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Sample records for dolichos lablab lectin

  1. Purification and characterization of Dolichos lablab lectin.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Meah, Y; Moore, J G; Goldstein, I J

    1999-02-01

    The mannose/glucose-binding Dolichos lablab lectin (designated DLL) has been purified from seeds of Dolichos lablab (hyacinth bean) to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography on an ovalbumin-Sepharose 4B column. The purified lectin gave a single symmetric protein peak with an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa on gel filtration chromatography, and five bands ranging from 10 kDa to 22 kDa upon SDS-PAGE. N-Terminal sequence analysis of these bands revealed subunit heterogeneity due to posttranslational proteolytic truncation at different sites mostly at the carboxyl terminus. The carbohydrate binding properties of the purified lectin were investigated by three different approaches: hemagglutination inhibition assay, quantitative precipitation inhibition assay, and ELISA. On the basis of these studies, it is concluded that the Dolichos lablab lectin has neither an extended carbohydrate combining site, nor a hydrophobic binding site adjacent to it. The carbohydrate combining site of DLL appears to most effectively accommodate a nonreducing terminal alpha-d-mannosyl unit, and to be complementary to the C-3, C-4, and C-6 equatorial hydroxyl groups of alpha-d-mannopyranosyl and alpha-d-glucopyranosyl residues. DLL strongly precipitates murine IgM but not IgG, and the recent finding that this lectin interacts specifically with NIH 3T3 fibroblasts transfected with the Flt3 tyrosine kinase receptor and preserves human cord blood stem cells and progenitors in a quiescent state for prolonged periods in culture, make this lectin a valuable tool in biomedical research. PMID:9949194

  2. Isolation and properties of a lectin from the seeds of the Indian bean or lablab (Dolichos lablab L.).

    PubMed Central

    Güran, A; Tichá, M; Filka, K; Kocourek, J

    1983-01-01

    The lectin of the Indian bean or lablab (Dolichos lablab L.) was purified by affinity chromatography on two types of affinity carriers: O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-Separon and Separon-bound ovomucoid. The lectin is homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge: S20, w = 6.14 S, Mr = 110 000; the molecule appears to comprise two pairs of two types of subunits (Mr 16 000 and 40 000), and contains 2% neutral sugar and 0.2 Mn and 0.5 Zn atom respectively. The lectin agglutinates human erythrocytes non-specifically with regard to ABO grouping at a limit concentration of 8 micrograms/ml, and this activity is inhibited most effectively by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside and ovomucoid, but not by free D-mannose. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6870786

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from Dolichos lablab

    PubMed Central

    Lavanya Latha, V.; Kulkarni, Kiran A.; Nagender Rao, R.; Siva Kumar, N.; Suguna, K.

    2006-01-01

    The galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.99, b = 84.13, c = 93.15 Å, α = 89.92, β = 76.01, γ = 76.99°. X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 3.0 Å have been collected under cryoconditions (100 K) using a MAR imaging-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. Molecular-replacement calculations carried out using the available structures of legume lectins as search models revealed that the galactose-specific lectin from D. lablab forms a tetramer similar to soybean agglutinin; two such tetramers are present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:16511291

  4. Cloning and functional expression of the gene encoding an inhibitor against Aspergillus flavus alpha-amylase, a novel seed lectin from Lablab purpureus (Dolichos lablab).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hwa; Woloshuk, Charles P; Cho, Eun Hee; Bae, Jung Myung; Song, Young-Sun; Huh, Gyung Hye

    2007-04-01

    Maize is one of the more important agricultural crops in the world and, under certain conditions, prone to attack from pathogenic fungi. One of these, Aspergillus flavus, produces toxic and carcinogenic metabolites, called aflatoxins, as byproducts of its infection of maize kernels. The alpha-amylase of A. flavus is known to promote aflatoxin production in the endosperm of these infected kernels, and a 36-kDa protein from the Lablab purpureus, denoted AILP, has been shown to inhibit alpha-amylase production and the growth of A. flavus. Here, we report the isolation of six full-length labAI genes encoding AILP and a detailed analysis of the activities of the encoded proteins. Each of the six labAI genes encoded sequences of 274 amino acids, with the deduced amino acid sequences showing approximately 95-99% identity. The sequences are similar to those of lectin members of a legume lectin-arcelin-alpha-amylase inhibitor family reported to function in plant resistance to insect pests. The labAI genes did not show any of the structures characteristic of conserved structures identified in alpha-amylase inhibitors to date. The recombinant proteins of labAI-1 and labAI-2 agglutinated human red blood cells and inhibited A. flavus alpha-amylase in a manner similar to that shown by AILP. These data indicate that labAI genes are a new class of lectin members in legume seeds and that their proteins have both lectin and alpha-amylase inhibitor activity. These results are a valuable contribution to our knowledge of plant-pathogen interactions and will be applicable for developing protocols aimed at controlling A. flavus infection. PMID:17149640

  5. cDNA cloning of FRIL, a lectin from Dolichos lablab, that preserves hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Colucci, G; Moore, J G; Feldman, M; Chrispeels, M J

    1999-01-19

    Ex vivo culture of hematopoietic stem cells is limited by the inability of cytokines to maintain primitive cells without inducing proliferation, differentiation, and subsequent loss of repopulating capacity. We identified recently in extracts of kidney bean and hyacinth bean a mannose-binding lectin, called FRIL, and provide here evidence that this protein appears to satisfy properties of a stem cell preservation factor. FRIL was first identified based on its ability to stimulate NIH 3T3 cells transfected with Flt3, a tyrosine kinase receptor central to regulation of stem cells. Molecular characterization from polypeptide sequencing and identification of the cDNA of hyacinth bean FRIL shows 78% amino acid identity with a mannose-binding lectin of hyacinth beans. Treatment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture with purified hyacinth FRIL alone is able to preserve cells for 1 month without medium changes. In vitro progenitor assays for human hematopoietic cells cultured 3 weeks in FRIL displayed small blast-like colonies that were capable of serial replating and persisted even in the presence of cytokines known to induce differentiation. These results suggest that FRIL is capable of preserving primitive progenitors in suspension culture for prolonged periods. FRIL's clinical utility involving procedures for stem cell transplantation, tumor cell purging before autologous transplantation, and ex vivo cultures used for expansion and stem cell gene therapy currently are being explored. PMID:9892687

  6. cDNA cloning of FRIL, a lectin from Dolichos lablab, that preserves hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Gabriella; Moore, Jeffrey G.; Feldman, Michael; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1999-01-01

    Ex vivo culture of hematopoietic stem cells is limited by the inability of cytokines to maintain primitive cells without inducing proliferation, differentiation, and subsequent loss of repopulating capacity. We identified recently in extracts of kidney bean and hyacinth bean a mannose-binding lectin, called FRIL, and provide here evidence that this protein appears to satisfy properties of a stem cell preservation factor. FRIL was first identified based on its ability to stimulate NIH 3T3 cells transfected with Flt3, a tyrosine kinase receptor central to regulation of stem cells. Molecular characterization from polypeptide sequencing and identification of the cDNA of hyacinth bean FRIL shows 78% amino acid identity with a mannose-binding lectin of hyacinth beans. Treatment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture with purified hyacinth FRIL alone is able to preserve cells for 1 month without medium changes. In vitro progenitor assays for human hematopoietic cells cultured 3 weeks in FRIL displayed small blast-like colonies that were capable of serial replating and persisted even in the presence of cytokines known to induce differentiation. These results suggest that FRIL is capable of preserving primitive progenitors in suspension culture for prolonged periods. FRIL’s clinical utility involving procedures for stem cell transplantation, tumor cell purging before autologous transplantation, and ex vivo cultures used for expansion and stem cell gene therapy currently are being explored. PMID:9892687

  7. In vivo biosynthetic studies of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Etzler, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The in vivo biosynthesis of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin was studied by pulse-chase labeling experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine. These studies demonstrate that each of the two mature lectin subunit types are derived by the processing of separate glycosylated precursors. The appearance of the precursor to subunit I before the precursor to subunit II supports the possibility raised by previous studies that both subunit types of this lectin may originate from a single gene product.

  8. A saponin conjugated with 2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one from Dolichos lablab.

    PubMed

    Yoshiki, Y; Kim, J H; Okubo, K; Nagoya, I; Sakabe, T; Tamura, N

    1995-01-01

    A new 2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one (DDMP)-conjugated saponin, lablab saponin I, was isolated from the hypocotyl of hyacinth bean (Dolichos lablab). The structure was elucidated by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and chemical techniques as 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl- (1-->2)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl(1-->2)-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl(1 -->)]-22-O- [2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one(2'-->)]-3 beta, 22 beta, 24-trihy-droxyolean-12-en-28-al. SOD (superoxide dismutase)-like activity depended upon the DDMP group and the aldehyde group (C-28) of the aglycone was observed in the order of lablab saponin I > glutathione > soyasaponin beta g > maltol. The soybean saponin Bb, lacking the DDMP moiety was found not to exhibit the SOD-like activity. PMID:7766056

  9. Effect of electroplating factory effluent on the germination and growth of hyacinth bean and mustard. [Dolichos lablab; Brassica compestris

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Khan, A.U.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of electroplating factory effluent in different concentrations (viz., 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0%) on the germination and growth of hyacinth beans (Dolichos lablab) and mustard seeds (Brassica compestris) was studied. The germination of seeds was delayed with the increase of effluent concentration and the germination of mustard seeds was totally inhibited at 1.5% effluent concentration while hyacinth bean seeds tolerated the effluent up to 2.5% concentration. The metal content in the hyacinth bean plants increased with increasing effluent concentration but after 1.0% effluent concentration, the concentration of all the metals (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cu, Zn, Fe) decreased in the plants except Cr, which increased throughout. Percentage germination, fresh weight, dry weight, root length, and shoot length of the plants were also analyzed. Cd, Ni, Co, Mn, and Pb were not detectable in the hyacinth bean plants.

  10. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation.

    PubMed

    Kanade, Santosh R; Paul, Beena; Rao, A G Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2006-05-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase)--a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen--and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1+/-2 to 75.9+/-0.6 A (1 A=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  11. Water Extract of Dolichos lablab Attenuates Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in a Cellular Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Yun Hee; Lee, Hye Won; Song, Kwang Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common chronic liver disease that is rising in prevalence worldwide. Therapeutic strategies for patients with NAFLD are limited by a lack of effective drugs. In this report, we show that Dolichos lablab water extract (DLL-Ex) protects against free fatty acid (FFA)-induced lipid accumulation and attenuates expression of genes involved in lipid droplet accumulation in cellular NAFLD models. The hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanism of DLL-Ex were assessed using an in vitro cellular model in which NAFLD was simulated by inducing excessive FFA influx into hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were treated with DLL-Ex and FFAs for 24 h, after which intracellular lipid content was observed by using Nile Red and Oil Red O staining. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression levels of genes related to FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion. Western blotting was used to measure protein levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha. In HepG2 cells, DLL-Ex inhibited expression of CD36, which regulates fatty acid uptake, as well as BODIPY-labeled fatty acid uptake. Additionally, DLL-Ex significantly attenuated FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Furthermore, DLL-Ex enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK, indicating that AMPK is a critical regulator of DLL-Ex-mediated inhibition of hepatic lipid accumulation, possibly through its antioxidative effect. These results demonstrate that DLL-Ex exerts potent anti-NAFLD activity, suggesting that it could be a potential adjuvant treatment for patients with NAFLD. PMID:27152979

  12. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation

    PubMed Central

    Kanade, Santosh R.; Paul, Beena; Rao, A. G. Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R.

    2006-01-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase) – a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen – and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1±2 to 75.9±0.6 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  13. Effects of various water or hydrothermal treatments on certain antinutritional compounds in the seeds of the tribal pulse, Dolichos lablab var. vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumari, K; Siddhuraju, P; Janardhanan, K

    1995-07-01

    Effects of soaking, cooking and autoclaving on changes in polyphenols, phytohaemagglutinating activity, phytic acid, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), oligosaccharides and in vitro protein digestibility were investigated in seeds of Dolichos lablab var. vulgaris. Both distilled water and NaHCO3 solution soaking and autoclaving significantly reduced the contents of total free phenolics (85-88%) compared to raw seeds. Autoclaving (45 min) reduced the content of tannins by upto 72%. Soaking seemed to have limited effect in eliminating phytohaemagglutinating activity, whereas autoclaving (45 min) seemed to eliminate the haemagglutinating activity completely. The reduction in content of phytic acid was found to be some what greater in distilled water soaking (28%) compared to NaHCO3 solution soaking (22%). Only a limited loss in content of phytic acid was observed under cooking as well as autoclaving. Loss of HCN was greater under autoclaving (87%) compared to the other processes studied. Of the three sugars analysed, soaking reduced the level of verbascose more than that of stachyose and raffinose. Autoclaving reduced the content of oligosaccharides more efficiently (67-86%) than ordinary cooking (53-76%). Autoclaving improved the in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) significantly (13%). Of all the different water and hydrothermal treatments studied autoclaving seemed to be the most efficient method in improving IVPD and eliminating the antinutrients investigated except phytic acid. PMID:8719735

  14. Medicinal foodstuffs. XII. Saponin constituents with adjuvant activity from hyacinth bean, the seeds of Dolichos lablab L. (1): Structures of lablabosides A, B, and C.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, M; Murakami, T; Komatsu, H; Matsuda, H

    1998-05-01

    From the glycoside mixture with adjuvant activity obtained from the hyacinth bean, the seeds of Dolichos lablab L., six new oleanane-type triterpene bisdesmosides, lablabosides A, B, C, D, E, and F, were isolated together with chikusetsusaponin IVa. The structures of lablabosides A, B, and C were determined on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence as follows: 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid]-28-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl) oleanolic acid (lablaboside A), 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid]-28-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl) 24-epi-hederagenin (lablaboside B), 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-D- galactopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid]-28-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] 24-epi-hederagenin (lablaboside C). PMID:9621416

  15. Supplemental UV-B radiation induced changes in growth, pigments and antioxidant pool of bean (Dolichos lablab) under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raghubansh; Singh, Suruchi; Tripathi, Ruchika; Agrawal, S B

    2011-03-01

    Present study is conducted to evaluate the response of bean (Dolichos lablabcv . pusa early prolific) plants to supplemental UV-B (sUV-B: 280-315 nm: 7.2 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) radiation. UV-B caused alteration in biomass translocation pattern with more retention of biomass in below ground parts leading to an increment in root shoot ratio. Specific leaf area (SLA) which is the measure of leaf thinness, increased in plants under sUV-B exposure by 95.7 and 82.3% after 15 and 30 days after germination. Photosynthetic machinery of bean plants was the potential target of UV-B as photosynthetic rate was decreased by 88.6% at 30 days after germination. sUV-B lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species thus generating oxidative stress. Stimulation of antioxidant defense system (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) was observed due to sUV-B radiation. Phenolic content decreased (34.7 and 18.6%) but protein showed varied response, increased initially (34%) thereafter declined (10.2%) under sUV-B radiation.

  16. Dual-function protein in plant defence: seed lectin from Dolichos biflorus (horse gram) exhibits lipoxygenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Roopashree, Subbaiah; Singh, Sridevi Annapurna; Gowda, Lalitha R.; Rao, A. G. Appu

    2006-01-01

    Plant–pathogen interactions play a vital role in developing resistance to pests. Dolichos biflorus (horse gram), a leguminous pulse crop of the subtropics, exhibits amazing defence against attack by pests/pathogens. Investigations to locate the possible source of the indomitable pest resistance of D. biflorus, which is the richest source of LOX (lipoxygenase) activity, have led to a molecule that exhibits LOX-like functions. The LOX-like activity associated with the molecule, identified by its structure and stability to be a tetrameric lectin, was found to be unusual. The evidence for the lectin protein with LOX activity has come from (i) MALDI–TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight) MS, (ii) N-terminal sequencing, (iii) partial sequencing of the tryptic fragments of the protein, (iv) amino acid composition, and (v) the presence of an Mn2+ ion. A hydrophobic binding site of the tetrameric lectin, along with the presence of an Mn2+ ion, accounts for the observed LOX like activity. This is the first ever report of a protein exhibiting both haemagglutination and LOX-like activity. The two activities are associated with separate loci on the same protein. LOX activity associated with this molecule adds a new dimension to our understanding of lectin functions. This observation has wide implications for the understanding of plant defence mechanisms against pests and the cellular complexity in plant–pathogen interactions that may lead to the design of transgenics with potential to impart pest resistance to other crops. PMID:16441240

  17. Immunochemical studies on blood groups LXII. Fractionation of hog and human A, H, and AH blood group active substance on insoluble immunoadsorbents of Dolichos and Lotus lectins.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M E; Kabat, E A

    1976-02-01

    The purified lectins from Lotus tetragonolobus and Dolichos biflorus were coupled to Sepharose 2B to make insoluble adsorbents for purification and fractionation of blood group A and H active glycoproteins. With both adsorbents, hog gastric mucin A + H blood substance (HGM), purified by phenol-ethanol precipitation, yielded fractions showing only A, only H, or AH activities. The AH fraction was obtained when the adsorbent column was overloaded with HGM and its A and H specificities seem to be carried on the same molecules since they were not separable by chromatography on either column. However A and H specificities of blood group substance from the stomach of a presumably heterozygous individual hog were both on the same molecules as they too could not be fractionated on either column. Analytical properties of the isolated fractions were generally similar to those of the unfractionated material, the purfied A substances had a higher galactosamine/fucose ratio than did the H substances. Although the original A + H showed very little specific optical rotation, the separated A and H substances rotated positively and negatively, respectively. The lectin-Sepharose adsorbents have also proven useful in isolating A or H substances directly from the crude commercial hog gastric mucin. Blood group A2 substance from a human ovarian cyst yielded two fractions on the Lotus-Sepharose column; the effluent did not interact with the Lotus lectin but precipitated the Ulex and Dolichos lectins and anti-A, and appears to contain type 1 H determinants. The other fraction reacted with Lotus and Ulex lectin as well as with Dolichos and anti-A.

  18. Legume Lectin FRIL Preserves Neural Progenitor Cells in Suspension Culture In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hailei; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Dongmei; Han, Shu; Shi, Shuangshuang; Nan, Xue; Bai, Cixian; Wang, Yunfang; Pei, Xuetao

    2008-01-01

    In vitro maintenance of stem cells is crucial for many clinical applications. Stem cell preservation factor FRIL (Flt3 receptor-interacting lectin) is a plant lectin extracted from Dolichos Lablab and has been found preserve hematopoietic stem cells in vitro for a month in our previous studies. To investigate whether FRIL can preserve neural progenitor cells (NPCs), it was supplemented into serum-free suspension culture media. FRIL made NPC grow slowly, induced cell adhesion, and delayed neurospheres formation. However, FRIL did not initiate NPC differentiation according to immunofluorescence and semiquantitive RT-PCR results. In conclusion, FRIL could also preserve neural progenitor cells in vitro by inhibiting both cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:18695740

  19. Cloning, restriction mapping and phylogenetic relationship of genomic components of MYMIV from Lablab purpureus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudheer Kumar; Chakraborty, S; Singh, Ashok Kumar; Pandey, P K

    2006-10-01

    The present work describes cloning of genomic components of whitefly transmitted geminivirus infecting Lablab purpureus syn. Dolichos lablab (commonly known as Dolichos bean or Hyacinth bean). The genome characterization using PCR with geminiviral degenerate primers and DNA sequencing were used to describe the bipartite virus associated with yellow mosaic disease of Dolichos lablab. Full-length DNA-A and DNA-B clones were obtained. The DNA-A sequence analysis showed that the isolate was similar to other Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) isolates reported earlier. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the full-length DNA-A of virus isolate revealed more than 97% homology with Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[Cowpea] (AF481865), while the DNA-B also showed >95% homology with MYMIV-[Cp] (AF503580) and MYMIV-[Sb] (AY049771). The phylogenetic analysis of present isolate showed close relationship to legume geminiviruses. The nucleotide sequence analysis showed presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) in DNA-A, with 2 ORFs aligned in sense and 4 ORFs in antisense orientation. Similarly, DNA-B contained two open reading frames (ORFs), one in sense and another in antisense orientation. PMID:16242317

  20. Lablab purpureus—A Crop Lost for Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Maggie R.; Venkatesha, S. C.; Angessa, Tefera Tolera; Ramme, Stefan; Pengelly, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, so-called ‘lost crops’ have been appraised in a number of reviews, among them Lablab purpureus in the context of African vegetable species. This crop cannot truly be considered ‘lost’ because worldwide more than 150 common names are applied to it. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this paper aims to put forward four theses, (i) Lablab is one of the most diverse domesticated legume species and has multiple uses. Although its largest agro-morphological diversity occurs in South Asia, its origin appears to be Africa. (ii) Crop improvement in South Asia is based on limited genetic diversity. (iii) The restricted research and development performed in Africa focuses either on improving forage or soil properties mostly through one popular cultivar, Rongai, while the available diversity of lablab in Africa might be under threat of genetic erosion. (iv) Lablab is better adapted to drought than common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) or cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), both of which have been preferred to lablab in African agricultural production systems. Lablab might offer comparable opportunities for African agriculture in the view of global change. Its wide potential for adaptation throughout eastern and southern Africa is shown with a GIS (geographic information systems) approach. PMID:20835399

  1. Wisconsin - Increased corn silage protein with intercropped lablab bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein supplements for livestock are costly. In recent research in southern WI, lablab bean grown with corn increased forage CP concentration over monoculture corn without compromising forage yield or potential milk production per acre. Corn was intercropped with each of three climbing beans: lab...

  2. Interaction of native and asialo rat sublingual glycoproteins with lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Herp, A; Song, S C; Wu, J H; Chang, K S

    1995-01-01

    The binding properties of the rat sublingual glycoprotein (RSL) and its asialo product with lectins were characterized by quantitative precipitin(QPA) and precipitin inhibition(QPIA) assays. Among twenty lectins tested for QPA, native RSL reacted well only with Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin), but weakly or not at all with the other lectins. However, its asialo product (asialo-RSL) reacted strongly with many Gal and GalNAc specific lectins-it bound best to three of the GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and/or Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc (II) active lectins [jacalin, Wistaria floribunda and Ricinus communis agglutinins] and completely precipitated each of these three lectins. Asialo-RSL also reacted well with Abrus precatorius, Glycine max, Bauhinia purpurea alba, and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and abrin-a, but not with Arachis hypogeae and Dolichos biflorus agglutinins. The interaction between asialo-RSL and lectins were inhibited by either Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc, p-NO2-phenyl alpha-GalNAc or both. The mapping of the precipitation and inhibition profiles leads to the conclusion that the asialo rat sublingual glycoprotein provides important ligands for II (Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->) and Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr) active lectins.

  3. Lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ in the Japanese striped snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2010-10-01

    The olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ of the Japanese striped snake were examined by lectin histochemistry. Of the 21 lectins used in the study, all lectins except succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA) showed similar binding patterns in the vomeronasal receptor cells and the olfactory receptor cells with varying intensities. The binding patterns of s-WGA varied among individuals in the vomeronasal and olfactory receptor cells, respectively. Four lectins, Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-II (BSL-II), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), and Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL) stained secretory granules and the organelles in the olfactory supporting cells and did not stain them in the vomeronasal supporting cells. These results suggest that the glycoconjugate moieties are similar in the vomeronasal and olfactory receptor cells of the Japanese striped snake. PMID:20597100

  4. Dolichos biflorus Linn. ameliorates diabetic complications in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Yogesh; Purwar, Brijesh; Meena, Harsh; Sarthi, Parth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Horsegram (Dolichos biflorus Linn.) is a known antilithiatic, hypolipedemic and has free radical scavenging activity and increased production of reactive oxygen species play a role in pathophysiological mechanisms that trigger diabetic complications. Aim: To see the effect of daily oral feeding of D.biflorous on nephropathy and retinopathy in streptozotocin (STZ) induced-diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 healthy rats were randomly grouped into controls, diabetic and diabetic on Dolichos. Diabetes was induced by a single dose of STZ (55 mg/kg) and animals were given prepared food and water ad libitum. Dolichos was orally given at 300 mg/kg/day to rats in diabetic on Dolichos group for next 30 days. Fasting blood glucose levels was monitored at beginning and at the end of the experiment while assessment of serum creatinine levels and histopathological study of kidney and retina was carried only at the end of the experiment. Statistical differences between groups were analyzed using analysis of variance followed by, Bonferroni test as posthoc test. Results: Results indicated improvement in serum creatinine levels and reduced glomerular sclerosing and Bowman's space with interstitial alterations and significantly reduced renal hypertrophy in diabetic rat son Dolichos diabetic rats (P < 0.001). Retinal layers showed inconsistent improvement in the width of the neuronal layers and decreased vacuolization of plexiform layers and retinal vessel density. Conclusion: D. biflorus at doses of 300 mg/kg/day for 30 days resulted in gradual but significant decreased diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26195910

  5. Differential binding of human blood group Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins with Dolichos biflorus and Vicia villosa-B4 agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Wu, J H; Watkins, W M; Chen, C P; Song, S C; Chen, Y Y

    1998-06-16

    The binding patterns of human blood group Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins (THGPs) with respect to four GalNAc specific agglutinins were studied by quantitative precipitin assay (QPA) and enzyme linked lectinosorbent assay (ELLSA). Of the native and asialo Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) THGP tested by QPA and ELLSA, only native and asialo Sd(a+) bound well with Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa-B4 (VVA-B4), while Sd(a-) THGP reacted poorly with these two lectins. Neither Sd(a+) nor Sd(a-) THGPs reacted with two other GalNAc alpha-anomer specific lectins: Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides and Artocarpus integrifolia. Furthermore, the binding of asialo Sd(a+)THGP-VVA-B4 and native Sd(a+)THGP-DBA through GalNAc beta--> was confirmed by inhibition assay. These results demonstrate that DBA and VVA-B4 are useful reagents to differentiate between Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) THGP.

  6. Effects of Feeding Corn-lablab Bean Mixture Silages on Nutrient Apparent Digestibility and Performance of Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongli; Jiang, Wei; Yin, Guoan; Wei, Chunbo; Bao, Jun

    2013-04-01

    This study estimated the fermentation characteristics and nutrient value of corn-lablab bean mixture silages relative to corn silages. The effects of feeding corn-lablab bean mixture silages on nutrient apparent digestibility and milk production of dairy cows in northern China were also investigated. Three ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were used to determine the ruminal digestion kinetics and ruminal nutrient degradability of corn silage and corn-lablab bean mixture silages. Sixty lactating Holstein cows were randomly divided into two groups of 30 cows each. Two diets were formulated with a 59:41 forage: concentrate ratio. Corn silage and corn-lablab bean mixture silages constituted 39.3% of the forage in each diet, with Chinese wildrye hay constituting the remaining 60.7%. Corn-lablab bean mixture silages had higher lactic acid, acetic acid, dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), ash, Ca, ether extract concentrations and ruminal nutrient degradability than monoculture corn silage (p<0.05). Neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) concentrations of corn-lablab bean mixture silages were lower than those of corn silage (p<0.05). The digestibility of DM, CP, NDF, and ADF for cows fed corn-lablab bean mixture silages was higher than for those fed corn silage (p<0.05). Feeding corn-lablab bean mixture silages increased milk yield and milk protein of dairy cows when compared with feeding corn silage (p<0.05). The economic benefit for cow fed corn-lablab bean mixture silages was 8.43 yuan/day/cow higher than that for that fed corn silage. In conclusion, corn-lablab bean mixture improved the fermentation characteristics and nutrient value of silage compared with monoculture corn. In this study, feeding corn-lablab bean mixture silages increased milk yield, milk protein and nutrient apparent digestibility of dairy cows compared with corn silage in northern China.

  7. Hydroponic rescue and regeneration of Aeschynomene, Corchorus species, and Lablab purpureus (L.) sweet genetic resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeschynomene, Corchorus species, and Lablab purpureus (L. Sweet) have uses ranging from forage, vegetables, nutraceutical, and medicinal. Many of these will not flower nor produce seed when grown under normal field conditions in Griffin or Byron, GA because of juvenility, photoperiod and freeze-sens...

  8. Phenotype and seed production among hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) accessions rescued using hydroponic techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus L. (Sweet) is a legume used as a vegetable, forage, and in home gardens as an ornamental plant. Many accessions do not flower during their juvenile period in Byron, GA. Other hyacinth bean accessions produce few seed when regenerated in the field. This study was condu...

  9. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  10. Phytochemical and pharmacological studies on methanolic seeds' extract of Dolichos biflorus.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansoor; Sharif, Sadaf; Mehjabeen; Sharif, Hina; Jahan, Noor; Naqvi, Ghazala Raza

    2014-03-01

    The Dolichos biflorus is a well known medicinal plant in folklore for its medicinal properties. In herbal medicine the seeds of it are mainly used as tonic, astringent, diuretic, and are also recommended in asthma, bronchitis, urinary discharges, hiccoughs, ozoena, heart trouble and other diseases of brain. The main purpose of this study is to explore and to provide experimental data on the traditional use of plant Dolichos biflorus. For this purpose we investigated the plant seed extract phytochemically and pharmacologically. Phytochemical analysis was performed on extract and powder form of the drug. Procedure use for evaluation were Identification of chemical constituent by color reaction, Fluorescence analysis of powder drug, pH (in powder and extract forms), loss on drying, Thin layer chromatography, Infrared spectroscopy, acid and saponification values. In pharmacological studies (diuretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities) were tested on the extract of plant seed. The tests were carried out over albino mice taking different concentration of seed extract. Seeds extract of Dolichos biflorus has exhibited mild analgesic activity, the results were (84.6±6.68) at dose 300mg/kg and (92.2±6.81) at dose 500mg/kg which were not much significant as compared to reference drug Aspirin (300mg/kg) having result (36.4±2.27). While seed extract of Dolichos biflorus exhibited remarkable diuretic activity, the values at 300 mg/kg was (1.33±0.13) and at 500 mg/kg were (2.66±0.31) which are highly significant as compared to drug Lasix (20mg /kg) having result (2.38±0.23). Anti-inflammatory effects of crude extract of Dolichos biflorus obtained at 0.06mg/kg and 01mg/kg were (26.6±2.96) and (36±1.67) respectively. While the value for aspirin as standard drug (300mg/kg) were (17.44±1.59).This study provides a platform for further investigation for the isolation of active principles responsible for biological activity.

  11. Lectin histochemical studies on the vomeronasal organ of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ of sheep was examined using lectin histochemistry in order to compare the types and amounts of the glycoconjugates among various components of the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. In the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) stained particular cells, located at the same level as the vomeronasal receptor cells, while the distribution, shape and number of the stained cells did not correspond to those of the vomeronasal receptor cells. Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) labeled the basal cells of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. While, Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120) labeled the basal cells of the sensory epithelium, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I) stained the basal cells of the non-sensory epithelium, respectively. Seventeen lectins labeled the free border of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, while Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Jacalin and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) labeled neither free border of the sensory nor that of non-sensory epithelia. The expression pattern of glycoconjugate was similar, but not identical, in the free border between the sensory and non-sensory epithelia. These results indicate that there are dissimilar features in the type and amount of glycoconjugates between the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, and at the same time, among the various cell types either in the vomeronasal sensory or non-sensory epithelium. PMID:23595118

  12. Purification of a protease inhibitor from Dolichos biflorus using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Kalika; Mittal, Anuradha; Kansal, Rekha; Gupta, Vijay Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are generally small proteins which play key roles in regulation of endogenous proteases and may exhibit antifeedant, antifungal, antitumor and cytokine inducing activities. Dolichos biflorus (horse gram) is an unexploited legume, which is rich in nutrients and also has therapeutic importance. It contains a double-headed PI, which is an anti-nutritional factor. As there is no report available on its simultaneous removal and purification in single step, in this study, a double-headed PI active against both trypsin and chymotrypsin was purified from Dolichos biflorus to -14-fold with -84% recovery using an immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) medium consisting of Zn-alginate beads. The method was single-step, fast, simple, reliable and economical. The purified inhibitor showed a single band on SDS-PAGE corresponding to molecular mass of 16 kDa and was stable over a pH range of 2.0-12.0 and up to a temperature of 100 degrees C for 20 min. The optimum temperature for trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor was observed to be 50 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively and pH optimum was pH 7.0 and 8.0, respectively. Thus, IMAC using Zn-alginate beads was useful in simultaneous purification and removal of an anti-nutritional factor from horse gram flour in single step. This procedure may also be employed for purification of other plant PIs in one step.

  13. Changes in glycoconjugate expression during early chick embryo development: a lectin-binding study.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C M; Sanders, E J

    1991-10-01

    A selection of lectins was used to investigate developmentally regulated changes in the distribution of cell surface oligosaccharides during the gastrulation and neurulation stages of early chick embryo development. Lectins from three specificity classes were used: glucose/mannose specificity (concanavalin A [Con A], Lens culinaris agglutinin [LCA], Pisum sativum agglutinin [PSA]); N-acetylglucosamine specificity (Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin [LEA], wheat germ agglutinin [WGA], succinylated WGA [sWGA]); N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose specificity (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin [DBA], soybean agglutinin [SBA], Sophora japonica agglutinin [SJA], Bandeiraea (Griffonia) simplicifolia lectin I [BSL I], peanut agglutinin [PNA], Artocarpus integrifolia lectin [Jacalin], Ricinus communis agglutinin-1 [RCA-1], Erythrina cristagalli lectin [ECL]). At gastrulation stages, patterns of lectin binding could be distinguished in the epiblast, mesoderm, and endoderm cell layers. The primitive streak failed to bind any of the lectins, but LEA and WGA bound to the epiblast in regions lateral to the streak, indicating the loss of some glucosamine residues medially in preparation for the ingression movements of gastrulation. Several lectins showed marked binding to the mesoderm cells after their passage through the primitive streak; these were LCA, PSA, WGA, sWGA, BSL, and most particularly PNA. Therefore, the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation from epiblast to mesoderm at the primitive streak is accompanied by cell surface oligosaccharide changes in the epiblast and mesoderm that involve all classes of lectins including the PNA-binding sequence Gal beta 1-3GalNAc. Ultrastructurally, PNA was shown to bind extracellularly to matrix fibrils. Jacalin, having the same sugar specificity as PNA, but binding to serine/threonine linked chains rather than asparagine linked chains showed no binding to the mesoderm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Development of gastrointestinal surface. VIII. Lectin identification of carbohydrate differences

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.Y.; Bresson, J.L.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of microvillus membranes (MVM) from newborn and adult rats by concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus (UEA I), Dolichos bifluorus (DBA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA) was examined to determine the availability of carbohydrate-containing sites for these lectins on the intestinal surface during development. Consistent patterns of differences in the reaction of MVM with these lectins were found. Con A and UEA had much higher reactivities to MVM of adult than newborn rats. /sup 125/I-labeled-UEA gel overlay experiments revealed the abundance of UEA-binding sites in MVM of adult rat in contrast to the two binding sites in MVM of a newborn rat. DBA bound only to MVM of the adults, and very few binding sites were found in immature MVM. In contrast to these lectins, WGA binding was much higher in MVM of the newborns and decreased with maturation. Additional experiments on the age dependence of UEA and DBA reactivities revealed that the most striking changes occur in animals from 2 to 2 wk of age. In MVM from 2-wk-old rats, there were only 13.9% and < 0.2% of the adult binding capacities for UEA and DBA, respectively. By the time the animals were 4 wk old, the binding capacity for UEA had attained close to the level of the adults, whereas for DBA it reached 71.3% of the adult value. These results provide definite evidence of changes in the intestinal surface during perinatal development.

  15. Lectin binding in the anterior segment of the bovine eye.

    PubMed

    Tuori, A; Virtanen, I; Uusitalo, H

    1994-10-01

    Eleven different fluorescent lectin-conjugates were used to reveal the location of carbohydrate residues in frozen sections of the anterior segment of bovine eyes. The lectins were specific for the following five major carbohydrate groups: (1) glucose/mannose group (Concanavalin A (Con A)); (2) N-acetylglucosamine group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)); (3) galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine group (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA), Psophocarpus tetragonolobus agglutinin (PTA), Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I-B4 (GSA-I-B4), Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (JAC), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA-I)); (4) L-fucose group (Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I)); (5) sialic acid group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)). All the studied lectins except UEA-I reacted widely with different structures and the results suggest that there are distinct patterns of expression of carbohydrate residues in the anterior segment of the bovine eye. UEA-I bound only to epithelial structures. Some of the lectins reacted very intensely with apical cell surfaces of conjunctival and corneal epithelia suggesting a different glycosylation at the glycocalyx of the epithelia. Also, the binding patterns of conjunctival and corneal epithelia differed with some of the lectins: PNA and RCA-I did not bind at all, and GSA-I-B4 bound only very weakly to the epithelium of the cornea, whereas they bound to the epithelium of the conjunctiva. In addition, HPA, HAA, PNA and WGA did not bind to the corneal basement membrane, but bound to the conjunctiva and vascular basement membranes. This suggests that corneal basement membrane is somehow different from other basement membranes. Lectins with the same carbohydrate specificity (DBA, HPA, HAA and PTA) reacted with the sections almost identically, but some differences were noticed: DBA did not bind to the basement membrane of the conjunctiva and the sclera and did bind to

  16. Lectin characterization of gonococci from an outbreak caused by penicillin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Rice, R J; Biddle, J W; Jeanlouis, Y; Larsen, S A; Whittington, W L

    1985-01-01

    A total of 40 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, representing 19 penicillin-resistant isolates (from 8 heterosexual patients and 11 homosexual patients) and 21 penicillin-susceptible isolates (from 15 heterosexual patients and 6 homosexual patients) and obtained from the same geographic area, were examined. Lectin agglutination patterns were based on the reactivity of the isolates with the following 14 lectins: concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, Arachis hypogeae (peanut agglutinin), Glycine max (soybean agglutinin), Dolichos bifloris, Griffonia simplicifolia II, Solanum tuberosum (potato starch agglutinin), Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin), Limax flavus, Phaseolus vulgaris, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus. All isolates were serotyped with monoclonal antibodies specific for gonococcal outer membrane protein I and auxotyped, and the plasmid content was determined. Resistant patient isolates were selected for their decreased penicillin susceptibility, and control isolates were selected for their penicillin susceptibility. Even though the patient isolates demonstrated resistance to penicillin, no phenotypic differences in lectin-grouping patterns were demonstrated between the two study groups; i.e., two predominant lectin groups were observed. No resistance-associated plasmids were detected. All patient isolates were serogroup IB (serovars IB-1, IB-2, and IB-4), whereas 12 of 21 control isolates were serogroup IA (P less than 0.05). Isolates obtained from different anatomical sites in the same patient (cervical and rectal) agreed with regard to lectin patterns and serovars but not auxotypes. PMID:3935658

  17. Glycoproteins in human parotid saliva assessed by lectin probes after resolution by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G H; Proctor, G B; Pankhurst, C L; Linden, R W; Shori, D K; Zhang, X S

    1996-01-01

    Human parotid salivary glycoproteins separated by gradient sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and electroblotted onto nitrocellulose have been investigated using a battery of biotinylated lectin probes of characterized sugar specificity. Lectin binding, detected on blots using avidin-biotin complex (ABC) and a chemiluminescence generating substrate, was recorded on photographic film and compared with the original fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) stained blots or with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250-stained gels run in parallel. A number of glycoprotein bands which were undetected by protein stains or the periodic acid Schiff reaction were revealed by lectins. Binding by lectins from Concanavalia ensiformis, Lens culinaris, Limax flavus, Phaseolus vulgaris, Ricinus communis, Triticum vulgaris, Lotus tetragonobulus and Ulex europaeus indicated that sialylated and fucosylated triantennary and bisected, N-linked complex sugar chains were present on many glycoproteins in addition to the major glycosylated proline-rich glycoprotein (GI). Binding with lectins from Arachis hypogaea and Dolichos biflorus indicated that the O-linked sugar chains were confined to the alpha-heavy chain of Ig A. Comparison of lectin binding in samples from five healthy individuals revealed differences in a number of glycoproteins in addition to the previously characterized G1 and CON 1/CON 2 polymorphisms and demonstrated that the H blood group antigen was expressed mainly on G1 in parotid saliva. This study will be used as a basis upon which to study salivary glycoproteins in diseases affecting parotid glands.

  18. Binding of the blood group-reactive lectins to human adult kidney specimens.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, L; Juusela, H; Virtanen, I

    1990-01-01

    The binding of a panel of blood group-reactive lectins to frozen sections of human kidney was studied with a special emphasis on reactivity with endothelia and basement membranes. The blood group A-reactive lectins, all specific for alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), Helix aspersa (HAA), Helix pomatia (HPA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I-A4 (GSA-I-A4) agglutinins bound to the endothelium in specimens with blood groups A and AB. In other samples, these lectins reacted predominantly with tubular basement membranes, as well as with certain tubules. Both Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinins (VVA), reported to react with blood group A1 substance, failed to reveal endothelia in most specimens, but bound differently to tubules in all blood groups. The blood group B-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-D-galactose (alpha-Gal) or GalNAc, respectively, GSA-I-B4 and Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), bound to the endothelia in specimens from blood group B or AB and in other specimens bound only to certain tubules. Among the blood group O-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-L-fucose (Fuc), Ulex europaeus I agglutinin (UEA-I) conjugates, but not other lectins with a similar nominal specificity, bound strongly to endothelia in specimens with blood group O. The UEA-I conjugates bound distinctly more faintly to endothelia in specimens of other blood groups. The present results indicate that lectins, binding to defined blood group determinants, react with endothelia in specimens of the respective blood group status. Furthermore, they suggest that basement membranes and some tubules in the human kidney show a distinct heterogeneity in their expression of saccharide residues, related to their blood group status.

  19. Rescue of photoperiod/freeze-sensitive and low seed producing accessions of Lablab purpureus using hydroponic cloning and aeroponics.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus is a legume used as a vegetable and the USDA, ARS, PGRCU conserves 137 hyacinth bean accessions from countries worldwide. Many accessions in this collection are photoperiod and freeze-sensitive due to their flower and seed production during November through March in t...

  20. Lectins from edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Singh, Senjam Sunil; Wang, Hexiang; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Dan, Xiuli; Yin, Cui Ming; Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-12-31

    Mushrooms are famous for their nutritional and medicinal values and also for the diversity of bioactive compounds they contain including lectins. The present review is an attempt to summarize and discuss data available on molecular weights, structures, biological properties, N-terminal sequences and possible applications of lectins from edible mushrooms. It further aims to update and discuss/examine the recent advancements in the study of these lectins regarding their structures, functions, and exploitable properties. A detailed tabling of all the available data for N-terminal sequences of these lectins is also presented here.

  1. Differential binding properties of Gal/GalNAc specific lectins available for characterization of glycoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Song, S C; Sugii, S; Herp, A

    1997-01-01

    Differentiating the binding properties of applied lectins should facilitate the selection of lectins for characterization of glycoreceptors on the cell surface. Based on the binding specificities studied by inhibition assays of lectin-glycan interactions, over twenty Gal and/or GalNAc specific lectins have been divided into eight groups according to their specificity for structural units (lectin determinants), which are the disaccharide as all or part of the determinants and of GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the peptide chain. A scheme of codes for lectin determinants is illustrated as follows: (1) F (GalNAc alpha 1-->3GalNAc), Forssman specific disaccharide--Dolichos biflorus (DBL), Helix pomatia (HPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (2) A (GalNAc alpha 1-->3 Gal), blood group A specific disaccharide--Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides (CFT), Soy bean (SBL), Vicia villosa-A4 (VVL-A4), and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (3) Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the protein core)--Vicia villosa B4 (VVL-B4), Salvia sclarea (SSL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin, AIL). (4) T (Gal beta 1-->3GalNAc), the mucin type sugar sequences on the human erythrocyte membrane(T alpha), T antigen or the disaccharides at the terminal nonreducing end of gangliosides (T beta)--Peanut (PNA), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Sophora japonica (SJL), Artocarpus lakoocha (Artocarpin) lectins and Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA).(5) I and II (Gal beta 1-->3(4)GlcNAc)--the disaccharide residue at the nonreducing end of the carbohydrate chains derived from either N- or O-glycosidic linkage--Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), Datura stramonium (TAL, Thorn apple), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL, Coral tree), and Geodia cydonium (GCL). (6) B (Gal alpha 1-->3Gal), human blood group B specific disaccharide--Griffonia(Banderiaea) simplicifolia B4 (GSI-B4). (7) E (Gal alpha 1-->4Gal), receptors for pathogenic E

  2. Updated version of an interim connection space LabPQR for spectral color reproduction: LabLab.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liang, Jingxing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interim connection space (ICS) called LabLab, which is an updated version of LabPQR, to overcome the drawback that the last three dimensions of LabPQR have no definite colorimetric meanings. We extended and improved the method by which the first three dimensions of LabPQR are deduced to obtain an ICS consisting of two sets of CIELAB values under different illuminants, and the reconstructed spectra from LabLab were obtained by minimizing colorimetric errors by means of the computational formula of the CIE-XYZ tristimulus values combined with least-squares best fit. The improvement obtained from the proposed method was tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of the 1950 Natural Color System color chips and more than 50,000 ISO SOCS color patches as well as six multispectral images acquired by multispectral image acquisition systems using 1600 glossy Munsell color chips as training samples. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color differences between the original and reconstructed spectra under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminants D50, D55, D65, D75, F2, F7, F11, and A as well as five multichip white LED light sources. The mean and maximum values of the root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed three LabLab interim connection spaces significantly outperform principal component analysis, LabPQR, XYZLMS, Fairman-Brill, and LabRGB in colorimetric reconstruction accuracy at the cost of slight reduction of spectral reconstruction accuracy and illuminant independence of color differences of the suggested LabLab interim connection spaces outperform other interim connection spaces. In addition, the presented LabLab interim connection spaces could be quite compatible with the extensively used colorimetric management system since each dimension has definite colorimetric

  3. Lectin binding properties of liver, small intestine and tail of metamorphosing marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus Pallas 1771).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Sengezer Inceli, Meliha; Sancar Bas, Serap

    2013-07-01

    In this present study, localization and variations of specific sugar moieties in the terminal carbohydrate chains of glycoconjugates in the small intestine, liver and tail have been investigated during the metamorphosis of Pelophylax ridibundus larvae. For this purpose, four lectins were used: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), in different larval stages of the frog. Some cells stained specifically in the intestinal mucosa and in tail epidermal cells with the lectins and their affinity changed during metamorphic transformation. For the most part, they decreased in the climax and postmetamorphic periods. It was also found that WGA, DBA and UEA-I lectins exhibited strong affinity to white blood cells in the liver and their binding affinities were the highest in prometamorphosis and they gradually decreased until the end of metamorphosis. These results suggest that the changes of lectin binding in metamorphosis may be an indication of some cellular events occurring in larval metamorphosis such as cell differentiation and damage of cell adhesion between death and differentiating cells. They also can be useful markers for detection of white blood cells in amphibian hematopoietic organs.

  4. Alterations in lectin binding to the epidermis following treatment with 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Takigawa, M.; Horio, T.

    1984-02-01

    The alterations in lectin fluorescence stainings to the epidermis were examined in guinea pig skin treated with topical application of a 1% 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) solution plus long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) radiation (1.5-3.5 J/cm2) (PUVA). Serial biopsy specimens taken up to 21 days postirradiation were stained with 8 commercially available lectins labeled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or biotin (followed by avidin D-FITC): Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin I (BSA), concanavalin A (Con-A), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). In normal guinea pig skin UEA staining was absent. Following PUVA treatment, UEA and DBA stainings became apparent or stronger in intensity after days 7-14 (UEA) and days 4-7 (DBA), respectively, and returned to negative or weak by days 14-21. Stainings with Con-A, SBA, and WGA gave remarkable decreases in intensity after days 2-4 and recovered to the baseline by days 7-14. Intensity of BSA, PNA, and RCA stainings was decreased to a lesser degree than the other lectins. Such changes were not produced by application of 8-MOP, UVA radiation (less than 10 J/cm2), UVB radiation (900-2700 mJ/cm2), or tape stripping. These results suggest that PUVA treatment perturbs the composition or organization of epidermal cell surface glycoconjugates to induce alterations in lectin stainings.

  5. Lectins: production and practical applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lectins are proteins found in a diversity of organisms. They possess the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes with known carbohydrate specificity since they have at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. This articles aims to review the production and practical applications of lectins. Lectins are isolated from their natural sources by chromatographic procedures or produced by recombinant DNA technology. The yields of animal lectins are usually low compared with the yields of plant lectins such as legume lectins. Lectins manifest a diversity of activities including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory, and anti-insect activities, which may find practical applications. A small number of lectins demonstrate antibacterial and anti-nematode activities. PMID:20890754

  6. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25569520

  7. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions. PMID:3189886

  9. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions.

  10. Agrobotanical attributes, nitrogen-fixation, enzyme activities and nutraceuticals and tyrosinase enzyme of hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus L.) - a bio-functional medicinal legume.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus L.) accessions of different origins received from USDA, ARS, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit, Griffin, GA, U.S.A. were evaluated for agrobotanical attributes, enzyme activities, nutraceuticals and quality in pot culture at AMU, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh. Fresh ...

  11. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  12. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  13. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270074

  14. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  15. Glycan and lectin biosensors.

    PubMed

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Tkáč, Ján

    2016-06-30

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  16. Dietary Plant Lectins Appear to Be Transported from the Gut to Gain Access to and Alter Dopaminergic Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, a Potential Etiology of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jolene; Wang, Mingming; Wei, Wenqian; Keller, Jeffrey N; Adhikari, Binita; King, Jason F; King, Michael L; Peng, Nan; Laine, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Lectins from dietary plants have been shown to enhance drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of rats, be transported trans-synaptically as shown by tracing of axonal and dendritic paths, and enhance gene delivery. Other carbohydrate-binding protein toxins are known to traverse the gut intact in dogs. Post-feeding rhodamine- or TRITC-tagged dietary lectins, the lectins were tracked from gut to dopaminergic neurons (DAergic-N) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) [egIs1(Pdat-1:GFP)] where the mutant has the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fused to a dopamine transport protein gene labeling DAergic-N. The lectins were supplemented along with the food organism Escherichia coli (OP50). Among nine tested rhodamine/TRITC-tagged lectins, four, including Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E), Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Arachis hypogaea agglutinin (PNA), appeared to be transported from gut to the GFP-DAergic-N. Griffonia Simplicifolia and PHA-E, reduced the number of GFP-DAergic-N, suggesting a toxic activity. PHA-E, BS-I, Pisum sativum (PSA), and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (Succinylated) reduced fluorescent intensity of GFP-DAergic-N. PHA-E, PSA, Concanavalin A, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin decreased the size of GFP-DAergic-N, while BS-I increased neuron size. These observations suggest that dietary plant lectins are transported to and affect DAergic-N in C. elegans, which support Braak and Hawkes' hypothesis, suggesting one alternate potential dietary etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). A recent Danish study showed that vagotomy resulted in 40% lower incidence of PD over 20 years. Differences in inherited sugar structures of gut and neuronal cell surfaces may make some individuals more susceptible in this conceptual disease etiology model. PMID:27014695

  17. Lectins Identify Glycan Biomarkers on Glioblastoma-Derived Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tucker-Burden, Carol; Chappa, Prasanthi; Krishnamoorthy, Malini; Gerwe, Brian A.; Scharer, Christopher D.; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Harris, Wayne; Usta, Sümeyra Naz; Eilertson, Carmen D.; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G.; Stice, Steven L.; Brat, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor with a poor prognosis. Despite aggressive therapy with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, nearly all patients succumb to disease within 2 years. Several studies have supported the presence of stem-like cells in brain tumor cultures that are CD133-positive, are capable of self-renewal, and give rise to all cell types found within the tumor, potentially perpetuating growth. CD133 is a widely accepted marker for glioma-derived cancer stem cells; however, its reliability has been questioned, creating a need for other identifiers of this biologically important subpopulation. We used a panel of 20 lectins to identify differences in glycan expression found in the glycocalyx of undifferentiated glioma-derived stem cells and differentiated cells that arise from them. Fluorescently labeled lectins that specifically recognize α-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and α-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) differentially bound to the cell surface based on the state of cellular differentiation. GalNAc and GlcNAc were highly expressed on the surface of undifferentiated cells and showed markedly reduced expression over a 12-day duration of differentiation. Additionally, the GalNAc-recognizing lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin was capable of specifically selecting and sorting glioma-derived stem cell populations from an unsorted tumor stock and this subpopulation had proliferative properties similar to CD133+ cells in vitro and also had tumor-forming capability in vivo. Our preliminary results on a single cerebellar GBM suggest that GalNAc and GlcNAc are novel biomarkers for identifying glioma-derived stem cells and can be used to isolate cancer stem cells from unsorted cell populations, thereby creating new cell lines for research or clinical testing. PMID:22435486

  18. Lectin histochemistry of an ovine lysosomal storage disease with deficiencies of beta-galactosidase and alpha-neuraminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Murnane, R. D.; Ahern-Rindell, A. J.; Prieur, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Lectin histochemistry is a useful technique to identify and to localize in cells and tissues the terminal carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins and glycolipids. The specific diagnosis of some glycoprotein storage diseases was accomplished using lectin staining patterns, and such methods of diagnosis have been attempted for some glycolipid storage diseases. This technique was applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and frozen neural, hepatic, and renal tissues of sheep with an inherited lysosomal storage disease with deficiencies of beta-galactosidase and alpha-neuraminidase. The cytoplasm of central nervous system neurons of affected sheep in paraffin-embedded sections stained with peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and soybean agglutinin (SBA). The cytoplasm of neurons in frozen sections of these tissues stained with PNA, RCA-I, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). The cytoplasm of frozen and paraffin-embedded sections of liver and kidney of affected sheep stained with PNA, whereas paraffin-embedded sections also stained with RCA-I. These results suggest the stored material in this disease has terminal saccharide moieties consisting of beta-galactose, N-acetylneuraminic acid, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Paraffin processing altered lectin staining patterns. Although the staining pattern in this glycolipid storage disease was complex, lectin histochemistry may prove to be a useful technique for the characterization of storage products and for the diagnosis of lysosomal storage diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2508478

  19. Fraction A of armadillo submandibular glycoprotein and its desialylated product as sialyl-Tn and Tn receptors for lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Shen, F; Herp, A; Song, S C; Wu, J H

    1995-02-27

    Fraction A of the armadillo submandibular glycoprotein (ASG-A) is one of the simplest glycoproteins among mammalian salivary mucins. The carbohydrate side chains of this mucous glycoprotein have one-third of the NeuAc alpha 2-->6GalNAc (sialyl-Tn) sequence and two thirds of Tn (GalNAc alpha-->Ser/Thr) residues. Those of the desialylated product (ASG-Tn) are almost exclusively unsubstituted GalNAc residues (Tn determinant). When the binding properties of these glycoproteins were tested by a precipitin assay with Gal, GalNAc and GlcNAc specific lectins, it was found that ASG-Tn reacted strongly with all of the Tn-active lectins and completely precipitated Vicia villosa (VVL both B4 and mixture of A and B), Maclura pomifera (MPA), and Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin) lectins. However, it precipitated poorly or negligibly with Ricinus communis (RCA1); Dolichos biflorus (DBA); Viscum album, ML-I; Arachis hypogaea (PNA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA). The reactivity of ASG-A (sialyl-Tn) was as active as that of ASG-Tn with MPA and less or slightly less active than that of ASG-Tn with VVL-A+B, VVL-B4, HPA, WFA, and jacalin, as one-third of its Tn was sialylated. These findings indicate that ASG-A and its desialylated product (ASG-Tn) are highly useful reagents for the differentiation of Tn, T (Gal beta 1-->3GalNAc), A (GalNAc alpha 1-->3Gal) or Gal specific lectins and monoclonal antibodies against such epitopes.

  20. Genome sequencing reveals a new lineage associated with lablab bean and genetic exchange between Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans

    PubMed Central

    Aritua, Valente; Harrison, James; Sapp, Melanie; Buruchara, Robin; Smith, Julian; Studholme, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Common bacterial blight is a devastating seed-borne disease of common beans that also occurs on other legume species including lablab and Lima beans. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 26 strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans, the causative agents of this disease, collected over four decades and six continents. This revealed considerable genetic variation within both taxa, encompassing both single-nucleotide variants and differences in gene content, that could be exploited for tracking pathogen spread. The bacterial strain from Lima bean fell within the previously described Genetic Lineage 1, along with the pathovar type strain (NCPPB 3035). The strains from lablab represent a new, previously unknown genetic lineage closely related to strains of X. axonopodis pv. glycines. Finally, we identified more than 100 genes that appear to have been recently acquired by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli from X. fuscans subsp. fuscans. PMID:26500625

  1. Genome sequencing reveals a new lineage associated with lablab bean and genetic exchange between Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans.

    PubMed

    Aritua, Valente; Harrison, James; Sapp, Melanie; Buruchara, Robin; Smith, Julian; Studholme, David J

    2015-01-01

    Common bacterial blight is a devastating seed-borne disease of common beans that also occurs on other legume species including lablab and Lima beans. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 26 strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans, the causative agents of this disease, collected over four decades and six continents. This revealed considerable genetic variation within both taxa, encompassing both single-nucleotide variants and differences in gene content, that could be exploited for tracking pathogen spread. The bacterial strain from Lima bean fell within the previously described Genetic Lineage 1, along with the pathovar type strain (NCPPB 3035). The strains from lablab represent a new, previously unknown genetic lineage closely related to strains of X. axonopodis pv. glycines. Finally, we identified more than 100 genes that appear to have been recently acquired by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli from X. fuscans subsp. fuscans. PMID:26500625

  2. Evaluation of maize yield in an on-farm maize-soybean and maize-Lablab crop rotation systems in the Northern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okogun, J A; Sanginga, N; Abaidoo, R C

    2007-11-01

    An attempt was made to solving the problem of shortfall of fertilizer to maize production in the Northern Guinea Savanna (NGS) of Nigeria by harnessing the potentials of legume/cereal crop rotation in on-farm trials. The yield of maize that succeeded two soybean varieties and Lablab in a two-cycle of soybean/maize and Lablab/maize crop rotation in NGS Nigeria was assessed in researcher-managed and farmer-managed plots. Though maize that followed the soybean received between 5 kg N ha(-1) from improved soybean variety (TGx 1448-2E) and 17 kg N ha(-1) from farmer soybean variety (Samsoy-2) as N balance, this did not significantly (p = 0.05) affect the maize yields. The soybean shed 90-100% of its leaves at physiological maturity which resulted in about 110 kg N ha(-1) N uptake. This source of N might be one of the factors responsible for the increase in maize yield that followed soybean (20 to 24%) compared with continuous maize yield plot. Maize yield in previous Lablab plot was significantly (p = 0.05) higher than in all other treatments. Maize yield in farmer-managed plot ranged between 0.13 and 4.53 t ha(-1), maize yield in researcher-managed plot was over 200% higher than maize yield in farmer-managed plot because of poor crop management on the part of the farmer.

  3. The binucleate cell of okapi and giraffe placenta shows distinctive glycosylation compared with other ruminants: a lectin histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carolyn J P; Wilsher, Sandra A; Wooding, F B P; Benirschke, K; Allen, W R

    2015-02-01

    The placenta of ruminants contains characteristic binucleate cells (BNC) with a highly conserved glycan structure which evolved early in Ruminant phylogenesis. Giraffe and Okapi placentae also contain these cells and it is not known whether they have a similar glycan array. We have used lectin histochemistry to examine the glycosylation of these cells in these species and compare them with bovine BNC which have a typical ruminant glycan composition. Two placentae, mid and near term, from Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and two term placenta of Okapi (Okapia johnstoni) were embedded in resin and stained with a panel of 23 lectins and compared with near-term bovine (Bos taurus) placenta. Significant differences were found in the glycans of Giraffe and Okapi BNC compared with those from the bovine, with little or no expression of terminal αN-acetylgalactosamine bound by Dolichos biflorus and Vicia villosa agglutinins which instead bound to placental blood vessels. Higher levels of N-acetylglucosamine bound by Lycopersicon esculentum and Phytolacca americana agglutinins were also apparent. Some differences between Okapi and Giraffe were evident. Most N-linked glycans were similarly expressed in all three species as were fucosyl residues. Interplacentomal areas in Giraffe and Bovine showed differences from the placentomal cells though no intercotyledonary BNC were apparent in Okapi. In conclusion, Giraffidae BNC developed different glycan biosynthetic pathways following their split from the Bovidae with further differences evolving as Okapi and Giraffe diverged from each other, affecting both inter and placentomal BNC which may have different functions during development. PMID:25527317

  4. The binucleate cell of okapi and giraffe placenta shows distinctive glycosylation compared with other ruminants: a lectin histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carolyn J P; Wilsher, Sandra A; Wooding, F B P; Benirschke, K; Allen, W R

    2015-02-01

    The placenta of ruminants contains characteristic binucleate cells (BNC) with a highly conserved glycan structure which evolved early in Ruminant phylogenesis. Giraffe and Okapi placentae also contain these cells and it is not known whether they have a similar glycan array. We have used lectin histochemistry to examine the glycosylation of these cells in these species and compare them with bovine BNC which have a typical ruminant glycan composition. Two placentae, mid and near term, from Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and two term placenta of Okapi (Okapia johnstoni) were embedded in resin and stained with a panel of 23 lectins and compared with near-term bovine (Bos taurus) placenta. Significant differences were found in the glycans of Giraffe and Okapi BNC compared with those from the bovine, with little or no expression of terminal αN-acetylgalactosamine bound by Dolichos biflorus and Vicia villosa agglutinins which instead bound to placental blood vessels. Higher levels of N-acetylglucosamine bound by Lycopersicon esculentum and Phytolacca americana agglutinins were also apparent. Some differences between Okapi and Giraffe were evident. Most N-linked glycans were similarly expressed in all three species as were fucosyl residues. Interplacentomal areas in Giraffe and Bovine showed differences from the placentomal cells though no intercotyledonary BNC were apparent in Okapi. In conclusion, Giraffidae BNC developed different glycan biosynthetic pathways following their split from the Bovidae with further differences evolving as Okapi and Giraffe diverged from each other, affecting both inter and placentomal BNC which may have different functions during development.

  5. Persistent torticollis, facial asymmetry, grooved tongue, and dolicho-odontoid process in connection with atlas malformation complex in three family subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chehida, Farid Ben; Gharbi, Hassan; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Grill, Franz; Varga, Franz; Klaushofer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Congenital clefts and other malformations of the atlas are incidental findings identified while investigating the cervical spine following trauma. A persistent bifid anterior and posterior arch of the atlas beyond the age of 3–4 years is observed in skeletal dysplasias, Goldenhar syndrome, Conradi syndrome, and Down’s syndrome. There is a high incidence of both anterior and posterior spina bifida of the atlas in patients with metabolic disorders, such as Morquio’s syndrome [Baraitser and Winter in London dysmorphology database, Oxford University Press, 2005; Torriani, Lourenco in Rev Hosp Clin Fac Med Sao Paulo 53: 73–76, 2002]. We report two siblings and their mother, with congenital, persistent torticollis, plagiocephaly, facial asymmetry, grooved tongues, and asymptomatic “dolicho-odontoid process”. All are of normal intelligence. No associated Neurological dysfunction, paresis, apnoea, or failures to thrive were encountered. Radiographs of the cervical spine were non-contributory, but 3D CT scanning of this area allowed further visualisation of the cervico–cranial malformation complex in this family and might possibly explain the sudden early juvenile mortality. Agenesis of the posterior arch of the atlas and bifidity/clefting of anterior arch of the atlas associated with asymptomatic “dolicho-odontoid process” were the hallmark in the proband and his female sibling. Some of the features were present in the mother. All the family subjects were investigated. To the best of our knowledge the constellation of malformation complex in this family has not been previously reported. PMID:17245565

  6. Lectins in the investigation of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtin, V. M.; Yamskov, Igor A.

    1991-08-01

    Problems of the purification and characterisation are considered for approximately 270 receptors (including cell surface and organelle enzymes), which are glycoconjugates (mainly glycoproteins) from animals, plants and microorganisms, using various lectins (mainly lectin sorbents). An analysis has been carried out of the stages of lectin affinity chromatography of receptors (choice of detergent, use of organic solvents, elution with carbohydrates, etc.). Examples are given of procedures for the purification of receptors, including the use of paired columns and combination chromatography on lectins. The possibility of separating sub-populations of receptors using lectins has been demonstrated. Examples are given of the use of lectins in the analysis of the oligosaccharide structure of receptors. Cases are recorded of the interaction of receptors with endogenous lectins and of receptor lectins with endogenous glycoconjugates. It has been shown that lectins, in combination with glycosidases and antibodies, may be useful in the investigation of receptors. The bibliography contains 406 references.

  7. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  8. A review of fish lectins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Fai Cheung, Randy Chi; Wing Ng, Charlene Cheuk; Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Lectins have been reported from various tissues of a diversity of fish species including Japanese eel, conger eel, electric eel, bighead carp, gibel carp, grass carp, Arabian Gulf catfish, channel catfish, blue catfish, catfish, pike perch, perch, powan, zebrafish, toxic moray, cobia fish, steelhead trout, Japanese trout, Atlantic salmon, chinook salmon, olive rainbow smelt, rainbow smelt, white-spotted charr, tilapia, blue gourami, ayu, Potca fish, Spanish mackerel, gilt head bream, tench, roach, rudd, common skate, and sea lamprey. The tissues from which the lectins were isolated comprise gills, eggs, electric organ, stomach, intestine, and liver. Lectins have also been isolated from skin, mucus serum, and plasma. The lectins differ in molecular weight, number of subunits, glycosylation, sugar binding specificity and amino acid sequence. Their activities include antimicrobial, antitumor, immunoregulatory and a role in development. PMID:25929869

  9. Use of lectins in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review.

  10. Characterisation of Jack fruit lectin.

    PubMed

    Arslan, M I; Chulavatnatol, M

    2000-04-01

    Jack fruit (Artocarpus Heterophyllus) seed extract contains a lectin termed Jack fruit lectin (JFL) which possesses diversed biological properties. A detailed analysis of its properties has been lacking. The present investigation was initiated to study the detail properties of JFL. After extraction and purification on affigel galactosamine-agarose column, JFL was subjected to ND-PAGE. Several different charged species from ND-PAGE upon SDS-PAGE gave rise to two dissimilar trimeric subunit at 12.5 and 15.0 KDa and retain biological activity. It was possible to elute the subunit bands separately from polyacrylamide gel to investigate their biological activity. Each subunit was found to be retained the lectin activity. Agglutinating activity of smaller subunit was found to be more, may be due to the greater amount of the subunit. This also suggests that each unit of trimeric JFL have similar lectin activity.

  11. In vitro screening of plant lectins and tropical plant extracts for anthelmintic properties.

    PubMed

    Ríos-de Álvarez, L; Jackson, F; Greer, A; Bartley, Y; Bartley, D J; Grant, G; Huntley, J F

    2012-05-25

    Lectins are plant secondary metabolites (PSM) found in many forages and which may confer anthelmintic properties to gastrointestinal parasites through disrupting the development of parasitic larvae throughout its life cycle. In experiment 1, the ability of the plant lectins jacalin (JAC), concanavalin A (Con A), phytohemagglutinin E2L2 (PHA-E2L2), phytohemagglutinin L4 (PHA-L4), phytohemagglutinin E3L (PHA-E3L), kidney bean albumin (KBA), Robinia pseudoacacia agglutinin (RPA), Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA), Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MAA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) to disrupt the feeding of the first stage larvae (L(1)) of the sheep gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN) Teladorsagia circumcincta, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis was investigated using a larval feeding inhibition test (LFIT). Only PHA-E3L, WGA and Con A had a potent effect on disrupting larval feeding of all of the three species of GIN investigated. The lectin concentration required to inhibit feeding in 50% of L(1) (IC50) was 7.3±1.2, 8.3±1.4 and 4.3±1.7 μg/ml for PHA-E3L; 59.1±32.4, 58.7±11.9 and 8.1±7.0 μg/ml for Con A and 78.9±11.2, 69.4±8.1 and 28.0±14.1 μg/ml for WGA for T. circumcincta, H. contortus and T. colubriformis larvae, respectively (P=0.006). The addition of the lectin inhibitors fetuin, glucose/mannose or N-acetylglucosamine for PHA-E3L, Con A and WGA, respectively, caused an increase in the proportion of larvae that had fed at all concentrations for PHA-E3L only. In experiment 2, the effect of extracts from the tropical plants Azadiractha indica, Trichanthera gigantea, Morus alba, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala on the feeding behaviour of H. contortus L(1,) was examined. A. indica, T. gigantea and M. alba failed to inhibit 50% of larvae from feeding at concentrations up to 10mg plant extract per ml. In contrast, both G. sepium and L. leucocephala demonstrated

  12. Lectin-Like Constituents of Foods Which React with Components of Serum, Saliva, and Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R. J.; Dankers, I.

    1981-01-01

    Hot and cold aqueous extracts were prepared from 22 commonly ingested fruits, vegetables, and seeds. When tested by agar diffusion, extracts from 13 and 10 of the foods formed precipitin bands with samples of normal rabbit serum and human saliva, respectively; extracts from four of the foods also reacted with antigen extracts of strains of Streptococcus mutans. When added to rabbit antiserum, extracts from 18 of 21 foods tested inhibited reactivity with antigen extracts derived from S. mutans MT3. Extracts from 16 foods agglutinated whole S. mutans cells, whereas those from 10 foods agglutinated human erythrocytes of blood types A and B. The lectin-like activities of extracts which reacted with human saliva were studied further. Pretreatment of saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (S-HA) beads with extracts of bananas, coconuts, carrots, alfalfa, and sunflower seeds markedly reduced the subsequent adsorption of S. mutans MT3. Pretreatment of S-HA with banana extract also strongly inhibited adsorption of S. mutans H12 and S. sanguis C1, but it had little effect on attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii L13 or A. viscosus LY7. Absorption experiments indicated that the component(s) in banana extract responsible for inhibiting streptococcal adsorption to S-HA was identical to that which bound to human erythrocytes. The banana hemagglutinin exhibited highest activity between pH 7 and 8, and it was inhibited by high concentrations of glucosamine, galactosamine, and, to a lesser extent, mannosamine. Other sugars tested had no effect. The selective bacterial adsorption-inhibiting effect noted for banana extract was also observed in studies with purified lectins. Thus, pretreating S-HA with wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A inhibited adsorption of S. mutans MT3 cells, whereas peanut agglutinin, Ulex agglutinin, Dolichos agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin had little effect; none of these lectins affected attachment of A. viscosus LY7. Collectively, the observations suggest that

  13. Dietary Plant Lectins Appear to Be Transported from the Gut to Gain Access to and Alter Dopaminergic Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, a Potential Etiology of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jolene; Wang, Mingming; Wei, Wenqian; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Adhikari, Binita; King, Jason F.; King, Michael L.; Peng, Nan; Laine, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    Lectins from dietary plants have been shown to enhance drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of rats, be transported trans-synaptically as shown by tracing of axonal and dendritic paths, and enhance gene delivery. Other carbohydrate-binding protein toxins are known to traverse the gut intact in dogs. Post-feeding rhodamine- or TRITC-tagged dietary lectins, the lectins were tracked from gut to dopaminergic neurons (DAergic-N) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) [egIs1(Pdat-1:GFP)] where the mutant has the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fused to a dopamine transport protein gene labeling DAergic-N. The lectins were supplemented along with the food organism Escherichia coli (OP50). Among nine tested rhodamine/TRITC-tagged lectins, four, including Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E), Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Arachis hypogaea agglutinin (PNA), appeared to be transported from gut to the GFP-DAergic-N. Griffonia Simplicifolia and PHA-E, reduced the number of GFP-DAergic-N, suggesting a toxic activity. PHA-E, BS-I, Pisum sativum (PSA), and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (Succinylated) reduced fluorescent intensity of GFP-DAergic-N. PHA-E, PSA, Concanavalin A, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin decreased the size of GFP-DAergic-N, while BS-I increased neuron size. These observations suggest that dietary plant lectins are transported to and affect DAergic-N in C. elegans, which support Braak and Hawkes’ hypothesis, suggesting one alternate potential dietary etiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD). A recent Danish study showed that vagotomy resulted in 40% lower incidence of PD over 20 years. Differences in inherited sugar structures of gut and neuronal cell surfaces may make some individuals more susceptible in this conceptual disease etiology model. PMID:27014695

  14. Molecular Approach Coupled with Biochemical Attributes to Elucidate the Presence of DYMV in Leaf Samples of Lablab purpureus. L Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rai, Nagendra; Rai, Krishna Kumar; Venkataravanappa, V; Saha, Sujoy

    2016-03-01

    A laboratory study was delineated to ascertain the impact and the extent of Dolichos yellow mosaic virus (DYMV) on biochemical constituents and various enzyme levels in the leaves of hyacinth bean. DYMV-infected leaves of all the genotypes used in the study revealed significant and consistent changes in activities of CAT, APX, PPO, DHAR, and MDHAR paralleled with a compelling hike in proline levels. Unlike that in non-infected leaves of the genotypes VRSEM-301 and VRSEM-749, VRSEM-894 and VRSEM-855, the enzyme level did not alter much which extended equally with increased phenolics, suggesting a well-coordinated generation of free radicals thereby suppressing oxidative stress in the latter. The genotypes were also evaluated at molecular level for elucidating the presence of the virus by using five sets of primer pairs. Two primers viz., DAC1 and DAC2 witnessed the presence of the virus in both non-infected and infected leaves. The difference in the appearance and/or disappearance of bands according to non-infected to infect reverberates the variation between genotypes in defense against infection. PMID:26541159

  15. Antinutritional properties of plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José Tadeu A

    2004-09-15

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding (glyco)proteins which are ubiquitous in nature. In plants, they are distributed in various families and hence ingested daily in appreciable amounts by both humans and animals. One of the most nutritionally important features of plant lectins is their ability to survive digestion by the gastrointestinal tract of consumers. This allows the lectins to bind to membrane glycosyl groups of the cells lining the digestive tract. As a result of this interaction a series of harmful local and systemic reactions are triggered placing this class of molecules as antinutritive and/or toxic substances. Locally, they can affect the turnover and loss of gut epithelial cells, damage the luminal membranes of the epithelium, interfere with nutrient digestion and absorption, stimulate shifts in the bacterial flora and modulate the immune state of the digestive tract. Systemically, they can disrupt lipid, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, promote enlargement and/or atrophy of key internal organs and tissues and alter the hormonal and immunological status. At high intakes, lectins can seriously threaten the growth and health of consuming animals. They are also detrimental to numerous insect pests of crop plants although less is presently known about their insecticidal mechanisms of action. This current review surveys the recent knowledge on the antinutritional/toxic effects of plant lectins on higher animals and insects. PMID:15302522

  16. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins. PMID:20726799

  17. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins.

  18. Lectin binding and effects in culture on human cancer and non-cancer cell lines: examination of issues of interest in drug design strategies.

    PubMed

    Petrossian, Karineh; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2007-01-01

    By using a non-cancer and a cancer cell line originally from the same tissue (colon), coupled with testing lectins for cell binding and for their effects on these cell lines in culture, this study describes a simple multi-parameter approach that has revealed some interesting results that could be useful in drug development strategies. Two human cell lines, CCL-220/Colo320DM (human colon cancer cells, tumorigenic in nude mice) and CRL-1459/CCD-18Co (non-malignant human colon cells) were tested for their ability to bind to agarose microbeads derivatized with two lectins, peanut agglutinin (Arachis hypogaea agglutinin, PNA) and Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and the effects of these lectins were assessed in culture using the MTT assay. Both cell lines bound to DBA-derivatized microbeads, and binding was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but not by L-fucose. Neither cell line bound to PNA-derivatized microbeads. Despite the lack of lectin binding using the rapid microbead method, PNA was mitogenic in culture at some time points and its mitogenic effect displayed a reverse-dose response. This was also seen with effects of DBA on cells in culture. While this is a simple study, the results were statistically highly significant and suggest that: (1) agents may not need to bind strongly to cells to exert biological effects, (2) cell line pairs derived from diseased and non-diseased tissue can provide useful comparative data on potential drug effects and (3) very low concentrations of potential drugs might be initially tested experimentally because reverse-dose responses should be considered. PMID:17706752

  19. Effects of an oxidative agent and lectins on the binding inhibition of recombinant hepatitis a virus proteins to oyster digestive tissues.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Mu; Kim, Jong-Oh; Oh, Myung-Joo; Kim, Duwoon

    2011-01-01

    While the exact mechanism of hepatitis A virus (HAV) accumulation remains unclear, it has been demonstrated that viruses related to shellfish-borne gastroenteritis can bind to carbohydrates of oyster tissues. We investigated carbohydrate-binding sites to determine if they were related to the binding of HAV to carbohydrate moieties on oyster digestive tissues (DTs) using recombinant HAV proteins (rHAVPs). In addition, we evaluated lectins to determine if they influenced the inhibition of binding of rHAVPs to carbohydrates present in DT. DT that was treated with 0.5% potassium periodate allowed only 23% ± 3.6% and 33% ± 7.8% binding of VP1-P2A and VP1 rHAVPs, respectively, when compared with a control group (100%) treated with distilled water, indicating that carbohydrate-binding sites are strongly related to the binding of HAV. Soybean agglutinin (SBA) led to the greatest decrease in the binding affinity among six lectins (Helix pomatia, Dolichos biflorus, Ulex europaeus, SBA, Triticum vulgaris, and Arachis hypogaea) tested for inhibition of the binding of rHAVPs to DT, indicating that exposing the virus-contaminated DT to SBA might have the potential to depurate viral contaminants found in shellfish food products by high-affinity binding between SBA and rHAVPs, thus improving food safety.

  20. Effects of an oxidative agent and lectins on the binding inhibition of recombinant hepatitis a virus proteins to oyster digestive tissues.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Mu; Kim, Jong-Oh; Oh, Myung-Joo; Kim, Duwoon

    2011-01-01

    While the exact mechanism of hepatitis A virus (HAV) accumulation remains unclear, it has been demonstrated that viruses related to shellfish-borne gastroenteritis can bind to carbohydrates of oyster tissues. We investigated carbohydrate-binding sites to determine if they were related to the binding of HAV to carbohydrate moieties on oyster digestive tissues (DTs) using recombinant HAV proteins (rHAVPs). In addition, we evaluated lectins to determine if they influenced the inhibition of binding of rHAVPs to carbohydrates present in DT. DT that was treated with 0.5% potassium periodate allowed only 23% ± 3.6% and 33% ± 7.8% binding of VP1-P2A and VP1 rHAVPs, respectively, when compared with a control group (100%) treated with distilled water, indicating that carbohydrate-binding sites are strongly related to the binding of HAV. Soybean agglutinin (SBA) led to the greatest decrease in the binding affinity among six lectins (Helix pomatia, Dolichos biflorus, Ulex europaeus, SBA, Triticum vulgaris, and Arachis hypogaea) tested for inhibition of the binding of rHAVPs to DT, indicating that exposing the virus-contaminated DT to SBA might have the potential to depurate viral contaminants found in shellfish food products by high-affinity binding between SBA and rHAVPs, thus improving food safety. PMID:21219781

  1. Lectindb: a plant lectin database.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Nagasuma R; Kumar, Nirmal; Jeyakani, Justin; Singh, Desh Deepak; Gowda, Sharan B; Prathima, M N

    2006-10-01

    Lectins, a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins, are now widely recognized to play a range of crucial roles in many cell-cell recognition events triggering several important cellular processes. They encompass different members that are diverse in their sequences, structures, binding site architectures, quaternary structures, carbohydrate affinities, and specificities as well as their larger biological roles and potential applications. It is not surprising, therefore, that the vast amount of experimental data on lectins available in the literature is so diverse, that it becomes difficult and time consuming, if not impossible to comprehend the advances in various areas and obtain the maximum benefit. To achieve an effective use of all the data toward understanding the function and their possible applications, an organization of these seemingly independent data into a common framework is essential. An integrated knowledge base ( Lectindb, http://nscdb.bic.physics.iisc.ernet.in ) together with appropriate analytical tools has therefore been developed initially for plant lectins by collating and integrating diverse data. The database has been implemented using MySQL on a Linux platform and web-enabled using PERL-CGI and Java tools. Data for each lectin pertain to taxonomic, biochemical, domain architecture, molecular sequence, and structural details as well as carbohydrate and hence blood group specificities. Extensive links have also been provided for relevant bioinformatics resources and analytical tools. Availability of diverse data integrated into a common framework is expected to be of high value not only for basic studies in lectin biology but also for basic studies in pursuing several applications in biotechnology, immunology, and clinical practice, using these molecules.

  2. Lectins as markers for blood grouping.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fauzia; Khan, Rizwan H; Sherwani, Asma; Mohmood, Sameena; Azfer, Md A

    2002-12-01

    Lectins are unique proteins of varying biological importance. They are characterized by specific binding to carbohydrate residues, whether monosaccharides, disaccharides or polysaccharides. The sugar heads on the surface of the erythrocyte specify the different blood groups. Lectins, as an antigenic determinant of blood group, have come to be an important tool in the identification of different blood groups. A handful of lectins may be considered excellent reagents for anti-A, anti-B, anti-N etc, but the anti-A and anti-M are not yet regarded as commercially suitable antisera. Lectin from Vicia cracca has been proved to be a good anti-A, lectin from Dolichus biflorus can be used as anti-A1, and lectin from Griffonia simplicifolia as anti-B. Lectin from Vicia graminea is said to be a good typing reagent as Anti-N. On the other hand, the lectins involved in polyagglutination are absolutely essential as the reagent of choice and these cannot as yet be replaced by antibodies of any kind. Erythrocytes with exposed cryptantigens are significantly more sensitive to agglutination by certain lectins than by polyclonal antibodies. Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Polybrene, and Glycine max lectins are frequently used for the identification of different cryptantigens. The application of lectins as an anti-B reagent has proven to be as useful as human polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies. Besides their specificity, lectins are excellent reagents because of their lower cost and indigenous production. The importance of various lectins used as markers for blood grouping is discussed.

  3. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  4. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  5. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  6. Lectin engineering, a molecular evolutionary approach to expanding the lectin utilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In the post genomic era, glycomics--the systematic study of all glycan structures of a given cell or organism--has emerged as an indispensable technology in various fields of biology and medicine. Lectins are regarded as "decipherers of glycans", being useful reagents for their structural analysis, and have been widely used in glycomic studies. However, the inconsistent activity and availability associated with the plant-derived lectins that comprise most of the commercially available lectins, and the limit in the range of glycan structures covered, have necessitated the development of innovative tools via engineering of lectins on existing scaffolds. This review will summarize the current state of the art of lectin engineering and highlight recent technological advances in this field. The key issues associated with the strategy of lectin engineering including selection of template lectin, construction of a mutagenesis library, and high-throughput screening methods are discussed.

  7. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  8. CancerLectinDB: a database of lectins relevant to cancer.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Deepa; Jeyakani, Justin; Chauhan, Alok; Kumar, Nirmal; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-04-01

    The role of lectins in mediating cancer metastasis, apoptosis as well as various other signaling events has been well established in the past few years. Data on various aspects of the role of lectins in cancer is being accumulated at a rapid pace. The data on lectins available in the literature is so diverse, that it becomes difficult and time-consuming, if not impossible to comprehend the advances in various areas and obtain the maximum benefit. Not only do the lectins vary significantly in their individual functional roles, but they are also diverse in their sequences, structures, binding site architectures, quaternary structures, carbohydrate affinities and specificities as well as their potential applications. An organization of these seemingly independent data into a common framework is essential in order to achieve effective use of all the data towards understanding the roles of different lectins in different aspects of cancer and any resulting applications. An integrated knowledge base (CancerLectinDB) together with appropriate analytical tools has therefore been developed for lectins relevant for any aspect of cancer, by collating and integrating diverse data. This database is unique in terms of providing sequence, structural, and functional annotations for lectins from all known sources in cancer and is expected to be a useful addition to the number of glycan related resources now available to the community. The database has been implemented using MySQL on a Linux platform and web-enabled using Perl-CGI and Java tools. Data for individual lectins pertain to taxonomic, biochemical, domain architecture, molecular sequence and structural details as well as carbohydrate specificities. Extensive links have also been provided for relevant bioinformatics resources and analytical tools. Availability of diverse data integrated into a common framework is expected to be of high value for various studies on lectin cancer biology. CancerLectinDB can be accessed through

  9. Changes in nonnutritional factors and antioxidant activity during germination of nonconventional legumes.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Díaz, María Felicia; Jiménez, Tania; Benítez, Vanesa; Herrera, Teresa; Cuadrado, Carmen; Martín-Pedrosa, Mercedes; Martín-Cabrejas, María A

    2013-08-28

    The present study describes the effects of germination on nonnutritional factors and antioxidant activity in the nonconventional legumes Vigna unguiculata (cowpea), Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean), Lablab purpureus (dolichos), and Stizolobium niveum (mucuna). Protease inhibitors and lectins were detected in raw legumes and were significantly decreased during the germination. Regarding total and individual inositol phosphates (IP5-IP3), important reductions of IP6 and high increases in the rest of inositol phosphates were also detected during this process. In addition, total phenols, catechins, and proanthocyanidins increased, accompanied by an overall rise of antioxidant activity (79.6 μmol of Trolox/g of DW in the case of mucuna). Germination has been shown to be a very effective process to reduce nonnutritional factors and increase bioactive phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of these nonconventional legumes. For this reason, they could be used as ingredients to obtain high-value legume flours for food formulation. PMID:23909570

  10. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor from Lablab purpureus induced by drought increases tolerance to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Luming; Jiang, Yina; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Biao; Zhou, Pei; Wu, Tianlong

    2016-10-01

    Few regulators for drought tolerance have been identified in Lablab purpureus which is a multipurpose leguminous crop. The transcription factor MYB is involved in regulatory networks in response to abiotic and biotic stresses in plants. A novel R2R3-MYB factor in L. purpureus has been identified. An suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using root tissues of L. purpureus MEIDOU 2012 from well-watered and water-stress treatments that were subjected to drought stress for 10 days. In addition, the cDNA of LpMYB1 was identified based on the SSH library. The cDNA of LpMYB1 is 858 bp and encodes a 285-amino acid protein with a calculated mass of 33.4 kDa. The LpMYB1 protein localizes to the nucleus and has transactivation activity with the activation domain in the C terminal region of the protein. In LpMYB1 overexpressed Arabidopsis, the tolerance of transgenic seedlings to drought and salt was improved, and the germination potential of transgenic seeds increase in the presence of NaCl or ABA. LpMYB1 is a drought-responsive R2R3-MYB factor that can increase the drought and salt tolerance of LpMYB1-overexpressed Arabidopsis. PMID:27565983

  11. Morphological and reproductive characterization in hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus (L.) sweet germplasm with clinically proven nutraceutical and pharmaceutical traits for use as a medicinal food.

    PubMed

    Morris, John Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus, is used throughout Asia and Africa for human food and medicine with potential to be a source of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Hyacinth bean accessions were grown in Griffin, Georgia, from 2002 to 2004 and characterized for agronomic traits including branching, foliage, plant size, days to 50% maturity, and seed reproduction. The plants regenerated a range reaching more than 4,000 seeds. Assessment of variation was determined using principal component analysis. This paper also discusses evidence from literature reviews regarding clinical trials supporting possible uses of various hyacinth bean phytochemicals as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Hyacinth bean seeds and pods could be used as famine food worldwide where humans suffer from malnourishment and disease. The purposes of this study are to characterize regenerating hyacinth bean genetic resources for branching, foliage, plant size, days to 50% maturity, seed production, and flower traits, as well as to discuss evidence from clinical trials supporting potential uses of various hyacinth bean containing phytochemicals as medicinal food, nutraceuticals, and pharmaceuticals. PMID:22435478

  12. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  13. Sugared biomaterial binding lectins: achievements and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bojarová, P; Křen, V

    2016-07-19

    Lectins, a distinct group of glycan-binding proteins, play a prominent role in the immune system ranging from pathogen recognition and tuning of inflammation to cell adhesion or cellular signalling. The possibilities of their detailed study expanded along with the rapid development of biomaterials in the last decade. The immense knowledge of all aspects of glycan-lectin interactions both in vitro and in vivo may be efficiently used in bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, diagnostic and analytic biological methods. Practically applicable examples comprise photoluminescence and optical biosensors, ingenious three-dimensional carbohydrate microarrays for high-throughput screening, matrices for magnetic resonance imaging, targeted hyperthermal treatment of cancer tissues, selective inhibitors of bacterial toxins and pathogen-recognising lectin receptors, and many others. This review aims to present an up-to-date systematic overview of glycan-decorated biomaterials promising for interactions with lectins, especially those applicable in biology, biotechnology or medicine. The lectins of interest include galectin-1, -3 and -7 participating in tumour progression, bacterial lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IL), E. coli (Fim-H) and Clostridium botulinum (HA33) or DC-SIGN, receptors of macrophages and dendritic cells. The spectrum of lectin-binding biomaterials covered herein ranges from glycosylated organic structures, calixarene and fullerene cores over glycopeptides and glycoproteins, functionalised carbohydrate scaffolds of cyclodextrin or chitin to self-assembling glycopolymer clusters, gels, micelles and liposomes. Glyconanoparticles, glycan arrays, and other biomaterials with a solid core are described in detail, including inorganic matrices like hydroxyapatite or stainless steel for bioimplants. PMID:27075026

  14. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  15. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  16. Determination of sugar specificity of jackfruit lectin by a simple sugar-lectin binding assay using microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Wetprasit, N; Chulavatnatol, M

    1997-06-01

    Sugar-lectin binding assay was developed as a simple method which employed direct coating of microtiter plate with galactose-binding lectins. Biotin-galactose conjugate was used to bind to the immobilized lectins. The bound conjugate was then detected using streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase. Using the assay in conjunction with various competing carbohydrates, jackfruit lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus was found to be specific for alpha-anomer of galactoside with an aromatic residue.

  17. Diversity of lectins in Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their expression patterns under spiroplasma MR-1008 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huanxi; Du, Jie; Hui, Kai-Min; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jing; Xiu, Yunji; Yao, Wei; Wu, Ting; Meng, Qingguo; Gu, Wei; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2013-08-01

    Lectins play important roles in crustacean innate immunity through recognition of foreign pathogens. In this study, 20 lectins including C-type lectins [dual-carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) type and single-CRD type], L-type lectin, and lectin with low-density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) domain were identified from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The tissue distribution and expression patterns of these lectins under spiroplasma strain MR-1008 challenge were investigated. Most of the lectins were found to be mainly distributed in the hepatopancreas. Lectin5, Lectin14, Lectin17, and Lectin18 exhibited the highest expression level in the hemocytes, nerve, intestine, and heart, respectively. MrLec1 to MrLec6 (dual-CRD lectins) in the hepatopancreas were up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Single-CRD lectins reached the highest level at 72 h after spiroplasma challenge. Lectin9 and Lectin15 both belong to L-type lectins. At post-spiroplasma challenge, Lectin9 expression was up-regulated, whereas Lectin15 expression was down-regulated. Lectin11 with LDLa domain showed the highest level after 12 h Lectin18 and Lectin20, namely, CD209, were also up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Lectin14, a C-type lectin, quickly reached the highest level after 2 h Lectin16 showed the highest level after 72 h Lectin5 reached the highest level in cultured hemocytes after 6 h Lectin17 in the intestine and Lectin14 in the nerve were slightly up-regulated after 6 and 2 h, respectively. Our research results indicate that lectins may play important roles in early or late immune responses against spiroplasma challenge.

  18. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  19. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  20. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  1. Comprehensive list of lectins: origins, natures, and carbohydrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Tateno, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Haruko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the first lectin ricin was discovered. Since then, a wide variety of lectins (lect means "select" in Latin) have been isolated from plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, as well as viruses, and their structures and properties have been characterized. At present, as many as 48 protein scaffolds have been identified as functional lectins from the viewpoint of three-dimensional structures as described in this chapter. In this chapter, representative 53 lectins are selected, and their major properties that include hemagglutinating activity, mitogen activity, blood group specificity, molecular weight, metal requirement, and sugar specificities are summarized as a comprehensive table. The list will provide a practically useful, comprehensive list for not only experienced lectin users but also many other non-expert researchers, who are not familiar to lectins and, therefore, have no access to advanced lectin biotechnologies described in other chapters. PMID:25117264

  2. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  3. Lectin genes in the Frankia alni genome.

    PubMed

    Pujic, Petar; Fournier, Pascale; Alloisio, Nicole; Hay, Anne-Emmanuelle; Maréchal, Joelle; Anchisi, Stéphanie; Normand, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Frankia alni strain ACN14a's genome was scanned for the presence of determinants involved in interactions with its host plant, Alnus spp. One such determinant type is lectin, proteins that bind specifically to sugar motifs. The genome of F. alni was found to contain 7 such lectin-coding genes, five of which were of the ricinB-type. The proteins coded by these genes contain either only the lectin domain, or also a heat shock protein or a serine-threonine kinase domain upstream. These lectins were found to have several homologs in Streptomyces spp., and a few in other bacterial genomes among which none in Frankia EAN1pec and CcI3 and two in strain EUN1f. One of these F. alni genes, FRAAL0616, was cloned in E. coli, fused with a reporter gene yielding a fusion protein that was found to bind to both root hairs and to bacterial hyphae. This protein was also found to modify the dynamics of nodule formation in A. glutinosa, resulting in a higher number of nodules per root. Its role could thus be to permit binding of microbial cells to root hairs and help symbiosis to occur under conditions of low Frankia cell counts such as in pioneer situations. PMID:22159868

  4. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  5. Jacalin: an IgA-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Roque-Barreira, M C; Campos-Neto, A

    1985-03-01

    We previously reported that seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit) contain a lectin, which we call jacalin, that is both a potent T cell mitogen and an apparently T cell-independent activator of human B cells for the secretion of immunoglobulins. During the above experiments we noted a massive precipitation in cell cultures stimulated with greater than or equal to 100 micrograms of lectin. In this paper, we show that the precipitate is formed after the interaction of jacalin and the serum protein added to the culture medium. More importantly, we demonstrate that IgA is probably the major serum constituent precipitated by the lectin and that no IgG or IgM can be detected in the precipitates. In secretions such as colostrum, IgA is the only protein precipitated by jacalin. On the basis of this specificity we describe a simple and reliable affinity chromatography procedure for the purification of both human serum and colostrum IgA. Jacalin is a D-Gal binding lectin and should be a useful tool for studying of serum and secretory IgA.

  6. A mushroom lectin from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eui Cha; Kim, Ki Don; Bae, Chan Hyung; Kim, Ju Cheol; Kim, Dae Kyong; Kim, Ha Hyung

    2007-05-01

    A mushroom lectin has been purified from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris, which is one of the most popular mushrooms in eastern Asia used as a nutraceutical and in traditional Chinese medicine. This lectin, designated CML, exhibited hemagglutination activity in mouse and rat erythrocytes, but not in human ABO erythrocytes. SDS-PAGE of CML revealed a single band with a molecular mass of 31.0 kDa under both nonreducing and reducing conditions that was stained by silver nitrate, and a 31.4 kDa peak in a Superdex-200 HR gel-filtration column. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by sialoglycoproteins, but not in by mono- or disaccharides, asialoglycoproteins, or de-O-acetylated glycoprotein. The activity was maximal at pH 6.0-9.1 and at temperatures below 50 degrees C. Circular dichroism spectrum analysis revealed that CML comprises 27% alpha-helix, 12% beta-sheets, 29% beta-turns, and 32% random coils. Its binding specificity and secondary structure are similar to those of a fungal lectin from Arthrobotrys oligospora. However, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of CML differs greatly from those of other lectins. CML exhibits mitogenic activity against mouse splenocytes. PMID:17306462

  7. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  8. Differentiation of Bacillus anthracis and other Bacillus species by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, H B; Ezzell, J W; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1984-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis was agglutinated by several lectins, including those from Griffonia simplicifolia, Glycine max, Abrus precatorius, and Ricinus communis. Some strains of Bacillus cereus var. mycoides (B. mycoides) were strongly reactive with the lectin from Helix pomatia and weakly reactive with the G. max lectin. The differential interactions between Bacillus species and lectins afforded a means of distinguishing B. anthracis from other bacilli. B. cereus strains exhibited heterogeneity with respect to agglutination patterns by lectins but could readily be differentiated from B. anthracis and the related B. mycoides. Spores of B. anthracis and B. mycoides retained lectin receptors, although the heating of spores or vegetative cells at 100 degrees C resulted in a decrease in their ability to be specifically agglutinated. Fluorescein-conjugated lectin of G. max stained vegetative cells of B. anthracis uniformly, suggesting that the distribution of lectin receptors was continuous over the entire cellular surface. B. anthracis cells grown under conditions to promote the production of capsular poly(D-glutamyl peptide) were also readily agglutinated by the lectins, suggesting that the lectin reactive sites penetrate the polypeptide layer. Trypsin, subtilisin, lysozyme, and mutanolysin did not modify the reactivity of B. anthracis with the G. max agglutinin, although the same enzymes markedly diminished the interaction between the lectin and B. mycoides. Because the lectins which interact with B. anthracis are specific for alpha-D-galactose or 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-galactose residues, it is likely that the bacteria possess cell surface polymers which contain these sugars. Lectins may prove useful in the laboratory identification of B. anthracis and possibly other pathogenic Bacillus species, such as B. cereus. Images PMID:6418761

  9. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  10. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  11. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  12. ON VASCULAR STENOSIS, RESTENOSIS AND MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN

    PubMed Central

    KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; SKARE, Thelma L; RIBAS, Carmen Australia Paredes Marcondes; RAMOS, Gabriela Piovezani; PETISCO, Roberta Dombroski

    2016-01-01

    Mannose binding lectin is a lectin instrumental in the innate immunity. It recognizes carbohydrate patterns found on the surface of a large number of pathogenic micro-organisms, activating the complement system. However, this protein seems to increase the tissue damage after ischemia. In this paper is reviewed some aspects of harmful role of the mannose binding lectin in ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27120743

  13. Mannose-binding lectin in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Sarah; Dzwonek, Agnieszka; Klein, Nigel J

    2010-01-01

    Infection with HIV represents a significant global health problem, with high infection rates and high mortality worldwide. Treatment with antiretroviral therapy is inaccessible to many patients and efficacy is limited by development of resistance and side effects. The interactions of HIV with the human immune system, both innate and humoral, are complex and complicated by the profound ability of the virus to disable the host immune response. Mannose-binding lectin, a component of the innate immune system, has been demonstrated to play a role in host-virus interactions. This protein may have a key role in determining host susceptibility to infection, pathogenesis and progression of disease, and may contribute to the extensive variability of host response to infection. Further understanding and manipulation of the mannose-binding lectin response may represent a target for immunomodulation in HIV infection, which may, in conjunction with highly active antiretroviral therapy, allow development of a novel therapeutic approach to HIV infection. PMID:21218140

  14. Concept, strategy and realization of lectin-based glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Lectins are a diverse group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Each lectin has its own specificity profile. It is believed that lectins exist in all living organisms that produce glycans. From a practical viewpoint, lectins have been used extensively in biochemical fields including proteomics due to their usefulness as detection and enrichment tools for specific glycans. Nevertheless, they have often been underestimated as probes, especially compared with antibodies, because of their low affinity and broad specificity. However, together with the concept of glycomics, such properties of lectins are now considered to be suitable for the task of 'profiling' in order to cover a wider range of ligands. Recently there has been rapid movement in the field of proteomics aimed at the investigation of glycan-related biomarkers. This is partly because of limitations of the present approach of simply following changes in protein-level expression, without paying sufficient attention to the fact and effects of glycosylation. The trend is reflected in the frequent use of lectins in the contexts of glycoprotein enrichment and glycan profiling. However, there are many aspects to be considered in using lectins, which differ considerably from antibodies. In this article, the author, as a developer of two unique methodologies, frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) and the lectin microarray, describes critical points concerning the use of lectins, together with the concept, strategy and means to achieve advances in these emerging glycan profiling technologies. PMID:18390573

  15. Are vicilins another major class of legume lectins?

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana C; Monteiro, Sara V; Carrapiço, Belmira M; Ferreira, Ricardo B

    2014-01-01

    Legume lectins comprise a structurally related, Ca/Mn-dependent, widespread, abundant and well characterized lectin family when compared to the large number of lectins from other sources described in the literature. Strangely enough, no specific function has been assigned to them aside from a possible role in storage and/or defense. Using a recent and fine-tuned methodology capable of specific lectin identification, β-conglutin, Vicia faba vicilin and β-lathyrin, the vicilin storage globulins from Lupinus albus, V. faba and Lathyrus sativus, respectively, were shown to be capable of affinity binding to thoroughly washed erythrocyte membranes and of specific elution with appropriate sugars. Based on this evidence and on sparse data published in the literature, a second family of legume lectins is proposed: the 7S family of storage proteins from leguminous seeds, or family II of legume lectins. These lectins are also structurally related, widespread and well characterized. In addition, they self-aggregate in a Ca/Mg, electrostatic dependent manner and are even more abundant than the family I of legume lectins. Using the same evidence, reserve and defense roles may be attributed to family II of legume lectins.

  16. Antifungal properties of lectin and new chitinases from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Gozia, O; Ciopraga, J; Bentia, T; Lungu, M; Zamfirescu, I; Tudor, R; Roseanu, A; Nitu, F

    1993-08-01

    We have purified from potato tubers, the lectin STA devoid of chitinase activity and two chitinases devoid of lectin activity. Both enzymes are 16 kDa glycoproteins, and probably belong to a new family of plant chitinases. The respective antifungal properties of lectin and chitinases were studied by following their effects against early developmental stages of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal potato pathogen. Here we demonstrate that: (1) lectin does not inhibit mycelial growth but irreversibly inhibits conidia germination and alters the germ tubes; and (2) chitinases block mycelial growth as well as conidia germination and lyse germ tubes.

  17. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  18. Tomato lectin histochemistry for microglial visualization.

    PubMed

    Villacampa, Nàdia; Almolda, Beatriz; González, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    The use of different lectins for the study of microglial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) is a valuable tool that has been extensively used in the last years for the selective staining of this glial cell population, not only in normal physiological conditions, but also in a wide range of pathological situations where the normal homeostasis of the parenchyma is disturbed. In this chapter we accurately describe the methodology for the selective labelling of microglial cells by using the tomato lectin (TL), a protein lectin obtained from Lycopersicum esculentum with specific affinity for poly-N-acetyl lactosamine sugar residues which are found on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm of microglia. Here we describe how to perform this technique on vibratome, frozen, and paraffin sections for optical microscopy, as well as for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Using this methodology it is possible to visualize amoeboid microglia in the developing brain, ramified microglia in the adult, and activated/reactive microglia in the experimentally damaged brain. In addition, as TL also recognized sugar residues in endothelial cells, this technique is very useful for the study of the relationship established between microglia and the CNS vasculature. PMID:23813385

  19. Biosynthesis of the Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) Lectin in Ripening Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1988-03-01

    The biosynthesis and processing of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin were studied in vivo in ripening snowdrop ovaries. Using labeling and pulse chase labeling experiments it could be demonstrated that the snowdrop lectin is synthesized as a precursor of relative molecular weight (M(r)) 15,000 which is posttranslationally converted into the authentic lectin polypeptide of M(r) 13,000 with a half-life of about 6 hours. Gel filtration of an extract of [(3)H]leucine labeled ovaries on Sepharose 4B showed that a significant portion of the newly synthesized lectin is associated with the particulate fraction. When the organellar fraction was fractionated on isopycnic sucrose gradients this lectin banded in the same density region as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker enzyme NADH cytochrome c reductase. Both radioactivity in lectin and in enzyme activity shifted towards a higher density in the presence of 2 millimolar Mg-acetate indicating that the labeled lectin was associated with the rough ER. Labeled lectin could be chased from the ER with a half-life of 4 hours and then accumulated in the soluble fraction. Whereas the ER-associated lectin contains exclusively polypeptides of M(r) 15,000 the soluble fraction contains both precursor molecules and mature lectin polypeptides. The snowdrop lectin in the ER is fully capable of binding immobilized mannose. It is associated into tetramers with an appropriate molecular weight of 60,000. These results indicate that newly synthesized snowdrop lectin is transiently associated with the ER before transport and processing.

  20. Effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on hepatoma, choriocarcinoma, melanoma and osteosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B; Ooi, V E; Liu, W K

    2000-03-01

    The effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on human hepatoma (H3B), human choriocarcinoma (JAr), mouse melanoma (B16) and rat osteosarcoma (ROS) cell lines were investigated. Cell viability was estimated by uptake of crystal violet. Wheat germ lectin was the lectin with the most deleterious effect on the viability of H3B, JAr and ROS cell lines. The cytotoxicity of lectins with similar sugar-binding specificity to wheat germ lectin, including Maackia amurensis lectin and Solanum tuberosum lectin, was weaker than that of wheat germ lectin. N-acetylgalactosamine-and galactose-binding Tricholoma mongolicum lectin ranked third, after wheat germ lectin and Maackia amurensis lectin, with regard to its effect on H3B, and ranked, together with Maackia amurensis lectin, as the lectins with the second most pronounced effects on ROS. However, the cytotoxic effects of Tricholoma mongolicum lectin on JAr were much weaker than those of Maackia amurensis lectin, Solanum tuberosum lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin, Lens culinaris lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin possessed milder cytotoxicity than the remaining lectins. which were approximately equipotent. The mannose-binding Narcissus pseudonarcissus and Lens culinaris lectins were only weakly cytotoxic, the exception being a stronger effect on H3B. The N-acetylgalactosamine-binding Glycine max lectin and methylgalactose-binding Artocarpus integrifolia lectin similarly exhibited low cytotoxicity. It can thus be concluded that in general the ranking was wheat germ lectin > Maackia amurensis lectin approximately Trichloma mongolicum lectins > other aforementioned lectins in cytotoxicity. A particular lectin may manifest more conspicuous toxicity on certain cell lines and less on others.

  1. Assessment of lectin inactivation by heat and digestion.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Grant, G

    1998-01-01

    Proteins/glycoproteins from plants, particularly lectins, are more resistant to heat denaturation than animal proteins (1, 2). With legume seeds, whose lectin content is appreciable, this presents potentially serious problems in nutritional practice. Therefore, before they can be used safely, legume-based food/ feeds usually require thorough and expensive heat processing to inactivate antinutritive components. Indeed, dry or moist heating of seeds at 70°C for several h has little or no effect on their lectin activity (Fig. 1) and treatment at much higher temperatures is needed to inactivate the biological and antinutritional effects of legume lectins (1, 2). The safety aspect is even more serious with some monocot lectins, such as wheatgerm agglutinin or a number of oilseed lectins, such as peanut agglutinin and many others because they are extremely heat stable and normal cooking or other conventional heat treatments may fail to inactivate them (3) Thus, the best way to avoid potential harmful effects of these heat-resistant lectins is to limit their dietary intake to a minimum. Fig. 1. Loss of lectin activity during aqueous heat treatment of soybean at various temperatures. PMID:21374488

  2. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  3. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  4. Plant Lectins: Wheat Defense Strategy Against Hessian Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants produce a variety of defense proteins, including lectins in response to attack by phytophagous insects. Ultrastructural studies reveal that binding to insect gut structures and resistance to proteolytic degradation by insect digestive enzymes are the two main prerequisites for the lectins to...

  5. Combined biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking using lectins.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gareth W; Kail, Mark; Hollinshead, Michael; Vaux, David J

    2013-10-01

    We have tested the application of high-mannose-binding lectins as analytical reagents to identify N-glycans in the early secretory pathway of HeLa cells during subcellular fractionation and cytochemistry. Post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) pre-Golgi intermediates were separated from the ER on Nycodenz-sucrose gradients, and the glycan composition of each gradient fraction was profiled using lectin blotting. The fractions containing the post-ER pre-Golgi intermediates are found to contain a subset of N-linked α-mannose glycans that bind the lectins Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) but not lectins binding Golgi-modified glycans. Cytochemical analysis demonstrates that high-mannose-containing glycoproteins are predominantly localized to the ER and the early secretory pathway. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that GNA colocalizes with the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and the COPI coat protein β-COP. In situ competition with concanavalin A (ConA), another high-mannose specific lectin, and subsequent GNA lectin histochemistry refined the localization of N-glyans containing nonreducing mannosyl groups, accentuating the GNA vesicular staining. Using GNA and treatments that perturb ER-Golgi transport, we demonstrate that lectins can be used to detect changes in membrane trafficking pathways histochemically. Overall, we find that conjugated plant lectins are effective tools for combinatory biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking of glycoproteins.

  6. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  7. Biotoxicity assays for fruiting body lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Garbani, Mattia; Lüthy, Peter; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a specific class of fungal lectins, commonly referred to as fruiting body lectins, play a role as effector molecules in the defense of fungi against predators and parasites. Hallmarks of these fungal lectins are their specific expression in reproductive structures, fruiting bodies, and/or sclerotia and their synthesis on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Fruiting body lectins are released upon damage of the fungal cell and bind to specific carbohydrate structures of predators and parasites, which leads to deterrence, inhibition of growth, and development or even killing of these organisms. Here, we describe assays to assess the toxicity of such lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins toward three different model organisms: the insect Aedes aegypti, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. All three assays are based on heterologous expression of the examined proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and feeding of these recombinant bacteria to omnivorous and bacterivorous organisms. PMID:20816208

  8. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  9. Mitogenic effect of Parkia speciosa seed lectin on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Suvachittanont, W; Jaranchavanapet, P

    2000-12-01

    Mitogenic activity of a lectin, purified from Parkia speciosa seeds, on the isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from normal blood donors and patients with esophageal carcinoma was examined using [3H]thymidine incorporation. The lectin increases the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA of human lymphocytes. The activity of the lectin increased as its concentration was increased and then declined once the concentration passed an optimum point. The stimulant effect was also expressed using a proliferation index (PI): the ratio of [3H]thymidine incorporated into lymphocytes in the presence and absence of the lectin. The mitogenic activity of the lectin is comparable to those of the known T-cell mitogens, such as concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen. Only slightly less responsiveness was observed in the case of lymphocytes from esophageal cancer compared to lymphocytes from normal donors. PMID:11199124

  10. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  11. Nutritional evaluation of lectin-free soybeans for poultry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, M W; Parsons, C M; Hymowitz, T

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans in comparison with raw Kunitz trypsin inhibitor-free soybeans, raw conventional soybeans, and commercial heat processed soybean meal (SBM). Analyzed lectin values (milligrams per kilogram) were 7.2, 7.1, and < 0.00015 for the Kunitz-free, conventional, and lectin-free soybeans, respectively. Three experiments were conducted using New Hampshire x Columbian male chicks fed 23% CP dextrose-soybean diets from 8 to 17 d of age. Growth performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was greater (P < 0.05) than that of chicks fed raw conventional soybeans in all three experiments. However, performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was lower than that of chicks fed Kunitz-free soybeans or SBM. The SBM yielded weight gains and feed efficiencies that were much higher than those observed from any of the raw soybeans. True amino acid digestibility and TMEn of the lectin-free and conventional soybeans were determined using the precision-fed cecectomized rooster assay. Seven roosters were crop-intubated with 30 g of soybeans and excreta were collected for 48 h. Digestibility coefficients of most amino acids for lectin-free soybeans were 5 to 8 percentage units higher than those for conventional soybeans, but the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Likewise, the TMEn for lectin-free soybeans was 11% higher than that for raw conventional soybeans (3.577 vs 3.227 kcal/g DM) but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans is greater than raw conventional soybeans but is less than raw Kunitz-free soybeans and SBM, suggesting that trypsin inhibitor is a greater antinutritional factor than lectins. PMID:10023754

  12. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age. PMID:27237111

  13. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  14. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes. PMID:23176516

  15. Noncovalent PEGylation via Lectin-Glycopolymer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Antonik, Paweł M; Eissa, Ahmed M; Round, Adam R; Cameron, Neil R; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    PEGylation, the covalent modification of proteins with polyethylene glycol, is an abundantly used technique to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic proteins. The drawback with this methodology is that the covalently attached PEG can impede the biological activity (e.g., reduced receptor-binding capacity). Protein therapeutics with "disposable" PEG modifiers have potential advantages over the current technology. Here, we show that a protein-polymer "Medusa complex" is formed by the combination of a hexavalent lectin with a glycopolymer. Using NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), size exclusion chromatography, and native gel electrophoresis it was demonstrated that the fucose-binding lectin RSL and a fucose-capped polyethylene glycol (Fuc-PEG) form a multimeric assembly. All of the experimental methods provided evidence of noncovalent PEGylation with a concomitant increase in molecular mass and hydrodynamic radius. The affinity of the protein-polymer complex was determined by ITC and competition experiments to be in the micromolar range, suggesting that such systems have potential biomedical applications. PMID:27403588

  16. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  17. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  18. Potential immunomodulatory effects of plant lectins in Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Reis, Eliana A G; Athanazio, Daniel A; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; de Paulo Teixeira Pinto, Vicente; Carmo, Theomira M A; Reis, Alice; Trocolli, Graziela; Croda, Julio; Harn, Donald; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Reis, Mitermayer G

    2008-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding glycoproteins that can stimulate, in a non-antigen-specific fashion, lymphocytes, leading to proliferation and cytokine production. Some lectins are utilized as in vitro mitogenic lymphocyte stimulators and their use as immunomodulators against infectious diseases has been evaluated experimentally. In the experimental murine model, the immune response to schistosomiasis is Th1-like during the initial stage of infection, with a shift towards a Th2-like response after oviposition. We report the response of schistosomiasis patients' (n=37) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to stimulation by lectins, including newly isolated lectins from Brazilian flora, and by Schistosomamansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA). Cytokine production upon lectin stimulation ex vivo was assessed in PBMC supernatants, collected at 24 and 72 h, by sandwich ELISA to IL-5, IL-10, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In PBMC from infected patients all but one of the lectins induced a Th2-like cytokine response, characterized by elevated IL-5 production that was higher than that induced by SEA stimulation alone. Our results show that the Th2 environment present during schistosomiasis is not affected and that it may be further stimulated by the presence of lectins. PMID:18579103

  19. The insecticidal activity of recombinant garlic lectins towards aphids.

    PubMed

    Fitches, Elaine; Wiles, Duncan; Douglas, Angela E; Hinchliffe, Gareth; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-10-01

    The heterodimeric and homodimeric garlic lectins ASAI and ASAII were produced as recombinant proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The proteins were purified as functional dimeric lectins, but underwent post-translational proteolysis. Recombinant ASAII was a single homogenous polypeptide which had undergone C-terminal processing similar to that occurring in planta. The recombinant ASAI was glycosylated and subject to variable and heterogenous proteolysis. Both lectins showed insecticidal effects when fed to pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) in artificial diet, ASAII being more toxic than ASAI at the same concentration. Acute toxicity (mortality at < or =48 h exposure; similar timescale to starvation) was only apparent at the highest lectin concentrations tested (2.0 mg ml(-)1), but dose-dependent chronic toxicity (mortality at >3d exposure) was observed over the concentration range 0.125-2.0 mg ml(-1). The recombinant lectins caused mortality in both symbiotic and antibiotic-treated aphids, showing that toxicity is not dependent on the presence of the bacterial symbiont (Buchnera aphidicola), or on interaction with symbiont proteins, such as the previously identified lectin "receptor" symbionin. A pull-down assay coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting identified two abundant membrane-associated aphid gut proteins, alanyl aminopeptidase N and sucrase, as "receptors" for lectin binding. PMID:18707000

  20. Isolation and characterization of a lectin from Japanese mottled beans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Ahmad, Ameer Maqsood; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-07-01

    A 64-kDa dimeric lectin was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Japanese mottled beans. The purification protocol involved ion exchange chromatography with Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose and size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was adsorbed on both Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose columns. Finally, the lectin gave a sharp absorbance peak which corresponded to 64 kDa based on results of size exclusion chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulphate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis displayed a single band at around 32 kDa, indicating that the protein was dimeric. The hemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that the lectin showed specificity toward galactose. The lectin preserved hemagglutinating activity below 70 °C and at a pH range 3 - 12. The lectin was able to inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 cells and Hep G2 cells and possessed antifungal activity toward Mycosphaeralla arachidicola with an IC50 value of 3.9 µM. The activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was reduced by 61.9 % in the presence of the lectin at 6.25 µM concentration. PMID:24654854

  1. New sensitive detection method for lectin hemagglutination using microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adamová, Lenka; Malinovská, Lenka; Wimmerová, Michaela

    2014-10-01

    The blood group system AB0 is determined by the composition of terminal oligosaccharides on red blood cells. Thanks to this structural feature, these groups can be recognized by saccharide-recognizing compounds. Lectins are proteins that are able to reversibly bind saccharide structures. They generally occur as multimers and are known as hemagglutination agents. Hemagglutination is a process in which blood cells are cross-linked via multivalent molecules. Apart from lectins, hemagglutination can also be caused by antibodies or viruses. A hemagglutination assay is commonly used for the detection of multivalent molecules that recognize blood cells, in order to search for their sugar specificity. It is traditionally performed on a microtiter plate, where the lectin solution is serially diluted and the lowest concentration of lectin causing agglutination is detected. This experimental set-up is utilized further for testing lectin specificity via a hemagglutination inhibition assay. We have developed a new way of detecting hemagglutination using microscopy, which was tested on purified lectins as well as cell lysates. Hemagglutination was performed on a microscope slide directly and detected using a microscope. Comparison with the standard hemagglutination assay using microtiter plates revealed that microscopic approach is faster and more robust and allows fast determination of lectin activities immediately in bacterial cytosols.

  2. Intrinsic fluorescence studies on saccharide binding to Artocarpus integrifolia lectin.

    PubMed

    Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-10-01

    The combining region of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin has been studied by using the ligand-induced changes in the fluorescence of the lectin. The saccharide binding properties of the lectin show that C-1, C-2, C-4, and C-6 hydroxyl groups of D-galactose are important loci for sugar binding. The alpha-anomer of galactose binds more strongly than its beta-counterpart. Inversion in the configuration at C-4 as in glucose results in a loss of binding to the lectin. The C-6 hydroxyl group is also presumably involved in binding as D-fucose does not bind to the lectin. The lectin binds to the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (Gal beta(1----3)GalNAc) more strongly than the other disaccharides studied, viz. Gal beta (1----4) Gal and Gal beta (1----3) GlcNAc, which are topographically similar to T-antigen. This observation suggests that the combining region of Artocarpus lectin is complementary to that of T-antigen. Solvent accessibility of the protein fluorophores have been probed by the quenching of protein fluorescence by Iodide ion in the absence and presence of sugar. In the presence of sugar a slight inaccessibility of the fluorophores to the solvent has been observed.

  3. Multiple lectin detection by cell membrane affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana; Catarino, Sofia; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2012-05-01

    Assuming that lectins evolved to recognise relatively complex and branched oligosaccharides or parts of them, rather than simple sugars, a procedure based on lectin affinity binding to isolated erythrocyte (or any other cell type) membranes is proposed. This methodology was validated using six pure commercial lectins, as well as lectins from total protein extracts of Arbutus unedo leaves. All commercial lectins, as well as five polypeptides from A. unedo leaves bound to the glycosylated membrane receptors and were eluted by the corresponding sugars. When compared to the standard affinity chromatography procedure involving an individual sugar bound to a solid matrix, the new method provides a single-step, effective detection method for lectins and allows the rapid screening of their profile present in any unknown protein solution, indicates their biological carbohydrate affinities as well as their sugar specificities (if any), enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples, does not require any pre-purification steps, permits detection of additional lectins and provides data which are more relevant from the physiological point of view. PMID:22381939

  4. Effects of lectin ingestion on animal growth and internal organs.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A

    1998-01-01

    Lectins are essential and omnipresent plant constituents. As many foods are of plant origin, the daily ingestion of lectins by both humans and animals is appreciable. For example, in an ad hoc survey, 53 edible plants were shown to contain lectins and approx 30% of fresh and processed food regularly consumed by humans had significant hemagglutinating activity (1). The situation is potentially even more acute in animal nutrition because animal diet is less diverse than that of humans, and in most instances foodstuffs are not thoroughly heat-treated. This is particularly significant in the light of our finding a correlation between lectin activity and antinutritional effects (2). As in evolution, the mammalian gut has been regularly exposed to lectins, they must have played an important part in the development of the digestive system. Although based on experience, most overtly toxic plants have been eliminated from the diet, many plants with appreciable lectin content are still consumed because it has not been easy to relate growth retardation and antinutritional, mild allergic or other subclinical symptoms to the food consumed or a particular component of it. As some lectins are at least partially heat stable and most survive the passage through the gut in functionally and immunologically intact form, their interaction with the gut surface epithelium (3) can damage the gut at high dietary intakes and this may lead to digestive disorders/diseases in some instances. However, it is not generally appreciated that not all lectins are antinutrients and indeed some may have beneficial effects and be of potential value in nutritional practice. Accordingly, it is of considerable importance to establish whether a lectin has deleterious or potentially beneficial effects for mammals. Unfortunately at present there are no adequate in vitro methods to do this reliably and it is usually necessary to carry out in vivo animal feeding studies, despite their relatively cumbersome

  5. The gene for stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin) encodes both a lectin and a chitinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, D R; Raikhel, N V

    1992-06-01

    Chitin-binding proteins are present in a wide range of plant species, including both monocots and dicots, even though these plants contain no chitin. To investigate the relationship between in vitro antifungal and insecticidal activities of chitin-binding proteins and their unknown endogenous functions, the stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin, UDA) cDNA was cloned using a synthetic gene as the probe. The nettle lectin cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding 374 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed a 21-amino acid putative signal sequence and the 86 amino acids encoding the two chitin-binding domains of nettle lectin. These domains were fused to a 19-amino acid "spacer" domain and a 244-amino acid carboxyl extension with partial identity to a chitinase catalytic domain. The authenticity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by deduced amino acid sequence identity with sequence data obtained from tryptic digests, RNA gel blot, and polymerase chain reaction analyses. RNA gel blot analysis also showed the nettle lectin message was present primarily in rhizomes and inflorescence (with immature seeds) but not in leaves or stems. Chitinase enzymatic activity was found when the chitinase-like domain alone or the chitinase-like domain with the chitin-binding domains were expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first example of a chitin-binding protein with both a duplication of the 43-amino acid chitin-binding domain and a fusion of the chitin-binding domains to a structurally unrelated domain, the chitinase domain. PMID:1375935

  6. Fine specificities of two lectins from Cymbosema roseum seeds: a lectin specific for high-mannose oligosaccharides and a lectin specific for blood group H type II trisaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Cavada, Benildo S; Nagano, Celso S; Rocha, Bruno Am; Benevides, Raquel G; Nascimento, Kyria S; de Sousa, Luiz Ag; Oscarson, Stefan; Brewer, C Fred

    2011-07-01

    The legume species of Cymbosema roseum of Diocleinae subtribe produce at least two different seed lectins. The present study demonstrates that C. roseum lectin I (CRL I) binds with high affinity to the "core" trimannoside of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cymbosema roseum lectin II (CRL II), on the other hand, binds with high affinity to the blood group H trisaccharide (Fucα1,2Galα1-4GlcNAc-). Thermodynamic and hemagglutination inhibition studies reveal the fine binding specificities of the two lectins. Data obtained with a complete set of monodeoxy analogs of the core trimannoside indicate that CRL I recognizes the 3-, 4- and 6-hydroxyl groups of the α(1,6) Man residue, the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the α(1,3) Man residue and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside. CRL I possesses enhanced affinities for the Man5 oligomannose glycan and a biantennary complex glycan as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans. On the other hand, CRL II distinguishes the blood group H type II epitope from the Lewis(x), Lewis(y), Lewis(a) and Lewis(b) epitopes. CRL II also distinguishes between blood group H type II and type I trisaccharides. CRL I and CRL II, respectively, possess differences in fine specificities when compared with other reported mannose and fucose recognizing lectins. This is the first report of a mannose-specific lectin (CRL I) and a blood group H type II-specific lectin (CRL II) from seeds of a member of the Diocleinae subtribe.

  7. Structure and Function of Mammalian Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kevin; Evers, David; Rice, Kevin G.

    Over the past three decades the field of glycobiology has expanded beyond a basic understanding of the structure and biosynthesis of glycoprotein, proteoglycans, and glycolipids toward a more detailed picture of how these molecules afford communication through binding to mammalian lectins. Although the number of different mammalian lectin domains appears to be finite and even much smaller than early estimates predicated based on the diversity of glycan structures, nature appears capable of using these in numerous combinations to fine tune specificity. The following provides an overview of the major classes of mammalian lectins and discusses their glycan binding specificity. The review provides a snapshot of the field of glycobiology that continues to grow providing an increasing number of examples of biological processes that rely upon glycan-lectin binding.

  8. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit. PMID:17590430

  9. Isolation and characterization of a lectin from Annona muricata seeds.

    PubMed

    Damico, D C S; Freire, M G M; Gomes, V M; Toyama, M H; Marangoni, S; Novello, J C; Macedo, M L R

    2003-11-01

    A lectin with a high affinity for glucose/mannose was isolated from Annona muricata seeds (Annonaceae) by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE SP-5 PW column, and molecular exclusion on a Protein Pak Glass 300 SW column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) yielded two protein bands of approximately 14 kDa and 22 kDa. However, only one band was seen in native PAGE. The Mr of the lectin estimated by fast-performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration on Superdex 75 was 22 kDa. The lectin was a glycoprotein with 8% carbohydrate (neutral sugar) and required divalent metal cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+) for full activity. Amino acid analysis revealed a large content of Glx, Gly, Phe, and Lys. The lectin agglutinated dog, chicken, horse, goose, and human erythrocytes and inhibited the growth of the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Colletotrichum musae.

  10. Sweet complementarity: the functional pairing of glycans with lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H-J; Manning, J C; Kopitz, J; André, S; Kaltner, H

    2016-05-01

    Carbohydrates establish the third alphabet of life. As part of cellular glycoconjugates, the glycans generate a multitude of signals in a minimum of space. The presence of distinct glycotopes and the glycome diversity are mapped by sugar receptors (antibodies and lectins). Endogenous (tissue) lectins can read the sugar-encoded information and translate it into functional aspects of cell sociology. Illustrated by instructive examples, each glycan has its own ligand properties. Lectins with different folds can converge to target the same epitope, while intrafamily diversification enables functional cooperation and antagonism. The emerging evidence for the concept of a network calls for a detailed fingerprinting. Due to the high degree of plasticity and dynamics of the display of genes for lectins the validity of extrapolations between different organisms of the phylogenetic tree yet is inevitably limited. PMID:26956894

  11. Insights into animal and plant lectins with antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Renata de Oliveira; Machado, Leandro Dos Santos; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2015-01-05

    Lectins are multivalent proteins with the ability to recognize and bind diverse carbohydrate structures. The glyco -binding and diverse molecular structures observed in these protein classes make them a large and heterogeneous group with a wide range of biological activities in microorganisms, animals and plants. Lectins from plants and animals are commonly used in direct defense against pathogens and in immune regulation. This review focuses on sources of animal and plant lectins, describing their functional classification and tridimensional structures, relating these properties with biotechnological purposes, including antimicrobial activities. In summary, this work focuses on structural-functional elucidation of diverse lectin groups, shedding some light on host-pathogen interactions; it also examines their emergence as biotechnological tools through gene manipulation and development of new drugs.

  12. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  13. Protozoa lectins and their role in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins of non-immune origin that agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc., and bind reversibly to carbohydrates present on the apposing cells. They have at least two carbohydrate binding sites and their binding can be inhibited by one or more carbohydrates. Owing to carbohydrate binding specificity of lectins, they mediate cell-cell interactions and play role in protozoan adhesion and host cell cytotoxicity, thus are central to the pathogenic property of the parasite. Several parasitic protozoa possess lectins which mediate parasite adherence to host cells based on their carbohydrate specificities. These interactions could be exploited for development of novel therapeutics, targeting the adherence and thus helpful in eradicating wide spread of protozoan diseases. The current review highlights the present state knowledge with regard to protozoal lectins with an emphasis on their haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, characteristics and also their role in pathogenesis notably as adhesion molecules, thereby aiding the pathogen in disease establishment.

  14. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata.

    PubMed

    Work, Thierry M; Farah, Yael

    2014-03-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis. PMID:24518620

  15. Potential of KM+ lectin in immunization against Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Clarissa R; Cavassani, Karen A; Gomes, Regis B; Teixeira, Maria Jania; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Cavada, Benildo S; da Silva, João Santana; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2006-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr), Pisum arvense (PAA) and Artocarpus integrifolia (KM+) lectins as immunostimulatory molecules in vaccination against Leishmania amazonensis infection. Although they induced IFN-gamma production, the combination of the lectins with SLA antigen did not lead to lesion reduction. However, parasite load was largely reduced in mice immunized with KM+ lectin and SLA. KM+ induced a smaller inflammatory reaction in the air pouch model and was able to inhibit differentiation of dendritic cells (BMDC), but to induce maturation by enhancing the expression of MHC II, CD80 and CD86. These observations indicate the modulatory role of plant lectins in leishmaniasis vaccination may be related to their action on the initial innate response.

  16. Lectin-binding properties of different Leishmania species.

    PubMed

    Andrade, A F; Saraiva, E M

    1999-07-01

    Carbohydrate cell-surface residues on stationary promastigotes of 19 isolates of Leishmania were studied with a panel of 27 highly purified lectins, which were specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, and sialic acid. The specificity of the cell-surface carbohydrates was analyzed by agglutination and radioiodinated lectin-binding assays. L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) donovani were agglutinated by 12 and 10 of the 27 lectins used, respectively. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (Jacalin) was incapable of agglutinating the tested species of the donovani complex, and this result was confirmed by radioiodinated Jacalin-binding assays. Jacalin had an average of 3.8 x 10(6) receptors/L. (L) amazonensis promastigote and bound with an association constant of 5 x 10(6) M(-1).

  17. Bacterial Isolation by Lectin-Modified Microengines

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana; Orozco, Jahir; Kagan, Daniel; Guix, Maria; Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Claussen, Jonathan C.; Merkoçi, Arben; Wang, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    New template-based self-propelled gold/nickel/polyaniline/platinum (Au/Ni/PANI/Pt) microtubular engines, functionalized with the Concanavalin A (ConA) lectin bioreceptor, are shown to be extremely useful for the rapid, real-time isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria from fuel-enhanced environmental, food and clinical samples. These multifunctional microtube engines combine the selective capture of E. coli with the uptake of polymeric drug-carrier particles to provide an attractive motion-based theranostics strategy. Triggered release of the captured bacteria is demonstrated by movement through a low-pH glycine-based dissociation solution. The smaller size of the new polymer-metal microengines offers convenient, direct and label-free optical visualization of the captured bacteria and discrimination against non-target cells. PMID:22136558

  18. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  19. A multiplex lectin-channel monitoring method for human serum glycoproteins by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong Heon; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-02-01

    A mass profiling method and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based quantitative approach were used to analyze multiple lectin-captured fractions of human serum using different lectins such as aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), phytohemagglutinin-L(4) (L-PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) to quantitatively monitor protein glycosylation diversity. Each fraction, prepared by multiple lectin-fractionation and tryptic digestion, was analyzed by 1-D LC-MS/MS. Semi-quantitative profiling showed that the list of glycoproteins identified from each lectin-captured fraction is significantly different according to the used lectin. Thus, it was confirmed that the multiplex lectin-channel monitoring (LCM) using multiple lectins is useful for investigating protein glycosylation diversity in a proteome sample. Based on the semi-quantitative mass profiling, target proteins showing lectin-specificity among each lectin-captured fraction were selected and analyzed by the MRM-based method in triplicate using each lectin-captured fraction (average CV 7.9%). The MRM-based analysis for each lectin-captured fraction was similar to those obtained by the profiling experiments. The abundance of each target protein measured varied dramatically, based on the lectin-specificity. The multiplex LCM approach using MRM-based analyses is useful for quantitatively monitoring target protein glycoforms selectively fractionated by multiple lectins. Thus through multiplex LCM rather than single, we could inquire minutely into protein glycosylation states. PMID:22158852

  20. The effect of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst in vitro attachment to host cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Barry; Stover, Larry; Gillem, Ashley; Winters, Katherine; Leet, John H; Chauret, Christian

    2006-02-01

    The influence of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst agglutination and on attachment to both fixed Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and fixed HCT-8 (human colorectal epithelial) cells was examined. Oocyst cell wall characteristics were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Lectin-free oocysts were shown to adhere equally to both MDCK cells and HCT-8 cells. In MDCK cells, the addition of 1-25 microg/ml Codium fragile lectin, 10 microg/ml Maclura pomifera lectin, 10 microg/ml Helix pomatia lectin, and 10-200 microg/ml Artocarpus integrifolia lectin significantly increased attachment to at least 1 of the cell cultures as compared to oocysts incubated without any lectin. The lectin-enhanced attachment was reversed by co-incubation of lectin treated-oocysts with 250 mM of each specific sugar (for a given lectin). In agglutination assays, concentrations as low as 0.5 microg/ml of C. fragile, M. pomifera, and A. integrifolia lectin agglutinated oocysts within 60 min. Finally, in TEM samples, colloidal gold conjugated-lectins from A. integrifolia, C. fragile, H. pomatia, and M. pomifera attached to oocysts, and this could be competitively inhibited by a lectin-specific sugar. This suggests that C. parvum oocysts are highly reactive to N-acetyl galactosamine-binding lectins and that the presence of N-acetyl-galactosamine containing molecules on oocysts can potentially help in oocyst attachment to host cells.

  1. Assessment of Sauromatum guttatum lectin toxicity against Bactrocera cucurbitae.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Thakur, Kshema; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Kaur, Satwinder; Kaur, Amritpal; Singh, Jatinder

    2015-11-01

    Lectins are proteins that bind specifically to foreign glycans. Due to this binding property, these molecules have potential application as bioinsecticidal tools replacing conventional chemical insecticides. The present study involved purification of phytolectin from the tubers of Sauromatum guttatum by affinity chromatography on asialofetuin-linked silica matrix. The purity of the sample was checked by SDS-PAGE at pH 8.3. Purified lectin was incorporated in the artificial diet of a Dipteran model, Bactrocera cucurbitae at different concentrations (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 µgml(-1)). The lectin significantly affected various developmental parameters that were studied. Percentage pupation and percentage emergence was reduced to 44 % and 7.9%, respectively, at 80 µgml(-1) concentration as compared to control (100%). LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin was calculated to be 19.42 µgml(-1). Treatment of insect larvae with LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin suppressed the activity of hydrolytic enzymes (esterases and acid phosphatases) and oxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase). Thus, with low LC50 and high mortality (approximately 92% at 80 µgml(-1)) of the insect larvae, Sauromatum guttatum lectin offers a possibility to engineer crop plants for improved and safer agriculture. PMID:26688959

  2. Antifungal activity of lectins against yeast of vaginal secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno Severo; Siqueira, Ana Beatriz Sotero; de Cássia Carvalho Maia, Rita; Giampaoli, Viviana; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; de Lima, Adriana Nunes; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-imune origin. This group of proteins is distributed widely in nature and they have been found in viruses, microorganisms, plants and animals. Lectins of plants have been isolated and characterized according to their chemical, physical-chemical, structural and biological properties. Among their biological activities, we can stress its fungicidal action. It has been previously described the effect of the lectins Dviol, DRL, ConBr and LSL obtained from the seeds of leguminous plants on the growth of yeasts isolated from vaginal secretions. In the present work the experiments were carried out in microtiter plates and the results interpreted by both methods: visual observations and a microplate reader at 530nm. The lectin concentrations varied from 0.5 to 256μg/mL, and the inoculum was established between 65-70% of trammitance. All yeast samples isolated from vaginal secretion were evaluated taxonomically, where were observed macroscopic and microscopic characteristics to each species. The LSL lectin did not demonstrate any antifungal activity to any isolate studied. The other lectins DRL, ConBr and DvioL, showed antifungal potential against yeast isolated from vaginal secretion. These findings offering offer a promising field of investigation to develop new therapeutic strategies against vaginal yeast infections, collaborating to improve women's health. PMID:24031889

  3. Chemical modification studies of Artocarpus lakoocha lectin artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Ahmed, H; Chatterjee, B P

    1991-05-01

    The effect of chemical modification on an anti T-like lectin, artocarpin isolated from Artocarpus lakoocha seeds was investigated in order to identify the type of amino acids involved in its agglutinating activity. Modification of carboxyl groups, arginine and lysine residues, did not affect the lectin activity. However, modification of tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine residues led to a complete loss of its activity, indicating the involvement of these amino acids in the saccharide-binding ability. A protection was observed in the presence of inhibitory sugar. A marked decrease in the fluorescence emission was found when the tryptophan residues of lectin were modified. The circular dichroism spectra showed the presence of an identical pattern of conformation in the native and modified lectin, indicating that the loss in activity was due to modification only. The effect of pronase on artocarpin showed loss of activity whereas papain and trypsin had no effect. The specific activity of artocarpin remained unaltered on treatment with glycosidases but remarkable increase in the activity (of the same) was observed with xylanase treatment. Immunodiffusion studies with chemically modified lectin showed no gross structural changes, indicating that the group specific modifying agents did not alter the antigenic sites of the modified lectin.

  4. Identification of lectin binding proteins in human tears.

    PubMed

    Kuizenga, A; van Haeringen, N J; Kijlstra, A

    1991-12-01

    The identity of glycoproteins in stimulated normal human tears was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of tears onto minigels, blotting, and subsequent incubation with different biotinylated lectins (concanavalin A [Con A], peanut agglutinin [PNA], glycine max agglutinin [SBA], Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin [WGA, native form], Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin [Jacalin], and Pisum sativum agglutinin). Control proteins included purified secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) from human colostrum, human milk lactoferrin, and chicken-egg lysozyme. All samples were prepared in a denaturing (SDS) buffer under nonreducing and reducing conditions. The sIgA in tears and IgA (alpha) heavy chain fragments (reduced sample) were identified with most of the lectins tested. A particular high molecular weight (greater than 200 kD) protein fraction in tears that just entered the separation gel on SDS-PAGE was detected with WGA and Jacalin. This fraction stain poorly with silver. Tear lactoferrin was identified with all lectins used, although binding was low with SBA. Purified milk lactoferrin showed a poor reaction with Jacalin, but a protein in tears of similar mobility bound this lectin (nonreduced samples). Under both nonreducing and reducing conditions, tear-specific prealbumin in tears did not bind any of the lectins tested. Tear lysozyme only reacted with lectin after reduction. The techniques described may provide additional valuable information in addition to commonly used methods for tear protein analysis and further knowledge concerning the role of glycoproteins on the ocular surface.

  5. Purification and cDNA cloning of a lectin and a lectin-like protein from Apios americana Medikus tubers.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Irie, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Rikiya; Yonekura, Masami

    2014-01-01

    An Apios americana lectin (AAL) and a lectin-like protein (AALP) were purified from tubers by chromatography on Butyl-Cellulofine, ovomucoid-Cellulofine, and DEAE-Cellulofine columns. AAL showed strong hemagglutinating activity toward chicken and goose erythrocytes, but AALP showed no such activity toward any of the erythrocytes tested. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was not inhibited by mono- or disaccharides, but was inhibited by glycoproteins, such as asialofetuin and ovomucoid, suggesting that AAL is an oligosaccharide-specific lectin. The cDNAs of AAL and AALP consist of 1,093 and 1,104 nucleotides and encode proteins of 302 and 274 amino acid residues, respectively. Both amino acid sequences showed high similarity to known legume lectins, and those of their amino acids involved in carbohydrate and metal binding were conserved. PMID:25036952

  6. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  7. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity. PMID:25451301

  8. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function. PMID:25534591

  9. Partial characterization of the lectin of runner beans (Phaseolus coccieneus) var. Alubia.

    PubMed

    Armienta-Aldana, Eduardo; Moreno-Legorreta, Manuel; Armienta-Aldana, Ernesto; Laguna-Granados, Sandra Viviana

    2009-03-01

    We extracted and partial characterized lectin from runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus L.). This lectin shows a great affinity to fetuin-agarose column like others lectins and the electrophoretic gels point one band of approximately 45 kDa. In addition to the previous assays, we detected the presence of lectins by agglutination assays. We know that lectins are non-enzymatic proteins or glycoproteins that bind carbohydrates. The biological function of plant lectins is not fully understood, but they are hypothesized to be involved in a number of intrinsic processes. Many of those processes include hemagglutination. We believe that the P. coocineus lectin will be an important tool for know the properties of many lectins, included their capacity to detected and quantify tumor markers.

  10. Tissue binding pattern of plant lectins in benign and malignant lesions of thyroid.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, T; Augustine, J; Mathew, L; Aleykutty, M A; Nair, M B; Remani, P; Nair, M K

    1992-01-01

    N-acetyl D-galactosamine specific lectins were isolated from the seeds of Jack Fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) and D-galactose specific lectin was isolated from peanut (Arachis hypogaea). These lectins were conjugated to Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP) and were used to study the lectin binding properties of benign and malignant lesions of the thyroid. For comparison of the results 10 normal fresh autopsy specimens were included in the study. The Peanut lectin (PNL) and Jack fruit lectin (JFL) conjugates showed positive binding with the cells in different lesions, while Winged Bean Lectin (WBL), despite its having a common inhibitory sugar, showed no binding even after neuraminidase treatment. These lectins revealed difference in the composition of glycoconjugates of benign and malignant thyroid cells. The HRP conjugated JFL and PNL may be of use in distinguishing carcinomatous tissues from benign tissues which makes them potential tools in the differential diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  11. Mannan-Binding Lectin in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cedzyński, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide so research continues into underlying mechanisms. Since innate immunity and its potent component mannan-binding lectin have been proven to play an important role in the inflammatory response during infection and ischaemia-reperfusion injury, attention has been paid to its role in the development of cardiovascular complications as well. This review provides a general outline of the structure and genetic polymorphism of MBL and its role in inflammation/tissue injury with emphasis on associations with cardiovascular disease. MBL appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and, in consequence, coronary artery disease and also inflammation and tissue injury after myocardial infarction and heart transplantation. The relationship between MBL and disease is rather complex and depends on different genetic and environmental factors. That could be why the data obtained from animal and clinical studies are sometimes contradictory proving not for the first time that innate immunity is a “double-edge sword,” sometimes beneficial and, at other times disastrous for the host. PMID:24877121

  12. Lectin-like activity from Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Meade, N A; Staat, R H; Langley, S D; Doyle, R J

    1980-01-15

    An extract from the seeds of Persea americana possessed an erythro-agglutinating activity. The agglutinin was devoid of specificity for carbohydrates, but interacted readily with basic proteins or basic polyamino acids. The interaction between the agglutinin and egg-white lysozyme was not inhibited by chaotropic salts, but was sensitive to relatively low concentrations of urea. An affinity chromatographic procedure was developed in an effort to purify the agglutinin. Products from the chromatographic procedure were found not to contain higher specific agglutinating activities than the crude extract. Amino acid acid analyses of the extract showed the presence of relatively high proportions of glutamic and aspartic acids. In addition, the extract contained phosphorus and a visible chromophore. The agglutinin was resistant to detergents and denaturants, and proteases, nucleases, and other enzymes. The results suggest that, as opposed to other plant agglutinins, the active component from Persea is not a protein. Similarly, in contrast to many lectins, the agglutinin from Persea was not mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes. The agglutinin partially inhibited the mitogenesis of lymphocytes when the cells were treated with concanavalin A, or with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

  13. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches. PMID:25943580

  14. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  15. Identification of Lectins from Metastatic Cancer Cells through Magnetic Glyconanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kavunja, Herbert W.; Voss, Patricia G.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells can have characteristic carbohydrate binding properties. Previously, it was shown that a highly metastatic melanoma cell line B16F10 bound to galacto-side-functionalized nanoparticles much stronger than the corresponding less metastatic B16F1 cells. To better understand the carbohydrate binding properties of cancer cells, herein, we report the isolation and characterization of endogenous galactose binding proteins from B16F10 cells using magnetic glyconanoparticles. The galactose-coated magnetic glyconanoparticles could bind with lectins present in the cells and be isolated through magnet-mediated separation. Through Western blot and mass spectrometry, the arginine/serine rich splicing factor Sfrs1 was identified as a galactose-selective endogenous lectin, overexpressed in B16F10 cells, compared with B16F1 cells. In addition, galactin-3 was found in higher amounts in B16F10 cells. Finally, the glyconanoparticles exhibited a superior efficiency in lectin isolation, from both protein mixtures and live cells, than the corresponding more traditional microparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. Thus, the magnetic glyconanoparticles present a useful tool for discovery of endogenous lectins, as well as binding partners of lectins, without prior knowledge of protein identities. PMID:27110035

  16. The specificity of frutalin lectin using biomembrane models.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Thatyane M; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Cominetti, Márcia R; Selistre de-Araújo, Heloísa S; Zaniquelli, Maria E D; Beltramini, Leila M

    2010-08-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric alpha-d-galactose (d-Gal)-binding lectin that activates natural killer cells in vitro and promotes leukocyte migration in vivo. Because lectins are potent lymphocyte stimulators, understanding the interactions that occur between them and cell surfaces can help to the action mechanisms involved in this process. In this paper, we present a detailed investigation of the interactions of frutalin with phospho- and glycolipids using Langmuir monolayers as biomembrane models. The results confirm the specificity of frutalin for d-Gal attached to a biomembrane. Adsorption of frutalin was more efficient for the galactose polar head lipids, in contrast to the one for sulfated galactose, in which a lag time is observed, indicating a rearrangement of the monolayer to incorporate the protein. Regarding ganglioside GM1 monolayers, lower quantities of the protein were adsorbed, probably due to the farther apart position of d-galactose from the interface. Binary mixtures containing galactocerebroside revealed small domains formed at high lipid packing in the presence of frutalin, suggesting that lectin induces the clusterization and the forming of domains in vitro, which may be a form of receptor internalization. This is the first experimental evidence of such lectin effect, and it may be useful to understand the mechanism of action of lectins at the molecular level.

  17. Cloning and characterization of a monocot mannose-binding lectin from Crocus vernus (family Iridaceae).

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Astoul, C H; Barre, A; Rougé, P; Peumans, W J

    2000-08-01

    The molecular structure and carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectin from bulbs of spring crocus (Crocus vernus) has been determined unambiguously using a combination of protein analysis and cDNA cloning. Molecular cloning revealed that the lectin called C. vernus agglutinin (CVA) is encoded by a precursor consisting of two tandemly arrayed lectin domains with a reasonable sequence similarity to the monocot mannose-binding lectins. Post-translational cleavage of the precursor yields two equally sized polypeptides. Mature CVA consists of two pairs of polypeptides and hence is a heterotetrameric protein. Surface plasmon resonance studies of the interaction of the crocus lectin with high mannose-type glycans showed that the lectin interacts specifically with exposed alpha-1,3-dimannosyl motifs. Molecular modelling studies confirmed further the close relationships in overall fold and three-dimensional structure of the mannose-binding sites of the crocus lectin and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. However, docking experiments indicate that only one of the six putative mannose-binding sites of the CVA protomer is active. These results can explain the weak carbohydrate-binding activity and low specific agglutination activity of the lectin. As the cloning and characterization of the spring crocus lectin demonstrate that the monocot mannose-binding lectins occur also within the family Iridaceae a refined model of the molecular evolution of this lectin family is proposed.

  18. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively. PMID:24200894

  19. BSA-boronic acid conjugate as lectin mimetics.

    PubMed

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Pinnamaneni, Poornima; Nie, Huan; Li, Yu; Sun, Xue-Long

    2014-01-10

    We report bovine serum albumin (BSA)-boronic acid (BA) conjugates as lectin mimetics and their glyco-capturing capacity. The BSA-BA conjugates were synthesized by amidation of carboxylic acid groups in BSA with aminophenyl boronic acid in the presence of EDC, and were characterized by Alizarin Red S (ARS) assay and SDS-PAGE gel. The BSA-BA conjugates were immobilized onto maleimide-functionalized silica beads and their sugar capturing capacity and specificity were confirmed by ARS displacement assay. Further, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis of the glyco-capturing activity of the BSA-BA conjugates was conducted by immobilizing BSA-BA onto SPR gold chip. Overall, we demonstrated a BSA-BA-based lectin mimetics for glyco-capturing applications. These lectin mimetics are expected to provide an important tool for glycomics and biosensor research and applications.

  20. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-09

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport.

  1. Production and purification of active snowdrop lectin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, M; Powell, K S; Gatehouse, J A; Raemaekers, R; Newell, C A; Hamilton, W D

    1998-02-15

    Recombinant snowdrop lectin was produced in Escherichia coli from a cDNA clone encoding mature Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. After induction with isopropylthio-beta-D-galactoside, inclusion bodies from E. coli were solubilised and the G. nivalis agglutinin purified by metal-affinity chromatography using a carboxy-terminal hexahistidine tag. The protein was refolded on the metal-affinity column prior to elution. After purification, the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes to a dilution similar to that determined for 'native' lectin purified from snowdrop, and showed similar specific binding to mannose. The toxicity of the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin towards rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) was shown to be similar to that of 'native' G. nivalis agglutinin when incorporated into an artificial diet. The recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin is thus functionally similar to 'native' snowdrop lectin.

  2. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport. PMID:25584830

  3. Evaluating the Thickness of Multivalent Glycopolymer Brushes for Lectin Binding.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Jaroslav; Park, Hyunji; Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Böker, Alexander; Elling, Lothar; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is applied for investigating binding of lectins to multivalent glycopolymer brushes grafted from interdigital gold microelectrodes. By variation of the measuring frequency, EIS allows simultaneous analysis of binding at different subnanometer distances from the sensor surfaces. In this way, the binding dynamics along the brushes are quantified, giving an idea about the motion of the lectin through the brush layer. Two different brush lengths are investigated, revealing distinct dynamics of lectin binding due to changing topology of the brushes. Moreover, very low K D values in the nanomolar range are obtained. This unique platform may be used as sophisticated biosensor for detailed investigation of high-affinity protein binding to poly-mer layers. PMID:26096302

  4. Cell surface lectin-binding glycoconjugates on marine planktonic protists.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Emily C; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Martin-Cereceda, Mercedes; Novarino, Gianfranco; Wootton, Emma C

    2006-12-01

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions appear to play an important role in the phagocytosis of microbial prey by free-living protozoa. The present study utilizes FITC-labelled plant lectins to investigate the presence and localization of cell surface glycoconjugates on live and fixed planktonic protists (Dunaliella primolecta, Oxyrrhis marina, Goniomonas amphinema, Paraphysomonas vestita and Euplotes vannus). With live flagellate preparations, lectins primarily bound to external cell surfaces, with minimal internal staining observed. In contrast, cell fixation permeabilized cell membranes, allowing lectins to bind to internal structures, such as nuclear membranes and food vacuoles, interfering with the characterization of cell surface glycoconjugates. The method developed to label cell surface sugar moieties of live planktonic protists successfully overcomes the problems associated with fixation, and thus provides a useful protocol for future studies on protistan cell surface carbohydrate characterization.

  5. Effect of lectins from Diocleinae subtribe against oral Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Theodora Thays Arruda; Anderson Matias da Rocha, Bruno; Alves Carneiro, Victor; Vassiliepe Sousa Arruda, Francisco; Fernandes do Nascimento, Antônia Sâmia; Cardoso Sá, Nairley; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Holanda Teixeira, Edson

    2011-01-01

    Surface colonization is an essential step in biofilm development. The ability of oral pathogens to adhere to tooth surfaces is directly linked with the presence of specific molecules at the bacterial surface that can interact with enamel acquired pellicle ligands. In light of this, the aim of this study was to verify inhibitory and antibiofilm action of lectins from the Diocleinaesubtribe against Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus oralis. The inhibitory action against planctonic cells was assessed using lectins from Canavaliaensi formis (ConA), Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr), Canavalia maritima (ConM), Canavalia gladiata (CGL) and Canavalia boliviana (ConBol). ConBol, ConBr and ConM showed inhibitory activity on S. mutans growth. All lectins, except ConA, stimulated significantly the growth of S. oralis. To evaluate the effect on biofilm formation, clarified saliva was added to 96-well, flat-bottomed polystyrene plates, followed by the addition of solutions containing 100 or 200 µg/mL of the selected lectins. ConBol, ConM and ConA inhibited the S. mutans biofilms. No effects were found on S. oralis biofilms. Structure/function analysis were carried out using bioinformatics tools. The aperture and deepness of the CRD (Carbohydrate Recognition Domain) permit us to distinguish the two groups of Canavalia lectins in accordance to their actions against S. mutans and S. oralis. The results found provide a basis for encouraging the use of plant lectins as biotechnological tools in ecological control and prevention of caries disease. PMID:21525793

  6. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26638121

  7. Erythrina lectins detect the H/HI blood groups.

    PubMed

    Sudakevitz, D; Gilboa-Garber, N; Levene, C; Sela, R; Bhattacharyya, L

    1991-08-01

    The lectin purified from Erythrina corallodendron seeds which binds N-acetyllactosamine greater than N-acetyl-D-galactosamine greater than alpha and beta galactosides greater than D-galactose was examined for its ABO(H) blood group specificity. It has been shown that this lectin causes the strongest hemagglutination of O(H) and weakest of Oh(Bombay) red blood cells, and interacts with the H antigen in association with the I antigen. The reactions of Erythrina corallodendron and Erythrina indica lectins (which are similar in sugar specificity) with erythrocytes of different ABO(H) and Ii blood groups (the I bloods were all from adults and the i from either cord or adult bloods) revealed the following order of activity: O(H)I greater than A2 I greater than O(H)i adult greater than A2BI greater than BI greater than O(H)i cord greater than A1I greater than A1i adult greater than Bi cord greater than A1BI greater than Ai cord greater than ABi cord greater than OhI. The Erythrina indica lectin showed a lower differentiation between the agglutination of O(H) and Oh erythrocytes. Both Erythrina lectins exhibited H/HI blood group preference but were not inhibited by the saliva from ABO(H) "secretors". Thus they may be classified with the Cytisus sessilifolius, Lotus tetragonolobus and Laburnum alpinum lectins which are inhibited by lactose but not by H blood group substances in secretions.

  8. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Electrochemical potential of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin.

    PubMed

    Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira de; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Souza, Sandra Rodrigues de; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2012-06-01

    This work reports the isolation of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) and the determination of electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺ and human type O erythrocytes. MvRL showed the highest specific hemagglutinating activity with human type O erythrocytes and showed a single polypeptide band of 17 kDa on SDS-PAGE. MvRL hemagglutinating activity was neutralized after dialysis with EDTA, and addition of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ restored the activity. Electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of 100 mM Ca²⁺ (882 mV) and 60 mM Mg²⁺ (1051 mV) were higher (p<0.05) than in the presence of only 0.15 M NaCl (247 mV), indicating that the electrochemical system was sensitive to structural and physico-chemical changes promoted by these ions. MvRL potential did not change in the presence of type O erythrocytes. The electrochemical system was able to detect changes in electrochemical potentials of MvRL promoted by Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, even in a complex environment (human serum supplemented with 40 and 60mM of these ions). The study reveals that the stimulatory effect of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ on hemagglutinating activity may be linked to conformational change and/or alterations in surface charge distribution of MvRL. PMID:22197266

  10. Neutrophil haptotaxis induced by the lectin KM+.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, L; Martins, A R; Espreáfico, E M; Roque-Barreira, M C

    1998-05-01

    KM+ is a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces neutrophil migration in vitro and in vivo. This attractant activity was shown to be caused by haptotaxis rather than chemotaxis. The inhibition by D-mannose of the neutrophil attraction exerted by KM+, both in vitro and in vivo, supports the idea that haptotaxis is triggered in vivo by the sugar binding sites interacting with glycoconjugates located on the neutrophil surface and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study an in vivo haptotaxis assay was performed by intradermally (i.d.) injecting 125I-KM+ (200 ng), which led to a selective staining of loose connective tissue and vascular endothelium. The radiolabelled area exhibited a maximum increase (five-fold) in neutrophil infiltration 3 h after injection, relative to i.d. 200 ng 125I-BSA. We characterized the ex vivo binding of KM+ to tissue elements by immunohistochemistry, using paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded, untreated rat skin. Bound KM+ was detected with an affinity-purified rabbit IgG anti-KM+ and visualized with an alkaline phosphatase based system. KM+ binding to connective tissue and vascular endothelium was inhibited by preincubating KM+ with 0.4 mM D-mannose and was potentiated by heparan sulfate (100 microg ml(-1)). An in vitro assay carried out in a Boyden microchamber showed that heparan sulfate potentiated the attractant effect of 10 microg KM+ by 34%. The present data suggest that KM+ induces neutrophil migration in vivo by haptotaxis and that the haptotactic gradient could be provided by the interaction of the KM+ carbohydrate recognition site(s) with mannose-containing glycoconjugate(s) in vascular endothelium and connective tissue. Heparan sulfate would act as an accessory molecule, enhancing the KM+ tissue binding and potentiating the induced neutrophil haptotaxis.

  11. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  12. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  13. Structural and functional similarities of breadfruit seed lectin and jacalin.

    PubMed

    Pineau, N; Pousset, J L; Preud'Homme, J L; Aucouturier, P

    1990-03-01

    Aquous extracts from seeds of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) were compared by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two bands of the same size (12 and 15 kD) as the jacalin subunits were the major components in breadfruit seed extract. They strongly reacted with anti-jacalin antibodies by western blotting. The breadfruit lectin displayed the same IgAl and IgD precipitation specificity as jacalin in gel double diffusion experiments. It also stimulated in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results suggest that lectins from both species of Artocarpus are very similar.

  14. Lectin extracts of champedak seeds demonstrate selective stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Gendeh, G S; Jaafar, M I

    1992-06-01

    The effect of extracts of champedak (Artocarpus integer) seed lectin on the proliferation of normal human lymphocyte was investigated. The IgA1 binding lectin was demonstrated to stimulate the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Action of the lectin on enriched T and B cell populations demonstrated T lymphocyte specificity. The lectin was not mitogenic to B lymphocytes. Optimal stimulation of proliferative response was achieved when cells were subjected to 5 days exposure to the crude lectin at 20 micrograms/ml.

  15. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin(s): use and applications in chromosome studies of lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Soares, M B; Armada, J L; Soares, V M; Seuánez, H N

    1982-01-01

    A simple procedure for extracting a lectin from the seeds of the jackfruit, Artocarpus integrifolia, is described. The extracts had an average protein concentration of 13.3 mg/ml, and were strongly erythroagglutinating with a 10(6) titre. Erythroagglutination was shown to be non-specific for A1-B-0 erythrocytes. Lymphoblastic transformation and mitogenic stimulation occurred in lymphocyte cultures both in man and Rhesus monkey, and chromosome preparations were obtained. Such preparations were of good quality and were adequate for chromosome analysis with chromosome banding techniques. In man, the response to the mitogenic stimulation did not vary significantly between individuals. In Rhesus monkey, where Phaseolus vulgaris phytohaemagglutinin produced a weaker mitogenic stimulation than in man, jacalin proved to be very effective.

  16. Lectin-binding sites in epithelial cells of the mouse prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Kentaro; Yoshida, Ayaka; Muragishi, Ryoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The prostate is an exocrine gland in the male reproductive tract that secretes seminal fluids. To gain insight into the cytochemical properties of prostatic epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in mouse prostate sections were examined by lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns were observed, depending on the type of lectins present in the epithelia. Luminal cells reacted specifically with mannose-binding lectins (Galanthus nivalis lectin, Hippeastrum hybrid lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin) and Maclura pomifera lectin in all lobes of the prostate. Luminal cells also expressed galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and fucose residues in the lateral and ventral lobes. Basal cells expressed GlcNAc and fucose, and reacted with Datura stramonium lectin and Aleuria aurantia lectin in all lobes. These results indicate that in the mouse prostate, the selectivity of lectin-binding sites for distinct cell types and lobe-dependent staining may relate to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, some lectins selectively bound to prostatic epithelial cells, indicating their potential use as markers for the histopathological evaluation of prostatic diseases, cancer diagnosis, or male infertility. PMID:26004072

  17. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  18. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  19. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  20. Binding of mannose-functionalized dendrimers with pea (Pisum sativum) lectin.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Kristian H; Udelhoven, Rachel A; Strohmeyer, Gregory C; Cloninger, Mary J

    2005-01-01

    Lectins are invaluable tools for chemical biology because they recognize carbohydrate arrays. Multivalent carbohydrate binding by lectins is important for processes such as bacterial and viral adhesion and cancer metastasis. A better understanding of mammalian lectin binding to carbohydrate arrays is critical for controlling these and other cellular recognition processes. Plant lectins are excellent model systems for the study of multivalent protein-carbohydrate interactions because of their robustness and ready availability. Here, we describe binding studies of mannose-functionalized poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to a mitogenic lectin from Pisum sativum (pea lectin). Hemagglutination and precipitation assays were performed, and results were compared to those obtained from concanavalin A (Con A), a lectin that has been studied in more detail. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments are also described.

  1. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on mistletoe (Viscum album) lectin-mediated toxicity and immunomodulatory activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Jung, Pil-Mun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on the reduction of the toxicity of mistletoe lectin using both in vitro and in vivo models. To extract the lectin from mistletoe, an (NH4)2SO4 precipitation method was employed and the precipitant purified using a Sepharose 4B column to obtain the pure lectin fraction. Purified lectin was then gamma-irradiated at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 kGy, or heated at 100 °C for 30 min. Toxic effects of non-irradiated, irradiated, and heat-treated lectins were tested using hemagglutination assays, cytotoxicity assays, hepatotoxicity, and a mouse survival test and immunological response was tested using cytokine production activity. Hemagglutination of lectin was remarkably decreased (P < 0.05) by irradiation at doses exceeding 10 kGy and with heat treatment. However, lectin irradiated with 5 kGy maintained its hemagglutination activity. The cytotoxicity of lectin was decreased by irradiation at doses over 5 kGy and with heat treatment. In experiments using mouse model, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) levels were decreased in the group treated with the 5 kGy irradiated and heat-treated lectins as compared to the intact lectin, and it was also shown that 5 kGy irradiated and heat-treated lectins did not cause damage in liver tissue or mortality. In the result of immunological response, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL-6) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the 5 kGy gamma-irradiated lectin treated group. These results indicate that 5 kGy irradiated lectin still maintained the immunological response with reduction of toxicity. Therefore, gamma-irradiation may be an effective method for reducing the toxicity of lectin maintaining the immune response. PMID:23847758

  3. Architectures of Multivalent Glycomimetics for Probing Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, Martina

    Well-defined multivalent glycoconjugates are valued tools in glycoscience and they are particularly valuable for the investigation of carbohydrate-lectin interactions. In addition to the relatively globularly shaped glycodendrimers many other designs have been realized. This chapter gives an overview on the common different architectures and their chemical synthesis by focussing on the achievements made since 2001.

  4. Membrane adsorbers comprising grafted glycopolymers for targeted lectin binding

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Husson, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    This work details the design and testing of affinity membrane adsorbers for lectin purifications that incorporate glucose-containing glycopolymers. It is the selective interaction between the sugar residues of the glycopolymer and the complementary carbohydrate-binding domain of the lectin that provides the basis for the isolation and purification of lectins from complex biological media. The design approach used in these studies was to graft glycopolymer ‘tentacles’ from macroporous regenerated cellulose membranes by atom transfer radical polymerization. As shown in earlier studies, this design approach can be used to prepare high-productivity membrane adsorbers. The model lectin, concanavalin A (conA), was used to evaluate membrane performance in bind-and-elute purification, using a low molecular weight sugar for elution. The membrane capacity for binding conA was measured at equilibrium and under dynamic conditions using flow rates of 0.1 and 1.0 mL/min. The first Damkohler number was estimated to relate the adsorption rate to the convective mass transport rate through the membrane bed. It was used to assess whether adsorption kinetics or mass transport contributed the primary limitation to conA binding. Analyses indicate that this system is not limited by the accessibility of the binding sites, but by the inherent rate of adsorption of conA onto the glycopolymer. PMID:25866416

  5. Momordica charantia seed lectin: toxicity, bacterial agglutination and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Nabi, Md Mahamodun; Nurujjaman, Md; Abu Reza, Md; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Uz Zaman, Rokon; Khalid-Bin-Ferdaus, Khandaker Md; Amin, Ruhul; Khan, Md Masudul Hasan; Hossain, Md Anowar; Uddin, Md Salim; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat

    2015-03-01

    In last three decades, several studies were carried out on the D-galactose-specific lectin of Momordica charantia seeds (MCL). In the present study, in vitro growth inhibition (8-23 %) at different concentrations (6-24 μg/ml) of MCL was observed against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. MCL also showed 28, 45, and 75 % growth inhibitions against EAC cells when administered 1.2, 2.0, and 2.8 mg/kg/day (i.p.), respectively for five consequent days in vivo in mice. After lectin treatment, the level of red blood cell and hemoglobin was increased significantly with the decrease of white blood cell and maintained the normal level when compared with EAC-bearing control and normal mice without EAC cells. Although MCL caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase of EAC cells, any irregular shape or apoptotic morphological alterations in the lectin-treated EAC cells was not observed by an optical and fluorescence microscope. Lectin showed toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii with an LC50 value of 49.7 μg/ml. Four out of seven pathogenic bacteria were agglutinated by MCL in the absence of inhibitory sugar D-lactose/D-galactose. In conclusion, MCL showed strong cytotoxic effect and therefore can be used as a potent anticancer chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:25542240

  6. Cancer Biomarker Discovery: Lectin-Based Strategies Targeting Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David; Mao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker discovery can identify molecular markers in various cancers that can be used for detection, screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease progression. Lectin-affinity is a technique that can be used for the enrichment of glycoproteins from a complex sample, facilitating the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers associated with a disease state. PMID:22710864

  7. Interaction of the tobacco lectin with histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Schouppe, Dieter; Ghesquière, Bart; Menschaert, Gerben; De Vos, Winnok H; Bourque, Stéphane; Trooskens, Geert; Proost, Paul; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Els J M

    2011-03-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) agglutinin or Nictaba is a member of a novel class of plant lectins residing in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of tobacco cells. Since tobacco lectin expression is only observed after the plant has been subjected to stress situations such as jasmonate treatment or insect attack, Nictaba is believed to act as a signaling protein involved in the stress physiology of the plant. In this paper, a nuclear proteomics approach was followed to identify the binding partners for Nictaba in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of tobacco cv Xanthi cells. Using lectin affinity chromatography and pull-down assays, it was shown that Nictaba interacts primarily with histone proteins. Binding of Nictaba with histone H2B was confirmed in vitro using affinity chromatography of purified calf thymus histone proteins on a Nictaba column. Elution of Nictaba-interacting histone proteins was achieved with 1 m N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). Moreover, mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the Nictaba-interacting histone proteins are modified by O-GlcNAc. Since the lectin-histone interaction was shown to be carbohydrate dependent, it is proposed that Nictaba might fulfill a signaling role in response to stress by interacting with O-GlcNAcylated proteins in the plant cell nucleus. PMID:21224338

  8. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... proteins derived from plants and lower animals that cause cell agglutination in the presence of...

  9. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... proteins derived from plants and lower animals that cause cell agglutination in the presence of...

  10. Purification, characterization, and biological activities of broccolini lectin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Zhang, Ting; Guo, Xiaolei; Ma, Chungwah; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-01-01

    Plant lectins have displayed a variety of biological activities. In this study, for the first time, a 27 kDa arabinose- and mannose-specific lectin from Broccolini (Brassica oleracea Italica × Alboglabra), named as BL (Broccolini lectin), was purified by an activity-driven protocol. Mass spectrometry analysis and database search indicated that no matches with any plant lectin were found, but BL contained some peptide fragments (QQQGQQGQQLQQVISR, QQGQQQGQQGQQLQQVISR and VCNIPQVSVCPF QK). BL exhibited hemagglutinating activity against chicken erythrocytes at 4 µg/mL. BL retained full hemagglutinating activity at pH 7-8 and temperature 30-40°C, and had an optimal activity in Ca(2+) solution. Bioactivity assay revealed that BL exhibited dose-dependent inhibition activity on 5 bacterial species with IC50 values of 143.95-486.33 μg/mL, and on 3 cancer cells with IC50 values of 178.82-350.93 μg/mL. Notably, 5-fold reduction in IC50 values was observed on normal L-O2 vs cancerous HepG-2 cells (924.35 vs. 178.82 μg/mL). This suggests that BL should be promising in food and medicine. PMID:25737003

  11. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proteins derived from plants and lower animals that cause cell agglutination in the presence of certain... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. Lectin cytochemistry in the exfoliative cytology of uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Remani, P; Pillai, K R; Haseenabeevi, V M; Ankathil, R; Bhattathiri, V N; Nair, M K; Vijayakumar, T

    1994-01-01

    A lectin was isolated from the seeds of jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and purified using a column of immobilized N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. This jack fruit lectin (JFL) was then conjugated to horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) type VI and used to study the cell surface carbohydrate profile of the cytological smears of the uterine cervix using diaminobenzidine as substrate. Cervical smears from 15 healthy individuals and 65 patients with dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and carcinoma of uterine cervix were used for the study. Normal cells showed weak binding in the membrane as well as cytoplasm, whereas carcinomatous cells showed strong binding towards JFL. Carcinoma in situ cells showed a binding pattern similar to that of carcinoma. Dysplastic cells showed difference in binding in mild, moderate and severe dysplasia. The intensity of binding increased with the severity of the dysplasia. The nature and intensity of binding of jack fruit lectin with cancer tissues suggest that this lectin may be of use as a diagnostic aid in exfoliative cytology.

  13. Lectin histochemistry of microvascular endothelium in chick and quail musculature.

    PubMed

    Nanka, O; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J; Pfüller, U; Valásek, P; Halata, Z; Schumacher, U; Grim, M

    2001-11-01

    The lectin binding pattern of muscular microvessels in chick, quail and chick/quail chimeras was analysed. Paraffin wax sections of muscles from embryonic and adult animals were used. The biotin-labelled lectins were detected by avidin-alkaline phosphatase complex. The following lectins bound to muscular microvessels including arterioles, capillaries and venules of both species: SNA-I (Sambucus nigra agglutinin), MAA (Maackia amurensis agglutinin), AIA (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin), VAA-I, VAA-II and VAA-III (Viscum album agglutinin I-III), WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), LEA (Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin). Endomysium and basement membranes of muscle fibres were also stained to a variable extent and intensity. Only SNA-I stained almost exclusively the endothelium of blood vessels. WFA (Wisteria floribunda agglutinin) bound to the quail endothelium only. MPA (Maclura pomifera agglutinin) marked vessels in adult muscles of chick and quail, but embryonic vessels were stained in quail only. Our results show that lectin histochemistry is a useful tool for visualisation of microvasculature in avian species. In particular, WFA and MPA can be used to determine the origin of endothelia in chick/quail chimeras.

  14. Antibiotic activity of lectins from marine algae against marine vibrios.

    PubMed

    Liao, W-R; Lin, J-Y; Shieh, W-Y; Jeng, W-L; Huang, R

    2003-07-01

    Saline and aqueous ethanol extracts of marine algae and the lectins from two red algal species were assayed for their antibiotic activity against marine vibrios. Experimental studies were also carried out on the influence of environmental factors on such activity, using batch cultures. The results indicated that many of the saline extracts of the algal species were active and that the activity was selective against those vibrios assayed. The algal extracts were active against Vibrio pelagius and the fish pathogen V. vulnificus, but inactive against V. neresis. Algal lectins from Eucheuma serra (ESA) and Galaxaura marginata (GMA) strongly inhibited V. vulnificus but were inactive against the other two vibrios. The antibacterial activity of algal extracts was inhibited by pretreatment with various sugars and glycoprotein. Extracts of the two red algae, E. serra and Pterocladia capillacea, in saline and aqueous ethanol, inhibited markedly the growth rate of V. vulnificus at very low concentrations. Culture results indicated that metabolites active against V. vulnificus were invariably produced in P. capillacea over a wide range of temperature, light intensity, and nutritional conditions. Enhanced antibacterial activity occurred when P. capillacea was grown under higher irradiance, severe nutrient stress and moderate temperature (20 degrees C), reflecting the specific antibiotic characteristics of this alga. The strong antibiotic activity of lectins towards fish pathogenic bacteria reveals one of the important roles played by algal lectins, as well as the potential high economic value of those marine algae assayed for aquaculture and for biomedical purposes. PMID:12884128

  15. Mushroom lectin protects arsenic induced apoptosis in hepatocytes of rodents.

    PubMed

    Rana, Tanmoy; Bera, Asit Kumar; Das, Subhashree; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Pan, Diganta; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasish; De, Sumanta; Das, Subrata Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Acute and chronic arsenic exposure result in toxicity both in human and animal beings and cause many hepatic and renal manifestations. The present study stated that mushroom lectin prevents arsenic-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis was measured by morphological alterations, cell proliferation index (CPI), phagocytic activity (nitro blue tetrazolium index; NBT), nitric oxide (NO) production, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activity. Arsenic exposure at 5 μM in the form of sodium arsenite resulted in significant elevation of deformed cells, NO production, TUNEL stained nuclei of hepatocytes, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activity. But the CPI and NBT index were significantly declined in arsenic-treated hepatocytes. The beneficial effect of mushroom lectin at 10 μg/mL, 20 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL) showed increased CPI and phagocytic activity. Mushroom lectin at those concentrations reduced deformed cells, NO production, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activity of hepatocytes. But significant better protection was observed in 50 μg/mL mushroom lectin-treated hepatocytes. This finding may be of therapeutic benefit in people suffering from chronic arsenic exposure.

  16. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, T. V.; Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1977-01-01

    Highly purified soybean lectin (SBL) was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-SBL) or tritium (3H-SBL) and repurified by affinity chromatography. FITC-SBL was found to bind to living cells of 15 of the 22 Rhizobium japonicum strains tested. The lectin did not bind to cells of the other seven R. japonicum strains, or to cells of any of the nine Rhizobium strains tested which do not nodulate soybean. The binding of the lectin to the SBL-positive strains of R. japonicum was shown to be specific and reversible by hapten inhibition with d-galactose or N-acetyl-d-galactosamine. The lectin-binding properties of the SBL-positive R. japonicum strains were found to change substantially with culture age. The percentage of cells in a population exhibiting fluorescence after exposure to FITC-SBL varied between 0 and 70%. The average number of SBL molecules bound per cell varied between 0 and 2 × 106. While most strains had their highest percentage of SBL-positive cells and maximum number of SBL-binding sites per cell in the early and midlog phases of growth, one strain had a distinctly different pattern. The SBL-negative strains did not bind lectin at any stage of growth. Quantitative binding studies with 3H-SBL indicated that the affinity constant for binding of SBL to its receptor sites on R. japonicum is approximately 4 × 107m−1. Many of the binding curves were biphasic. An inhibitor of SBL binding was found to be present in R. japonicum culture filtrates. PMID:16660121

  17. Urtica dioica agglutinin. A superantigenic lectin from stinging nettle rhizome.

    PubMed

    Galelli, A; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1993-08-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is an unusual plant lectin that differs from all other known plant lectins with respect to its molecular structure and its extremely low specific agglutination activity. We recently reported that this small lectin (8.5 kDa) is a T cell mitogen distinguishable from classical T cell lectin mitogens by its ability to discriminate a particular population of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as its capacity to induce an original pattern of T cell activation and cytokine production. The mechanism by which UDA activates T cells was investigated and compared with the conventional T cell mitogen Con A and the known superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Our data show that T cell proliferation induced by UDA is strictly dependent on AC expressing MHC class II molecules but is not MHC restricted. This proliferation can be partially inhibited by anti-I-A or anti-I-E mAb and completely blocked by a mAb recognizing monomorphic determinants on the Ia molecule. UDA indeed binds to specific carbohydrate structures present on class II molecules. UDA-induced T cell stimulation is dependent on TCR recognition of the unprocessed intact molecule in association with various Ia molecules. T cell response to UDA is clonally expressed and correlates with particular TCR V beta gene families usage. This stimulation leads to a sixfold enrichment of V beta 8.3+ T cells within 3 days. Therefore, UDA appears to use the same molecular mechanism as structurally unrelated bacterial or retroviral superantigens and we propose that this lectin is a superantigen. UDA, which is not a pathogenicity factor, could provide a useful probe for the analysis of T cell activation by superantigens. PMID:8345184

  18. Properties of Lectins in the Root and Seed of Lotononis bainesii1

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ian J.; Strijdom, Barend W.

    1984-01-01

    A lectin was purified from the root of Lotononis bainesii Baker by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-blood group substance A + H. The molecular weight of the lectin was estimated by gel filtration to be 118,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the lectin was a tetramer composed of two slightly different subunits with respective molecular weights of 32,000 and 35,000. The lectin had a hexose content of 12% (w/w) and contained the sugars fucose, glucosamine, mannose, and xylose. Root lectin hemagglutination was preferentially inhibited by disaccharides with terminal nonreducing galactose residues. Antigens capable of cross-reaction with root lectin antibody were not detected in the seed of L. bainesii. A lectin from the seed of L. bainesii was partially purified by adsorption to pronase-treated rabbit erythrocytes. The lectin preparation had a molecular weight of approximately 200,000. Galactose and galactono-1,4-lactone inhibited seed lectin hemagglutination but lactose was ineffective. There was no evidence that the root of L. bainesii contained material antigenically related to the seed lectin. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16663508

  19. Comprehensive profiling of accessible surface glycans of mammalian sperm using a lectin microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that cell surface glycans or glycocalyx play important roles in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of the sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic research (sperm glycobiology) and clinical studies, such as diagnostics of infertility. As a group of natural glycan binders, lectin is an ideal tool for cell surface glycan profiling. However, because of the lack of effective technology, only a few lectins have been tested for lectin-sperm binding profiles. To address this challenge, we have developed a procedure for high-throughput probing of mammalian sperm with 91 lectins on lectin microarrays. Normal sperm from human, boar, bull, goat and rabbit were collected and analyzed on the lectin microarrays. Positive bindings of a set of ~50 lectins were observed for all the sperm of 5 species, which indicated a wide range of glycans are on the surface of mammalian sperm. Species specific lectin bindings were also observed. Clustering analysis revealed that the distances of the five species according to the lectin binding profiles are consistent with that of the genome sequence based phylogenetic tree except for rabbit. The procedure that we established in this study could be generally applicable for sperm from other species or defect sperm from the same species. We believe the lectin binding profiles of the mammalian sperm that we established in this study are valuable for both basic research and clinical studies. PMID:24629138

  20. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  1. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin.

    PubMed

    Rauschenberg, Melanie; Fritz, Eva-Corrina; Schulz, Christian; Kaufmann, Tobias; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors ("synthetic lectins") constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  2. Purification of the glycoprotein lectin from the broad bean (Vicia faba) and a comparison of its properties with lectins of similar specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A K; Desai, N N; Neuberger, A

    1976-01-01

    1. The lectin from the broad bean (Vicia faba) was purified by affinity chromatography by using 3-O-methylglucosamine covalently attached through the amino group to CH-Sepharose (an omega-hexanoic acid derivative of agarose). Its composition and the nature of its subunits were compared with concanavalin A and the lectins from pea and lentil. 2. Unlike the other three lectins, broad-bean lectin is a glycoprotein; a glycopeptide containing glucosamine and mannose was isolated from a proteolytic digest. 3. The mol.wt. is about 47500; the glycoprotein consists of two apprently identical subunits, held together by non-covalent forces. Fragments of the subunits, similar to those found in concanavalin A and soya-bean agglutinin, were found in active preparations. 4. Broad-bean lectin was compared with concanavalin A and the lectins from pea and lentil in an investigation of the inhibition of their action by a number of monosaccharides, methyl ethers of monosaccharides, disaccharides and glycopeptides. The most striking differences concern 3-O-substituted monosaccharides, which are strong inhibitors of the action of broad-bean, pea and lentil lectins but not of the action of concanavalin A. There is, however, no strong inhibition of the action of these lectins by 3-Olinked disaccharides. PMID:938471

  3. Leguminous lectins as tools for studying the role of sugar residues in leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, N M; Teixeira, E H; Assreuy, A M; Cavada, B S; Flores, C A; Ribeiro, R A

    1999-01-01

    The natural physiological ligands for selectins are oligosaccharides found in glycoprotein or glycolipid molecules in cell membranes. In order to study the role of sugar residues in the in vivo lectin anti-inflammatory effect, we tested three leguminous lectins with different carbohydrate binding affinities in the peritonitis and paw oedema models induced by carrageenin in rats. L. sericeus lectin was more anti-inflammatory than D. virgata lectin, the effects being reversed by their specific binding sugars (N-acetylglucosamine and alpha-methylmannoside, respectively). However, V. macrocarpa, a galactose-specific lectin, was not anti-inflammatory. The proposed anti-inflammatory activity of lectins could be due to a blockage of neutrophil-selectin carbohydrate ligands. Thus, according to the present data, we suggest an important role for N-acetylglucosamine residue as the major ligand for selectins on rat neutrophil membranes. PMID:10704148

  4. Transcriptomic response of cowpea bruchids to N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Hua; Chi, Yong Hun; Guo, Feng-Guang; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Balfe, Susan; Fang, Ji-Chao; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2015-02-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) are N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectins. Previous studies demonstrated that they have anti-insect activity, a property potentially useful in pest control. To gain some insight into the insect response to dietary lectins, we performed transcriptomic analysis using the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) midgut microarray platform we built. Compared to the nonnutritional cellulose treatment, dietary lectins induced more profound changes in gene expression. Ingestion of relatively high doses of lectins for 24 h resulted in alteration of gene expression involved in sugar and lipid metabolism, transport, development, defense, and stress tolerance. Metabolic genes were largely downregulated. Moreover, we observed disorganized microvilli resulting from ingestion of WGA. This morphological change is consistent with the lectin-induced changes in genes related to midgut epithelial cell repair. In addition, suboptimal nutrient conditions may serve as a stress signal to trigger senescence processes, leading to growth arrest and developmental delay.

  5. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  6. Effect of Artocarpus integer lectin on functional activity of guinea-pig complement.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Gendeh, G S; Cheong, C N; Jaafar, M I

    1994-03-01

    The effect of Artocarpus integer lectin (lectin C) on the functional activity of guinea-pig complement was investigated. Purified and crude extract of lectin C from six cultivars of Artocarpus integer seeds were found to consume complement and thus decreased the complement-induced haemolytic activity of sensitized sheep erythrocytes. The change in the complement-mediated haemolytic activity was significantly decreased when incubation of the lectins was performed in the presence of melibiose. The reversal effect of the carbohydrate, which is a potent inhibitor of the lectin's binding to O-linked oligosaccharides of glycoprotein, demonstrate involvement of the lectins interaction with O-glycans of glycoproteins in the consumption of guinea-pig complement.

  7. Lectins in fish skin: do they play a role in host-monogenean interactions?

    PubMed

    Buchmann, K

    2001-09-01

    Mucus samples from rainbow trout skin with or without infections by Gyrodactylus derjavini were tested for the presence of lectins reacting with mannose, galactose and lactose. The samples inhibited the binding of biotinylated lectins (from Canavalia ensiformis, Artocarpus integrifolia and Erythrina corallodendron, respectively) to microtitre plates with covalently bound carbohydrates (mannopyranoside, galactopyranoside and lactose, respectively). However, the inhibition of C. ensiformis and A. integrifolia lectins was slightly greater when mucus from infected (but recovering) fish was used, suggesting an increase of mannose and galactose binding lectins in fish skin exposed to parasites. As mannose, galactose and lactose are present on the glycocalyx of Gyrodactylus derjavini, it is suggested that lectins could play a dual role in interactions between fish hosts and their monogenean parasites. Thus, recognition between parasite and host and also host responses towards parasite infections could both, at least partly, involve carbohydrate-lectin binding.

  8. Tissue binding patterns of lectins in premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, K K; Remani, P; Beevi, V M; Ankathil, R; Vijayakumar, T; Rajendran, R; Augustine, J; Vasudevan, D M

    1987-01-01

    Lectins from the seeds of Jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) were isolated using an immobilized N-acetyl D-galactosamine column and conjugated to type VI horse radish peroxidase. The purified conjugate was used for the study of tissue specificities using diaminobenzidine as the substrate on dewaxed tissue sections of normal, oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, verucous carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. In spite of having a common inhibitory sugar, winged bean lectin did not bind to any lectins whereas Jackfruit lectin showed varying degrees of binding towards the above tissues. The difference in the nature and intensity of binding of the Jackfruit lectin suggest the utilizing this lectin in the differential diagnosis of the premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity.

  9. Fluorimetric studies on saccharide binding to the basic lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, S M; Gurjar, M M; Khan, M I

    1998-09-01

    The binding of Artocarpus hirsuta lectin to galactose and its derivatives was examined by fluorescence spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity of the lectin was enhanced by 55% upon binding to methyl alpha-galactose without any change in the emission maximum (333 nm). 4-Methyl umbellifery alpha-galactopyranoside showed 100% quenching of its fluorescence intensity upon binding to the lectin without any shift in the emission maximum (373 nm). The association constant for the binding of the above sugars to the lectin decreases with increasing temperature. Methyl group in the alpha anomeric position of galactose enhanced the binding while that in the beta position reduced the binding to the lectin. Solute quenching studies of the lectin using acrylamide, potassium iodide and cesium chloride indicated that the tryptophan residues were fully accessible to the neutral quencher, while only partly accessible to the ionic quenchers.

  10. Isolation and characterization of three Ca2+-dependent beta-galactoside-specific lectins from snake venoms.

    PubMed Central

    Gartner, T K; Ogilvie, M L

    1984-01-01

    Three lactose-inhibited lectins from the venoms of the snakes Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix (southern copperhead), Ancistrodon piscivorous leukostoma (western cottonmouth moccasin) and Crotalus atrox (western diamondback rattlesnake) have been isolated and newly characterized. The three lectins are similar to thrombolectin, a lectin isolated from the venom of Bothrops atrox (fer-de-lance) (Gartner, Stocker & Williams, 1980), with regard to sugar specificity, Mr, Ca2+ requirements and sensitivity to reducing agents. Each lectin is a dimer (Mr 28 000) consisting of monomers (Mr 14 000) indistinguishable on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Haemagglutination activity is dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and is inhibited by reducing agents. The lectins are not identical and can be distinguished on the basis of relative affinities for inhibiting sugars, isoelectric points and immunoprecipitation assays using anti-(cottonmouth lectin) serum. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6391472

  11. Unique posttranslational modifications of chitin-binding lectins of Entamoeba invadens cyst walls.

    PubMed

    Van Dellen, Katrina L; Chatterjee, Anirban; Ratner, Daniel M; Magnelli, Paula E; Cipollo, John F; Steffen, Martin; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2006-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amebic dysentery and liver abscesses, is spread via chitin-walled cysts. The most abundant protein in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens, a model for amebic encystation, is a lectin called EiJacob1. EiJacob1 has five tandemly arrayed, six-Cys chitin-binding domains separated by low-complexity Ser- and Thr-rich spacers. E. histolytica also has numerous predicted Jessie lectins and chitinases, which contain a single, N-terminal eight-Cys chitin-binding domain. We hypothesized that E. invadens cyst walls are composed entirely of proteins with six-Cys or eight-Cys chitin-binding domains and that some of these proteins contain sugars. E. invadens genomic sequences predicted seven Jacob lectins, five Jessie lectins, and three chitinases. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that mRNAs encoding Jacobs, Jessies, and chitinases are increased during E. invadens encystation, while mass spectrometry showed that the cyst wall is composed of an approximately 30:70 mix of Jacob lectins (cross-linking proteins) and Jessie and chitinase lectins (possible enzymes). Three Jacob lectins were cleaved prior to Lys at conserved sites (e.g., TPSVDK) in the Ser- and Thr-rich spacers between chitin-binding domains. A model peptide was cleaved at the same site by papain and E. invadens Cys proteases, suggesting that the latter cleave Jacob lectins in vivo. Some Jacob lectins had O-phosphodiester-linked carbohydrates, which were one to seven hexoses long and had deoxysugars at reducing ends. We concluded that the major protein components of the E. invadens cyst wall all contain chitin-binding domains (chitinases, Jessie lectins, and Jacob lectins) and that the Jacob lectins are differentially modified by site-specific Cys proteases and O-phosphodiester-linked glycans.

  12. Large Scale Magnetic Separation of Solanum tuberosum Tuber Lectin from Potato Starch Waste Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Horska, Katerina; Martinez, Lluis M.; Safarikova, Mirka

    2010-12-01

    A simple procedure for large scale isolation of Solanum tuberosum tuber lectin from potato starch industry waste water has been developed. The procedure employed magnetic chitosan microparticles as an affinity adsorbent. Magnetic separation was performed in a flow-through magnetic separation system. The adsorbed lectin was eluted with glycine/HCl buffer, pH 2.2. The specific activity of separated lectin increased approximately 27 times during the isolation process.

  13. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  14. Purification and biological effects of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae) seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de; Aragao, Karoline Saboia; Gomes, Raphaela Cardoso; Freitas Pires, Alana de; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Oliveira Toyama, Daniela de; Nunes de Alencar, Nylane Maria; Criddle, David Neil; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio . E-mail: assreuy@uece.br; Cavada, Benildo Sousa . E-mail: bscavada@ufc.br

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the purification and characterization of a new N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific lectin from Araucaria angustifolia (AaL) seeds (Araucariaceae) and its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. AaL was purified using a combination of affinity chromatography on a chitin column and ion exchange chromatography on Sephacel-DEAE. The pure protein has 8.0 kDa (SDS-PAGE) and specifically agglutinates rabbit erythrocytes, effect that was independent of the presence of divalent cations and was inhibited after incubation with glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. AaL showed antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains, shown by scanning electron microscopy. AaL, intravenously injected into rats, showed anti-inflammatory effect, via carbohydrate site interaction, in the models of paw edema and peritonitis. This lectin can be used as a tool for studying bacterial infections and inflammatory processes.

  15. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent.

  16. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. PMID:23737242

  17. Bishydrazide glycoconjugates for lectin recognition and capture of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S; Wei, Alexander

    2010-11-17

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexa(ethylene glycol) (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive cross-linking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS(2) under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 10³ cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  18. Bishydrazide Glycoconjugates for Lectin Recognition and Capture of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P.; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S.; Wei, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexaethylene glycol (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive crosslinking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS2 under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Psuedomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 103 cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  19. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  20. Prevention of intestinal amebiasis by vaccination with the Entamoeba histolytica Gal/GalNac lectin.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Eric; Barroso, Lisa; Lockhart, Lauren; Wright, Rhonda; Cramer, Carole; Lyerly, David; Petri, William A

    2004-01-26

    Prevention of intestinal infection by Entamoeba histolytica would block both invasive disease and parasite transmission. The amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin mediates parasite adherence to the colonic surface and fecal anti-lectin IgA is associated with protection from intestinal reinfection in children. We tested if vaccination with the E. histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin could prevent cecal infection in a C3H mouse model of amebic colitis. Two trials using native lectin purified from the parasite and two trials using a 64 kDa recombinant fragment ("LecA") were performed with a combined intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization regimen using cholera toxin and Freund's adjuvants, respectively. Two weeks after immunization mice were challenged intracecally with trophozoites, and 4-12 weeks after challenge mice were sacrificed for histopathologic evaluation of infection. Vaccination prevented intestinal infection with efficacies of 84 and 100% in the two native lectin trials and 91 and 34% in the two LecA trials. Mice with detectable pre-challenge fecal anti-lectin IgA responses were significantly more resistant to infection than mice without fecal anti-lectin IgA responses. These results show for the first time that immunization with the Gal/GalNAc lectin can prevent intestinal amebiasis in mice and suggest a protective role for fecal anti-lectin IgA in vivo.

  1. Cloning and characterization of the lectin cDNA clones from onion, shallot and leek.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Engelborghs, I; Aelbers, H; Balzarini, J; Pusztai, A; van Leuven, F; Goldstein, I J; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the lectins from onion (Allium cepa), shallot (A. ascalonicum) and leek (A. porrum) has shown that these lectins differ from previously isolated Alliaceae lectins not only in their molecular structure but also in their ability to inhibit retrovirus infection of target cells. cDNA libraries constructed from poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from young shoots of onion, shallot and leek were screened for lectin cDNA clones using colony hybridization. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from these three species revealed a high degree of sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. Apparently the onion, shallot and leek lectins are translated from mRNAs of ca. 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins (ca. 19 kDa) which are converted into the mature lectin polypeptides (12.5-13 kDa) after post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  2. Toxicity and binding profile of lectins from the Genus canavalia on brine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins. PMID:24380079

  3. Bitter-sweet symphony: glycan-lectin interactions in virus biology.

    PubMed

    Van Breedam, Wander; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Favoreel, Herman W; de Groot, Raoul J; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-01

    Glycans are carbohydrate modifications typically found on proteins or lipids, and can act as ligands for glycan-binding proteins called lectins. Glycans and lectins play crucial roles in the function of cells and organs, and in the immune system of animals and humans. Viral pathogens use glycans and lectins that are encoded by their own or the host genome for their replication and spread. Recent advances in glycobiological research indicate that glycans and lectins mediate key interactions at the virus-host interface, controlling viral spread and/or activation of the immune system. This review reflects on glycan-lectin interactions in the context of viral infection and antiviral immunity. A short introduction illustrates the nature of glycans and lectins, and conveys the basic principles of their interactions. Subsequently, examples are discussed highlighting specific glycan-lectin interactions and how they affect the progress of viral infections, either benefiting the host or the virus. Moreover, glycan and lectin variability and their potential biological consequences are discussed. Finally, the review outlines how recent advances in the glycan-lectin field might be transformed into promising new approaches to antiviral therapy.

  4. A simple fibril and lectin model for cyst walls of Entamoeba and perhaps Giardia.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, John; Robbins, Phillips

    2011-01-01

    Cyst walls of Entamoeba and Giardia protect them from environmental insults, stomach acids, and intestinal proteases. Each cyst wall contains a sugar homopolymer: chitin in Entamoeba and a unique N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) homopolymer in Giardia. Entamoeba cyst wall proteins include Jacob lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) that crosslink chitin, chitinases that degrade chitin, and Jessie lectins that make walls impermeable. Giardia cyst wall proteins are also lectins that bind fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer. Although many of the details remain to be determined for the cyst wall of Giardia, current data suggest a relatively simple fibril and lectin model for the Entamoeba cyst wall.

  5. Toxicity and Binding Profile of Lectins from the Genus Canavalia on Brine Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins. PMID:24380079

  6. Functional recombinants designed from a fetuin/asialofetuin-specific marine algal lectin, rhodobindin.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong Won; Jung, Min Gui; Shim, Eun Young; Shim, Jun Bo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Plant lectins have attracted much attention for biomedical applications including targeted drug delivery system and therapy against tumors and microbial infections. The main problem of using lectins as a biomedical tool is a batch-to-batch variation in isoforms content. The production of lectins using recombination tools has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with more precise properties, but there are only a handful of functional recombinant lectins presently available. A fetuin/asialo-fetuin specific lectin, Rhodobindin, has unique tandem repeats structure which makes it useful in exploiting for recombinant lectin. We developed three functional recombinant lectins using E. coli expression system: one from full cDNA sequence and two from fragmentary sequences of Rhodobindin. Hemagglutinating activity and solubility of the recombinant lectins were highest at OD 0.7 cell concentration at 20 °C. The optimized process developed in this study was suitable for the quality-controlled production of high amounts of soluble recombinant lectins. PMID:25871294

  7. Characterization of a new lectin involved in the protoplast regeneration of Bryopsis hypnoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce; Lü, Fang; Zhou, Baicheng; Peng, Guang

    2009-09-01

    A group of coenocytic marine algae differs from higher plants, whose totipotency depends on an intact cell (or protoplast). Instead, this alga is able to aggregate its extruded protoplasm in sea water and generate new mature individuals. It is thought that lectins play a key role in the aggregation process. We purified a lectin associated with the aggregation of cell organelles in Bryopsis hypnoides. The lectin was ca. 27 kDa with a pI between pH 5 and pH 6. The absence of carbohydrate suggested that the lectin was not a glycoprotein. The hemagglutinating activity (HA) of the lectin was not dependent on the presence of divalent cations and was inhibited by N-Acetylgalactosamine, N-Acetylglucosamine, and the glycoprotein bovine submaxillary mucin. The lectin preferentially agglutinated Gram-negative bacterium. The HA of this lectin was stable between pH 4 to pH 10. Cell organelles outside the cytoplasm were agglutinated by the addition of lectin solution (0.5 mg ml-1). Our results suggest that the regeneration of B. hypnoides is mediated by this lectin. We also demonstrated that the formation of cell organelle aggregates was inhibited by nigericin in natural seawater (pH 8.0). Given that nigericin dissipates proton gradients across the membrane, we hypothesize that the aggregation of cell organelles was proton-gradient dependent.

  8. Functional Recombinants Designed from a Fetuin/Asialofetuin-Specific Marine Algal Lectin, Rhodobindin

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jong Won; Jung, Min Gui; Shim, Eun Young; Shim, Jun Bo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Plant lectins have attracted much attention for biomedical applications including targeted drug delivery system and therapy against tumors and microbial infections. The main problem of using lectins as a biomedical tool is a batch-to-batch variation in isoforms content. The production of lectins using recombination tools has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with more precise properties, but there are only a handful of functional recombinant lectins presently available. A fetuin/asialo-fetuin specific lectin, Rhodobindin, has unique tandem repeats structure which makes it useful in exploiting for recombinant lectin. We developed three functional recombinant lectins using E. coli expression system: one from full cDNA sequence and two from fragmentary sequences of Rhodobindin. Hemagglutinating activity and solubility of the recombinant lectins were highest at OD 0.7 cell concentration at 20 °C. The optimized process developed in this study was suitable for the quality-controlled production of high amounts of soluble recombinant lectins. PMID:25871294

  9. Evaluation of the specificity of lectin binding to sections of plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Guinel, F C; McCully, M E

    1985-01-01

    Hand sections of young corn root tips have been used in a study of problems encountered in the binding of fluorescently-labelled lectins to plant tissues. It was found, surprisingly, that with lectins specific for a sugar known to be present (Lotus and Ulex lectins for L-fucose), with a lectin specific for a sugar thought not to be present (wheat-germ agglutinin for N-acetylglucosamine), with non-lectin glycoprotein and protein (gamma-globulin and bovine serum albumin) and with basophilic dyes (alcian blue and toluidine blue), a coincidental binding pattern similar to the pattern of autofluorescence in the same tissue was obtained. Corn root tissues include cell walls composed of complex polysaccharides esterified with ferulic acid residues, as well as mucilages which are highly hydrated and expanded. In such material, neither standard inhibition controls with haptens nor the use of a wide range of lectin concentrations are adequate to distinguish clearly specific and non-specific binding of fluorescently-labelled lectin. Therefore, lectins are not the simple test probes they have been supposed. Before interpreting results obtained in using fluorescently-labelled lectins on any tissue sections, all available information (biochemical as well as histochemical) about the tissue must be considered.

  10. F-type lectin involved in defense against bacterial infection in the pearl oyster (Pinctada martensii).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-02-01

    In invertebrates and vertebrates, carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) play an important role in innate immunity against microbial invasion. In the present study, we report the cloning of an F-type lectin (designated as PmF-lectin) from pearl oyster (Pinctada martensii) using a combination of expression sequence tag (EST) analysis and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The full-length cDNA of PmF-lectin contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 579 bp coding for192 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide possesses six conserved residues of the F-lectin family critical for the formation of disulfide bonds (Cys⁴³-Cys¹⁴³, Cys⁷⁵-Cys⁷⁶ and Cys¹⁰²-Cys¹¹⁹). Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses in adult tissues showed that the PmF-lectin mRNA was abundantly expressed in haemocytes and gill, moderately expressed in the mantle, and rarely expressed in other tissues tested. After challenge with Vibrio alginolyticus, expression of PmF-lectin mRNA in haemocytes was dramatically up-regulated, reaching the highest level (13-fold higher than that of the control group) at 3 h post challenge, and then dropped gradually. These results suggest that PmF-lectin is a member of the F-lectin family and is involved in the innate immune response in pearl oyster.

  11. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  12. Role of the lectin complement pathway in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    In the last 15 years two major advances in the role of complement in the kidney transplant have come about. The first is that ischaemia reperfusion injury and its profound effect on transplant outcome is dependent on the terminal product of complement activation, C5b-9. The second key observation relates to the function of the small biologically active fragments C3a and C5a released by complement activation in increasing antigen presentation and priming the T cell response that results in transplant rejection. In both cases local synthesis of C3 principally by the renal tubule cells plays an essential role that overshadows the role of the circulating pool of C3 generated largely by hepatocyte synthesis. More recent efforts have investigated the molecules expressed by renal tissue that can trigger complement activation. These have revealed a prominent effect of collectin-11 (CL-11), a soluble C-type lectin that is expressed in renal tissue and aligns with its major ligand L-fucose at sites of complement activation following ischaemic stress. Biochemical studies have shown that interaction between CL-11 and L-fucose results in complement activation by the lectin complement pathway, precisely targeting the innate immune response to the ischaemic tubule surface. Therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammatory and immune stimulation in ischaemic kidney have so far targeted C3 or its activation products and several are in clinical trials. The finding that lectin-fucose interaction is an important trigger of lectin pathway complement activation within the donor organ opens up further therapeutic targets where intervention could protect the donor kidney against complement. PMID:27286717

  13. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  14. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, T. V.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of rhizosphere/rhizoplane culture conditions on the ability of various rhizobia to bind soybean seed lectin (SBL) was examined. Eleven strains of the soybean symbiont, Rhizobium japonicum, and six strains of various heterologous Rhizobium species were cultured in root exudate of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and in association with roots of soybean seedlings which were growing either hydroponically or in montmorillonite clay soil amendment (Turface). All 11 of the R. japonicum strains developed biochemically specific receptors for the lectin when cultured under these conditions, whereas six of the 11 did not develop such receptors when cultured in synthetic salts medium. Two cowpea strains also developed receptors for SBL. The other four heterologous strains of rhizobia gave no evidence of biochemically specific SBL binding in either synthetic salts media or rhizosphere/rhizoplane cultures. These results demonstrate that the environment provided by plant roots is an important factor in the development of specific lectin receptors on the cell surface of R. japonicum. PMID:16660472

  15. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  16. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling. PMID:1030938

  17. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  18. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide. PMID:26022515

  19. Ganoderma lucidum: a source for novel bioactive lectin.

    PubMed

    U Girjal, Vinay; Neelagund, Shivayogeeswar; Krishnappa, Madappa

    2011-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is known for its high medicinal value, clinically used in treatment for various diseases. We have selected this mushroom for isolation of novel bioactive lectin. The isolation procedure comprised of ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE- cellulose and affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel. Purified lectin was monomer with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE, Gel filtration, MALDI-ToF. It showed hemagglutinating activity against both human and animal erythrocytes. The hemagglutination activity was not inhibited by simple sugars but inhibited by glycoproteins. The activity was maximal at pH range 4.0-9.0 and at temperature up to 60° C. The hemagglutination activity was stable even in the presence of 10mM EDTA and other divalent metal cations such as CaCl2, MgCl2, ZnCl2, and MnCl2. Lectin was shown antifungal activity against following pathogens Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus Niger, Colletotrichum musae, Botrytis cinerea, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton interdigitale, Epidermophyton floccosum and Microsporum canis. PMID:21728991

  20. Plasmon waveguide resonance for sensing glycan-lectin interactions.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isabel; Kurylo, Ievgen; Coffinier, Yannick; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Harté, Etienne; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-05-11

    Carbohydrate-modified interfaces have been shown to be valuable tools for the study of protein-glycan recognition events. Label-free approache such as plasmonic based techniques are particularly attractive. This paper describes a new analytical platform for the sensitive and selective screening of carbohydrate-lectin interactions using plasmon waveguide resonance. Planar optical waveguides (POW), consisting of glass prisms coated with silver (50 nm) and silica (460 nm) layers were derivatized with mannose or lactose moieties. The specific association of the resulting interface with selected lectins was assessed by following the changes in its plasmonic response. The immobilization strategy investigated in this work is based on the formation of a covalent bond between propargyl-functionalized glycans and surface-linked azide groups via a Cu(I) "click" chemistry. Optimization of the surface architecture through the introduction of an oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer between the plasmonic surface and the glycan ligands provided an interface which allowed screening of glycan-lectin interactions in a highly selective manner. The limit of detection (LOD) of this method for this particular application was found to be in the subnanomolar range (0.5 nM), showing it to constitute a promising analytical platform for future development and use in a pharmaceutical or biomedical setting.

  1. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  2. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  3. Mosaic lectin labelling in the quail collecting ducts.

    PubMed

    Menghi, G; Gabrielli, M G; Accili, D

    1995-04-01

    Morphological and histoenzymological differences have been observed between intercalated and principal cells of the quail Coturnix coturnix japonica collecting ducts. The present study was designed to shed light on the lectin affinity of the collecting duct cells within cortex and medulla by the use of HRP-labelled lectins combined with glycosidase degradation. Binding of PNA and RCA-I lectins consequent to enzymatic release of sialic acid revealed abundant sialylated carbohydrate moieties within the principal cell cytoplasm. This characteristic binding pattern differed considerably from the staining observed in the intercalated cells. Interesting information also emerged about the presence of sialoglycoconjugates having the terminal disaccharide sialic acid-beta-N-acetylgalactosamine originating from the increased SBA binding and the unmodified DBA labelling after removal of sialic acid. Sequential degradation by sialidase/beta-galactosidase followed by incubation with DBA offered the possibility to suspect that the receptor sugar for the penultimate beta-galactose may be N-acetylgalactosamine. Conversely, we were not able to define the accept sugar for penultimate beta-GalNAc owing to the lack of availability of beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme. When although further studies are clearly needed to elucidate the physiological role of the cellular sialoglycoconjugates detected, the present results already provide valuable insight into the carbohydrate composition of intercalated and principal cells in the quail collecting ducts.

  4. Artocarpus hirsuta lectin. Differential modes of chemical and thermal denaturation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sushama M; Gurjar, Madhura M; Khan, M Islam

    2002-03-01

    Unfolding, inactivation and dissociation of the lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta seeds were studied by chemical (guanidine hydrochloride, GdnHCl) and thermal denaturation. Conformational transitions were monitored by intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism. The gradual red shift in the emission maxima of the native protein from 335 to 356 nm, change in the ellipticity at 218 nm and simultaneous decrease in the sugar binding activity were observed with increasing concentration of GdnHCl in the pH range between 4.0 and 9.0. The unfolding and inactivation by GdnHCl were partially reversible. Gel filtration of the lectin in presence of 1-6 m GdnHCl showed that the protein dissociates reversibly into partially unfolded dimer and then irreversibly into unfolded inactive monomer. Thermal denaturation was irreversible. The lectin loses activity rapidly above 45 degrees C. The exposure of hydrophobic patches, distorted secondary structure and formation of insoluble aggregates of the thermally inactivated protein probably leads to the irreversible denaturation.

  5. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  6. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; Mot, René

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. Bacteriocins mediate highly selective antagonism among closely related bacteria but such antimicrobial proteins have not yet been reported in Burkholderia. We identified a lectin-like protein of the LlpA family in a Burkholderia cenocepacia human isolate that strain-specifically and selectively kills planktonic and biofilm cells of other Burkholderia cepacia complex members. PMID:23737242

  7. Structure of mannose-specific snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) lectin is representative of a new plant lectin family.

    PubMed

    Hester, G; Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Wright, C S

    1995-06-01

    Tetrameric Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (50,000 M(r)) belongs to a super-family of alpha-D-mannose-specific plant bulb lectins known to be potent inhibitors of retroviruses. The 2.3 A crystal structure of this lectin complexed with methyl alpha-D-mannose reveals a novel three-fold symmetric beta-sheet polypeptide fold. Three antiparallel four-stranded beta-sheets, each with a conserved mannose-binding site, are arranged as a 12-stranded beta-barrel. The tetramer displays 222 symmetry. Pairs of monomers form stable dimers through C-terminal strand exchange. The so formed hybrid beta-sheets are the sites for high affinity mannose binding in the dimer interface. Occupancy observed at corresponding sites in other beta-sheets suggests a potential for twelve sites per tetramer.

  8. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn's disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn's disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn's disease phenotype in 69 Crohn's disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin-mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn's disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn's disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants.

  9. Functional characterization of mannose-binding lectin in zebrafish: implication for a lectin-dependent complement system in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Bu, Lingzhen; Sun, Weiwei; Hu, Lili; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The lectin pathway involves recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and the subsequent activation of associated enzymes, termed MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). In this study, we demonstrate that the transcript of MBL gene is present in the early embryo of zebrafish, and MBL protein is also present in the embryo. In addition, we show that recombinant zebrafish MBL was able to bind the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, and rMBL was able to promote the phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus by macrophages, indicating that like mammalian MBL, zebrafish MBL performs a dual function in both pattern recognition and opsonization. Importantly, we show that microinjection of anti-MBL antibody into the early developing embryos resulted in a significantly increased mortality in the embryos challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila (pathogenic to zebrafish); and injection of rMBL into the embryos (resulting in increase in MBL in the embryo) markedly promoted their resistance to A. hydrophila; and this promoted bacterial resistance was significantly reduced by the co-injection of anti-MBL antibody with rMBL but not by the injection of anti-actin antibody with rMBL. These suggest that the lectin pathway may be already functional in the early embryos in zebrafish before their immune system is fully matured, protecting the developing embryos from microbial infection. This work provides a new angle to understand the immune role of the lectin pathway in early development of animals.

  10. Regulation of adherence and virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica lectin cytoplasmic domain, which contains a beta2 integrin motif.

    PubMed

    Vines, R R; Ramakrishnan, G; Rogers, J B; Lockhart, L A; Mann, B J; Petri, W A

    1998-08-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the beta2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediated cell adherence. Mutation of the integrin-like sequence abrogates the dominant negative effect. Amebae expressing the dominant negative mutant are less virulent in an animal model of amebiasis. These results suggest that inside-out signaling via the lectin cytoplasmic domain may control the extracellular adhesive activity of the amebic lectin and provide in vivo demonstration of the lectin's role in virulence.

  11. Evidence for export of a muscle lectin from cytosol to extracellular matrix and for a novel secretory mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.N.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1990-05-01

    A soluble lactose-binding lectin with subunit Mr of 14,500 is believed to function by interacting with extracellular glycoconjugates, because it has been detected extracellularly by immunohistochemistry. This localization has been questioned, however, since the lectin lacks a secretion signal sequence, which challenges the contention that it is secreted. We have demonstrated externalization of this lectin from C2 mouse muscle cells by both immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein and immunohistochemical localization. We further show that externalization of the lectin is a developmentally regulated process that accompanies myoblast differentiation and that the lectin codistributes with laminin in myotube extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical localization during intermediate stages of externalization suggests that the lectin becomes concentrated in evaginations of plasma membrane, which pinch off to form labile lectin-rich extracellular vesicles. This suggests a possible mechanism for lectin export from the cytosol to the extracellular matrix.

  12. Jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and the Agaricus mushroom lectin fit also to the so-called peanut receptor.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, B P; Ahmed, H; Uhlenbruck, G; Janssen, E; Kolar, C; Seiler, F R

    1985-12-01

    The lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) reacts with the peanut-specific lectin receptor represented by the T-disaccharide, which is also part of the Thomsen (= T)-Friedenreich antigen, namely O-beta-D-galactosyl-(1----3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. The difference between the jackfruit lectin and peanut lectin has been shown to be mainly due to the further linkage of the T-disaccharide: Whereas the peanut lectin reacts with both anomeric forms, jackfruit lectin and the closely - with respect to its specificity - related Agaricus bisporus mushroom lectin react predominantly with the alpha-linked T-disaccharide, so that they cannot detect the lipid-linked T-disaccharide, as the peanut lectin does.

  13. The in vivo synthesis and accumulation of lectin in developing seeds of black gram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper).

    PubMed

    Suseelan, K N; Mitra, R; Bhatia, C R; Gopalakrishna, T

    2004-01-01

    Black gram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) seed contains two D-galactose-specific lectin species, BGL-I and BGL-II, identified on the basis of elution from ion exchange column and immunochemical cross-reactivity. BGL-I consisted of two monomeric lectins, BGL-I-1 and BGL-1-2, of relative molecular weights 94 and 89 kDa, respectively. BGL-II is another monomeric lectin with a molecular weight of 83 kDa. The in vivo synthesis studies using pulse-chase experiment showed that BGL-II lectin was synthesized as early as 14 days after flowering (DAF). The 94-kDa BGL-I-1 lectin was synthesized around 17 DAF. There was no cotranslational or posttranslational modification of the lectin proteins. The amount of lectin in developing seeds was determined by radial immunodiffusion assay technique. The maximum amount of lectin per seed was found at 28 DAF.

  14. Targeted delivery of antigen to hamster nasal lymphoid tissue with M-cell-directed lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, P J; Boden, J A; Monath, T P

    1997-01-01

    The nasal cavity of a rodent is lined by an epithelium organized into distinct regional domains responsible for specific physiological functions. Aggregates of nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT) located at the base of the nasal cavity are believed to be sites of induction of mucosal immune responses to airborne antigens. The epithelium overlying NALT contains M cells which are specialized for the transcytosis of immunogens, as demonstrated in other mucosal tissues. We hypothesized that NALT M cells are characterized by distinct glycoconjugate receptors which influence antigen uptake and immune responses to transcytosed antigens. To identify glycoconjugates that may distinguish NALT M cells from other cells of the respiratory epithelium (RE), we performed lectin histochemistry on sections of the hamster nasal cavity with a panel of lectins. Many classes of glycoconjugates were found on epithelial cells in this region. While most lectins bound to sites on both the RE and M cells, probes capable of recognizing alpha-linked galactose were found to label the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) almost exclusively. By morphological criteria, the FAE contains >90% M cells. To determine if apical glycoconjugates on M cells were accessible from the nasal cavity, an M-cell-selective lectin and a control lectin in parallel were administered intranasally to hamsters. The M-cell-selective lectin was found to specifically target the FAE, while the control lectin did not. Lectin bound to M cells in vivo was efficiently endocytosed, consistent with the role of M cells in antigen transport. Intranasal immunization with lectin-test antigen conjugates without adjuvant stimulated induction of specific serum immunoglobulin G, whereas antigen alone or admixed with lectin did not. The selective recognition of NALT M cells by a lectin in vivo provides a model for microbial adhesin-host cell receptor interactions on M cells and the targeted delivery of immunogens to NALT following intranasal

  15. Phenotypic Variation of Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Geographically Distinct Regions Detected by Lectin Typing

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Sean O.; Broutet, Nathalie; Wadström, Torkel; Mikelsaar, Marika; O’Toole, Paul W.; Telford, John; Engstrand, Lars; Kamiya, Shigeru; Mentis, Andreas F.; Moran, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 309 Helicobacter pylori isolates from 18 different countries were analyzed with a previously developed lectin typing system. The system was developed by using a proteolytic pretreatment to enhance the carbohydrate fraction of the sample. Four lectins from Ulex europaeus, Lotus tetragonolobus, Erythrina cristigali, and Triticum vulgaris were used to type the strains. The lectins were chosen for their specificities for sugars commonly encountered in the lipopolysaccharide of H. pylori. The isolates were received from their parent institutions as pellets of biomass and were typed at one of three centers (in Ireland, Sweden, and Estonia). All 16 possible lectin reaction patterns were observed in the study, with the isolates with the predominant pattern exhibiting reactions with all the lectins in the panel. For European patients suffering from gastritis, an association was noted between lectin reaction pattern MH4 and atrophic chronic gastritis; isolates with lectin reaction pattern MH4 were isolated from patients with atrophic chronic gastritis, whereas isolates with this pattern were not isolated from patients with chronic gastritis (P = 0.0006). In addition, statistically significant relationships were noted between the lectin reaction pattern and the associated pathology of isolates from the Swedish population. Isolates with patterns MH13 and MH16, which had low lectin reactivities, correlated with nonulcer disease (P = 0.0025 and P = 0.0002, respectively), and all four isolates from adenocarcinoma patients were characterized as possessing reaction pattern MH16. In contrast, isolates with lectin reaction patterns MH1 and MH10, which had high lectin reactivities, were associated with ulcer disease (P = 0.046 and P = 0.0022, respectively). PMID:11773120

  16. Further characterization and immunochemical studies on the carbohydrate specificity of jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, H; Chatterjee, B P

    1989-06-01

    The lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds has been purified by Rivanol (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate) treatment. The specific activity, molecular weights of parent lectin and its subunit, its glycoprotein nature, and hemagglutination-inhibition assays suggest that this preparation is identical to that obtained by affinity chromatography on melibiose-agarose adsorbent (Ahmed, H., and Chatterjee, B. P. (1986) in Lectins, Biology, Biochemistry, Clinical Biochemistry (Bøg-Hansen, T. C., and van Driessche, E., eds) Vol. 5, pp. 125-133, Walter de Gruyter, New York). The lectin strongly agglutinates human and several animal erythrocytes. The lectin contains five isolectins of pI values 7.1, 6.85, 5.5, 5.3, and 5.1. It is thermally stable and loses its activity above 75 degrees C. The hemagglutinating activity remains unchanged in the presence of bivalent cations viz., Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, etc. It is a metalloprotein. The lectin retains its activity by dialysis with acetic acid followed by EDTA. It agglutinates Ehrlich ascites cells. Equilibrium dialysis of lectin with melibiose and quenching of fluorescence of 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside by the lectin show that homotetrameric jackfruit lectin has two sugar-binding sites. The lectin precipitates well several galactomannans and glycoproteins having terminal D-Gal-alpha-(1----6)- or D-Gal-beta-(1----3)-D-GalNAc residues. It hardly or does not precipitate polysaccharides having terminal D-Gal-alpha-(1----3) residues. Quantitative precipitin-inhibition studies using various haptens suggest that the -OCH2- group at C-1 and -OH groups at C-4 and partially at C-6 in the alpha-glycoside of D-galactose configuration are important for lectin-sugar interaction.

  17. Mechanism of entomotoxicity of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) in Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-09-01

    Plant lectins have received a lot of attention because of their insecticidal properties. When orally administered in artificial diet or in transgenic plants, lectins provoke a wide range of detrimental effects, including alteration of the digestive enzyme machinery, fecundity drop, reduced feeding, changes in oviposition behavior, growth and development inhibition and mortality. Although many studies reported the entomotoxicity of lectins, only a few of them investigated the mode of action by which lectins exert toxicity. In the present paper we have studied for the first time the insecticidal potential of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) bulbs against the larvae of the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). Bioassays on neonate larvae showed that this mannose-specific lectin affected larval growth, causing a development retardation and larval weight decrease. Using primary cell cultures from S. littoralis midguts and confocal microscopy we have elucidated FITC-HHA binding and internalization mechanisms. We found that HHA did not exert a toxic effect on S. littoralis midgut cells, but HHA interaction with the brush border of midgut cells interfered with normal nutrient absorption in the S. littoralis midgut, thereby affecting normal larval growth in vivo. This study thus confirms the potential of mannose-specific lectins as pest control agents and sheds light on the mechanism underlying lectin entomotoxicity.

  18. Biosynthesis, primary structure and molecular cloning of snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis L.) lectin.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Kaku, H; Perini, F; Goldstein, I J; Peeters, B; Yagi, F; Decock, B; Peumans, W J

    1991-11-15

    Poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from ripening ovaries of snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis L.) yielded a single 17-kDa lectin polypeptide upon translation in a wheat-germ cell-free system. This lectin was purified by affinity chromatography. Translation of the same RNA in Xenopus leavis oocytes revealed a lectin polypeptide which was about 2 kDa smaller than the in vitro synthesized precursor, suggesting that the oocyte system had removed a 2-kDa signal peptide. A second post-translational processing step was likely to be involved since both the in vivo precursor and the Xenopus translation products were about 2 kDa larger than the mature lectin polypeptide. This hypothesis was confirmed by the structural analysis of the amino acid sequence of the mature protein and the cloned mRNA. Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase Y digestion of the mature protein, and structural analysis of the peptides obtained after chemical cleavage and modification, allowed determination of the complete 105 amino acid sequence of the snowdrop lectin polypeptide. Comparison of this sequence with the deduced amino acid sequence of a lectin cDNA clone revealed that besides the mature lectin polypeptide, the lectin mRNA also encoded a 23 amino acid signal-sequence and a C-terminal extension of 29 amino acids, which confirms the results from in vitro translation experiments.

  19. Participation of a galactose-specific C-type lectin in Drosophila immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tanji, Takahiro; Ohashi-Kobayashi, Ayako; Natori, Shunji

    2006-01-01

    A galactose-specific C-type lectin has been purified from a pupal extract of Drosophila melanogaster. This lectin gene, named DL1 (Drosophila lectin 1), is part of a gene cluster with the other two galactose-specific C-type lectin genes, named DL2 (Drosophila lectin 2) and DL3 (Drosophila lectin 3). These three genes are expressed differentially in fruit fly, but show similar haemagglutinating activities. The present study characterized the biochemical and biological properties of the DL1 protein. The recombinant DL1 protein bound to Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi, but not to other Gram-negative or any other kinds of microbial strains that have been investigated. In addition, DL1 agglutinated E. coli and markedly intensified the association of a Drosophila haemocytes-derived cell line with E. coli. For in vivo genetic analysis of the lectin genes, we also established a null-mutant Drosophila. The induction of inducible antibacterial peptide genes was not impaired in the DL1 mutant, suggesting that the galactose-specific C-type lectin does not participate in the induction of antibacterial peptides, but possibly participates in the immune response via the haemocyte-mediated mechanism. PMID:16475980

  20. Purification and characterization of a novel lectin with antiphytovirus activities from the wild mushroom Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou Xian; Zhang, Guo Qing; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Li Geng, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wang, He Xiang

    2013-07-01

    A novel lectin was isolated from the dried fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Paxillus involutus. Isolation was conducted by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Cellulose, Q-Sepharose and gel filtration on Superdex 75 using a fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) system. This lectin had a molecular mass of 28 kDa and was composed of four identical subunits, each with a molecular mass of 7 kDa. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the P. involutus lectin was determined to be CTCAVFLNNTTVKS, which showed a low level of similarity to mushroom lectin sequences reported previously. The biochemical properties of this lectin were determined, and the hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by inulin and O-Nitrophenyl-β-D-galacto-pyranoside. Additionally, Ca2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe2+, and Al3+ inhibited its hemagglutinating activity, while Cu2+ promoted this activity. This lectin exhibited poor thermostability and was sensitive to HCl, but it had a high tolerance to NaOH exposure. In terms of biological properties, this lectin manifested antiphytovirus activity towards tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with a 70.61% inhibition at a concentration of 200 µg/mL. This lectin was devoid of inhibitory activities toward pathogenic fungi and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and antiproliferative activities were observed in tumor cell lines including lung cancer A-549 and human colon cancer HCT-8 cells. PMID:23092133

  1. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  2. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. (Anasazi Beans)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arishya; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho; Lin, Peng

    2009-01-01

    A lectin has been isolated from seeds of the Phaseolus vulgaris cv. “Anasazi beans” using a procedure that involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 200. The lectin was comprised of two 30-kDa subunits with substantial N-terminal sequence similarity to other Phaseolus lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was stable within the pH range of 1–14 and the temperature range of 0–80°C. The lectin potently suppressed proliferation of MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells with an IC50 of 1.3 μM, and inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 7.6 μM. The lectin evoked a mitogenic response from murine splenocytes as evidenced by an increase in [3H-methyl]-thymidine incorporation. The lectin had no antifungal activity. It did not stimulate nitric oxide production by murine peritoneal macrophages. Chemical modification results indicated that tryptophan was crucial for the hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. PMID:19343172

  3. The Lectin Frontier Database (LfDB), and data generation based on frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Tateno, Hiroaki; Shikanai, Toshihide; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are a large group of carbohydrate-binding proteins, having been shown to comprise at least 48 protein scaffolds or protein family entries. They occur ubiquitously in living organisms-from humans to microorganisms, including viruses-and while their functions are yet to be fully elucidated, their main underlying actions are thought to mediate cell-cell and cell-glycoconjugate interactions, which play important roles in an extensive range of biological processes. The basic feature of each lectin's function resides in its specific sugar-binding properties. In this regard, it is beneficial for researchers to have access to fundamental information about the detailed oligosaccharide specificities of diverse lectins. In this review, the authors describe a publicly available lectin database named "Lectin frontier DataBase (LfDB)", which undertakes the continuous publication and updating of comprehensive data for lectin-standard oligosaccharide interactions in terms of dissociation constants (Kd's). For Kd determination, an advanced system of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is used, with which quantitative datasets of interactions between immobilized lectins and >100 fluorescently labeled standard glycans have been generated. The FAC system is unique in its clear principle, simple procedure and high sensitivity, with an increasing number (>67) of associated publications that attest to its reliability. Thus, LfDB, is expected to play an essential role in lectin research, not only in basic but also in applied fields of glycoscience. PMID:25580689

  4. Characterization of quail intestinal mucin as a ligand for endogenous quail lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, R; Mantle, M; Ceri, H

    1993-01-01

    The S-type lectins have been shown to be components of mucosal scrapings, and in avian systems these lectins have been localized immunohistochemically to the mucosal surface and goblet cells of the intestine. The interaction of lectin specifically with purified mucin has not, however, been established. Quail intestinal mucin was purified by two subsequent isopycnic density-gradient centrifugations in CsCl and chromatography on Sepharose Cl-2B. Purified mucin, obtained from the void volume of the Sepharose column, was characterized by SDS/PAGE, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses, sensitivity to thiol reduction, and cross-reactivity with antibody preparations to rat and human intestinal mucins on Western blots. Antibody raised against purified quail mucin partially cross-reacts with purified rat, rabbit and human intestinal mucins, and specifically labels the mucosal surface and goblet cells of quail intestine by the immunoperoxidase technique. Protein eluted by lactose from an affinity matrix composed of quail intestinal mucin possessed the same molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as intestinal lectin and reacted on Western blots with a lectin-specific antibody. The data clearly demonstrate the co-localization of lectin and mucin in the quail intestine and also the ability of the lectin to specifically interact with the purified mucin, raising the question of the role of endogenous lectins in secretions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8352754

  5. Adenovirus carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin induces cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyan; Wu, Liqin; Duan, Xuemei; Cui, Lianzhen; Luo, Jingjing; Li, Gongchu

    2014-06-30

    Lectins exist widely in marine bioresources such as bacteria, algae, invertebrate animals and fishes. Some purified marine lectins have been found to elicit cytotoxicity to cancer cells. However, there are few reports describing the cytotoxic effect of marine lectins on cancer cells through virus-mediated gene delivery. We show here that a replication-deficient adenovirus-carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (Ad.FLAG-HddSBL) suppressed cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, as compared to the control virus Ad.FLAG. A down-regulated level of anti-apoptosis factor Bcl-2 was suggested to be responsible for the apoptosis induced by Ad.FLAG-HddSBL infection. Further subcellular localization studies revealed that HddSBL distributed in cell membrane, ER, and the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. In contrast, a previously reported mannose-binding lectin Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin entered the nucleus as well, but did not distribute in inner membrane systems, suggesting differed intracellular sialylation and mannosylation, which may provide different targets for lectin binding. Further cancer-specific controlling of HddSBL expression and animal studies may help to provide insights into a novel way of anti-cancer marine lectin gene therapy. Lectins may provide a reservoir of anti-cancer genes.

  6. Purification and characterization of a galactose-specific lectin with mitogenic activity from pinto beans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jack H; Wong, Clarence C T; Ng, T B

    2006-05-01

    A galactose-specific dimeric lectin from pinto beans was purified using a procedure that involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 200. The molecular mass of this homodimeric lectin was 62 kDa and that of each of its subunits was 31 kDa. The hemagglutinating activity of pinto bean lectin was stable within the pH range of 3-12 and the temperature range of 0-70 degrees C. By using the [3H-methyl]-thymidine incorporation assay, it was shown that the lectin had the ability to evoke a mitogenic response from murine splenocytes but it did not inhibit proliferation of L1210 leukemia cells. The pinto bean lectin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 3 microM. PMID:16600511

  7. Polyphemin: a teichoic acid-binding lectin from the horseshoe crab, Limulus Polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Brandin, E R; Pistole, T G

    1983-06-15

    A Staphylococcus aureus-agglutinating lectin, capable of binding to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, was isolated from the serum of Limulus polyphemus. The monosaccharide alone was incapable of inhibiting bacterial agglutination by this lectin. Quantitative precipitation studies with purified cell wall-derived teichoic acids, either devoid of or containing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, confirmed the carbohydrate-binding specificity of the lectin and suggested that secondary, non-specific interactions contribute to binding biomolecules containing this sugar. The agglutination pattern with various S. aureus strains having N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-associated teichoic acid, teichoic acid without this sugar, and no teichoic acid indicated that this cell wall component is not the sole binding site for the lectin on intact S. aureus cells. Affinity gel chromatography, using N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-associated teichoic acid as the specific absorbent, has been used to isolate this lectin from Limulus serum.

  8. Strain characterization and grouping of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by interaction with lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K H; Skelton, S K; Feeley, J C

    1986-01-01

    Strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli were characterized and grouped by their distinct reaction patterns with lectins. Heating of the Campylobacter cultures to 100 degrees C and holding for 30 to 60 min greatly enhanced their reactivity with lectins and permitted the grouping of all but 3 of 155 cultures tested in this study without interference of autoagglutination and other nonspecific activities. The lectin reaction patterns of the heated cultures were stable and reproducible. They were strain specific and independent of the heat-stable antigenic types. The lectin-reactive sites of C. jejuni and C. coli may be useful as additional markers for strain characterization. Based on these observations, a simple slide agglutination procedure is described for differentiating strains of C. jejuni and C. coli by their interaction with a selected group of commercially available lectins. PMID:3754264

  9. Mitogenic activity of new lectins from seeds of wild Artocarpus species from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Blasco, E; Ngoc, L D; Aucouturier, P; Preud'Homme, J L; Barra, A

    1996-05-01

    Proliferative response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated by new lectins purified from seeds of differents Artocarpus species from Vietnam (A. asperulus, A. heterophyllus, A. masticata, A. melinoxylus, A. parva and A. petelotii) was studied and compared to those of the lectin jacalin purified from jackfruit (A. heterophyllus) seeds collected in the island La Réunion. All lectins stimulated human PBMC to proliferate, with a variable efficiency of the mitogenic activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after 7 day-cultures showed that these lectins mostly stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. These results suggest that these lectins from different Artocarpus species are similar in terms of their mitogenic activity although their structural features are not identical.

  10. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from Artocarpus incisa L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R A; Castelo-Branco, C C; Monteiro, A C; Tavares, R O; Beltramini, L M

    1998-04-01

    A lectin was isolated from the saline extract of Artocarpus incisa seed by affinity chromatography on cross-linked Adenanthera pavonina galactomannan in 0.15 M NaCl. The lectin was also retained in a D-gal-agarose resin and had no requirements for divalent metal cations (Ca2+ and Mn2+) for activity. The lectin contains 2.1% of carbohydrate and is characterized by high contents of acidic and hydroxylated amino acids. The lectin presented two protein bands in SDS-PAGE, with M(r) 15.5 and 12 kDa, respectively, and contains no alpha-helix, 64% antiparallel beta-sheet and 21% parallel beta-sheet/beta-turn. When submitted to gel filtration in Superose 12 R (FPLC) and Superdex 75 HR 5/5 (HPLC) columns, the lectin showed an M(r) of 48-49 kDa, suggesting a tetrameric structure.

  11. Lectin(s) extracted from seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit): potent and selective stimulator(s) of distinct human T and B cell functions.

    PubMed

    Bunn-Moreno, M M; Campos-Neto, A

    1981-08-01

    A lectin activity that selectively induces different functions of human lymphocytes has been described in a PBS crude extract obtained from the seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit). Both unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and purified T cells are strongly stimulated to proliferate by this extract, whereas purified B cells are not. However, the lectin induced a potent polyclonal activation of B cells measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay using a multivalent anti-human Fab antibody.

  12. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research. PMID:23828036

  13. Histochemistry to detect Helix pomatia lectin binding in breast cancer: methodology makes a difference.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S A; Lymboura, M; Schumacher, U; Leathem, A J

    1996-05-01

    A number of studies have shown that altered cellular glycosylation, as detected by binding of Helix pomatia lectin to paraffin sections, is associated with metastatic disease and consequent poor patient prognosis in breast and other cancers. In a 24-year retrospective study, sections of 373 primary breast cancers were stained for binding of the lectin using two different histochemical techniques: a direct method (using peroxidase-conjugated lectin) and an indirect method (using native, unconjugated lectin). Similar percentages of cases were positive (79%) and negative (21%) for lectin binding with either technique, but there was enormous inconsistency when individual cases were examined. A total of 38/373 (10.2%) cases that were negative by the indirect method were positive by the direct method, and 37/373 (9.9%) cases that were negative by the direct method were positive by the indirect method. Life tables calculated for lectin staining vs nonstaining cases showed a very strong correlation between lectin binding and long-term survival (p < 0.0001) when staining was performed by the indirect method, but only very weak correlation with prognosis (p < 0.03, borderline significance) when the direct technique was employed. SDS-PAGE revealed that there were differences in breast cancer glycoproteins recognized by native lectin and peroxidase-conjugated lectin immobilized on Sepharose 4B affinity beads. Helix pomatia lectin binding appears to be an intriguing and potentially valuable marker of biological behavior in breast cancer. This study emphasizes the importance of selecting an appropriate immunohistochemical technique for its visualization.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel lectin with mitogenic activity from Pleurotus ferulae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng-Jian; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Niu, Bo-Nan; Liu, Bing; Li, Ying-Biao; Wang, Xue-Ming; Lu, Shi-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Lectins are the tools for the determination of sugar chain structure. Recently, lectin arrays have become a popular new technology; therefore, lectins with specific sugar-binding properties are required. The objective of the study was to isolate a novel lectin from Pleurotus ferulae mushrooms and characterize its various biological activities. A novel lectin was extracted with deionized water, precipitated from the aqueous extract using 75% saturated (NH4)2SO4, and subjected on DEAE-cellulose followed by affinity chromatography on sepharose-6B. The activity was tested using hemagglutination assays, and carbohydrate-binding specificity was determined by glycan microarray analysis. Its effects on the mitogenic activity of mouse splenocytes were determined by MTT assay. The novel lectin was adsorbed on ion-exchange chromatography DEAE-cellulose and shown as a band with the molecular mass of 17.5 kDa on a SDS-PAGE and as a single 35.0-kDa peak in gel filtration on Superdex G-75. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was inhibited by D-glucose, lactose, D-galactose, and galactosamine. The lectin was stable on 60°C. The hemagglutinating activity of lectin was reduced by 50% at 70°C. At 80°C, it was further reduced to 6.25% of its original activity. The hemagglutinating activity was the highest at pH 6-9. Moreover, its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. The lectin isolated from P. ferulae in the current study possessed highly potent hemagglutinating and proliferative activities toward mouse splenocytes. PMID:25016256

  15. Lectins from Triticum vulgaris and Limax flavus are universal antagonists of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin.

    PubMed

    Bakry, N; Kamata, Y; Simpson, L L

    1991-09-01

    Lectins from Anguilla anguilla, Artocarpus integrifolia, Canavalia ensiformis, Datora stramonium, Glycine max, Limax flavus, Ricinus communis and Triticum vulgaris were tested for their abilities to antagonize the binding of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin to rat brain membranes and to antagonize the ability of these toxins to block neuromuscular transmission in mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations. Lectins from Limax flavus and Triticum vulgaris, both of which have affinity for sialic acid, were antagonists of the various serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin. When tested against the high affinity binding site for botulinum neurotoxin type B, the lectin from Limax flavus had a Ki of 3.1 x 10(-7) M and the lectin from Triticum vulgaris had a Ki of 3.75 x 10(-7) M. When tested against the high affinity binding site for tetanus toxin, the lectins from Limax flavus and Triticum vulgaris had Ki values of 1.5 x 10(-7) and 1 x 10(-6) M, respectively. In all cases the lectins behaved as competitive antagonists. In reverse experiments, neither botulinum toxin nor tetanus toxin was a very effective antagonist of lectin binding to brain membranes. Studies on isolated neuromuscular preparations showed that the lectin from Triticum vulgaris did not affect transmission at concentrations of 10(-6) to 10(-3) M, but at a concentration of 3 x 10(-5) M the lectin produced highly statistically significant antagonism of the neuromuscular blocking properties of botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, C, D, E and F as well as tetanus toxin. The lectin did not antagonize beta-bungarotoxin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. IgA binding lectins isolated from distinct Artocarpus species demonstrate differential specificity.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Ng, C L; Gendeh, S; Nik Jaafar, M I

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of jacalin, a group of lectins from jackfruit seeds (Artocarpus heterophyllus), has attracted considerable attention due to its numerous interesting immunological properties as well as its usefulness in the isolation of various serum proteins. We have further identified a similar lectin from the seeds of Champedak (Artocarpus integer) which we refer to as lectin-C and performed comparative studies with two types of jacalin isolated from different batches of the Malaysian jackfruit seeds (jacalin-M1 and jacalin-M2). The three purified lectins demonstrated equivalent apparent Mr of about 52,500, each of which comprised of a combination of two types of non-covalently-linked subunits with apparent Mr of approximately 13,300 and 16,000. The lectins demonstrated equal haemagglutinating activity against human erythrocytes of blood groups A, B, AB and O. Our data also demonstrated that lectin-C, jacalin-M1 and jacalin-M2 are similar by selectively precipitating human serum IgA1 and colostral sIgA but not IgA2, IgD, IgG and IgM. When immunoelectrophoresis was performed on normal human sera and reacted with the lectins, single precipitin arcs corresponding to IgA immunoprecipitates were detected with lectin-C and jacalin-MI. Jacalin-M2, however, exhibited two closely associated precipitin arcs. The binding of these lectins with IgA was pronouncedly inhibited in the presence of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, 1-o-methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside, D-melibiose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and D-galactose. The data therefore provide evidence on the differential specificity of IgA binding lectins isolated from seeds of similar as well as distinct Artocarpus species.

  17. The lectin KM+ induces corneal epithelial wound healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chahud, Fernando; Ramalho, Leandra N Z; Ramalho, Fernando S; Haddad, Antonio; Roque-Barreira, Maria C

    2009-04-01

    Neutrophil influx is essential for corneal regeneration (Gan et al. 1999). KM+, a lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia, induces neutrophil migration (Santos-de-Oliveira et al. 1994). This study aims at investigating a possible effect of KM+ on corneal regeneration in rabbits. A 6.0-mm diameter area of debridement was created on the cornea of both eyes by mechanical scraping. The experimental eyes received drops of KM+ (2.5 microg/ml) every 2 h. The control eyes received buffer. The epithelial wounded areas of the lectin-treated and untreated eyes were stained with fluorescein, photographed and measured. The animals were killed 12 h (group 1, n = 5), 24 h (group 2, n = 10) and 48 h (group 3, n = 5) after the scraping. The corneas were analysed histologically (haematoxylin and eosin and immunostaining for proliferation cell nuclear antigen, p63, vascular endothelial growth factor, c-Met and laminin). No significant differences were found at the epithelial gap between treated and control eyes in the group 1. However, the number of neutrophils in the wounded area was significantly higher in treated eyes in this group. Three control and seven treated eyes were healed completely and only rare neutrophils persisted in the corneal stroma in group 2. No morphological distinction was observed between treated and control eyes in group 3. In treated corneas of group 2, there was an increase in immunostaining of factors involved in corneal healing compared to controls. Thus, topical application of KM+ may facilitate corneal epithelial wound healing in rabbits by means of a mechanism that involves increased influx of neutrophils into the wounded area induced by the lectin.

  18. Extraction and purification of a lectin from red kidney bean and preliminary immune function studies of the lectin and four Chinese herbal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4-6, back extraction at pH 9-11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4-6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity.

  19. Interaction of lectins with human IgE: IgE-binding property and histamine-releasing activity of twelve plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, M; Sumazaki, R; Isoyama, S; Takita, H

    1992-01-01

    We examined the IgE-binding reaction and the histamine-releasing response of basophils to a panel of 12 lectins: concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris hemagglutinin (LcH), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA-I), Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin (Lotus A), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), phytohemagglutinin E (PHA-E) and phytohemagglutinin L (PHA-L), IgE from allergic patients bound with high affinity to Con A, LcH, PSA, RCA-I and PHA-E, and with lower affinity to WGA, BPA, Lotus A and UEA-I, but they did not bind to SBA, PNA or PHA-L. There was no apparent individual difference in the reactivity of IgE to these lectins between 10 IgE preparations from allergic patients. The binding to these lectins, except Lotus A and UEA-I, were competitively inhibited by the lectin-specific sugars or glycopeptide. Upon stimulation by Con A, LcH, PSA, WGA, RCA-1 and PHA-E, leukocytes from allergic patients showed a significant release of histamine, but cells from IgE-deficient subjects did not respond to these lectins. The histamine-releasing responses by these lectins were also inhibited by specific sugars or glycopeptides.

  20. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn’s disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn’s disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn’s disease phenotype in 69 Crohn’s disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin–mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn’s disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn’s disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn’s disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants. PMID:27404661

  1. Extraction and purification of a lectin from red kidney bean and preliminary immune function studies of the lectin and four Chinese herbal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4-6, back extraction at pH 9-11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4-6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity. PMID:20976304

  2. Lectin-based Isolation and Culture of Mouse Embryonic Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Rebecca; Jablonka, Sibylle; Sczepan, Teresa; Sendtner, Michael; Wiese, Stefan; Klausmeyer, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Spinal motoneurons develop towards postmitotic stages through early embryonic nervous system development and subsequently grow out dendrites and axons. Neuroepithelial cells of the neural tube that express Nkx6.1 are the unique precursor cells for spinal motoneurons1. Though postmitotic motoneurons move towards their final position and organize themselves into columns along the spinal tract2,3. More than 90% of all these differentiated and positioned motoneurons express the transcription factors Islet 1/2. They innervate the muscles of the limbs as well as those of the body and the inner organs. Among others, motoneurons typically express the high affinity receptors for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), the tropomyosin-related kinase B and C (TrkB, TrkC). They do not express the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA)4. Beside the two high affinity receptors, motoneurons do express the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. The p75NTR can bind all neurotrophins with similar but lower affinity to all neurotrophins than the high affinity receptors would bind the mature neurotrophins. Within the embryonic spinal cord, the p75NTR is exclusively expressed by the spinal motoneurons5. This has been used to develop motoneuron isolation techniques to purify the cells from the vast majority of surrounding cells6. Isolating motoneurons with the help of specific antibodies (panning) against the extracellular domains of p75NTR has turned out to be an expensive method as the amount of antibody used for a single experiment is high due to the size of the plate used for panning. A much more economical alternative is the use of lectin. Lectin has been shown to specifically bind to p75NTR as well7. The following method describes an alternative technique using wheat germ agglutinin for a preplating procedure instead of the p75NTR antibody. The lectin is an extremely inexpensive alternative to the p75NTR antibody and the purification grades using

  3. Tissue staining properties of lectins from the seeds of the jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and the winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus).

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, T; Robertson, D; McIntosh, D; Forrester, J A

    1987-01-01

    N-acetyl-D-galactosamine binding lectins from winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) and jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) were isolated, purified and conjugated with horse radish peroxidase and their tissue staining properties studied. Despite having an apparently common inhibiting sugar, the lectins showed differences in their staining properties. The lectin from the winged bean stained none of the mouse and human tissues tried even after neuraminidase treatment whereas the jack fruit lectin stained most of the untreated cells. The staining was found to be improved by the prior treatment of the cells with neuraminidase and inhibited completely by the inhibiting sugar. The differences in the staining properties of the lectins are discussed.

  4. Interaction of Artocarpus lectins with human IgA does not involve asparagine-linked oligosaccharide of the immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Kobayashi, K; Taniguchi, N

    1992-07-01

    In view of the controversy with respect to the interaction of jacalin with human IgA2, a study was undertaken to assess the reactivity of the Artocarpus heterophyllus lectin, as well as the lectin from Artocarpus integer (lectin C), with subclasses of human immunoglobulin A by ELISA. Our data is consistent with the view that Artocarpus lectins have no affinity for the IgA2 immunoglobulins. In further support of the findings, we have established that N-linked oligosaccharide moieties of IgA have no significant bearing in the lectin-immunoglobulin binding. Interaction was also not affected in the presence of 1% (w/v) BSA.

  5. Gal/GalNAc specific multiple lectins in marine bivalve Anadara granosa.

    PubMed

    Adhya, Mausumi; Singha, Biswajit

    2016-03-01

    Complete lectin mapping of molluscs with their diversified recognition pattern and possible role in lectin-carbohydrate interaction based immune response triggering need much attention. In this communication, Gal/GalNAc specific three lectins AGL-IA (Anadara granosa lectin-IA), AGL-IB (A. granosa lectin-IB) and AGL-IV (A. granosa lectin-IV) and a lectin having hemolytic activity AGL-III (A. granosa lectin-III) were purified from the plasma of A. granosa bivalve by a combination of gel filtration and affinity chromatography. AGL-IA and IB were oligomeric lectins whereas, AGL-III and IV were monomeric. The molecular weight of AGL-IA, IB, III and IV were 375, 260, 45 and 33 kDa respectively. AGL-IA and IV agglutinated both rabbit and pronase treated human erythrocytes, whereas AGL-IB agglutinated only rabbit erythrocytes. AGL-III was found to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, however, it caused hemolysis of pronase treated human erythrocytes. The activity of all four lectins was calcium dependent and maximum at a pH range 7-8. Apart from Gal/GalNAc specific, the four lectins showed substantial differences in their carbohydrate recognition pattern. Moreover, there was a difference in the carbohydrate specificity between AGL-III and other three lectins (AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV) towards polyvalent glycotope. On the one hand, 'cluster glycoside effect' i.e., an enhancement of the activity of a multivalent ligand, was observed for carbohydrate specificities of AGL-IA, AGL-IB, AGL-IV. On the other hand, the effect of multivalent ligands on the carbohydrate specificity of AGL-III was opposite of cluster glycoside effect. The affinity of AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV for ligands can be ranked as follows: glycoproteins > polysaccharide > oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. However, Gal related monosaccharides were the best inhibitors of AGL-III and the inhibitory activity decreased gradually in the following order: monosaccharide > disaccharide > polysaccharide. Thus, the

  6. The degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors during germination of white kidney beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; Tamminga, S; Leenaars, P P; Schering, J; Ter Maat, D W

    1994-04-01

    White kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), cv Processor, contain a relatively high content of phaseolin (storage protein), lectins and a special group of glycoproteins as well as a considerable amount of protein-type trypsin inhibitors. Protein digestion of raw 'Processor' beans in monogastrics, for example pigs, is disturbed by poorly digested, phaseolin lectins, which can bind to carbohydrates in brush border membranes of the small intestinal epithelium, and trypsin inhibitors. The effect of the germination of white kidney beans on lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors was studied in order to achieve a degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors and an increase of in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein of bean flour. Therefore, whole bean extracts were examined throughout a germination period of up to seven days for their lectin and phaseolin pattern, lectin content, binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes and trypsin inhibitor content. In addition the in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis by pepsin and pancreatin of the protein from flours of (un)germinated white kidney beans was studied. SDS-PAGE demonstrated a degradation of E-lectins and a disappearance of L-lectins and phaseolin during germination. Results indicated a decrease of the lectin content by 85%, a loss of binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes by 91%, and a decrease of trypsin inhibitors by 76%, in bean flour after germination for seven days. A maximum in in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of protein from bean flour was already established after germination for half a day.

  7. Comparative analyses of IgA1 binding lectins from seeds of six distinct clones of Artocarpus integer.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Gendeh, G S; Jaafar, M I

    1993-01-01

    Purified lectins from seeds of six distinct clones of Artocarpus integer (lectin C) were shown to be structurally and functionally similar. All lectins comprised of two types of non-covalently-linked subunits with apparent M(r) of 13,300 and 16,000. The lectins appeared to interact with several human serum proteins, with the predominance of the IgA1 and C1 inhibitor molecules. Interaction was not detected with IgA2, IgD, IgG and IgM. The lectin Cs were also shown to precipitate monkey, sheep, rabbit, cat, hamster, rat and guinea-pig serum. Due to their uniform properties, lectin C may provide better alternative to the Artocarpus heterophyllus lectin, jacalin, for use in future investigations.

  8. Xylaria hypoxylon Lectin as Adjuvant Elicited Tfh Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Zuo, Y; Guo, Q; Wang, H; Liu, Q; Liu, Q; Xia, G; Kang, Y

    2015-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) caused by FMD virus (FMDV) is a major health and economic problem in the farming industry. Vaccination of livestock against this highly infectious viral disease is crucial, and inactivated FMD vaccine has been effective at controlling infection. However, accumulated data show that the inactivated vaccine generates weak immune responses and that the oil formulation results in undesirable side effects. Mushroom lectins have recently been shown to display adjuvant effects when incorporated into DNA vaccines. In this study, to enhance the cellular immune response of FMDV antigen (146S), C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 146S combined with Xylaria hypoxylon lectin (XHL). The oil formulation (146S/Oil) was served as control group. Strong humoral immune responses were elicited in mice immunized with 146S/XHL as shown by high 146S antigen-specific IgG levels, and also in 146S/Oil group. Interestingly, XHL in conjunction with inactivated FMD vaccine activated strong Th1 and Tc1 cell responses, especially Tfh cell responses, in immunized mice. XHL stimulated dendritic cell maturation by upregulating expression of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) molecules and co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 in immunized mice. No XHL-specific IgG or inflammatory factors were detected indicating the safety of XHL as an adjuvant. Taken together, these results suggest the effectiveness of XHL at inducing cellular immune responses and therefore confirm its suitability as an adjuvant for inactivated FMD vaccine.

  9. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  10. Molecular cloning of a human macrophage lectin specific for galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Cherayil, B.J.; Chairovitz, S.; Wong, C.; Pillai, S. Harvard Medical School, Boston )

    1990-09-01

    The murine Mac-2 protein is a galactose- and IgE-binding lectin secreted by inflammatory macrophages. The authors describe here the cloning an dcharacterization of cDNA representing the human homolog of Mac-2 (hMac-2). The amino acid sequence derived from the hMac-2 cDNA indicates that the protein is evolutionarily highly conserved, with 85% of its amino acid residues being similar to those in the murine homolog. This conservation is especially marked in the carboxyl-terminal lectin domain. The amino-terminal half of the protein is less conserved but still contains the repetitive proline-glycine-rich motif seen in the mouse protein. hMac-2 synthesized in vitro is recognized by the M3/38 monoclonal antibody to Mac-2 and binds to the desialylated glycoprotein asialofetuin and to laminin, a major component of basement membranes. These findings are discussed in the context of the potential functions of hMac-2.

  11. Jacalin: a lectin mitogenic for human CD4 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, N; Aucouturier, P; Brugier, J C; Preud'homme, J L

    1990-01-01

    The major protein component of seeds from jackfruit is the lectin jacalin. Jackfruit crude extracts are known to stimulate human lymphocytes, but the mitogenic properties of purified jacalin have not been studied in detail so far. Study of the proliferative response of cell populations from normal human peripheral blood to purified jacalin showed it to be mitogenic through an interaction with lymphocytes by its lectin-binding site, as shown by inhibition by IgA. Jacalin failed to stimulate B cells to proliferate and to undergo plasma cell maturation. It induced a proliferation of CD4 (and not CD8) lymphocytes, as shown by phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after culture and by studies of the response of isolated T cell subpopulations. The proliferative response to jacalin was autologous monocyte-dependent. The kinetics of jacalin-induced DNA synthesis, expression of CD25 and interleukin-2 secretion was shifted by comparison with that induced by phytohaemagglutinin. The reason for the restricted responsiveness of CD4 T cells is presently unclear; jacalin bound to all blood cells and did not significantly co-cap with CD1, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD38, and jacalin response was neither enhanced nor inhibited by antibodies to these surface antigens. PMID:2372991

  12. Lectin KM+-induced neutrophil haptotaxis involves binding to laminin.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, Luciane; Martins, Antônio R; Freymüller, Edna; Mortara, Renato A; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2005-01-18

    The lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia, also known as artocarpin, induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis. The interactions of KM+ with both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and neutrophils depend on the lectin ability to recognize mannose-containing glycans. Here, we report the binding of KM+ to laminin and demonstrate that this interaction potentiates the KM+-induced neutrophil migration. Labeling of lung tissue by KM+ located its ligands on the endothelial cells, in the basement membrane, in the alveolus, and in the interstitial connective tissue. Such labeling was inhibited by 400 mM D-mannose, 10 mM Manalpha1-3[Manalpha1-6]Man or 10 microM peroxidase (a glycoprotein-containing mannosyl heptasaccharide). Laminin is a tissue ligand for KM+, since both KM+ and anti-laminin antibodies not only reacted with the same high molecular mass components of a lung extract, but also determined colocalized labeling in basement membranes of the lung tissue. The relevance of the KM+-laminin interaction to the KM+ property of inducing neutrophil migration was evaluated. The inability of low concentrations of soluble KM+ to induce human neutrophil migration was reversed by coating the microchamber filter with laminin. So, the interaction of KM+ with laminin promotes the formation of a substrate-bound KM+ gradient that is able to induce neutrophil haptotaxis.

  13. The effect of lectin from Taro tuber (Colocasia antiquorum) given by force-feeding on the growth of mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Y J; Une, S; Tsukamoto, I; Miyoshi, M

    1990-06-01

    In earlier experiments in our laboratory, a lectin from the Kintoki bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was found to have not only erythrocyte agglutinating activity but also toxicities for mice and rats, including growth inhibitory activity and even lethal activity. A number of studies on legume lectins have been carried out in other laboratories as well. But relatively little attention has been paid to lectins from non-leguminous foods. In the present study, we chose Taro tuber as a source of non-leguminous lectins and prepared two types of Taro tuber lectin. One was crude lectin precipitated with ammonium sulfate from the aqueous extract and the other was pure lectin isolated as we described previously. The two were compared with regards to the antinutritional functions in mice. The daily doses were 100 mg for either intact or autoclaved crude lectin, which was a maximum amount available to give to mice in 1 ml, and 30 mg for the pure lectin which was equivalent to 100 mg of the crude lectin in hemagglutinating activity. Control mice were given 1 ml of water and the experiment was conducted for 6 days. Growth retardation was found in the mice given either lectin, but no significant difference was found in the weight increase between the control group and the autoclaved lectin group. For 3 days during the experimental period, physical activity was measured as an index of vigor of mice. The activities of the crude lectin and the pure lectin groups leveled down to 62.9 and 64.2% of that of the control group, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2292730

  14. Animal lectins as self/non-self recognition molecules. Biochemical and genetic approaches to understanding their biological roles and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vasta, G R; Ahmed, H; Fink, N E; Elola, M T; Marsh, A G; Snowden, A; Odom, E W

    1994-04-15

    In recent years, the significant contributions from molecular research studies on animal lectins have elucidated structural aspects and provided clues not only to their evolution but also to their multiple biological functions. The experimental evidence has suggested that distinct, and probably unrelated, groups of molecules are included under the term "lectin." Within the invertebrate taxa, major groups of lectins can be identified: One group would include lectins that show significant homology to membrane-integrated or soluble vertebrate C-type lectins. The second would include those beta-galactosyl-specific lectins homologous to the S-type vertebrate lectins. The third group would be constituted by lectins that show homology to vertebrate pentraxins that exhibit lectin-like properties, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P. Finally, there are examples that do not exhibit similarities to any of the aforementioned categories. Moreover, the vast majority of invertebrate lectins described so far cannot yet be placed in one or another group because of the lack of information regarding their primary structure. (See Table 1.) Animal lectins do not express a recombinatorial diversity like that of antibodies, but a limited diversity in recognition capabilities would be accomplished by the occurrence of multiple lectins with distinct specificities, the presence of more than one binding site, specific for different carbohydrates in a single molecule, and by certain "flexibility" of the binding sites that would allow the recognition of a range of structurally related carbohydrates. In order to identify the lectins' "natural" ligands, we have investigated the interactions between those proteins and the putative endogenous or exogenous glycosylated substances or cells that may be relevant to their biological function. Results from these studies, together with information on the biochemical properties of invertebrate and vertebrate lectins, including their structural

  15. Effective inhibition of melanosome transfer to keratinocytes by lectins and niacinamide is reversible.

    PubMed

    Greatens, Amanda; Hakozaki, Tomohiro; Koshoffer, Amy; Epstein, Howard; Schwemberger, Sandy; Babcock, George; Bissett, Donald; Takiwaki, Hirotsugu; Arase, Seiji; Wickett, R Randall; Boissy, Raymond E

    2005-07-01

    Skin pigmentation results in part from the transfer of melanized melanosomes synthesized by melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Plasma membrane lectins and their glycoconjugates expressed by these epidermal cells are critical molecules involved in this transfer process. In addition, the derivative of vitamin B(3), niacinamide, can inhibit melanosome transfer and induce skin lightening. We investigated the effects of these molecules on the viability of melanocytes and keratinocytes and on the reversibility of melanosome-transfer inhibition induced by these agents using an in vitro melanocyte-keratinocyte coculture model system. While lectins and neoglycoproteins could induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner to melanocytes or keratinocytes in monoculture, similar dosages of the lectins, as opposed to neoglycoproteins, did not induce apoptosis to either cell type when treated in coculture. The dosages of lectins and niacinamide not affecting cell viability produced an inhibitory effect on melanosome transfer, when used either alone or together in cocultures of melanocytes-keratinocytes. Cocultures treated with lectins or niacinamide resumed normal melanosome transfer in 3 days after removal of the inhibitor, while cocultures treated with a combination of lectins and niacinamide demonstrated a lag in this recovery. Subsequently, we assessed the effect of niacinamide on facial hyperpigmented spots using a vehicle-controlled, split-faced design human clinical trial. Topical application of niacinamide resulted in a dose-dependent and reversible reduction in hyperpigmented lesions. These results suggest that lectins and niacinamide at concentrations that do not affect cell viability are reversible inhibitors of melanosome transfer.

  16. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  17. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. Methods The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. Results The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Conclusions Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections. PMID:27537843

  18. Isolation and analysis of mannose/trehalose/maltose specific lectin from jack bean with antibruchid activity.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavel, Sakthivelkumar; Velayutham, Veeramani; Kamalanathan, Tamilarasan; Periasamy, Mullainadhan; Munusamy, Arumugam; Sundaram, Janarthanan

    2016-10-01

    A lectin with insecticidal property against the stored product pest, Callosobruchus maculatus was successfully isolated from the seeds of Canavalia virosa using standard affinity chromatography. The isolated molecule typically behaved like a lectin in its characteristics. It agglutinated indicator red blood cells (RBC) in its native as well as enzyme treated conditions. The enzyme treated RBC types exhibited a very high hemagglutination (HA) titre values and this property of isolated molecule behaved like arcelin, the lectin-like molecules reported from several species of Phaseolus. As a characteristic feature of a lectin, the isolated molecule effectively inhibited the agglutination of indicator RBC types with simple and complex carbohydrates including glycoproteins. This nature of the isolated molecule also relate with characteristic feature of arcelin isoforms in inhibiting HA activity with complex glycoproteins as reported in many studies. Most interestingly, the present study disclosed trehalose as a potent inhibitor of C. virosa lectin. Therefore, feeding insect pests on the lectin like arcelin could serve as antibiosis factor/anti-insect activity. The molecular characteristics of this isolated molecule and its mass studies too revealed its homology with arcelin, arcelin-1, 2 and 6 isoforms of P. vulgaris and lectin from Canavalia cathartica, C. lineata and C. brasiliensis. PMID:27238584

  19. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-11-01

    Lectins have captured the attention of a large number of researchers on account of their various exploitable activities, including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities. A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from green split peas (a variety of Pisum sativum) and characterized. The purification step involved anion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column, cation-exchange chromatography on an SP-Sepharose column, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Superdex 200. The purified lectin had a native molecular mass of around 50 kDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. It appeared as a heterotetramer, composed of two distinct polypeptide bands with a molecular mass of 6 and 19 kDa, respectively, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal sequence of green split pea lectin shows some degree of homology compared to lectins from other legume species. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by glucose, mannose, and sucrose, and attenuated at pH values higher than 12 or lower than 3. Hemagglutinating activity was preserved at temperatures lower than 80 °C. The lectin did not show antifungal activity toward fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Green split pea lectin showed a mitogenic effect toward murine splenocytes and could inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  20. In-house preparation of lectin panel and detection of Tn polyagglutination.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Polyagglutination is a condition in which red cells are agglutinated by ABO-compatible adult human sera, but not by cord blood sera and may be acquired or inherited. Lectins are invaluable reagents in the investigation of red cells polyagglutination. We prepared in-house lectin panel and confirmed Tn polyagglutination in a pregnant lady. The lady was anemic and refused blood transfusion elsewhere due to serological discrepancy. We found ABO discrepancy and an incompatible minor cross-match in the initial investigation and suspected polyagglutination. Confirmation of polyagglutination was done using adult and cord sera. We then used the in-house lectin panels to detect the type of polyagglutination. The agglutination pattern with the various lectins was suggestive of Tn polyagglutination, which was further supported by the enzyme study. Most blood banks in India lack commercial lectin panels because of cost and procurement difficulty. Lectins play an important role in the diagnosis and differentiation of polyagglutination and immunohematological management of patient. The important and basic lectins can be prepared in-house using specific raw seeds following standardized protocol. PMID:25722587

  1. Differentiation of Helicobacter pylori Isolates Based on Lectin Binding of Cell Extracts in an Agglutination Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Sean O.; Hirmo, Siiri; Wadström, Torkel; Moran, Anthony P.

    1999-01-01

    Plant and animal lectins with various carbohydrate specificities were used to type 35 Irish clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori and the type strain NCTC 11637 in a microtiter plate assay. Initially, a panel of eight lectins with the indicated primary specificities were used: Anguilla anguilla (AAA), Lotus tetragonolobus (Lotus A), and Ulex europaeus I (UEA I), specific for α-l-fucose; Solanum tuberosum (STA) and Triticum vulgaris (WGA), specific for β-N-acetylglucosamine; Glycine max (SBA), specific for β-N-acetylgalactosamine; Erythrina cristagali (ECA), specific for β-galactose and β-N-acetylgalactosamine; and Lens culinaris (LCA), specific for α-mannose and α-glucose. Three of the lectins (SBA, STA, and LCA) were not useful in aiding in strain discrimination. An optimized panel of five lectins (AAA, ECA, Lotus A, UEA I, and WGA) grouped all 36 strains tested into eight lectin reaction patterns. For optimal typing, pretreatment by washing bacteria with a low-pH buffer to allow protein release, followed by proteolytic degradation to eliminate autoagglutination, was used. Lectin types of treated samples were stable and reproducible. No strain proved to be untypeable by this system. Electrophoretic and immunoblotting analyses of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) indicated that the lectins interact primarily, but not solely, with the O side chain of H. pylori LPS. PMID:10325361

  2. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-11-01

    Lectins have captured the attention of a large number of researchers on account of their various exploitable activities, including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities. A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from green split peas (a variety of Pisum sativum) and characterized. The purification step involved anion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column, cation-exchange chromatography on an SP-Sepharose column, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Superdex 200. The purified lectin had a native molecular mass of around 50 kDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. It appeared as a heterotetramer, composed of two distinct polypeptide bands with a molecular mass of 6 and 19 kDa, respectively, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal sequence of green split pea lectin shows some degree of homology compared to lectins from other legume species. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by glucose, mannose, and sucrose, and attenuated at pH values higher than 12 or lower than 3. Hemagglutinating activity was preserved at temperatures lower than 80 °C. The lectin did not show antifungal activity toward fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Green split pea lectin showed a mitogenic effect toward murine splenocytes and could inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. PMID:26304129

  3. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  4. Lectin-Mediated Resistance Impairs Plant Virus Infection at the Cellular Level[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Shiraishi, Takuya; Okano, Yukari; Himeno, Misako; Sugawara, Kyoko; Neriya, Yutaro; Minato, Nami; Miura, Chihiro; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Namba, Shigetou

    2012-01-01

    Plants possess a multilayered defense response, known as plant innate immunity, to infection by a wide variety of pathogens. Lectins, sugar binding proteins, play essential roles in the innate immunity of animal cells, but the role of lectins in plant defense is not clear. This study analyzed the resistance of certain Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to a potexvirus, plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV). Map-based positional cloning revealed that the lectin gene JACALIN-TYPE LECTIN REQUIRED FOR POTEXVIRUS RESISTANCE1 (JAX1) is responsible for the resistance. JAX1-mediated resistance did not show the properties of conventional resistance (R) protein–mediated resistance and was independent of plant defense hormone signaling. Heterologous expression of JAX1 in Nicotiana benthamiana showed that JAX1 interferes with infection by other tested potexviruses but not with plant viruses from different genera, indicating the broad but specific resistance to potexviruses conferred by JAX1. In contrast with the lectin gene RESTRICTED TEV MOVEMENT1, which inhibits the systemic movement of potyviruses, which are distantly related to potexviruses, JAX1 impairs the accumulation of PlAMV RNA at the cellular level. The existence of lectin genes that show a variety of levels of virus resistance, their targets, and their properties, which are distinct from those of known R genes, suggests the generality of lectin-mediated resistance in plant innate immunity. PMID:22307853

  5. Purification and characterization of a new mannose-specific lectin from Sternbergia lutea bulbs.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Misaki, A; Goldstein, I J

    1997-12-01

    A new mannose-binding lectin was isolated from Sternbergia lutea bulbs by affinity chromatography on an alpha(1-2)mannobiose-Synsorb column and purified further by gel filtration. This lectin (S. lutea agglutinin; SLA) appeared homogeneous by native-gel electrophoresis at pH 4.3, gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G-75 column, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, These data indicate that SLA is a dimeric protein (20 kDa) composed of two identical subunits of 10 kDa which are linked by non-covalent interactions. The carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin was investigated by quantitative precipitation and hapten inhibition assays. It is an alpha-D-mannose-specific lectin that interacts to form precipitates with various alpha-mannans, galactomannan and asialo-thyroglobulin, but not with alpha-glucans and thyroglobulin. Of the monosaccharides tested only D-mannose was a hapten inhibitor of the SLA-asialothyroglobulin precipitation system, whereas D-glucose, D-galactose and L-arabinose were not. The lectin appears to be highly specific for terminal alpha(1-3)-mannooligosaccharides. The primary structure of SLA appears to be quite similar to that of the snow drop (Galanthus nivalis) bulb lectin which is a mannose-binding lectin from the same plant family Amaryllidaceae. The N-terminal 46 amino acid sequence SLA showed 76% homology with that of GNA.

  6. alpha-Galactoside binding lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta: characterization of the sugar specificity and binding site.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, M M; Khan, M I; Gaikwad, S M

    1998-07-23

    The hemagglutinin from the seeds of Artocarpus hirsuta was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-sephadex. The native protein of molecular mass 60,000 (gel filtration) is made up of two pairs of unidentical subunits, alpha and beta with molecular masses of 15,800 and 14,130. The lectin is basic in nature (pI 8.5) and a glycoprotein with neutral sugar content of 6.25%. Rabbit as well as human erythrocytes (A, B and O) are agglutinated by the lectin. The lectin activity is neither affected by Ca2+, Mg2+ or Mn2+ nor by EDTA. Methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside, pNP-alpha-D-galactopyranoside and pNP-alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine are the best inhibitors of the lectin. 4-Methylumbelliferyl-alpha-galactopyranoside fluorescence was quenched on binding to A. hirsuta lectin. The sugar has two binding sites per tetramer of the lectin with a Ka of 3.5x105 M-1 at 25 degrees C. Chemical modification studies indicate that the net positive charge associated with epsilon-NH2 of lysine residues and the phenyl ring of tyrosine are essential for the sugar binding activity of A. hirsuta lectin.

  7. Binding of FITC-labelled lectins to the gastrointestinal epithelium of the rat.

    PubMed

    Baintner, K; Jakab, G; Gyôri, Z; Kiss, P

    2000-01-01

    Biotechnology uses lectin genes to transfect into crop plants for protection against insects and nematodes. On the other hand, the information is limited on lectin-binding properties of cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, binding of a panel of FITC-labelled plant lectins to gastrointestinal cells of the rat was studied. In the stomach, cytoplasmic staining of parietal cells by PHA appeared to be due to glycoproteins attached to the tubulovesicles. PNA also stained the parietal cells, but only in the isthmus and neck regions, reacting with desialylated glycoproteins. WGA bound to the mucous neck cells with higher affinity than to the surface and foveolar mucous cells. The mucous cells were also stained by SNA-I, UEA-I and, less intensively, by LCA. Chief cells did not show detectable reaction with any of the applied lectins. Binding of PHA to gastric cells showed differences when compared with the results of in vivostudies. Small intestinal brush border was stained with UEA-I and SNA-I, the latter lectin also strongly stained the surface of small intestinal crypts. Both lectins reacted with the mucus of goblet cells. In the large intestine UEA-I and SNA-I stained the goblet cells at the base and upper part of the crypts, respectively. Accordingly, we provided evidences for the unique lectin-binding phenotype of the various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:11033457

  8. Probing carbohydrate-lectin recognition in heterogeneous environments with monodisperse cyclodextrin-based glycoclusters.

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, Marta; Benito, Juan M; Butera, Anna P; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M; Jiménez Blanco, José L

    2012-02-01

    A series of β-cyclodextrin (βCD)-scaffolded glycoclusters exposing heterogeneous yet perfectly controlled displays of α-mannosyl (α-Man) and β-lactosyl (β-Lact) antennas were synthesized to probe the mutual influence of varying densities of the saccharide motifs in the binding properties toward different plant lectins. Enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) data indicated that the presence of β-Lact residues reinforced binding of α-Man to the mannose-specific lectin concanavalin A (Con A) even though homogeneous β-Lact clusters are not recognized at all by this lectin, supporting the existence of synergic recognition mechanisms (heterocluster effect). Conversely, the presence of α-Man motifs in the heteroglycoclusters also resulted in a binding-enhancing effect of β-Lact toward peanut agglutinin (PNA), a lectin strongly binding multivalent lactosides but having no detectable affinity for α-mannopyranosides, for certain architectural arrangements. Two-site, sandwich-type ELLA data corroborated the higher lectin clustering efficiency of heterogeneous glycoclusters compared with homogeneous displays of the putative sugar ligand with identical valency. A turbidity assay was also consistent with the previous observations. Most revealingly, the lectin cross-linking ability of heterogeneous glycoclusters was sensitive to the presence of high concentrations of the non-ligand sugar, strongly suggesting that "mismatching" saccharide motifs may modulate carbohydrate-lectin specific recognition in a lectin-dependent manner when present in highly dense displays together with the "matching" ligand, a situation frequently encountered in biological systems.

  9. Rapid identification of lectin receptors and their possible function in sea urchin cell systems.

    PubMed

    Latham, V H; Herrera, S; Rostamiani, K; Chun, H H; Oppenheimer, S B

    1995-10-01

    An assay using lectin derivatized agarose beads to rapidly and inexpensively identify cell surface lectin receptors was recently described by Latham et al. (1995). In this earlier study, the assay was tested on large, early stage sea urchin embryo cells. In this study this assay was used to examine lectin receptors on small, later stage sea urchin embryo cells that are more typical of cells that most investigators deal with, to ascertain if cell size is a determining factor in the assay's validity. The results indicated that the assay is a valid method to identify lectin receptors on small as well as large cells. Twenty-three hour Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo cells strongly bound Triticum vulgaris, concanavalin A, Artocarpus integrifolia and Vicia villosa using both the agarose bead and fluorescence assays, while three other lectins, Ulex europaeus I, Lotus tetragonolobus and Lens culinaris did not strongly bind to the cells using these two assays. As in earlier studies agglutinability results did not correlate well with results using the two other assays. In all cases where lectin bead binding, fluorescent lectin binding or lectin-mediated agglutination occurred, specific sugars reduced the observed binding. The second part of this study examined the putative role of concanavilin A receptors in a specific cellular interaction: sperm-egg binding. Concanavalin A inhibited fertilization of dejellied sea urchin eggs when their vitelline layers were intact and to a lesser extent when their vitelline layers were removed. This effect was counteracted by alpha methyl glucose. The major differences between these studies and previous work is that here concanavalin A was washed out after incubation with eggs, making it more likely that results reflect binding to cell surface lectin receptors rather than toxicity. In addition, performing the experiments on eggs with or without vitelline layers provided information on the location of concanavalin A receptors that may

  10. Physicochemical properties and oxidative inactivation of soluble lectin from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) brain.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sabika; Banu, Naheed

    2008-03-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins present in a wide variety of plants and animals, which serve various important physiological functions. A soluble beta-galactoside binding lectin has been isolated and purified to homogeneity from buffalo brain using ammonium sulphate precipitation (40-70%) and gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G50-80 column. The molecular weight of buffalo brain lectin (BBL) as determined by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions was 14.2 kDa, however, with gel filtration it was 28.5 kDa, revealing the dimeric form of protein. The neutral sugar content of the soluble lectin was estimated to be 3.3%. The BBL showed highest affinity for lactose and other sugar moieties in glycosidic form, suggesting it to be a beta-galactoside binding lectin. The association constant for lactose binding as evidenced by Scatchard analysis was 6.6 x 10(3) M(-1) showing two carbohydrate binding sites per lectin molecule. A total inhibition of lectin activity was observed by denaturants like guanidine HCl, thiourea and urea at 6 M concentration. The treatment of BBL with oxidizing agent destroyed its agglutination activity, abolished its fluorescence, and shifted its UV absorption maxima from 282 to 250 nm. The effect of H2O2 was greatly prevented by lactose indicating that BBL is more stable in the presence of its specific ligand. The purified lectin was investigated for its brain cell aggregation properties by testing its ability to agglutinate cells isolated from buffalo and goat brains. Rate of aggregation of buffalo brain cells by purified protein was more than the goat brain cells. The data from above study suggests that the isolated lectin may belong to the galectin-1 family but is glycosylated unlike those purified till date.

  11. Genomic sequence and organization of two members of a human lectin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Gitt, M.A.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA encoding a human dimeric soluble lactose-binding lectin. The gene has four exons, and its upstream region contains sequences that suggest control by glucocorticoids, heat (environmental) shock, metals, and other factors. They have also isolated and sequenced three exons of the gene encoding another human putative lectin, the existence of which was first indicated by isolation of its cDNA. Comparisons suggest a general pattern of genomic organization of members of this lectin gene family.

  12. Differential lectin binding to cellular membranes in the epidermis of the newborn rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brabec, R K; Peters, B P; Bernstein, I A; Gray, R H; Goldstein, I J

    1980-01-01

    Three fluorescein-labeled lectins have been shown to exhibit specificity for the surface of cells in different layers of the epidermis in the newborn rat. An isolectin from seeds of Bandeiraea simplicifolia with specificity for alpha-D-galactosyl end groups labeled the basal and lower spinous cells; a lectin from Ulex europaeus exhibiting specificity for alpha-L-fucosyl units outlines the surface of spinous cells, and a second lectin from B. simplicifolia, with specificity for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, labels the cornified cells. Appropriate blocking experiments have confirmed the specific nature of the binding. Images PMID:6928640

  13. Recognition of a CD4+ mouse medullary thymocyte subpopulation by Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Lascurain, R; Chávez, R; Gorocica, P; Pérez, A; Montaño, L F; Zenteno, E

    1994-01-01

    We have used the Gal beta(1-->3)GalNAc-specific Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to isolate a thymus cell subpopulation which is different from that sorted with Arachis hypogaea lectin. The cells recognized by A. leucocarpus lectin were predominantly CD4+, whereas a minor proportion of CD8+ cells (approximately 11%) were also identified. The A. leucocarpus-positive cells were located in the thymus medulla and the cortico-medullary junction. The cortex was negative for A. leucocarpus cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7835965

  14. A comprehensive study of interactions between lectins and glycoproteins for the development of effective theranostic nanoagents.

    PubMed

    Shipunova, V O; Nikitin, M P; Zelepukin, I V; Nikitin, P I; Deyev, S M; Petrov, R V

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the interactions between lectins and glycoproteins possessing different glycosylation profiles in the composition of nanoparticles was carried out in order to find specifically interacting protein pairs for the creation of novel classes of multifunctional nanoagets that based on protein-assisted selfassembly. We obtained information about specific interactions of certain lectins with selected glycoproteins as well as about the ability of certain monosaccharides to competitively inhibit binding of glycoproteins with lectins. These protein-mediated interactions may be involved in the formulation of self-assembled nanoparticles for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases. PMID:26518557

  15. Iron binding to human lactoferrin alters reactivity of the protein with plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Ying, L; Furmanski, P

    1993-10-29

    Binding of Fe by human apolactoferrin results in altered reactivity of the glycoprotein with plant lectins. Reaction with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA) was abolished with Fe binding. Reaction with the lectins from Datura stramonium (DSA) and Aleuria aurantia (AAA) was significantly reduced but not fully abolished on Fe binding, while reaction with the Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (Jacalin) and Sambucus nigrabark (SNA) was not changed at all. Loss of WGA reactivity occurred when only one of two Fe binding sites on the molecule was saturated. The results demonstrate conformational changes that are associated with high-avidity binding of Fe by lactoferrin.

  16. Molecular cloning of the mitogenic mannose/maltose-specific rhizome lectin from Calystegia sepium.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Barre, A; Verhaert, P; Rougé, P; Peumans, W J

    1996-11-18

    cDNA clones encoding the mitogenic mannose/maltose-specific lectin from the rhizomes of hedge bindweed (Calystegia sepium) have been isolated and sequenced. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence and the molecular weight of the lectin subunit as determined by mass spectrometry indicated that the mature protein comprises the entire open reading frame of the cDNA, which implies that the primary translation product contains no signal peptide and is not proteolytically processed. Searches in the databases revealed sequence homology with the previously described lectins from the taxonomically unrelated Moraceae species Artocarpus integrifolia and Maclura pomifera.

  17. A sperm-agglutinating lectin from seeds of Jack fruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus).

    PubMed

    Namjuntra, P; Muanwongyathi, P; Chulavatnatol, M

    1985-04-30

    A lectin specific for N-acetylgalactosamine was isolated from seed extract of Jack fruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) by ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by affinity chromatography on a Affigel-galactosamine-agarose column. The lectin possessed agglutinating activities for human and rat sperm as well as human red blood cells. It was found to have Mr = 62,000 consisting of two dissimilar subunits of Mr = 18,000 and 13,000. It also cross-reacted with an antibody against the lectin of Osage Orange (Maclura pomifera).

  18. Artocarpin is a polyspecific jacalin-related lectin with a monosaccharide preference for mannose.

    PubMed

    Barre, Annick; Peumans, Willy J; Rossignol, Michel; Borderies, Gisèle; Culerrier, Raphaël; Van Damme, Els J M; Rougé, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A reinvestigation of the carbohydrate-binding properties revealed that artocarpin, a previously described mannose-specific lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds, behaves as a polyspecific lectin. Surface plasmon resonance hapten inhibition experiments demonstrated that artocarpin readily interacted with a wide range of monosaccharides covering galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, mannose, glucose, sialic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Molecular docking confirmed this unexpected ability of artocarpin to interact with structurally different sugars. The biological significance of the polyspecificity of the lectin is discussed in terms of the broadening of the range of potential target glycans present on the surface of plant phytopathogens or predators.

  19. A novel L-type lectin was required for the multiplication of WSSV in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunjia; Wang, Yuqing; Zhao, Lingling; Qin, Zhendong; Yuan, Junfa; Qin, Qiwei; Lin, Li; Lan, Jiangfeng

    2016-08-01

    L-type lectins are involved in glycoproteins secretory pathways and are associated with many immune responses. There is growing evidence that L-type lectins are also involved in viral replication. In this study, a novel L-type lectin (named as PcL-lectin) was identified from red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii). Gene sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the PcL-lectin was a kind of endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment-53 (ERGIC-53). The expression level of PcL-lectin was significantly down regulated in crayfish after challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Recombinant PcL-lectin protein facilitated the replication of WSSV in crayfish. In addition, WSSV replication was decreased when endogenous PcL-lectin was knocked down by RNA interference in crayfish. Furthermore, PcL-lectin may interact with VP24, an envelope protein of WSSV. Our results suggest that PcL-lectin may be required for the multiplication of WSSV, and will pave a new way for the developing of strategies against WSSV infection. PMID:27208793

  20. Construction and immunogenicity of a codon-optimized Entamoeba histolytica Gal-lectin-based DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Denis; Chadee, Kris

    2002-09-10

    Invasive amebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica is the third leading parasitic cause of mortality, and there are no vaccines available to help control the disease. The galactose-adherence lectin (Gal-lectin) is the parasite's major molecule allowing it to adhere to colonic mucin for colonization and to target cells for tissue destruction. It is immunodominant and is regarded as the most promising candidate molecule to be included in a subunit vaccine against amebiasis. In this study, we are reporting the construction of a codon-optimized DNA vaccine encoding a portion of the Gal-lectin heavy subunit that includes the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), and its in vivo testing in mice. The vaccine stimulated a Th1-type Gal-lectin-specific cellular immune response as well as the development of serum antibodies that recognized a recombinant portion of the heavy subunit, and that inhibited the adherence of trophozoites to target cells in vitro.

  1. Diagnostic value of interactions between members of the family Neisseriaceae and lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, R J; Nedjat-Haiem, F; Keller, K F; Frasch, C E

    1984-01-01

    The lectin slide agglutination test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been modified and improved. Results show that wheat germ agglutinin and soybean lectin agglutinate 100% (193 of 193 tested) of clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoeae. Lectin-reactive meningococci can be readily identified by the hydrolysis of gamma-glutamyl-beta-naphthylamide. Branhamella catarrhalis, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria perflava, and meningococcal serogroups A, B, C, X, Y, and Z do not interfere with the positive identification of N. gonorrhoeae. The frequently encountered problem of autoagglutination of members of the family Neisseriaceae may be circumvented by a short treatment of cellular suspensions with DNase. Based on agglutination assays, the enzyme treatment did not result in a loss of wheat germ agglutinin receptors from the bacteria. The lectin agglutination test, coupled with the gamma-glutamyl aminopeptidase assay, is proposed as a rapid and accurate means of identifying clinical isolates of gonococci. PMID:6546936

  2. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl. PMID:26354528

  3. Entomotoxic and nematotoxic lectins and protease inhibitors from fungal fruiting bodies.

    PubMed

    Sabotič, Jerica; Ohm, Robin A; Künzler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Fruiting bodies or sporocarps of dikaryotic (ascomycetous and basidiomycetous) fungi, commonly referred to as mushrooms, are often rich in entomotoxic and nematotoxic proteins that include lectins and protease inhibitors. These protein toxins are thought to act as effectors of an innate defense system of mushrooms against animal predators including fungivorous insects and nematodes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the structures, target molecules, and regulation of the biosynthesis of the best characterized representatives of these fungal defense proteins, including galectins, beta-trefoil-type lectins, actinoporin-type lectins, beta-propeller-type lectins and beta-trefoil-type chimerolectins, as well as mycospin and mycocypin families of protease inhibitors. We also present an overview of the phylogenetic distribution of these proteins among a selection of fungal genomes and draw some conclusions about their evolution and physiological function. Finally, we present an outlook for future research directions in this field and their potential applications in medicine and crop protection.

  4. Biophysical characterization of lectin-glycan interactions for therapeutics, vaccines and targeted drug-delivery.

    PubMed

    Christie, Michelle P; Toth, Istvan; Simerská, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-glycan interactions play a role in biological processes, host-pathogen interactions and in disease. A more detailed understanding of these interactions is not only useful for the elucidation of their biological function but can also be applied in immunology, drug development and delivery and diagnostics. We review some commonly used biophysical techniques for studying lectin-glycan interactions; namely: frontal affinity chromatography, glycan/lectin microarray, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescent assays, enzyme linked lectin sorbent assay and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Each method is evaluated on efficiency, cost and throughput. We also consider the advantages and limitations of each technique and provide examples of their application in biology, drug discovery and delivery, immunology, glycoprofiling and biosensing. PMID:25531972

  5. [Dynamic of lectin activity during germination of bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Koval'chuk, N V

    2006-01-01

    PHA quantity and activity dynamics during early germination of bean seed were investigated. Electrophoretic characteristics, subunits composition and carbohydrate-binding specificity of lectin extracted from white kidney bean cv. Bilozerna were studied. It was shown that investigated lectin consisted of 2 subunits E and L with molecular weight 34 and 36 kDa, respectively, analogously to purified PHA ("Serva", Germany), and specifically bound N-acetyl-D-galactosamin and galactose. During germination both quantity and activity of PHA were dramatically decreasing in embryonic axes and in cotyledons, possibly, as a result of the lectin release from seeds to the environment. It is very likely that one of the defence mechanisms of germinating seeds is related with the releasing of lectins that are able to bind components of the bacterial cell wall and to inhibit their growth.

  6. Jack fruit lectin binding pattern in carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Remani, P; Joy, A; Vijayan, K K; Ravindran, A; Haseena Beevi, V M; Vasudevan, D M; Vijayakumar, T

    1990-01-01

    A lectin was isolated and purified from the seeds of Jack Fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) using a column of immobilized N-acetyl D-Galactosamine. The Jack Fruit lectin (JFL) was conjugated to horse radish peroxidase (HRP). The purified conjugate was used to study the binding properties of tissues from carcinomas of the uterine cervix. The binding to cancer tissues was compared with that of normal controls. The carcinomatous cells showed varying degrees of binding towards JFL in contrast to normal controls which generally had uniform binding. The nature and intensity of binding of the lectin with the cancer tissues suggest that this lectin may be used as a diagnostic marker in carcinoma of uterine cervix.

  7. Effect of the mannose-binding Artocarpus integer lectin on the cellular proliferation of murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, S B; Kanthimathi, M S; Hashim, O H

    1998-12-01

    The effect of the mannose-binding champedak (Artocarpus integer) lectin-M on the cellular proliferation of murine lymphocytes was investigated in this study. Our data demonstrated that the lectin was the main mitogenic component in the crude extract of the champedak seeds. It stimulated the proliferation of murine T cells at an optimal concentration of 2.5 microg/ml in a 3 day culture. Lectin-M appeared to be a T-cell mitogen as it does not induce significant DNA synthesis when cultured with spleen cells from the nude mouse. In the absence of T cells, the lectin was incapable of inducing resting B cells to differentiate into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  8. Jack fruit lectin binding pattern in benign and malignant lesions of the breast.

    PubMed

    Remani, P; Augustine, J; Vijayan, K K; Ankathil, R; Vasudevan, D M; Nair, M K; Vijayakumar, T

    1989-01-01

    N-acetyl D-galactosamine specific lectin was isolated from Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and conjugated to horse radish peroxidase type VI. The purified conjugate was used for the study of tissue binding properties on benign and malignant lesions of the breast using diaminobenzidine as substrate on dewaxed tissue sections. Forty mammary carcinomas, 10 cystic hyperplasias of the breast and 10 normal breast tissues were used for the study. Neoplastic cells showed increased affinity to the lectin. The lectin binding was focally strong in neoplastic cells compared to the normal as well as the hyperplastic tissues. The stroma of the cancer tissues showed an intense strong binding where elastosis was present. The use of the lectin as a histochemical reagent is discussed.

  9. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl. PMID:26354528

  10. Nutritional significance of lectins and enzyme inhibitors from legumes.

    PubMed

    Lajolo, Franco M; Genovese, Maria Inés

    2002-10-23

    Legumes have natural components, such as lectins, amylase, and trypsin inhibitors, that may adversely affect their nutritional properties. Much information has already been obtained on their antinutritional significance and how to inactivate them by proper processing. Chronic ingestion of residual levels is unlikely to pose risks to human health. On the other hand, the ability of these molecules to inhibit some enzymes such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, disaccharidases, and alpha-amylases, to selectively bind to glycoconjugates, and to enter the circulatory system may be a useful tool in nutrition and pharmacology. Trypsin inhibitors have also been studied as cancer risk reducing factors. These components seem to act as plant defense substances. However, increased contents may represent an impairment of the nutritional quality of legumes because these glycoproteins and the sulfur-rich protease inhibitors have been shown to be poorly digested and to participate in chemical reactions during processing reducing protein digestibility, a still unsolved question. PMID:12381157

  11. Platform Synthetic Lectins for Divalent Carbohydrate Recognition in Water

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Tom S.; Mooibroek, Tiddo J.; Stewart, Patrick F. N.; Crump, Matthew P.; Galan, M. Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biomimetic carbohydrate receptors (“synthetic lectins”) have potential as agents for biological research and medicine. However, although effective strategies are available for “all‐equatorial” carbohydrates (glucose, etc.), the recognition of other types of saccharide under natural (aqueous) conditions is less well developed. Herein we report a new approach based on a pyrene platform with polar arches extending from aryl substituents. The receptors are compatible with axially substituted carbohydrates, and also feature two identical binding sites, thus mimicking the multivalency observed for natural lectins. A variant with negative charges forms 1:2 host/guest complexes with aminosugars, with K 1>3000 m −1 for axially substituted mannosamine, whereas a positively charged version binds the important α‐sialyl unit with K 1≈1300 m −1. PMID:27312071

  12. Data on IL-17 production induced by plant lectins

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Fernandes, Fabrício Freitas; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    We reported in article da Silva et al. (2016) [2] that ArtinM induces the IL-17 production through interaction with CD4+ T cells and stimulation of IL-23 and IL-1. Besides ArtinM, other plant lectins (PLs) induce IL-17 production by murine spleen cells. The IL-17 production induced by PLs was evaluated regarding the involvement of IL-23, IL-6, Th1-, and Th2-cytokines. Furthermore, the effect exerted TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 on the PLs׳ performance in the induction of IL-17 was examined. The current data were compared to the known ArtinM ability to induce Th17 immunity. PMID:27222857

  13. Enhanced cell adhesion on silk fibroin via lectin surface modification.

    PubMed

    Teuschl, Andreas H; Neutsch, Lukas; Monforte, Xavier; Rünzler, Dominik; van Griensven, Martijn; Gabor, Franz; Redl, Heinz

    2014-06-01

    Various tissue engineering (TE) approaches are based on silk fibroin (SF) as scaffold material because of its superior mechanical and biological properties compared to other materials. The translation of one-step TE approaches to clinical application has generally failed so far due to the requirement of a prolonged cell seeding step before implantation. Here, we propose that the plant lectin WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), covalently bound to SF, will mediate cell adhesion in a time frame acceptable to be part of a one-step surgical intervention. After the establishment of a modification protocol utilizing carbodiimide chemistry, we examined the attachment of cells, with a special focus on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), on WGA-SF compared to pure native SF. After a limited time frame of 20min the attachment of ASCs to WGA-SF showed an increase of about 17-fold, as compared to pure native SF. The lectin-mediated cell adhesion further showed an enhanced resistance to trypsin (as a protease model) and to applied fluid shear stress (mechanical stability). Moreover, we could demonstrate that the adhesion of ASCs on the WGA-SF does not negatively influence proliferation or differentiation potential into the osteogenic lineage. To test for in vitro immune response, the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in contact with the WGA-SF was determined, showing no alterations compared to plain SF. All these findings suggest that the WGA modification of SF offers important benefits for translation of SF scaffolds into clinical applications. PMID:24530561

  14. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  15. Interactions with lectins and agglutination profiles of clinical, food, and environmental isolates of Listeria.

    PubMed Central

    Facinelli, B; Giovanetti, E; Casolari, C; Varaldo, P E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary trials with 14 collection strains of Listeria, five lectins (Canavalia ensiformis, concanavalin A; Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I; Helix pomatia agglutinin; Ricinus communis agglutinin; and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin) were selected to set up a microtiter agglutination assay. The lectin agglutination profiles of 174 clinical, food, and environmental strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Listeria seeligeri were investigated. Data on the standard determination of the antigenic structure were available for clinical strains; nonclinical isolates were assigned to serogroup 1 or 4 with commercial antisera. The listeria-lectin interaction was related to serological type rather than species; in particular, the strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3b, and 7 were never agglutinated by G. simplicifolia lectin I. The five-lectin set proved to be capable of detecting differences between serologically identical isolates of L. monocytogenes. Of the 150 isolates of this species, 144 were distributed over 15 different lectin agglutination profiles and 6 autoagglutinated, the overall typeability being 96%. However, the profiles encountered among L. monocytogenes isolates were not randomly distributed. With strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 3b, the clinical isolates fell into only two of the eight patterns recorded overall; with strains of serogroup 4 and serovar 4b, food and environmental isolates were distributed over eight of the nine patterns found in total, while clinical isolates were distributed over five patterns. In a comparative study of 15 epidemiologically relevant isolates of L. monocytogenes from five distinct outbreaks, strains with identical phage types and/or DNA fingerprints displayed identical lectin profiles. The heterogeneity of agglutination profiles may form the basis of a new approach to L. monocytogenes typing

  16. A C-type lectin from Bothrops jararacussu venom disrupts Staphylococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of lectin receptor-like kinases in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yongil; Labbé, Jessy; Muchero, Wellington; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara S.; Kennedy, Megan; Johnson, Jenifer; Sreedasyam, Avinash; Schmutz, Jeremy; Tuskan, Gerald A.; et al

    2016-09-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) belong to a large protein family with over 600 members in Arabidopsis and over 1000 in rice. Among RLKs, the lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) possess a characteristic extracellular carbohydrate-binding lectin domain and play important roles in plant development and innate immunity. In addition, there are 75 and 173 LecRLKs in Arabidopsis and rice, respectively. However, little is known about LecRLKs in perennial woody plants.

  18. Isolation and antiproliferative activity of Lotus corniculatus lectin towards human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Shaista; Majeed, Rabiya; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Ganai, Bashir Ahmad; Wani, Ishfak; Rakhshanda, Syed; Qurishi, Yasrib; Sharma, P R; Hamid, Abid; Masood, Akbar; Hamid, Rabia

    2013-12-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate the anti cancer activity of a lectin isolated from Lotus corniculatus seeds. A tetrameric 70kDa galactose specific lectin was purified using two step simple purification protocol which involved affinity chromatography on AF-BlueHC650M and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The lectin was adsorbed on AF-BlueHC650M and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 yielded a major peak absorbance that gave two bands of 15kDa and 20kDa in SDS PAGE. Hemagglutination activity was completely preserved, when the temperature was in the range of 20-60°C. However, drastic reduction in activity occurred at temperatures above 60°C. Full hemagglutination activity was retained at ambient pH 4-12. Thereafter no activity was observed above pH 13. Hemaglutination of the lectin was inhibited by d-galactose. The lectin showed a strong antiproliferative activity towards human leukemic (THP-1) cancer cells followed by lung cancer (HOP62) cells and HCT116 with an IC50 of 39μg/ml and 50μg/ml and 60μg/ml respectively. Flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G0G1 phase confirming that Lotus corniculatus lectin induced apoptosis. Morphological observations showed that Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) treated THP-1 cells displayed apparent apoptosis characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of membrane enclosed apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) effectively inhibits the cell migration in a dose dependent manner as indicated by the wound healing assay. PMID:24055517

  19. A C-Type Lectin from Bothrops jararacussu Venom Disrupts Staphylococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model. PMID:25811661

  20. Lectin staining patterns in human gastric mucosae with and without exposure to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Junior, Mario R.; Cavalcanti, Carmelita L.B.; Pontes-Filho, Nicodemos T.; Carvalho Jr, Luiz B.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate qualitative changes in the glycoconjugate expression in human gastric tissue of positive and negative patients for Helicobacter pylori, through lectins: Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (Con A). The lectins recognized differently the glycoconjugates in the superficial mucous layer at the gastric tissues. The results suggest a significant change in the carbohydrate moieties present on the surface of the gastric cells during infection. PMID:24031208

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of multiple isoforms of the snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis L.) lectin.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; De Clercq, N; Claessens, F; Hemschoote, K; Peeters, B; Peumans, W J

    1991-12-01

    Screening of a copy-DNA (cDNA) library constructed from RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) resulted in the isolation of five lectin clones which clearly differed from each other with regard to their nucleotide sequence and deduced amino-acid sequence. Sequence comparison between the coding regions of different lectin cDNAs revealed the highest homology between lectin clones LECGNA 3 and LECGNA 5, showing 96.4% and 93.6% similarity at the nucleotide level and at the deduced amino-acid level, respectively, whereas lectin clones LECGNA 1 and LECGNA 3 showed the lowest homology of 81.6% and 68.6% for the nucleotide sequence and the amino-acid sequence, respectively. Only very few lectin cDNA clones containing a polyadenylated tail could be isolated. Moreover all these cDNA clones were derived from isolectin 3 and showed some variability within the length of the 3' untranslated region. The major transcription initiation site was located 30 bases upstream from the AUG codon as could be deduced from primer-extension analysis. Taking into account the small 5' untranslated region of the lectin clones, the size of the lectin mRNA, which is approx. 780 nucleotides as determined by Northern blot analysis, is in good agreement with the length of the cDNA clones isolated. Besides the ovary tissue, both the leaf and the flower tissue were also shown to express the lectin mRNA in a flowering snowdrop plant.

  2. Interaction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli with lectins and blood group antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K H; Skelton, S K; Feeley, J C

    1985-01-01

    Lectins and blood group antibodies were used to probe the surface structures of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Of the 29 strains tested, there were distinct reaction patterns. The lectin-reactive and blood group antibody-reactive sites on the bacterial surface were distinguishable from the heat-stable (lipopolysaccharide) antigenic determinants. The interactions were strain specific. The reactive sites were stable with respect to culture media and passage and may be useful as additional markers for strain characterization. PMID:2410445

  3. Isolation and antiproliferative activity of Lotus corniculatus lectin towards human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Shaista; Majeed, Rabiya; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Ganai, Bashir Ahmad; Wani, Ishfak; Rakhshanda, Syed; Qurishi, Yasrib; Sharma, P R; Hamid, Abid; Masood, Akbar; Hamid, Rabia

    2013-12-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate the anti cancer activity of a lectin isolated from Lotus corniculatus seeds. A tetrameric 70kDa galactose specific lectin was purified using two step simple purification protocol which involved affinity chromatography on AF-BlueHC650M and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The lectin was adsorbed on AF-BlueHC650M and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 yielded a major peak absorbance that gave two bands of 15kDa and 20kDa in SDS PAGE. Hemagglutination activity was completely preserved, when the temperature was in the range of 20-60°C. However, drastic reduction in activity occurred at temperatures above 60°C. Full hemagglutination activity was retained at ambient pH 4-12. Thereafter no activity was observed above pH 13. Hemaglutination of the lectin was inhibited by d-galactose. The lectin showed a strong antiproliferative activity towards human leukemic (THP-1) cancer cells followed by lung cancer (HOP62) cells and HCT116 with an IC50 of 39μg/ml and 50μg/ml and 60μg/ml respectively. Flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G0G1 phase confirming that Lotus corniculatus lectin induced apoptosis. Morphological observations showed that Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) treated THP-1 cells displayed apparent apoptosis characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of membrane enclosed apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) effectively inhibits the cell migration in a dose dependent manner as indicated by the wound healing assay.

  4. Fucofullerenes as tight ligands of RSL and LecB, two bacterial lectins.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Kevin; Gillon, Emilie; Holler, Michel; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Imberty, Anne; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2015-06-21

    A series of water-soluble glycofullerenes containing up to 24 fucose residues have been prepared. These compounds were tested against the two bacterial fucose-binding lectins LecB and RSL, and C60(E)12 bearing 24 fucose residues appeared to be the best known inhibitor of both lectins to date. We have shown that increasing both the valency and the length of the spacer between the central core and the peripheral sugars can be beneficial for the affinity.

  5. A C-type lectin from Bothrops jararacussu venom disrupts Staphylococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model. PMID:25811661

  6. Lectin-based glycomics: how and when was the technology born?

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-based glycomics is an emerging, comprehensive technology in the post-genome sciences. The technique utilizes a panel of lectins, which is a group of biomolecules capable of deciphering "glycocodes," with a novel platform represented by a lectin microarray. The method enables multiple glycan-lectin interaction analyses to be made so that differential glycan profiling can be performed in a rapid and sensitive manner. This approach is in clear contrast to another advanced technology, mass spectrometry, which requires prior glycan liberation. Although the lectin microarray cannot provide definitive structures of carbohydrates and their attachment sites, it gives useful clues concerning the characteristic features of glycoconjugates. These include differences not only in terminal modifications (e.g., sialic acid (Sia) linkage, types of fucosylation) but also in higher ordered structures in terms of glycan density, depth, and direction composed for both N- and O-glycans. However, before this technique began to be implemented in earnest, many other low-throughput methods were utilized in the late twentieth century. In this chapter, the author describes how the current lectin microarray technique has developed based on his personal experience. PMID:25117239

  7. Isolation and characterization of a novel lectin from the mushroom Armillaria luteo-virens

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, K.; Liu, Q.H.; Ng, T.B.; Liu, H.Z.; Li, J.Q.; Chen, G.; Sheng, H.Y.; Xie, Z.L.; Wang, H.X. . E-mail: hxwang@cau.edu.cn

    2006-07-14

    From the dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Armillaria luteo-virens, a dimeric lectin with a molecular mass of 29.4 kDa has been isolated. The purification procedure involved (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, and Q-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin could not be inhibited by simple sugars but was inhibited by the polysaccharide inulin. The activity was stable up to 70 {sup o}C but was acid- and alkali-labile. Salts including FeCl{sub 3}, AlCl{sub 3}, and ZnCl{sub 2} inhibited the activity whereas MgCl{sub 2}, MnCl{sub 2}, and CaCl{sub 2} did not. The lectin stimulated mitogenic response of mouse splenocytes with the maximal response achieved by 1 {mu}M lectin. Proliferation of tumor cells including MBL2 cells, HeLa cells, and L1210 cells was inhibited by the lectin with an IC{sub 5} of 2.5, 5, and 10 {mu}M, respectively. However, proliferation of HepG2 cells was not affected. The novel aspects of the isolated lectin include a novel N-terminal sequence, fair thermostability, acid stability, and alkali stability, together with potent mitogenic activity toward spleen cells and antiproliferative activity toward tumor cells.

  8. Integrated Microfluidic Lectin Barcode Platform for High-Performance Focused Glycomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yuqin; Zeng, Yun; Zeng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the key processes that play essential roles in biological functions and dysfunctions. However, progress in glycomics has considerably lagged behind genomics and proteomics, due in part to the enormous challenges in analysis of glycans. Here we present a new integrated and automated microfluidic lectin barcode platform to substantially improve the performance of lectin array for focused glycomic profiling. The chip design and flow control were optimized to promote the lectin-glycan binding kinetics and speed of lectin microarray. Moreover, we established an on-chip lectin assay which employs a very simple blocking method to effectively suppress the undesired background due to lectin binding of antibodies. Using this technology, we demonstrated focused differential profiling of tissue-specific glycosylation changes of a biomarker, CA125 protein purified from ovarian cancer cell line and different tissues from ovarian cancer patients in a fast, reproducible, and high-throughput fashion. Highly sensitive CA125 detection was also demonstrated with a detection limit much lower than the clinical cutoff value for cancer diagnosis. This microfluidic platform holds the potential to integrate with sample preparation functions to construct a fully integrated "sample-to-answer" microsystem for focused differential glycomic analysis. Thus, our technology should present a powerful tool in support of rapid advance in glycobiology and glyco-biomarker development. PMID:26831207

  9. Fasciola hepatica miracidia: lectin binding and stimulation of in vitro miracidium-to-sporocyst transformation.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Katya; Georgieva, Simona; Mizinska, Yana; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R

    2012-03-01

    The lectin binding properties of Fasciola hepatica miracidia were studied by a panel of fluorescein- and gold-conjugated lectins (ConA, LCA, WGA, LEA, SBA, HPA and UEA-I). The presence of mannose and/or glucose residues was demonstrated with ConA and LCA as weak diffuse fluorescence of the miracidial surface, which was more intense at the anterior part of the larva. The N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectins WGA and LEA reacted intensely with the whole miracidial surface. No labelling with N-acetylgalactosamine and/or galactose-specific (SBA and HPA) and fucose-specific UEA-I lectins was observed. The possibility that the specific recognition of the miracidial surface carbohydrates by lectins may initiate the process of transformation of the miracidia into sporocysts was examined in vitro in physiological saline for Galba truncatula. Incubation in the presence of ConA and WGA resulted in facilitation of the transformation process. Facilitation was absent in the presence of inhibitor sugars. Incubation in the presence of SBA or UEA-I had no effect. The results suggested a possible impact of carbohydrate-lectin interactions in transformation of miracidia of F. hepatica to sporocysts in vivo. PMID:22807013

  10. Lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc transferases exhibit glycopeptide binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Meldal, Morten; Holmér, Andreas P; Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-09-16

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence specificity, whereas the primary function of the lectin domain is to increase affinity to previously glycosylated substrates. Whether the lectin domain also has peptide sequence selectivity has remained unclear. Using a glycopeptide array with a library of synthetic and recombinant glycopeptides based on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate an additional level of complexity in the initiation step of O-glycosylation by GalNAc-Ts.

  11. Integrated Microfluidic Lectin Barcode Platform for High-Performance Focused Glycomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yuqin; Zeng, Yun; Zeng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the key processes that play essential roles in biological functions and dysfunctions. However, progress in glycomics has considerably lagged behind genomics and proteomics, due in part to the enormous challenges in analysis of glycans. Here we present a new integrated and automated microfluidic lectin barcode platform to substantially improve the performance of lectin array for focused glycomic profiling. The chip design and flow control were optimized to promote the lectin-glycan binding kinetics and speed of lectin microarray. Moreover, we established an on-chip lectin assay which employs a very simple blocking method to effectively suppress the undesired background due to lectin binding of antibodies. Using this technology, we demonstrated focused differential profiling of tissue-specific glycosylation changes of a biomarker, CA125 protein purified from ovarian cancer cell line and different tissues from ovarian cancer patients in a fast, reproducible, and high-throughput fashion. Highly sensitive CA125 detection was also demonstrated with a detection limit much lower than the clinical cutoff value for cancer diagnosis. This microfluidic platform holds the potential to integrate with sample preparation functions to construct a fully integrated “sample-to-answer” microsystem for focused differential glycomic analysis. Thus, our technology should present a powerful tool in support of rapid advance in glycobiology and glyco-biomarker development. PMID:26831207

  12. [A new mannose-specific lectin from daylily (Hemerocallis fulva L.) rhizome: purification and properties].

    PubMed

    Antoniuk, V O; Panchak, L V; Starykovych, M O; Stoĭka, R S

    2013-01-01

    A new lectin was purified from the daylily (Hemerocallis fulva L.) with the yield of approximately 10 mg per kg of fresh plant rhizome. The purification procedure was based on application of the affinity chromathography on the column with yeast mannan and the ion-exchange chromatography on the column with DEAE-Toyopearl. The lectin possessed low affinity for alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside, D-fructose, D-turanose and 2-acetamido-D-galactopyranose and hight affinity for the yeast mannan. The lectin bound with greatly less affinity for the mannose-containig glycoproteins, such as ovoalbumin, ovomucoid and horseradish peroxidase. According to the results of electrophoresis in 20% DSNa-PAGE, the lectin consists of subunits of 12 kDa molecular weight. According to the results of gel-chromatography on the Toyopearl HW-55, the lectin's molecular weight is 48 kDa. It agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes very well, while rat and guinea-pig erythrocytes were agglutinated worse, and human erythrocytes were not agglutinated at all. Lectin's dialysis against 1% EDTA or heating to 60 degrees C for 60 min did not stop its hemagglutinating activity. PMID:23808307

  13. Biological Modulation by Lectins and Their Ligands in Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Susumu; Raz, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are a group of specific proteins that preferentially bind to carbohydrates inside and outside cells. To date, an increasing number of animal lectins have been found and categorized into several families in terms of the significant primary structural homology, while the classification is not always straightforward. These lectins can exert immense biological functions mainly through their specific carbohydrate-protein interactions in a variety of situations. In cancer biology, aberrant glycosylation changes on many glycoproteins and glycolipids are often observed and numerous experimental evidences have revealed that these structural changes are related to tumor malignancy. Galectins, which are broadly expressed animal lectins, can play crucial biological roles in tumor cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions through their binding activities to the tumor cell surface carbohydrate determinants. Certain galectin family proteins have also shown to affect tumor cell survival, signal transduction, and proliferation mainly inside the cell. Selectins, which are one of the C-type lectins and expressed leukocytes and/or vascular endothelium, can also play an immense role in tumor cell adhesion and invasion. In addition, certain annexin family proteins, which are originally known as phospholipid binding proteins, have been revealed to possess the carbohydrate binding activity, and these novel functions in tumors are being unveiled. Understanding how carbohydrate-protein interactions function in tumor cells will be one of the important goals in cancer research. This review focuses on the role of these lectins and their ligands in cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:18220503

  14. A seedling specific vegetative lectin gene is related to development in Cicer arietinum.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Rocío; Dopico, Berta; Muñoz, Francisco J; Romo, Silvia; Labrador, Emilia

    2002-04-01

    Plant lectins are a group of glycoproteins with the ability to recognize and bind carbohydrate ligands. Seed lectins function as storage and defense proteins, but the specific function of vegetative lectins is uncertain. In this paper we describe the characterization of a clone, CanVLEC, encoding a vegetative lectin from chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. cv. Castellana). The expression of the CanVLEC gene was specific in seedlings, mostly in hooks and elongating epicotyls, and no expression was detected in adult plants. The level of chickpea vegetative lectin transcripts in epicotyls decreased through the epicotyl growth suggesting a relationship to development. Treatment with indoleacetic acid (IAA) and brassinolides (BR), hormones that promoted elongation in chickpea epicotyl, increased the level of CanVLEC mRNA, supporting a relationship to growth. CanVLEC is drastically down regulated by water deficit ruling out its possible involvement in plant response to water stress, unlike other vegetative lectins. CanVLEC protein may be targeted to an extracellular location owing to the presence of a signal peptide.

  15. A simple micro-method for determining precise oligosaccharidic specificity of mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Debray, Henri; Coddeville, Bernadette; Bomfim, Liezelotte R; Ramos, Márcio V

    2009-12-01

    A simple and inexpensive method was developed to rapidly define the specificity of mannose-specific lectins toward oligomannoside-type structures. The method involved the interaction of a mixture of N-[(14)C]-acetylated glycoasparagines, prepared by exhaustive pronase digestion of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease B and N-[(14)C]-acetylation with [(14)C]-acetic anhydride and containing all the possible oligomannoside-type N-glycans, with the lectin immobilized on Sepharose-4B. After exhaustive desalting, the obtained fractions were separated by high-performance thin-layer chromatography on silica gel plates and visualized by autoradiography with intensifying screen. As an example of the usefulness of this method, the fine specificity of artocarpin, the mannose-specificity lectin isolated from seeds of jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) toward oligomannoside-type structures is presented. On the basis of such a determination, the best oligomannosidic ligand recognized by a mannose-specific lectin can be selected for studies of crystal structures of the lectin in complex with the defined ligand. Furthermore, some of these immobilized lectins, after definition of their precise specificities with the method, could represent valuable tools for the fractionation and characterization of oligomannose-type structures, present in complex mixtures.

  16. Isolation and Partial Characterization of a New Lectin from Seeds of the Greater Celandine (Chelidonium majus) 1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; De Ley, Marc; Stinissen, Hetty M.; Broekaert, Willem F.

    1985-01-01

    Seeds of the greater celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) contain a lectin which could be isolated using a combination of affinity chromatography on chitin and ion exchange chromatography on sulphopropyl-Sephadex. The purified lectin was partially characterized with respect to its biochemical and physicochemical properties. It is a small dimeric protein composed of two different subunits of Mr 9,500 and 11,500, respectively. Its amino acid composition is typified by high contents of glycine and cysteine. No covalently bound carbohydrate could be detected. Hapten inhibition experiments indicated that the lectin exhibits specificity towards oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine, the potency of inhibition increasing with chain length up to four residues. The greater celandine lectin is the first lectin to be isolated from a species belonging to the plant family Papaveraceae (poppy family). Although it represents a new type of plant lectin, resemblances to phytohemaglutinins from diverse taxonomic origin are obvious. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664249

  17. Isolation of a homodimeric lectin with antifungal and antiviral activities from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ye, X Y; Ng, T B; Tsang, P W; Wang, J

    2001-07-01

    A homodimeric lectin adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-Sepharose and possessing a molecular weight of 67 kDa was isolated from red kidney beans. The hemagglutinating activity of this lectin was inhibited by glycoproteins but not by simple sugars. The lectin manifested inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase and alpha-glucosidase. The N-terminal sequence of the lectin exhibited some differences from previously reported lectins from Phaseolus vulgaris but showed some similarity to chitinases. It exerted a suppressive effect on growth of the fungal species Fusarium oxysporum, Coprinus comatus, and Rhizoctonia solani. The lectin had low ribonuclease and negligible translation-inhibitory activities. PMID:11732688

  18. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Lectin Analysis of the Surface of the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Yagoda-Shagam, Janet; Barton, Larry L.; Reed, William P.; Chiovetti, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface of Azospirillum brasilense was probed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectins, with binding determined by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. Cells from nitrogen-fixing or ammonium-assimilating cultures reacted similarly to FITC-labeled lectins, with lectin binding in the following order: Griffonia simplicifolia II agglutinin > Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin > Triticum vulgaris agglutinin > Glycine max agglutinin > Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin > Limax flavus agglutinin > Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin. The fluorescence intensity of cells labeled with FITC-labeled G. simplicifolia I, C. ensiformis, T. vulgaris, and G. max agglutinins was influenced by lectin concentration. Flow cytometry measurements of lectin binding to cells was consistent with measurements of agglutination resulting from lectin-cell interaction. Capsules surrounding nitrogen-fixing and ammonium-assimilating cells were readily demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopies. Images PMID:16347693

  19. [Effect of Azospirillum lectins on the Activity of Proteolytic Enzymes and Their Inhibitors in Wheat Seedling Roots].

    PubMed

    Alen'kina, S A; Nikitina, V E

    2015-01-01

    The lectins of associative nitrogen-fixing strains Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and Sp245 were shown to exerte a multidirectional effect on the activity of acidic (pH 3.5), neutral (6.8), and alkaline (pH 7.8) proteinases. The lectin of the epiphytic A. brasilense Sp7 decreased proteolytic activity at all pH values, whereas the lectin of the endophytic A. brasilense Sp245 activated neutral and alkaline proteinases, while not affecting the alkaline ones. Experiments with protease inhibitors made it possible to conclude that the lectins of the studied A. brasilense strains alter the ratio between the activities of different protease types in germinating seeds. The activity of trypsin inhibitors in wheat seedling roots was found to increase in the presence of the lectins. Our results indicate a broader spectrum of effects of azospirilla lectins on the host plant organism.

  20. [Effect of Azospirillum lectins on the Activity of Proteolytic Enzymes and Their Inhibitors in Wheat Seedling Roots].

    PubMed

    Alen'kina, S A; Nikitina, V E

    2015-01-01

    The lectins of associative nitrogen-fixing strains Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and Sp245 were shown to exerte a multidirectional effect on the activity of acidic (pH 3.5), neutral (6.8), and alkaline (pH 7.8) proteinases. The lectin of the epiphytic A. brasilense Sp7 decreased proteolytic activity at all pH values, whereas the lectin of the endophytic A. brasilense Sp245 activated neutral and alkaline proteinases, while not affecting the alkaline ones. Experiments with protease inhibitors made it possible to conclude that the lectins of the studied A. brasilense strains alter the ratio between the activities of different protease types in germinating seeds. The activity of trypsin inhibitors in wheat seedling roots was found to increase in the presence of the lectins. Our results indicate a broader spectrum of effects of azospirilla lectins on the host plant organism. PMID:27169244

  1. Evolutionary analysis reveals collective properties and specificity in the C-type lectin and lectin-like domain superfamily.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Sharon; Sharon, Nathan; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2003-10-01

    Members of the C-type lectin/C-type lectin-like domain (CTL/CTLD) superfamily share a common fold and are involved in a variety of functions, such as generalized defense mechanisms against foreign agents, discrimination between healthy and pathogen-infected cells, and endocytosis and blood coagulation. In this work we used ConSurf, a computer program recently developed in our lab, to perform an evolutionary analysis of this superfamily in order to further identify characteristics of all or part of its members. Given a set of homologous proteins in the form of multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and an inferred phylogenetic tree, ConSurf calculates the conservation score in every alignment position, taking into account the relationships between the sequences and the physicochemical similarity between the amino acids. The scores are then color-coded onto the three-dimensional structure of one of the homologous proteins. We provide here and at http://ashtoret.tau.ac.il/ approximately sharon a detailed analysis of the conservation pattern obtained for the entire superfamily and for two subgroups of proteins: (a) 21 CTLs and (b) 11 heterodimeric CTLD toxins. We show that, in general, proteins of the superfamily have one face that is constructed mostly of conserved residues and another that is not, and we suggest that the former face is involved in binding to other proteins or domains. In the CTLs examined we detected a region of highly conserved residues, corresponding to the known calcium- and carbohydrate-binding site of the family, which is not conserved throughout the entire superfamily, and in the CTLD toxins we found a patch of highly conserved residues, corresponding to the known dimerization region of these proteins. Our analysis also detected patches of conserved residues with yet unknown function(s).

  2. A single-molecule force spectroscopy study of the interactions between lectins and carbohydrates on cancer and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weidong; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2013-03-01

    The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells.The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00553d

  3. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Lectin Extracted from Fruiting Bodies of the Korean Cauliflower Medicinal Mushroom, Sparassis latifolia (Agaricomycetes).

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Lee, Young-Chul; Park, Hyun; Wu, Yuanzheng; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In this article we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel lectin from fruiting bodies of the mushroom Sparassis latifolia. The antibacterial activity of the purified lectin against Escherichia coli and resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as the antifungal activity against Candida and Fusarium species were determined. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and the tryptophan blue shift assay indicated that the lectin interacts with microbial surfaces. This suggests the potential of the lectin isolated from S. latifolia, a valuable source of bioactive constituents, as a therapeutic in pharmaceutical agent. PMID:27481295

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of HML, a lectin from the red marine alga Hypnea musciformis

    SciTech Connect

    Nagano, Celso S.; Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Cavada, Benildo S.; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago Do; Nunes, Eudismar Vale; Sampaio, Alexandre H.; Calvete, Juan J.

    2005-11-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a red marine alga lectin isolated from H. musciformis is reported. HML, a lectin from the red marine alga Hypnea musciformis, defines a novel lectin family. Orthorhombic crystals of HML belonging to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} grew within three weeks at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete data set was collected at 2.4 Å resolution. HML is the first marine alga lectin to be crystallized.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-binding lectin from the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, with specificity for 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO).

    PubMed

    Rostam-Abadi, H; Pistole, T G

    1982-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding lectin was recovered from the serum of Limulus polyphemus by ion-exchange chromatography. Electrophoretic analysis of this lectin preparation revealed three poorly migrating bands. When whole serum was incubated with glycolipid obtained from the Rc mutant of Salmonella minnesota prior to electrophoresis, bands corresponding to those seen in the partially purified lectin were missing, suggesting that the recovered material was composed of isolectins. Qualitative precipitin tests revealed no reactivity of this purified lectin with lipid A fractions or with LPS devoid of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO). The agglutination of chicken erythrocytes by this lectin was inhibited by both N-acetyl-neuraminic acid and KDO. Erythrocytes complexed with glycolipid from the Re mutant of S. minnesota were strongly agglutinated by this lectin. We conclude that this LPS-binding lectin is specific for the KDO portion of the molecule and that it is identical to the previously described sialic acid-binding lectin from L. polyphemus. This lectin may play a role in the host defense mechanisms of Limulus.

  6. Purification and Characterization of a Mucin Specific Mycelial Lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis: Application for Mitogenic and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Hemant Preet; Singh, Jatinder

    2014-01-01

    Background Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins or glycoproteins that bind reversibly to specific carbohydrates present on the apposing cells, which are responsible for their ability to agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc. Interest in lectins has been intensified due to their carbohydrate specificity as they can be valuable reagents for the investigation of cell surface sugars, purification and characterization of glycoproteins. The present study reports the purification, characterization and evaluation of mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of a mycelial lectin from Aspergillus gorakhpurensis. Methods Affinity chromatography on mucin-sepharose column was carried out for purification of Aspergillus gorakhpurensis lectin. The lectin was characterized for physico-chemical parameters. Mitogenic potential of the lectin was evaluated against splenocytes of Swiss albino mice by MTT assay. Antimicrobial activity of the purified lectin has also been evaluated by disc diffusion assay. Results Single-step affinity purification resulted in 18.6-fold purification of the mycelial lectin. The molecular mass of the lectin was found to be 70 kDa and it was composed of two subunits of 34.8 kDa as determined by gel filtration chromatography, SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. pH optima of the lectin was found to be 6.5–9.5, while optimum temperature for lectin activity was 20–30°C. Lectin was stable within a pH range of 7.0–10.5 and showed fair thermostability. EDTA did not affect lectin activity whereas it was found susceptible to the denaturants tested. MTT assay revealed strong mitogenic potential of A. gorakhpurensis lectin at a concentration upto 150 µg/mL. Antimicrobial activity assay showed its potent antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcous aureus and Escherichia coli and marginal antifungal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion This is the first report on the mitogenic and antimicrobial potential of

  7. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and electron microscopy studies of concanavalin A and Dioclea grandiflora lectin cross-linked with synthetic divalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; Das, Sanjoy K; Pagé, Daniel; Macaluso, Frank; Brewer, C Fred

    2005-03-11

    The jack bean lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and the Dioclea grandiflora lectin (DGL) are highly homologous Man/Glc-specific members of the Diocleinae subtribe. Both lectins bind, cross-link, and precipitate with carbohydrates possessing multiple terminal nonreducing Man residues. The present study investigates the binding and cross-linking interactions of ConA and DGL with a series of synthetic divalent carbohydrates that possess spacer groups with increasing flexibility and length between terminal alpha-mannopyranoside residues. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry was used to determine the thermodynamics of binding of the two lectins to the divalent analogs, and kinetic light scattering and electron microscopy studies were used to characterize the cross-linking interactions of the lectins with the carbohydrates. The results demonstrated that divalent analogs with flexible spacer groups between the two terminal Man residues possess higher affinities for the two lectins as compared with those with inflexible spacer groups. Furthermore, despite their high degree of homology, ConA and DGL exhibit differences in their kinetics of cross-linking and precipitation with the divalent analogs. Electron microscopy shows the loss of organized cross-linked lattices of the two lectins with analogs possessing increased distance between the terminal Man residues. The loss of lattice patterns with the analogs is distinct for each lectin. These results have important implications for the interactions of lectins with multivalent carbohydrate receptors in biological systems.

  8. The galactose-binding and mannose-binding jacalin-related lectins are located in different sub-cellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Hause, B; Van Damme, E J

    2000-07-21

    A galactose-specific and a mannose-specific lectin of the family of the jacalin-related lectins have been localized by immunofluorescence microscopy. The present localization studies provide for the first time unambiguous evidence for the cytoplasmic location of the mannose-specific jacalin-related lectin from rhizomes of Calystegia sepium, which definitely differs from the vacuolar location of the galactose-specific jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia. These observations support the hypothesis that the galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins evolved from their mannose-specific homologues through the acquisition of vacuolar targeting sequences.

  9. Optimizing the Multivalent Binding of the Bacterial Lectin LecA by Glycopeptide Dendrimers for Therapeutic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Benjamin

    2016-06-27

    Bacterial lectins are nonenzymatic sugar-binding proteins involved in the formation of biofilms and the onset of virulence. The weakness of individual sugar-lectin interactions is compensated by the potentially large number of simultaneous copies of such contacts, resulting in high overall sugar-lectin affinities and marked specificities. Therapeutic compounds functionalized with sugar residues can compete with the host glycans for binding to lectins only if they are able to take advantage of this multivalent binding mechanism. Glycopeptide dendrimers, featuring treelike topologies with sugar moieties at their leaves, have already shown great promise in this regard. However, optimizing the dendrimers' amino acid sequence is necessary to match the dynamics of the lectin active sites with that of the multivalent ligands. This work combines long-time-scale coarse-grained simulations of dendrimers and lectins with a reasoned exploration of the dendrimer sequence space in an attempt to suggest sequences that could maximize multivalent binding to the galactose-specific bacterial lectin LecA. These candidates are validated by simulations of mixed dendrimer/lectin solutions, and the effects of the dendrimers on lectin dynamics are discussed. This approach is an attractive first step in the conception of therapeutic compounds based on the dendrimer scaffold and contributes to the understanding of the various classes of multivalency that underpin the ubiquitous "sugar code". PMID:27223679

  10. Activation of dendritic cells by the Gal-lectin of Entamoeba histolytica drives Th1 responses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Catherine P A; Chadee, Kris

    2007-02-01

    Amebiasis is a human disease caused by the protozoan intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Vaccine development has focused on the parasite's surface galactose-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine inhibitable lectin (Gal-lectin) as a protective antigen. The Gal-lectin is immunogenic and has been shown to induce Th1 cytokines in vitro and in vivo. The immunological basis of the protective immune response elicited by the Gal-lectin is unknown. In this study, we investigated the response of BALB/c bone marrow-derived DC to E. histolytica Gal-lectin. Incubation of immature DC with Gal-lectin resulted in activation and maturation after 24 h. FACS analysis demonstrated an up-regulation of DC maturation markers CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHC class II upon exposure to Gal-lectin. The Gal-lectin also induced DC production of IL-12, indicating a Th1 response. Gal-lectin-activated DC were able to stimulate T cell proliferation in an allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction and adoptive transfer of Gal-lectin-treated DC into naïve mice resulted in IFN-gamma-producing Gal-lectin-sensitized T cells. The activation of DC by Gal-lectin was mediated by MAPK and NF-kappaB. These findings indicate that E. histolytica Gal-lectin is a potent vaccine antigen capable of directly initiating DC maturation and activation characterized by Th1 cytokine production.

  11. An unusual anti-H lectin inhibited by milk from individuals with the Bombay phenotype.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S R; Vasantha, K; Robb, J S

    2005-01-01

    There are several lectins with anti-H specificity but few of them serve as useful reagents. An anti-H lectin, extracted from the seeds of the plant Momordica dioica Roxb. ex willd., was tested for its hemagglutination and inhibition properties, using standard serologic methods and panel RBCs, serum, saliva, milk, and oligosaccharides purified from milk. The extract displayed strongest agglutination with group O RBCs and was weakest with group A1B RBCs in a spectrum of O>A2>B>A2B>A1>A1B; the extract failed to react with the RBCs from 25 individuals with the Bombay (Oh) phenotype and was inhibited by H secretor saliva, hence it was characterized as anti-H. However, its inhibition by milk samples from five mothers with the Bombay phenotype called into question its specificity as anti-H. The lectin reacted as strongly with group O ii (adult) RBCs as with normal OI RBCs, ruling out its specificity as anti-HI. Hemagglutination inhibition was observed with 2'-fucosyllactose (Type 2 H) and lacto-N-fucopentose-I (Type 1 H), suggesting that the binding of the lectin had preference for H structures. However, inhibition by N-acetyllactosamine, lacto-Ntetraose, and lacto-N-neotetraose suggested that the lectin also recognized unsubstituted terminal beta-linked galactose units. The hemagglutinin property in the present lectin showed an unusual anti-H specificity. The lectin was inhibited by milk from Bombay phenotype individuals and certain milk oligosaccharides not specific for the H antigen.

  12. Visualization of melanoma tumor with lectin-conjugated rare-earth doped fluoride nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Dumych, Tetiana; Lutsyk, Maxym; Banski, Mateusz; Yashchenko, Antonina; Sojka, Bartlomiej; Horbay, Rostyslav; Lutsyk, Alexander; Stoika, Rostyslav; Misiewicz, Jan; Podhorodecki, Artur; Bilyy, Rostyslav

    2014-01-01

    Aim To develop specific fluorescent markers for melanoma tumor visualization, which would provide high selectivity and reversible binding pattern, by the use of carbohydrate-recognizing proteins, lectins, combined with the physical ability for imaging deep in the living tissues by utilizing red and near infrared fluorescent properties of specific rare-earth doped nanocrystals (NC). Methods B10F16 melanoma cells were inoculated to C57BL/6 mice for inducing experimental melanoma tumor. Tumors were removed and analyzed by lectin-histochemistry using LABA, PFA, PNA, HPA, SNA, GNA, and NPL lectins and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. NPL lectin was conjugated to fluorescent NaGdF4:Eu3+-COOH nanoparticles (5 nm) via zero length cross-linking reaction, and the conjugates were purified from unbound substances and then used for further visualization of histological samples. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ with the fluorescent emission at 600-720 nm range. Results NPL lectin selectively recognized regions of undifferentiated melanoblasts surrounding neoangiogenic foci inside melanoma tumor, PNA lectin recognized differentiated melanoblasts, and LCA and WGA were bound to tumor stroma regions. NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC were efficiently detecting newly formed regions of melanoma tumor, confirmed by fluorescent microscopy in visible and near infrared mode. These conjugates possessed high photostability and were compatible with convenient xylene-based mounting systems and preserved intensive fluorescent signal at samples storage for at least 6 months. Conclusion NPL lectin-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC permitted distinct identification of contours of the melanoma tissue on histological sections using red excitation at 590-610 nm and near infrared emission of 700-720 nm. These data are of potential practical significance for development of glycans-conjugated nanoparticles to be used for in vivo visualization of melanoma tumor. PMID:24891277

  13. Diagnosis of myocardial infarction based on lectin-induced erythrocyte agglutination: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Reichert, Thomas; Laffers, Wiebke; Marecka, Monika; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Piltz, Joachim; Esche, Hans-Jürgen; Wolf, Günther; Dähnert, Ingo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is an acute life-threatening disease with a high incidence worldwide. Aim of this study was to test lectin-carbohydrate binding-induced red blood cell (RBC) agglutination as an innovative tool for fast, precise and cost effective diagnosis of MI. Five lectins (Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA), Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA), Artocarpus agglutinin (ArA), Triticum agglutinin (TA)) were tested for ability to differentiate between agglutination characteristics in patients with MI (n = 101) or angina pectoris without MI (AP) (n = 34) and healthy volunteers (HV) as control (n =68) . RBC agglutination was analyzed by light absorbance of a stirred RBC suspension in the green to red light spectrum in an agglutimeter (amtec, Leipzig, Germany) for 15 min after lectin addition. Mean cell count in aggregates was estimated from light absorbance by a mathematical model. Each lectin induced RBC agglutination. RCA led to the strongest RBC agglutination (~500 RBCs/aggregate), while the others induced substantially slower agglutination and lead to smaller aggregate sizes (5-150 RBCs/aggregate). For all analyzed lectins the lectin-induced RBC agglutination of MI or AP patients was generally higher than for HV. However, only PHA induced agglutination that clearly distinguished MI from HV. Variance analysis showed that aggregate size after 15 min. agglutination induced by PHA was significantly higher in the MI group (143 RBCs/ aggregate) than in the HV (29 RBC-s/aggregate, p = 0.000). We hypothesize that pathological changes during MI induce modification of the carbohydrate composition on the RBC membrane and thus modify RBC agglutination. Occurrence of carbohydrate-lectin binding sites on RBC membranes provides evidence about MI. Due to significant difference in the rate of agglutination between MI > HV the differentiation between these groups is possible based on PHA-induced RBC-agglutination. This novel assay

  14. Binding of T-antigen disaccharides to Artocarpus hirsuta lectin and jacalin are energetically different.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sushama M; Khan, M Islam

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamics of binding of Me-alpha(-GalNAc, Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc-alpha-O-Me (T-antigen-alpha), Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc and Gal-alpha-1-6Glc (mellibiose) to Artocarpus hirsuta lectin was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The binding affinities of the saccharides are in the order Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc-alpha-O-Me > Me-alpha-GalNAc > Me-alpha-Gal > Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc > Gal-alpha-1-6Glc. The binding affinities were comparable to those for jacalin. However, binding of the saccharides to the A. hirsuta lectin was not affected as strongly by temperature as observed in jacalin and the trend was found to be reversed. Values for AH and AS were found to be positive in A. hirsuta lectin-disaccharide binding despite similar binding affinities. Thus, with 99% structural and 96% sequence homology, with similar sugar specificity and affinity, the energetics of the disaccharide binding of the two lectins seem to be different. Me-alpha-GalNAc binding to A. hirsuta lectin is enthalpically driven, because the association constant decreases with increasing temperature. However, the binding of the T-antigen disaccharides and mellibiose disaccharides to the lectin is entropically driven. The difference in the molecular associations in the packing and variation of the C-terminal length of the beta chain of the A. hirsuta lectin could be reflected in the different disaccharide binding energetics.

  15. Terminal N-Acetylgalactosamine-Specific Leguminous Lectin from Wisteria japonica as a Probe for Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Keisuke; Teruya, Futaba; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Millettia japonica was recently reclassified into the genus Wisteria japonica based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences. Because the seed of Wisteria floribunda expresses leguminous lectins with unique N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity, we purified lectin from Wisteria japonica seeds using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis demonstrated that unlike Wisteria floribunda and Wisteria brachybotrys lectins, which bind to both terminal N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose residues, Wisteria japonica lectin (WJA) specifically bound to both α- and β-linked terminal N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose residues on oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. Further, frontal affinity chromatography using more than 100 2-aminopyridine-labeled and p-nitrophenyl-derivatized oligosaccharides demonstrated that the ligands with the highest affinity for Wisteria japonica lectin were GalNAcβ1-3GlcNAc and GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, with Ka values of 9.5 × 104 and 1.4 × 105 M-1, respectively. In addition, when binding was assessed in a variety of cell lines, Wisteria japonica lectin bound specifically to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells while other Wisteria lectins bound equally to all of the cell lines tested. Wisteria japonica lectin binding to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells was dramatically decreased in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose, mannose, or N-acetylglucosamine, and was completely abrogated by β-hexosaminidase-digestion of these cells. These results clearly demonstrate that Wisteria japonica lectin binds to terminal N-acetylgalactosamine but not galactose. In addition, histochemical analysis of human squamous cell carcinoma tissue sections demonstrated that Wisteria japonica lectin specifically bound to differentiated cancer tissues but not normal tissue. This novel binding characteristic of Wisteria japonica lectin has the potential to become a powerful tool for clinical applications. PMID:24349556

  16. The degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors during germination of white kidney beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; Tamminga, S; Leenaars, P P; Schering, J; Ter Maat, D W

    1994-04-01

    White kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), cv Processor, contain a relatively high content of phaseolin (storage protein), lectins and a special group of glycoproteins as well as a considerable amount of protein-type trypsin inhibitors. Protein digestion of raw 'Processor' beans in monogastrics, for example pigs, is disturbed by poorly digested, phaseolin lectins, which can bind to carbohydrates in brush border membranes of the small intestinal epithelium, and trypsin inhibitors. The effect of the germination of white kidney beans on lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors was studied in order to achieve a degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors and an increase of in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein of bean flour. Therefore, whole bean extracts were examined throughout a germination period of up to seven days for their lectin and phaseolin pattern, lectin content, binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes and trypsin inhibitor content. In addition the in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis by pepsin and pancreatin of the protein from flours of (un)germinated white kidney beans was studied. SDS-PAGE demonstrated a degradation of E-lectins and a disappearance of L-lectins and phaseolin during germination. Results indicated a decrease of the lectin content by 85%, a loss of binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes by 91%, and a decrease of trypsin inhibitors by 76%, in bean flour after germination for seven days. A maximum in in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of protein from bean flour was already established after germination for half a day. PMID:8052578

  17. A lectin with highly potent inhibitory activity toward breast cancer cells from edible tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. nagaimo.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-01-01

    A 70-kDa galactose-specific lectin was purified from the tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. nagaimo. The purification involved three chromatographic steps: anion exchange chromatography on a Q-Sepharose column, FPLC-anion exchange chromatography on a Mono Q column, and FPLC-gel filtration on a Superdex 75 column. The purified nagaimo lectin presented as a single 35-kDa band in reducing SDS-PAGE while it exhibited a 70-kDa single band in non-reducing SDS-PAGE suggesting its dimeric nature. Nagaimo lectin displayed moderate thermostability, retaining full hemagglutinating activity after heating up to 62°C for 30 minutes. It also manifested stability over a wide pH range from pH 2 to 13. Nagaimo lectin was a galactose-specific lectin, as evidenced by binding with galactose and galactose-containing sugars such as lactose and raffinose. The minimum concentration of galactose, lactose and raffinose required to exert an inhibitory effect on hemagglutinating activity of nagaimo lectin was 20 mM, 5 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Nagaimo lectin inhibited the growth of some cancer cell lines including breast cancer MCF7 cells, hepatoma HepG2 cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells, with IC(50) values of 3.71 µM, 7.12 µM and 19.79 µM, respectively, after 24 hour treatment with nagaimo lectin. The induction of phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization indicated that nagaimo lectin evoked apoptosis in MCF7 cells. However, the anti-proliferative activity of nagaimo lectin was not blocked by application of galactose, signifying that the activity was not related to the carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin. PMID:23349827

  18. A Lectin with Highly Potent Inhibitory Activity toward Breast Cancer Cells from Edible Tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. Nagaimo

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-01-01

    A 70-kDa galactose-specific lectin was purified from the tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. nagaimo. The purification involved three chromatographic steps: anion exchange chromatography on a Q-Sepharose column, FPLC-anion exchange chromatography on a Mono Q column, and FPLC-gel filtration on a Superdex 75 column. The purified nagaimo lectin presented as a single 35-kDa band in reducing SDS-PAGE while it exhibited a 70-kDa single band in non-reducing SDS-PAGE suggesting its dimeric nature. Nagaimo lectin displayed moderate thermostability, retaining full hemagglutinating activity after heating up to 62°C for 30 minutes. It also manifested stability over a wide pH range from pH 2 to 13. Nagaimo lectin was a galactose-specific lectin, as evidenced by binding with galactose and galactose-containing sugars such as lactose and raffinose. The minimum concentration of galactose, lactose and raffinose required to exert an inhibitory effect on hemagglutinating activity of nagaimo lectin was 20 mM, 5 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Nagaimo lectin inhibited the growth of some cancer cell lines including breast cancer MCF7 cells, hepatoma HepG2 cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells, with IC50 values of 3.71 µM, 7.12 µM and 19.79 µM, respectively, after 24 hour treatment with nagaimo lectin. The induction of phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization indicated that nagaimo lectin evoked apoptosis in MCF7 cells. However, the anti-proliferative activity of nagaimo lectin was not blocked by application of galactose, signifying that the activity was not related to the carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin. PMID:23349827

  19. Terminal N-acetylgalactosamine-specific leguminous lectin from Wisteria japonica as a probe for human lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Soga, Keisuke; Teruya, Futaba; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Millettia japonica was recently reclassified into the genus Wisteria japonica based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences. Because the seed of Wisteria floribunda expresses leguminous lectins with unique N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity, we purified lectin from Wisteria japonica seeds using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis demonstrated that unlike Wisteria floribunda and Wisteria brachybotrys lectins, which bind to both terminal N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose residues, Wisteria japonica lectin (WJA) specifically bound to both α- and β-linked terminal N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose residues on oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. Further, frontal affinity chromatography using more than 100 2-aminopyridine-labeled and p-nitrophenyl-derivatized oligosaccharides demonstrated that the ligands with the highest affinity for Wisteria japonica lectin were GalNAcβ1-3GlcNAc and GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, with K(a) values of 9.5 × 10(4) and 1.4 × 10(5) M(-1), respectively. In addition, when binding was assessed in a variety of cell lines, Wisteria japonica lectin bound specifically to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells while other Wisteria lectins bound equally to all of the cell lines tested. Wisteria japonica lectin binding to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells was dramatically decreased in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose, mannose, or N-acetylglucosamine, and was completely abrogated by β-hexosaminidase-digestion of these cells. These results clearly demonstrate that Wisteria japonica lectin binds to terminal N-acetylgalactosamine but not galactose. In addition, histochemical analysis of human squamous cell carcinoma tissue sections demonstrated that Wisteria japonica lectin specifically bound to differentiated cancer tissues but not normal tissue. This novel binding characteristic of Wisteria japonica lectin has the potential to become a powerful tool for clinical applications. PMID:24349556

  20. Mannose-Binding Lectin Serum Levels in Patients With Candiduria

    PubMed Central

    Moslem, Maryam; Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Fatahinia, Mahnaz; Kheradmand, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candida species are normal mycoflora of human body which are capable to cause urinary tract infection (UTI). Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a kind of innate immune system and decreasing plasma levels of MBL may disrupt the natural immune response and increase susceptibility to infections. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess MBL in the serum of patients with candiduria and compare them with control. Patients and Methods: The blood and urine samples were collected from 335 patients (hospitalized in Golestan hospital, Ahvaz) using standard methods and the growing colonies on CHROMagar were identified using routine diagnostic tests. MBL activity in the serum of 45 patients with candiduria and 45 controls was measured using Eastbiopharm enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results: In this study, 45 (13.4 %) urine samples were positive for Candida species (17 males and 28 females). The most common isolated yeast was Candida albicans (34%), followed by C. glabrata (32.1%), C. tropicalis (9.4%), other Candida species (22.6%), and Rhodotorula species (1.9%). The mean serum levels of MBL were 0.85 ± 0.01 ng/mL and 1.02 ± 0.03 ng/mL among candiduric patients and controls, respectively, and there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.6). Conclusions: Our results showed that there was no significant relationship between MBL serum levels and candiduria. PMID:26870314

  1. Lectin-Based Characterization of Vascular Cell Microparticle Glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, April K.; Cioffi, Eugene A.; Cioffi, Donna L.; King, Judy A. C.; Bauer, Natalie N.

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are released constitutively and from activated cells. MPs play significant roles in vascular homeostasis, injury, and as biomarkers. The unique glycocalyx on the membrane of cells has frequently been exploited to identify specific cell types, however the glycocalyx of the MPs has yet to be defined. Thus, we sought to determine whether MPs, released both constitutively and during injury, from vascular cells have a glycocalyx matching those of the parental cell type to provide information on MP origin. For these studies we used rat pulmonary microvascular and artery endothelium, pulmonary smooth muscle, and aortic endothelial cells. MPs were collected from healthy or cigarette smoke injured cells and analyzed with a panel of lectins for specific glycocalyx linkages. Intriguingly, we determined that the MPs released either constitutively or stimulated by CSE injury did not express the same glycocalyx of the parent cells. Further, the glycocalyx was not unique to any of the specific cell types studied. These data suggest that MPs from both normal and healthy vascular cells do not share the parental cell glycocalyx makeup. PMID:26274589

  2. Targeting C-Type Lectin Receptors for Cancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huimin; Kamiya, Tomomori; Suabjakyong, Papawee; Tsuji, Noriko M.

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are a large family of soluble and trans-membrane pattern recognition receptors that are widely and primarily expressed on myeloid cells. CLRs are important for cell–cell communication and host defense against pathogens through the recognition of specific carbohydrate structures. Similar to a family of Toll-like receptors, CLRs signaling are involved in the various steps for initiation of innate immune responses and promote secretion of soluble factors such as cytokines and interferons. Moreover, CLRs contribute to endocytosis and antigen presentation, thereby fine-tune adaptive immune responses. In addition, there may also be a direct activation of acquired immunity. On the other hand, glycans, such as mannose structures, Lewis-type antigens, or GalNAc are components of tumor antigens and ligate CLRs, leading to immunoregulation. Therefore, agonists or antagonists of CLRs signaling are potential therapeutic reagents for cancer immunotherapy. We aim to overview the current knowledge of CLRs signaling and the application of their ligands on tumor-associating immune response. PMID:26379663

  3. Pumpkin phloem lectin genes are specifically expressed in companion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D E; Dannenhoffer, J M; Skaggs, M I; Lister, R M; Larkins, B A; Thompson, G A

    1992-01-01

    Pumpkin phloem exudate contains two abundant phloem proteins: PP1 is a 96-kD protein that forms polymeric filaments in vivo, and PP2 is a 48-kD dimeric lectin. Polyclonal antibodies raised against pumpkin phloem exudate were used to isolate several cDNAs corresponding to PP1 and PP2. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that PP1 is encoded by an mRNA of approximately 2500 nucleotides, whereas PP2 subunits are encoded by an mRNA of 1000 nucleotides. Sequence analysis of PP2 cDNAs revealed a 654-bp open reading frame encoding a 218-amino acid polypeptide; this polypeptide had the carbohydrate binding characteristics of a PP2 subunit. The PP2 mRNA was localized within the phloem of pumpkin hypocotyl cross-sections based on in situ hybridization of a digoxigenin-labeled antisense probe. PP2 mRNA was found within the companion cells in both the bicollateral vascular bundles and the extrafascicular phloem network. PMID:1467652

  4. Bacterial translocation in the rat model of lectin induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shoda, R; Mahalanabis, D; Wahed, M A; Albert, M J

    1995-03-01

    Red kidney beans were fed to weanling Long-Evans rats to cause diarrhoea (mean (SD) faecal wet weight: 2.66 (0.73) g/day in six rats fed beans v 1.12 (0.47) g/day in six control rats, p < 0.01) and increased faecal energy loss (4.87 (0.41) v 2.14 (0.23) kcal/day, p < 0.01). In addition, the rats fed beans had heavier small intestines (80.6 (4.6) v 51.9 (8.4) g/kg body weight, p < 0.01), heavier mesenteric lymph nodes (0.72 (0.27) v 0.08 (0.08) g/kg body weight, p < 0.05), and translocation of indigenous intestinal bacteria, Citrobacter Spp and Escherichia coli, to the mesenteric lymph nodes. (Translocation positive, that is, > 100 colonies per g of nodal tissue: 75% v 0%, p < 0.005.) These data suggest that diarrhoea induced by red kidney beans is a suitable model for studies of an important cause of persistent diarrhoea--that is, systemic complications. This rat model of lectin induced diarrhoea with translocation of intraluminal enteric bacteria into mesenteric lymph nodes should be useful in understanding the well known septicaemic complications associated with prolonged diarrhoea in infants and small children and in studies on factors that may modify or prevent bacterial translocation. PMID:7698696

  5. Misfolded Proteins Induce Aggregation of the Lectin Yos9*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Melanie H.; Rodriguez, Edwin H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    A substantial fraction of nascent proteins delivered into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) never reach their native conformations. Eukaryotes use a series of complementary pathways to efficiently recognize and dispose of these terminally misfolded proteins. In this process, collectively termed ER-associated degradation (ERAD), misfolded proteins are retrotranslocated to the cytosol, polyubiquitinated, and degraded by the proteasome. Although there has been great progress in identifying ERAD components, how these factors accurately identify substrates remains poorly understood. The targeting of misfolded glycoproteins in the ER lumen for ERAD requires the lectin Yos9, which recognizes the glycan species found on terminally misfolded proteins. In a role that remains poorly characterized, Yos9 also binds the protein component of ERAD substrates. Here, we identified a 45-kDa domain of Yos9, consisting of residues 22–421, that is proteolytically stable, highly structured, and able to fully support ERAD in vivo. In vitro binding studies show that Yos9(22–421) exhibits sequence-specific recognition of linear peptides from the ERAD substrate, carboxypeptidase Y G255R (CPY*), and binds a model unfolded peptide ΔEspP and protein Δ131Δ in solution. Binding of Yos9 to these substrates results in their cooperative aggregation. Although the physiological consequences of this substrate-induced aggregation remain to be seen, it has the potential to play a role in the regulation of ERAD. PMID:25086047

  6. Thermoresponsive diblock glycopolymer by RAFT polymerization for lectin recognition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kan; Xu, Muru; Zhou, Kaichun; Nie, Huali; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Limin

    2016-11-01

    A thermoresponsive double-hydrophilic diblock glycopolymer, poly(diethyl- eneglycol methacrylate)-block-poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-glucose) (PDEGMA-b-POVAG), was successfully prepared by a combination of enzymatic synthesis and reversible addition-fragment chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization protocols using poly(diethyl- eneglycol methacrylate) (PDEGMA) as macro-RAFT agent. The block glycopolymer was characterized by (1)H NMR and GPC. UV-vis, DLS and TEM studies revealed that the glycopolymer PDEGMA-b-POVAG was thermoresponsive with LCST at 31.0°C, and was able to self-assemble into spherical micelles of various sizes in aqueous solution. The glucose pendants in the glycopolymer could interact with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), the average hydrodynamic diameters of glycopolymer micelles increased to 170nm from 110nm after recognizing Con A. The diblock glycopolymer micelles have excellent biocompatibility with pig iliac endothelial cells, as measured using the MTT assay, but micelles loaded with Con A could be used to induce apoptosis in human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells. PMID:27524009

  7. Lectin-Based Characterization of Vascular Cell Microparticle Glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, April K; Cioffi, Eugene A; Cioffi, Donna L; King, Judy A C; Bauer, Natalie N

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are released constitutively and from activated cells. MPs play significant roles in vascular homeostasis, injury, and as biomarkers. The unique glycocalyx on the membrane of cells has frequently been exploited to identify specific cell types, however the glycocalyx of the MPs has yet to be defined. Thus, we sought to determine whether MPs, released both constitutively and during injury, from vascular cells have a glycocalyx matching those of the parental cell type to provide information on MP origin. For these studies we used rat pulmonary microvascular and artery endothelium, pulmonary smooth muscle, and aortic endothelial cells. MPs were collected from healthy or cigarette smoke injured cells and analyzed with a panel of lectins for specific glycocalyx linkages. Intriguingly, we determined that the MPs released either constitutively or stimulated by CSE injury did not express the same glycocalyx of the parent cells. Further, the glycocalyx was not unique to any of the specific cell types studied. These data suggest that MPs from both normal and healthy vascular cells do not share the parental cell glycocalyx makeup.

  8. Mosquito C-type lectins maintain gut microbiome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rudian; Liu, Jianying; Liu, Qiyong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The long-term evolutionary interaction between the host immune system and symbiotic bacteria determines their cooperative rather than antagonistic relationship. It is known that commensal bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate the mammalian host immune system and maintain homeostasis. However, the strategies employed by the microbiome to overcome host immune responses in invertebrates still remain to be understood. Here, we report that the gut microbiome in mosquitoes utilizes C-type lectins (mosGCTLs) to evade the bactericidal capacity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Aedes aegypti mosGCTLs facilitate colonization by multiple bacterial strains. Furthermore, maintenance of the gut microbial flora relies on the expression of mosGCTLs in A. aegypti. Silencing the orthologues of mosGCTL in another major mosquito vector (Culex pipiens pallens) also impairs the survival of gut commensal bacteria. The gut microbiome stimulates the expression of mosGCTLs, which coat the bacterial surface and counteract AMP activity. Our study describes a mechanism by which the insect symbiotic microbiome offsets gut immunity to achieve homeostasis. PMID:27572642

  9. The peanut lectin-binding glycoproteins of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, A.I. ); Keeble, S.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-08-01

    The peanut lectin (PNA) is known to bind more strongly to keratinocytes that are undergoing terminal differentiation than to proliferating keratinocytes. In order to investigate the significance of this change in cell-surface carbohydrate authors have identified the PNA-binding glycoproteins of cultured human keratinocytes and antibodies against them. Two heavily glycosylated bands of 110 and 250 kDa were resolved by PAGE of ({sup 14}C)galactose- or ({sup 14}C)mannose- and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine-labeled cell extracts eluted with galactose from PNA affinity columns. The higher molecular weight band was also detected on PNA blots of unlabeled cell extracts transferred to nitrocellulose. Both bands were sensitive to pronase digestion, but only the 250-kDa band was digested with trypsin. A rabbit antiserum that we prepared (anti-PNA-gp) immunoprecipitated both bands from cell extracts. In contrast to PNA, anti-PNA-gp bound equally to proliferating and terminally differentiating cells, indicating that some epitope(s) of the PNA-binding glycoproteins is present on the cell surface prior to terminal differentiation. When keratinocytes grown as a monolayer in low-calcium medium were switched to medium containing 2 mM calcium ions in order to induce desmosome formation and stratification, there was a dramatic redistribution of the PNA-binding glycoproteins, which became concentrated at the boundaries between cells. This may suggest a role for the glycoproteins in cell-cell interactions during stratification.

  10. Galectin-8: a matricellular lectin with key roles in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, María F; Ferragut, Fátima; Bacigalupo, María L; Cárdenas Delgado, Víctor M; Nugnes, Lorena G; Gentilini, Lucas; Laderach, Diego; Wolfenstein-Todel, Carlota; Compagno, Daniel; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Elola, María T

    2014-10-01

    Galectin-8 (gal-8) is a "tandem-repeat"-type galectin, containing two carbohydrate recognition domains connected by a linker peptide. gal-8 is expressed both in the cytoplasm and nucleus in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) from normal and tumor-associated blood vessels, and in lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we describe a novel role for gal-8 in the regulation of vascular and lymphatic angiogenesis and provide evidence of its critical implications in tumor biology. Functional assays revealed central roles for gal-8 in the control of capillary-tube formation, EC migration and in vivo angiogenesis. So far, two endothelial ligands have been described for gal-8, namely podoplanin in lymphatic vessels and CD166 (ALCAM, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule) in vascular ECs. Other related gal-8 functions are also summarized here, including cell adhesion and migration, which collectively demonstrate the multi-functionality of this complex lectin. Thus, gal-8 is an important component of the angiogenesis network, and an essential molecule in the extracellular matrix by providing molecular anchoring to this surrounding matrix. The implications of gal-8 in tumor angiogenesis remain to be further explored, but it is exciting to speculate that modulating gal-8-glycan interactions could be used to block lymphatic-vascular connections vital for metastasis.

  11. Mosquito C-type lectins maintain gut microbiome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rudian; Liu, Jianying; Liu, Qiyong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The long-term evolutionary interaction between the host immune system and symbiotic bacteria determines their cooperative rather than antagonistic relationship. It is known that commensal bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate the mammalian host immune system and maintain homeostasis. However, the strategies employed by the microbiome to overcome host immune responses in invertebrates still remain to be understood. Here, we report that the gut microbiome in mosquitoes utilizes C-type lectins (mosGCTLs) to evade the bactericidal capacity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Aedes aegypti mosGCTLs facilitate colonization by multiple bacterial strains. Furthermore, maintenance of the gut microbial flora relies on the expression of mosGCTLs in A. aegypti. Silencing the orthologues of mosGCTL in another major mosquito vector (Culex pipiens pallens) also impairs the survival of gut commensal bacteria. The gut microbiome stimulates the expression of mosGCTLs, which coat the bacterial surface and counteract AMP activity. Our study describes a mechanism by which the insect symbiotic microbiome offsets gut immunity to achieve homeostasis. PMID:27170846

  12. Destabilization of pea lectin by substitution of a single amino acid in a surface loop.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaeker, F J; van Eijsden, R R; Díaz, C L; de Pater, B S; Kijne, J W

    1993-09-01

    Legume lectins are considered to be antinutritional factors (ANF) in the animal feeding industry. Inactivation of ANF is an important element in processing of food. In our study on the stability of Pisum sativum L. lectin (PSL), a conserved hydrophobic amino acid (Val103) in a surface loop was replaced with alanine. The mutant lectin, PSL V103A, showed a decrease in unfolding temperature (Tm) by some 10 degrees C in comparison with wild-type (wt) PSL, and the denaturation energy (delta H) is only about 55% of that of wt PSL. Replacement of an adjacent amino acid (Phe104) with alanine did not result in a significant difference in stability in comparison with wt PSL. Both mutations did not change the sugar-binding properties of the lectin, as compared with wt PSL and with PSL from pea seeds, at ambient temperatures. The double mutant, PSL V103A/F104A, was produced in Escherichia coli, but could not be isolated in an active (i.e. sugar-binding) form. Interestingly, the mutation in PSL V103A reversibly affected sugar-binding at 37 degrees C, as judged from haemagglutination assays. These results open the possibility of production of lectins that are active in planta at ambient temperatures, but are inactive and possibly non-toxic at 37 degrees C in the intestines of mammals. PMID:8400124

  13. Purification and characterization of a novel beta-D-galactosides-specific lectin from Clitoria ternatea.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Haque, Shabirul; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-09-01

    A lectin present in seeds of Clitoria ternatea agglutinated trypsin-treated human B erythrocytes. The sugar specificity assay indicated that lectin belongs to Gal/Gal NAc-specific group. Hence the lectin, designated C. ternatea agglutinin (CTA), was purified by the combination of acetic acid precipitation, salt fractionation and affinity chromatography. HPLC gel filtration, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry indicated that the native lectin is composed of two identical subunits of molecular weight 34.7 kDa associated by non covalent bonds. The N-terminal sequence of CTA shared homology with Glycine max and Pisum sativum. Complete sequence was also found to be homologous to S-64 protein of Glycine max, suggesting that CTA probably exhibits both hemagglutination and probably sugar uptake activity. The carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin was investigated by quantitative turbidity measurements, and percent inhibition assays. Based on these assays, we conclude that CTA binds beta-D: -galactosides, and also may has an extended specificity towards non-reducing terminal Neu5Acalpha2,6Gal. PMID:17514413

  14. Identification of Novel Pathways in Plant Lectin-Induced Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Sun, Rong; Yu, Tian; Liu, Rong; Cheng, Li-Jia; Bao, Jin-Ku; Zou, Liang; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Plant lectins have been investigated to elucidate their complicated mechanisms due to their remarkable anticancer activities. Although plant lectins seems promising as a potential anticancer agent for further preclinical and clinical uses, further research is still urgently needed and should include more focus on molecular mechanisms. Herein, a Naïve Bayesian model was developed to predict the protein-protein interaction (PPI), and thus construct the global human PPI network. Moreover, multiple sources of biological data, such as smallest shared biological process (SSBP), domain-domain interaction (DDI), gene co-expression profiles and cross-species interolog mapping were integrated to build the core apoptotic PPI network. In addition, we further modified it into a plant lectin-induced apoptotic cell death context. Then, we identified 22 apoptotic hub proteins in mesothelioma cells according to their different microarray expressions. Subsequently, we used combinational methods to predict microRNAs (miRNAs) which could negatively regulate the abovementioned hub proteins. Together, we demonstrated the ability of our Naïve Bayesian model-based network for identifying novel plant lectin-treated cancer cell apoptotic pathways. These findings may provide new clues concerning plant lectins as potential apoptotic inducers for cancer drug discovery. PMID:26867193

  15. Structural characterization of novel chitin-binding lectins from the genus Artocarpus and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Melissa B; Lopes, José L S; Soares-Costa, Andréa; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina; Moreira, Renato A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Beltramini, Leila M

    2006-01-01

    Two novel chitin-binding lectins from seeds of Artocarpus genus were described in this paper, one from A. integrifolia (jackfruit) and one from A. incisa (breadfruit). They were purified from saline crude extract of seeds using affinity chromatography on chitin column, size-exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography on the C-18 column. Both are 14 kDa proteins, made up of 3 chains linked by disulfide bonds. The partial amino acid sequences of the two lectins showed they are homologous to each other but not to other plant chitin-binding proteins. Thus, they cannot be classified in any known plant chitin-binding protein family, particularly because of their inter-chain covalent bonds. Their circular dichroism spectra and deconvolution showed a secondary structure content of beta-sheet and unordered elements. The lectins were thermally stable until 80 degrees C and structural changes were observed below pH 6. Both lectins inhibited the growth of Fusarium moniliforme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and presented hemagglutination activity against human and rabbit erythrocytes. These lectins were denoted jackin (from jackfruit) and frutackin (from breadfruit).

  16. Surface modifications evoked by antidiuretic hormone in isolated epithelial cells: evidence from lectin probes.

    PubMed

    Pietras, R J; Naujokaitis, P J; Szego, C M

    1975-01-01

    Epithelial cells (80-90% "granular" type) were isolated from urinary bladders of Bufo marinus and Rana catesbiana. The inhibitory effect of alpha-methyl-D-mannoside on fluorescein-labeled concanavalin A (Con A) binding to these cells indicates that they possess specific binding sites for Con A. The lectin also mediates adsorption of erythrocytes to these cells. Both Con A binding and Con A-mediated hemadsorption to epithelial cells are depressed at 4 degrees C, as compared with cells maintained at 22 degrees C. Elevation of temperature to 37 degrees C, however, enhances hemadsorption independently of alterations in lectin binding. Treatment of cells with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) at 22 degrees C followed by 15 min of incubation at 22 degrees or 37 degrees C before exposure of cells to Con A promotes increments in Con A-mediated hemadsorption, but not in lectin binding, at 22 degrees or 37 degrees C. These hormonal effects are not significant when hemadsorption is assayed at 4 degrees C. Treatment of cells with another octapeptide, angiotensin, elicits a small, but significant, increment in hemadsorption to epithelial cells which is likewise uninfluenced by quantitative changes in lectin binding. Collectively, these data and other independent observations suggest that treatment with octapeptide hormones acts to enhance the redistribution and aggregation of lectin-binding proteins in the membranes of granular epithelial cells from amphibian urinary bladder. Such changes, in turn, may contribute to the alterations in membrane transport properties which characterize the hormonal response. PMID:813065

  17. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of chitin-binding lectin from Canna limbata seeds.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Theolyta S; Teixeira, Claudener S; Falcão, Maria A P; Junior, Vanir R Pinto; Santiago, Mayara Quiroz; Benevides, Raquel G; Delatorre, Plínio; Martins, Jorge L; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna S; Cavada, Benildo S; Campesatto, Eliane A; Rocha, Bruno A M

    2013-12-01

    Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of proteins or glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to a specific mono- or oligosaccharide. Monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. In this study, we evaluated anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of monocot lectin from the Canna limbata seeds (CLL). To accomplish this, CLL was purified and subjected to pharmacological assays: abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate and Zymosan A-induced peritonitis tests. The CLL was purified by chromatographic chitin column, and the relative mass of 21 kDa observed in electrophoresis was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry, which also revealed that purified CLL consists of a dimer having a weight of 49,676 Da. The CLL showed nociceptive activity in the acetic acid test as well as peripheral antinociceptive response. The CLL also showed anti-inflammatory effect with the reduction of inflammation in the formalin test and neutrophil migration into the peritoneal cavity. This is the first report of anti-inflammatory activity for a monocot lectin, and it suggests a new pharmacological tool to understand inflammatory and antinociceptive processes mediated through lectins.

  18. Isolation, functional, and partial biochemical characterization of galatrox, an acidic lectin from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Franqueiro, Elaine de Paula; Alves-Paiva, Raquel de Melo; Sartim, Marco Aurélio; Callejon, Daniel Roberto; Paiva, Helder Henrique; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Rosa, José César; Cintra, Adélia Cristina Oliveira; Franco, João José; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Sampaio, Suely Vilela

    2011-03-01

    Snake venom lectins have been studied in regard to their chemical structure and biological functions. However, little is known about lectins isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom. We report here the isolation and partial functional and biochemical characterization of an acidic glycan-binding protein called galatrox from this venom. This lectin was purified by affinity chromatography using a lactosyl-sepharose column, and its homogeneity and molecular mass were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The purified galatrox was homogeneous and characterized as an acidic protein (pI 5.2) with a monomeric and dimeric molecular mass of 16.2 and 32.5 kDa, respectively. Alignment of N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of galatrox indicated that this protein exhibits high homology to other C-type snake venom lectins. Galatrox showed optimal hemagglutinating activity at a concentration of 100 μg/ml and this effect was drastically inhibited by lactose, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and heating, which confirmed galatrox's lectin activity. While galatrox failed to induce the same level of paw edema or mast cell degranulation as B. atrox crude venom, galatrox did alter cellular viability, which suggested that galatrox might contribute to venom toxicity by directly inducing cell death. PMID:21297119

  19. Rapid affinity-purification and physicochemical characterization of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Swamy, Musti J

    2010-04-21

    The chito-oligosaccharide-specific lectin from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on chitin. After SDS/PAGE in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, the pumpkin phloem lectin yielded a single band corresponding to a molecular mass of 23.7 kDa, whereas ESI-MS (electrospray ionization MS) gave the molecular masses of the subunit as 24645 Da. Analysis of the CD spectrum of the protein indicated that the secondary structure of the lectin consists of 9.7% alpha-helix, 35.8% beta-sheet, 22.5% beta-turn and 32.3% unordered structure. Saccharide binding did not significantly affect the secondary and tertiary structures of the protein. The haemagglutinating activity of pumpkin phloem lectin was mostly unaffected in the temperature range 4-70 degrees C, but a sharp decrease was seen between 75 and 85 degrees C. Differential scanning calorimetric and CD spectroscopic studies suggest that the lectin undergoes a co-operative thermal unfolding process centred at approx. 81.5 degrees C, indicating that it is a relatively stable protein.

  20. Structural-functional insights and studies on saccharide binding of Sophora japonica seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Priya; Shahane, Ganesh; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Sengupta, Durba; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2016-10-01

    Functional and conformational transitions of the Sophora japonica seed lectin (SJL) were studied in detail using bioinformatics and biophysical tools. Homology model of the lectin displayed all the characteristics of the legume lectin monomer and the experimental observations correlated well with the structural information. In silico studies were performed by protein-ligand docking, calculating the respective binding energies and the residues involved in the interactions were derived from LigPlot(+) analysis. Fluorescence titrations showed three times higher affinity of T-antigen disaccharide than N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc) towards SJL indicating extended sugar binding site of the lectin. Thermodynamic parameters of T-antigen binding to SJL indicated the process to be endothermic and entropically driven while those of GalNAc showed biphasic process. SDS-PAGE showed post-translationally modified homotetrameric species of the lectin under native conditions. In presence of guanidine hydrochloride (0.5-5.0M), the tetramer first dissociated into dimers followed by unfolding of the protein as indicated by size exclusion chromatography, fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. Different structural rearrangements were observed during thermal denaturation of SJL at physiological pH 7.2, native pH 8.5 and molten globule inducing pH 1.0. Topological information revealed by solute quenching studies at respective pH indicated differential hydrophobic environment and charge density around tryptophan residues. PMID:27185070

  1. Inhibition of Pasteurella multocida Adhesion to Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium Using Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Magda Patricia; Martinez, Nhora María; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a panel of lectins to inhibit the ability of Pasteurella multocida to adhere to and affect the rabbit respiratory epithelium. Nasal septa from rabbit fetuses were cultured with various lectins before the addition of P. multocida. The percentage of bacteria adhering to the epithelium was evaluated semiquantitatively by indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP) staining. The goblet cells (GCs) were counted in semithin sections stained with toluidine blue and served as the main morphological criterion to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the lectins. The lectins PNA, WGA, RCA120, and DBA significantly inhibited the adhesion of P. multocida to the ciliated epithelium (P < 0.05) and prevented the pathogen-induced increase in the number of GCs (P < 0.05) compared with those of positive control tissues. In addition, VVA, SJA, UEA I, DSL, SBA, and ECL significantly inhibited the increase in GCs compared with that of the control tissues. The results suggest that less aggressive therapeutic strategies, such as treatment with lectins, may represent alternative approaches to control bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:25810949

  2. Anti-tumor and anti-viral activities of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2013-04-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding specific lectins widespread among monocotyledonous plants, is well-known to possess a broad range of biological functions such as anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Herein, we mainly focused on exploring the precise molecular mechanisms by which GNA-related lectins induce cancer cell apoptotic and autophagic death targeting mitochondria-mediated ROS-p38-p53 apoptotic or autophagic pathway, Ras-Raf and PI3K-Akt anti-apoptotic or anti-autophagic pathways. In addition, we further discussed the molecular mechanisms of GNA-related lectins exerting anti-viral activities by blocking the entry of the virus into its target cells, preventing transmission of the virus as well as forcing virus to delete glycan in its envelope protein and triggering neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, these findings may provide a new perspective of GNA-related lectins as potential drugs for cancer and virus therapeutics in the future.

  3. Mitigation of arsenic-mediated renal oxidative stress in rat by Pleurotus florida lectin.

    PubMed

    Bera, Asit Kumar; Rana, Tanmoy; Das, Subhashree; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Pan, Diganta; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasish; Das, Subrata Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Oyster mushroom, Pleurotus florida is regarded as one of the popular food with biopharmaceutical properties. Here, the study aimed to investigate the antioxidative effects of mushroom (Pleurotus florida) lectin against arsenic-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Animals were divided into four groups; Group 1 was control. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were exposed to arsenic (20 parts per million [ppm] in drinking water), arsenic plus oral supplementation of ascorbic acid (25 mg/kg body weight) and arsenic plus oral supplementation of mushroom lectin (150 mg/kg body weight) respectively. Both ascorbic acid and mushroom lectin prevented the arsenic-mediated growth retardation and normalized the elevated kidney weight. Disrupted activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and enhanced lipid peroxidation (LPO), protein carbonyl (PC) and nitric oxides (NO) production in kidney caused by arsenic could also be maintained towards normalcy by supplementation of mushroom lectin and ascorbic acid. These antioxidative effects were exhibited in a time-dependant manner. Further, arsenic-mediated down-regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD(2)) gene was obstructed by these agents. Thus it was found that mushroom lectin reversed the effect of arsenic-mediated oxidative stress in a time-dependent manner.

  4. Chemical Lectinology: Tools for Probing the Ligands and Dynamics of Mammalian Lectins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Belardi, Brian; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The importance and complexity associated with the totality of glycan structures, i.e. the glycome, has garnered significant attention from chemists and biologists alike. However, what is lacking from this biochemical picture is how cells, tissues, and organisms interpret glycan patterns and translate this information into appropriate responses. Lectins, glycan-binding proteins, are thought to bridge this gap by decoding the glycome and dictating cell fate based on the underlying chemical identities and properties of the glycome. Yet, our understanding of the in vivo ligands and function for most lectins is still incomplete. This review focuses on recent advances in chemical tools to study the specificity and dynamics of mammalian lectins in live cells. A picture emerges of lectin function that is highly sensitive to its organization, which in turn drastically shapes immunity and cancer progression. We hope this review will inspire biologists to make use of these new techniques and stimulate chemists to continue developing innovative approaches to probe lectin biology in vivo. PMID:26256477

  5. Identification of group B streptococcal antigen with lectin-bound polystyrene particles.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Cumbie, R

    1987-01-01

    The lectin of the tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, or of the potato, Solanum tuberosum, can be passively coupled to amide-modified polystyrene spheres to be used as a detection reagent for the specific identification of group B streptococcal cultures grown in selective or nonselective Todd-Hewitt broth for 5 and 4 h, respectively. Agglutination occurred when the lectin reagents were allowed to react with either the cell suspension, clarified broth, or antigen extracts from group B streptococci grown in Todd-Hewitt broth. No agglutination occurred when these lectins were allowed to react with strains of serogroup A, C, D, F, or G streptococci. False-negative agglutination responses may occur with certain serotype of group B streptococci grown on Columbia sheep blood agar. A 20-min staining time permitted the specific labeling of fixed smears of group B streptococci with fluorescein-conjugated Lycopersicon lectin. The lectin from the solanaceous plant Datura stramonium did not agglutinate group B streptococci or other clinically significant streptococcal serogroups. PMID:3301888

  6. Surface array proteins of Campylobacter fetus block lectin-mediated binding to type A lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, G C; Yang, L Y; Wang, E; Blaser, M J

    1990-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus strains with type A lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a surface array protein layer (S+) have been found to be pathogenic in humans and animals. Spontaneous laboratory mutants that lack surface array proteins (S-) are sensitive to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum. The ability of lectins to determine the presence of the S-layer and differentiate LPS type was assessed. We screened 14 lectins and found 3 (wheat germ agglutinin, Bandeiraea simplicifolia II, and Helix pomatia agglutinin) that agglutinated S- C. fetus strains with type A LPS but not S- strains with type B or type C LPS or S+ strains. However, the S+ type A strains were agglutinated after sequential water extraction, heat, or pronase treatment, all of which remove the S-layer, whereas there was no effect on the control strains. Specific carbohydrates for each lectin and purified LPS from a type A C. fetus strain specifically inhibited agglutination of an S- type A strain. In a direct enzyme-linked lectin assay, binding to the S- type A LPS strain was significantly greater than binding to the S+ strain (P = 0.01) or to a Campylobacter jejuni strain (P = 0.008). Consequently, these results indicate that the three lectins bind to the O side chains of C. fetus type A LPS but that the presence of the S-layer on intact cells blocks binding. Images PMID:2387622

  7. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application - the frutalin case study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly glycosylated α-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit) seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that "batch-to-batch" variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine. PMID:25152749

  8. Glycopolymer brushes for specific lectin binding by controlled multivalent presentation of N-acetyllactosamine glycan oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunji; Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Elling, Lothar; Böker, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A new multivalent glycopolymer platform for lectin recognition is introduced in this work by combining the controlled growth of glycopolymer brushes with highly specific glycosylation reactions. Glycopolymer brushes, synthetic polymers with pendant saccharides, are prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-O-(N-acetyl-β-d-glucosamine)ethyl methacrylate (GlcNAcEMA). Here, the fabrication of multivalent glycopolymers consisting of poly(GlcNAcEMA) is reported with additional biocatalytic elongation of the glycans directly on the silicon substrate by specific glycosylation using recombinant glycosyltransferases. The bioactivity of the surface-grafted glycans is investigated by fluorescence-linked lectin assay. Due to the multivalency of glycan ligands, the glycopolymer brushes show very selective, specific, and strong interactions with lectins. The multiarrays of the glycopolymer brushes have a large potential as a screening device to define optimal-binding environments of specific lectins or as new simplified diagnostic tools for the detection of cancer-related lectins in blood serum. PMID:25354386

  9. Glycan heterogeneity on gold nanoparticles increases lectin discrimination capacity in label-free multiplexed bioassays†

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Lucienne; Vlachou, Denise; Richards, Sarah-Jane; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new analytical tools as point-of-care biosensors is crucial to combat the spread of infectious diseases, especially in the context of drug-resistant organisms, or to detect biological warfare agents. Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature and are often the first site of adhesion/recognition during infection making them appealing targets for biosensors. Glycosylated gold nanoparticles have been developed that change colour from red to blue upon interaction with carbohydrate-binding proteins and may find use as biosensors, but are limited by the inherent promiscuity of some of these interactions. Here we mimic the natural heterogeneity of cell-surface glycans by displaying mixed monolayers of glycans on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These are then used in a multiplexed, label-free bioassay to create ‘barcodes’ which describe the lectin based on its binding profile. The increased information content encoded by using complex mixtures of a few sugars, rather than increased numbers of different sugars makes this approach both scalable and accessible. These nanoparticles show increased lectin identification power at a range of lectin concentrations, relative to single-channel sensors. It was also found that some information about the concentration of the lectins can be extracted, all from just a simple colour change, taking this technology closer to being a realistic biosensor. PMID:27181289

  10. Rheologic characterization of vegetal lectins by dissociation of induced erythrocyte agglutinates.

    PubMed

    Rasia, R J; Valverde, J R; Gentils, M; Cauchois, C; Stoltz, J F

    1997-01-01

    Energy evolved from hemagglutination reaction or spent in dissociating erythrocyte agglutinates has been proved to be an excellent parameter for analyzing cell-cell interactions mediated by bridging molecules such as antibodies or lectins. We developed a new rheo-optical method to estimate the energy of dissociation of red blood cell agglutinates. In a Couette shear field agglutinates can be dissociated until a suspension of monodispersed cells is obtained. Intensity of light backscattered by suspended agglutinates increases during their mechanical dissociation. Variation of backscattered light intensity correlates with the energy spent in the process. The adhesive energy of erythrocyte agglutination induced by lectins has been estimated by applying this method. Two specific lectins (Dolichus Biflorus agglutinin and Ulex Europaeus agglutinin) and a new lectin obtained from Amarantus Cruentus seeds which specificity is unknown were studied. Results obtained in this work for Dolichus Biflorus lectin are comparable with values published by other authors. An asymptotic decrease of adhesive energy was observed when the mechanical dissociation was applied several times on the same sample. Our results suggest that the cell detachment is accompanied by the extraction of membrane receptors. This finding is consistent with results obtained by other authors.

  11. Receptors of garlic (Allium sativum) lectins and their role in insecticidal action.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh K; Singh, Pradhyumna K

    2012-08-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) lectins are promising candidate molecules for the protection against chewing (lepidopteran) as well as sap sucking (homopteran) insect pests. Molecular mechanism of toxicity and interaction of lectins with midgut receptor proteins has been described in many reports. Lectins show its effect right from sensory receptors of mouth parts by disrupting the membrane integrity and food detection ability. Subsequently, enter into the gut lumen and interact with midgut glycosylated proteins like alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aminopeptidase-N (APN), cadherin-like proteins, polycalins, sucrase, symbionin and others. These proteins play critical role in life cycle of insect directly or indirectly. Lectins interfere with the activity of these proteins and causes physiological disorders leading to the death of insects. Lectins further transported across the insect gut, accumulated in various body parts (like haemolymph and ovary) and interact with intracellular proteins like symbionin and cytochrome p450. Binding with cytochrome p450 (which involve in ecdysone synthesis) might interfere in the development of insects, which results in growth retardation and pre-mature death.

  12. pH-dependent aggregation of oligomeric Artocarpus hirsuta lectin on thermal denaturation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sushama M; Islam Khan, M

    2003-11-14

    The pH dependence of the activity, aggregation, and secondary structure of Artocarpus hirsuta lectin was studied using intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, light scattering, and circular dichroism. The lectin is more stable in the neutral and acidic than in the alkaline pH range, which is also reflected in the binding constants of the lectin to methyl alpha-galactopyranoside (me alpha-gal). The aggregation of the protein due to heat denaturation is prevented at both extremes of pH. The binding of hydrophobic dye to the lectin takes place at pH 1-2, which increases with increasing temperature. The exposure of hydrophobic patches at pH 1 is reversible. The secondary structure of the lectin is intact in the pH range of 1-8 and is distorted above pH 9. Aggregation of the protein due to heat denaturation is also prevented in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl).

  13. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application - the frutalin case study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly glycosylated α-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit) seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that "batch-to-batch" variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine.

  14. Binding of porphyrins by the tumor-specific lectin, jacalin [Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) agglutinin].

    PubMed

    Komath, S S; Bhanu, K; Maiya, B G; Swamy, M J

    2000-08-01

    Jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin) specifically recognizes the tumor-associated T-antigenic disaccharide structure, Gal beta13GalNAc. Porphyrins and their derivatives are currently used as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy to treat malignant tumors. In this study, the interaction of several free base porphyrins and their metal derivatives with jacalin is investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Each lectin subunit was found to bind one porphyrin molecule and the association constants were estimated to be in the range of 2.4 x 10(3) M(-1) to 1.3 x 10(5) M(-1) at room temperature for the interaction of different porphyrins with jacalin. These values are in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of monosaccharides to jacalin. Both free lectin and lectin saturated with the specific saccharide were found to bind different porphyrins with comparable binding strength indicating that porphyrin binding takes place at a site different from the sugar binding site. Further, both anionic and cationic porphyrins were found to interact with the lectin with comparable affinity, clearly indicating that the charge on the porphyrin does not play any role in the binding process and that most likely the interaction is mediated by hydrophobic forces. These results suggest that jacalin and other lectins may potentially be useful for targeted delivery of porphyrins to tumor tissues in photodynamic therapy.

  15. Assessment of plant lectin antifungal potential against yeasts of major importance in medical mycology.

    PubMed

    Klafke, Gabriel Baracy; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmitt Garcia; Monte, Leonardo Garcia; Pereira, Juliano Lacava; Brandolt, Tchana Martinez; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Pinto, Luciano da Silva

    2013-02-01

    The search for new compounds with antifungal activity is accelerating due to rising yeast and fungal resistance to commonly prescribed drugs. Among the molecules being investigated, plant lectins can be highlighted. The present work shows the potential of six plant lectins which were tested in vitro against yeasts of medical importance, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Malassezia pachydermatis, Rhodotorula sp. and Trichosporon sp. Broth microdilution susceptibility testing was performed in accordance with standard protocols to evaluate antifungal activity. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined at 80% yeast growth inhibition, whereas the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) was evaluated after making the subcultures of each dilution. Only C. parapsilosis growth was inhibited by the lectins tested. Abelmoschus esculentus lectin showed the highest MIC (0.97 μg ml(-1)). Lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis, Mucuna pruriens and Clitoria fairchildiana presented the highest MFC at (3.90 μg ml(-1)). These results encourage further studies with wider yeast strain selections, and open new perspectives for the development of pharmacological molecules. PMID:23161017

  16. Glycan heterogeneity on gold nanoparticles increases lectin discrimination capacity in label-free multiplexed bioassays.

    PubMed

    Otten, Lucienne; Vlachou, Denise; Richards, Sarah-Jane; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-07-21

    The development of new analytical tools as point-of-care biosensors is crucial to combat the spread of infectious diseases, especially in the context of drug-resistant organisms, or to detect biological warfare agents. Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature and are often the first site of adhesion/recognition during infection making them appealing targets for biosensors. Glycosylated gold nanoparticles have been developed that change colour from red to blue upon interaction with carbohydrate-binding proteins and may find use as biosensors, but are limited by the inherent promiscuity of some of these interactions. Here we mimic the natural heterogeneity of cell-surface glycans by displaying mixed monolayers of glycans on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These are then used in a multiplexed, label-free bioassay to create 'barcodes' which describe the lectin based on its binding profile. The increased information content encoded by using complex mixtures of a few sugars, rather than increased numbers of different sugars makes this approach both scalable and accessible. These nanoparticles show increased lectin identification power at a range of lectin concentrations, relative to single-channel sensors. It was also found that some information about the concentration of the lectins can be extracted, all from just a simple colour change, taking this technology closer to being a realistic biosensor. PMID:27181289

  17. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-01-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery. PMID:26832966

  18. A comparative study of lectin affinity based plant n-glycoproteome profiling using tomato fruit as a model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) can provide a valuable front-end enrichment strategy for the study of N-glycoproteins and has been used to characterize a broad range eukaryotic N-glycoproteomes. Moreover, studies with mammalian systems have suggested that the use of multiple lectins with differ...

  19. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  20. A Glucosamine-Specific Lectin from Green Dragon No. 8 Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Induced Apoptosis on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    A lectin exhibiting antiproliferative activity on tumor cell lines but devoid of antifungal activity has been purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Green Dragon no. 8 seeds. The lectin was a 60 kDa dimeric protein with two 30 kDa subunits. It was a glucosamine-specific lectin as implied from the inhibitory effect of glucosamine on hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. The steps for isolation of the lectin involved Affi-gel blue gel (affinity gel), Mono Q (anion exchanger), and Superdex 75 column (size exclusion). The lectin was purified 20.8-fold from the crude extract of the beans. The purified lectin showed antiproliferative activity on breast cancer MCF7 cell line and nasopharyngeal cancer HONE1 and CNE2 cell lines, but a low activity on normal skin fibroblast HSF98 cell line. The lectin was shown to induce apoptosis on HONE1 cells, as indicated by increased phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization. It also blocked HONE1 cell division and kept the cells at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. PMID:26290674

  1. A Glucosamine-Specific Lectin from Green Dragon No. 8 Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Induced Apoptosis on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    A lectin exhibiting antiproliferative activity on tumor cell lines but devoid of antifungal activity has been purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Green Dragon no. 8 seeds. The lectin was a 60 kDa dimeric protein with two 30 kDa subunits. It was a glucosamine-specific lectin as implied from the inhibitory effect of glucosamine on hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. The steps for isolation of the lectin involved Affi-gel blue gel (affinity gel), Mono Q (anion exchanger), and Superdex 75 column (size exclusion). The lectin was purified 20.8-fold from the crude extract of the beans. The purified lectin showed antiproliferative activity on breast cancer MCF7 cell line and nasopharyngeal cancer HONE1 and CNE2 cell lines, but a low activity on normal skin fibroblast HSF98 cell line. The lectin was shown to induce apoptosis on HONE1 cells, as indicated by increased phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization. It also blocked HONE1 cell division and kept the cells at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. PMID:26290674

  2. A Glucosamine-Specific Lectin from Green Dragon No. 8 Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Induced Apoptosis on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    A lectin exhibiting antiproliferative activity on tumor cell lines but devoid of antifungal activity has been purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Green Dragon no. 8 seeds. The lectin was a 60 kDa dimeric protein with two 30 kDa subunits. It was a glucosamine-specific lectin as implied from the inhibitory effect of glucosamine on hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. The steps for isolation of the lectin involved Affi-gel blue gel (affinity gel), Mono Q (anion exchanger), and Superdex 75 column (size exclusion). The lectin was purified 20.8-fold from the crude extract of the beans. The purified lectin showed antiproliferative activity on breast cancer MCF7 cell line and nasopharyngeal cancer HONE1 and CNE2 cell lines, but a low activity on normal skin fibroblast HSF98 cell line. The lectin was shown to induce apoptosis on HONE1 cells, as indicated by increased phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization. It also blocked HONE1 cell division and kept the cells at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle.

  3. Phenotype-associated lectin-binding profiles of normal and transformed blood cells: a comparative analysis of mannose- and galactose-binding lectins from plants and human serum/placenta.

    PubMed

    Mann, K K; André, S; Gabius, H J; Sharp, J G

    1994-10-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of normal and transformed blood cells are commonly characterized by plant lectins. To infer physiological significance of protein-carbohydrate interactions, mammalian lectins are obviously preferable as research tools. So far, human serum lectins have not been used to assess their binding to immunophenotyped human normal or transformed blood cells. Thus, our study combines two groups of lectins with different specificity from plant and human sources. Besides concanavalin A (ConA) we have isolated the mannose-binding protein and serum amyloid P component from human serum. Especially the mannose-binding protein is believed to play a role in host defence against bacteria and yeast cells with unknown impact on normal and tumor cells. These three lectins establish the first group. In addition to the immunomodulatory mistletoe lectin, whose binding can elicit enhanced cytokine secretion from mononuclear blood cells, we included the beta-galactoside-binding lectin (14 kDa) from human placenta in the second group. The initial series of measurements was undertaken using two-color flow cytometry to determine the phenotype-associated binding (based on cluster designation; CD) of the lectins to blood and bone marrow cells from normal donors and the cell line CEM (T-lymphoblastoid), KG1-A (primitive myeloid leukemia) and Croco II (B-lymphoblastoid). Heterogeneity was apparent for each lectin in the CD-defined cell populations. Significant differences in binding were noted between Viscum album agglutinin (VAA) and other lectins for CD4+ cells from blood and between mannose-binding protein (MBP) and VAA versus 14 kDa, ConA and serum amyloid P component (SAP) for CD19+ cells from bone marrow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Purification of the rice embryo lectin and its binding to nitrogen-fixing bacteria from the rhizosphere of rice.

    PubMed

    Tabary, F; Balandreau, J; Bourrillon, R

    1984-03-15

    A lectin was purified from rice embryos by aqueous acid extraction of crude embryo powder, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation, affinity chromatography on agarose p-aminophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine and gel-filtration on AcA 54. Its homogeneity was checked by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel-filtration and immunological methods. The hemagglutinating activity of the purified rice lectin was 0.02 micrograms/ml. This lectin labelled with [14C] acetic anhydride was shown to interact in vitro with different bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. The most efficient binding was obtained with Beijerinckia V.. The affinity constant Ka was (1.04 +/- 0.30) X 10(7) M-1 and each bacterium contained 1660 +/- 150 lectin receptor sites. In contrast, no interaction between bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of maize or E. coli K 12 and rice lectin was evidenced. PMID:6712642

  5. Structural and biological characterization of Nattectin, a new C-type lectin from the venomous fish Thalassophryne nattereri.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica; Magalhães, Geraldo Santana; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio de Loiola M; Le Ho, Paulo; Lima, Carla; Valente, Richard H; Moura-da-Silva, Ana Maria

    2011-06-01

    Lectins are glycan-binding receptors that recognize glycan epitopes on foreign pathogens and in the host systems. They can be involved in functions that include innate immunity, development, immune regulation and homeostasis. Several lectins have been purified and characterized from fish species. In this work, using cation-exchange chromatography, a galactose-specific lectin belonging to the family of C-type lectins was isolated from the venom of the Brazilian venomous fish Thalassophryne nattereri. Nattectin is a basic, non-glycosilated, 15 kDa monomeric protein. It exhibits hemagglutination activity that is independent of Ca(2+). We also demonstrated a lectin activity for Nattectin in the innate immune system, especially in neutrophil mobilization in mice, indicating that marine organisms are source of immunomodulator agents.

  6. Community-Based Network Study of Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions in Plant Lectins Using Glycan Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Adeel; Lee, Juyong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01

    Lectins play major roles in biological processes such as immune recognition and regulation, inflammatory responses, cytokine signaling, and cell adhesion. Recently, glycan microarrays have shown to play key roles in understanding glycobiology, allowing us to study the relationship between the specificities of glycan binding proteins and their natural ligands at the omics scale. However, one of the drawbacks in utilizing glycan microarray data is the lack of systematic analysis tools to extract information. In this work, we attempt to group various lectins and their interacting carbohydrates by using community-based analysis of a lectin-carbohydrate network. The network consists of 1119 nodes and 16769 edges and we have identified 3 lectins having large degrees of connectivity playing the roles of hubs. The community based network analysis provides an easy way to obtain a general picture of the lectin-glycan interaction and many statistically significant functional groups. PMID:24755681

  7. Boronic acid functionalized peptidyl synthetic lectins: Combinatorial library design, peptide sequencing, and selective glycoprotein recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bicker, Kevin L.; Sun, Jing; Lavigne, John J.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of cell membrane and secreted glycoproteins is a hallmark of various disease states, including cancer. The natural lectins currently used in the recognition of these glycoproteins are costly, difficult to produce, and unstable towards rigorous use. Herein we describe the design and synthesis of several boronic acid functionalized peptide-based synthetic lectin (SL) libraries, as well as the optimized methodology for obtaining peptide sequences of these SLs. SL libraries were subsequently used to identify SLs with as high as 5-fold selectivity for various glycoproteins. SLs will inevitably find a role in cancer diagnositics, given that they do not suffer from the drawbacks of natural lectins and that the combinatorial nature of these libraries allows for the identification of an SL for nearly any glycosylated biomolecule. PMID:21405093

  8. Structural characterization of coagulant Moringa oleifera Lectin and its effect on hemostatic parameters.

    PubMed

    Luz, Luciana de Andrade; Silva, Mariana Cristina Cabral; Ferreira, Rodrigo da Silva; Santana, Lucimeire Aparecida; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire Aparecida; Mentele, Reinhard; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Paiva, Patricia Maria Guedes; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso

    2013-07-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate recognition proteins. cMoL, a coagulant Moringa oleifera Lectin, was isolated from seeds of the plant. Structural studies revealed a heat-stable and pH resistant protein with 101 amino acids, 11.67 theoretical pI and 81% similarity with a M. oleifera flocculent protein. Secondary structure content was estimated as 46% α-helix, 12% β-sheets, 17% β-turns and 25% unordered structures belonging to the α/β tertiary structure class. cMoL significantly prolonged the time required for blood coagulation, activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT) and prothrombin times (PT), but was not so effective in prolonging aPTT in asialofetuin presence. cMoL acted as an anticoagulant protein on in vitro blood coagulation parameters and at least on aPTT, the lectin interacted through the carbohydrate recognition domain. PMID:23537800

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lectin from Dioclea rostrata Benth seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Delatorre, Plínio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Melo, Luciana Magalhães; Souza, Emmanuel Prata de; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias da; Benevides, Raquel G.; Oliveira, Taiana Maia de; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Bezerra, Maria Júlia Barbosa; Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva da; Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra da; Freire, Valder Nogueira; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2006-02-01

    D. rostrata lectin was crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222 and diffracted to 1.87 Å resolution. Lectins from the Diocleinae subtribe (Leguminosae) are highly similar proteins that promote various biological activities with distinctly differing potencies. The structural basis for this experimental data is not yet fully understood. Dioclea rostrata lectin was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion at 293 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.51, b = 88.22, c = 87.76 Å. Assuming the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be about 47.9%. A complete data set was collected at 1.87 Å resolution.

  10. Solid-phase assay of lectin activity using HRP-conjugated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Various enzyme-conjugated probes have been widely used for detection of specific interactions between biomolecules. In the case of glycan-protein interaction, horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated glycoproteins (HRP-GPs) are useful for the detection of carbohydrate-binding activity of plant and animal lectins. In this chapter, a typical solid-phase assay of the carbohydrate-binding activity of Sophora japonica agglutinin I, a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin, using HRP-conjugated asialofetuin is described. HRP-GPs are versatile tools for probing lectin activities in crude extracts, screening many samples at one time, and applicable not only for solid-phase binding assays but also samples which are dot- or Western-blotted onto the membrane. PMID:25117228

  11. Evaluation of Parkia pendula lectin mRNA differentially expressed in seedlings.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, M J B M; Santos, P B; Carvalho-Junior, L B; Stirling, J; Beltrão, E I C

    2014-05-01

    Parkia pendula (Willd.) Walp. (Fabaceae) is a neotropical species of the genus Parkia more abundantly distributed in Central to South America. From the seeds of P. pendula a glucose/mannose specific lectin (PpeL) was isolated that has been characterised and used as a biotechnological tool but until now this is the first manuscript to analyse P. pendula mRNA expression in seedlings. For this porpoise a Differential display reverse transcription polimerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of P. pendula lectin mRNAs in non-rooted seedlings. No bands were observed in the agarose gel, indicating the absence of mRNA of PpeL seedlings. our findings confirm that lectins mRNAs are differently regulated among species even if they are grouped in the same class. PMID:25166336

  12. Impedance-derived electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy for the evaluation of lectin-glycoprotein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriano; Carvalho, Fernanda C; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Bueno, Paulo R

    2014-12-15

    Characterization of lectin-carbohydrate binding using label-free methods such as impedance-derived electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy (ECS) is desirable to evaluate specific interactions, for example, ArtinM lectin and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) glycoprotein, used here as a model for protein-carbohydrate binding affinity. An electroactive molecular film comprising alkyl ferrocene as a redox probe and ArtinM as a carbohydrate receptive center to target HRP was successfully used to determine the binding affinity between ArtinM and HRP. The redox capacitance, a transducer signal associated with the alkyl ferrocene centers, was obtained by ECS and used in the Langmuir adsorption model to obtain the affinity constant (1.6±0.6)×10(8) L mol(-1). The results shown herein suggest the feasibility of ECS application for lectin glycoarray characterization. PMID:24994505

  13. Antifungal activity of Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin on genetically distinct Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici races.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira de; Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Silva, Márcia Vanusa da; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici races 1, 2, and 3 deteriorate tomato crops since they cause a vascular wilt. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with hemagglutinating and antifungal activities. This work reports that Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) inhibits F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 growth (61 %) more intensely than of races 1 (55 %) and 2 (45 %). The hemagglutinating activity of MvRL was inhibited by glycoprotein preparations from mycelia of races 1, 2, and 3, and these data indicate that lectin carbohydrate-binding sites recognized glycosylated molecules from races. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker system showed that race 3 is genetically distinct from races 1 and 2, and thus the highest sensitiveness of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 to MvRL may be due to molecular characteristics of this race. PMID:24142386

  14. [Effect of lectins from Azospirillum brasilense to peroxidase and oxalate oxidase activity regulation in wheat roots].

    PubMed

    Alen'kina, S A; Nikitina, V E

    2010-01-01

    Lectins were extracted from the surface of nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and from its mutant A. brasilense Sp7.2.3 defective in lectin activity. The ability oflectins to stimulate the rapid formation of hydrogen peroxide related to increase of oxalate oxidase and peroxidase activity in the roots of wheat seedlings has been demonstrated. The most rapid induced pathway of hydrogen peroxide formation in the roots of wheat seedlings was the oxalic acid oxidation by oxalate oxidase which is the effect oflectin in under 10 min in a concentration of 10 microg/ml. The obtained results show that lectins from Azospirillum are capable of inducing the adaptation processes in the roots of wheat seedlings.

  15. Lectin binding studies on a glycopolymer brush flow-through biosensor by localized surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Nguyen, Vu Hoa; Park, Hyunji; Schulte, Christine; Böker, Alexander; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Elling, Lothar

    2016-08-01

    A localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor in a flow-through configuration was applied for investigating kinetics of lectin binding to surface-grafted glycopolymer brushes. Polycarbonate filter membranes with pore sizes of 400 nm were coated with a 114-nm thick gold layer and used as substrate for surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of a glycomonomer. These grafted from glycopolymer brushes were further modified with two subsequent enzymatic reactions on the surface to yield an immobilized trisaccharide presenting brush. Specific binding of lectins including Clostridium difficile toxin A receptor domain to the glycopolymer brush surface could be investigated in a microfluidic setup with flow-through of the analytes and transmission surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Graphical abstract Glycopolymer brushes serve as high affinity ligands for lectin and toxin interactions in a sensitive, disposable flow-through LSPR biosensor. PMID:27277814

  16. The lectin-gold technique: an overview of applications to pathological problems.

    PubMed

    Versura, P; Maltarello, M C; Bonvicini, F; Laschi, R

    1989-06-01

    Lectins are proteins, mainly of vegetal origin, which recognize glycosidic residues with high specificity; for this property they have been used for many studies of molecular biology. The colloidal gold represents at present the most popular electron dense marker employed in immunocytochemistry, since it offers intrinsic and unique characteristics which are superior to those displayed by the other markers. The cytochemical method which utilizes the gold-labelled lectins takes advantages from both the two systems, in order to optimize the localization of the glycoconjugates. The present paper reviews both the technical aspects of the preparation of the lectin-gold complex and its application to some selected pathological problems. In particular, the papers concerning the eye and ear tissues, the urinary, reproductive, nervous and digestive systems and the blood cells are quoted.

  17. Pillar[5]arene-Based Glycoclusters: Synthesis and Multivalent Binding to Pathogenic Bacterial Lectins.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Kevin; Nierengarten, Iwona; Galanos, Nicolas; Gillon, Emilie; Holler, Michel; Imberty, Anne; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien; Vincent, Stéphane P; Nierengarten, Jean-François

    2016-02-24

    The synthesis of pillar[5]arene-based glycoclusters has been readily achieved by CuAAC conjugations of azido- and alkyne-functionalized precursors. The lectin binding properties of the resulting glycosylated multivalent ligands have been studied by at least two complementary techniques to provide a good understanding. Three lectins were selected from bacterial pathogens based on their potential therapeutic applications as anti-adhesives, namely LecA and LecB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and BambL from Burkholderia ambifaria. As a general trend, multivalency improved the binding to lectins and a higher affinity can be obtained by increasing to a certain limit the length of the spacer arm between the carbohydrate subunits and the central macrocyclic core.

  18. Impedance-derived electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy for the evaluation of lectin-glycoprotein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriano; Carvalho, Fernanda C; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Bueno, Paulo R

    2014-12-15

    Characterization of lectin-carbohydrate binding using label-free methods such as impedance-derived electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy (ECS) is desirable to evaluate specific interactions, for example, ArtinM lectin and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) glycoprotein, used here as a model for protein-carbohydrate binding affinity. An electroactive molecular film comprising alkyl ferrocene as a redox probe and ArtinM as a carbohydrate receptive center to target HRP was successfully used to determine the binding affinity between ArtinM and HRP. The redox capacitance, a transducer signal associated with the alkyl ferrocene centers, was obtained by ECS and used in the Langmuir adsorption model to obtain the affinity constant (1.6±0.6)×10(8) L mol(-1). The results shown herein suggest the feasibility of ECS application for lectin glycoarray characterization.

  19. [Production of lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds and its interaction with carbohydrates and glycoproteins].

    PubMed

    Aberman, L E; Petlychna, L I; Lutsyk, M D

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed to obtain lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds using an affinity chromatography on a sorbent prepared from the egg white. The minimum agglutination concentration of human erythrocytes is 80 ng/ml, the molecular weight of the preparation is about 39 kDa, it contains 1.8% of neutral hexoses and 3.1% of hexosamines. PAAG electrophoresis in the alkali system has revealed several molecular forms of lectin isolated by preparative electrophoresis, their properties are investigated. SDS-PAAG electrophoresis has revealed several types of polypeptide chains among which two chains (12 and 14 kDa) are predominant. Lectin possesses affinity to galactosides (not to free galactose) and N-acetylgalactosamine and interacts with O-glycans with high affinity. The preparation has mitogenic activity in optimal concentration 50 micrograms/ml.

  20. New GlcNAc/GalNAc-specific lectin from the ascidian Didemnum ternatanum.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Valentina; Chikalovets, Irina; Li, Wei; Kobelev, Stanislav; Kozyrevskaya, Svetlana; Bogdanovich, Raisa; Howard, Eric; Belogortseva, Natalia

    2005-05-25

    Previously we isolated GlcNAc-specific lectin (DTL) from the ascidian Didemnum ternatanum by affinity chromatography on cross-linked ovalbumin. Here we report the purification and characterization of new D-GlcNAc/D-GalNAc-specific lectin DTL-A from the same ascidian. This lectin was isolated from non-bound cross-linked ovalbumin fraction and further was purified by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B, affinity chromatography on GlcNAc-agarose and gel filtration on Superdex 200. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration of purified lectin on Sepharose CL-4B indicates that it exists as large aggregates in the native state. Investigations of the carbohydrate specificity of DTL-A by enzyme-linked lectin assay suggest the multi-specificity of this lectin. DTL-A binds BSM, asialo-BSM as well as heparin and dextran sulfate. The binding of DTL-A to BSM was inhibited by monosaccharides D-GlcNAc and D-GalNAc, their alpha- but not beta-anomers. Among polysaccharides and glycoconjugates, DTL-A binding to BSM was effectively inhibited by BSM, asialo-BSM, pronase-treated BSM and synthetic alpha-D-GalNAc-PAA. Fetuin and asialofetuin showed a much lower inhibitory potency, heparin and dextran sulfate were noninhibitory. On the other hand, DTL-A binding to heparin was effectively inhibited by dextran sulfate, fucoidan, whereas BSM showed insignificantly inhibitory effect. DTL-A binding to heparin was not inhibited by D-GlcNAc and D-GalNAc.

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  2. Isolation, cloning, and characterization of a novel phosphomannan-binding lectin from porcine serum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bruce Yong; Nakamura, Natsuko; Dlabac, Vladimir; Naito, Haruna; Yamaguchi, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Makiko; Nonaka, Motohiro; Ishiguro, Masaji; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Oka, Shogo; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2007-04-27

    Mannan-binding protein (MBP) is a C-type serum lectin that is an important constituent of the innate immune defense because it activates the complement system via the lectin pathway. While the pig has been proposed to be an attractive source of xenotransplantable tissues and organs, little is known about porcine MBP. In our previous studies, phosphomannan, but not mannan, was found to be an effective inhibitor of the C1q-independent bactericidal activity of newborn piglet serum against some rough strains of Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, the inhibitory activities of phosphomannan and mannan were very similar in the case of MBP-dependent bactericidal activity against rough strains of Escherichia coli K-12 and S-16. Based on these findings, we inferred that an MBP-like lectin with slightly or completely different carbohydrate binding specificity might exist in newborn piglet serum and be responsible for the C1q-independent bactericidal activity. Herein we report that a novel phosphomannan-binding lectin (PMBL) of 33 kDa under reducing conditions was isolated from both newborn and adult porcine serum and characterized. Porcine PMBL functionally activated the complement system via the lectin pathway triggered by binding with both phosphomannan (P-mannan) and mannan, which, unlike MBP, was effectively inhibited by mannose 6-phosphate- or galatose-containing oligosaccharides. Our observations suggest that porcine PMBL plays a critical role in the innate immune defense from the newborn stage to adult-hood, and the establishment of a newborn piglet experimental model for the innate immune system studies is a valuable step toward elucidation of the physiological function and molecular mechanism of lectin pathway. PMID:17324926

  3. Vimentin and desmin possess GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Sato, Takao; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Vimentin and desmin are intermediate filament proteins found in various mesenchymal and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. These proteins play an important role in the stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture. Here, we found, using artificial biomimicking glycopolymers, that vimentin and desmin possess N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectin-like properties on the cell surfaces of various vimentin- and desmin-expressing cells such as cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The rod II domain of these proteins was demonstrated to be localized to the cell surface and to directly bind to the artificial biomimicking GlcNAc-bearing polymer, by confocal laser microscopy and surface plasmon resonance analysis. These glycopolymers strongly interact with lectins and are useful tools for the analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions, since glycopolymers binding to lectins can induce the clustering of lectins due to multivalent glycoside ligand binding. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and pull-down assay with His-tagged vimentin-rod II domain protein showed that the vimentin-rod II domain interacts with O-GlcNAc proteins. These results suggest that O-GlcNAc proteins might be one candidate for physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands with which vimentin and desmin interact. These findings demonstrate a novel function of vimentin and desmin that does not involve stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture by which these proteins interact with physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands such as O-GlcNAc proteins on the cell surface through their GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties. PMID:20332081

  4. Activation of the lectin pathway of complement in experimental human keratitis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Brown, Karl D.; Kong, David C.M.; Daniell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) microbial keratitis (MK) is a sight-threatening disease. Previous animal studies have identified an important contribution of the complement system to the clearance of P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition receptor of the lectin pathway of complement, has been implicated in the host defense against P. aeruginosa. However, studies addressing the role of the lectin pathway in P. aeruginosa MK are lacking. Hence, we sought to determine the activity of the lectin pathway in human MK caused by P. aeruginosa. Methods Primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) from cadaveric donors were exposed to two different P. aeruginosa strains. Gene expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, MBL, and other complement proteins was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) and MBL synthesis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and intracellular flow cytometry. Results MBL gene expression was not detected in unchallenged HCECs. Exposure of HCECs to P. aeruginosa resulted in rapid induction of the transcriptional expression of MBL, IL-6, and IL-8. In addition, expression of several complement proteins of the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, were upregulated after 5 h of challenge, including MBL-associated serine protease 1. However, MBL protein secretion was not detectable 18 h after challenge with P. aeruginosa. Conclusions MK due to P. aeruginosa triggers activation of MBL and the lectin pathway of complement. However, the physiologic relevance of this finding is unclear, as corresponding MBL oligomer production was not observed. PMID:24426774

  5. Lectin histochemistry of the gastric mucosa in normal and Helicobacter pylori infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lueth, M; Sturegård, E; Sjunnesson, H; Wadström, T; Schumacher, U

    2005-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori attaches via lectins, carbohydrate binding proteins, to the carbohydrate residues of gastric mucins. Guinea-pigs are a suitable model for a H. pylori infection and thus the carbohydrate composition of normal and H. pylori infected gastric mucosa was investigated by lectin histochemistry. The stomach of all infected animals showed signs of an active chronic gastritis in their mucosa, whereas no inflammation was present in the control animals. The corpus-fundus regions of the controls showed heterogeneous WGA, SNA-I, UEA-I and HPA binding in almost all parts of the gastric glands. While these lectins labelled the superficial mucous cells and chief cells heterogeneously, the staining of the parietal cells was limited to WGA and PHA-L. Mucous neck cells reacted heterogeneously with UEA-I, HPA, WGA and PHA-L. In the antrum, the superficial mucous cells and glands were stained by WGA, UEA-I, HPA, SNA-I or PHA-L. WGA, UEA-I, SNA-I and HPA labelled the surface lining cells strongly. The mucoid glands reacted heterogeneously with WGA, UEA-I, HPA, SNA-I and PHA-L. In both regions, the H. pylori infected animals showed similar lectin binding pattern as the controls. No significant differences in the lectin binding pattern and thus in the carbohydrate composition between normal and H. pylori infected mucosa could be detected, hence H. pylori does not induce any changes in the glycosylation of the mucosa of the guinea-pig. This unaltered glycosylation is of particular relevance for the sialic acid binding lectin SNA-I as H. pylori uses sialic acid binding adhesin for its attachment to the mucosa. As sialic acid binding sites are already expressed in the normal mucosa H. pylori can immediately attach via its sialic acid binding adhesin to the mucosa making the guinea-pig particularly useful as a model organism.

  6. A novel core fucose-specific lectin from the mushroom Pholiota squarrosa.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Tateno, Hiroaki; Dohra, Hideo; Moriwaki, Kenta; Miyoshi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Jun; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2012-10-01

    Fucα1-6 oligosaccharide has a variety of biological functions and serves as a biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma because of the elevated presence of fucosylated α-fetoprotein (AFP) in this type of cancer. In this study we purified a novel Fucα1-6-specific lectin from the mushroom Pholiota squarrosa by ion-exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on thyroglobulin-agarose. The purified lectin was designated as PhoSL (P. squarrosa lectin). SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicate that PhoSL has a molecular mass of 4.5 kDa and consists of 40 amino acids (NH(2)-APVPVTKLVCDGDTYKCTAYLDFGDGRWVAQWDTNVFHTG-OH). Isoelectric focusing of the lectin showed bands near pI 4.0. The lectin activity was stable between pH 2.0 and 11.0 and at temperatures ranging from 0 to 100 °C for incubation times of 30 min. When PhoSL was investigated with frontal affinity chromatography using 132 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, it was found that the lectin binds only to core α1-6-fucosylated N-glycans and not to other types of fucosylated oligosaccharides, such as α1-2-, α1-3-, and α1-4-fucosylated glycans. Furthermore, PhoSL bound to α1-6-fucosylated AFP but not to non-fucosylated AFP. In addition, PhoSL was able to demonstrate the differential expression of α1-6 fucosylation between primary and metastatic colon cancer tissues. Thus, PhoSL will be a promising tool for analyzing the biological functions of α1-6 fucosylation and evaluating Fucα1-6 oligosaccharides as cancer biomarkers.

  7. Opposite effects on human colon cancer cell proliferation of two dietary Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Yu, L G; Milton, J D; Fernig, D G; Rhodes, J M

    2001-02-01

    Increased cell surface expression of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen, Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha-) is a common feature in malignant and pre-malignant epithelia. Our previous studies have shown that dietary TF-binding lectins from peanut (Arachis hypogea) and edible mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) produce marked but different effects on human intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. This study investigates the proliferative effects of the other two known dietary TF-binding lectins: jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia, JAC) and amaranth lectin (Amaranthus caudatus, ACA). JAC produced dose-dependent and non-cytotoxic inhibition of proliferation in HT29 human colon cancer cells with maximal effects of 46 +/- 4% at 20 microg/ml, whereas ACA produced dose-dependent stimulation of proliferation with maximal effects of 22 +/- 3% at 20 microg/ml when assessed both by incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and by cell counting. The lectin-mediated effects were inhibitable by the presence of appropriate Galbeta1-3GalNAc-expressing glycoproteins but differences existed between JAC and ACA in their patterns of inhibition by such substances. Ligand binding equilibrium studies using iodinated lectins revealed different Kd of the two lectins for HT29 cell surface glycoproteins. Lectin blots of cell membrane extracts showed different binding patterns in all the four TF-binding lectins. These results provide further evidence that dietary TF-binding lectins can have marked effects on the proliferation of human malignant gastro-intestinal epithelial cells and hence may play a role in intestinal cancer development, and also show that the biological effects of dietary lectins cannot be predicted solely from their carbohydrate binding properties.

  8. Differentiation of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci by lectins and plant agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Davidson, S K; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1982-04-01

    The screening of staphylococci with a panel of 14 lectins and extracts demonstrating lectin-like activity led to the development of a rapid agglutination slide test for the differentiation of certain coagulase-negative staphylococci and human strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The coagulase-negative staphylococci were agglutinated by agglutinins from Mangifera indica, Triticum vulgaris, and crude Limulus polyphemus. The test is rapid, requiring only 5 to 15 min to identify an unknown strain of staphylococci, as opposed to the 4 to 16 h required to perform the conventional tube coagulase test.

  9. Inactivation and fragmentation of lectin from Bothrops leucurus snake venom by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, E. S.; Souza, M. A. A.; Vaz, A. F. M.; Coelho, L. C. B. B.; Aguiar, J. S.; Silva, T. G.; Guarnieri, M. C.; Melo, A. M. M. A.; Oliva, M. L. V.; Correia, M. T. S.

    2012-04-01

    Gamma radiation alters the molecular structure of biomolecules and is able to mitigate the action of snake venoms and their isolated toxins. The effect of γ-radiation on the folding of Bothrops lecurus venom lectin was measured by a hemagglutinating assay, intrinsic and bis-ANS fluorescence. Intrinsic and bis-ANS fluorescence analyses indicated that irradiation caused unfolding followed by aggregation of the lectin. Our results suggest that irradiation can lead to significant changes in the protein structure, which may promote the loss of its binding property and toxic action.

  10. An insecticidal N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectin gene from Griffonia simplicifolia (Leguminosae).

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, K; Huesing, J E; Shade, R E; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M; Murdock, L L

    1996-01-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia II, an N-acetylglucosamine-specific legume lectin, has insecticidal activity when fed to the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). A cDNA clone encoding G. simplicifolia II was isolated from a leaf cDNA library, sequenced, and expressed in a bacterial expression system. The recombinant protein exhibited N-acetylglucosamine-binding and insecticidal activity against cowpea weevil, indicating that glycosylation and multimeric structure are not required for these properties. These results support the hypothesis that genes of the legume lectin gene family encode proteins that function in plant defense against herbivores. PMID:8587982

  11. Differentiation of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci by lectins and plant agglutinins.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, S K; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1982-01-01

    The screening of staphylococci with a panel of 14 lectins and extracts demonstrating lectin-like activity led to the development of a rapid agglutination slide test for the differentiation of certain coagulase-negative staphylococci and human strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The coagulase-negative staphylococci were agglutinated by agglutinins from Mangifera indica, Triticum vulgaris, and crude Limulus polyphemus. The test is rapid, requiring only 5 to 15 min to identify an unknown strain of staphylococci, as opposed to the 4 to 16 h required to perform the conventional tube coagulase test. PMID:7068834

  12. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of a mannose-binding lectin from champedak.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Isaacs, Neil W; Hashim, Onn Haji; Cogdell, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    Mannose-binding lectin from champedak (Artocarpus integer) is a homotetramer with a single-monomer molecular weight of 16 800 Da. Previous work has shown it to bind IgE and IgM, as well as being a mitogen of T cells in humans. Champedak mannose-binding lectin has successfully been used to detect altered glycosylation states of serum proteins. The protein was crystallized at 293 K in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 76.89, b = 86.22, c = 95.37 A) and the crystals diffracted to 2.0 A resolution.

  13. Preparative isolation of the lectin jacalin by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Simone, S G; Santos, R; Araujo, M F; Pinho, R T

    1994-12-30

    The lectin jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia was purified to homogeneity in a single step by preparative anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Selection of the optimum chromatographic parameters in gradient elution allowed a rapid procedure to be obtained for the qualitative and quantitative isolation of the most important alpha- and alpha'-jacalin components. A recovery of 27-33% was obtained from a total soluble extract using a polyacrylate-DEAE HPLC column. The identities of the two isolated polypeptides were established by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis and from the IgA1 binding lectin activity.

  14. Lectin-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection via soluble and transmembrane C-type lectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Brudner, Matthew; Karpel, Marshall; Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M Reza; Eisen, Damon P; Mungall, Bruce A; Kotton, Darrell N; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L; Ezekowitz, Alan B; Spear, Gregory T; Olinger, Gene G; Schmidt, Emmett V; Michelow, Ian C

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  15. Association Study of Mannose-Binding Lectin Levels and Genetic Variants in Lectin Pathway Proteins with Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Dean, Melinda M.; Baird, Paul N.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Daniell, Mark; Guymer, Robyn H.; Eisen, Damon P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the complement system is thought to be activated by chronic oxidative damage with genetic variants identified in the alternative pathway as susceptibility factors. However, the involvement of the lectin pathway of complement, a key mediator of oxidative damage, is controversial. This study investigated whether mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and genetic variants in lectin pathway proteins, are associated with the predisposition to and severity of AMD. Methods MBL levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 and the ficolin-2 (FCN2) gene were determined in 109 patients with AMD and 109 age- and sex-matched controls. Results MBL expression levels were equally distributed in both cases (early and late AMD) and controls (p>0.05). However, there was a trend towards higher median MBL levels in cases with late AMD compared to cases with early AMD (1.0 vs. 0.4 μg/ml, p = 0.09) and MBL deficiency (<0.5 μg/ml) was encountered less frequently in the late AMD group (35% vs 56%, p = 0.03). FCN2 and MBL2 allele frequencies were similarly distributed in early and late AMD cases compared with controls (p>0.05 for all analyses) as were MBL2 genotypes. Similarly, there was no significant difference in allele frequencies in any SNPs in either the MBL2 or FCN2 gene in cases with early vs. late AMD. Conclusions SNPs of lectin pathway proteins investigated in this study were not associated with AMD or AMD severity. However, MBL levels deserve further study in a larger cohort of early vs. late AMD patients to elucidate any real effect on AMD severity. PMID:26207622

  16. Affinophoresis of pea lectin and fava bean lectin with an anionic affinophore, bearing rho-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannoside as an affinity ligand.

    PubMed

    Shimura, K; Kasai, K

    1987-07-29

    Affinophoresis is an electrophoretic separation technique for biological polymers with the aid of an affinophore, which is a macromolecular polyelectrolyte bearing affinity ligands. The affinophore migrates rapidly in an electric field, and consequently the electrophoretic mobility of molecules having an affinity for the ligand is specifically changed. An anionic affinophore-bearing mannosyl residue was synthesized for the affinophoresis of lectins. rho-Aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and aminomethanesulphonic acid were coupled to about one-tenth and one-fifth, respectively, of the carboxyl groups of succinyl-poly-L-lysine with an average degree of polymerization of 120 by the use of a water-soluble carbodiimide. Extracts of seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) or fava bean (Vicia fava) were subjected to two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, in which the first dimension was ordinary agarose gel electrophoresis and the second dimension was affinophoresis with the affinophore. The separated proteins were stained with Coomassie Blue R250. The lectins in both seed extracts were separated from a diagonal line formed by other proteins in the extracts. About 10 ng of the separated pea lectin was detected on a nitrocellulose blot by immunostaining with a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated second antibody.

  17. Affinophoresis of pea lectin and fava bean lectin with an anionic affinophore, bearing rho-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannoside as an affinity ligand.

    PubMed

    Shimura, K; Kasai, K

    1987-07-29

    Affinophoresis is an electrophoretic separation technique for biological polymers with the aid of an affinophore, which is a macromolecular polyelectrolyte bearing affinity ligands. The affinophore migrates rapidly in an electric field, and consequently the electrophoretic mobility of molecules having an affinity for the ligand is specifically changed. An anionic affinophore-bearing mannosyl residue was synthesized for the affinophoresis of lectins. rho-Aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and aminomethanesulphonic acid were coupled to about one-tenth and one-fifth, respectively, of the carboxyl groups of succinyl-poly-L-lysine with an average degree of polymerization of 120 by the use of a water-soluble carbodiimide. Extracts of seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) or fava bean (Vicia fava) were subjected to two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, in which the first dimension was ordinary agarose gel electrophoresis and the second dimension was affinophoresis with the affinophore. The separated proteins were stained with Coomassie Blue R250. The lectins in both seed extracts were separated from a diagonal line formed by other proteins in the extracts. About 10 ng of the separated pea lectin was detected on a nitrocellulose blot by immunostaining with a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated second antibody. PMID:3667759

  18. In vitro and in vivo interaction of Entamoeba histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin with various target cells: an immunocytochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Judith; Shibayama, Mineko; Campos, Rafael; Beck, David L; Houpt, Erick; Petri, William A; Tsutsumi, Víctor

    2004-03-01

    The Gal/GalNAc lectin of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites plays an important role in adhesion. The distribution and final destiny of the lectin during the interaction with host cells are poorly understood. Using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the lectin we studied by immunocytochemistry the in vitro and in vivo interaction of E. histolytica trophozoites with human and hamster hepatocytes. We also analyzed the presence and distribution of the lectin in a mouse model of intestinal amoebiasis. In all cases, trophozoites were highly labeled by anti-lectin antibodies. Cultured human and hamster hepatocytes in contact with, or localized at the vicinity of parasites were also labeled by anti-lectin antibodies. Most of the labeled hepatocytes showed variable degrees of cell damage. Hepatocytes distantly localized from the parasites were also stained with the anti-lectin antibodies. Immunolabeling of tissue sections from different stages of the development of experimental amoebic liver abscess in hamsters showed inflammatory foci containing lectin-labeled trophozoites, hepatocytes, and sinusoidal and inflammatory cells. Lectin-containing hepatocytes had vacuolated cytoplasm with some nuclei with a condensed appearance. Damaged intestinal epithelium also was labeled with anti-lectin antibodies in a mouse model of intestinal amoebiasis. Electron microscopy of axenically cultured trophozoites using gold-labeled monoclonal and polyclonal anti-lectin antibody showed that plasma membrane, vacuole membranes and areas of cell cytosol were labeled. Higher deposits of gold particles in plasma membrane suggestive of cell secretion were observed. Our results demonstrated that Gal/GalNAc lectin was bound and captured by different target cells, and that host cells containing the lectin showed signs of cell damage. The contribution of lectin transfer to host cells in adherence and cell injury remains to be determined.

  19. Specific lectin biomarkers for isolation of human pluripotent stem cells identified through array-based glycomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Nakagawa, Masato; Garitaonandia, Ibon; Slavin, Ileana; Altun, Gulsah; Lacharite, Robert M; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Lynch, Candace L; Leonardo, Trevor R; Liu, Ying; Peterson, Suzanne E; Laurent, Louise C; Yamanaka, Shinya; Loring, Jeanne F

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and dependable methods for isolating human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) populations are urgently needed for quality control in basic research and in cell-based therapy applications. Using lectin arrays, we analyzed glycoproteins extracted from 26 hPSC samples and 22 differentiated cell samples, and identified a small group of lectins with distinctive binding signatures that were sufficient to distinguish hPSCs from a variety of non-pluripotent cell types. These specific biomarkers were shared by all the 12 human embryonic stem cell and the 14 human induced pluripotent stem cell samples examined, regardless of the laboratory of origin, the culture conditions, the somatic cell type reprogrammed, or the reprogramming method used. We demonstrated a practical application of specific lectin binding by detecting hPSCs within a differentiated cell population with lectin-mediated staining followed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, and by enriching and purging viable hPSCs from mixed cell populations using lectin-mediated cell separation. Global gene expression analysis showed pluripotency-associated differential expression of specific fucosyltransferases and sialyltransferases, which may underlie these differences in protein glycosylation and lectin binding. Taken together, our results show that protein glycosylation differs considerably between pluripotent and non-pluripotent cells, and demonstrate that lectins may be used as biomarkers to monitor pluripotency in stem cell populations and for removal of viable hPSCs from mixed cell populations. PMID:21894191

  20. Isolation of a galactose-binding lectin from the venom of the snake Bothrops godmani (Godmann's pit viper).

    PubMed

    Lomonte, B; Rojas, G; Gutiérrez, J M; Ramírez, G

    1990-01-01

    A galactose-binding lectin, isolated from the venom of B. godmani by affinity chromatography, is an acidic protein (pI 4.9) with a subunit mol. wt of about 14,000, occurring mostly as a disulfide-linked dimer of 28,000. A small proportion of lectin appears as a monomer and as a tetramer. The lectin agglutinates erythrocytes from mice, rabbit, cow and human (all ABO types, either Rh positive or negative), but does not agglutinate horse, sheep, goat and snake (Oxybelis aeneus, Colubridae) erythrocytes. The agglutinating activity is inhibited by 1 mM EDTA. The lectin is devoid of lethal, hemorrhagic, myotoxic, proteolytic and phospholipase A2 activities. It is not mitogenic for human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The only effect observed was a moderate induction of edema in the footpad of mice, with a minimal edema-forming dose of 22 micrograms. This effect developed rapidly, and was significantly inhibited by i.p. administration of cyproheptadine, a histamine and serotonin antagonist, before injection of the lectin. Despite the edema-forming activity observed, the low concentration of lectin in crude venom, together with its relatively low potency, suggest that this lectin is not a key component in the development of edema following envenomations by B. godmani.

  1. A Novel Bifunctional Hybrid with Marine Bacterium Alkaline Phosphatase and Far Eastern Holothurian Mannan-Binding Lectin Activities

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Kovalchuk, Svetlana; Bulgakov, Alexander; Likhatskaya, Galina; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP) and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ) was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25±5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens. PMID:25397876

  2. A calcium ion-dependent dimeric bean lectin with antiproliferative activity toward human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Leung, Ho Him; Pan, Wen Liang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a 60.8-kDa dimeric lectin was isolated from the Phaseolus vulgaris cv. jade bean and characterized. The lectin was bound on Blue Sepharose 6 and Q Sepharose and was finally purified by size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 200. Its hemagglutinating activity toward rabbit erythrocytes was dependent on divalent cations, especially calcium ions. Various carbohydrates tested were devoid of any effect on the hemagglutinating activity. The lectin was stable at pH between 4.5 and 9.4 and temperatures between 30 and 70 °C. It did not exert antifungal activity toward Valsa mali, Setosphaeria turcica, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, Fusarium oxysporum and Bipolaris maydis. The IC50 of the antiproliferative activity of the lectin toward MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was 174 μM. It did not inhibit proliferation of WRL-68 human normal embryonic hepatocytes. The lectin was dependent on calcium ions for hemagglutinating activity and possessed a blocked N-terminus. These two characteristics make the lectin unique among Phaseolus lectins.

  3. A calcium ion-dependent dimeric bean lectin with antiproliferative activity toward human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Leung, Ho Him; Pan, Wen Liang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a 60.8-kDa dimeric lectin was isolated from the Phaseolus vulgaris cv. jade bean and characterized. The lectin was bound on Blue Sepharose 6 and Q Sepharose and was finally purified by size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 200. Its hemagglutinating activity toward rabbit erythrocytes was dependent on divalent cations, especially calcium ions. Various carbohydrates tested were devoid of any effect on the hemagglutinating activity. The lectin was stable at pH between 4.5 and 9.4 and temperatures between 30 and 70 °C. It did not exert antifungal activity toward Valsa mali, Setosphaeria turcica, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, Fusarium oxysporum and Bipolaris maydis. The IC50 of the antiproliferative activity of the lectin toward MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was 174 μM. It did not inhibit proliferation of WRL-68 human normal embryonic hepatocytes. The lectin was dependent on calcium ions for hemagglutinating activity and possessed a blocked N-terminus. These two characteristics make the lectin unique among Phaseolus lectins. PMID:23475505

  4. A galactose-binding lectin isolated from Aplysia kurodai (sea hare) eggs inhibits streptolysin-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Watanabe, Miharu; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Suzuki, Jun; Dogasaki, Chikaku; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujii, Yuki; Iriko, Hideyuki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A specific galactose-binding lectin was shown to inhibit the hemolytic effect of streptolysin O (SLO), an exotoxin produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Commercially available lectins that recognize N-acetyllactosamine (ECA), T-antigen (PNA), and Tn-antigen (ABA) agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but had no effect on SLO-induced hemolysis. In contrast, SLO-induced hemolysis was inhibited by AKL, a lectin purified from sea hare (Aplysia kurodai) eggs that recognizes α-galactoside oligosaccharides. This inhibitory effect was blocked by the co-presence of d-galactose, which binds to AKL. A possible explanation for these findings is that cholesterol-enriched microdomains containing glycosphingolipids in the erythrocyte membrane become occupied by tightly stacked lectin molecules, blocking the interaction between cholesterol and SLO that would otherwise result in penetration of the membrane. Growth of S. pyogenes was inhibited by lectins from a marine invertebrate (AKL) and a mushroom (ABA), but was promoted by a plant lectin (ECA). Both these inhibitory and promoting effects were blocked by co-presence of galactose in the culture medium. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glycans and lectins in regulating mechanisms of toxicity, creation of pores in the target cell membrane, and bacterial growth. PMID:25197935

  5. Use of lectins to in situ visualize glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances in acidophilic archaeal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R Y; Neu, T R; Bellenberg, S; Kuhlicke, U; Sand, W; Vera, M

    2015-05-01

    Biofilm formation and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by meso- and thermoacidophilic metal-oxidizing archaea on relevant substrates have been studied to a limited extent. In order to investigate glycoconjugates, a major part of the EPS, during biofilm formation/bioleaching by archaea on pyrite, a screening with 75 commercially available lectins by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) has been performed. Three representative archaeal species, Ferroplasma acidiphilum DSM 28986, Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482(T) and a novel isolate Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 were used. In addition, Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur were studied. The results of FLBA indicate (i) 22 lectins bound to archaeal biofilms on pyrite and 21 lectins were binding to Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur; (ii) major binding patterns, e.g. tightly bound EPS and loosely bound EPS, were detected on both substrates; (iii) the three archaeal species produced various EPS glycoconjugates on pyrite surfaces. Additionally, the substratum induced different EPS glycoconjugates and biofilm structures of cells of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099. Our data provide new insights into interactions between acidophilic archaea on relevant surfaces and also indicate that FLBA is a valuable tool for in situ investigations on archaeal biofilms.

  6. Detection of sugar-lectin interactions by multivalent dendritic sugar functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, K. S.; Naresh, K.; Bagul, R. S.; Jayaraman, N.; Sood, A. K.

    2012-07-01

    We show that single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) decorated with sugar functionalized poly (propyl ether imine) (PETIM) dendrimer is a very sensitive platform to quantitatively detect carbohydrate recognizing proteins, namely, lectins. The changes in electrical conductivity of SWNT in field effect transistor device due to carbohydrate-protein interactions form the basis of present study. The mannose sugar attached PETIM dendrimers undergo charge-transfer interactions with the SWNTs. The changes in the conductance of the dendritic sugar functionalized SWNT after addition of lectins in varying concentrations were found to follow the Langmuir type isotherm, giving the concanavalin A (Con A)-mannose affinity constant to be 8.5 × 106 M-1. The increase in the device conductance observed after adding 10 nM of Con A is same as after adding 20 μM of a non-specific lectin peanut agglutinin, showing the high specificity of the Con A-mannose interactions. The specificity of sugar-lectin interactions was characterized further by observing significant shifts in Raman modes of the SWNTs.

  7. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  8. Crystallization and X-ray analysis of the salmon-egg lectin SEL24K

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Kenji; Fisher, Andrew J.; Hedrick, Jerry L.

    2007-05-01

    The 24 kDa egg lectin of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was purified by affinity chromatography from salmon eggs and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using 15/4 EO/OH (pentaerythritol ethoxylate) as a precipitant. The 24 kDa egg lectin of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is released from the egg during the cortical reaction. The lectin functions in blocking polyspermy during the fertilization process. The egg lectin was purified by affinity chromatography from salmon eggs and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using 15/4 EO/OH (pentaerythritol ethoxylate) as a precipitant. The crystal diffracted synchrotron-radiation X-rays to 1.63 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 73.6, c = 113.6 Å, α = 90, β = 92.82, γ = 90°. The crystal is likely to contain eight molecules in the asymmetric unit (V{sub M} = 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}), corresponding to a solvent content of 45.5%. A self-rotation function suggests an arrangement with 222 point symmetry within the asymmetric unit.

  9. The barley lectin carboxyl-terminal propeptide is a vacuolar protein sorting determinant in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, S Y; Raikhel, N V

    1991-01-01

    We have previously shown that the 15-amino acid carboxyl-terminal propeptide of probarley lectin is necessary for the proper sorting of this protein to the plant vacuole. A mutant form of the protein lacking the carboxyl-terminal propeptide is secreted. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal propeptide is the vacuole sorting determinant of probarley lectin, we examined in transgenic tobacco the processing and sorting of a series of fusion proteins containing the secreted protein, cucumber chitinase, and regions of probarley lectin. Pulse-labeling experiments demonstrated that the fusion proteins were properly translocated through the tobacco secretory system and that cucumber chitinase and cucumber chitinase fusion proteins lacking the carboxyl-terminal propeptide were secreted. The cucumber chitinase fusion protein containing the carboxyl-terminal propeptide was properly processed and sorted to the vacuole in transgenic tobacco as confirmed by organelle fractionation and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry. Therefore, the barley lectin carboxyl-terminal propeptide is both necessary and sufficient for protein sorting to the plant vacuole. PMID:1821765

  10. Structural analysis for glycolipid recognition by the C-type lectins Mincle and MCL

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Atsushi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Mori, Daiki; Toyonaga, Kenji; Okabe, Yuki; Toji, Aya; Kanda, Ryo; Miyake, Yasunobu; Ose, Toyoyuki; Yamasaki, Sho; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Mincle [macrophage inducible Ca2+-dependent (C-type) lectin; CLEC4E] and MCL (macrophage C-type lectin; CLEC4D) are receptors for the cord factor TDM (trehalose-6,6′-dimycolate), a unique glycolipid of mycobacterial cell-surface components, and activate immune cells to confer adjuvant activity. Although it is known that receptor–TDM interactions require both sugar and lipid moieties of TDM, the mechanisms of glycolipid recognition by Mincle and MCL remain unclear. We here report the crystal structures of Mincle, MCL, and the Mincle–citric acid complex. The structures revealed that these receptors are capable of interacting with sugar in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as observed in other C-type lectins. However, Mincle and MCL uniquely possess shallow hydrophobic regions found adjacent to their putative sugar binding sites, which reasonably locate for recognition of fatty acid moieties of glycolipids. Functional studies using mutant receptors as well as glycolipid ligands support this deduced binding mode. These results give insight into the molecular mechanism of glycolipid recognition through C-type lectin receptors, which may provide clues to rational design for effective adjuvants. PMID:24101491

  11. Lectin histochemistry of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3-infected muscle of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jaeyoun; Park, Changnam; Jang, Yeounghwan; Ahn, Meejung; Shin, Taekyun

    2016-01-01

    The localization of carbohydrate terminals in Kudoa septempunctata ST3-infected muscle of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was investigated using lectin histochemistry to determine the types of carbohydrate sugar residues expressed in Kudoa spores. Twenty-one lectins were examined, i.e., N-acetylglucosamine (s-WGA, WGA, DSL-II, DSL, LEL, STL), mannose (Con A, LCA, PSA), galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (RCA12, BSL-I, VVA, DBA, SBA, SJA, Jacalin, PNA, ECL), complex type N-glycans (PHA-E and PHA-L), and fucose (UEA-I). Spores encased by a plasmodial membrane were labeled for the majority of these lectins, with the exception of LCA, PSA, PNA, and PHA-L. Four lectins (RCA 120, BSL-I, DBA, and SJA) belonging to the galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine group, only labeled spores, but not the plasmodial membrane. This is the first confirmation that various sugar residues are present in spores and plasmodial membranes of K. septempunctata ST3. PMID:27169676

  12. Docking, synthesis, and NMR studies of mannosyl trisaccharide ligands for DC-SIGN lectin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Díaz, Irene; Nieto, Pedro M; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2008-08-01

    DC-SIGN, a lectin, which presents at the surface of immature dendritic cells, constitutes nowadays a promising target for the design of new antiviral drugs. This lectin recognizes highly glycosylated proteins present at the surface of several pathogens such as HIV, Ebola virus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, etc. Understanding the binding mode of this lectin is a topic of tremendous interest and will permit a rational design of new and more selective ligands. Here, we present computational and experimental tools to study the interaction of di- and trisaccharides with DC-SIGN. Docking analysis of complexes involving mannosyl di- and trisaccharides and the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN have been performed. Trisaccharides Manalpha1,2[Manalpha1,6]Man 1 and Manalpha1,3[Manalpha1,6]Man 2 were synthesized from an orthogonally protected mannose as a common intermediate. Using these ligands and the soluble extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN, NMR experiments based on STD and transfer-NOE were performed providing additional information. Conformational analysis of the mannosyl ligands in the free and bound states was done. These studies have demonstrated that terminal mannoses at positions 2 or 3 in the trisaccharides are the most important moiety and present the strongest contact with the binding site of the lectin. Multiple binding modes could be proposed and therefore should be considered in the design of new ligands. PMID:18633532

  13. Use of lectins to in situ visualize glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances in acidophilic archaeal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R Y; Neu, T R; Bellenberg, S; Kuhlicke, U; Sand, W; Vera, M

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by meso- and thermoacidophilic metal-oxidizing archaea on relevant substrates have been studied to a limited extent. In order to investigate glycoconjugates, a major part of the EPS, during biofilm formation/bioleaching by archaea on pyrite, a screening with 75 commercially available lectins by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) has been performed. Three representative archaeal species, Ferroplasma acidiphilum DSM 28986, Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482T and a novel isolate Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 were used. In addition, Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur were studied. The results of FLBA indicate (i) 22 lectins bound to archaeal biofilms on pyrite and 21 lectins were binding to Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur; (ii) major binding patterns, e.g. tightly bound EPS and loosely bound EPS, were detected on both substrates; (iii) the three archaeal species produced various EPS glycoconjugates on pyrite surfaces. Additionally, the substratum induced different EPS glycoconjugates and biofilm structures of cells of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099. Our data provide new insights into interactions between acidophilic archaea on relevant surfaces and also indicate that FLBA is a valuable tool for in situ investigations on archaeal biofilms. PMID:25488256

  14. Myeloid thrombomodulin lectin-like domain inhibits osteoclastogenesis and inflammatory bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Lai, Chao-Han; Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Jou, Yin-Bo; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Yang, Ai-Lun; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Ho, Mei-Ling; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is an essential process during bone metabolism which can also be promoted by inflammatory signals. Thrombomodulin (TM), a transmembrane glycoprotein, exerts anti-inflammatory activities such as neutralization of proinflammatory high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) through TM lectin-like domain. This study aimed to identify the role of myeloid TM (i.e., endogenous TM expression on the myeloid lineage) in osteoclastogenesis and inflammatory bone loss. Using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages, we observed that the protein levels of TM were dramatically reduced as these cells differentiated into osteoclasts. In addition, osteoclastogenesis and extracellular HMGB1 accumulation were enhanced in primary cultured monocytes from myeloid-specific TM-deficient mice (LysMcre/TMflox/flox) and from TM lectin-like domain deleted mice (TMLeD/LeD) compared with their respective controls. Micro-computerized tomography scans showed that ovariectomy-induced bone loss was more pronounced in TMLeD/LeD mice compared with controls. Finally, the inhibiting effects of recombinant TM lectin-like domain (rTMD1) on bone resorption in vitro, and bone loss in both the ovariectomized model and collagen antibody-induced arthritis model has been detected. These findings suggested that the myeloid TM lectin-like domain may inhibit osteoclastogenesis by reducing HMGB1 signaling, and rTMD1 may hold therapeutic potential for inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27311356

  15. Purification and characterization of three mitogenic lectins from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Kino, M; Yamaguchi, K; Umekawa, H; Funatsu, G

    1995-04-01

    Three mitogenic lectins, designated PL-A, PL-B, and PL-C, were purified from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) using Q-Sepharose column chromatography followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75, hydrophobic chromatography on Butyl-Toyopearl, and FPLC on a Mono-Q column. PL-A, PL-B, and PL-C are acidic proteins having isoelectric points of 4.35 and their apparent molecular masses were 22, 48, and 21 kDa by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, respectively. The three lectins have similar amino acid compositions rich in half-cystine and similar N-terminal sequences, indicating that they are homologous proteins. Identical sequences of N-terminal regions and six corresponding tryptic peptides in PL-A and PL-B suggested that PL-A may be an N-terminal half fragment of PL-B. Although all of three lectins have mitogenic activities, PL-B is a mitogenic lectin with the most potent hemagglutinating and mitogenic activities, and PL-C has almost no hemagglutinating activity.

  16. Lectin histochemistry of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3-infected muscle of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Kang, Jaeyoun; Park, Changnam; Jang, Yeounghwan; Ahn, Meejung; Shin, Taekyun

    2016-01-01

    The localization of carbohydrate terminals in Kudoa septempunctata ST3-infected muscle of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was investigated using lectin histochemistry to determine the types of carbohydrate sugar residues expressed in Kudoa spores. Twenty-one lectins were examined, i.e., N-acetylglucosamine (s-WGA, WGA, DSL-II, DSL, LEL, STL), mannose (Con A, LCA, PSA), galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (RCA12, BSL-I, VVA, DBA, SBA, SJA, Jacalin, PNA, ECL), complex type N-glycans (PHA-E and PHA-L), and fucose (UEA-I). Spores encased by a plasmodial membrane were labeled for the majority of these lectins, with the exception of LCA, PSA, PNA, and PHA-L. Four lectins (RCA 120, BSL-I, DBA, and SJA) belonging to the galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine group, only labeled spores, but not the plasmodial membrane. This is the first confirmation that various sugar residues are present in spores and plasmodial membranes of K. septempunctata ST3. PMID:27169676

  17. Effect of Moringa oleifera lectin on development and mortality of Aedes aegypti larvae.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Juliene S; Santos, Nataly D L; Napoleão, Thiago H; Gomes, Francis S; Ferreira, Rodrigo S; Zingali, Russolina B; Coelho, Luana C B B; Leite, Sônia P; Navarro, Daniela M A F; Paiva, Patrícia M G

    2009-11-01

    Aedes aegypti larvae have developed tolerance to many insecticides used for mosquito control. Moringa oleifera seeds contain a water-soluble lectin (WSMoL) and this paper reports the effect of M. oleifera seed extracts (MoE(1-15)) and WSMoL on development and survival of A. aegypti larvae. WSMoL peptide from in-gel trypsin digestion is also described. MoE(1-15) showed hemagglutinating activity and WSMoL had similarity with flocculating proteins from M. oleifera seeds. MoE(1) and MoE(3) delayed larval development which stopped in the third instar (L3) in MoE(6) and MoE(15). Significant (p<0.0001) larval mortality was only detected in MoE(15). Native WSMoL showed larvicidal activity (LC(50) 0.197 mg mL(-1)) and heated lectin, without hemagglutinating activity, did not kill fourth instar (L4) larvae. Optical microscopy showed that live L4 from MoE(1) presented underlying epithelium, increased gut lumen and hypertrophic segments; dead L4 from WSMoL were absent of underlying epithelium, had increased gut lumen and hypertrophic segments. The presence of hemagglutinating activity in the extracts suggests that soluble lectin promotes the delay of larval development and mortality; furthermore, the absence of larvicidal activity in heat-denatured WSMoL strengthens the involvement of lectin in this activity mechanism. PMID:19747711

  18. Enrichment and identification of glycoproteins in human saliva using lectin magnetic bead arrays.

    PubMed

    Caragata, Michael; Shah, Alok K; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hill, Michelle M; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-03-15

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and could provide diagnostic value in cancer detection. Human saliva is an ideal source of glycoproteins due to the relatively high proportion of glycosylated proteins in the salivary proteome. Moreover, saliva collection is noninvasive and technically straightforward, and the sample collection and storage is relatively easy. Although differential glycosylation of proteins can be indicative of disease states, identification of differential glycosylation from clinical samples is not trivial. To facilitate salivary glycoprotein biomarker discovery, we optimized a method for differential glycoprotein enrichment from human saliva based on lectin magnetic bead arrays (saLeMBA). Selected lectins from distinct reactivity groups were used in the saLeMBA platform to enrich salivary glycoproteins from healthy volunteer saliva. The technical reproducibility of saLeMBA was analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the glycosylated proteins enriched by each lectin. Our saLeMBA platform enabled robust glycoprotein enrichment in a glycoprotein- and lectin-specific manner consistent with known protein-specific glycan profiles. We demonstrated that saLeMBA is a reliable method to enrich and detect glycoproteins present in human saliva.

  19. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

  20. Importance of topology for glycocluster binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia ambifaria bacterial lectins.

    PubMed

    Ligeour, Caroline; Dupin, Lucie; Angeli, Anthony; Vergoten, Gérard; Vidal, Sébastien; Meyer, Albert; Souteyrand, Eliane; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Chevolot, Yann; Morvan, François

    2015-12-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Burkholderia ambifaria (BA) are two opportunistic Gram negative bacteria and major infectious agents involved in lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria can develop resistance to conventional antibiotherapies. An alternative strategy consists of targeting virulence factors in particular lectins with high affinity ligands such as multivalent glycoclusters. LecA (PA-IL) and LecB (PA-IIL) are two tetravalent lectins from PA that recognise galactose and fucose respectively. BambL lectin from BA is trimeric with 2 binding sites per monomer and is also specific for fucose. These three lectins are potential therapeutic targets in an anti-adhesive anti-bacterial approach. Herein, we report the synthesis of 18 oligonucleotide pentofuranose-centered or mannitol-centered glycoclusters leading to tri-, penta- or decavalent clusters with different topologies. The linker arm length between the core and the carbohydrate epitope was also varied leading to 9 galactoclusters targeting LecA and 9 fucoclusters targeting both LecB and BambL. Their dissociation constants (Kd) were determined using a DNA-based carbohydrate microarray technology. The trivalent xylo-centered galactocluster and the ribo-centered fucocluster exhibited the best affinity for LecA and LecB respectively while the mannitol-centered decafucocluster displayed the best affinity to BambL. These data demonstrated that the topology and nature of linkers were the predominant factors for achieving high affinity rather than valency.