalene disulfonate (2,7-NDS{sup 2-}), benzenesulfonate (BS{sup -}), and benzenedisulfonate (BDS{sup 2-})-for the uptake of two aromatics-1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB) and anisole (AS)-from aqueous solution and determined the effect of the aromatic sulfonates on the uptake of these aromatics. We found that the electron-rich aromatic ring of the intercalated aromatic sulfonates such as 2,7-NDS{sup 2-} undergoes strong {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions with the electron-poorer benzene ring of DNB in aqueous solution, and these interactions result in a higher uptake of DNB by the modified Mg-Al LDHs. In contrast, the electron-poor aromatic ring of the aromatic sulfonates such as BDS{sup 2-} undergoes weak {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions with the electron-poorer benzene ring of DNB, and these interactions result in a lower uptake of DNB by the modified Mg-Al LDHs.

  18. Measuring the mutual diffusion coefficient for dodecyl acrylate in low molecular weight poly(dodecyl acrylate) with laser line deflection (Wiener's Method) and the fluorescence of pyrene.

    PubMed

    Antrim, Daniel; Bunton, Patrick; Lewis, Lydia Lee; Zoltowski, Brian D; Pojman, John A

    2005-06-16

    Diffusion of small molecules into glassy polymers is quite complicated and almost always non-Fickian. Little work has been done with the diffusion of low molecular weight polymers that are liquids at room temperature (such as poly(dodecyl acrylate)) into their miscible monomers. We have studied three molecular weights under 20 000 to determine if poly(dodecyl acrylate) diffusion into dodecyl acrylate could be treated with Fick's law and if so to determine the values of the diffusion coefficients. We compare two methods for measuring the diffusion of dodecyl acrylate into poly(dodecyl acrylate): We used laser line deflection (Wiener's method) and improved upon the method from published reports. We also used the dependence of pyrene's fluorescence on the viscosity to measure the concentration distribution, and thus to extract the diffusion coefficient. After an initial relaxation period, diffusion in all cases followed Fick's law with a single concentration-independent diffusion coefficient. Comparison of the diffusion coefficients obtained by both methods yielded the same order of magnitude for the diffusion coefficients (10(-7) cm2/s) and showed the same trend in the dependence on the average molecular weight of the polymer (a decrease in the diffusion coefficient with an increase in the molecular weight).

  19. Inactivation of Prions by Acidic Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, David; Supattapone, Surachai; Giles, Kurt; Vergara, Julie; Freyman, Yevgeniy; Lessard, Pierre; Safar, Jiri G.; Glidden, David V.; McCulloch, Charles; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Scott, Michael; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2006-01-01

    Prompted by the discovery that prions become protease-sensitive after exposure to branched polyamine dendrimers in acetic acid (AcOH) (S. Supattapone, H. Wille, L. Uyechi, J. Safar, P. Tremblay, F. C. Szoka, F. E. Cohen, S. B. Prusiner, and M. R. Scott, J. Virol. 75:3453-3461, 2001), we investigated the inactivation of prions by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in weak acid. As judged by sensitivity to proteolytic digestion, the disease-causing prion protein (PrPSc) was denatured at room temperature by SDS at pH values of ≤4.5 or ≥10. Exposure of Sc237 prions in Syrian hamster brain homogenates to 1% SDS and 0.5% AcOH at room temperature resulted in a reduction of prion titer by a factor of ca. 107; however, all of the bioassay hamsters eventually developed prion disease. When various concentrations of SDS and AcOH were tested, the duration and temperature of exposure acted synergistically to inactivate both hamster Sc237 prions and human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) prions. The inactivation of prions in brain homogenates and those bound to stainless steel wires was evaluated by using bioassays in transgenic mice. sCJD prions were more than 100,000 times more resistant to inactivation than Sc237 prions, demonstrating that inactivation procedures validated on rodent prions cannot be extrapolated to inactivation of human prions. Some procedures that significantly reduced prion titers in brain homogenates had a limited effect on prions bound to the surface of stainless steel wires. Using acidic SDS combined with autoclaving for 15 min, human sCJD prions bound to stainless steel wires were eliminated. Our findings form the basis for a noncorrosive system that is suitable for inactivating prions on surgical instruments, as well as on other medical and dental equipment. PMID:16352557

  20. Superfund fact sheet: Benzene. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The fact sheet describes benzene, a chemical that can be found in a variety of products, including petroleum products (e.g. gasoline), some household cleaners, and some glues and adhesives. Explanations of how people are exposed to benzene and how benzene can enter the body and may affect human health are given. The fact sheet is one in a series providing reference information about Superfund issues and is intended for readers with no formal scientific training.

  1. Susceptibility of Candida albicans to new synthetic sulfone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    The influence of halogenated methyl sulfones, i.e. bromodichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named halogenated methyl sulfone 1), dichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (halogenated methyl sulfone 2), and chlorodibromomethyl-4-hydrazino-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (halogenated methyl sulfone 3), on cell growth inhibition, aspartic protease gene (SAP4-6) expression, adhesion to epithelium, and filamentation was investigated. Antifungal susceptibility of the halogenated methyl sulfones was determined with the M27-A3 protocol in the range of 16-0.0313 µg/mL. Adherence to Caco-2 cells was performed in 24-well plates; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells after 18 h of growth in YEPD and on Caco-2 cells. SAP4-6 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that halogenated methyl sulfone 1 containing bromodichloromethyl or dichloromethyl function at C-4 (halogenated methyl sulfone 2) of the phenyl ring showed the best activity (100% cell inhibition at 0.5 µg/mL), while hydrazine at C-1 (halogenated methyl sulfone 3) reduced the sulfone potential (100% = 4 µg/mL). SAP4-6 were up- or down-regulated depending on the strains' genetic background and the substitutions on the phenyl ring. Halogenated methyl sulfone 2 repressed germination and affected adherence to epithelium (P ≤ 0.05). The tested halogenated methyl sulfones interfered with the adhesion of Candida albicans cells to the epithelial tissues, without affecting their viability after 90 min of incubation. The mode of action of the halogenated methyl sulfones was attributed to the reduced virulence of C. albicans. SAP5 and SAP6 contribute to halogenated methyl sulfones resistance. Thus, halogenated methyl sulfones can inhibit biofilm formation due to their interference with adherence and with the yeast-to-hyphae transition.

  2. Carcinogenic effects of benzene: Cesare Maltoni's contributions.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2002-12-01

    Cesare Maltoni's contributions to understanding, identifying, and characterizing widely used commercial chemicals in experimental animals are among the most important methods developed in the history of toxicology and serve to protect working men and women, the general population, and our environment from hazardous substances. Maltoni developed experimental methods that have reached the "platinum standard" for protection of public health. Benzene was among the 400 or more chemicals that Maltoni and his associates tested for carcinogenicity. In 1976, Maltoni reported that benzene is a potent experimental carcinogen. Maltoni's experiments clearly demonstrated that benzene is carcinogenic in Sprague-Dawley rats, Wistar rats, Swiss mice, and RF/J mice when administered by inhalation or ingestion. Benzene caused carcinomas of the Zymbal gland, oral cavity, nasal cavities; cancers of the skin, forestomach, mammary glands, and lungs; angiosarcomas and hepatomas of the liver; and hemolymphoreticular cancers. Thus, benzene was shown to be a multipotential carcinogen that produced cancers in several species of animals by various routes of administration. On November 2, 1977, Chemical Week reported that Maltoni provided a "bombshell" when he demonstrated the "first direct link" between benzene and cancer. In this paper, I shall summarize early experiments and human studies and reports; Maltoni's experimental contribution to understanding the carcinogenicity of benzene in humans and animals; earlier knowledge concerning benzene toxicity; and benzene standards and permissible exposure levels.

  3. Production of Phenol from Benzene via Cumene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, D. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment involving the production of phenol from benzene with the intermediate production of isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene hydroperoxide. (SL)

  4. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  5. The harmonic frequencies of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, Nicholas C.; Maslen, Paul E.; Amos, Roger D.; Andrews, Jamie S.; Murray, Christopher W.; Laming, Gregory J.

    1992-09-01

    We report calculations for the harmonic frequencies of C 6H 6 and C 6D 6. Our most sophisticated quantum chemistry values are obtained with the MP2 method and a TZ2P+f basis set (288 basis functions), which are the largest such calculations reported on benzene to date. Using the SCF density, we also calculate the frequencies using the exchange and correlation expressions of density functional theory. We compare our calculated harmonic frequencies with those deduced from experiment by Goodman, Ozkabak and Thakur. The density functional frequencies appear to be more reliable predictions than the MP2 frequencies and they are obtained at significantly less cost.

  6. Waterflooding employing mixtures of sulfonate surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Savins, J.G.; Waite, J.M.; Burdyn, R.F.

    1980-11-04

    A new waterflooding process is described in which at least a portion of the injected fluid comprises a viscous aqueous liquid having a monovalent salt salinity within the range of 1.5 to 4.0% by wt and containing first and second sulfonate surfactants. The first surfactant is a petroleum sulfonate having a relatively broad molecular weight distribution and the second surfactant is a synthetic alkyl or alkylaryl sulfonate having a molecular weight distribution narrower than that of the first surfactant. The first and second surfactants are present in the aqueous liquid in relative amounts such that the ratio of the concentration of the first surfactant to the concentration of the second surfactant is within the range of 1:3 to 1:1. The thickened aqueous liquid containing the above described multicomponent surfactant system also contains a water-soluble C3-C6 aliphatic alcohol. 11 claims.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF BENZENE OXIDE IN THE BLOOD OF RATS FOLLOWING ADMINISTRATION OF BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although it is generally assumed that metabolism of benzene proceeds through an initial step involving oxidation to benzene oxide (BO) by CYP450 in the liver, the production of BO has never been unambiguously confirmed in animals dosed with benzene. Furthermore, prevailing hypo...

  8. Simulation study of sulfonate cluster swelling in ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Taylor, Philip L.; Löwen, Hartmut

    2009-12-01

    We have performed simulations to study how increasing humidity affects the structure of Nafion-like ionomers under conditions of low sulfonate concentration and low humidity. At the onset of membrane hydration, the clusters split into smaller parts. These subsequently swell, but then maintain constant the number of sulfonates per cluster. We find that the distribution of water in low-sulfonate membranes depends strongly on the sulfonate concentration. For a relatively low sulfonate concentration, nearly all the side-chain terminal groups are within cluster formations, and the average water loading per cluster matches the water content of membrane. However, for a relatively higher sulfonate concentration the water-to-sulfonate ratio becomes nonuniform. The clusters become wetter, while the intercluster bridges become drier. We note the formation of unusual shells of water-rich material that surround the sulfonate clusters.

  9. Chemical of current interest--benzene.

    PubMed

    Marcus, W L

    1987-03-01

    Benzene is one of the world's major commodity chemicals. It is derived from petroleum and coal and is used both as a solvent and as a starting material in chemical syntheses. The numerous industrial uses of benzene over the last century need not be recounted here, but the most recent addition to the list of uses of benzene is as a component in a mixture of aromatic compounds added to gasoline for the purpose of replacing lead compounds as anti-knock ingredients. The best known and longest recognized toxic effect of benzene is the depression of bone marrow function seen in occupationally exposed individuals. These people have been found to display anemia, leucopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. When pancytopenia, i.e., the simultaneous depression of all three cell types, occurs and is accompanied by bone marrow necrosis, the syndrome is called aplastic anemia. In addition to observing this decrease in humans and relating it to benzene exposure, it has been possible to establish animal models which mimic the human disease. The result has been considerable scientific investigation into the mechanism of benzene toxicity. Although the association between benzene exposure and aplastic anemia has been recognized and accepted throughout most of this century, it is only recently that leukemia, particularly of the acute myelogenous type, has been related to benzene. The acceptance of benzene as an etiological agent in aplastic anemia in large measure derives from our ability to reproduce the disease in most animals treated with sufficiently high doses of benzene over the necessary time period. Unfortunately, despite extensive efforts in several laboratories, it has not been possible to establish a reproducible, reliable model for the study of benzene-induced leukemia. The recent demonstration that several animals exposed to benzene either by inhalation or in the drinking water during studies by Drs. B. Goldstein and C. Maltoni suggests that such a model may be forthcoming

  10. Systems biology of human benzene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Li, Guilan; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Hubbard, Alan E.; Ren, Xuefeng; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; North, Matthew; Skibola, Christine F.; Yin, Songnian; Vulpe, Christopher; Chanock, Stephen J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Toxicogenomic studies, including genome-wide analyses of susceptibility genes (genomics), gene expression (transcriptomics), protein expression (proteomics), and epigenetic modifications (epigenomics), of human populations exposed to benzene are crucial to understanding gene-environment interactions, providing the ability to develop biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility. Comprehensive analysis of these toxicogenomic and epigenomic profiles by bioinformatics in the context of phenotypic endpoints, comprises systems biology, which has the potential to comprehensively define the mechanisms by which benzene causes leukemia. We have applied this approach to a molecular epidemiology study of workers exposed to benzene. Hematotoxicity, a significant decrease in almost all blood cell counts, was identified as a phenotypic effect of benzene that occurred even below 1ppm benzene exposure. We found a significant decrease in the formation of progenitor colonies arising from bone marrow stem cells with increasing benzene exposure, showing that progenitor cells are more sensitive to the effects of benzene than mature blood cells, likely leading to the observed hematotoxicity. Analysis of transcriptomics by microarray in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of exposed workers, identified genes and pathways (apoptosis, immune response, and inflammatory response) altered at high (>10ppm) and low (<1ppm) benzene levels. Serum proteomics by SELDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins consistently down-regulated in exposed workers. Preliminary epigenomics data showed effects of benzene on the DNA methylation of specific genes. Genomic screens for candidate genes involved in susceptibility to benzene toxicity are being undertaken in yeast, with subsequent confirmation by RNAi in human cells, to expand upon the findings from candidate gene analyses. Data on these and future biomarkers will be used to populate a large toxicogenomics database, to which we will apply bioinformatic

  11. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Kenyon, E.M.; Seaton, M.J.; Schlosser, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase 11 enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Major sources of benzene exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L A

    1989-01-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis. PMID:2477239

  13. Major sources of benzene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis.

  14. Resonant photodissociation in substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Tim; McAcy, Collin; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2011-05-01

    Cyclic aromatic molecules are abundant in organic chemistry, with a wide variety of applications, including pharmacology, pollution studies and genetic research. Among the simplest of these molecules is benzene (C6H6) , with many relevant molecules being benzene-like with a single atomic substitution. In such a substitution, the substituent determines a characteristic perturbation of the electronic structure of the molecule. We discuss the substitution of halogens into the ring (C6H5X), and its effects on the dynamics of ionization and dissociation of the molecule without the focal volume effect. In particular, using 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses, we present results in the dissociation of fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and iodobenzene into the phenyl ring (C6H5) and the atomic halogen, and the subsequent ionization of these fragments. The impact of the ``heavy atom effect'' on a 1 (π , π*) -->3 (n , σ*) singlet-triplet intersystem crossing will be emphasized. Currently under investigation is whether such a dissociation can be treated as an effective source of the neutral substituent. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0355235.

  15. Major sources of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A

    1989-07-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis.

  16. 40 CFR 721.1625 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt... Substances § 721.1625 Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzene sulfonate,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10035 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10035 Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzene sulfonate...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10035 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10035 Alkylbenzene sulfonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzene sulfonate...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1625 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt... Substances § 721.1625 Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzene sulfonate,...

  20. 21 CFR 173.395 - Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid. 173.395 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.395 Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid. Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid has the empirical formula CF3SO3H (CAS Reg. No. 1493-13-6). The catalyst...

  1. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1) identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used...

  2. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1) identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used...

  3. 21 CFR 173.395 - Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid. 173.395 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.395 Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid. Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid has the empirical formula CF3SO3H (CAS Reg. No. 1493-13-6). The catalyst...

  4. 21 CFR 173.395 - Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid. 173.395 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.395 Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid. Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid has the empirical formula CF3SO3H (CAS Reg. No. 1493-13-6). The catalyst...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1625 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt... Substances § 721.1625 Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34636, June... substance identified generically as alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt (PMN P-90-456) is subject...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  8. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  10. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  14. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety data sheet (MSDS) which addresses benzene and complies with 29 CFR 1910.1200. (ii) Employers who... the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(h) (1) and (2), and shall include specific information on benzene... and unloading operations, except for the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.1200 as incorporated into...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  19. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... safety data sheet (MSDS) which addresses benzene and complies with 29 CFR 1910.1200. (ii) Employers who... the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(h) (1) and (2), and shall include specific information on benzene... and unloading operations, except for the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.1200 as incorporated into...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  4. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  6. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  8. Degradation of benzene in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, F.; Klein, W.

    1982-01-01

    A test system for measurement of benzene and other aromatic compounds using a carbon 14 label is described. The biodegradability test of ecotoxicological profile analysis is performed in a closed system, thus allowing the investigation of volatile compounds. Results show that benzene is readily biodegradable. (JMT)

  9. Biomarkers of susceptibility following benzene exposure: influence of genetic polymorphisms on benzene metabolism and health effects.

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Damiano; Chiarella, Pieranna; Mansi, Antonella; Pigini, Daniela; Iavicoli, Sergio; Tranfo, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous occupational and environmental pollutant. Improved industrial hygiene allowed airborne concentrations close to the environmental context (1-1000 µg/m(3)). Conversely, new limits for benzene levels in urban air were set (5 µg/m(3)). The biomonitoring of exposure to such low benzene concentrations are performed measuring specific and sensitive biomarkers such as S-phenylmercapturic acid, trans, trans-muconic acid and urinary benzene: many studies referred high variability in the levels of these biomarkers, suggesting the involvement of polymorphic metabolic genes in the individual susceptibility to benzene toxicity. We reviewed the influence of metabolic polymorphisms on the biomarkers levels of benzene exposure and effect, in order to understand the real impact of benzene exposure on subjects with increased susceptibility.

  10. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) depletion in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is an industrial chemical that is used as a surfactant in several manufactured consumer products but is also a breakdown product from other chemical surfactants. As a result of its extensive use, PFOS is ubiquitous in the environment and is often detected in biosoli...

  11. Phase Behavior of Symmetric Sulfonated Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Moon Jeong; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2008-08-21

    Phase behavior of poly(styrenesulfonate-methylbutylene) (PSS-PMB) block copolymers was studied by varying molecular weight, sulfonation level, and temperature. Molecular weights of the copolymers range from 2.9 to 117 kg/mol. Ordered lamellar, gyroid, hexagonally perforated lamellae, and hexagonally packed cylinder phases were observed in spite of the fact that the copolymers are nearly symmetric with PSS volume fractions between 0.45 and 0.50. The wide variety of morphologies seen in our copolymers is inconsistent with current theories on block copolymer phase behavior such as self-consistent field theory. Low molecular weight PSS-PMB copolymers (<6.2 kg/mol) show order-order and order-disorder phase transitions as a function of temperature. In contrast, the phase behavior of high molecular weight PSS-PMB copolymers (>7.7 kg/mol) is independent of temperature. Due to the large value of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, x, between the sulfonated and non-sulfonated blocks, PSS-PMB copolymers with PSS and PMB molecular weights of 1.8 and 1.4 kg/mol, respectively, show the presence of an ordered gyroid phase with a 2.5 nm diameter PSS network. A variety of methods are used to estimate x between PSS and PMB chains as a function of sulfonation level. Some aspects of the observed phase behavior of PSS-PMB copolymers can be rationalized using x.

  12. Sulfonated Polymerized Ionic Liquid Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Meek, Kelly M; Elabd, Yossef A

    2016-07-01

    The successful synthesis of a new diblock copolymer, referred to as sulfonated polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) block copolymer, poly(SS-Li-b-AEBIm-TFSI), is reported, which contains both sulfonated blocks (sulfonated styrene: SS) and PIL blocks (1-[(2-acryloyloxy)ethyl]-3-butylimidazolium: AEBIm) with both mobile cations (lithium: Li(+) ) and mobile anions (bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide: TFSI(-) ). Synthesis consists of polymerization via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer, followed by post-functionalization reactions to covalently attach the imidazolium cations and sulfonic acid anions to their respective blocks, followed by ion exchange metathesis resulting in mobile Li(+) cations and mobile TFSI(-) anions. Solid-state films containing 1 m Li-TFSI salt dissolved in ionic liquid result in an ion conductivity of >1.5 mS cm(-1) at 70 °C, where small-angle X-ray scattering data indicate a weakly ordered microphase-separated morphology. These results demonstrate a new ion-conducting block copolymer containing both mobile cations and mobile anions. PMID:27125600

  13. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, the food additive... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600...

  14. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, the food additive... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600...

  15. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, the food additive... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600...

  16. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Olcomendy, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyether sulfone was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Animal response times were relatively short at pyrolysis temperatures of 600 to 800 C, with death occurring within 6 min. The principal toxicant appeared to be a compound other than carbon monoxide.

  17. Effect of repeated benzene inhalation exposures on benzene metabolism, binding to hemoglobin, and induction of micronuclei.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, P J; Sun, J D; MacGregor, J T; Wehr, C M; Birnbaum, L S; Lucier, G; Henderson, R F

    1990-05-01

    Metabolism of benzene is thought to be necessary to produce the toxic effects, including carcinogenicity, associated with benzene exposure. To extrapolate from the results of rodent studies to potential health risks in man, one must know how benzene metabolism is affected by species, dose, dose rate, and repeated versus single exposures. The purpose of our studies was to determine the effect of repeated inhalation exposures on the metabolism of [14C]benzene by rodents. Benzene metabolism was assessed by characterizing and quantitating urinary metabolites, and by quantitating 14C bound to hemoglobin and micronuclei induction. F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed, nose-only, to 600 ppm benzene or to air (control) for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. On the last day, both benzene-pretreated and control animals were exposed to 600 ppm, 14C-labeled benzene for 6 hr. Individual benzene metabolites in urine collected for 24 hr after the exposure were analyzed. There was a significant decrease in the respiratory rate of mice (but not rats) pretreated with benzene which resulted in lower levels of urinary [14C]benzene metabolites. The analyses indicated that the only effects of benzene pretreatment on the metabolite profile in rat or mouse urine were a slight shift from glucuronidation to sulfation in mice and a shift from sulfation to glucuronidation in rats. Benzene pretreatment also had no effect, in either species, on formation of [14C]benzene-derived hemoglobin adducts. Mice and rats had similar levels of hemoglobin adduct binding, despite the higher metabolism of benzene by mice. This indicates that hemoglobin adduct formation occurs with higher efficiency in rats. After 1 week of exposure to 600 ppm benzene, the frequency of micronucleated, polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in mice was significantly increased. Exposure to the same level of benzene for an additional 2 weeks did not further increase the frequency of micronuclei in PCEs. These results indicate

  18. Atomistic simulation study of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates at the water/air interface

    PubMed Central

    He, Xibing; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations with the CHARMM atomistic force field have been used to study monolayers of a series of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) at the water/air interface. Both the numbers of carbon atoms in the LAS alkyl tail (1 to 11), and the position of attachment of the benzene ring on the alkyl chain have been varied. Totally 36 LAS homologues and isomers have been investigated. The surface tensions of the systems and the average tilt angles of the LAS molecules are found to be related to both the length and the degree of branching of the alkyl tails, whereas the solubility and mobility are mostly determined by the tail length. PMID:20614916

  19. Fate of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in activated sludge plants.

    PubMed

    Temmink, H; Klapwijk, Bram

    2004-02-01

    Monitoring data were collected in a pilot-scale municipal activated sludge plant to assess the fate of the C12-homologue of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS-C12). The pilot-plant was operated at influent LAS-C12 concentrations between 2 and 12 mg l(-1) and at sludge retention times of 10 and 27 days. Effluent and waste sludge concentrations varied between 5 and 10 microg l(-1) and between 37 and 69 microg g(-1) VSS, respectively. In the sludge samples only 2-8% was present as dissolved LAS-C12, whereas the remaining 92-98% was found to be adsorbed to the sludge. In spite of this high degree of sorption, more than 99% of the LAS-C12 load was removed by biodegradation, showing that not only the soluble fraction but also the adsorbed fraction of LAS-C12 is readily available for biodegradation. Sorption and biodegradation of LAS-C12 were also investigated separately. Sorption was an extremely fast and reversible process and could be described by a linear isotherm with a partition coefficient of 3.2 l g(-1) volatile suspended solids. From the results of biodegradation kinetic tests it was concluded that primary biodegradation of LAS-C12 cannot be described by a (growth) Monod model, but a secondary utilisation model should be used instead. The apparent affinity of the sludge to biodegrade LAS-C12 increased when the sludge was loaded with higher influent concentrations of LAS-C12.

  20. Percutaneous penetration of benzene and benzene contained in solvents used in the rubber industry

    SciTech Connect

    Maibach, H.I.; Anjo, D.M.

    1981-09-01

    Penetration of benzene through the skin of the rhesus monkey was determined using /sup 14/C-benzene, and quantitating the labelled metabolites in urine. The modes of application and amounts of benzene that penetrated the skin (indicated in parentheses) are as follows: (1) a single, direct cutaneous application of liquid benzene (0.172 +/- 0.139%); (2) a single application of benzene-containing (0.36%) solvent (0.0805 +/- 0.0306%); (3) multiple washes with full-strength benzene (0.848 +/- 0.0806%); (4) multiple washes with the benzene-containing (0.35%) solvent (0.431 +/- 0.258%); (5) removal of the stratum corneum followed by application of full-strength benzene (0.09 +/- 0.627%); and (6) application of benzene to the palmar surface (0.651 +/- 0.482%). Until more complete human data becomes available, benzene penetration in the monkey may be used to estimate penetration in man, both for industrial hygiene purposes and general toxicological use.

  1. Reduction of benzene toxicity by toluene.

    PubMed

    Plappert, U; Barthel, E; Seidel, H J

    1994-01-01

    BDF1 mice were exposed in inhalation chambers to benzene (900 ppm, 300 ppm) and/or toluene (500 ppm, 250 ppm) 6 hr per day, 5 days per week, for up to 8 weeks. Benzene alone induced a slight anemia after 4 and 8 weeks and a reduction of BFU-E and CFU-E numbers in the marrow. The coexposure to toluene reduced the degree of anemia. These results confirm previous studies where toluene was found to reduce benzene toxicity. This protective effect was most pronounced when DNA damage was studied in peripheral blood cells, bone marrow, and liver using the single cell gel (SCG) assay. With benzene alone, either with 300 or 900 ppm, a significant increase in DNA damage was detected in cells sampled from all three organs. Toluene alone did not induce a significant increase in DNA damage. The coexposure of benzene and toluene reduced the extent of DNA damage to about 50% of benzene alone. This result is considered a clear indication for a protective effect of toluene on the genetic toxicity of benzene.

  2. Reduction of benzene toxicity by toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Plappert, U.; Barthel, E.; Seidel, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    BDF{sub 1} mice were exposed in inhalation chambers to benzene (900 ppm, 300 ppm) and/or toluene (500 ppm, 250 ppm) 6 hr per day, 5 days per week, for up to 8 weeks. Benzene alone induced a slight anemia after 4 and 8 weeks and a reduction of BFU-E and CFU-E numbers in the marrow. The coexposure to toluene reduced the degree of anemia. These results confirm previous studies where toluene was found to reduce benzene toxicity. This protective effect was most pronounced when DNA damage was studied in peripheral blood cells, bone marrow, and liver using the single cell gel (SCG) assay. With benzene alone, either with 300 or 900 ppm, a significant increase in DNA damage was detected in cells sampled from all three organs. Toluene alone did not induce a significant increase in DNA damage. The coexposure of benzene and toluene reduced the extent of DNA damage to about 50% of benzene alone. This result is considered a clear indication for a protective effect of toluene on the genetic toxicity of benzene. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Biomarkers of human exposure to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1993-01-01

    Three biomarkers for benzene exposure were developed. The first biomarker, muconic acid in urine, results from the ring opening of a benzene metabolite. A gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) assay was developed to measure urinary muconic acid, and the analyte in urine samples from workers occupationally exposed to benzene was determined. Workers exposed to benzene concentrations as low as 4.4 ppm over an 8-h day showed higher urinary muconic acid concentrations than did any control individual (p < .005). The second biomarker, S-phenylcysteine (SPC) in hemoglobin (Hb), results from the addition of benzene oxide to a cysteine sulfhydryl group. A GC/MS assay was developed to measure SPC in the blood of F344/N rats and B67C3F mice exposed to benzene by inhalation. The cysteine moiety on rat Hb is at a more accessible site than on Hb of mice or humans, and rats showed considerably higher levels of SPC than did mice. As yet, we have been unable to detect SPC in the globin of humans occupationally exposed to benzene. The third biomarker is SPC in albumin. In humans occupationally exposed to average concentrations of 0, 4.4, 8.4, and 23.1 ppm benzene, 8 h/d, 5 d/wk, SPC increased in the exposed groups linearly, giving a statistically significant slope (p < .001) of 0.044 [+-] 0.008 pmol/mg albumin/ppm. The assay for SPC is arduous and often imprecise; assuming these difficulties can be overcome, muconic acid in urine and SPC in albumin may be useful for accurately determining benzene exposure. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Lidar Measurements of Industrial Benzene Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to measure benzene concentrations was added to the RIVM mobile DIAL system. In a ten-days campaign, it was used to measure benzene emissions in the Rijnmond, a heavily industrialised area in the South-west of the Netherlands with petrochemical industry, petrochemical products storage and the port of Rotterdam. On two of the ten days, benzene emissions were found. Combined with measurements of wind speed and wind direction, the Lidar measurements indicated the possible origins of these emissions. This makes the Lidar a valuable tool, augmenting the data collected at fixed monitoring stations.

  5. Studies on the mechanism of benzene toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Dimitriadis, E; Guy, R; Hu, P; Cooper, K; Bauer, H; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1989-01-01

    Using the 59Fe uptake method of Lee et al. it was shown that erythropoiesis in female mice was inhibited following IP administration of benzene, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and muconaldehyde. Toluene protected against the effects of benzene. Coadministration of phenol plus either hydroquinone or catechol resulted in greatly increased toxicity. The combination of metabolites most effective in reducing iron uptake was hydroquinone plus muconaldehyde. We have also shown that treating animals with benzene leads to the formation of adducts of bone marrow DNA as measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique. PMID:2792049

  6. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  7. Modification of the cellulosic component of hemp fibers using sulfonic acid derivatives: Surface and thermal characterization.

    PubMed

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G; Bressler, David C

    2015-12-10

    The aim of this study was to characterize the surface, morphological, and thermal properties of hemp fibers treated with two commercially available, inexpensive, and water soluble sulfonic acid derivatives. Specifically, the cellulosic component of the fibers were targeted, because cellulose is not easily removed during chemical treatment. These acids have the potential to selectively transform the surfaces of natural fibers for composite applications. The proposed method proceeds in the absence of conventional organic solvents and high reaction temperatures. Surface chemical composition and signature were measured using gravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). XPS data from the treated hemp fibers were characterized by measuring the reduction in O/C ratio and an increase in abundance of the C-C-O signature. FTIR confirmed the reaction with the emergence of peaks characteristic of disubstituted benzene and amino groups. Grafting of the sulfonic derivatives resulted in lower surface polarity. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that treated fibers were characterized by lower percent degradation between 200 and 300 °C, and a higher initial degradation temperature.

  8. Highly branched sulfonated poly(fluorenyl ether ketone sulfone)s membrane for energy efficient vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bibo; Li, Zhaohua; Dai, Wenjing; Wang, Lei; Yu, Lihong; Xi, Jingyu

    2015-07-01

    A series of highly branched sulfonated poly (fluorenyl ether ketone sulfone)s (HSPAEK) are synthesized by direct polycondensation reactions. The HSPAEK with 8% degree of branching is further investigated as membrane for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The HSPAEK membrane prepared by solution casting method exhibits smooth, dense and tough morphology. It possesses very low VO2+ permeability and high ion selectivity compared to those of Nafion 117 membrane. When applied to VRFB, this novel membrane shows higher coulombic efficiency (CE, 99%) and energy efficiency (EE, 84%) than Nafion 117 membrane (CE, 92% and EE, 78%) at current density of 80 mA cm-2. Besides, the HSPAEK membrane shows super stable CE and EE as well as excellent discharge capacity retention (83%) during 100 cycles life test. After being soaked in 1.5 mol L-1 VO2+ solution for 21 days, the weight loss of HSPAEK membrane and the amount of VO2+ reduced from VO2+ are only 0.26% and 0.7%, respectively, indicating the superior chemical stability of the membrane.

  9. Improved oral absorption of cilostazol via sulfonate salt formation with mesylate and besylate

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Hong; Park, Jung Bae; Choi, Woong-Kee; Park, Sunhwa; Sung, Yun Jin; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cilostazol is a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II drug with low solubility and high permeability, so its oral absorption is variable and incomplete. The aim of this study was to prepare two sulfonate salts of cilostazol to increase the dissolution and hence the oral bioavailability of cilostazol. Methods Cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate were synthesized from cilostazol by acid addition reaction with methane sulfonic acid and benzene sulfonic acid, respectively. The salt preparations were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The water contents, hygroscopicity, stress stability, and photostability of the two cilostazol salts were also determined. The dissolution profiles in various pH conditions and pharmacokinetic studies in rats were compared with those of cilostazol-free base. Results The two cilostazol salts exhibited good physicochemical properties, such as nonhygroscopicity, stress stability, and photostability, which make it suitable for the preparation of pharmaceutical formulations. Both cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate showed significantly improved dissolution rate and extent of drug release in the pH range 1.2–6.8 compared to the cilostazol-free base. In addition, after oral administration to rats, cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate showed increases in Cmax and AUCt of approximately 3.65- and 2.87-fold and 3.88- and 2.94-fold, respectively, compared to cilostazol-free base. Conclusion This study showed that two novel salts of cilostazol, such as cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate, could be used to enhance its oral absorption. The findings warrant further preclinical and clinical studies on cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate at doses lower than the usually recommended dosage, so that it can be established as an alternative to the marketed cilostazol tablet. PMID:26251575

  10. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  11. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  12. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  13. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  14. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  15. Morphologies in Sulfonated Styrenic Pentablock Copolymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Hong; Bramson, Matt; Winey, Karen I.

    2010-03-01

    Membranes of pentablock and triblock copolymers consisting of poly(tert-butyl styrene) (TBS), hydrogenated polyisoprene (HI), and partially sulfonated poly(styrene-ran-styrene sulfonate) (SS) were studied using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TBS-HI-SS-HI-TBS pentablock and TBS-HI-SS triblock copolymer membranes exhibit anisotropic microphase separated morphologies. Because the pentablock and triblock copolymers can be expected to have complex morphologies, thermal annealing was conducted to promote well-defined morphologies. The annealed membranes exhibit stronger peaks and more high order reflections in SAXS patterns, as well as better defined microstructures in the TEM. Electron microcopy studies with various staining protocols are underway to establish the morphology of the pentablock copolymer membranes including the size and shape of the three microdomains (TBS, HI and SS). We gratefully acknowledge Kraton Polymers, Inc. for materials.

  16. Sorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate by montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Xing, Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    Sorption of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates by soils and sediments is an important process that may affect their fate, transport, toxicity and their application in remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to elucidate the sorption of a widely used anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), by montmorillonite. It was observed that: (i) SDBS was sorbed significantly by montmorillonite saturated with Ca(2+), but little by Na-saturated montmorillonite; (ii) the amount of SDBS sorbed by Ca(2+)-montmorillonite was enhanced by NaCl; and (iii) no significant intercalation of SDBS into Ca(2+)-montmorillonite was observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. These results indicate that the removal of SDBS by Ca(2+)-montmorillonite was primarily attributed to the precipitation between DBS(-) and Ca(2+) in solution which was released from montmorillonite via cation exchange. These results will help us to understand the sorption behavior and environmental effects of anionic surfactants. PMID:16759775

  17. Sorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate by montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Xing, Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    Sorption of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates by soils and sediments is an important process that may affect their fate, transport, toxicity and their application in remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to elucidate the sorption of a widely used anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), by montmorillonite. It was observed that: (i) SDBS was sorbed significantly by montmorillonite saturated with Ca(2+), but little by Na-saturated montmorillonite; (ii) the amount of SDBS sorbed by Ca(2+)-montmorillonite was enhanced by NaCl; and (iii) no significant intercalation of SDBS into Ca(2+)-montmorillonite was observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. These results indicate that the removal of SDBS by Ca(2+)-montmorillonite was primarily attributed to the precipitation between DBS(-) and Ca(2+) in solution which was released from montmorillonite via cation exchange. These results will help us to understand the sorption behavior and environmental effects of anionic surfactants.

  18. Evidence for the existence of an effective interfacial tension between miscible fluids. 2. Dodecyl acrylate-poly(dodecyl acrylate) in a spinning drop tensiometer.

    PubMed

    Zoltowski, Brian; Chekanov, Yuri; Masere, Jonathan; Pojman, John A; Volpert, Vitaly

    2007-05-01

    We studied drops of dodecyl acrylate in poly(dodecyl acrylate) (molecular weight of 25,000) in a spinning drop tensiometer to determine whether an effective interfacial tension (EIT) existed between these two miscible fluids. We found convincing evidence. We estimated the mechanical relaxation time from an immiscible analogue (1-propanol and poly(dodecyl acrylate)) and showed that the dodecyl acrylate drops maintained quasi-steady diameters long after this relaxation period. Drops continuously grew in length and became more diffuse, but the width of the transition zone did not grow with t(1/2) as expected from Fick's law although this system had been shown to follow Fick's law in a static configuration (Antrim, D.; Bunton, P.; Lewis, L. L.; Zoltowski, B. D.; Pojman, J. A. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 11842-11849). The EIT was determined from Vonnegut's equation, EIT = (Deltarho)omega(2)r(3)/4; both the inner and outer diameters were measured, yielding values of 0.002 and 0.02 mN m(-1), respectively. The EIT was found to be independent of the rotation rate above 6000 rpm and independent of the initial drop volume. The EIT was found to decrease with temperature and increase with the difference in concentration between the monomer drop and polymer-monomer fluid. The square gradient parameter, k, was determined from EIT = k(Deltac(2)/delta), where Deltac is the difference in mole fraction and delta is the width of the transition zone. The square gradient parameter was on the order of 10(-9) N. The square gradient parameter was found to decrease with temperature, to be independent of concentration, and to increase with the molecular weight of the polymer.

  19. EPR study of Gallium atoms in benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.A.; Joly, H.A.; Mile, B.; Sutcliffe, R. )

    1991-09-05

    An EPR study of a Ga atom matrix isolated in benzene at 77 K has revealed the presence of a paramagnetic species with the magnetic parameters {alpha}{sub zz}(69) = 256 MHz, {alpha}{sub xx}(69) = 270 MHz, {alpha}{sub yy}(69) = 284 MHz, {alpha}{sub zz}(71) = 325 MHz, {alpha}{sub xx}(71) = 343 MHz, {alpha}{sub yy}(71) = 361 Mhz, g{sub zz} = 1.9970, g{approximately}{sub xx} = 1.9750, and g{sub yy} = 1.9350. These parameters are consistent with a trapped atom or a weak Ga-benzene complex that has had the degeneracy of the Ga p orbitals lifted by interaction with the benzene matrix. This contrasts with Al in benzene which gives a mononuclear monoligand complex, Al(C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), with quite strong bonding between the metal atom and the ligand.

  20. Oxidation Mechanisms of Toluene and Benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1995-01-01

    An expanded and improved version of a previously published benzene oxidation mechanism is presented and shown to model published experimental data fairly successfully. This benzene submodel is coupled to a modified version of a toluene oxidation submodel from the recent literature. This complete mechanism is shown to successfully model published experimental toluene oxidation data for a highly mixed flow reactor and for higher temperature ignition delay times in a shock tube. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis showing the most important reactions is presented for both the benzene and toluene reacting systems. The NASA Lewis toluene mechanism's modeling capability is found to be equivalent to that of the previously published mechanism which contains a somewhat different benzene submodel.

  1. Electromers of the benzene dimer radical cation.

    PubMed

    Błoch-Mechkour, Anna; Bally, Thomas

    2015-04-28

    The well-studied benzene dimer radical cation, which is prototypical for this class of species, has been reinvestigated computationally. Thereby it turned out that both the σ-hemibonded and the half-shifted sandwich structures of the benzene dimer cation, which had been independently proposed, represent stationary points on the B2PLYP-D potential energy surfaces. However, these structures belong to distinct electronic states, both of which are associated with potential surfaces that are very flat with regard to rotation of the two benzene rings in an opposite sense relative to each other. The surfaces of these two "electromers" of the benzene dimer cation are separated by only 3-4 kcal mol(-1) and do not intersect along the rotation coordinate, which represents a rather unique electronic structure situation. When moving on either of the two surfaces the title complex is an extremely fluxional species, in spite of its being bound by over 20 kcal mol(-1).

  2. Phase behavior of simple salt tolerant sulfonates

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, Y.; Fortney, L.N.; Lalanne-Cassou, C.; Schechter, R.S.; Wade, W.H.; Yiv, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Alkane and /alpha/-olefin sulfonates can be utilized to produce optimal microemulsion formulations which have very high salinity (including divalent ion) tolerance while maintaining large solubilization parameters and low interfacial tensions. Such molecules require elevated temperatures or higher alcohol concentrations to suppress liquid crystal formulation. As found for other species, solubilization is inversely related to width of the three phase regime, and interfacial tension and solubilization are strongly coupled. 18 refs.

  3. Phase behavior of simple salt tolerant sulfonates

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, Y.; Fortney, L.N.; Lalanne-Cassou, C.; Schechter, R.S.; Wade, W.H.; Yiv, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Alkane and ..cap alpha..-olefin sulfonates can be utilized to produce optimal microemulsion formulations which have very high salinity (including divalent ion) tolerance while maintaining large solubilization parameters and low interfacial tensions. Such molecules require elevated temperatures or higher alcohol concentrations to suppress liquid crystal formation. As found for other species, solubilization is inversely related to width of the three phase regime, and interfacial tension and solubilization are strongly coupled.

  4. High Lipophilicty of Perfluoroalkyl Carboxylate and Sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ping; Rodgers, Patrick J.; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    Here we report on remarkably high lipophilicity of perfluoroalkyl carboxylate and sulfonate. A lipophilic nature of this emerging class of organic pollutants has been hypothesized as an origin of their bioaccumulation and toxicity. Both carboxylate and sulfonate, however, are considered hydrophilic while perfluroalkyl groups are not only hydrophobic but also oleophobic. Partition coefficients of homologous series of perfluoroalkyl and alkyl carboxylates between water and n-octanol were determined as a measure of their lipophilicity by ion-transfer cyclic voltammetry. Very similar lipophilicity of perfluoroalkyl and alkyl chains with the same length is demonstrated experimentally for the first time by fragment analysis of the partition coefficients. This finding is important for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of perfluoroalkyl compounds. Interestingly, ∼2 orders of magnitude higher lipophilicity of a perfluoroalkyl carboxylate or sulfonate in comparison to its alkyl counterpart is ascribed nearly exclusively to their oxoanion groups. The higher lipophilicity originates from a strong electron-withdrawing effect of the perfluoroalkyl group on the adjacent oxoanion group, which is weakly hydrated to decrease its hydrophilicity. In fact, the inductive effect is dramatically reduced for a fluorotelomer with an ethylene spacer between perfluorohexyl and carboxylate groups, which is only as lipophilic as its alkyl counterpart, nonanoate, and is 400 times less lipophilic than perfluorononanoate. The high lipophilicity of perfluoroalkyl carboxylate and sulfonate implies that their permeation across such a thin lipophilic membrane as a bilayer lipid membrane is limited by their transfer at a membrane/water interface. The limiting permeability is lower and less dependent on their lipophilicity than the permeability controlled by their diffusion in the membrane interior as assumed in the classical solubility-diffusion model. PMID:19170492

  5. Biodegradation kinetics of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in sludge-amended agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Ward, T E; Larson, R J

    1989-02-01

    The kinetics of ultimate biodegradation (mineralization to CO2) of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) were studied in sludge-amended agricultural soils for a series of pure chain length LAS homologs containing 10 to 14 carbon atoms in the alkyl chain. Degradation rates were measured by following the production of 14CO2 from uniformly 14C-ring-labeled material. In general, degradation of LAS was rapid in soil over a broad concentration range (0.1 to 10 times the expected environmental concentration) and demonstrated little variation among different homologs. Half-lives for mineralization of the benzene ring ranged from 18 to 26 days and were not significantly different for any homolog over the range of alkyl chain lengths tested. Half-lives measured for LAS degradation in these studies were comparable to values reported in the literature and also to values obtained for naturally occurring materials (stearic acid, cellulose) typically present in soil environments. On the basis of the results of the present studies and those of other investigators, it is concluded that soil environments exposed to LAS in sewage sludges contain microbial communities which can actively metabolize this material. Rates of biodegradation of the benzene ring, the final step in the LAS biodegradation pathway prior to complete mineralization, are also sufficient to prevent LAS from accumulating in soil environments.

  6. Photoionization spectrum of liquid benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Saik, V. O.; Lipsky, S. )

    1994-11-17

    The photocurrent from neat liquid benzene has been studied for excitation energies from threshold to 10.3 eV and for externally applied electric fields from 1 to 50 kV/cm. Using a power law fit to the energy dependence of the threshold current, an onset of [epsilon][sub t] = 7.65 [+-] 0.1 eV has been obtained. The field dependence was fit to an exponential radial probability density for thermalized ion-pair separation distances with an average separation distance of [r] = 23 [+-] 2 A at an excitation energy, [epsilon] of 8.86 eV (1.2 eV above threshold). Photocurrent was too weak to establish a dependence of [r] on excitation energy. The quantum yield for photocurrent at 8.86 eV was determined by comparison with the photocurrent from TMPD in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) to be 6.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] at zero field. From this, the intrinsic molecular ionization probability at [epsilon] = 8.86 eV was determined to be 0.6 [+-] 0.3. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Benzene-derived carbon nanothreads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.; Guthrie, Malcolm; Xu, En-Shi; Crespi, Vincent H.; Davidowski, Stephen K.; Cody, George D.; Alem, Nasim; Badding, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene and diamondoids have extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Compression-induced polymerization of aromatic molecules could provide a viable synthetic route to ordered carbon nanomaterials, but despite almost a century of study this approach has produced only amorphous products. Here we report recovery to ambient pressure of macroscopic quantities of a crystalline one- dimensional sp3 carbon nanomaterial formed by high-pressure solid-state reaction of benzene. X-ray and neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations reveal close- packed bundles of subnanometre-diameter sp3-bonded carbon threads capped with hydrogen, crystalline in two dimensions and short-range ordered in the third. These nanothreads promise extraordinary properties such as strength and stiffness higher than that of sp2 carbon nanotubes or conven tional high-strength polymers. They may be the first member of a new class of ordered sp3 nanomaterials synthesized by kinetic control of high-pressure solid-state reactions.

  8. Benzene-derived carbon nanothreads.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C; Guthrie, Malcolm; Xu, En-shi; Crespi, Vincent H; Davidowski, Stephen K; Cody, George D; Alem, Nasim; Badding, John V

    2015-01-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene and diamondoids have extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Compression-induced polymerization of aromatic molecules could provide a viable synthetic route to ordered carbon nanomaterials, but despite almost a century of study this approach has produced only amorphous products. Here we report recovery to ambient pressure of macroscopic quantities of a crystalline one- dimensional sp(3) carbon nanomaterial formed by high-pressure solid-state reaction of benzene. X-ray and neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations reveal close- packed bundles of subnanometre-diameter sp(3)-bonded carbon threads capped with hydrogen, crystalline in two dimensions and short-range ordered in the third. These nanothreads promise extraordinary properties such as strength and stiffness higher than that of sp(2) carbon nanotubes or conventional high-strength polymers. They may be the first member of a new class of ordered sp(3) nanomaterials synthesized by kinetic control of high-pressure solid-state reactions.

  9. Benzene and leukemia. An epidemiologic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsky, R.A.; Smith, A.B.; Hornung, R.; Filloon, T.G.; Young, R.J.; Okun, A.H.; Landrigan, P.J.

    1987-04-23

    To assess quantitatively the association between benzene exposure and leukemia, we examined the mortality rate of a cohort with occupational exposure to benzene. Cumulative exposure for each cohort member was estimated from historical air-sampling data and, when no sampling data existed, from interpolation on the basis of existing data. The overall standardized mortality ratio (a measure of relative risk multiplied by 100) for leukemia was 337 (95 percent confidence interval, 154 to 641), and that for multiple myeloma was 409 (95 percent confidence interval, 110 to 1047). With stratification according to levels of cumulative exposure, the standardized mortality ratios for leukemia increased from 109 to 322, 1186, and 6637 with increases in cumulative benzene exposure from less than 40 parts per million-years (ppm-years), to 40 to 199, 200 to 399, and 400 or more, respectively. A cumulative benzene exposure of 400 ppm-years is equivalent to a mean annual exposure of 10 ppm over a 40-year working lifetime; 10 ppm is the currently enforceable standard in the United States for occupational exposure to benzene. To examine the shape of the exposure-response relation, we performed a conditional logistic-regression analysis, in which 10 controls were matched to each cohort member with leukemia. From this model, it can be calculated that protection from benzene-induced leukemia would increase exponentially with any reduction in the permissible exposure limit.

  10. Determinants of indoor benzene in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. K.; Jantunen, M. J.; Künzli, N.; Kulinskaya, E.; Colvile, R.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.

    This study identified the key determinants associated with the indoor benzene concentrations that were measured between 1996 and 2000 using the EXPOLIS protocol in the residences of six European cities, including Athens (Greece), Basel (Switzerland), Helsinki (Finland), Milan (Italy), Oxford (United Kingdom), and Prague (Czech Republic). Two consecutive days of home indoor and home outdoor measurements of benzene were carried out at the homes of adult participants on different dates and seasons during the sampling period. Regression models, with interactions searched by all-possible subset method, were used to assess the city effects and the determinants of home indoor benzene (adjusted R2=0.57, n=412). Outdoor benzene concentrations, outdoor temperature, wind speed, the use of anti-moth products, and indoor smoking in terms of number of cigarettes consumed per day were shown to be the key determinants of indoor benzene concentrations. The model was further used to predict the indoor benzene levels in cities. Non-linear relationships were commonly found, indicating that a unit change in the indoor concentration cannot be simply estimated by a proportional change of the determinant, and the pattern of relationships could be differed in different places. This finding is important in formulating indoor air quality guidelines as well as calculating an accurate health risk estimate based on the estimates of population's lifetime exposure levels.

  11. Meeting benzene regulations through new desalting applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schantz, S.; Garcia, J.; Mourer, J.

    1995-09-01

    In the past, the industry has studied the impact of changing desalting variables on total oil undercarry. With the advent of the NESHAP regulations, benzene measurement is performed on a scheduled basis but not observed as desalting variables are changed and optimized. Benzene is normally present in crude at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 ppm, and it is extremely soluble in water: up to 1,800 mg/l at standard temperature and pressure. The NESHAP benzene standard has created a strong interest in real-time experiments to clarify the factors that affect benzene concentrations in desalter effluent water. The work reported on in this paper attempts to answer the following questions: can the benzene concentration in desalter wastewater be determined reliably in real time so that desalter operational parameters can be tuned to minimize this concentration; how do changes in four key desalter variables--temperature, chemical dosage, wash water rate, and mix-valve pressure differential, affect benzene concentration in the effluent water?

  12. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  13. Study of adjuvant effect of model surfactants from the groups of alkyl sulfates, alkylbenzene sulfonates, alcohol ethoxylates and soaps.

    PubMed

    Clausen, S K; Sobhani, S; Poulsen, O M; Poulsen, L K; Nielsen, G D

    2000-11-01

    The sodium salts of representatives of anionic surfactants, dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and coconut oil fatty acids, and a nonionic surfactant, dodecyl alcohol ethoxylate, were studied for adjuvant effect on the production of specific IgE antibodies in mice. The surfactants were injected subcutaneously (sc) in concentrations of 1000, 100, 10 or 1 mg/l, respectively, together with 1 microg of ovalbumin (OVA). In addition, groups of mice received OVA in saline (control group) or in Al(OH)(3) (positive adjuvant control group). After the primary immunization the mice were boosted up to three times with OVA (0.1 microg sc) in saline. OVA-specific IgE antibodies were determined by the heterologous mouse rat passive cutaneous anaphylaxis test. The results were confirmed by a specific ELISA method. After the first booster, the Al(OH)(3) group and the 10 mg/l SDS group showed a statistically significant increase in OVA specific IgE levels. After two boosters, a statistically significant suppression in OVA-specific IgE production occurred with SDS (1000 mg/l), SDBS (1000 and 100 mg/l), coconut soap (1000 mg/l) and the alcohol ethoxylate (10 mg/l). This study suggests that a limited number of surfactants possess an adjuvant effect whereas all surfactants at certain levels can suppress specific IgE production.

  14. A solid device based on doped hybrid composites for controlling the dosage of the biocide N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine in industrial formulations.

    PubMed

    Argente-García, A; Muñoz-Ortuño, M; Molins-Legua, C; Moliner-Martínez, Y; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2016-01-15

    A colorimetric composite device is proposed to determine the widely used biocide N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (ADP).This sensing device is based on a film of 1,2-Naphthoquinone-4-sulfonate (NQS) embedded into polydimethylsiloxane-tetraethylortosilicate-SiO2 nanoparticles composite (PDMS-TEOS-SiO2NPs). Semiquantitative analysis can be performed by visual inspection. Digitalized image or diffuse reflectance (DR) measurements can be carried out for quantitative analysis. Satisfactory detection limit (0.018%, w/v) and relative standard deviations <12% were achieved. The proposed device has been applied for the determination of ADP in detergent industrial formulations with recovery values between 80% and 112%. The method has been successfully validated, showing its high potential to control and monitor this compound because the device is easy to prepare and use, robust, portable, stable over time and cost effective. This device allows a green, simple and rapid approach for the analysis of samples without pretreatment and does not require highly trained personnel. These advantages give the proposed kit good prospects for implementation in several industries. PMID:26592589

  15. Electrodeposition and characterisation of polypyrroles containing sulfonated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Carol; Wallace, Gordon G; Officer, David L

    2007-10-01

    Using facile diazonium chemistry, sulfonate groups have been covalently attached to single wall carbon nanotubes. The resulting sulfonated tubes form a stable aqueous dispersion in the presence of pyrrole monomer. Subsequent electropolymerisation results in a conductive, electroactive polypyrrole doped with sulfonated tubes being formed at unusually low potentials. The potential of this material as a host matrix for biomolecules has been demonstrated by entrapping horse-radish peroxidase directly in the polypyrrole during composite formation.

  16. [Effect of anionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate and alkylbenzyl sulfonate on adsorption and transport behavior of several enterotropic viruses in the soil under model conditions].

    PubMed

    Dizer, H

    1990-09-01

    The adsorption of poliovirus 3, coxsackievirus B1, and coliphage f2 on soil from an irrigation field loaded for years with waste water and sandy soil from an aquifer was investigated under the influence of two anionic detergents, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and alkylbenzolsulphonate (ABS). The investigation was carried out through batch and column experiments under simulated conditions. The concentrations of both detergents found generally in surface water (0.2-10 mg/l) had no effect on the adsorption of tested viruses. The concentration of 100 mg/l was the lowest intensity that led to an impaired adsorption of viruses on the sediments. The desorbing effect of SDS was relatively higher than ABS. Both detergents gave rise to a desorption and migration of viruses. Especially in soil from an irrigation field the effect was stronger at pH 7.2 than at pH 5.1. Despite low concentrations of detergents in surface water, such procedures as bank filtration, waste water irrigation for the enrichment of groundwater, and the use of sewage sludge on agricultural fields or forest grounds can cause an accumulation of detergents or their metabolites which impairs the binding of viruses to sediments. Therefore, the danger occurrence of a groundwater contamination with enteroviruses should be considered in those sectors.

  17. Analysis of sperm antigens by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.G.; Huang, Y.S.; Hu, P.C.; Gomel, V.; Menge, A.C.

    1982-06-01

    A radioimmunobinding method based on the blotting of renatured proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate gels on to nitrocellulose filter papers was developed to analyze the sperm antigens that elicit serum anti-sperm antibodies. In rabbits, serum anti-sperm antibodies were raised by immunization with homologous epididymal spermatozoa mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. The raised antisera from either male or female rabbits were shown to react with three major sperm protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the corresponding molecular weights of about 70,000 +/- 5000, 14,000, and 13,000, respectively. In humans, the monoclonal antibodies against human sperm were raised by a hybridoma technique. Out of six independent hybrid cell lines that were generated, three of them were shown to secrete immunoglobulins that react with the same two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, which have the approximate molecular weight of 10,000. The same procedure was also used to analyze human serum samples that were shown to contain anti-sperm antibodies by the known techniques. Unique sperm antigens that elicit anti-sperm antibodies in humans were identified and correlated. The results of this study suggest that sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method may be a sensitive and useful tool for the study of sperm antigens that elicit autoimmune responses and their association with human infertility.

  18. Thermodynamics of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) Micellization: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcolongo, Juan P.; Mirenda, Martin

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is presented that allows a thermodynamic characterization of micelle formation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solutions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the degree of micelle ionization (alpha) are obtained at different temperatures by conductimetry. The molar standard free energy…

  19. Sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, methods for producing the same, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hofmann, Michael A.

    2006-11-14

    The present invention is directed to sulfonimide-containing polymers, specifically sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, and processes for making the sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, for use conductive membranes and fuel cells.

  20. Acid-mediated formation of trifluoromethyl sulfonates from sulfonic acids and a hypervalent iodine trifluoromethylating agent.

    PubMed

    Koller, Raffael; Huchet, Quentin; Battaglia, Philip; Welch, Jan M; Togni, Antonio

    2009-10-28

    A variety of sulfonic acids have been trifluoromethylated using 1-trifluoromethyl-1,2-benziodoxol-3(1H)-one under mild conditions in good to excellent yields. Initial mechanistic investigations of this reaction show a clean second-order kinetics and only very weak substrate electronic effects.

  1. Molecular sieve/sulfonated poly(ether ketone ether sulfone) composite membrane as proton exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changkhamchom, Sairung; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2012-02-01

    A proton exchange membrane (PEM) is an electrolyte membrane used in both polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Currently, PEMs typically used for PEMFCs are mainly the commercially available Nafion^ membranes, which is high cost and loss of proton conductivity at elevated temperature. In this work, the Sulfonated poly(ether ketone ether sulfone), (S-PEKES), was synthesized by the nucleophilic aromatic substitution polycondensation between bisphenol S and 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone, and followed by the sulfonation reaction with concentrated sulfuric acid. The molecular sieve was added in the S-PEKES matrix at various ratios to form composite membranes to be the candidate for PEM. Properties of both pure sulfonated polymer and composite membranes were compared with the commercial Nafion^ 117 membrane from Dupont. S-PEKES membranes cast from these materials were evaluated as a polymer electrolyte membrane for direct methanol fuel cells. The main properties investigated were the proton conductivity, methanol permeability, thermal, chemical, oxidative, and mechanical stabilities by using a LCR meter, Gas Chromatography, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fenton's reagent, and Universal Testing Machine. The addition of the molecular sieve helped to increase both the proton conductivity and the methanol stability. These composite membranes are shown as to be potential candidates for use as a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM).

  2. Adsorptive treatment of shale-tar benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, R.V.; Kharitonova, L.K.

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the use of adsorbents to remove thiophene from benzene. A nickel-substituted type X zeolite has been developed as a thiophene-selective adsorbent. Unsaturates were removed from the benzene by using A-4M microbead adsorbent. The optimal treating conditions were selected in pilot-unit tests at a pressure p=2 MPa, using a mathematically designed experiment. The A-4M adsorbent can be used repeatedly, with a service life of 6 months. The clarified benzene was treated at room temperature, passing the benzene at a velocity of 0.3 cm/min through a bed of NiCaX, which adsorbs unsaturated hydrocarbons along with the thiophene. The final stage in the treatment is the removal of saturated hydrocarbons from the benzene on commercial CaA zeolite in the vapor phase at 100/sup 0/C with a feed velocity of 0.3 cm/min. The hydrocarbons were desorbed from the void spaces of the zeolite with n-pentane, subsequently removing the desorbent by conventional fractionation.

  3. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies. PMID:26117498

  4. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies.

  5. Personal benzene vapor detection device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glatkowski, P.; Druy, M.

    1992-07-01

    A badge was developed as a personal vapor detector to record the cumulative exposure of an individual to benzene vapor. The badge consisted of an optical fiber, small sections of which were coated with a membrane specific for the adsorption of benzene vapor. Membranes made of polyethylene and nylon, and filled with zeolite were applied to a silver halide fiber. Following exposure, the fiber was subjected to Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. The coating successfully retained the benzene vapor for several days. A concentration of 100,000 parts per million (ppm) could be detected. Concentrations of dichlorobenzene of 80,000ppm were also detected. Unique absorbance peaks were used to distinguish the two compounds. It was possible to reuse the sensor. However, the desired detectability range of 1 to 100ppm was not met.

  6. Synthesis of cyclic sulfones by ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-02-01

    A general and highly efficient synthesis of cyclic sulfones based on ring-closing metathesis has been developed. The synthetic utility of the resulting cyclic sulfones was demonstrated by their participation in stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions and transformation to cyclic dienes by the Ramberg-Bäcklund reaction. PMID:11820896

  7. Synthesis of basic and overbasic sulfonate detergent additives

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El Naga, H.H.; Abd El-Azim, W.M.; Bendary, S.A.; Awad, N.G.

    1993-12-01

    Heavy alkylbenzene, which accumulates as a by-product from linear alkylbenzene synthesis, is evaluated as a starting material for preparation of basic and over basic sulfonate detergent additives. Chemical structure analysis showed that this by-product contains several components in different proportions. Most of these components, as traced via mass spectrometry, showed the presence of paraffinic side chains within the carbon range C{sub 11}--C{sub 22}. Accordingly, sulfonation conditions for it were adjusted to optimize the reaction yield and sulfonic quality. Neutralization of the sulfonic acid was carried out by adding CaO in the presence of methanol as a promoter. Preparation of over basic sulfonate was run via a carbonation process at 55--60 C. Evaluations of synthesized basic calcium sulfonate in comparison to a commercial additive is supported by its efficiency as a detergent additive. The synthesized product has a higher total base number and Ca content than those for the commercial one. On the other hand, evaluation of the synthesized overbasic calcium sulfonate compared with overbasic commercial additives with medium and high alkalinity indicated that the synthesized product can be classified as overbasic calcium sulfonate with medium alkalinity, good dispersive power, and detergent efficiency.

  8. 21 CFR 177.2210 - Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated. 177.2210... (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2210 Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated. Ethylene polymer, chlorosulfonated...

  9. Sulfonated Nanoplates in Proton Conducting Membranes for Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.F.; Ni’mah, H.; Yu-Cheng Shen, Y.-C.; Kuo, P.-L.

    2011-09-29

    Surface-functionalized nanoplates are synthesized by anchoring sulfonic acid containing siloxanes on zirconium phosphate, and in turn blended with Nafion to fabricate proton conducting membranes. The effects of these sulfonated nanoplates on proton conduction, hydro-characteristics and fuel cell performance are reported.

  10. Synthesis of cyclic sulfones by ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-02-01

    A general and highly efficient synthesis of cyclic sulfones based on ring-closing metathesis has been developed. The synthetic utility of the resulting cyclic sulfones was demonstrated by their participation in stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions and transformation to cyclic dienes by the Ramberg-Bäcklund reaction.

  11. MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT.
    C. Lau and J.M. Rogers, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), an environmentally persistent compound used ...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1625 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt... Substances § 721.1625 Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... salt (PMN P-90-456) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new use described...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1625 - Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt... Substances § 721.1625 Alkylbenzene sulfonate, amine salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... salt (PMN P-90-456) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new use described...

  14. Gas phase nitrosation of substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechamps, Noémie; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Robert; Bouchoux, Guy; Nam, Pham-Cam; Nguyen, Minh-Tho

    2004-03-01

    Using a combination of tandem mass spectrometric experiments (ion-molecule reactions, collisional activation, neutralization-reionization, MS/MS/MS) and theoretical calculations, protonated substituted benzenes are demonstrated to readily react with neutral t-butyl nitrite by the formation of stable complexes linking ionized nitric oxide to the benzene derivatives. The overall process is proposed to involve the concomitant elimination of neutral 2-methyl-2-propanol. Proton-bound dimers are proposed to intervene as the key-intermediates in these reactions, which also competitively produce protonated t-butyl nitrite. All the experiments were performed in a single hybrid tandem mass spectrometer of sector-quadrupole-sector configuration.

  15. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  16. The pyrolysis of toluene and ethyl benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolovskaya, V. G.; Samgin, V. F.; Kalinenko, R. A.; Nametkin, N. S.

    1987-01-01

    The pyrolysis of toluene at 850 to 950 C gave mainly H2, CH4, and benzene; PhEt at 650 to 750 C gave mainly H2, CH4, styrene, benzene, and toluene. The rate constants for PhEt pyrolysis were 1000 times higher than those for toluene pyrolysis; the chain initiation rate constants differed by the same factor. The activation energy differences were 46 kJ/mole for the total reaction and 54 kJ/mole for chain initiation. The chain length was evaluated for the PhEt case (10 + or - 2).

  17. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Anders S; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2003-04-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C12 LAS), which show that C12 LAS was biodegradable under methanogenic conditions. Sorption of C12 LAS on sewage sludge was described with a Freundlich isotherm. The C12 LAS sorption was determined with different concentrations of total solids (TS). In the semi-continuously stirred tank reactor, 18% of the added C12 LAS was bioavailable and 20% was biotransformed when spiking with 100 mg/L of C12 LAS and a TS concentration of 14.2 mg/L. Enhanced bioavailability of C12 LAS was obtained in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with granular sludge and sewage sludge. Biodegradation under thermophilic conditions was 37% with LAS as sole carbon source. Benzaldehyde was produced in the UASB reactor during LAS transformation.

  18. Urinary excretion of unmetabolized benzene as an indicator of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Ghittori, S; Fiorentino, M L; Maestri, L; Cordioli, G; Imbriani, M

    1993-03-01

    Benzene concentrations in urine samples (Cu, ng/L) from 110 workers exposed to benzene in chemical plants and gasoline pumps were determined by injecting urine supernate into a gas chromatograph. The urine was saturated with anhydrous N2SO4 to facilitate the passage of benzene in the air over the urine. The solvent was stripped from the urine surface and concentrated on an adsorbent substrate (Carbotrap tube) by means of a suction pump (flow rate 150 ml/m). Wash-up of the head space was achieved by simultaneous intake of filtered air through charcoal. Benzene was thermically desorbed and injected in a column (thermal tube disorder, Supelco; 370 degrees C thermal flash; borosilicate capillary glass column SPB-1, 60 m length, 0.75 mm ID, 1 microns film thickness; GC Dani 8580-FID). Benzene concentrations in the urine from 40 non-exposed subjects (20 smokers > 20 cigarette/d and 20 nonsmokers) were also determined [median value of 790 ng/L (10.17 nmol/L) and 131 ng/L (1.70 nmol/L), respectively]. The 8-h time-weighted exposure intensity (Cl, micrograms/m3) of individual workers was monitored by means of charcoal tubes. The median value for exposure to benzene was 736 micrograms/m3 (9.42 mumol/m3) [geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 2.99; range 64 micrograms/m3 (0.82 mumol/m3) to 13,387 micrograms/m3) (171.30 mumol/m3)]. The following linear correlation was found between benzene concentrations in urine (Cu, ng/L) and benzene concentrations in the breathing zone (Cl, micrograms/m3): log(Cu) = 0.645 x log(Cl) + 1.399 r = .559, n = 110, p < .0001 With exclusion of workers who smoked from the study, the correlation between air benzene concentration and benzene measured in urine was: log(Cu) = 0.872 x log(Cl) + 0.6 r = .763, n = 63, p < .0001 The study results indicate that the urinary level of benzene is an indicator of occupational exposure to benzene.

  19. Crystal structures of N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)benzene­sulfonamide and N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Suchetan, P. A.; Naveen, S.; Lokanath, N. K.; Lakshmikantha, H. N.; Srivishnu, K. S.; Supriya, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of two N-(aryl­sulfon­yl)aryl­amides, namely N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)benzene­sulfonamide, C13H10FNO3S, (I), and N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide, C14H12FNO3S, (II), are described and compared with related structures. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 82.73 (10)° in (I) compared to 72.60 (12)° in (II). In the crystal of (I), the mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions, resulting in a three-dimensional grid-like architecture, while C—H⋯O inter­actions lead to one-dimensional ribbons in (II). The crystals of both (I) and (II) feature strong but non-structure-directing N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with R 2 2(8) ring motifs. The structure of (I) also features π–π stacking inter­actions. PMID:27375856

  20. Personal reflections on 50 years of study of benzene toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Parke, D V

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of benzene is reviewed, and the objectives of a quantitative balance study begun in 1945 are outlined; problems of toxicology and metabolism research of some 50 years ago are considered. The quantitative metabolism of 14C-benzene in the rabbit is annotated and compared with that of unlabeled benzene quantified by nonisotopic methods. The anomalies of phenylmercapturic acid and trans-trans-muconic acid as metabolites of benzene are examined in detail by isotopic and nonisotopic methods; these compounds are true but minor metabolites of benzene. Oxygen radicals are involved in both the metabolism of benzene and its toxicity; the roles of CYP2E1, the redox cycling of quinone metabolites, glutathione oxidation, and oxidative stress in the unique radiomimetic, hematopoietic toxicity of benzene are discussed. Differences between the toxicity of benzene and the halobenzenes are related to fundamental differences in their electronic structures and to the consequent pathways of metabolic activation and detoxication. PMID:9118881

  1. Effect of carbon and hydrogen isotopic substitutions on the thermal diffusion of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal diffusion factor of the benzene/carbon 13 substituted benzene pair and of the benzene/deuterated benzene pair are reported. The results show some interesting effects of mass distribution. (AIP)

  2. Benzene derivatives produced by Fusarium graminearum - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Setshedi, Itumeleng

    2015-06-01

    Using NMR spectroscopy benzene derivatives were detected in mycelia of Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize. In previous studies F. graminearum was found to cause cancer to humans and benzene derivatives were detected in breath of cancer sufferers. Surprisingly, no study found benzene derivatives to be the cancerous agents in F. graminearum. In this study we detected benzene derivatives in F. graminearum and propose to study their role as cancer agents.

  3. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.L.; Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about l.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodcyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks.

  4. Formation of benzene in the interstellar medium

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block—the aromatic benzene molecule—has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3-butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 → C6H6 + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadiene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium. PMID:21187430

  5. Behavioral changes in mice following benzene inhalation.

    PubMed

    Evans, H L; Dempster, A M; Snyder, C A

    1981-01-01

    Although benzene is an important occupational health hazard and a carcinogen, the possibility that behavioral changes may forewarn of the later-occurring hematological changes has not been investigated. A time-sampling protocol was used to quantify the occurrence of 7 categories of behavior in the homecage following daily 6-hr exposures to two strains of adult mice (CD1 and C57BL/6J). The behavioral categories were stereotypic behavior, sleeping, resting, eating, grooming, locomotion, and fighting. The inhalation exposures were designed to reflect occupational exposure. Dynamic vapor exposure techniques in standard inhalation chambers were employed. Exposure to 300 or 900 ppm benzene increased the occurrence of eating and grooming and reduced the number of mice that were sleeping or resting. The responses to benzene of both the CD1 and the C57 strains were similar. The positive findings with benzene inhalation indicate the utility of behavioral investigations into the toxicology of inhaled organic solvents. The methods described herein illustrate an objective observation of animal behavior that is capable of documenting toxicity and of guiding detailed follow-up studies aimed at mechanism of action.

  6. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BENZENE (NONCANCER EFFECTS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene, also known as benzol, is widely used as an industrial solvent, as an intermediate in chemical syntheses, and as a component of gasoline; hence, the potential for human exposure is great. The emphasis of this document is a discussion of the noncancer adverse healt...

  7. Formation of benzene in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brant M; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M; Cordiner, Martin A; Charnley, Steven B

    2011-01-11

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block--the aromatic benzene molecule--has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C(6)H(6)) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3-butadiene, C(2)H + H(2)CCHCHCH(2) → C(6)H(6) + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadiene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium.

  8. Electroencephalographic findings in workers exposed to benzene.

    PubMed

    Kellerová, V

    1985-01-01

    Preventive EEG examination was carried out in 40 workers significantly exposed to benzene. The EEG findings were compared with those of a control group of 48 healthy persons, a group of 110 workers significantly exposed to toluene and xylene and a group of 236 workers exposed to vinyl chloride. The individuals exposed to benzene exhibited 22.5% of abnormal and 45% threshold findings, the abnormalities being episodic, diffuse or a combination of the two. The effect of benzene entailed a frequent (32.5%) occurrence of a characteristic frequency lability. Sleep phenomena were found in a total of 60% cases (37.5% cases reached stage 1 B3 while 15% reached stage 2 according to Roth [14]). The rapid onset of deeper sleep stages (in 30% cases) is considered typical for benzene exposure. The photic driving response often had an extended frequency range (a total of 61.1%, to beta frequencies only in 30.55%, to both beta and theta frequencies also in 30.55% of cases). The different EEG features characteristic of the neurotoxic action of various types of organic solvents make possible a more efficient diagnostics of the effects of these chemicals on the CNS. PMID:4086812

  9. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  10. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  11. Formation of Benzene in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Crim, F. Fleming (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block-the aromatic benzene molecule-has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3- butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 --> C6H6, + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadlene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium.

  12. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  13. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  14. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  15. Chitin nanowhisker-supported sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) proton exchange for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chan; Zhuang, Xupin; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Wei; Cheng, Bowen; Kang, Weimin; Cai, Zhanjun; Li, Mengqin

    2016-04-20

    To balance the relationship among proton conductivity and mechanic strength of sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) (SPES) membrane, chitin nanowhisker-supported nanocomposite membranes were prepared by incorporating whiskers into SPES. The as-prepared chitin whiskers were prepared by 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) mediated oxidation of α-chitin from crab shells. The structure and properties of the composite membranes were examined as proton exchange membrane (PEM). Results showed that chitin nanowhiskers were dispersed incompactly in the SPES matrix. Thermal stability, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of the nanocomposite films were improved from those of the pure SPES film with increasing whisker content, which ascribed to strong interactions between whiskers and between SPES molecules and chitin whiskers via hydrogen bonding. These indicated that composition of filler and matrix got good properties and whisker-supported membranes are promising materials for PEM.

  16. Cycling performance and efficiency of sulfonated poly(sulfone) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soowhan; Yan, Jingling; Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo; Hickner, Michael A.

    2010-11-30

    As an alternative to the expensive Nafion® ion exchange membrane, an inexpensive commercially-available Radel® polymer was sulfonated, fabricated into a thin membrane, and evaluated for its performance in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The sulfonated Radel (S-Radel) membrane showed almost an order of magnitude lower permeability of V (IV) ions (2.07×10-7 cm2/min), compared to Nafion 117 (1.29×10-6 cm2/min), resulting in better coulombic efficiency (~98% vs. 95% at 50 mA/cm2) and lower capacity loss per cycle. Even though the S-Radel membrane had slightly higher membrane resistance, the energy efficiency of the VRFB with the S-Radel membrane was comparable to that of Nafion due to its better coulombic efficiency. The S-Radel membrane exhibited good performance up to 40 cycles, but a decay in performance at later cycles was observed.

  17. Solute-solvent interactions in micellar electrokinetic chromatography. Selectivity of lithium dodecyl sulfate-lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate mixed-micellar buffers.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, E; Ràfols, C; Bosch, E; Rosés, M; Abraham, M H

    2001-01-12

    The solvation parameter model has been applied to the characterization of micellar electrokinetic chromatographic (MEKC) systems with mixtures of lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate as surfactant. The variation in MEKC surfactant composition results in changes in the coefficients of the correlation equation, which in turns leads to information on solute-solvent and solute-micelle interactions. Lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate is more dipolar and hydrogen bond acidic but less polarizable and hydrogen bond basic than lithium dodecyl sulfate. Therefore mixtures of lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate cover a very wide range of polarity and hydrogen bond properties, which in turn results in important selectivity changes for analytes with different solute properties.

  18. Interactions between dodecyl phosphates and hydroxyapatite or tooth enamel: relevance to inhibition of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Jones, Siân B; Barbour, Michele E; Shellis, R Peter; Rees, Gareth D

    2014-05-01

    Tooth surface modification is a potential method of preventing dental erosion, a form of excessive tooth wear facilitated by softening of tooth surfaces through the direct action of acids, mainly of dietary origin. We have previously shown that dodecyl phosphates (DPs) effectively inhibit dissolution of native surfaces of hydroxyapatite (the type mineral for dental enamel) and show good substantivity. However, adsorbed saliva also inhibits dissolution and DPs did not augment this effect, which suggests that DPs and saliva interact at the hydroxyapatite surface. In the present study the adsorption and desorption of potassium and sodium dodecyl phosphates or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to hydroxyapatite and human tooth enamel powder, both native and pre-treated with saliva, were studied by high performance liquid chromatography-mass Spectrometry. Thermo gravimetric analysis was used to analyse residual saliva and surfactant on the substrates. Both DPs showed a higher affinity than SDS for both hydroxyapatite and enamel, and little DP was desorbed by washing with water. SDS was readily desorbed from hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the phosphate head group is essential for strong binding to this substrate. However, SDS was not desorbed from enamel, so that this substrate has surface properties different from those of hydroxyapatite. The presence of a salivary coating had little or no effect on adsorption of the DPs, but treatment with DPs partly desorbed saliva; this could account for the failure of DPs to increase the dissolution inhibition due to adsorbed saliva.

  19. Miscibility of sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the adsorbed film and aggregate.

    PubMed

    Iyota, Hidemi; Krastev, Rumen

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption, micelle formation, and salting out of sodium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of sodium chloride were studied from the viewpoint of their mixed adsorption and aggregate formation. The surface tension of aqueous solutions of a sodium chloride-sodium dodecyl sulfate mixture was measured as a function of the total molality and composition of the mixture. Phase diagrams of adsorption and aggregate formation were obtained by applying thermodynamic equations to the surface tension. Judging from the phase diagrams, sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate are miscible in the adsorbed film at very large composition of sodium chloride and in the salted-out crystalline particle, while they are immiscible in the micelle. The miscibilities in the adsorbed film, micelle, and crystalline particle increase in the following order: particle > adsorbed film > micelle. The difference in miscibility among the oriented states was ascribed to the difference in geometry between the adsorbed film and micelle and to the interaction between bilayer surfaces in the particle.

  20. Film morphology, orientation and performance of dodecyl/carboxyl functional polysiloxane on cotton substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qiufeng; Wang, Kefeng; Jia, Yun

    2011-03-01

    A novel polysiloxane (RCAS) bearing dodecyl and carboxyl side groups was synthesized by reaction of a dodecyl/amino functionalized polysiloxane with maleic anhydride. Film morphology, molecular orientation and performance of the synthesized polysiloxane on cotton substrates were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray photoelectron microscope (XPS) and so on. Affected by the dodecyl and polar carboxyl side groups, RCAS formed a semi hydrophilic, macroscopic smooth but actually uneven siloxane film with many pillar-likes or small humps on the treated substrate surfaces. On the natural cotton surface, RCAS may take such an orientation to form its film that the Si-CH3, Si-C12H25 groups projected outward into air, while the carboxyl groups pointed inward to the substrate, interacting with the hydroxyls of the cotton substrates in ester and hydrogen bonds or twisted away from the negatively charged cotton fiber surface. As a result of such a film-formation, RCAS provided the treated fabric with not only a good wettability of about 22.96 s and a whiteness of 88.44°, but also an improved softness as well as thickening handle.

  1. Complexation between Sodium Poly(styrenesulfonate) and Alkyltrimethylammonium Bromides in the Presence of Dodecyl Maltoside.

    PubMed

    Fegyver, Edit; Mészáros, Róbert

    2015-04-23

    In the present paper, the impact of dodecyl maltoside (C12G2) on the association of sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) with dodecyl- and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromides (DTAB and CTAB) was studied. A low amount of nonionic surfactant enhances the binding of the investigated cationic amphiphiles on PSS, reducing the cationic surfactant-to-polyanion ratio needed for charge neutralization and precipitation. This effect is more pronounced for DTAB than for CTAB due to the considerably higher free surfactant concentration of the former cationic amphiphile. The synergistic surfactant binding also affects the nonequilibrium features of PSS/CTAB association via enhancing the kinetically stable concentration range of overcharged polyion/surfactant nanoparticle dispersions. With increasing C12G2 concentration, however, an opposite effect of the uncharged additive dominates. Namely, the CTAB molecules are solubilized excessively into mixed surfactant micelles, which reduces the surface charge of the PSS/CTAB/C12G2 nanoparticles and thus destabilizes their dispersion. At appropriately large nonionic surfactant concentrations, the binding of CTAB is largely reduced, resulting in the redissolution of the precipitate. In contrast, neither the destabilization nor the resolubilization effects of the added dodecyl maltoside were observed for the PSS/DTAB system due to the much lower driving force of DTAB binding compared to CTAB. Our results clearly demonstrate that the alkyl chain length of the ionic amphiphile has a pronounced effect on both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects of polyion/mixed surfactant complexation which might be further exploited in various next generation applications.

  2. Chemical and Mechanical Degradation of Sulfonated Poly(sulfone) Membranes in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soowhan; Tighe, Timothy B.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Yan, Jingling; Zhang, Jianlu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo; Hickner, Michael A.

    2011-10-01

    A sulfonated poly(sulfone) (S-Radel{reg_sign}) membrane with high proton conductivity and low vanadium ion diffusion showed high initial performance in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) but suffered damage during charge/discharge cycling. The S-Radel membrane had different degradation behaviors in flow cell cycling and ex-situ vanadium ion immersion tests. The S-Radel membrane immersed in V5+ solution cracked into small pieces, but in the VRFB cell, the membrane underwent internal delamination preferentially on the side of the membrane that faced the positive electrode. A vanadium-rich interface was observed near the membrane surface that experienced delamination and Raman spectroscopic analysis of the surfaces of the membrane indicated a slightly depressed 1026 cm-1 band corresponding to the sulfonate SO2 stretch for the degraded surface. Even though the S-Radel membrane underwent severe mechanical damage during the flow cell cycling, significant chemical degradation was not obvious from the spectroscopic analyses. For the VRFB containing an S-Radel membrane, an increase in membrane resistance caused an abnormal voltage depression during the discharge cycle. The reversible increase in membrane resistance and severe mechanical degradation of the membrane during cycling may be attributed repeated formation and dissolution of particles inside the membrane. The mechanical stresses imposed by the particles coupled with a small amount of chemical degradation of the polymer by V5+, are likely degradation mechanisms of the S-Radel membrane in VRFBs under high state-of-charge conditions.

  3. Electrical conductivity of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) based composite membranes containing sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celso, Fabricio; Mikhailenko, Serguei D.; Rodrigues, Marco A. S.; Mauler, Raquel S.; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2016-02-01

    Composite proton exchange membranes (PEMs) intended for fuel cell applications were prepared by embedding of various amounts of dispersed tri-sulfonic acid ethyl POSS (S-Et-POSS) and tri-sulfonic acid butyl POSS (S-Bu-POSS) in thin films of sulfonated poly ether-ether ketone. The electrical properties of the PEMs were studied by Impedance spectroscopy and it was found that their conductivity σ changes with the filler content following a curve with a maximum. The water uptake of these PEMs showed the same dependence. The investigation of initial isolated S-POSS substances revealed the properties of typical electrolytes, which however in both cases possessed low conductivities of 1. 17 × 10-5 S cm-1 (S-Et-POSS) and 3.52 × 10-5 S cm-1 (S-Bu-POSS). At the same time, the insoluble in water S-POSS was found forming highly conductive interface layer when wetted with liquid water and hence producing a strong positive impact on the conductivity of the composite PEM. Electrical properties of the composites were analysed within the frameworks of effective medium theory and bounding models, allowing to evaluate analytically the range of possible conductivity values. It was found that these approaches produced quite good approximation of the experimental data and constituted a fair basis for interpretation of the observed relationship.

  4. Neutron powder diffraction study of perdeuterodimethyl sulfone.

    PubMed

    Ibberson, R M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of perdeuterodimethyl sulfone, (CD(3))(2)SO(2) or C(2)D(6)O(2)S, has been refined at 4.5 K against high-resolution neutron powder diffraction data. The structure determined previously by Sands [Z. Kristallogr. (1963), 119, 245-251] at ambient temperature is shown to remain down to liquid helium temperature, and at 4.5 K the S-C and S-O bond distances are 1.441 (2) and 1.760 (2) A, respectively. The molecules are distorted tetrahedra with C(2v) point symmetry (crystallographic symmetry m2m for S and m for C, O and one D atom) and are linked through a network of weak hydrogen bonds in the C-centred orthorhombic structure.

  5. Reclamation of waste polystyrene by sulfonation

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yasuhito; Kuromiya, Miyuki; Noguchi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Haruo

    1999-06-08

    Waste polystyrene containing additives was converted into a polymeric flocculant by a chemical modification. Specifically, waste polystyrene and waste high-impact polystyrene (HI-PS) containing rubber components or a coloring agent were sulfonated to produce a water-soluble polymer whose molecular weight ranged from 400,000 to 700,000. The polymer provides superior purification of the supernatant after flocculating a kaolin suspension than a conventional polymeric flocculant such as a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (hereafter abbreviate PAA). Moreover, using the polymer and a PAA together provides a higher sedimentation rate and a purer supernatant in the treatment of actual wastewater than using each one separately. A new reclamation technology to convert waste plastic into a functional polymer is reported.

  6. Sulfonated methyl esters of fatty acids in aqueous solutions: Interfacial and micellar properties.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Basheva, Elka S; Ivanova, Veronika I; Petkov, Jordan T

    2015-11-01

    The interest to sulfonated methyl esters of fatty acids (SME) has been growing during the last decade, because these surfactants are considered as an environmentally friendly and renewable alternative of the linear alkyl-benzene sulfonates (LAS). Here, we present a quantitative study on the properties of aqueous SME solutions, and especially on their surface tension isotherms, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and its dependence on the concentration of added NaCl. It is demonstrated that the CMC of an ionic surfactant determined by electrical conductivity is insensitive to the presence of a small nonionic admixture, so that the CMC values determined by conductivity represent the CMC of the pure surfactant. Using SME as an example, we have demonstrated the application of a new and powerful method for determining the physicochemical parameters of the pure ionic surfactant by theoretical data analysis ("computer purification") if the used surfactant sample contains nonionic admixtures, which are present as a rule. This method involves fits of the experimental data for surface tension and conductivity by a physicochemical model based on a system of mass-balance, chemical-equilibrium and electric-double-layer equations, which allows us to determine the adsorption and micellization parameters of C12-, C14-, C16- and C18-SME, as well the fraction of nonionic admixtures (if any). Having determined these parameters, we can further predict the interfacial and micellization properties of the surfactant solutions, such as surface tension, adsorption, degree of counterion binding, and surface electric potential at every surfactant, salt and co-surfactant concentrations.

  7. Sulfonated methyl esters of fatty acids in aqueous solutions: Interfacial and micellar properties.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Basheva, Elka S; Ivanova, Veronika I; Petkov, Jordan T

    2015-11-01

    The interest to sulfonated methyl esters of fatty acids (SME) has been growing during the last decade, because these surfactants are considered as an environmentally friendly and renewable alternative of the linear alkyl-benzene sulfonates (LAS). Here, we present a quantitative study on the properties of aqueous SME solutions, and especially on their surface tension isotherms, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and its dependence on the concentration of added NaCl. It is demonstrated that the CMC of an ionic surfactant determined by electrical conductivity is insensitive to the presence of a small nonionic admixture, so that the CMC values determined by conductivity represent the CMC of the pure surfactant. Using SME as an example, we have demonstrated the application of a new and powerful method for determining the physicochemical parameters of the pure ionic surfactant by theoretical data analysis ("computer purification") if the used surfactant sample contains nonionic admixtures, which are present as a rule. This method involves fits of the experimental data for surface tension and conductivity by a physicochemical model based on a system of mass-balance, chemical-equilibrium and electric-double-layer equations, which allows us to determine the adsorption and micellization parameters of C12-, C14-, C16- and C18-SME, as well the fraction of nonionic admixtures (if any). Having determined these parameters, we can further predict the interfacial and micellization properties of the surfactant solutions, such as surface tension, adsorption, degree of counterion binding, and surface electric potential at every surfactant, salt and co-surfactant concentrations. PMID:26196714

  8. Alkyl phosphonic acids and sulfonic acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Onwo, Wilfred M.; Cronin, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Homologous series of alkyl phosphonic acids and alkyl sulfonic acids, along with inorganic orthophosphate and sulfate, are identified in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite after conversion to their t-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl compounds are observed in both series. Five of the eight possible alkyl phosphonic acids and seven of the eight possible alkyl sulfonic acids through C4 are identified. Abundances decrease with increasing carbon number as observed of other homologous series indigenous to Murchison. Concentrations range downward from approximately 380 nmol/gram in the alkyl sulfonic acid series, and from 9 nmol/gram in the alkyl phosphonic acid series.

  9. Electrochemical Windows of Sulfone-Based Electrolytes for High-Voltage Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Nan; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, Deen

    2011-01-01

    Further development of high-voltage lithium-ion batteries requires electrolytes with electrochemical windows greater than 5 V. Sulfone-based electrolytes are promising for such a purpose. Here we compute the electrochemical windows for experimentally tested sulfone electrolytes by different levels of theory in combination with various solvation models. The MP2 method combined with the polarizable continuum model is shown to be the most accurate method to predict oxidation potentials of sulfone-based electrolytes with mean deviation less than 0.29 V. Mulliken charge analysis shows that the oxidation happens on the sulfone group for ethylmethyl sulfone and tetramethylene sulfone, and on the ether group for ether functionalized sulfones. Large electrochemical windows of sulfone-based electrolytes are mainly contributed by the sulfone group in the molecules which helps lower the HOMO level. This study can help understand the voltage limits imposed by the sulfone-based electrolytes and aid in designing new electrolytes with greater electrochemical windows.

  10. Differential fate of metabolism of a sulfonated azo dye Remazol Orange 3R by plants Aster amellus Linn., Glandularia pulchella (Sweet) Tronc. and their consortium.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Akhil N; Khandare, Rahul V; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2011-06-15

    Plant consortium-AG of Aster amellus Linn. and Glandularia pulchella (Sweet) Tronc. showed complete decolorization of a dye Remazol Orange 3R in 36 h, while individually A. amellus and G. pulchella took 72 and 96 h respectively. Individually A. amellus showed induction in the activities of enzymes veratryl alcohol oxidase and DCIP reductase after degradation of the dye while G. pulchella showed induction of laccase and tyrosinase, indicating their involvement in the dye metabolism. Consortium-AG showed induction in the activities of lignin peroxidase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, tyrosinase and DCIP reductase. Two different sets of induced enzymes from A. amellus and G. pulchella work together in consortium-AG resulting in faster degradation of the dye. The degradation of the dye into different metabolites was confirmed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy analysis identified four metabolites of dye degradation by A. amellus as acetamide, benzene, naphthalene and 3-diazenylnaphthalene-2-sulfonic acid, four metabolites by G. pulchella as acetamide, 3-diazenyl-4-hydroxynaphthalene-2-sulfonic acid, naphthalen-1-ol and (ethylsulfonyl)benzene, while two metabolites by consortium-AG as 2-(phenylsulfonyl)ethanol and N-(naphthalen-2-yl)acetamide. The non-toxic nature of the metabolites of Remazol Orange 3R degradation was revealed by phytotoxicity studies.

  11. Effects of ethanol on benzene degradation under denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoguo; Li, Yunfeng; Hui, Lin; Tan, Ying; Jin, Song

    2009-02-01

    As a popular fuel oxygenate, ethanol frequently co-occurs with petroleum hydrocarbons, including benzene, in groundwater that is contaminated by gasoline. Anaerobic pathways have been identified in benzene biodegradation. Limited reports focus on denitrifying degradation of benzene; however, the role of ethanol in this pathway is unknown. This study investigated the effects of ethanol on benzene degradation under denitrifying condition by using groundwater and sediment samples collected from locations with known history of benzene contamination. Results indicate that benzene can be biodegraded under denitrifying conditions. When concentrations of nitrate were in the range of 480-920 mg/L, there is a critical value in ethanol concentration:Ethanol at concentration less than the critical value enhanced the denitrifying degradation of benzene over a period of time; in contrast, ethanol at concentration higher than the critical value, which was degraded before benzene, demonstrated an inhibitory effect. And the critical value varied with nitrate concentration. It appears that the role of ethanol may be closely associated with its own and nitrate concentrations. Two mathematical equations were established based on the data and may be used to determine if ethanol presents an enhancing or inhibitory effect on denitrification of benzene. The roles of ethanol in COD/NO(3) (-)-N and the subsequent denitrification of benzene were also studied. An optimal COD/NO(3) (-)-N ratio of 1.32 was obtained for this testing system, in which the highest rate of benzene degradation can be achieved under denitrifying conditions.

  12. Refiners have several options for reducing gasoline benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Goelzer, A.R.; Hernandez-Robinson, A. ); Ram, S. ); Chin, A.A. ); Harandi, M.N.; Smith, C.M. )

    1993-09-13

    Although the linkage between gasoline benzene content and evaporative, running, and tailpipe emission is not yet defined, the U.S. 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate a benzene content of less than 1.0 vol% in reformulated gasolines. Likewise, the California Air Resources Board plans to restrict benzene to less than about 0.8 vol %. Mobil Research and Development Corp. and Badger Co. Inc. have developed several alternatives for reducing benzene levels in gasoline. Where benzene extraction is viable and maximum catalytic reformer hydrogen is needed, the companies' cumene and ethylbenzene processes are desirable. Mobil's benzene reduction process can be an alternative to benzene hydrosaturation. All of these processes utilize low-value offgas from the fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit.

  13. Crystal structures of three N-(aryl-sulfon-yl)-4-fluoro-benzamides.

    PubMed

    Suchetan, P A; Naveen, S; Lokanath, N K; Srivishnu, K S; Supriya, G M; Lakshmikantha, H N

    2016-04-01

    The crystal structures of three N-aryl-sulfonyl-4-fluoro-benzamides, namely 4-fluoro-N-(2-methyl-phenyl-sulfon-yl)benzamide, C14H12FNO3S, (I), N-(2-chloro-phenyl-sulfon-yl)-4-fluorobenzamide, C13H9ClFNO3S, (II), and N-(4-chloro-phenyl-sulfon-yl)-4-fluoro-benzamide monohydrate, C13H9ClFNO3S·H2O, (III), are described and compared with related structures. The asymmetric unit of (I) contains two independent mol-ecules (A and B), while that of (II) contains just one mol-ecule, and that of (III) contains a mol-ecule of water in addition to one main mol-ecule. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 82.83 (11)° in mol-ecule A and 85.01 (10)° in mol-ecule B of (I), compared to 89.91 (10)° in (II) and 81.82 (11)° in (III). The crystal structure of (I) features strong N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the A and B mol-ecules, resulting in an R 4 (4)(16) tetra-meric unit. These tetra-meric units are connected into sheets in the bc plane by various C-H⋯O inter-actions, and adjacent sheets are further inter-linked via C-H⋯πar-yl inter-actions, forming a three-dimensional architecture. The crystal structure is further stabilized by πar-yl-πar-yl and S=O⋯πar-yl inter-actions. In the crystal of (II), mol-ecules are connected into R 2 (2)(8) and R 2 (2)(14) dimers via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and C-H⋯O inter-actions, respectively; the dimers are further inter-connected via a weak C=O⋯πar-yl inter-action, leading to the formation of chains along [1-10]. In the crystal of (III), N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving both the main mol-ecule and the solvent water mol-ecule results in the formation of sheets parallel to the bc plane. The sheets are further connected by C-H⋯O inter-actions and weak C-Cl⋯πar-yl, C-F⋯πar-yl and S=O⋯πar-yl inter-actions, forming a three-dimensional architecture.

  14. Uptake and distribution of sup 203 Hg by fish fingerlings, Cirrhina mrigala, exposed to linear alkyl benzene sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, V.; Kumar, V.; Pandey, S.D.; Viswanathan, P.N. )

    1989-07-01

    Ecological changes caused by the continued pollution of the aquatic environment by chemicals through industrial effluents and domestic sewage and emanations settling into water pose grave concern. Synthetic detergents are one of the most important in this respect since they find their way into aquatic ecosystems thereby affecting the food chain. Earlier studies with diverse aquatic fauna and flora suggested the potential ecotoxicological impact of synthetic detergents. A large number of reports are available on the pollutants toxic to fish. Fish are known to accumulate mercury by virtue of efficient uptake and slow rate of elimination. Mercury also causes morphological and physiological defects with consequent behavioral abnormalities in fish. Even though in actual situations the stress to the ecosystem is caused by a mixture of pollutants, the interactive effect of two or more pollutants present together is poorly understood. Also, in the presence of one toxicant, the capacity of the ecosystem to deal with others can be impaired so that even biodegradable water pollutants may tend to accumulate. Therefore, an attempt has been made to study the uptake and distribution of mercury in presence and absence of detergent to test for any combined effects.

  15. Structure-Property Relationships in Sulfonated Pentablock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Hong; Willis, Carl; Winey, Karen I.

    2011-03-01

    Membranes of pentablock copolymers consisting of poly(tert-butyl styrene) (TBS), hydrogenated polyisoprene (HI), and partially sulfonated poly(styrene-ran-styrene sulfonate) (SS) were studied using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TBS-HI-SS-HI-TBS pentablock copolymer in solution forms spherical micelles with a core of SS and a corona of solvated HI and TBS. The spherical micelles in solution compact as the solvent evaporates and some of SS cores merge to form interconnected SS microdomains without substantially changing their shape. The number of connections increases with the volume fraction of the SS block, which increases with sulfonation level. The structure does not have long-range order, because strong ionic interactions prevent extensive rearrangement. The morphologies of the sulfonated pentablock copolymers will be correlated with their transport properties.

  16. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  17. Risk analysis for worker exposure to benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, William H.; Flowers, Roxanne E.

    1992-05-01

    Cancer risk factors (characterized by route, dose, dose rate per kilogram, fraction of lifetime exposed, species, and sex) were derived for workers exposed to benzene via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure at the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) and at leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites were evaluated. At the current PEL of 1 ppm, the theoretical lifetime excess risk of cancer from benzene inhalation is ten per 1000. The theoretical lifetime excess risk for worker inhalation exposure at LUST sites ranged from 10 to 40 per 1000. These results indicate that personal protection should be required. The theoretical lifetime excess risk due to soil ingestion is five to seven orders of magnitude less than the inhalation risks.

  18. Benzene inhalation produces leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Cronkite, E P; Bullis, J; Inoue, T; Drew, R T

    1984-09-15

    Female C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 300 ppm benzene 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 16 weeks and then held for lifetime observation. Sixty-four weeks after commencement of the study, 10 of 90 exposed mice had died as opposed to only 1 of 88 controls. Of the 10 exposed mice that died, 6 had thymic lymphomas, 2 had unspecified lymphomas, 1 was killed when moribund and found leukemia-free, and 1 was undiagnosed due to autolysis and partial cannibalization. The single dead control animal did not have lymphoma or leukemia. These data provide proof of the leukemogenicity of benzene in female C57Bl/6 mice.

  19. Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Huwiler, Simona G; Kung, Johannes W; Weidenweber, Sina; Hellwig, Petra; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Biskup, Till; Weber, Stefan; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Ermler, Ulrich; Boll, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    In chemical synthesis, the widely used Birch reduction of aromatic compounds to cyclic dienes requires alkali metals in ammonia as extremely low-potential electron donors. An analogous reaction is catalyzed by benzoyl-coenzyme A reductases (BCRs) that have a key role in the globally important bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds at anoxic sites. Because of the lack of structural information, the catalytic mechanism of enzymatic benzene ring reduction remained obscure. Here, we present the structural characterization of a dearomatizing BCR containing an unprecedented tungsten cofactor that transfers electrons to the benzene ring in an aprotic cavity. Substrate binding induces proton transfer from the bulk solvent to the active site by expelling a Zn(2+) that is crucial for active site encapsulation. Our results shed light on the structural basis of an electron transfer process at the negative redox potential limit in biology. They open the door for biological or biomimetic alternatives to a basic chemical synthetic tool.

  20. Metatranscriptome of an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture reveals involvement of carboxylation in benzene ring activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Gitiafroz, Roya; Devine, Cheryl E; Gong, Yunchen; Hug, Laura A; Raskin, Lutgarde; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-01

    The enzymes involved in the initial steps of anaerobic benzene catabolism are not known. To try to elucidate this critical step, a metatranscriptomic analysis was conducted to compare the genes transcribed during the metabolism of benzene and benzoate by an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. RNA was extracted from the mixed culture and sequenced without prior mRNA enrichment, allowing simultaneous examination of the active community composition and the differential gene expression between the two treatments. Ribosomal and mRNA sequences attributed to a member of the family Peptococcaceae from the order Clostridiales were essentially only detected in the benzene-amended culture samples, implicating this group in the initial catabolism of benzene. Genes similar to each of two subunits of a proposed benzene-carboxylating enzyme were transcribed when the culture was amended with benzene. Anaerobic benzoate degradation genes from strict anaerobes were transcribed only when the culture was amended with benzene. Genes for other benzoate catabolic enzymes and for nitrate respiration were transcribed in both samples, with those attributed to an Azoarcus species being most abundant. These findings indicate that the mineralization of benzene starts with its activation by a strict anaerobe belonging to the Peptococcaceae, involving a carboxylation step to form benzoate. These data confirm the previously hypothesized syntrophic association between a benzene-degrading Peptococcaceae strain and a benzoate-degrading denitrifying Azoarcus strain for the complete catabolism of benzene with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor.

  1. Metatranscriptome of an Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture Reveals Involvement of Carboxylation in Benzene Ring Activation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fei; Gitiafroz, Roya; Devine, Cheryl E.; Gong, Yunchen; Hug, Laura A.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the initial steps of anaerobic benzene catabolism are not known. To try to elucidate this critical step, a metatranscriptomic analysis was conducted to compare the genes transcribed during the metabolism of benzene and benzoate by an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. RNA was extracted from the mixed culture and sequenced without prior mRNA enrichment, allowing simultaneous examination of the active community composition and the differential gene expression between the two treatments. Ribosomal and mRNA sequences attributed to a member of the family Peptococcaceae from the order Clostridiales were essentially only detected in the benzene-amended culture samples, implicating this group in the initial catabolism of benzene. Genes similar to each of two subunits of a proposed benzene-carboxylating enzyme were transcribed when the culture was amended with benzene. Anaerobic benzoate degradation genes from strict anaerobes were transcribed only when the culture was amended with benzene. Genes for other benzoate catabolic enzymes and for nitrate respiration were transcribed in both samples, with those attributed to an Azoarcus species being most abundant. These findings indicate that the mineralization of benzene starts with its activation by a strict anaerobe belonging to the Peptococcaceae, involving a carboxylation step to form benzoate. These data confirm the previously hypothesized syntrophic association between a benzene-degrading Peptococcaceae strain and a benzoate-degrading denitrifying Azoarcus strain for the complete catabolism of benzene with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. PMID:24795366

  2. Benzene contamination at a metal plating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, B. A.; Burston, M. R.

    2005-08-01

    A metal plating facility in central Kentucky was required to complete a RCRA Facility Investigation to address a number of Solid Waste Management Units at the site. Twenty monitoring wells were installed at the facility. Ground water from the wells was sampled for total and dissolved metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid extractable compounds, base neutral compounds, and volatile organic compounds. Unexpectedly, relatively large concentrations of benzene, up to 120 μg/l, were detected in samples from some of the wells, including wells that should have been hydraulically upgradient from the facility. As a result of the detection of benzene, the facility completed an investigation to identify the source. A nearby facility had completed a gasoline underground storage tank (UST) closure at about the time of the installation of the 20 wells. Reportedly the UST had small holes when removed. Three potential pathways of migration (a ditch, sanitary sewer, and a sink hole) from the nearby facility to the metal-plating facility and residual soils with very large concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes have been identified.

  3. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. PTEN methylation involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zuo, Xin; Bai, Wenlin; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that benzene is a hematotoxic carcinogen. PTEN promoter methylation is a representative example of transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. However, the effect of PTEN methylation on benzene-induced hematotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, the animal model of benzene hematotoxicity was successfully established. WBC significantly decreased in experimental groups (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the weight of rats increased slowly and even declined with increasing doses of benzene in the benzene-treated groups. An increase in the level of PTEN methylation was observed in the low dose group, and PTEN methylation level increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, it was interesting that PTEN mRNA expression increased in the low dose group, but declined with increasing doses of benzene. The decrease of tumor suppressor function caused by PTEN methylation may be an important mechanism of benzene hematotoxicity. Furthermore, lymphoblast cell line F32 was incubated by benzene and then treated with 5-aza and TSA, alone or in combination. A dramatic decrease in the PTEN mRNA expression and a significant increase of PTEN methylation level in benzene-treated cells were also shown. PTEN mRNA expression was up regulated and PTEN methylation level was reduced by the epigenetic inhibitors, 5-aza and TSA. In conclusion, PTEN methylation is involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity through suppressing PTEN mRNA expression.

  5. Attenuation of aqueous benzene in soils under saturated flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J; Yun, S-T

    2006-01-01

    The fate of aqueous benzene in subsurface was investigated in this study, focusing on the role of sorption and biodegradation on the benzene attenuation under dynamic flow conditions. Two sets of column tests were conducted in Plexiglass flow cells packed uniformly with sandy aquifer materials. The first set of the experiment was conducted with a step-type injection of benzene with different powder activated carbon (PAC) contents: (1) PAC = 0 %; (2) PAC = 0.5 %; (3) PAC = 2.0%. The second set was performed as a pulse-type with different test conditions: (4) benzene; (5) benzene and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa); (6) benzene and bacteria (P. aeruginosa) with hydrogen peroxide. In addition, numerical experiments were performed to examine the role of sorption processes on the benzene attenuation. In the step mode experiments, the KCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) reached the input concentration while the benzene BTCs were considerably lower than those of KCl with slight retardation for all cases, indicating that both reversible/retardation and irreversible sorption occurred. The pulse type tests showed that attenuation of benzene increased in the presence of bacteria due to biodegradation. The benzene attenuation by microbial degradation increased furthermore in the presence of hydrogen peroxide owing to sufficient supply of dissolved oxygen in soil column. Numerical experiments demonstrated that retardation could not contribute to the attenuation of benzene in soils but could only extend its breakthrough time. Experimental results indicated that aqueous benzene could be attenuated by irreversible sorption and biodegradation during transport through the subsurface. Additionally, the attenuation of aqueous benzene is closely related to organic carbon content and oxygen level existing in contaminated aquifers.

  6. Detection of Connexins in Liver Cells Using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis and Immunoblot Analysis.

    PubMed

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Since connexin expression is partly regulated at the protein level, immunoblot analysis represents a frequently addressed technique in the connexin research field. The present chapter describes the setup of an immunoblot procedure, including protein extraction and quantification from biological samples, gel electrophoresis, protein transfer, and immunoblotting, which is optimized for analysis of connexins in liver tissue. In essence, proteins are separated on a polyacrylamide gel using sodium dodecyl sulfate followed by transfer of proteins on a nitrocellulose membrane. The latter allows specific detection of connexins with antibodies combined with revelation through enhanced chemiluminescence. PMID:27207285

  7. Heme degradation upon production of endogenous hydrogen peroxide via interaction of hemoglobin with sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Salehi, N; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Fotouhi, L; Yousefinejad, S; Shourian, M; Hosseinzadeh, R; Sheibani, N; Habibi-Rezaei, M

    2014-04-01

    In this study the hemoglobin heme degradation upon interaction with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was investigated using UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate curve resolution analysis, and chemiluminescence method. Our results showed that heme degradation occurred during interaction of hemoglobin with SDS producing three fluorescent components. We showed that the hydrogen peroxide, produced during this interaction, caused heme degradation. In addition, the endogenous hydrogen peroxide was more effective in hemoglobin heme degradation compared to exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. The endogenous form of hydrogen peroxide altered oxyHb to aquamethemoglobin and hemichrome at low concentration. In contrast, the exogenous hydrogen peroxide lacked this ability under same conditions.

  8. Multilayer films from phenolic resin-sodium dodecyl sulfate complex and polycations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Cao, Weixiao; Xu, Jian

    2002-05-01

    Novel multilayer ultrathin films of PR-SDS-PC were fabricated by employing the complex of phenolic resin (PR) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a "complex polyanion" and various polycations (PCs). The resulting films were etched quickly when being immersed in polar organic solvents due to the weak hydrophobic interaction between PR and SDS. By employing the photosensitive diazo resin (DR) as PC, the stability of the PR-SDS-DR film increases significantly after UV irradiation, because a covalent crosslinking structure forms in the film. PMID:16290572

  9. N-Cyclo­dodecyl-5-(dimethyl­amino)­naphthalene-1-sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Conrad; Gruber, Tobias; Seichter, Wilhelm; Weber, Edwin; Ibragimov, Bakhtiyar T.

    2008-01-01

    The molecule of the title compound, C24H36N2O2S, displays a U-shaped conformation. The prominent inter­molecular inter­actions are N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in the formation of dimers. Additional C—H⋯π contacts involving one of the methyl­ene groups of the macrocycle and the naphthalene rings of a neighbouring mol­ecule stabilize the packing structure. In the crystal structure, the cyclo­dodecyl ring is disordered over two positions; the site occupancy factors are ca 0.86 and 0.14. PMID:21202844

  10. Syntheses and structures of a series of uranyl phosphonates and sulfonates: an insight into their correlations and discrepancies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiting; Tian, Tao; Wu, Hong-Yue; Pan, Qing-Jiang; Dang, Song; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Six uranyl phosphonates and sulfonates have been hydrothermally synthesized, namely, (H2tib)[(UO2)3(PO3C6H5)4]·2H2O (UPhP-1), Zn(pi)2(UO2)(PO3C6H5)2 (UPhP-2), Zn(dib)(UO2)(PO3C6H5)2·2H2O (UPhP-3), (HTEA)[(UO2)(5-SP)] (USP-1), (Hdib)2[(UO2)2(OH)(O)(5-SP)] (USP-2), and Zn(phen)3(UO2)2(3-SP)2 (USP-3) (tib = 1,3,5-tri(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzene, pi = 1-phenyl-1H-imidazole, dib = 1,4-di(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzene, TEA = triethylamine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, 5-SP = 5-sulfoisophthalic acid, and 3-SP = 3-sulfoisophthalic acid). UPhP-1 has been determined to be a layered structure constructed by UO7 pentagonal bipyramids, UO6 octahedra, and phenylphosphonates. Protonated tib plays a role in balancing the negative charge and holding its structure together. UPhP-2 is made up of UO6 octahedra, ZnO2N2 tetrahedra and PO3C tetrahedra in phenylphosphonates, forming a 1D assembly, which is stabilized by chelate phen ligand. Further connection of such chainlike structure via dib yields a 2D layered architecture of UPhP-3. Although sulfonate group possesses similar tetrahedral structure as the phosphonate group, a unidentated coordination mode is only found in this work. UO7 pentagonal bipyramids are linked by 5-SP to form the layered assembly of USP-1. USP-2 also consists of the same sulfonate ligand, but features tetranulear uranyl clusters. Similarly, protonated TEA and dib molecules enable stabilization of their structures, respectively. Formed by dinuclear uranyl cluster and 3-SP ligand, USP-3 appears as a 1D arrangement, in which Zn(phen)3 acts as the counterion to compensate the negative charge. All of these compounds have been characterized by IR and photoluminescent spectroscopy. Their characteristic emissions have been attributed as transition properties of uranyl cations.

  11. At-line benzene monitor for measuring benzene in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, W.J.

    1992-10-14

    A highly accurate and repeatable at-line benzene monitor (ALBM) has been developed to measure the benzene concentration in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) in the DWPF. This analyzer was conceived and jointly developed within SRTC by the Analytical Development and the Defense Waste Process Technology Sections with extensive support from the Applied Statistics Group and the TNX Operations Section. It is recommended that an ALBM specifically adapted to DWPF analytical requirements be used to measure benzene in PHA; calibrations be performed using a 10% methanol solution matrix (for standard stability); and based on experience gained in development at TNX, the services of ADS and ASG be employed to both adapt the ALBM to DWPF requirements and develop statistical control procedures.

  12. Benzene-RISc: The development and performance of an immunoassay to detect benzene in water

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.B.; Withers, T.; Almond, R.; Stewart, T.; Allen, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Immunoassay methods have become available for environmental applications. Their simplicity, reliability, and ability to provide information rapidly and on-site is enhancing the efficiency of many field and laboratory programs. Immunoassay methods rely upon antibody molecules to provide the sensitivity and specificity characteristics they exhibit, but many molecules are either insufficiently immunogenic or structurally unremarkable to induce an appropriate antibody response. Such compounds are usually considered to be incompatible with the development of an immunoassay method. An immunoassay method for the detection of benzene in water would have utility in detecting contamination from spills and leaking underground storage tanks. Benzene, however, is frequently considered to be in the class of compounds considered to be incompatible with antibody, and therefore immunoassay, development. The authors have developed an immunoassay for the detection of benzene in water by developing both sample processing and immunochemical procedures and reagents that overcome the technical limitations frequently encountered.

  13. Ion Exchange Formation via Sulfonated Bicomponent Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Hannah L.

    For many years ion exchange resins were used to: remove heavy metals from water, recover materials from wastewater, and eliminate harmful gases from the air. While use of these resin beads dominates the ion exchange industry, the beads have limitations that should be considered when decisions are made to employ them. For instance, officials must balance the inherent zero sum surface area and porosity of the materials. This series of studies investigates the use of bicomponent nonwovens as a base substrate for producing high surface area ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metal ions. Functionalized materials were produced in a two-step process: (1) PET/PE spunbond bicomponent fibers were fractured completely, producing the high surface area nonwoven to be used as the base ion exchange material, and (2) the conditions for functionalizing the PET fibers of the nonwoven webs were investigated where an epoxy containing monomer was grafted to the surface followed by sulfonation of the monomer. The functionalization reactions of the PET fibers were monitored based on: weight gain, FTIR, TOF-SIMS, and SEM. Ion exchange properties were evaluated using titration and copper ion removal capacity from test solutions. The relationship between web structure and removal efficiency of the metal ions was defined through a comparison of the bicomponent and homocomponent nonwovens for copper ion removal efficiency. The investigation revealed that utilizing the high surface area, fractured bicomponent nonwoven ion exchange materials with capacities comparable to commercially available ion exchange resins could be produced.

  14. Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration on the photocatalytic activity and dielectric properties of intercalated sodium dodecyl sulfate into Zn–Cd–Al layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Abdullah Ahmed Ali; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS were synthesized with different SDS concentrations. • Photocatalytic activity of samples was improved by increasing SDS concentration. • Dielectric response of LDH can be described by anomalous low frequency dispersion. • The dc conductivity values were calculated for Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS samples. • ESR spectra exhibited the successful intercalation of DS molecule into LDH gallery. - Abstract: Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been successfully intercalated into Zn–Cd–Al–LDH precursor with different SDS concentrations (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 1 mol L{sup −1}) using the coprecipitation method at (Zn{sup 2+} + Cd{sup 2+})/Al{sup 3+} molar ratio of 13 and pH 8. The structural, morphological, texture and composition properties of the synthesized (Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS) nanostructure were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), respectively. The photocatalytic activity of these materials was developed by increasing the concentration of intercalated SDS. The absorbance spectra have been used to detect an anion in the LDH interlayer before and after the intercalation process, which confirmed the presence of the dodecyl sulfate (DS{sup −}) anion into LDH gallery after intercalation. The anomalous low frequency dispersion (ALFD) has been used to describe the dielectric response of Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS nanostructure using the second type of universal power law. At low frequency, the polarization effect of electrodes caused the rising in dielectric constant and loss values. An important result of the dielectric measurements is the calculated dc conductivity values, which are new in dielectric spectroscopy of LDH materials. An important result of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra exhibited the successful intercalation of DS molecule into LDH gallery. The g-factor value was affected by

  15. Effect of 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium Halide on the Relative Stability between Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelles and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Poly(ethylene oxide) Nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriel M Dias; Ferreira, Guilherme M Dias; Agudelo, Álvaro J Patiño; Hespanhol da Silva, Maria C; Rezende, Jaqueline de Paula; Pires, Ana Clarissa Dos Santos; da Silva, Luis Henrique Mendes

    2015-12-24

    It is well-known that ionic liquids (ILs) alter the properties of aqueous systems containing only surfactants. However, the effect of ILs on polymer-surfactant systems is still unknown. Here, the effect of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (bmimBr) and chloride (bmimCl) on the micellization of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and its interaction with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was evaluated using conductimetry, fluorimetry, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The ILs decreased the critical micellar concentration (cmc) of the surfactant, stabilizing the SDS micelles. A second critical concentration (c2thc) was verified at high SDS concentrations, due to the micelle size decrease. The stability of PEO/SDS aggregates was also affected by ILs, and the critical aggregation concentration (cac) of SDS increased. Integral aggregation enthalpy changed from -0.72 in water to 2.16 kJ mol(-1) in 4.00 mM bmimBr. IL anions did not affect the SDS micellization or the beginning of PEO/SDS aggregation. Nevertheless, when chloride was replaced with bromide, the amount of SDS bound to the polymer increased. At 100.0 mM IL, the PEO-SDS interaction vanished. We suggest that the effect of ILs comes from participating in the structure of the formed aggregates, interacting with the SDS monomers at the core/interface of the micelles, and promoting preferential solvation of the polymer.

  16. Synthesis and Properties of Dodecyl Trehaloside Detergents for Membrane Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Houchao; Fu, Yu; Thompson, Aaron; Lee, Sung Chang; Mahoney, Nicholas; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhang, Qinghai

    2012-01-01

    Sugar-based detergents, mostly derived from maltose or glucose, prevail in the extraction, solubilization, stabilization and crystallization of membrane proteins. Inspired by the broad use of trehalose for protecting biological macromolecules and lipid bilayer structures, we synthesized new trehaloside detergents for potential applications in membrane protein research. We devised an efficient synthesis of four dodecyl trehalosides, each with the 12-carboned alkyl chain attached to different hydroxyl groups of trehalose, thus presenting a structurally diverse but related family of detergents. The detergent physical properties, including solubility, hydrophobicity, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and size of micelles, were evaluated and compared with the most popular maltoside analog, β- D-dodecylmaltoside (DDM), which varied from each other due to distinct molecular geometries and possible polar group interactions in resulting micelles. Crystals of 2-dodecyl trehaloside (2-DDTre) were also obtained in methanol, and the crystal packing revealed multiple H-bonded interactions among adjacent trehalose groups. The few trehaloside detergents were tested for the solubilization and stabilization of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptor (ORL1) and MsbA, which belong to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and ATP-binding cassette transporter families, respectively. Our results demonstrated the utility of trehaloside detergents as membrane protein solubilization reagents with the optimal detergents being protein dependent. Continuing development and investigations of trehaloside detergents are attractive given their interesting and unique chemical-physical properties and potential interactions with membrane lipids. PMID:22780816

  17. Beyond the detergent effect: a binding site for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in mammalian apoferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Renyu Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Mortazavi, Shirin R.; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2012-05-01

    Using X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) binds specifically to a pre-formed internal cavity in horse-spleen apoferritin. Although sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is widely used as an anionic detergent, it can also exert specific pharmacological effects that are independent of the surfactant properties of the molecule. However, structural details of how proteins recognize SDS are scarce. Here, it is demonstrated that SDS binds specifically to a naturally occurring four-helix bundle protein: horse apoferritin. The X-ray crystal structure of the apoferritin–SDS complex was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Å and revealed that the SDS binds in an internal cavity that has previously been shown to recognize various general anesthetics. A dissociation constant of 24 ± 9 µM at 293 K was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. SDS binds in this cavity by bending its alkyl tail into a horseshoe shape; the charged SDS head group lies in the opening of the cavity at the protein surface. This crystal structure provides insights into the protein–SDS interactions that give rise to binding and may prove useful in the design of novel SDS-like ligands for some proteins.

  18. Mechanism of denaturation of bovine serum albumin by dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Bordbar, A K; Taleshi, A A; Naderimanesh, H M; Ghadam, P

    1996-09-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) denaturation has been extensively studied by different anionic and cationic surfactant. Dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) is a cationic surfactant, and it is suggested that it binds to the C-terminal section of BSA. In the present study, the thermodynamical denaturation of BSA by dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) has been studied with various experimental techniques. Equilibrium dialysis, thermal denaturation, gel electrophoresis, titration microcalorimetry at pH 7, I = 0.005, and different temperatures were all performed. The enthalpy obtained from the van't Hoff relation and calorimetry method as well as electrophoresis results were utilized to explain the BSA tranistion state. Major findings included: the binding isotherm shifts at a low free concentrations of DTAB and at a higher temperature suggest endothermicity for enthalpy of interaction; the calorimetry enthalpy (delta Hcal) of interaction was smaller than the van't Hoff enthalpy (delta HvH) for BSA-DTAB interaction; and the aggregation of BSA increased with increasing DTAB concentration. This study suggests that BSA unfolding induced by DTAB follows a multistate transition model and does not follow the two-state mechanism assumed for most single subunit proteins.

  19. Study of sodium dodecyl sulfate-poly(propylene oxide) methacrylate mixed micelles.

    PubMed

    Bastiat, Guillaume; Grassl, Bruno; Khoukh, Abdel; François, Jeanne

    2004-07-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-poly(propylene oxide) methacrylate (PPOMA) (of molecular weight M(w) = 434 g x mol(-1)) mixtures have been studied using conductimetry, static light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, and 1H NMR. It has been shown that SDS and PPOMA form mixed micelles, and SDS and PPOMA aggregation numbers, N(ag SDS) and N(ag PPOMA), have been determined. Total aggregation numbers of the micelles (N(ag SDS) + N(ag PPOMA)) and those of SDS decrease upon increasing the weight ratio R = PPOMA/SDS. Localization of PPOMA inside the mixed micelles is considered (i) using 1H NMR to localize the methacrylate function at the hydrophobic core-water interface and (ii) by studying the SDS-PPO micellar system (whose M(w) = 400 g x mol(-1)). Both methods have indicated that the PPO chain of the macromonomer is localized at the SDS micelle surface. Models based on the theorical prediction of the critical micellar concentration of mixed micelles and structural model of swollen micelles are used to confirm the particular structure proposed for the SDS-PPOMA system, i.e., the micelle hydrophobic core is primarily composed of the C12 chains of the sodium dodecyl sulfate, the hydrophobic core-water interface is made up of the SDS polar heads as well as methacrylate functions of the PPOMA, the PPO chains of the macromonomer are adsorbed preferentially on the surface, i.e., on the polar heads of the SDS.

  20. n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside specifically competes with general anesthetics for anesthetic binding sites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longhe; Matsunaga, Felipe; Xi, Jin; Li, Min; Ma, Jingyuan; Liu, Renyu

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) specifically interacts with the anesthetic binding site in horse spleen apoferritin, a soluble protein which models anesthetic binding sites in receptors. This raises the possibility of other detergents similarly interacting with and occluding such sites from anesthetics, thereby preventing the proper identification of novel anesthetic binding sites. n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside (DDM) is a non-ionic detergent commonly used during protein-anesthetic studies because of its mild and non-denaturing properties. In this study, we demonstrate that SDS and DDM occupy anesthetic binding sites in the model proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and horse spleen apoferritin and thereby inhibit the binding of the general anesthetics propofol and isoflurane. DDM specifically interacts with HSA (Kd = 40 μM) with a lower affinity than SDS (Kd = 2 μM). DDM exerts all these effects while not perturbing the native structures of either model protein. Computational calculations corroborated the experimental results by demonstrating that the binding sites for DDM and both anesthetics on the model proteins overlapped. Collectively, our results indicate that DDM and SDS specifically interact with anesthetic binding sites and may thus prevent the identification of novel anesthetic sites. Special precaution should be taken when undertaking and interpreting results from protein-anesthetic investigations utilizing detergents like SDS and DDM.

  1. Structure Formation in Salt-Free Solutions of Amphiphilic Sulfonated Polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaller, Michael; Koehler, Werner

    2000-03-01

    Self-assembled systems have long attracted attention due to their practical importance in many technical and biological fields. Dodecyl-substituted poly(para-phenylen)sulfonates (abbreviated PPPS) are highly charged polyelectrolytes which in the uncharged state have been investigated extensively and an intrinsic persistence length of 15 nm has been reported. Due to their hydrophobic side chains, PPPS are compatible with water only as micellar aggregates and tend to form supramolecular structures even at concentrations as low as 10-5mol_mon.units/l. Because of the rodlike conformation of PPPS, this self-assembly leads to aggregates of anisotropic shape. Therefore, depolarized light scattering was employed to yield complementary information about structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. Aqueous solutions of PPPS at room temperature undergo a structural transition at a critical concentration of c_crit.=0.016 g/l. This transition is characterized by a strong increase of scattered intensity in forward direction and dynamic depolarized scattering. Above c_crit. the cylindrical micelles (L=310 nm, d=3.1 nm, N_radial=12) self assembly into large ellipsoidal clusters of size in the μ m range. Due to the strong increase of depolarized scattered intensity there has to be a preferential orientation of the micelles inside those clusters, which thus represent a lyotropic mesophase. By combining static and dynamic light scattering for the low q-range as well as small angle x-ray scattering for the higher q-range it is possible to determine size and shape of each aggregation step. Decreasing the molecular weight of the PPPS has profound influence on the micellar length and hence on c_crit. which is close to the overlap concentration (c ~ 1/L^3) allowing for the observation of the polyelectrolyte effect.

  2. Ionic Liquid-Induced Unprecedented Size Enhancement of Aggregates within Aqueous Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Rewa; Baker, Gary A; Behera, Kamalakanta; Mohanty, Pravakar; Kurur, Narayanan; Pandey, Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of aqueous micellar solutions may change in the presence of ionic liquids (ILs). Micelles help to increase the aqueous solubility of ILs. The average size of the micellar aggregates within aqueous sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) is observed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to increase in a sudden and drastic fashion as the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) is added. Similar addition of [bmim][PF6] to aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) results in only a slow gradual increase in average aggregate size. While addition of the IL [bmim][BF4] also gives rise to sudden aggregate size enhancement within aqueous SDBS, the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([emim][BF4]), and inorganic salts NaPF6 and NaBF4, only gradually increase the assembly size upon their addition. Bulk dynamic viscosity, microviscosity, dipolarity (indicated by the fluorescent reporter pyrene), zeta potential, and electrical conductance measurements were taken to gain insight into this unusual size enhancement. It is proposed that bmim cations of the IL undergo Coulombic attractive interactions with anionic headgroups at the micellar surface at all [bmim][PF6] concentrations in aqueous SDS; in aqueous SDBS, beyond a critical IL concentration, bmim becomes involved in cation- interaction with the phenyl moiety of SDBS within micellar aggregates with the butyl group aligned along the alkyl chain of the surfactant. This relocation of bmim results in an unprecedented size increase in micellar aggregates. Aromaticity of the IL cation alongside the presence of sufficiently aliphatic (butyl or longer) alkyl chains on the IL appear to be essential for this dramatic critical expansion in self-assembly dimensions within aqueous SDBS.

  3. Which one is preferred: Myers-Saito cyclization of ene-yne-allene or Garratt-Braverman cyclization of conjugated bisallenic sulfone? A theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Basak, Amit; Das, Sanket; Mallick, Dibyendu; Jemmis, Eluvathingal D

    2009-11-01

    A competitive scenario between Myers-Saito (MS) and Garratt-Braverman (GB) cyclization has been created in a molecule. High-level computations indicate a preference for GB over MS cyclization. The activation energies for the rate-determining steps of the GB and MS cyclizations were found to be the same (24.4 kcal/mol) at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory; thus, from the kinetic point of view, both reactions are feasible. However, the main biradical intermediate GB2 of the GB reaction is 6.2 kcal/mol lower in energy than the biradical MS2, which is the main intermediate of MS reaction, so GB cyclization is thermodynamically favored over MS cyclization. To verify the prediction by computational techniques, bisenediynyl sulfones 1-4 and bisenediynyl sulfoxide 17 were synthesized. Under basic conditions, these molecules isomerized to a system possessing both the ene-yne-allene and the bisallenic sulfone. The isolation of only one product, identified as the corresponding naphthalene- or benzene-fused sulfone 8-11, indicated the occurrence of GB cyclization as the sole reaction pathway. No product corresponding to the MS cyclization pathway could be isolated. Though the theoretical prediction showed a preference for the GB pathway over the MS pathway, the exclusive preference for GB over MS cyclization is very striking. Further analysis showed that the intramolecular self-quenching nature of the GB pathway may play an important role in the complete preference for this reaction. Apart from the mechanistic studies, these sulfones showed DNA cleavage activity that had an inverse relation with the reactivity order. Our findings are important for the design of artificial DNA-cleaving agents.

  4. Biofiltration control of VOC emissions: Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory studies were conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane and benzene from air streams using activated sludge-treated compost biofilters. Four types of experimental biofilter systems were developed: a bench scale packed tower system used primarily for kinetic studies; a small scale column system used to study the effects of different filter media on n-butane removal; a three stage system used to study benzene elimination; and a static batch biofilter system used to study the effects of temperature, compost water content, compost pH, and initial benzene concentrations on benzene elimination. Removal efficiencies greater than 90% were obtained for n-butane. Removal followed first order kinetics at inlet concentrations less than 25 ppM n-butane and zero order kinetics above 100 ppM n-butane. Removal of benzene followed fractional order kinetics for inlet concentrations from 15 to 200 ppM benzene. Thus, the removal of benzene is both mass transfer and bioreaction limited for the concentration range studied. The removal efficiency of benzene was found to be highly dependent on compost water content, compost pH, and temperature. Compost showed a low capacity for benzene removal, which suggested that degradation of these hydrocarbons required different species of microorganisms.

  5. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of... not include the volume and benzene content of the oxygenate in any compliance calculations or...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  16. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. This paper describes a long-term (26 week) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 1) the length of exposure, and it describes three 8-week experiments relating concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 2) their concentration in soil 3) the soil organic matter content and, 4) the degree of chlorination. In the 26-week experiment, the concentration of 1,2,4 - trichlorobenzene in earthworms fluctuated only slightly about a mean of 0.63 ppm (Fig. 1). Although a statistically significant decrease can be demonstrated over the test (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.62 p < 0.05), the decrease was minor. Hexachlorobenzene in earthworms showed a cyclical trend that coincided with replacement of the media, and a slight but statistically significant tendency to increase from about 2 to 3 ppm over the 26 weeks (r = 0.55, p < 0.05). Concentrations of both trichlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene in earthworms increased as the concentrations in the soil increased (Fig. 2), but leveled off at the highest soil concentrations. The most surprising result of this study was the relatively low concentrations in earthworms compared to those in soils. The average concentration of each of the six isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene in earthworms was only about 1 ppm (Table 2); the isomeric structure did not affect accumulation. The concentration of organic matter in soil had a prominent effect on hexachlorobenzene concentrations in earthworms (Fig. 3). Hexachlorobenzene concentrations decreased steadily from 9.3 ppm in earthworms kept in soil without any peat moss added to about 1 ppm in soil containing 16 or 32% organic matter.

  17. Hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity of inhaled benzene.

    PubMed

    Cronkite, E P; Drew, R T; Inoue, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Bullis, J E

    1989-07-01

    CBA/Ca male mice have been exposed to benzene in air at 10, 25, 100, 300, 400, and 3000 ppm for variable intervals 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for up to 16 weeks. Two weeks of inhaling 10 ppm produced no hematologic effects; 25 ppm induced a significant lymphopenia. Inhalation of 100, 300, and 400 ppm produced dose-dependent decreases in blood lymphocytes, bone marrow cellularity, marrow content of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and an increased fraction of CFU-S in DNA synthesis. Exposure of mice to 300 ppm for 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks produced severe lymphopenia and decrease in marrow CFU-S. Recovery was rapid and complete after 2 and 4 weeks of exposure. After 8 and 16 weeks of exposure, recovery of lymphocytes was complete within 8 weeks. It took 16 weeks for the CFU-S to recover to that of the age-matched controls after 8 weeks of exposure and 25 weeks to recover to age-matched after 16 weeks of exposure. Inhalation of 3000 ppm for 8 days was less damaging than inhalation of 300 ppm for 80 days (same integral amount of benzene inhaled). The inhalation of 3000 ppm has not increased the incidence of leukemia or shortened its latency for development. Inhalation of 300 ppm 6 hr/day for 16 weeks significantly increases the incidence of myelogenous neoplasms in male CBA/Ca mice. Inhalation of 100 ppm for same interval does not influence incidence of myelogenous neoplasms but does increase incidence of solid neoplasms particularly in female CBA/Ca mice. Benzene is a potent carcinogen in CBA/Ca mice.

  18. The electronic structure and molecular symmetry of pure benzene and benzene coadsorbed with CO on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, W.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Pache, T.; Menzel, D.

    1989-07-01

    Benzene adsorption on Ni(111) was studied by ARUPS using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation at various benzene coverages and for benzene coadsorbed with CO. Overall the electronic structure of chemisorbed benzene is found to be very similar for the different benzene coverages and in the presence of coadsorbed CO: only small shifts in the electronic binding energies are observed which are attributed to electrostatic initial state changes. Using dipole selection rules the orientation of the adsorbed benzene molecules is determined to be parallel to the surface for all layers investigated. The molecular symmetry is reduced to C 3v in all cases. The photon energy dependence of the photoionization cross section shows a pronounced resonance of the 2e 1u level at a photon energy of 25 eV ( Ekin ≈ 13 eV); the corresponding electron emission is centered along the surface normal. This resonance is attributed to a shape resonance into an a 1 final state.

  19. Studies of the condensation of sulfones with ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Garst, Michael E; Dolby, Lloyd J; Esfandiari, Shervin; Okrent, Rachel A; Avey, Alfred A

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] The condensation of ketones or aldehydes with sulfones was shown to give a variety of products. Condensation of 2-methylcyclohexanone with dimethyl sulfone using potassium t-butoxide as base gave useful yields of 1,2-dimethylenecyclohexane. Under the same conditions, cycloheptanone, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and 2-butanone were converted to dienes. Remarkably, these reaction conditions converted acetophenone into p-terphenyl (10%) and (E)-1,4-diphenyl-3-penten-1-one (44%). Propiophenone was converted to 2'-methyl-p-terphenyl (61%). Using alpha-tetralone produced 1-methynaphthalene and naphthalene. No reaction took place with beta-tetralone. Using diethyl sulfone with alpha-tetralone lead to pure naphthalene. Condensation of isobutyraldehyde and dimethyl sulfone using potassium t-butoxide gave isoprene in low yield. Using benzaldehyde and benzyl phenyl sulfone in N,N-dimethylacetamide gave 1,2-diphenyl-1-phenylsulfonylethylene, N,N-dimethylcinnamide, and a complex condensation product. Only 1,2-diphenyl-1-phenylsulfonylethylene was obtained when the solvent was THF. PMID:16408963

  20. Pnictogen-Silicon Analogues of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Andreas E; Eckhardt, Maria; Erlebach, Andreas; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Sierka, Marek; Scheer, Manfred

    2016-08-24

    Since the discovery of the first "inorganic benzene" (borazine, B3N3H6), the synthesis of other noncarbon derivatives is an ongoing challenge in Inorganic Chemistry. Here we report on the synthesis of the first pnictogen-silicon congeners of benzene, the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene [(PhC(NtBu)2)3Si3E3] (E = P (1a), As (1b)) by a simple metathesis reaction. These compounds are formed by the reaction of [Cp″2Zr(η(1:1)-E4)] (E = P, As; Cp″ = C5H3tBu2) with [PhC(NtBu)2SiCl] in toluene at room temperature along with the silicon pnictogen congeners of the cyclobutadiene, [(PhC(NtBu)2)2Si2E2] (E = P (2a), As (2b)), which is unprecedented for the arsenic system 2b. All compounds were comprehensively characterized, and density functional theory calculations were performed to verify the stability and the aromatic character of the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene. PMID:27513314

  1. Sulfonation Pathway Inhibitors Block Reactivation of Latent HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Murry, Jeffrey P.; Godoy, Joseph; Mukim, Amey; Swann, Justine; Bruce, James W.; Ahlquist, Paul; Bosque, Alberto; Planelles, Vicente; Spina, Celsa A.; Young, John A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived pools of latently infected cells are a significant barrier to the development of a cure for HIV-1 infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms of reactivation from latency is needed to facilitate the development of novel therapies that address this problem. Here we show that chemical inhibitors of the sulfonation pathway prevent virus reactivation, both in latently infected J-Lat and U1 cell lines and in a primary human CD4+ T cell model of latency. In each of these models, sulfonation inhibitors decreased transcription initiation from the HIV-1 promoter. These inhibitors block transcription initiation at a step that lies downstream of nucleosome remodeling and affects RNA polymerase II recruitment to the viral promoter. These results suggest that the sulfonation pathway acts by a novel mechanism to regulate efficient virus transcription initiation during reactivation from latency, and further that augmentation of this pathway could be therapeutically useful. PMID:25310595

  2. Characteristics of the complexing of chitosan with sodium dodecyl sulfate, according to IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilova, S. V.; Romanova, K. A.; Galyametdinov, Yu. G.; Tret'yakova, A. Ya.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The complexing of protonated chitosan with dodecyl sulfate ions in water solutions is studied using IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations. It is established that the electrostatic interaction between the protonated amino groups of chitosan and dodecyl sulfate ions is apparent in the IR spectrum as a band at 833 cm-1. The need to consider the effect the solvent has on the formation of hydrogen-bound ion pairs [CTS+ ṡ C12H25O 3 - ] is shown via a quantum-chemical simulation of the equilibrium geometry and the energy characteristics of complexing and hydration.

  3. Renaturation of enzymes after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Springhorn, S.S.

    1980-08-10

    A number of enzymes, including amylases, dehydrogenases, and proteases, were shown to be renaturable after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Enzyme activity was detected in situ by action on substrates introduced into the gel and subsequent staining of either the product or unreacted substrate. Enzymes appeared to recover activity as soon as the detergent diffused out of the gel. Renatured enzymes were retained in gels after electrophoresis longer than native enzymes which had been subjected to electrophoresis in the absence of detergent. Re-electrophoresis of the renatured enzymes showed that part of the retained activity was physically anchored to the gel, possibly by the folding of polypeptides around the gel matrix as the enzymes were renatured.

  4. Sand sorption process for the removal of sodium dodecyl sulfate (anionic surfactant) from water.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nasiruddin; Zareen, Uzma

    2006-05-20

    Granite sand was used to adsorb anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) from water at natural pH 6.25. The effect of adsorbent size, pH, temperature and amount of adsorbent has been examined. The results indicate that the Langmuir model provides the best correlation of experimental data. Thermodynamic parameters like entropy, enthalpy and free energy of adsorption were evaluated. Decreasing the temperature accelerates the adsorption of SDS onto sand surface. The kinetic data were analyzed by using pseudo-first order Lagergren equation. Adsorption of SDS was exothermic and dominated by physisorption with activation energy (Ea) 33.65 kJ mol(-1). In addition, regeneration of granite sand by washing with Fenton likes reagent was examined. The results suggested that granite sand is suitable as a sorbent material for recovery and adsorption of SDS from aqueous solutions in view of its effectiveness and cheaper cost.

  5. Flour sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extractable protein level as a cookie flour quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Pareyt, Bram; Bruneel, Charlotte; Brijs, Kristof; Goesaert, Hans; Delcour, Jan A

    2010-01-13

    Flour characteristics of laboratory-milled flour fractions of two wheat cultivars were related to their cookie-baking performance. Cultivar (cv.) Albatros wheat milling yielded fractions with lower damaged starch (DS) and arabinoxylan levels and higher sodium dodecyl sulfate-extractable protein (SDSEP) levels than did cv. Meunier wheat milling. During baking, cv. Albatros flour doughs spread faster and set later than their cv. Meunier counterparts and, hence, resulted in larger cookie diameters. DS levels negatively affected spread rate during both cv. Albatros (R2=0.68) and cv. Meunier (R2=0.51) cookie baking. SDSEP levels also influenced cookie quality. The use of flour heat-treated to reduce its SDSEP levels to different degrees led to reduction of the set time (R2=0.90). It was deduced that larger gluten polymer sizes limit dough spread time during baking and that, apart from DS level, the SDSEP level is an indicator for cookie flour quality.

  6. Structural characterization of hydroperoxide lyase in dodecyl maltoside by using circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Panagakou, I; Touloupakis, E; Ghanotakis, D F

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) is a membrane protein, member of the lipoxygenase pathway, which holds a central role in plant defense. Green bell pepper fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, was purified and solubilized in two different non ionic detergents, Triton X-100 and dodecyl maltoside (DM). DM is considered to be more useful compared to Triton X-100, as it allows characterization of the protein with spectroscopic techniques, for which Triton X-100 was inapplicable. Circular dichroism demonstrated that HPL's secondary structure in DM consists of 13.53 % α-helix, 32.73 % β-sheet, 21.76 % turn and 31.13 % unordered. PMID:23076732

  7. Interaction of cellulase with sodium dodecyl sulfate at critical micelle concentration level.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jin; Fan, Jun-Bao; Chen, Nan; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2006-05-01

    The interactions between Trichoderma reesei cellulase and an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), at critical micelle concentration level have been investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism. SDS micelles have dual interactions with cellulase: electrostatic at first and then hydrophobic interactions. When the concentration of SDS is smaller than 45.0mM, SDS micelles cause a partial loss in the hydrolytic activity together with a steep decrease in the alpha-helical content of cellulase. With further increasing the concentration of SDS, however, a re-formation of the alpha-helical structure and a partial recovery of the hydrolytic activity of cellulase induced by SDS micelles are observed. Taken together, these results indicate that SDS micelles exert dual effects on cellulase through binding as both a denaturant and a recovery reagent.

  8. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Molin, Soeren; Yang, Liang; Ndoni, Sokol

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms cause extensive damage to industrial settings. Thus, it is important to improve the existing techniques and develop new strategies to prevent bacterial biofilm formation. In the present study, we have prepared nanoporous polymer films from a self-assembled 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS) block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment in short-term (3 h) and significantly reduce biofilm formation in long-term (1 week) by gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Tuning the thickness or surface morphology of the nanoporous polymer films allowed to extent the anti-biofilm capability. PMID:23377015

  9. Trapping of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate at the Air-Water Interface of Oscillating Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Corti, Mario; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    We report that at very low initial bulk concentrations, a couple of hundred times below the critical micellar concentration (CMC), anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) adsorbed at the air-water interface of a gas bubble cannot be removed, on the time scale of the experiment (hours), when the surrounding solution is gently replaced by pure water. Extremely sensitive interferometric measurements of the resonance frequency of the bubble-forced oscillations give precise access to the concentration of the surfactant monolayer. The bulk-interface dynamic exchange of SDS molecules is shown to be inhibited below a concentration which we believe refers to a kind of gas-liquid phase transition of the surface monolayer. Above this threshold we recover the expected concentration-dependent desorption. The experimental observations are interpreted within simple energetic considerations supported by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. PMID:26039913

  10. Adsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on Ge Substrate: The Effect of a Low-Polarity Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Rommel B.; da Silva, Albérico B. F.; Pimentel, André S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) molecules in a low polar solvent on Ge substrate by using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The maximum SDS amount adsorbed is (5.0 ± 0.3) × 1014 molecules cm−2 in CHCl3, while with the use of CCl4 as subphase the ability of SDS adsorbed is 48% lower. AFM images show that depositions are highly disordered over the interface, and it was possible to establish that the size of the SDS deposition is around 30–40 nm over the Ge surface. A complete description of the infrared spectroscopic bands for the head and tail groups in the SDS molecule is also provided. PMID:22942685

  11. Platelets to rings: Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate on Zn-Al layered double hydroxide morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Ceren; Unal, Ugur; Yagci Acar, Havva

    2012-03-01

    In the current study, influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the crystallization of Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated. Depending on the SDS concentration coral-like and for the first time ring-like morphologies were obtained in a urea-hydrolysis method. It was revealed that the surfactant level in the starting solution plays an important role in the morphology. Concentration of surfactant equal to or above the anion exchange capacity of the LDH is influential in creating different morphologies. Another important parameter was the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactant. Surfactant concentrations well above CMC value resulted in ring-like structures. The crystallization mechanism was discussed.

  12. Sulfur and hydrogen isotope anomalies in meteorite sulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G W; Thiemens, M H; Jackson, T L; Chang, S

    1997-08-22

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  13. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  14. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Salviano Dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1-10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food. PMID:26904662

  15. Acute high dose exposure to benzene in shipyard workers

    SciTech Connect

    Midzenski, M.A.; McDiarmid, M.A.; Rothman, N.; Kolodner, K. )

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen degassers were acutely exposed over several days to high concentrations (> 60 ppm) of benzene during removal of residual fuel (degassing) from shipboard fuel tanks. Medical surveillance evaluation mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Benzene Standard initially revealed 11 workers (73%) reporting neurotoxic symptoms while degassing. Workers with more than 2 days (16 hours) of acute exposure were significantly more likely to report dizziness and nausea than those with 2 or fewer days of acute exposure. Repeated laboratory analyses performed over a 4-month period after the acute exposure revealed at least one hematologic abnormality consistent with benzene exposure in 9 (60%) of these degassers. One year later, 6 workers (40%) had persistent abnormalities; an additional worker with normal hematologic parameters at the time of our initial evaluation subsequently developed an abnormality consistent with benzene exposure. Numerous large granular lymphocytes were observed on 6 (40%) of the peripheral blood smears. Despite these laboratory findings, there were no significant associations between the presence of hematologic abnormalities and either the number of hours of acute benzene exposure or the duration of employment as a degasser. Volatilization of benzene from the residual fuel was the suspected source of benzene in the headspace of tanks. Confined space exposure to petroleum products may be exposing workers to benzene at levels above the OSHA Short-Term Exposure Limit (STEL). This situation warrants further study.

  16. Mobil-Badger technologies for benzene reduction in gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Goelzer, A.R.; Ram, S.; Hernandez, A. ); Chin, A.A.; Harandi, M.N.; Smith, C.M. Mobil Research and Development Corp., Paulsboro, NJ )

    1993-01-01

    Many refiners will need to reduce the barrels per day of benzene entering the motor gasoline pool. Mobil and Badger have developed and now jointly license three potential refinery alternatives to conventional benzene hydrosaturation to achieve this: Mobil Benzene Reduction, Ethylbenzene and Cumene. The Mobil Benzene Reduction Process (MBR) uses dilute olefins in FCC offgas to extensively alkylate dilute benzene as found in light reformate, light FCC gasoline, or cyclic C[sub 6] naphtha. MBR raises octanes and lowers C[sub 5]+ olefins. MBR does not involve costly hydrogen addition. The refinery-based Mobil/Badger Ethylbenzene Process reacts chemical-grade benzene extracted from light reformate with dilute ethylene found in treated FCC offgas to make high-purity ethylbenzene. EB is the principal feedstock for the production of styrene. The Mobil/Badger Cumene Process alkylates FCC-derived dilute propylene and extracted benzene to selectively yield isopropyl benzene (cumene). Cumene is the principal feedstock for the production of phenol. All three processes use Mobil developed catalysts.

  17. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  18. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods

    PubMed Central

    Salviano dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1–10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food. PMID:26904662

  19. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas. PMID:25960203

  20. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Salviano Dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1-10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food.

  1. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas.

  2. Unfolding and folding pathway of lysozyme induced by sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Filho, Pedro L O; Bozelli, José C; Carvalho, Juliana; Schreier, Shirley; Oliveira, Cristiano L P

    2015-10-21

    Proteins may exhibit an unfolding or folding state in the presence of a surfactant. In the present study, the unfolding and folding pathway of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) induced by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is studied. The stoichiometry obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides guidelines for other techniques. The fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism show that the fluorescence properties and secondary structure of proteins undergo a two-step change upon binding with SDS, in which the intensity decreases, the emission blue shifts and the helical conformation decreases at low ratios of SDS to HEWL, while all of them return to the native-like state upon the addition of SDS at higher ratios. At the end of the binding, HEWL presents a higher α-helical content but its tertiary structure is lost compared to its native state, which is namely a molten globule state. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis and the derived model reveal that the complexes possess a decorated core-shell structure, with the core composed of dodecyl chains and the shell consisting of SDS head groups with a protein in molten globule state. Five binding steps, including the individual details involved in the denaturation, were obtained to describe the unfolding and folding pathway of HEWL induced by SDS. The results of this study not only present details about the denaturation of protein induced by SDS and the structure of the complexes involved in each binding step, but also provide molecular insights into the mechanism of the higher helical conformation of proteins in the presence of surfactant micelles. PMID:26308474

  3. Adsorption of simple benzene derivatives on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, L. M.; Bădescu, Ş. C.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption of simple benzene derivatives composed of a benzene ring with NO2 , CH3 , or NH2 functional groups on a semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotube is studied using the density-functional theory within the local-density approximation. The effects of molecular relaxation in the adsorption process are obtained, as well as the adsorption energies and equilibrium distances for several molecular locations and orientations on the surface. We find that all of these benzene derivatives are physisorbed mainly through the interaction of the π orbitals of the benzene ring and those of the carbon nanotube. These aromatics do not change significantly the carbon nanotube’s electronic structure, and therefore only small changes in the nanotube’s properties are expected. This suggests that these benzene derivatives are suitable for noncovalent nanotube functionalization and molecule immobilization on nanotube surfaces.

  4. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  5. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  6. Different aggregation dynamics of benzene-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cen-Feng; Tian, Shan Xi

    2014-10-28

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations for benzene-water mixtures are performed, aiming to explore the relationship between the microscopic structures and the thermodynamic properties, in particular, the transformation dynamics from the mutually soluble state to the phase-separated state. We find that the molecular aggregation of benzene in the water-rich mixture is distinctly different from that of water in the benzene-rich mixture. This aggregation difference is attributed to the different intermolecular interactions: the clustering of benzene molecules in the water-rich mixture is primarily driven by weak short-distance π-π interactions; while the formation of water clusters in the benzene-rich solution is triggered by long-range dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions. Moreover, the molecular aggregations show double-scaled features: firstly assembling in a quasi-plane at a low concentration, then bulking in three dimensions with an increase in concentration.

  7. 40 CFR 417.110 - Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. 417.110 Section 417.110 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY SO3 Solvent and Vacuum Sulfonation Subcategory § 417.110 Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  8. 40 CFR 417.110 - Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. 417.110 Section 417.110 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY SO3 Solvent and Vacuum Sulfonation Subcategory § 417.110 Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  9. 40 CFR 417.110 - Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. 417.110 Section 417.110 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY SO3 Solvent and Vacuum Sulfonation Subcategory § 417.110 Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  10. 40 CFR 417.110 - Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. 417.110 Section 417.110 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY SO3 Solvent and Vacuum Sulfonation Subcategory § 417.110 Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  11. 40 CFR 417.110 - Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. 417.110 Section 417.110 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY SO3 Solvent and Vacuum Sulfonation Subcategory § 417.110 Applicability; description of the SO3 solvent and vacuum sulfonation subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  12. 40 CFR 721.6220 - Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6220 Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate. (a... generically as an aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate (PMN P-91-584) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5425 - α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts... Substances § 721.5425 α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an α-olefin sulfonate, potassium salt...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6220 - Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6220 Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate. (a... generically as an aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate (PMN P-91-584) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2565 - Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and amine salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2565 Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and... substances identified as alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali salt (PMN P-93-352) and...

  16. 40 CFR 721.950 - Sodium salt of an alkylated, sulfonated aromatic (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., sulfonated aromatic (generic name). 721.950 Section 721.950 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.950 Sodium salt of an alkylated, sulfonated... chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of an alkylated, sulfonated aromatic (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9597 - Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9597 Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo... substance identified generically as salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound (PMN P-00-0094)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5450 - α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. 721... Substances § 721.5450 α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as α-olefin sulfonate, sodium...

  19. 40 CFR 721.950 - Sodium salt of an alkylated, sulfonated aromatic (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., sulfonated aromatic (generic name). 721.950 Section 721.950 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.950 Sodium salt of an alkylated, sulfonated... chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of an alkylated, sulfonated aromatic (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9597 - Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9597 Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo... substance identified generically as salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound (PMN P-00-0094)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2565 - Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and amine salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2565 Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and... substances identified as alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali salt (PMN P-93-352) and...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5450 - α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. 721... Substances § 721.5450 α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as α-olefin sulfonate, sodium...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9620 - Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9620 Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine. (a) Chemical substance... aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine (PMN P-93-832) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10437 - Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10437 Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono... chemical substances identified generically as sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9620 - Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9620 Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine. (a) Chemical substance... aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine (PMN P-93-832) is subject to reporting under this section...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10437 - Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10437 Sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono... chemical substances identified generically as sulfonic acid, linear xylene alkylate, mono, sodium...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9620 - Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9620 Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine. (a) Chemical substance... aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine (PMN P-93-832) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9620 - Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9620 Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine. (a) Chemical substance... aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine (PMN P-93-832) is subject to reporting under this section...

  9. 40 CFR 721.644 - Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates... Substances § 721.644 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates...

  10. 40 CFR 721.644 - Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates... Substances § 721.644 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates...

  11. 40 CFR 721.644 - Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates... Substances § 721.644 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates...

  12. 40 CFR 721.644 - Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates... Substances § 721.644 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates...

  13. 40 CFR 721.644 - Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates... Substances § 721.644 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10564 - Mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10564 Mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers (generic). (a) Chemical... as mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers (PMN P-08-39) is subject to reporting under this section...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10564 - Mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10564 Mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers (generic). (a) Chemical... as mixed amino diaryl sulfone isomers (PMN P-08-39) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9674 - Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9674 Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a... chemical substance identified generically as sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9674 - Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9674 Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a... chemical substance identified generically as sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9674 - Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9674 Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a... chemical substance identified generically as sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9674 - Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9674 Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a... chemical substance identified generically as sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9674 - Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane dye (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9674 Sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a... chemical substance identified generically as sulfonated-copper phthalocyanine salt of a triarylmethane...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5425 - α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts... Substances § 721.5425 α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an α-olefin sulfonate, potassium salt...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9620 - Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9620 Aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine. (a) Chemical substance... aromatic sulfonic acid compound with amine (PMN P-93-832) is subject to reporting under this section...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5450 - α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. 721... Substances § 721.5450 α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as α-olefin sulfonate, sodium...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5425 - α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts... Substances § 721.5425 α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an α-olefin sulfonate, potassium salt...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5425 - α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts... Substances § 721.5425 α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an α-olefin sulfonate, potassium salt...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5450 - α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. 721... Substances § 721.5450 α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as α-olefin sulfonate, sodium...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5450 - α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. 721... Substances § 721.5450 α-Olefin sulfonate, sodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as α-olefin sulfonate, sodium...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5425 - α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts... Substances § 721.5425 α-Olefin sulfonate, potassium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an α-olefin sulfonate, potassium salt...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). (a... generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN P-04-107) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). (a... generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN P-04-107) is subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN P-12-276) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.6220 - Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6220 Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate. (a... generically as an aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate (PMN P-91-584) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6220 - Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6220 Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate. (a... generically as an aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate (PMN P-91-584) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6220 - Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6220 Aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate. (a... generically as an aryl sulfonate of a fatty acid mixture, polyamine condensate (PMN P-91-584) is subject...

  15. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Florin; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Niculina; Kuypers, Marcel; Widdel, Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Benzene, the archetypal aromatic hydrocarbon is a common constituent of crude oil and oil-refined products. As such, it can enter the biosphere through natural oil seeps or as a consequence of exploitation of fossil fuel reservoirs. Benzene is chemically very stable, due to the stabilizing aromatic electron system and to the lack of functional groups. Although the anaerobic degradation of benzene has been reported under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions, the microorganisms involved and the initial biochemical steps of degradation remain insufficiently understood. Using marine sediment from a Mediterranean lagoon a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture with benzene as the sole organic substrate was obtained. Application of 16S rRNA gene-based methods showed that the enrichment was dominated (more than 85% of total cells) by a distinct phylotype affiliated with a clade of Deltaproteobacteria that include degraders of other aromatic hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene. Using benzoate as a soluble substrate in agar dilution series, several pure cultures closely related to Desulfotignum spp. and Desulfosarcina spp. were isolated. None of these strains was able to utilize benzene as a substrate and hybridizations with specific oligonucleotide probes showed that they accounted for as much as 6% of the total cells. Incubations with 13C-labeled benzene followed by Halogen in situ Hybridization - Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (HISH-SIMS) analysis showed that cells of the dominant phylotype were highly enriched in 13C, while the accompanying bacteria had little or no 13C incorporation. These results demonstrate that the dominant phylotype was indeed the apparent benzene degrader. Dense-cell suspensions of the enrichment culture did not show metabolic activity toward added phenol or toluene, suggesting that benzene degradation did not proceed through anaerobic hydroxylation or methylation. Instead, benzoate was identified in

  16. Competitive Nitration of Benzene-Fluorobenzene and Benzene-Toluene Mixtures: Orientation and Reactivity Studies Using HPLC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankespoor, Ronald L.; Hogendoorn, Stephanie; Pearson, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The reactivity and orientation effects of a substituent are analyzed by using HPLC to determine the competitive nitration of the benzene-toluene and benzene-fluorobenzene mixtures. The results have shown that HPLC is an excellent instrumental method to use in analyzing these mixtures.

  17. Prolonged ethanol ingestion enhances benzene myelotoxicity and lowers urinary concentrations of benzene metabolite levels in CD-1 male mice.

    PubMed

    Marrubini, Giorgio; Castoldi, Anna F; Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi

    2003-09-01

    Benzene toxicity is attributed to its metabolism, which is primarily mediated by the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 2E1 isoform (CYP2E1). The present study investigated the myelotoxicity and urinary concentrations of major benzene metabolites in adult CD-1 male mice treated with low levels of benzene vapors, ethanol, or a combination of the two. Groups of ethanol-treated (5% in a Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet, 3 weeks) or pair-fed control mice were exposed to 10 ppm benzene, 6 h per day, 5 days per week for 2 weeks, starting from the second week of ethanol administration. On the last day of treatment, the number of early and late erythroid progenitors (BFU-E and CFU-E) was reduced by 55%, while the number of granulocyte/macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM) was reduced by 36% in benzene-treated mice. Ethanol lowered the CFU-E, BFU-E, and CFU-GM colony formation by 33, 28, and 12%, respectively. In animals coexposed to benzene and ethanol, the CFU-E colony counts were decreased by 70%, the BFU-E by 80%, and the CFU-GM by 45%. Phenol (Ph), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (Cat), and trans,trans-muconic acid (MA) were measured by HPLC-UV in urine samples collected weekly during the last 6-h benzene/air exposure session. In benzene-exposed mice urinary metabolite levels peaked at the end of the first week of treatment (microg/kg body weight (bw): Ph: 4931 +/- 1055; Cat: 109 +/- 17; HQ: 784 +/- 137; MA: 534 +/- 92) and significantly decreased at the end of the second week (microg/kg bw: Ph: 3909 +/- 984; Cat: 82 +/- 24; HQ: 337 +/- 72; MA: 235 +/- 55). In mice given benzene and ethanol, the urinary levels of Ph, Cat, HQ, and MA were significantly lower than those measured in the group given benzene alone. The urinary levels of Ph and Cat showed a decreasing trend, again, from the first to the second week of benzene exposure. These data indicate that chronic ethanol ingestion exacerbates benzene myelotoxicity and, in addition, reduces the urinary excretion of benzene metabolites in

  18. Methyl tunnelling in trihalogeno-trimethyl-benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinnel, J.; Häusler, W.; Mani, M.; Tazi, M.; Nusimovici, M.; Sanquer, M.; Wyncke, B.; Heidemann, A.; Carlile, C. J.; Tomkinson, J.; Hennion, B.

    1992-06-01

    Results of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) from 1,3,5-trihalogeno-2,4,6-trimethyl-benzenes are reported for the chloro-, the bromo- and the iodo-case. For the whole family the spectra show numerous similarities, in the μeV as well as in the meV range. We observe three tunnelling lines of equal intensity corresponding to three crystallographically inequivalent methyl rotors. The observed librational peaks are at much lower energies than expected from a pure threefold potential. Within the halogen family a systematic reduction of the barrier height is found with larger halogen sizes. The temperature dependence of the tunnelling energies shows the most pronounced difference between TBM and TIM, where the corresponding tunnelling lines even shift in opposite directions.

  19. Toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Sun, Han-Zhang

    1997-12-01

    Growth of Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum exposed to monochlorobenzene (MCB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), 1, 2, 3, 4-tetrachlorobenzene (1, 2, 3, 4-TeCB) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) was tested. Tests of 72 h- EC 50 values showed that the toxicity ranged in the order: MCB<1,2-DCB<1,2,3,4-TeCBbenzene (CB) alone to marine algae was almost in the order: Pyramidomonas sp. < Platymonas subcordiformis < Nannochloropsis oculata < Chlorella marine < Phaeodactylum tricomutum. Study of the QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) between K OW and toxicity of CBs to marine algae showed good relationships between -log EC 50 and log K OW.

  20. Detailed mechanism for oxidation of benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of benzene is presented and used to compute experimentally obtained concentration profiles and ignition delay times over a wide range of equivalence ratio and temperature. The computed results agree qualitatively with all the experimental trends. Quantitative agreement is obtained with several of the composition profiles and for the temperature dependence of the ignition delay times. There are indications, however, that some important reactions are as yet undiscovered in this mechanism. Recent literature expressions have been used for the rate coefficients of most important reactions, except for some involving phenol. The discrepancy between the phenol pyrolysis rate coefficient used in this work and a recent literature expression remains to be explained.

  1. Electroanalytical approaches to understanding benzene metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lunte, S M; Lunte, C E

    1990-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques are ideally suited to the study of the metabolism of aromatic xenobiotics because the metabolites are frequently easier to oxidize than the parent compounds. In many cases, the trace metabolites have the lowest oxidation potentials and hence electrochemical methods have the greatest selectivity for these compounds. The sensitivity of dual-electrode liquid chromatography-electrochemistry for the detection and identification of trace metabolites was demonstrated by the detection of the secondary metabolite, hydroquinone, in a microsomal incubation containing benzene and ascorbic acid. The use of an electrochemical detector in a series configuration provides increased selectivity for chemically reversible metabolites such as hydroquinone. Electrochemical methods can also be used to generate metabolites. The products of the electrochemical oxidation of phenol and biphenol are compared with those generated in a peroxidase incubation.

  2. Gas phase acidity of substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-04-01

    Deprotonation thermochemistry of benzene derivatives C 6H 5X (X = H, F, Cl, OH, NH 2, CN, CHO, NO 2, CH 3, C 2H 5, CHCH 2, CCH) has been examined at the G3B3 level of theory. For X = F, Cl, CN, CHO and NO 2, the most favorable deprotonation site is the ortho position of the phenyl ring. This regio-specificity is directly related to the field/inductive effect of the substituent. G3B3 gas phase acidities, Δ acidH° and Δ acidG°, compare within less than 4 kJ mol -1 with experimental data. A noticeable exception is nitrobenzene for which tabulated acidity appear to be underestimated by ca. 120 kJ mol -1.

  3. Modification of an acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate disruption method for cellular protein extraction from neuropathogenic Clostridium botulinum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) disruption method was used for the extraction of cellular proteins from neurotoxigenic Clostridium botulinum. The amount of protein extracted per gram of dry weight and the protein profile as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was comparabl...

  4. Benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emissions of 4-stroke motorbikes: Benefits and risks of the current TWC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxer, Christian J.; Forss, Anna-Maria; Rüdy, Claudio; Heeb, Norbert V.

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been applied to determine benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emission rates of 4-stroke motorbikes. Extra emissions and duration of the cold start were deduced from the legislative urban driving cycle. The Common Artemis driving cycle was investigated to study the emission characteristics at transient driving from 0 to 135 km h -1. In addition, the benefits and risks of the currently available 3-way catalyst technology (TWC) are explored. Benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene cold start emissions of 230-290, 920-980 and 950-1270 mg start -1 were obtained for the TWC motorbikes, exceeding those without catalyst by more than a factor of 3. At hot engine/catalyst, benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emission factors in the range of 10-140, 10-160 and 10-170 mg km -1 were found for the TWC motorbikes. Without catalyst, the corresponding emission factors were higher, varying from 40 to 260, 100 to 500 and 110 to 480 mg km -1, respectively. A comparison with the latest passenger car technology, with reported aromatic hydrocarbon (HC) emission factors of 0.2-3.0 mg km -1, revealed that the investigated 4-stroke motorbikes, indeed, are an important source of air pollution. Furthermore, cold start duration, driving distance under cold start influence and velocity dependence of aromatic HC emissions were deduced from time-resolved data. In addition, variations of aromatic HC mixing ratios were studied. Narrow and unimodal distributions of, e.g. benzene/C 2-benzene mixing ratios with median values of 0.46-0.73 were found for all motorbikes but one. This motorcycle, equipped with a TWC, showed a broad and bimodal distribution with a median mixing ratio of 1.47. Catalyst-induced formation of benzene from alkylbenzenes is the assumed process, leading to increased benzene/alkylbenzene mixing ratios.

  5. 21 CFR 177.2210 - Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated. 177.2210... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2210 Ethylene polymer,...

  6. 21 CFR 177.2210 - Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated. 177.2210... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2210 Ethylene polymer,...

  7. Identification of sulfonic acids as efficient ecto-5'-nucleotidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jamshed; Saeed, Aamer; Raza, Rabia; Matin, Abdul; Hameed, Abdul; Furtmann, Norbert; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) is well known for its implication in cancer. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidases is thought to provide an attractive approach to cancer therapy. This study identifies sulfonic acid compounds as efficient inhibitors of ecto-5'-nucleotidases. The compounds were tested against recombinant human and rat ecto-5'-nucleotidases. The most potent new sulfonic acid inhibitor 6-amino-4-hydroxynaphthalene-2-sulfonic acid (1) of ecto-5'-nucleotidase had an IC₅₀ of 1.32 ± 0.09 μM for the human and 10.4 ± 3.3 μM for the rat enzyme. Generally, all compounds were more active against the human enzyme. Plausible binding mode models were developed for this new class of inhibitors. Furthermore, several sulfonic acid inhibitors were efficient cytotoxic agents when tested on H157 cancer cell lines. Hence, new ecto-5'-nucleotidases inhibitors displayed significant potential for further development as compounds for anti-cancer therapy.

  8. Complexes of poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone with sulfonated tetraphenylporphins

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvelis, Yu. V. Lebedev, V. T.; Toeroek, Gy.; Klyubin, V. V.

    2007-05-15

    The interaction of sulfonated tetraphenylporphins H{sub 2}TPPS{sub 4}(HCl){sub 2} and in CuTPPS{sub 4} with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is studied using small-angle neutron scattering, dynamic light scattering, visible spectrophotometry, and viscometry. It is shown that porphyrin molecules form complexes with PVP, thus charging the polymeric chain.

  9. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers were dosed with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by intra-arterial injection and sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma, and either urine or expired water. The data were then an...

  10. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) is an environmentally persistent chemical that has been detected in humans and wildlife. PFOS is primarily distributed in liver and blood. The current study evaluated the level of PFOS in the adult and neonatal rat brain and determined whether t...

  11. Use of amine neutralized sulfonated polystyrenes for particle flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, D.J.; Peiffer, D.G.; Thaler, W.A.; Duvdevani, I.

    1987-10-20

    A process is described for flocculating solid fines selected from the group consisting of coke films, catalyst fines, synthetic fuel fines, coal fines, and shale fines from a solution comprising the solid fines and an organic liquid which comprises the steps of: (a) adding with mixing about 5 to about 10,000 ppm of the water insoluble unneutralized or neutralized sulfonated polystyrene to the solution wherein the sulfonated polystyrene is dissolved in a dissolving organic liquid at a concentration level of about 0.01 to about 20 weight percent, and has about 0.5 to about 100 mole percent of sulfonate groups; and (b) heating at about 25/sup 0/C to about 350/sup 0/C for about 1 to about 45 minutes the mixture of the solution and the unneutralized or neutralized polystyrene wherein the sulfonated polystrene is absorbed on the surface of the solid fines, and the solid fines collide to form agglomerates which precipitate out of the solution.

  12. PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) DISRUPTS THE THYROID STATUS IN LABORATORY RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) DISRUPTS THE THYROID STATUS IN LABORATORY RODENTS. C. Lau, J.R. Thibodeaux, R.G. Hanson, B.E. Gray and J.M. Rogers. Reprod. Tox. Div. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    PFOS is an environmental contaminant ubiquitously found in h...

  13. Epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly (phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Michael; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Norman, Kirsten; Hickner, Michael A.

    2010-10-19

    An epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer composition used as proton exchange membranes, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cell, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes, and in sulfur dioxide electrolyzers. These improved membranes are tougher, have higher temperature capability, and lower SO.sub.2 crossover rates.

  14. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177.2500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only...

  15. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177.2500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only...

  16. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177.2500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for...

  17. Absorption and distribution of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is an industrial chemical that is found in biosolids, and the application of these biosolids to pastures has raised concerns about human exposure through the accumulation of PFOS in edible tissues of these animals. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) h...

  18. Hydrogen-bonding patterns in pyrimethaminium pyridine-3-sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Nirmalram, Jeyaraman Selvaraj; Thomas Muthiah, Packianathan

    2010-01-01

    In the asymmetric unit of the title salt [systematic name: 2,4-diamino-5-(4-chloro­phen­yl)-6-ethyl­pyrimidin-1-ium pyri­dine-3-sulfonate], C12H14N4Cl+·C5H4NSO3 −, there are two independent pyrimethaminium cations and two 3-pyridine sulfonate anions. Each sulfonate group inter­acts with the corresponding protonated pyrimidine ring through two N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a cyclic hydrogen-bonded bimolecular R 2 2(8) motif. Even though the primary mode of association is the same, the next higher level of supra­molecular architectures are different due to different hydrogen-bonded networks. In one of the independent molecules in the asymmetric unit, the pyrimethamine cation is paired centrosymmetrically through N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, generating an R 2 2(8) ring motif. In the other molecule, the pyrimethamine cation does not form any base pairs; instead it forms hydrogen bonds with the 3-pyridine sulfonate anion. The structure is further stabilized by C—H⋯O, C—H⋯N and π–π stacking [centroid–centroid distance = 3.9465 (13) Å] inter­actions. PMID:21588411

  19. 21 CFR 177.2210 - Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated. 177.2210... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2210 Ethylene polymer,...

  20. 21 CFR 177.2210 - Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene polymer, chloro-sulfonated. 177.2210... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2210 Ethylene polymer,...

  1. Pyrolysis Pathways of Sulfonated Polyethylene, an Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, Jarod M; Saito, Tomonori; Hunt, Marcus A; Beste, Ariana; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonated polyethylene is an emerging precursor for the production of carbon fibers. Pyrolysis of sulfonated polyethylene was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). n-heptane-4-sulfonic acid (H4S) was selected as a model compound for the study of sulfonated polyethylene. Density functional theory and conventional transition state theory were used to determine the rate constants of pyrolysis for H4S from 300-1000 K. Multiple reaction channels from two different mechanisms were explored: 1) internal five-centered elimination (Ei 5) and 2) radical chain reaction. The pyrolysis of H4S was simulated with kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to obtain TGA plots that compared favorably to experiment. We observed that at tem- peratures < 550 K, the radical mechanism was dominant and yielded the trans-alkene, whereas cis-alkene was formed at higher temperatures from the internal elimination. The maximum rates of % mass loss became independent of initial OH radical concentration at 440-480 K. Experimentally, the maximum % mass loss occurred from 440-460 K (heating rate dependent). Activation energies derived from the kMC-simulated TGAs of H4S (26-29 kcal/mol) agreed with experiment for sulfonated polyethylene ( 31 kcal/mol). The simulations revealed that in this region, decomposition of radical HOSO2 became competitive to H abstraction by HOSO2, making OH the carrying radical for the reaction chain. The maximum rate of % mass loss for internal elimination was observed at temperatures > 600 K. Low-scale carbonization utilizes temperatures < 620 K; thus, internal elimination will not be competitive. Ei5 elimination has been studied for sulfoxides and sulfones, but this represents the first study of internal elimination in sulfonic acids. Nonlinear Arrhenius plots were found for all bimolecular reactions. The most significant nonlinear behavior was observed for reactions where the barrier was small. For reactions with low activation barriers, nonlinearity was traced to

  2. Benzene exposure: An overview of monitoring methods and their findings

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Clifford P.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person’s total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites

  3. The contribution of benzene to smoking-induced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Korte, J E; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Schulz, M R; Ball, L M; Duell, E J

    2000-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of leukemia; benzene, an established leukemogen, is present in cigarette smoke. By combining epidemiologic data on the health effects of smoking with risk assessment techniques for low-dose extrapolation, we assessed the proportion of smoking-induced total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) attributable to the benzene in cigarette smoke. We fit both linear and quadratic models to data from two benzene-exposed occupational cohorts to estimate the leukemogenic potency of benzene. Using multiple-decrement life tables, we calculated lifetime risks of total leukemia and AML deaths for never, light, and heavy smokers. We repeated these calculations, removing the effect of benzene in cigarettes based on the estimated potencies. From these life tables we determined smoking-attributable risks and benzene-attributable risks. The ratio of the latter to the former constitutes the proportion of smoking-induced cases attributable to benzene. Based on linear potency models, the benzene in cigarette smoke contributed from 8 to 48% of smoking-induced total leukemia deaths [95% upper confidence limit (UCL), 20-66%], and from 12 to 58% of smoking-induced AML deaths (95% UCL, 19-121%). The inclusion of a quadratic term yielded results that were comparable; however, potency models with only quadratic terms resulted in much lower attributable fractions--all < 1%. Thus, benzene is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-tenth to one-half of smoking-induced total leukemia mortality and up to three-fifths of smoking-related AML mortality. In contrast to theoretical arguments that linear models substantially overestimate low-dose risk, linear extrapolations from empirical data over a dose range of 10- to 100-fold resulted in plausible predictions. PMID:10753092

  4. The contribution of benzene to smoking-induced leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Korte, J E; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Schulz, M R; Ball, L M; Duell, E J

    2000-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of leukemia; benzene, an established leukemogen, is present in cigarette smoke. By combining epidemiologic data on the health effects of smoking with risk assessment techniques for low-dose extrapolation, we assessed the proportion of smoking-induced total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) attributable to the benzene in cigarette smoke. We fit both linear and quadratic models to data from two benzene-exposed occupational cohorts to estimate the leukemogenic potency of benzene. Using multiple-decrement life tables, we calculated lifetime risks of total leukemia and AML deaths for never, light, and heavy smokers. We repeated these calculations, removing the effect of benzene in cigarettes based on the estimated potencies. From these life tables we determined smoking-attributable risks and benzene-attributable risks. The ratio of the latter to the former constitutes the proportion of smoking-induced cases attributable to benzene. Based on linear potency models, the benzene in cigarette smoke contributed from 8 to 48% of smoking-induced total leukemia deaths [95% upper confidence limit (UCL), 20-66%], and from 12 to 58% of smoking-induced AML deaths (95% UCL, 19-121%). The inclusion of a quadratic term yielded results that were comparable; however, potency models with only quadratic terms resulted in much lower attributable fractions--all < 1%. Thus, benzene is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-tenth to one-half of smoking-induced total leukemia mortality and up to three-fifths of smoking-related AML mortality. In contrast to theoretical arguments that linear models substantially overestimate low-dose risk, linear extrapolations from empirical data over a dose range of 10- to 100-fold resulted in plausible predictions. PMID:10753092

  5. Process for recovering 4,4 prime dihydroxydiphenyl sulfone from an isomer mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Zemlanicky, F.; Cooker, B.

    1991-03-19

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of 4,4{prime}-bisphenol sulfone from an isomer mixture comprising 4,4{prime}-bisphenol sulfone and 2,4{prime}-bisphenol sulfone. It comprises dissolving the isomer mixture in a basic aqueous solution comprising about one mole of base per mole of the mixture of 4,4{prime}-bisphenol sulfone and 2,4{prime}-bisphenol sulfone to form a basic isomer solution and adding acid to the isomer solution in an amount of from about 0.85 to 0.95 mole per mole of the 4,4{prime}-bisphenol sulfone wherein the acid is added in an amount sufficient to cause selective precipitation of crystals of 4,4{prime}-bisphenol sulfone yet in an amount less than sufficient to neutralize the isomer solution and removing the crystals of 4,4{prime}-bisphenol from the aqueous solution.

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Il; Hirabayashi, Yoko; Kawasaki, Yasushi; Kodama, Yukio; Kaneko, Toyozo; Kanno, Jun; Kim, Dae-Yong; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Tohru

    2002-11-01

    Benzene can induce hematotoxicity and leukemia in humans and mice. Since a review of the literature shows that the CYP2E1 knockout mouse is not known to possess any benzene toxicity, the metabolism of benzene by CYP2E1 in the liver is regarded to be prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, although the mechanism is not fully understood yet. Because it was found some years ago that benzene was also a substrate for CYP1A1, we investigated the involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in benzene hematotoxicity using AhR wild-type (AhR(+/+)), heterozygous (AhR(+/-)), and homozygous (AhR(-/-)) male mice. Interestingly, following a 2-week inhalation of 300 ppm benzene (a potent dose for leukemogenicity), no hematotoxicity was induced in AhR(-/-) mice. Further, there were no changes in cellularity of peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM), nor in levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units in BM. This lack of hematotoxicity was associated with the lack of p21 overexpression, which was regularly seen in the wild-type mice following benzene inhalation. Combined treatment with two major benzene metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, induced hemopoietic toxicity, although it was not known whether this happened due to a surprising lack of expression of CYP2E1 by AhR knockout, or due to a lack of other AhR-mediated CYP enzymes, including 1A1 (i.e., a possible alternative pathway of benzene metabolism). The former possibility, evaluated in the present study, failed to show a significant relationship between AhR and the expression of CYP2E1. Furthermore, a subsequent evaluation of AhR expression after benzene inhalation tended to show higher but less significant expression in the liver, and none in the BM, compared with sham control. Although this study failed to identify the more likely of the above-mentioned two possibilities, the study using AhR knockout mice on benzene inhalation presents the unique possibility that the benzene toxicity may be

  7. Peroxidase-dependent metabolism of benzene's phenolic metabolites and its potential role in benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M T; Yager, J W; Steinmetz, K L; Eastmond, D A

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of two of benzene's phenolic metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, by peroxidase enzymes has been studied in detail. Studies employing horseradish peroxidase and human myeloperoxidase have shown that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide phenol is converted to 4,4'-diphenoquinone and other covalent binding metabolites, whereas hydroquinone is converted solely to 1,4-benzoquinone. Surprisingly, phenol stimulates the latter conversion rather than inhibiting it, an effect that may play a role in the in vivo myelotoxicity of benzene. Indeed, repeated coadministration of phenol and hydroquinone to B6C3F1 mice results in a dramatic and significant decrease in bone marrow cellularity similar to that observed following benzene exposure. A mechanism of benzene-induced myelotoxicity is therefore proposed in which the accumulation and interaction of phenol and hydroquinone in the bone marrow and the peroxidase-dependent formation of 1,4-benzoquinone are important components. This mechanism may also be responsible, at least in part, for benzene's genotoxic effects, as 1,4-benzoquinone has been shown to damage DNA and is shown here to induce multiple micronuclei in human lymphocytes. Secondary activation of benzene's phenol metabolites in the bone marrow may therefore play an important role in benzene's myelotoxic and carcinogenic effects. PMID:2551665

  8. Crystal structures of three N-(aryl­sulfon­yl)-4-fluoro­benzamides

    PubMed Central

    Suchetan, P. A.; Naveen, S.; Lokanath, N. K.; Srivishnu, K. S.; Supriya, G. M.; Lakshmikantha, H. N.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of three N-aryl­sulfonyl-4-fluoro­benzamides, namely 4-fluoro-N-(2-methyl­phenyl­sulfon­yl)benzamide, C14H12FNO3S, (I), N-(2-chloro­phenyl­sulfon­yl)-4-fluorobenzamide, C13H9ClFNO3S, (II), and N-(4-chloro­phenyl­sulfon­yl)-4-fluoro­benzamide monohydrate, C13H9ClFNO3S·H2O, (III), are described and compared with related structures. The asymmetric unit of (I) contains two independent mol­ecules (A and B), while that of (II) contains just one mol­ecule, and that of (III) contains a mol­ecule of water in addition to one main mol­ecule. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 82.83 (11)° in mol­ecule A and 85.01 (10)° in mol­ecule B of (I), compared to 89.91 (10)° in (II) and 81.82 (11)° in (III). The crystal structure of (I) features strong N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the A and B mol­ecules, resulting in an R 4 4(16) tetra­meric unit. These tetra­meric units are connected into sheets in the bc plane by various C—H⋯O inter­actions, and adjacent sheets are further inter­linked via C—H⋯πar­yl inter­actions, forming a three-dimensional architecture. The crystal structure is further stabilized by πar­yl–πar­yl and S=O⋯πar­yl inter­actions. In the crystal of (II), mol­ecules are connected into R 2 2(8) and R 2 2(14) dimers via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and C—H⋯O inter­actions, respectively; the dimers are further inter­connected via a weak C=O⋯πar­yl inter­action, leading to the formation of chains along [1-10]. In the crystal of (III), N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving both the main mol­ecule and the solvent water mol­ecule results in the formation of sheets parallel to the bc plane. The sheets are further connected by C—H⋯O inter­actions and weak C—Cl⋯πar­yl, C—F⋯πar­yl and S=O⋯πar­yl inter­actions, forming a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:27375892

  9. A new insight on the dynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate aqueous micellar solutions by dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lanzi, Leandro; Carlà, Marcello; Lanzi, Leonardo; Gambi, Cecilia M C

    2009-02-01

    Aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate micellar solutions were investigated by a recently developed double-differential dielectric spectroscopy technique in the frequency range 100 MHz-3 GHz at 22 degrees C, in the surfactant concentration range 29.8-524 mM, explored for the first time above 104 mM. The micellar contribution to dielectric spectra was analyzed according to three models containing, respectively, a single Debye relaxation, a Cole-Cole relaxation and a double Debye relaxation. The single Debye model is not accurate enough. Both Cole-Cole and double Debye models fit well the experimental dielectric spectra. With the double Debye model, two characteristic relaxation times were identified: the slower one, in the range 400-900 ps, is due to the motion of counterions bound to the micellar surface (lateral motion); the faster one, in the range 100-130 ps, is due to interfacial bound water. Time constants and amplitudes of both processes are in fair agreement with Grosse's theoretical model, except at the largest concentration values, where interactions between micelles increase. For each sample, the volume fraction of bulk water and the effect of bound water as well as the conductivity in the low frequency limit were computed. The bound water increases as the surfactant concentration increases, in quantitative agreement with the micellar properties. The number of water molecules per surfactant molecule was also computed. The conductivity values are in agreement with Kallay's model over the whole surfactant concentration range.

  10. Interaction of Some Amino Acids with Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate in Aqueous Solution at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Anwar; Itoo, Firdoos Ahmad; Ansari, Nizamul Haque

    2011-05-01

    The density ρ, and viscosity η of 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20 mol kg-1 glycine (Gly), dlalanine (Ala), dl-serine (Ser), and dl-valine (Val) have been measured in 0.002 mol kg-1 aqueous sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) at 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15 K. These data have been used to calculate the apparent molar volume φv, infinite dilution apparent molar volume φv°, and the standard partial molar volumes of transfer φv° (tr), of the amino acids from water to the aqueous SDS solutions. Falkenhagen coefficient A, Jones-Dole coefficient B, free energies of activation per mole of solvent (aqueous SDS) Δμ1°*, and per mole solute (amino acids) Δμ2°*, also enthalpy ΔH* and entropy ΔS* of activation of viscous flow were evaluated using viscosity data. The molar refraction RD was calculated by using experimental values of the refractive index nD of the systems. The results have been interpreted in terms of ion-ion, ion-polar and hydrophobic-hydrophobic group interactions. The volume of the transfer data suggest that ion-ion intertactions are predominant.

  11. Microfluidic integration of Western blotting is enabled by electrotransfer-assisted sodium dodecyl sulfate dilution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chenlu; Herr, Amy E

    2013-01-01

    We integrate sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with subsequent antibody probing in a single, monolithic microdevice to realize microfluidic Western blotting. A hurdle to successful on-chip Western blotting lies in restoring antibody recognition of previously sized (denatured, reduced) proteins. To surmount this hurdle, we locally dilute free SDS from SDS-protein complexes using differential electromigration of the species during electrotransfer between SDS-PAGE and blotting regions of a microchamber. Local dilution of SDS minimizes re-association of SDS with proteins offering means to restore antibody binding affinity to proteins after SDS-PAGE. To achieve automated, programmable operation in a single instrument, we utilize a 1 × 2 mm(2) glass microchamber photopatterned with spatially distinct, contiguous polyacrylamide regions for SDS-PAGE, electrotransfer, and antibody blotting. Optimization of both the SDS-PAGE and electrotransfer conditions yields transfer distances of <1 mm (40 s). The Western blot is completed in 180 s, with fully automated assay operation using programmable voltage control. After SDS-PAGE and electrotransfer, we observe ~80% capture of protein band mass on the blotting region for a model protein, C-reactive protein. This novel microfluidic Western blot approach introduces fine transport control for in-transit protein handling to form the basis for an automated, rapid alternative to conventional slab-gel Western blotting. PMID:23042290

  12. Solubilities of ethane in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.; Han, B.; Yan, H.; Liu, R.

    1995-10-01

    The solubilities of ethane in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were measured at 313.15 K and at pressures up to 3 MPa. The molalities of SDS (m{sub SDS}) in the aqueous solution were 0.0000, 0.0020, 0.0040, 0.0060, 0.0070, 0.0080, 0.0090, 0.0100, 0.0126, 0.0150, 0.0200, and 0.0300. The effect of SDS on the gas solubility in both concentration regions below and above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) was studied. The existence of the micelles of SDS in the solution is favorable to the dissolution of ethane due to the hydrocarbon-like interior of the micelles. The solubilities of ethane in each micelle at different pressures were evaluated based on some assumptions. It was found that the intramicellar solubility of ethane is less than that of the gas in n-dodecane. It was also found that the solubility of ethane in the micelles increases linearly with the partial pressure of ethane. The cmc of SDS was evaluated based on the solubility vs m{sub SDS} curves and the effect of dissolved ethane on the cmc was studied. It was observed that the cmc shifts toward a higher value with the increase in dissolved ethane.

  13. Surface modification to produce hydrophobic nano-silica particles using sodium dodecyl sulfate as a modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Bing; Liang, Yong; Wang, Ting-Jie; Jiang, Yanping

    2016-02-01

    Hydrophobic silica particles were prepared using the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a modifier by a new route comprising three processes, namely, aqueous mixing, spray drying and thermal treatment. Since SDS dissolves in water, this route is free of an organic solvent and gave a perfect dispersion of SDS, that is, there was excellent contact between SDS and silica particles in the modification reaction. The hydrophobicity of the modified surface was verified by the contact angle of the nano-sized silica particles, which was 107°. The SDS grafting density reached 1.82 nm-2, which is near the highest value in the literature. The optimal parameters of the SDS/SiO2 ratio in the aqueous phase, process temperature and time of thermal treatment were determined to be 20%, 200 °C and 30 min, respectively. The grafting mechanism was studied by comparing the modification with that on same sized TiO2 particles, which indicated that the protons of the Brønsted acid sites on the surface of SiO2 reacted with SDS to give a carbocation which then formed a Si-O-C structure. This work showed that the hydrophilic surface of silica can be modified to be a hydrophobic surface by using a water soluble modifier SDS in a new modification route.

  14. Simple Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Assisted Sample Preparation Method for LC-MS-based Proteomic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Shi, Tujin; Wang, Lu; Gao, Xiaoli; Su, Dian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-03-10

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is one of the most popular laboratory reagents used for highly efficient biological sample extraction; however, SDS presents a significant challenge to LC-MS-based proteomic analyses due to its severe interference with reversed-phase LC separations and electrospray ionization interfaces. This study reports a simple SDS-assisted proteomic sample preparation method facilitated by a novel peptide-level SDS removal protocol. After SDS-assisted protein extraction and digestion, SDS was effectively (>99.9%) removed from peptides through ion substitution-mediated DS- precipitation with potassium chloride (KCl) followed by {approx}10 min centrifugation. Excellent peptide recovery (>95%) was observed for less than 20 {mu}g of peptides. Further experiments demonstrated the compatibility of this protocol with LC-MS/MS analyses. The resulting proteome coverage from this SDS-assisted protocol was comparable to or better than those obtained from other standard proteomic preparation methods in both mammalian tissues and bacterial samples. These results suggest that this SDS-assisted protocol is a practical, simple, and broadly applicable proteomic sample processing method, which can be particularly useful when dealing with samples difficult to solubilize by other methods.

  15. Magnetic Properties of nickel hydroxides layers 30A apart obtained by intercalation with dodecyl sulfate ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmavonyan, Gagik; Zadoyan, Ovsanna

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic systems with reduced dimensionality make good test beds for checks on theoretical models. Here, changes in the nature of magnetic ordering in quasi-2d system of layered Ni hydroxides (LH-Ni-) with variations in the interlayer spacing c are investigated. Magnetic properties of LH-Ni-DS with c ~ 30 A° synthesized by intercalating dodecyl sulfate ion, (C12H25OSO3)- between the layers are compared with those of LH-Ni-Ac (c ~ 8.5 A°) containing the acetate (Ac) ligand. Measurements included those of magnetization M vs. T and H, ac susceptibilities (f = 0.1 Hz - 1000 Hz) and EMR (Electron Magnetic Resonance) spectra at 9.28 GHz. Results show that just like LH-Ni-Ac, LH-Ni-DS also orders ferromagnetically but with Tc ~ 23 Kabout 45 % largerthanT c 16 Kreportedfor LH-Ni-Ac.. In EMR studies, linewidth is strongly temperature-dependent, decreasing with decreasing T from 300 K, reaching a minimum near 45 K and then increasing sharply for T < 45 K, the latter due to short range magnetic ordering. These results differ with the model of Drillon et al in which interlayer dipolar interaction between clusters of correlated spins in the layers yields TC nearly independent of c. Roles of magnetic anisotropy and exchange constants in determining TC in the LH-Ni systems is discussed.

  16. Magnetic ordering of nickel hydroxide layers 30 Å apart obtained by intercalating dodecyl sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehra, M. S.; Singh, V.

    2013-09-01

    The nature of magnetic ordering in quasi-2D layered hydroxide of Ni (LH-Ni-DS) with hexagonal structure and synthesized by intercalating dodecyl sulfate (DS) ligand, (C12H25OSO3)-, between the layers using a hydrothermal technique is investigated. The observation of (00l) peaks up to l = 8 in x-ray diffraction on the sample yields an interlayer spacing c ≃ 30.5 Å and a crystallite size ≃ 16 nm. Assignment of the lines observed in the FTIR spectra to the various groups of the DS ligand confirms the intercalation. From the analysis of detailed investigations of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M at different magnetic fields, ac susceptibilities at frequencies from 0.1 to 1 kHz, and electron magnetic resonance spectra at 9.28 GHz, it is concluded that LH-Ni-DS orders ferromagnetically at TC ≃ 23 K. This TC is about 45% higher than TC ≃ 16 K reported for LH-Ni-Ac with c ≃ 8.6 Å obtained by intercalating an acetate ligand between the layers. The roles of the interlayer dipolar interaction, magnetic anisotropy and exchange interactions in determining TC in LH-Ni-L systems for several ligands L yielding different c-axes are discussed.

  17. Structural changes of a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle induced by alcohol molecules.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Bermúdez, Jose G; Dominguez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Coarse-grained dynamical simulations have been performed to investigate the behavior of a surfactant micelle in the presence of six different alcohols: hexanol, octanol, decanol, dodecanol, tetradecanol, and hexadecanol. The self-assembly of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is modified by the alcohol molecules into cylindrical and bilayer micelles as a function of the alcohol/SDS mass ratio. Therefore, in order to understand, from a molecular point of view, how SDS and alcohol molecules self-organize to form the new micelles, different studies were carried out. Analysis of micelle structures, density profiles, and parameters of order were conducted to characterize the shape and size of those micelles. The density profiles revealed that the alcohol molecules were located at the water-micelle interface next to the SDS molecules at low alcohol/SDS mass ratio. At high alcohol/SDS mass ratios, alcohol molecules moved to the middle of the micelle by increasing their size and by producing a structural change. Moreover, micelle structures and sizes were influenced not only by the alcohol/SDS mass ratio but also by the order of the SDS and alcohol tails. Finally, the size of the micelles and enthalpy calculations were used as order parameters to determine a structural phase diagram of alcohol/SDS mixtures in water. Graphical Abstract Structural transition of SDS/alcohol mixtures. PMID:26768159

  18. Effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate on structures of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) at the particle surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng Wei

    2015-01-01

    The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) tethered to nanoparticles was experimentally investigated using dynamic light scattering below the lower critical solution temperature. A mean-field analytical model was used to calculate the parameters of interfacial PNIPAM-SDS complexes. Particularly, the magnitude of SDS adsorption energy obtained decreases with decreasing excluded volume parameter, implying that the partially collapsed PNIPAM brush virtually favors the adsorption of SDS onto the PNIPAM chains. A self-consistent field theory (SCFT) model was used to get a detailed quantitative description of monomer density distribution. By lowering the solvent quality, a number of phenomena related to the noncontinuity of monomer density are revealed. These phenomena are either referred to as the vertical phase separation or as its precursor, which can be delayed and eventually eliminated as the SDS coverage is increased. The distribution of free chain ends was calculated using the SCFT model. Increasing the SDS coverage gives rise to a broader and more asymmetric distribution of free chain ends, accompanied by a considerable expansion of the dead zone (below which the free chain ends do not exist), but lowering the solvent quality has opposite influences. The relative thickness of the dead zone can be scaled to a master curve, regardless of SDS coverage.

  19. Thermodynamic selectivity of functional agents on zeolite for sodium dodecyl sulfate sequestration.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ling; Wang, Jian; Qiu, Xianxiu; Zhao, Yanxiang; Yip, Yuk-Wang; Law, Ga-Lai; Shih, Kaimin; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-11-15

    This study proposes a thermodynamic approach to effectively select functional agents onto zeolite for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sequestration in greywater reuse. We combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and quantum chemistry simulation (QCS) to identify the interactions between SDS and agents at the molecular level. Three potential agents, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), N,N,N-trimethyltetradecan-1-aminium bromide (C14TAB), and 14-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethyltetradecan-1-aminium bromide (C14HTAB), differ in carbon chain length and hydrophilic groups. The ITC titration of SDS with CTAB released the highest heat, followed by those with C14TAB and C14HTAB, as was the same trend for the amounts of SDS adsorbed by the respective functionalized-zeolites. Results suggest that the favorable SDS sorption occurred at the bilayer CTAB-zeolite is driven by enthalpy as similar as the SDS…CTAB interaction found, regardless of the contribution from electrostatic and/or hydrophobic behaviors, while the declined sorption is entropy-driven via the predominant hydrophobic interaction onto the monolayer CTAB-zeolite. The data presented here interpret the nature of molecularly thermodynamic quantities and enable the manipulation of sorption capacity optimization. PMID:27399145

  20. Denaturation and intermediates study of two sturgeon hemoglobins by n-dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Ariaeenejad, Shohreh; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Kavousi, Kaveh; Jamili, Shahla; Fatemi, Mohammad Reza; Hong, Jun; Poursasan, Najmeh; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A

    2013-02-01

    Varieties of hemoglobin (Hb) forms exist in fish, which are usually well adapted to the different ecological conditions or various habitats. In the current study, Hbs from two Sturgeon species of the Southern Caspian Sea Basin were purified and studied upon interaction with n-dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB; as a cationic surfactant) by various methods including UV-visible absorption, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and ANS fluorescence spectrophotometry. The chemometric analysis of Hbs was investigated upon interaction with DTAB under titration, using UV-visible absorption spectra. The chemometric resolution techniques were used to determine the number of the components and mole fraction of the oxidized Hbs. These results provided the evidence for the existence of three different molecular components including native (N), intermediate (I) and denatured (D) in sturgeon Hbs. According to the distribution of intermediates, which were broadened in a range of DTAB concentration, the aggregation states, DLS experiments, and thermal stability (T(m) obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)), the Acipenser stellatus Hb was more stable compared to Acipenser persicus Hb. These results demonstrate a significant relationship between the stability of fish Hbs and the habitat depth requirements.