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Sample records for dolomedes triton foil

  1. Trichobothrial mediation of an aquatic escape response: directional jumps by the fishing spider, Dolomedes triton, foil frog attacks.

    PubMed

    Suter, Robert B

    2003-01-01

    Fishing spiders (Pisauridae) frequent the surfaces of ponds and streams and thereby expose themselves to predation by a variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic vertebrates. To assess the possibility that the impressive jumps of fishing spiders from the water surface function in evading attacks by frogs, attacks by bullfrogs (Rana catesbiana) and green frogs (R. clamitans) on Dolomedes triton were studied. Both the attack dynamics of the frogs and the evasive behaviors of the spiders were recorded at 250 frames per second. A freeze-dried bullfrog, propelled toward spiders with acceleration, posture, and position that approximated the natural attack posture and dynamics, was used to assess the spiders' behavior. Qualitatively, the spiders responded to these mock-attacks just as they had to attacks by live frogs: jumping (N=29 jumps, 56.9% of instances), rearing the legs nearest the attacking frog (N=15, 29.4%), or showing no visible response (N=7, 13.7%). Spiders that jumped always did so away (in the vertical plane) from the attack (mean =137 degrees vs. vertical at 90 degrees or horizontally toward the frog at 0 degrees ). The involvement of the trichobothria (leg hairs sensitive to air movements), and the eyes as sensory mediators of the evasion response was assessed. Spiders with deactivated trichobothria were significantly impaired relative to intact and sham-deactivated spiders, and relative to spiders in total darkness. Thus, functional trichobothria, unlike the eyes, are both necessary and sufficient mediators of the evasion response. Measurements of air flow during frog attacks suggest that an exponential rise in flow velocity is the airborne signature of an attack. PMID:15841235

  2. Trichobothrial mediation of an aquatic escape response: Directional jumps by the fishing spider, Dolomedes triton, foil frog attacks

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Robert. B.

    2003-01-01

    Fishing spiders (Pisauridae) frequent the surfaces of ponds and streams and thereby expose themselves to predation by a variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic vertebrates. To assess the possibility that the impressive jumps of fishing spiders from the water surface function in evading attacks by frogs, attacks by bullfrogs (Rana catesbiana) and green frogs (R. clamitans) on Dolomedes triton were studied. Both the attack dynamics of the frogs and the evasive behaviors of the spiders were recorded at 250 frames per second. A freeze-dried bullfrog, propelled toward spiders with acceleration, posture, and position that approximated the natural attack posture and dynamics, was used to assess the spiders' behavior. Qualitatively, the spiders responded to these mock-attacks just as they had to attacks by live frogs: jumping (N=29 jumps, 56.9% of instances), rearing the legs nearest the attacking frog (N=15, 29.4%), or showing no visible response (N=7, 13.7%). Spiders that jumped always did so away (in the vertical plane) from the attack (mean =137° vs. vertical at 90° or horizontally toward the frog at 0°). The involvement of the trichobothria (leg hairs sensitive to air movements), and the eyes as sensory mediators of the evasion response was assessed. Spiders with deactivated trichobothria were significantly impaired relative to intact and sham-deactivated spiders, and relative to spiders in total darkness. Thus, functional trichobothria, unlike the eyes, are both necessary and sufficient mediators of the evasion response. Measurements of air flow during frog attacks suggest that an exponential rise in flow velocity is the airborne signature of an attack. Abbreviation: a acceleration (m s−2) fps frames per second HS high-speed video v velocity (m s−1) PMID:15841235

  3. Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo of Triton is one of a continuing series of 'observatory phase' images obtained by the Voyager spacecraft. Lines inscribed on the image at right form a reference grid used by the Imaging Science Team. The Voyager project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications.

  4. A Comparative Analysis of the Venom Gland Transcriptomes of the Fishing Spiders Dolomedes mizhoanus and Dolomedes sulfurous.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xunxun; Wang, Hengyun; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Zhaotun; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Dolomedes sulfurous and Dolomedes mizhoanus are predaceous arthropods catching and feeding on small fish. They live in the same area and have similar habits. Their venoms exhibit some similarities and differences in biochemical and electrophysiological properties. In the present work, we first performed a transcriptomic analysis by constructing the venom gland cDNA library of D. sulfurous and 127 novel putative toxin sequences were consequently identified, which were classified into eight families. This venom gland transcriptome was then compared with that of D. mizhoanus, which revealed that the putative toxins from both spider venoms might have originated from the same gene ancestors although novel toxins were evolved independently in the two spiders. The putative toxins from both spiders contain 6-12 cysteine residues forming seven cysteine patterns. As revealed by blast search, the two venoms are rich in neurotoxins targeting ion channels with pharmacological and therapeutic significance. This study provides insight into the venoms of two closely related species of spider, which will be of use for future investigations into the structure and function of their toxins.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of the Venom Gland Transcriptomes of the Fishing Spiders Dolomedes mizhoanus and Dolomedes sulfurous

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xunxun; Wang, Hengyun; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Zhaotun; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Dolomedes sulfurous and Dolomedes mizhoanus are predaceous arthropods catching and feeding on small fish. They live in the same area and have similar habits. Their venoms exhibit some similarities and differences in biochemical and electrophysiological properties. In the present work, we first performed a transcriptomic analysis by constructing the venom gland cDNA library of D. sulfurous and 127 novel putative toxin sequences were consequently identified, which were classified into eight families. This venom gland transcriptome was then compared with that of D. mizhoanus, which revealed that the putative toxins from both spider venoms might have originated from the same gene ancestors although novel toxins were evolved independently in the two spiders. The putative toxins from both spiders contain 6–12 cysteine residues forming seven cysteine patterns. As revealed by blast search, the two venoms are rich in neurotoxins targeting ion channels with pharmacological and therapeutic significance. This study provides insight into the venoms of two closely related species of spider, which will be of use for future investigations into the structure and function of their toxins. PMID:26445494

  6. A Comparative Analysis of the Venom Gland Transcriptomes of the Fishing Spiders Dolomedes mizhoanus and Dolomedes sulfurous.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xunxun; Wang, Hengyun; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Zhaotun; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Dolomedes sulfurous and Dolomedes mizhoanus are predaceous arthropods catching and feeding on small fish. They live in the same area and have similar habits. Their venoms exhibit some similarities and differences in biochemical and electrophysiological properties. In the present work, we first performed a transcriptomic analysis by constructing the venom gland cDNA library of D. sulfurous and 127 novel putative toxin sequences were consequently identified, which were classified into eight families. This venom gland transcriptome was then compared with that of D. mizhoanus, which revealed that the putative toxins from both spider venoms might have originated from the same gene ancestors although novel toxins were evolved independently in the two spiders. The putative toxins from both spiders contain 6-12 cysteine residues forming seven cysteine patterns. As revealed by blast search, the two venoms are rich in neurotoxins targeting ion channels with pharmacological and therapeutic significance. This study provides insight into the venoms of two closely related species of spider, which will be of use for future investigations into the structure and function of their toxins. PMID:26445494

  7. Triton mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This picture of Triton is a mosaic of the highest resolution images taken by Voyager 2 on Aug. 25, 1989 from a distance of about 40,000 kilometers (24,800 miles). The mosaic is superimposed on the lower resolution mapping images taken about 2 hours earlier in order to fill in gaps between high resolution images. The smallest features that can be seen on the images are about 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles) across. The terminator (line separating day and night) is at the top of the picture and is centered at about 30 degrees north latitude and 330 degrees longitude. These highest resolution images were targeted for the terminator region to show details of the topography by the shadows it casts. Near the center of the picture is a depression filled with smooth plains that are probably ices which were once erupted in a fluid state. The depth of the depression is about 300 meters (900 feet) and the prominent fresh impact crater on its floor is about 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter and about 1 kilometer (0.6 mile) deep. On the right is an elongate crater with adjacent dark deposits above it. This feature may be an explosive eruption vent formed by gaps within the ice. The linear structure on the left is probably a fracture along which fresh ice has been extruded. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  8. Aurora on Triton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. W.; Dessler, A. J.

    1989-07-01

    It is argued that the presence of an aurora on Triton implies the existence of an intrinsic field on this satellite. The highly conducting ionosphere predicted for Triton, coupled with Triton's 40 km/s velocity relative to the magnetospheric plasma, leads to a limiting current that produces an induced magnetosphere. This magnetosphere would deviate the flowing plasma and reduce the potential across Triton. If Triton were to have a weak intrinsic magnetic field, the current would be funneled into an auroral zone, producing a concentration of current that may trigger specific auroral acceleration processes such as double-layer formation.

  9. Foil Artists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2010-01-01

    Foil can be shaped into almost anything--it is the all-purpose material for children's art. Foil is a unique drawing surface. It reflects, distorts and plays with light and imagery as young artists draw over it. Foil permits quick impressions of a model or object to be sketched. Foil allows artists to track their drawing moves, seeing the action…

  10. A comparative study of the molecular composition and electrophysiological activity of the venoms from two fishing spiders Dolomedes mizhoanus and Dolomedes sulfurous.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiayan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Hengyun; Yu, Hai; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2014-06-01

    Dolomedes mizhoanus and Dolomedes sulfurous are two venomous spiders found in the same area in southern China and are characterized by living in water plants and feeding on fish. In this study, the chemical compositions and activities of these venoms were compared. Both venoms contain hundreds of peptides as shown by off-line RP-HPLC/MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, but have a different peptide distribution, with D. mizhoanus venom containing fewer high molecular mass (7000-9000 Da) peptides (3%) than D. sulfurous venom (25.6%). Patch-clamp analyses showed that both venoms inhibited voltage-activated Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) channels in rat DRG neurons, however, differences in their inhibitory effects were observed. In general, D. mizhoanus venom had lower inhibitory activity than D. sulfurous venom and both venoms had a different inhibitory spectrum against these ion channels, showing that both venoms are useful for identifying antagonists to them. In addition, intrathoracic injection of both venoms caused severe neurotoxic effects in zebrafish and death at higher concentrations, respectively. Considering that both spiders belong to the same genus, live in the same area and have similar habits, elucidation of the differences between the peptide toxins from both venoms would provide new molecular insights into the evolution of spider peptides.

  11. Tectonics on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-03-01

    Tectonic features on Triton have been mapped as part of a larger study of the geology of Triton. Few purely tectonic structures are found on Triton: some grabens and possibly some compressive ridges. However, most of the other structures seen (primarily cryovolcanic in origin) exhibit tectonic control. A regional tectonic network has the following dominant orientations: N-S, E-W, NE-SW, and NW-SE. Most of the orientations are consistent with tidal deformations related to Triton's decreasing orbital radius. Localized quasi-concentric patterns may be due to interior processes such as mantle plumes.

  12. Tectonics on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    Tectonic features on Triton have been mapped as part of a larger study of the geology of Triton. Few purely tectonic structures are found on Triton: some grabens and possibly some compressive ridges. However, most of the other structures seen (primarily cryovolcanic in origin) exhibit tectonic control. A regional tectonic network has the following dominant orientations: N-S, E-W, NE-SW, and NW-SE. Most of the orientations are consistent with tidal deformations related to Triton's decreasing orbital radius. Localized quasi-concentric patterns may be due to interior processes such as mantle plumes.

  13. Global Warming on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; McDonald, S. W.; Person, M. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Buie, M. W.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; McConnochie, T. H.

    1998-01-01

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, has been predicted to undergo significant seasonal changes that would reveal themselves as changes in its mean frost temperature. But whether this temperature should at the present time be increasing, decreasing or constant depends on a number of parameters (such as the thermal properties of the surface, and frost migration patterns) that are unknown. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Triton which, when combined with earlier results, show that Triton has undergone a period of global warming since 1989. Our most conservative estimates of the rate of temperature and surface-pressure increase during this period imply that the atmosphere is doubling in bulk every 10 years, significantly faster than predicted by any published frost model for Triton. Our result suggests that permanent polar caps on Triton play a c dominant role in regulating seasonal atmospheric changes. Similar processes should also be active on Pluto.

  14. Water Ice on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Roush, Ted L.; Owen, Tobias C.; Schmitt, Bernard; Quirico, Eric; Geballe, Thomas R.; deBergh, Catherine; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; DalleOre, Cristina M.; Doute, Sylvain

    1999-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic detection of H2O ice on Triton, evidenced by the broad absorptions in the near infrared at 1.55 and 2.04 micron. The detection on Triton confirms earlier preliminary studies (D. P. Cruikshank, R. H. Brown, and R. N. Clark, Icarus 58, 293-305, 1984). The spectra support the contention that H2O ice on Triton is in a crystalline (cubic or hexagonal) phase. Our spectra (1.87-2.5 micron) taken over an interval of nearly 3.5 years do not show any significant changes that might relate to reports of changes in Triton's spectral reflectance (B. Buratti, M. D. Hicks, and R. L. Newburn, Jr., Nature 397, 219, 1999), or in Triton's volatile inventory (J. L. Elliot et al., Nature 393, 765-767, 1998).

  15. Triton's distorted atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Elliot, J L; Stansberry, J A; Olkin, C B; Agner, M A; Davies, M E

    1997-10-17

    A stellar-occultation light curve for Triton shows asymmetry that can be understood if Triton's middle atmosphere is distorted from spherical symmetry. Although a globally oblate model can explain the data, the inferred atmospheric flattening is so large that it could be caused only by an unrealistic internal mass distribution or highly supersonic zonal winds. Cyclostrophic winds confined to a jet near Triton's northern or southern limbs (or both) could also be responsible for the details of the light curve, but such winds are required to be slightly supersonic. Hazes and clouds in the atmosphere are unlikely to have caused the asymmetry in the light curve.

  16. Triton: A hot potato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Brown, R. H.

    The effect of sunlight on the surface of Triton was studied. Widely disparate models of the active geysers observed during Voyager 2 flyby were proposed, with a solar energy source almost their only feature. Yet Triton derives more of its heat from internal sources (energy released by the radioactive decay) than any other icy satellite. The effect of this relatively large internal heat on the observable behavior of volatiles on Triton's surface is investigated. The following subject areas are covered: the Global Energy Budget; insulation polar caps; effect on frost stability; mantle convection; and cryovolcanism.

  17. Triton's Distorted Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Stansberry, J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Agner, M. A.; Davies, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    A stellar-occultation light curve for Triton shows asymmetry that can be understood if Triton's middle atmosphere is distorted from spherical symmetry. Although a globally oblate model can explain the data, the inferred atmospheric flattening is so large that it could be caused only by an unrealistic internal mass distribution or highly supersonic zonal winds. Cyclostrophic winds confined to a jet near Triton's northern or southern limbs (or both) could also be responsible for the details of the light curve, but such winds are required to be slightly supersonic. Hazes and clouds in the atmosphere are unlikely to have caused the asymmetry in the light curve.

  18. Triton: A hot potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Brown, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of sunlight on the surface of Triton was studied. Widely disparate models of the active geysers observed during Voyager 2 flyby were proposed, with a solar energy source almost their only feature. Yet Triton derives more of its heat from internal sources (energy released by the radioactive decay) than any other icy satellite. The effect of this relatively large internal heat on the observable behavior of volatiles on Triton's surface is investigated. The following subject areas are covered: the Global Energy Budget; insulation polar caps; effect on frost stability; mantle convection; and cryovolcanism.

  19. Triton - Voyager's finale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of the Neptunian satellite Triton by the Voyager 2 is described with interpretations of the object's nature and composition. The orbit, seasonal cycle, and southern-hemisphere solstice are described, and the composition of the satellite is discussed. Triton's mass and radius are known, and the objects is made up of about 70 percent rock and organics and 30 percent ice by mass. Triton's interior is warm and geologically active considering its distance from the sun, and large amounts of frozen methane and nitrogen are theorized to contribute to the object's high reflectivity. Also noted in the Voyager color images are creeping ice, cryogenic lava, and dark streaks on the south polar cap from nitrogen gas leaks driven by a type of greenhouse effect. Triton represents a class of satellite that has not been observed previously: a moon-sized body in a retrograde inclined orbit from the class of objects that coalesced to form Neptune.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of the venom gland transcriptome of the spider Dolomedes fimbriatus.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergey A; Lazarev, Vassili N; Kostryukova, Elena S; Selezneva, Oksana V; Ospanova, Elena A; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Govorun, Vadim M; Grishin, Eugene V

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive transcriptome analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) database of the spider Dolomedes fimbriatus venom glands using single-residue distribution analysis (SRDA) identified 7,169 unique sequences. Mature chains of 163 different toxin-like polypeptides were predicted on the basis of well-established methodology. The number of protein precursors of these polypeptides was appreciably numerous than the number of mature polypeptides. A total of 451 different polypeptide precursors, translated from 795 unique nucleotide sequences, were deduced. A homology search divided the 163 mature polypeptide sequences into 16 superfamilies and 19 singletons. The number of mature toxins in a superfamily ranged from 2 to 49, whereas the diversity of the original nucleotide sequences was greater (2-261 variants). We observed a predominance of inhibitor cysteine knot toxin-like polypeptides among the cysteine-containing structures in the analyzed transcriptome bank. Uncommon spatial folds were also found.

  1. Classroom Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pafford, William N.

    1970-01-01

    Aluminum foil, because of its characteristics, can be used for many elementary science activities: demonstrating Archimedes Principle, how to reduce cohesion, reflection and mirror effect, fuse action, condensation, friction, and as containers and barriers. (BR)

  2. Detail of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers (330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  3. Neptune's story. [Triton's orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Murray, N.; Longaretti, P. Y.; Banfield, D.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that Triton was captured from a heliocentric orbit as the result of a collision with what was then one of Neptune's regular satellites. The immediate post-capture orbit was highly eccentric. Dissipation due to tides raised by Neptune in Triton caused Triton's orbit to evolve to its present state in less than one billion years. For much of this time Triton was almost entirely molten. While its orbit was evolving, Triton cannibalized most of the regular satellites of Neptune and also perturbed Nereid, thus accounting for that satellite's highly eccentric and inclined orbit. The only regular satellites of Neptune that survived were those that formed well within 5 Neptune radii, and they move on inclined orbits as the result of chaotic perturbations forced by Triton.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of venom glands from a single fishing spider Dolomedes mizhoanus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Liu, Changjun; Duan, Zhigui; Deng, Meichun; Tang, Xing; Liang, Songping

    2013-10-01

    The spider venom is a large pharmacological repertoire composed of different types of bioactive peptide toxins. Despite the importance of spider toxins in capturing terrestrial prey and defending themselves against predators, we know little about the venom components from the spider acting on the fish. Here we constructed a cDNA library of a pair of venomous glands from a single fish-hunting spider Dolomedes mizhoanus. A total of 356 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from the venom gland cDNA library and analyzed. These transcripts were further classified into 45 clusters (19 contigs and 26 singletons), most of which encoded cystine knot toxins (CKTs) and non-CKTs. The ESTs coding for 53 novel CKT precursors were abundant transcripts in the venom glands of the spider D. mizhoanus, accounting for 76% of the total ESTs, the precursors of which were grouped into six families based on the sequence identity and the phylogenetic analysis. In addition, the non-CKTs deduced from 21% of the total ESTs were annotated by Gene Ontology terms and eukaryotic orthologous groups. Fifty-five CKT precursors deduced from 273 ESTs are the largest dataset for a single spider specimen to date. The results may contribute to discovering novel potential drug leads from spider venoms and a better understanding of the evolutionary relationship of the spider toxin.

  5. Triton's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This polar projection of Triton's southern hemisphere provides a view of the southern polar cap and bright equatorial fringe. The margin of the cap is scalloped and ranges in latitude from +10 degrees to -30 degrees. The bright fringe is closely associated with the cap's margin; from it, diffuse bright rays extend north-northeast for hundreds of kilometers. The bright fringe probably consists of very fresh nitrogen frost or snow, and the rays consist of bright-fringe materials that were redistributed by north-moving Coriolis-deflected winds.

  6. Triton 2 (1B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Michelle L.; Meiss, A. G.; Neher, Jason R.; Rudolph, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a detailed design analysis on a conceptually designed preliminary flight trainer. The Triton 2 (1B) must meet the current regulations in FAR Part 23. The detailed design process included the tasks of sizing load carrying members, pulleys, bolts, rivets, and fuselage skin for the safety cage, empennage, and control systems. In addition to the regulations in FAR Part 23, the detail design had to meet established minimums for environmental operating conditions and material corrosion resistance.

  7. Inversion of triton moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, R. B.; Levinger, J. S.

    1981-02-01

    We use the formalism of hyperspherical harmonics to calculate several moments for the triton photoeffect, for a Volkov spin-independent potential. First, we improve the accuracy of Maleki's calculations of the moments σ2 and σ3 by including more terms in the hyperspherical expansion. We also calculate moments σ0 and σ1 for a Serber mixture. We find reasonable agreement between our moments found by sum rules and those found from the cross sections calculated by Fang et al. and Levinger-Fitzgibbon. We then develop a technique of inversion of a finite number of moments by making the assumption that the cross section can be written as a sum of several Laguerre polynomials multiplied by a decreasing exponential. We test our inversion technique successfully on several model potentials. We then modify it and apply it to the five moments (σ-1 to σ3) for a force without exchange, and find fair agreement with Fang's values of the cross section. Finally, we apply the inversion technique to our three moments (σ-1,σ0,and σ1) for a Serber mixture, and find reasonable agreement with Gorbunov's measurements of the 3He photoeffect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Triton photoeffects, hyperspherical harmonics, moments of photoeffect, inversion of moments.

  8. Foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  9. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  10. Geomorphology of Triton's polar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    One of Triton's most debated puzzles is the nature, distribution, and transport of its atmospheric volatiles. The full potential of constraints provided by detailed observations of the morphology and distribution of the polar deposits has not been realized. The objective of this study is characterization of the morphology, distribution, stratigraphy, and geologic setting of Triton's polar materials.

  11. Montage of Neptune and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This computer generated montage shows Neptune as it would appear from a spacecraft approaching Triton, Neptune's largest moon at 2706 km (1683 mi) in diameter. The wind and sublimation eroded south polar cap of Triton is shown at the bottom of the Triton image, a cryovolcanic terrain at the upper right, and the enigmatic 'cantaloupe terrain' at the upper left. Triton's surface is mostly covered by nitrogen frost mixed with traces of condensed methane, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tenuous atmosphere of Triton, though only about one hundredth of one percent of Earth's atmospheric density at the surface, is thick enough to produce wind-deposited streaks of dark and bright materials of unknown composition in the south polar cap region. The southern polar cap was sublimating at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby, as indicated by the irregular and eroded appearance of the edge of the cap.

  12. Triton, Pluto and Charon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    On the eve of the Voyager encounter with Neptune and Triton, the knowledge of the surface and atmosphere of the satellite has made some progress. Methane, and perhaps molecular nitrogen, appears to dominate the surface and atmospheric chemistry. Sketchy evidence suggests changes in the disposition and state of the volatile materials on this body in the past few years, perhaps in response to the extreme seasons. Pluto and its satellite Charon are at last revealed in some detail, chiefly resulting from observations of the mutual transits and occultations of 1985-1990. A stellar occultation by Pluto in 1988 has given the first detailed information on the planet's atmosphere. The density of the Pluto-Charon system indicates a bulk composition consisting of silicates and water ice, suggesting formation directly from the solar nebula.

  13. Astrometric observations of triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, R. C.; Yan, Y. R.; Shen, K. X.; Dourneau, G.; Xi, X. J.; Cheng, X.; Wang, S. H.; Tang, Z. H.; Liu, J. R.

    2007-04-01

    Astrometric positions of the Neptunian Satellite Triton are given for the opposition of Neptune for the years 1996, 2003, 2005 and 2006. The 943 observed positions were obtained at the Cassegrain focus of a 156-cm reflector. In our reduction, the up-to-date catalogue of stars UCAC2 was chosen to ensure a proper astrometric calibration. Our observed positions are compared to theoretical positions provided from JPL and IMCCE ephemerides. The observed minus calculated residuals have s.d. values of the order of 0.04 arcsec. The data are available in electronic form as Supplementary Material to the online version of the paper on Blackwell Synergy, at the CDS via anonymous FTP to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html. E-mail: rcqiao@ntsc.ac.cn

  14. Foil Electron Multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Baldonado, Juan R.; Dors, Eric E.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Skoug, Ruth M.

    2006-03-28

    An apparatus for electron multiplication by transmission that is designed with at least one foil having a front side for receiving incident particles and a back side for transmitting secondary electrons that are produced from the incident particles transiting through the foil. The foil thickness enables the incident particles to travel through the foil and continue on to an anode or to a next foil in series with the first foil. The foil, or foils, and anode are contained within a supporting structure that is attached within an evacuated enclosure. An electrical power supply is connected to the foil, or foils, and the anode to provide an electrical field gradient effective to accelerate negatively charged incident particles and the generated secondary electrons through the foil, or foils, to the anode for collection.

  15. Montage of Neptune and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This computer generated montage shows Neptune as it would appear from a spacecraft approaching Triton, Neptune's largest moon at 2706 km (1683 mi) in diameter. The wind and sublimation-eroded south polar cap of Triton is shown at the bottom of the Triton image, a cryovolcanic terrain at the upper right, and the enigmatic 'cantaloupe terrain' at the upper left. Triton's surface is mostly covered by nitrogen frost mixed with traces of condensed methane, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tenuous atmosphere of Triton, though only about one-hundredth of one percent of Earth's atmospheric density at the surface, is thick enough to produce wind-deposited streaks of dark and bright materials of unknown composition in the south polar cap region. The southern polar cap was sublimating at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby, as indicated by the irregular and eroded appearance of the edge of the cap. The polar frosts were sublimating because Triton's orbital and rotational motion causes the sun to shine directly on the polar cap for a period of several decades during Neptune's and Triton's long austral summer. Though the polar cap was undergoing 'heat death', surface temperatures still were only about 38 K (-391 degrees Fahrenheit).

  16. Evolution of Triton's volatile budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1993-01-01

    Triton's volatile budget provides important links to planetary formation processes in the cold outer solar nebula. However, the budget has been modified by processes subsequent to the accretion of this body. It is of interest to assess whether certain formation environments can be ruled out for Triton on the basis of its current volatile abundances, and also to quantify some of the post-accretional processes by which the abundances have been modified.

  17. Foil changing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Crist, Charles E.; Ives, Harry C.; Leifeste, Gordon T.; Miller, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    A self-contained hermetically sealed foil changer for advancing a portion of foil web into a position normal to the path of a high energy particle beam. The path of the beam is defined generally by an aperture plate and cooperating axially movable barrel such that the barrel can be advanced toward the plate thereby positioning a portion of the foil across the beam path and sealing the foil between the barrel and the plate to form a membrane across said beam path. A spooling apparatus contained in the foil changer permits selectively advancing a fresh supply of foil across the beam path without breaking the foil changer seal.

  18. Photometric properties of Triton hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager imaging observations of Triton have been used to investigate the characteristics of the atmospheric hazes on Triton at three wavelengths: violet (0.41 micrometers), blue (0.48 micrometers), and green (0.56 micrometers). The globally averaged optical depth is wavelength dependent, varying from 0.034 in green to 0.063 in violet. These photometric results are dominated by the properties of localized discrete clouds rather than by those of the thinner, more widespread haze known to occur on Triton. The cloud particles are bright, with single-scattering albedos near unity at all three wavelengths, suggestive of a transparent icy condensate. The asymmetry parameter (+0.6) and the wavelength dependence of the optical depth both indicate cloud particles 0.2-0.4 micrometers in radius. The clouds are concentrated at 50-60 deg S latitude, where opacities up to three times the global average are observed. This is the same latitude region where most of the evidence for current surface activity is found, suggesting that the clouds may be related to the plumes or at least to some process connected with the sublimation of the south polar cap. The effects of possible temporal variations in the haze opacity are examined. Increases in the haze opacity tend to redden Triton. However, the degree of reddening is not sufficient to explain the full range of observed changed in Triton over the past decade; variations in the surface properties appear to be necessary.

  19. A control network of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Merton E.; Rogers, Patricia G.; Colvin, Tim R.

    1991-01-01

    A control network for Triton has been computed using a bundle-type analytical triangulation program. The network contains 105 points that were measured on 57 Voyager-2 pictures. The adjustment contained 1010 observation equations and 382 normal equations and resulted in a standard measurement error of 13.36 microns. The coordinates of the control points, the camera orientation angles at the times when the pictures were taken, and Triton's mean radius were determined. A separate statistical analysis confirmed Triton's radius to be 1352.6 + or - 2.4 km. Attempts to tie the control network around the satellite were unsuccessful because discontinuities exist in high-resolution coverage between 66 deg and 289 deg longitude, north of 38 deg latitude, and south of 78 deg latitude.

  20. Global Color Mosaic of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Global color mosaic of Triton, taken in 1989 by Voyager 2 during its flyby of the Neptune system. Color was synthesized by combining high- resolution images taken through orange, violet, and ultraviolet filters; these images were displayed as red, green, and blue images and combined to create this color version. With a radius of 1,350 (839 mi), about 22% smaller than Earth's moon, Triton is by far the largest satellite of Neptune. It is one of only three objects in the Solar System known to have a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere (the others are Earth and Saturn's giant moon, Titan). Triton has the coldest surface known anywhere in the Solar System (38 K, about -391 degrees Farenheit); it is so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost, making it the only satellite in the Solar System known to have a surface made mainly of nitrogen ice. The pinkish deposits constitute a vast south polar cap believed to contain methane ice, which would have reacted under sunlight to form pink or red compounds. The dark streaks overlying these pink ices are believed to be an icy and perhaps carbonaceous dust deposited from huge geyser-like plumes, some of which were found to be active during the Voyager 2 flyby. The bluish-green band visible in this image extends all the way around Triton near the equator; it may consist of relatively fresh nitrogen frost deposits. The greenish areas include what is called the cataloupe terrain, whose origin is unknown, and a set of 'cryovolcanic' landscapes apparently produced by icy-cold liquids (now frozen) erupted from Triton's interior.

  1. Global Color Mosaic of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Global color mosaic of Triton, taken in 1989 by Voyager 2 during its flyby of the Neptune system. Color was synthesized by combining high-resolution images taken through orange, violet, and ultraviolet filters; these images were displayed as red, green, and blue images and combined to create this color version. With a radius of 1,350 (839 mi), about 22% smaller than Earth's moon, Triton is by far the largest satellite of Neptune. It is one of only three objects in the Solar System known to have a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere (the others are Earth and Saturn's giant moon, Titan). Triton has the coldest surface known anywhere in the Solar System (38 K, about -391 degrees Fahrenheit); it is so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost, making it the only satellite in the Solar System known to have a surface made mainly of nitrogen ice. The pinkish deposits constitute a vast south polar cap believed to contain methane ice, which would have reacted under sunlight to form pink or red compounds. The dark streaks overlying these pink ices are believed to be an icy and perhaps carbonaceous dust deposited from huge geyser-like plumes, some of which were found to be active during the Voyager 2 flyby. The bluish-green band visible in this image extends all the way around Triton near the equator; it may consist of relatively fresh nitrogen frost deposits. The greenish areas includes what is called the cantaloupe terrain, whose origin is unknown, and a set of 'cryovolcanic' landscapes apparently produced by icy-cold liquids (now frozen) erupted from Triton's interior.

  2. Color and chemistry on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1990-01-01

    The surface of Triton is very bright but shows subtle yellow to peach hues which probably arise from the production of colored organic compounds from CH4 + N2 and other simple species. In order to investigate possible relationships between chemical processes and the observed surface distribution of chromophores, the surface units are classified according to color/albedo properties, the rates of production of organic chromophores by the action of ultraviolet light and high-energy charged particles is estimated, and rates, spectral properties, and expected seasonal redistribution processes are compared to suggest possible origins of the colors seen on Triton's surface.

  3. Additional calculations of triton moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lally, D. F.; Levinger, J. S.

    1982-02-01

    The formalism of hyperspherical harmonics is used to calculate several moments of the triton photoeffect for a Volkov potential with Serber exchange. The accuracy of Clare's calculations of moments σ0 and σ1 is improved by including more terms in the hyperspherical harmonic expansion of the potential and of the ground state wave function. The moment σ2=8.9×104 MeV3 mb is calculated using one term in the hyperspherical harmonic expansions of the potential and wave function. We invert four moments and find reasonable agreement with Gorbunov's measurements of the 3He photoeffect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Triton photoeffect, hyperspherical harmonics, moments of photoeffect, inversion of moments.

  4. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  5. 6Li foil thermal neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Favalli, Andrea; Chung, Kiwhan; Macarthur, Duncan W

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on the design of a multilayer thermal neutron detector based on {sup 6}Li reactive foil and thin film plastic scintillators. The {sup 6}Li foils have about twice the intrinsic efficiency of {sup 10}B films and about four times higher light output due to a unique combination of high energy of reaction particles, low self absorption, and low ionization density of tritons. The design configuration provides for double sided readout of the lithium foil resulting in a doubling of the efficiency relative to a classical reactive film detector and generating a pulse height distribution with a valley between neutron and gamma signals similar to {sup 3}He tubes. The tens of microns thickness of plastic scintillator limits the energy deposited by gamma rays, which provides the necessary neutron/gamma discrimination. We used MCNPX to model a multilayer Li foil detector design and compared it with the standard HLNCC-II (18 {sup 3}He tubes operated at 4 atm). The preliminary results of the {sup 6}Li configuration show higher efficiency and one third of the die-away time. These properties, combined with the very short dead time of the plastic scintillator, offer the potential of a very high performance detector.

  6. Triton College: One Institution's Search for Distinctiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.; Catanzaro, James L.

    1989-01-01

    Recounts Triton College's efforts to identify its distinctive elements. Reviews empirical evidence showing that Triton's school schedule, curricular offerings, and continuing education and support services are distinctive among local colleges. Discusses students' and staff members' perceptions of Triton. Considers the value of the research to the…

  7. Ices on the surface of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Owen, T. C.; Geballe, T. R.; de Bergh, C.; Schmitt, B.; Brown, R. H.; Bartholomew, M. J.

    1993-08-01

    The near-infrared spectrum of Triton reveals ices of nitrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, of which nitrogen is the dominant component. Carbon dioxide ice may be spatially segregated from the other more volatile ices, covering about 10 percent of Triton's surface. The absence of ices of other hydrocarbons and nitriles challenges existing models of methane and nitrogen photochemistry on Triton.

  8. Ices on the surface of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Roush, Ted L.; Owen, Tobias C.; Geballe, Thomas R.; De Bergh, Catherine; Schmitt, Bernard; Brown, Robert H.; Bartholomew, Mary J.

    1993-01-01

    The near-infrared spectrum of Triton reveals ices of nitrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, of which nitrogen is the dominant component. Carbon dioxide ice may be spatially segregated from the other more volatile ices, covering about 10 percent of Triton's surface. The absence of ices of other hydrocarbons and nitriles challenges existing models of methane and nitrogen photochemistry on Triton.

  9. Triton College, 1980-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    Focusing on the period from 1980 to 1982, this public information booklet reviews the accomplishments and innovative programs of Triton College. After an introduction by the college president summarizing these achievements, subsequent sections focus on: (1) training partnerships with business and industry, including cooperative agreements with the…

  10. The Humanities at Triton College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacot, Robert E.; Prendergast, Nancy E.

    Designed to assist college personnel in assessing program needs, this report provides an overview of the humanities programs at Triton College. Part I focuses on curricular humanities programs, including discussions of the role and objectives of the School of Arts and Sciences; humanities courses offered in the school; special humanities…

  11. Redesigning TRACER trial after TRITON.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L

    2015-10-15

    Designing of smart clinical trials is critical for regulatory approval and future drug utilization. Importantly, trial design should be reconsidered if the interim analyses suggest unexpected harm, or conflicting results were yielded from the other trials within the same therapeutic area. With regard to antiplatelet agents, the perfect example is redesigning of the ongoing PRoFESS trial by eliminating aspirin from clopidogrel arm after the earlier MATCH trial results became available. The goal was to aseess the unchanged TRACER trial design in light of the evidence yielded from the earlier completed TRITON trial. TRACER was designed as a triple versus dual antiplatelet trial in NSTEMI patients with no previous long-term outcome data supporting such aggressive strategy. TRITON data represented dual versus dual antiplatelet therapy, and became available before TRACER enrollment starts revealing prasugrel front-loaded early vascular benefit predominantly in STEMI patients with the growing over time bleeding and cancer risks. Moreover, large prasugrel NSTEMI TRITON cohort exhibited trend towards excess mortality in experimental arm warning against aggressive TRACER design. The long-term TRITON results in general, and especially in the NSTEMI patients challenge unchanged TRACER trial design. Applying dual, rather than triple antiplatelet therapy protocol modification should be considered in TRACER to minimize bleeding, cancer, and non-cardiovascular death risks. PMID:26126053

  12. Methane on Triton - Physical state and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Apt, J.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared spectrophotometric measurements of Neptune's satellite Triton obtained between 1980 and 1982 in the spectral range 0.8-2.5 microns show six individual absorption bands attributable to methane. An additional band in the Triton data is not methane. The Triton spectral data conform more closely to a laboratory spectrum of frozen methane than to a synthetic spectrum of methane gas computed for conditions of low temperature expected at the satellite. Additionally, the strength of the bands vary with Triton's orbital position. The data thus suggest that methane in the ice phase is mostly responsible for the bands in Triton's spectrum, and that the ice is distributed nonuniformly around the satellite's surface.

  13. Exploring Triton with multiple landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2005-01-01

    In our pathway for Outer Planetary Exploration several mission concepts were considered, based on the proposed JIMO mission architecture. This paper describes a JIMO follow-on mission concept to Neptunes largest moon. Triton is a target of interest for outer solar system studies. It has a highly inclined retrograde orbit, suggesting that it may have been a Kuiper Belt object captured by Neptune. Given this assumption its composition, which may include organic materials, would be of significant scientific interest.

  14. Flexible Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, Catherine; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José. Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    Hydrodynamic tunnel experiments with flexible flapping foils of 4:1 span-to-chord aspect ratio are used in the present work to study the effect of foil compliance in the dynamical features of a propulsive wake. The average thrust force produced by the foil is estimated from 2D PIV measurements and the regime transitions in the wake are characterized according to a flapping frequency-amplitude phase diagram as in Godoy-Diana et al. (Phys. Rev. E 77, 016308, 2008). We show that the thrust production regime occurs on a broader region of the parameter space for flexible foils, with propulsive forces up to 3 times greater than for the rigid case. We examine in detail the vortex generation at the trailing edge of the foils, and propose a mechanism to explain how foil deformation leads to an optimization of propulsion.

  15. Voyager imaging of Triton's clouds and hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rages, Kathy; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a detailed analysis of Voyager images of Triton obtained at the highest solar phase angles; these have been fit to Mie scattering models in order to obtain the mean particle sizes, number densities, and the vertical extent of the two different scattering components of the Triton atmosphere. The 0.001-0.01 optical depths of about 0.17 micron particles are vertically distributed with scale heights of about 10 km throughout Triton. A number of properties of the haze particles in question suggest that they are composed of photochemically produced gases which have condensed in the cold lower atmosphere of Triton.

  16. Search for glazed surfaces on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Helfenstein, Paul; Veverka, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The paper summarizes arguments leading to suggestions that Triton's icy surface may be unusual in texture, sith special attention given to the hypothesis of the existence of glazed areas on Triton. Results are presented of a search for an evidence of specular reflection diagnostic of 'glazed' icy surfaces on Triton, using high-resolution Voyager 2 images of three regions on Triton: the South Polar Cap Mottled Unit, the Bright Fringe, and the Frost Band. No such evidence was found in these three different terrains.

  17. Exploring Triton with Multiple Landers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, T. S.

    In our pathway for Outer Planetary Exploration several mission concepts were considered, based on the proposed Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission architecture. This paper describes a JIMO follow-on mission concept to Neptune's largest moon. Triton is a target of interest for outer solar system studies. It has a highly inclined retrograde orbit, suggesting that it may have been a Kuiper Belt object, captured by Neptune. Given this assumption, its composition, which may include organic materials, would be of significant scientific interest. The present concept considers a surface mission architecture with two landers, each powered by a standard multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG). The landers would operate on the surface for several years providing science data, thus expanding our understanding of the environment, the dynamic surface and atmospheric processes, and some of the seasonal variations. A JIMO class orbiter would provide telecommunication link between the landers and Earth, and would be instrumented to observe both Triton and Neptune. In this paper all key aspects of the mission architecture are addressed, including the science instruments, the main subsystems, trade options for the power system, and a conceptual design for the landers.

  18. Foil Face Seal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, John

    2009-01-01

    In the seal literature you can find many attempts by various researchers to adapt film riding seals to the gas turbine engine. None have been successful, potential distortion of the sealing faces is the primary reason. There is a film riding device that does accommodate distortion and is in service in aircraft applications, namely the foil bearing. More specifically a foil thrust bearing. These are not intended to be seals, and they do not accommodate large axial movement between shaft & static structure. By combining the 2 a unique type of face seal has been created. It functions like a normal face seal. The foil thrust bearing replaces the normal primary sealing surface. The compliance of the foil bearing allows the foils to track distortion of the mating seal ring. The foil seal has several perceived advantages over existing hydrodynamic designs, enumerated in the chart. Materials and design methodology needed for this application already exist. Also the load capacity requirements for the foil bearing are low since it only needs to support itself and overcome friction forces at the antirotation keys.

  19. Triton Blushes: A Clue to Global Warming?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Newburn, R. L., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The large Neptunian satellite Triton is a geologically active body that apparently undergoes complex seasonal changes in its 165 year journey around the sun. Because it is the vehicle for the seasonal transport of volatiles, Triton's atmosphere is expected to undergo large changes in temperature and pressure on a time scale of decades.

  20. The Plausibility of Boiling Geysers on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested and modeled whereby there may be boiling geysers on Triton. The geysers would be of nitrogen considering that Voyager detected cryovolcanic activity, that solid nitrogen conducts heat much less than water ice, and that there is internal heat on Triton.

  1. SNS Injection Foil Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Macek, Robert James; Raparia, Deepak; Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  2. Triton - Do we see to the surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Brown, R. H.; Giver, L. P.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1989-07-01

    The quantity and physical state of methane and nitrogen in the atmosphere of Neptune's satellite Triton and on the surface are evaluated by means of new telescopic data and laboratory measurements of these volatiles. Methane ice is seen in some spectral regions, indicating that the atmosphere is sufficiently transparent to permit sunlight penetration to the surface. Some of the molecular nitrogen absorption occurs in the atmosphere, though some must occur in condensed nitrogen (liquid or solid) on Triton's surface, or in a thin cloud of condensed nitrogen. The Voyager spacecraft cameras should see the surface of Triton.

  3. The density of triton: A prediction

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, W.B. ); Mueller, S. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors predict the density of Triton, as a function of radius, based on the assumptions that it was captured from solar orbit and thus has rock/ice ratio similar to that of the Pluto-Charon system. The best present estimates for Triton's radius are 1000-2000 km, and if the origin hypothesis is correct, its density should be greater than 2.0 g cm{sup {minus}3}, increasing slowly with radius. On the other hand, if Triton is an original regular satellite whose orbit has been perturbed, its density will be lower and more consistent with the derived rock fractions of other icy satellites.

  4. Comparison of Ridges on Triton and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Pappalardo, R. .

    2003-01-01

    Triton and Europa each display a variety of ridges and associated troughs. The resemblance of double ridges on these two satellites has been previously noted [R. Kirk, pers. comm.], but as yet, the similarities and differences between these feature types have not been examined in any detail. Triton s ridges, and Europa s, exhibit an evolutionary sequence ranging from isolated troughs, through doublet ridges, to complex ridge swaths [1, 2]. Comparison of ridges on Europa to those on Triton may provide insight into their formation on both satellites, and thereby have implications for the satellites' histories.

  5. Anomalous-scattering region on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Helfenstein, Paul; Veverka, Joseph; Mccarthy, Derek

    1992-01-01

    A photometric analysis of Voyager 2 images of a broad, 'anomalous scattering region' (ASR) on Triton shows its material to differ from the average Triton regolith in being only weakly backward scattering at all Voyager 2 camera wavelengths; the ASR also displays distinctive phase-dependent green/violet color ratios and clear-filter albedo. These characteristics are used to map the global distribution of the ASR areas for which photometric coverage is incomplete. The ASR may form an almost continuous band of material that runs parallel to the Triton equator, characterized by the presence of a transparent and optically thin, seasonally-controlled veneer of well-annealed solid N2.

  6. Physical Properties of Neptune and Triton Inferred from the Orbit of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The orbital motion of Triton was redetermined from photographic data spanning the interval 1899-1981. The resulting ephemeris should provide Triton positions with respect to Neptune with an accuracy of plus or minus 500 km through the end of the century. The following physical results follow from the orbit solution. The inverse mass of Neptune + Triton is solar mass over (c sub N + m sub T) = 19490 plus or minus 40. No acceleration of the mean motion nor orbital eccentricity were detected, thus constraining the tidal dissipation factors of Neptune and Triton to O sub N less than or equal to 650 and QT less than or equal to 10,000. Tidal heating of Triton is presently insignificant. The gravitational harmonic J sub 2 of Neptune is 0.0043 plus or minus 0.0003 if Triton is as massive as m sub T/ M sub N = 0.00128, and if Neptune's spin is prograde with P approximately 18(h), or J sub 2 = 0.0037 plus or minus 0.0002 if Triton is much less massive. Triton undergoes extreme climatic variations due to the combined motion of it's orbit plane and Neptune's orbital motion. Approximately 10% of Triton's surface is presently hidden from diurnal insolation, which may provide a powerful cold trap for atmospheric voltatiles.

  7. Volatile processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    A basic model for latitudinal transport of nitrogen is reviewed focusing on its limitations and some complications associated with surface and atmospheric physics. Data obtained by 1989 Voyager encounter with the Neptune system revealed the complexity in the pure nitrogen transport which is caused by the nonuniform albedo of the frosts. It is concluded that Triton is similar to Mars in terms of the complexity of volatile transport and to understand Triton's surface-atmosphere system, Mars may be a very good analog.

  8. A close-up view of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Miner, Ellis D.; Collins, Stewart A.

    1990-01-01

    Triton, the only large moon in the solar system with a retrograde motion, is investigated. The moon rotates about Neptune every 5.88 days and its annual cycle lasts 165 years. The orbit of Triton is 355,000 km from Neptune and it is inclined 23 deg relative to Neptune's equator. The precession of its orbital plane causes complications in its seasonal progression. Triton has a radius of 1353 km and a density of 2.07 gm/cu cm. Triton is believed to have a core of rock surrounded by water ice and a surface veneer of methane and nitrogen ice. The bright haze in its atmosphere could be small grains of particulates. Triton's surface features suggest that the moon should have remained molten until about 1 billion years ago. In order to explain the active geyser-like plumes observed near the subsolar latitude of about 50 deg south, various mechanisms are suggested including explosive escape of nitrogen gas, surface winds, and buoyancy of warmer gas. Voyager 2, which left Neptune and Triton in August 1989 and is now moving out of the solar system, is expected to provide the first glimpses of interstellar material.

  9. The impact cratering record on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Croft, Steven K.; Boyce, Joseph M.

    1990-10-01

    Impact craters on Triton are scarce owing to the relatively recent resurfacing by icy melts. The most heavily cratered surface has a crater density about the same as the lunar maria. The transition diameter from simple to complex craters occurs at a diameter of about 11 kilometers, and the depth-diameter relationship is similar to that of other icy satellites when gravity is taken into account. The crater size-frequency distribution has a differential -3 slope (cumulative -2 slope) and is the same as that for the fresh crater population on Miranda. The most heavily cratered region is on the leading hemisphere in Triton's orbit. Triton may have a leading-trailing asymmetry in its crater population. Based primarily on the similarity of size distributions on Triton and Miranda and the relatively young surface on Triton, the source of Triton's craters is probably comets. The very peculiar size distribution of sharp craters on the 'cantaloupe' terrain and other evidence suggests thay are volcanic explosion craters.

  10. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    DOEpatents

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  11. The Atmospheric Structure of Triton and Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research was to better determine the atmospheric structures of Triton and Pluto through further analysis of three occultation data sets obtained with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO.) As the research progressed, we concentrated our efforts on the Triton data, as this appeared to be the most fruitful. Three papers have been prepared as a result of this research. The first paper presents new results about Triton's atmospheric structure from the analysis of all ground-based stellar occultation data recorded to date, including one single-chord occultation recorded on 1993 July 10 and nine occultation lightcurves from the double-star event on 1995 August 14. These stellar occultation observations made both in the visible and in the infrared have good spatial coverage of Triton, including the first Triton central-flash observations, and are the first data to probe the altitude level 20-100 km on Triton. The small-planet lightcurve model of J. L. Elliot and L. A. Young was generalized to include stellar flux refracted by the far limb, and then fitted to the data. Values of the pressure, derived from separate immersion and emersion chords, show no significant trends with latitude, indicating that Triton's atmosphere is spherically symmetric at approximately 50 km altitude to within the error of the measurements; however, asymmetry observed in the central flash indicates the atmosphere is not homogenous at the lowest levels probed (approximately 20 km altitude). From the average of the 1995 occultation data, the equivalent isothermal temperature of the atmosphere is 47 plus or minus 1 K and the atmospheric pressure at 1400 km radius (approximately 50 km altitude) is 1.4 plus or minus 0.1 microbar. Both of these are not consistent with a model based on Voyager UVS and RSS observations in 1989. The atmospheric temperature from the occultation is 5 K colder than that predicted by the model and the observed pressure is a factor of 1.8 greater than the

  12. Triton burnup study in JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Nishitani, T.; Hoek, M.; Isobe, M.; Tobita, K.; Kusama, Y.; Harano, H.; Wurden, G.A.; Chrien, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    The behavior of 1 MeV tritons produced in the d(d,p)t reaction is important to predict the properties of D-T produced 3.5 MeV alphas because 1 MeV tritons and 3.5 MeV alphas have similar kinematic properties, such as Larmor radius and precession frequency. The confinement and slowing down of the fast tritons were investigated by measuring the 14 MeV and the 2.5 MeV neutron production rates. Here the time resolved triton burnup measurements have been performed using a new type 14 MeV neutron detector based on scintillating fibers, as part of a US-Japan tokamak collaboration. Loss of alpha particles due to toroidal ripple is one of the most important issues to be solved for a fusion reactor such as ITER. The authors investigated the toroidal ripple effect on the fast triton by analyzing the time history of the 14 MeV emission after NB turn-off.

  13. The Phase Composition of Triton's Polar Caps.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, N S; Brown, R H

    1993-08-01

    Triton's polar caps are modeled as permanent nitrogen deposits hundreds of meters thick. Complex temperature variations on Triton's surface induce reversible transitions between the cubic and hexagonal phases of solid nitrogen, often with two coexisting propagating transition fronts. Subsurface temperature distributions are calculated using a two-dimensional thermal model with phase changes. The phase changes fracture the upper nitrogen layer, increasing its reflectivity and thus offering an explanation for the surprisingly high southern polar cap albedo (approximately 0.8) seen during the Voyager 2 flyby. The model has other implications for the phase transition phenomena on Triton, such as a plausible mechanism for the origin of geyser-like plume vent areas and a mechanism of energy transport toward them.

  14. The phase composition of Triton's polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Triton's polar caps are modeled as permanent nitrogen deposits hundreds of meters thick. Complex temperature variations on Triton's surface induce reversible transitions between the cubic and hexagonal phases of solid nitrogen, often with two coexisting propagating transition fronts. Subsurface temperature distributions are calculated using a two-dimensional thermal model with phase changes. The phase changes fracture the upper nitrogen layer, increasing its reflectivity and thus offering an explanation for the surprisingly high southern polar cap albedo (approximately 0.8) seen during the Voyager 2 flyby. The model has other implications for the phase transition phenomena on Triton, such as a plausible mechanism for the origin of geyser-like plume vent areas and a mechanism of energy transport toward them.

  15. The Phase Composition of Triton's Polar Caps.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, N S; Brown, R H

    1993-08-01

    Triton's polar caps are modeled as permanent nitrogen deposits hundreds of meters thick. Complex temperature variations on Triton's surface induce reversible transitions between the cubic and hexagonal phases of solid nitrogen, often with two coexisting propagating transition fronts. Subsurface temperature distributions are calculated using a two-dimensional thermal model with phase changes. The phase changes fracture the upper nitrogen layer, increasing its reflectivity and thus offering an explanation for the surprisingly high southern polar cap albedo (approximately 0.8) seen during the Voyager 2 flyby. The model has other implications for the phase transition phenomena on Triton, such as a plausible mechanism for the origin of geyser-like plume vent areas and a mechanism of energy transport toward them. PMID:17757213

  16. Triton stellar occultation candidates - 1992-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A search for Triton stellar occultation candidates for the period 1992-1994 has been completed with CCD strip-scanning observations. The search reached an R magnitude of about 17.4 and found 129 candidates within 1.5 arcsec of Triton's ephemeris during this period. Of these events, around 30 occultations are expected to be visible from the earth, indicating that a number of Triton occultation events should be visible from major observatories. Even the faintest of the present candidate events could produce useful occultation data if observed with a large enough telescope. The present astrometric accuracy is inadequate to identify which of these appulse events will produce occultations on the earth; further astrometry is needed to refine the predictions for positive occultation identification. To aid in selecting candidates for additional astrometric and photometric studies, finder charts and earth-based visibility charts for each event are included.

  17. The phase composition of Triton's polar caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1993-08-01

    Triton's polar caps are modeled as permanent nitrogen deposits hundreds of meters thick. Complex temperature variations on Triton's surface induce reversible transitions between the cubic and hexagonal phases of solid nitrogen, often with two coexisting propagating transition fronts. Subsurface temperature distributions are calculated using a two-dimensional thermal model with phase changes. The phase changes fracture the upper nitrogen layer, increasing its reflectivity and thus offering an explanation for the surprisingly high southern polar cap albedo (approximately 0.8) seen during the Voyager 2 flyby. The model has other implications for the phase transition phenomena on Triton, such as a plausible mechanism for the origin of geyser-like plume vent areas and a mechanism of energy transport toward them.

  18. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-11-06

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80/sup 0/ C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V.

  19. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    SciTech Connect

    Goguen, J.D.; Hammel, H.B.; Brown, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however. 39 references.

  20. Triton Explorer - Neptune Orbiter Mission Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, T. S.; Shirley, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Triton is larger than the planet Pluto, and its highly inclined, retrograde orbit suggests that it may be a captured object that initially formed somewhere else in the solar system. Its composition (and its inventory of organic materials) is thus of considerable interest. Triton possesses an appreciable atmosphere, and its circulation, like that of Mars, is one of seasonal condensation flow between the southern and northern hemispheres. Although the surface pressure is only ~ 16 microbar, winds of 5-15 m / sec flow toward the equator from the sunlit hemisphere. Voyager 2 detected a number of plumes extending from the surface to approximately 8 km elevation within the atmosphere. Triton exhibits a variety of puzzling surface features; among these are structural features that suggest extensive faulting in the past, together with ice volcanism, and dark streaks that may be associated with the plumes. The Solar System Exploration Decadal Survey (NRC, 2003) lists a Neptune Orbiter / Triton Explorer as a "Deferred High-Priority Flight Mission" that may be considered for the second decade of this century. Likely science objectives for a Triton Lander mission would include a more complete characterization of the composition and circulation of the atmosphere; investigation of the physical processes responsible for plume formation; surface composition measurements; and geophysical monitoring, including seismological measurements that could potentially constrain the physics of plume eruptions. We describe here a conceptual dual-Lander mission to explore Triton's surface. Each of the two Landers would be powered by a standard multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG). These Landers could operate on the surface of Triton for several years. A companion Neptune Orbiter would provide telecommunication links between the Landers and the Earth, and would be instrumented to observe both Triton and Neptune. Although a Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) follow-on mission

  1. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansberry, John A.; Yelle, Roger V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1992-01-01

    A model encompassing the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport is presently used to investigate the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system of Triton. Under the assumption of a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, the atmospheric temperature 1 km above the surface is found to be 1-3 K hotter than the Triton surface. The observed N2 frosts must have an emissivity lower than unity in order to match a frost temperature at the surface of about 38 K.

  2. A massive early atmosphere on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Nolan, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of an early greenhouse atmosphere for Triton is presented and the conditions under which it may have been sustained are quantified. The volatile content of primordial Triton is modeled, and tidal heating rates are assessed to set bounds on the available energy. The atmospheric model formalism is presented, and it is shown how a massive atmosphere could have been raised by modest tidal heating fluxes. The implications of the model atmospheres for the atmospheric escape rates, the chemical evolution, and the cratering record are addressed.

  3. Role of Internal Heat Source for Eruptive Plumes on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time the role of the internal heat source, due to radioactive decay in Triton's core, is investigate with respect to geyser-like plumes...A new mechanism of energy supply to the Tritonian eruptive plumes is proposed...We present the critical values of these parameters for Triton. A possible origin of the subsurface vents on Triton is also suggested.

  4. Restaurant Training Recipe At Triton College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quagliano, Joseph

    1974-01-01

    The successful restaurant training program at Triton College (Illinois) involves a broadly based, two-year curriculum offering practical training in nearly all the areas associated with a comprehensive food operation--management, food preparation, menu planning, nutrition, personnel vending, dining room service, and cost control. (Author/EA)

  5. Triton College Faculty Recruitment Action Plan (FRAP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    Triton College's (Illinois) Faculty Recruitment Action Plan (FRAP) provides a detailed guide to hiring new faculty, focusing on the desired characteristics of new faculty; marketing and recruitment strategies; employment incentives; the application, interviewing, and selection process; new faculty orientation; a timeline for implementation; cost…

  6. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stansberry, J.A.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I.; McEwen, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    We explore the energetics of Triton's surface-atmosphere system using a model that includes the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport. The model relies on a 1?? by 1?? resolution hemispheric bolometric albedo map of Triton for determining the atmospheric temperature, the N2 frost emissivity, and the temperatures of unfrosted portions of the surface consistent with a frost temperature of ???38 K. For a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, we find that the atmospheric temperature roughly 1 km above the surface is approximately 1 to 3 K hotter than the surface. Atmospheric temperatures of 48 K suggested by early analysis of radio occultation data cannot be obtained for plausible values of the heat transfer coefficients. Our calculations indicate that Triton's N2 frosts must have an emissivity well below unity in order to have a temperature of ???38 K, consistent with previous results. We also find that convection over small hot spots does not significantly cool them off, so they may be able to act as continous sources of buoyancy for convective plumes, but have not explored whether the convection is vigorous enough to entrain particulate matter thereby forming a dust devil. Our elevated atmospheric temperatures make geyser driven plumes with initial upward velocities ???10 m s-1 stagnate in the lower atmosphere. These "wimpy" plumes provide a possible explanation for Triton's "wind streaks.". ?? 1992.

  7. Triton's eruptions analogous to Comet Halley's?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Max K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    1992-11-01

    It is hypothesized that Triton's geysers are analogous to the remnant activity of Comet Halley, whose outbursts producing a particulate coma are persisting out beyond 12 AU Halley's outbursts are understood as resulting from inward freezing of a subsurface lake or sea that's maintained at greater than 10 m depth via metabolic energy release. Cracking of the ice due to thermal expansion forces generates sporadic emissions of H2O and other gases. Analogous activity on Triton is a manifestation of internal freezing of an interior sea under a km or so of ice. This sea at the present epoch is quite separate from the interior liquid ocean, expected to be maintained at greater than 100 km deep by radiogenic heating. The near-surface sea is maintained also by chemical or metabolic energy and sporadically emits gases and condensates through cracks induced during its freezing. Emissions through the ice cover on both comets and Triton would drive surface geology, thus enabling access to new nutrients and trace elements that may be vital for subterranean biology. Triton's biology would be a relic from its tidal heating phase, when the interior was liquid below a 1-2 km frozen lithosphere.

  8. Triton College Marketing Plan '85-'86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonte, Richard, Ed.; Leach, Ernie, Ed.

    Prepared in response to shifts in the student body make-up and demographic changes in the school district, this report provides an in-depth analysis of environmental conditions faced by Triton College (Illinois) and presents a specific marketing plan developed in response to the identified trends. The first sections of the report focus on trends…

  9. A Search for Hemispheric Asymmetry on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, C. M.; Storrs, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We will present reconstructed images of Neptune's largest satellite Triton as part of an investigation of hemispheric asymmetry. The images we observed from the Hubble Space Telescope in July of 1997, using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera. The images were taken in several filters: F439W, F555W, and F791W. Image restoration was performed using the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003). We present the ratio between the filters to determine if there is any hemispheric color asymmetry at this time. The photometry of Triton appears normal in this data although Hicks and Buratti (2004) observe Triton to be anomalously red in August of 1997. References: Hicks, M.D., and Buratti, B.J. (2004): "The Spectral Variability of Triton from 1997-2000", Icarus 171 pp. 210-218 Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. "MISTRAL: a Myopic Edge-Preserving Image Restoration Method. Applicaton to Astronomical Adaptive Optics Corrected Long-Exposure Images." JOSA A (submitted)

  10. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to

  11. Stellar Occultation Probe of Triton's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this research were (i) to better characterize Triton's atmospheric structure by probing a region not well investigated by Voyager and (ii) to begin acquiring baseline data for an investigation of the time evolution of the atmosphere which will set limits on the thermal conductivity of the surface and the total mass of N2 in the atmosphere. Our approach was to use observations (with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory) of a stellar occultation by Triton that was predicted to occur on 1993 July 10. As described in the attached reprint, we achieved these objectives through observation of this occultation and a subsequent one with the KAO in 1995. We found new results about Triton's atmospheric structure from the analysis of the two occultations observed with the KAO and ground-based data. These stellar occultation observations made both in the visible and infrared, have good spatial coverage of Triton including the first Triton central-flash observations, and are the first data to probe the 20-100 km altitude level on Triton. The small-planet light curve model of Elliot and Young (AJ 103, 991-1015) was generalized to include stellar flux refracted by the far limb, and then fitted to the data. Values of the pressure, derived from separate immersion and emersion chords, show no significant trends with latitude indicating that Triton's atmosphere is spherically symmetric at approximately 50 km altitude to within the error of the measurements. However, asymmetry observed in the central flash indicates the atmosphere is not homogeneous at the lowest levels probed (approximately 20 km altitude). From the average of the 1995 occultation data, the equivalent-isothermal temperature of the atmosphere is 47 +/- 1 K and the atmospheric pressure at 1400 km radius (approximately 50 km altitude) is 1.4 +/- 0.1 microbar. Both of these are not consistent with a model based on Voyager UVS and RSS observations in 1989 (Strobel et al, Icarus 120, 266-289). The atmospheric

  12. Solar control of the upper atmosphere of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, James R.; Yung, Yuk L.; Allen, Mark

    1992-01-01

    If the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Triton are controlled by precipitation of electrons from Neptune's magnetosphere as previously proposed, Triton could have the only ionosphere in the solar system not controlled by solar radiation. However, a new model of Triton's atmosphere, in which only solar radiation is present, predicts a large column of carbon atoms. With an assumed, but reasonable, rate of charge transfer between N2(+) and C, a peak C(+) abundance results that is close to the peak electron densities measured by Voyager in Triton's ionosphere. These results suggest that Triton's upper atmospheric chemistry may thus be solar-controlled. Measurement of key reaction rate constants, currently unknown or highly uncertain at Triton's low temperatures, would help to clarify the chemical and physical processes occurring in Triton's atmosphere.

  13. The venom of the fishing spider Dolomedes sulfurous contains various neurotoxins acting on voltage-activated ion channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengyun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Dan; Xu, Shiyan; He, Juan; Yu, Hai; Li, Jiayan; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2013-04-01

    Dolomedes sulfurous is a venomous spider distributed in the south of China and characterized with feeding on fish. The venom exhibits great diversity and contains hundreds of peptides as revealed by off-line RP-HPLC/MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The venom peptides followed a triple-modal distribution, with 40.7% of peptides falling in the mass range of 1000-3000 Da, 25.6% peptides in the 7000-9000 Da range and 23.5% peptides in the 3000-5000 Da range. This distribution modal is rather different from these of peptides from other spider venoms analyzed. The venom could inhibit voltage-activated Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) channels in rat DRG neurons as revealed by voltage-clamp analysis. Significantly, the venom exhibited inhibitory effects on TTX-R Na(+) and T-type Ca(2+) currents, suggesting that there exist both channel antagonists which might be valuable tools for investigation of both channels and drug development. Additionally, intrathoracically injection of venom could cause serve neurotoxic effects on zebrafish and death at higher concentrations. The LD50 value was calculated to be 28.8 μg/g body weight. Our results indicated that the venom of D. sulfurous contain diverse neurotoxins which serve to capture prey. Intensive studies will be necessary to investigate the structures and functions of specific peptides of the venom in the future.

  14. Foil radiometer accessory improves measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, P. E.

    1967-01-01

    The responsiveness of a foil radiometer is increased and its time constant is simultaneously decreased by isolating the foil in a controlled environment. Using an optical system, it is coupled to the media to be measured, and the resulting concentration of energy permits the thermocouple junction temperature to respond quickly.

  15. Rhenium-Foil Witness Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Cylindrical portion of wall of combustion chamber replaced with rhenium foil mounted on holder. Rhenium oxidizes without melting, indicating regions of excess oxidizer in combustion-chamber flow. Rhenium witness foils also useful in detecting excess oxygen and other oxidizers at temperatures between 2,000 and 3,600 degrees F in burner cores of advanced gas-turbine engines.

  16. Consequences of FOIL for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koban, Lori; Sisneros-Thiry, Simone

    2015-01-01

    FOIL is a well-known mnemonic that is used to find the product of two binomials. We conduct a large sample (n = 252) observational study of first-year college students and show that while the FOIL procedure leads to the accurate expansion of the product of two binomials for most students who apply it, only half of these students exhibit conceptual…

  17. Ultraviolet spectrometer observations of neptune and triton.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, A L; Atreya, S K; Bertaux, J L; Blamont, J E; Dessler, A J; Donahue, T M; Forrester, W T; Hall, D T; Herbert, F; Holberg, J B; Hunter, D M; Krasnopolsky, V A; Linick, S; Lunine, J I; McConnell, J C; Moos, H W; Sandel, B R; Schneider, N M; Shemansky, D E; Smith, G R; Strobel, D F; Yelle, R V

    1989-12-15

    Results from the occultation of the sun by Neptune imply a temperature of 750 +/- 150 kelvins in the upper levels of the atmosphere (composed mostly of atomic and molecular hydrogen) and define the distributions of methane, acetylene, and ethane at lower levels. The ultraviolet spectrum of the sunlit atmosphere of Neptune resembles the spectra of the Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus atmospheres in that it is dominated by the emissions of H Lyman alpha (340 +/- 20 rayleighs) and molecular hydrogen. The extreme ultraviolet emissions in the range from 800 to 1100 angstroms at the four planets visited by Voyager scale approximately as the inverse square of their heliocentric distances. Weak auroral emissions have been tentatively identified on the night side of Neptune. Airglow and occultation observations of Triton's atmosphere show that it is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, with a trace of methane near the surface. The temperature of Triton's upper atmosphere is 95 +/- 5 kelvins, and the surface pressure is roughly 14 microbars.

  18. Chemical processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Thompson, W. R.

    1987-05-01

    Liquid solutions of N2 containing up to one-third CH4 can exist on Triton's surface in regions T > 62.5K. More generally, subsurface oceans of N2 solution are expected to be stable beneath overlying, thermally insulating, less dense layers of the abundant light hydrocarbon products of radiochemical synthesis: C2H6, C3H8, and C4H10. Cosmic rays are the main source of energy, capable of producing synthesis of organic compounds from N2 - CH4 solutions on the surface. For baseline Triton models with R = 2500 km, ρ = 2.1 g cm-3, and Ts = 65 or 55K, respectively, 4×10-3 or 7×10-3erg cm-2sec-1 (49 or 87% of the total incident flux) is deposited within a few meters below the surface. Using yields from laboratory experiments, the authors estimate the quantities of products produced.

  19. Anomalous scattering of light on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Lee, Pascal; Mccarthy, Derek; Veverka, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Researchers report here the discovery of an isolated region of anomalously forward scattering materials on the surface of Triton. The researchers' best-fit Hapke parameters indicate that regolith particles in the anomalous scattering region are not only less backward scattering, but also slightly lower in single scattering albedo than average materials on Triton's surface. While it might be possible to account for such differences in terms of differences in particle size and transparency, it is also possible that the anomalous region is compositionally distinct from other terrains. It is noteworthy that, for the anomalous region, there exists a distinctively strong spatial correlation between the photometric ratios at different phase angles, and that, relative to other terrains, the anomalous region reddens at a different rate with increasing phase angle.

  20. Triton stellar occultation candidates: 1995-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    We have completed a search for candidates for stellar occultations by Triton over the years 1995-1999. CCd strip scan images provided star positions in the relevant sky area to a depth of about 17.5 R magnitude. Over this time period, we find that Triton passes within 1.0 arcsec of 75 stars. Appulses with geocentric minimum separations of less than 0.35 arcsec will result in stellar occultations, but further astrometry and photometry is necessary to refine individual predictions for identification of actual occultations. Finder charts are included to aid in further studies and prediction refinement. The two most promising potential occultations, Tr176 and Tr180, occur in 1997.

  1. Voyager disk-integrated photometry of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Goguen, J.; Johnson, T. V.

    1990-01-01

    Hapke's (1981) photometric model has been combined with a plane-parallel thin atmospheric haze model to describe Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton, in the violet, blue, and green wavelength bands, in order to obtain estimates of Triton's geometric albedo, phase integral, and Bond albedo. Phase angle coverage in these filters ranging from about 12 to 159 deg was obtained by combining narrow- and wide-angle camera images. An upturn in the data at the highest phase angles observed can be explained by including scattering in a thin atmospheric haze layer with optical depths systematically decreasing with wavelength from about 0.06 in the violet to 0.03 for the green filter data.

  2. HST BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Dan; Storrs, Alex D.; Wells, Eddie N.; Hershey, John L.; Rohde, James R.; Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Currie, Douglas G.

    2006-12-01

    BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus was derived from HST images taken in 1997. The VEGAMAG photometric technique was used. Triton was found to be brighter by a few percent than observations of the 1970's and 1980's, as expected due to the increasingly greater exposure of the bright south polar region. The leading side was also found to be brighter than the trailing side by 0.09 mag in all filters—50% larger than reported by Franz [Franz, O.G., 1981. Icarus 45, 602-606]. Contrary to our previous results [Pascu, D., et al., 1998. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 30, 1101], we found no episodic reddening. Our previous conclusions were based on an inaccurate early version of the Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) correction. The present result limits the start of the reddening event reported by Hicks and Buratti [Hicks, M.D., Buratti, B.J., 2004. Icarus 171, 210-218]. Our ( B- V) result of 0.70±0.01 supports the global blueing described by Buratti et al. [Buratti, B.J., Goguen, J.D., Gibson, J., Mosher, J., 1994. Icarus 110, 303-314]. Our observations of July 1997 agree with the Voyager results and are among the bluest colors seen. We found Proteus somewhat brighter than earlier studies, but in good agreement with the recent value given by Karkoschka [Karkoschka, E., 2003. Icarus 162, 400-407]. A leading/trailing brightness asymmetry was detected for Proteus, with the leading side 0.1 mag brighter. The unique differences in action of the endogenic and exogenic processes on Triton and Proteus provides an opportunity to separate the endogenic and exogenic effects on Triton.

  3. Voyager disk-integrated photometry of triton.

    PubMed

    Hillier, J; Helfenstein, P; Verbiscer, A; Veverka, J; Brown, R H; Goguen, J; Johnson, T V

    1990-10-19

    Hapke's photometric model has been combined with a plane-parallel thin atmospheric haze model to describe Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton, in the violet (0.41 microm), blue (0.48 microm), and green (0.56 microm) wavelength bands, in order to obtain estimates of Triton's geometric albedo, phase integral, and Bond albedo. Phase angle coverage in these filters ranging from approximately 12 degrees to 159 degrees was obtained by combining narrow- and wide-angle camera images. An upturn in the data at the highest phase angles observed can be explained by including scattering in a thin atmospheric haze layer with optical depths systematically decreasing with wavelength from approximately 0.06 in the violet to 0.03 for the green filter data. The geometric albedo, phase integral, and spherical albedo of Triton in each filter corresponding to our best fit Hapke parameters yield an estimated Bond albedo of 0.82 +/- 0.05. If the 14-microbar N(2) atmosphere detected by Voyager is in vapor equilibrium with the surface (therefore implying a surface temperature of 37.5 K), our Bond albedo implies a surface emissivity of 0.59 +/- 0.16.

  4. Acceleration of tritons with a compact cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegmann, H.; Huenges, E.; Muthig, H.; Morinaga, H.

    1981-01-01

    With the compact cyclotron at the Faculty of the Technical University of Munich, tritons have been accelerated to an energy of 7 MeV. A safe and reliable operation of the gas supply for the ion source was obtained by a new tritium storage system. A quantity of 1500 Ci tritium is stored by two special Zr-Al getter pumps in a non-gaseous phase. The tritium can be released in well-defined amounts by heating the getter material. During triton acceleration the pressure in the cyclotron vacuum chamber is maintained only by a large titanium sputter-ion pump, thus forming a closed vacuum system without any exhaust of tritium contaminated gas. Any tritium contaminations in the air can be detected by an extremely sensitive tritium monitoring system. The triton beam with a maximum intensity of 30 μA has been used so far to produce neutron-rich radioisotopes such as 28Mg, 43K or 72Zn, which are successfully applied in tracer techniques in the studies of biological systems.

  5. Comparative Planetary Atmospheres of Pluto and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, D. F.; Zhu, X.

    2015-10-01

    Both atmospheres of Pluto and Neptune's largest satellite Triton have cold surfaces with similar surface gravities and atmospheric surface pressures. We have updated the Zhu et al.Icarus 228 , 301, 2014) model for Pluto's atmosphere by adopting Voigt line profiles in the radiation code with the latest spectral database and extended the model to Triton's atmosphere by including additional parameterized heating due to the magnetospheric electron energy deposition. Numerical experiments show that the escape rate of an atmosphere for an icy planetary body similar to Pluto or Triton is quite sensitive to the methane abundance and planetary surface gravity. Together this leads to a cumulative effect on the density variation with the altitude that significantly changes the atmospheric scale height at the exobase together with the exobase altitude. The atmospheric thermal structure near the exobase is sensitive to the atmospheric escape rate only when it is significantly greater than 10 26 molecules s-1 above which an enhanced escape rate corresponds to a stronger radial velocity that adiabatically cools the atmosphere to a lower temperature.

  6. Chemical investigation of Titan and Triton tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Gene D.; Thompson, W. R.; Heinrich, Michael; Khare, Bishun N.; Sagan, Carl

    1994-01-01

    We report chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses of both Titan and Triton tholins, organic solids made from the plasma irradiation of 0.9:0.1 and 0.999:0.001 N2/CH4 gas mixtures, respectively. The lower CH4 mixing ratio leads to a nitrogen-richer tholin (N/C greater than 1), probably including nitrogen heterocyclic compounds. Unlike Titan tholin, bulk Triton tholin is poor in nitriles. From high-pressure liquid chromatography, ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy, and molecular weight estimation by gel filtration chromatography, we conclude that (1) several H2O-soluble fractions, each with distinct UV and IR spectral signatures, are present, (2) these fractions are not identical in the two tholins, (3) the H2O-soluble fractions of Titan tholins do not contain significant amounts of nitriles, despite the major role of nitriles in bulk Titan tholin, and (4) the H2O-soluble fractions of both tholins are mainly molcules containing about 10 to 50 (C + N) atoms. We report yields of amino acids upon hydrolysis of Titan and Triton tholins. Titan tholin is largely insoluble in the putative hydrocarbon lakes or oceans on Titan, but can yield the H2O-soluble species investigated here upon contact with transient (e.g., impact-generated) liquid water.

  7. Triton's plumes - The dust devil hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Tryka, Kimberly A.

    1990-01-01

    Triton's plumes are narrow columns 10 km in height, with tails extending horizontally for distances over 100 km. This structure suggests that the plumes are an atmospheric rather than a surface phenomenon. The closest terrestrial analogs may be dust devils, which are atmospheric vortices originating in the unstable layer close to the ground. Since Triton has such a low surface pressure, extremely unstable layers could develop during the day. Patches of unfrosted ground near the subsolar point could act as sites for dust devil formation because they heat up relative to the surrounding nitrogen frost. The resulting convection would warm the atmosphere to temperatures of 48 k or higher, as observed by the Voyager radio science team. Assuming that velocity scales as the square root of temperature difference times the height of the mixed layer, a velocity of 20 m/sec is derived for the strongest dust devils on Triton. Winds of this speed could raise particles provided they are a factor of 1000 to 10,000 less cohesive than those on earth.

  8. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  9. Consequences of FOIL for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koban, Lori; Sisneros-Thiry, Simone

    2015-02-01

    FOIL is a well-known mnemonic that is used to find the product of two binomials. We conduct a large sample (n = 252) observational study of first-year college students and show that while the FOIL procedure leads to the accurate expansion of the product of two binomials for most students who apply it, only half of these students exhibit conceptual understanding of the procedure. We generalize this FOIL dichotomy and show that the ability to transfer a mathematical property from one context to a less familiar context is related to both procedural success and attitude towards math.

  10. The thermal structure of Triton's atmosphere - Pre-Voyager models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Zent, A. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Courtin, R.

    1989-08-01

    Spectral data from earth observations have indicated the presence of N2 and CH4 on Triton. This paper outlines the use of the 1-D radiative-convective model developed for Titan to calculate the current pressure of N2 and CH4 on Triton. The production of haze material is obtained by scaling down from the Titan value. Results and predictions for the Voyager Triton encounter are as follows: A N2-CH4 atmosphere on Triton is thermodynamically self consistent and would have a surface pressure of approximately 50 millibar; due to the chemically produced haze, Triton has a hot atmosphere with a temperature of approximately 130 K; Triton's troposphere is a region of saturation of the major constituent of the atmosphere, N2.

  11. Secondary fusion coupled deuteron/triton transport simulation and thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. B.; Wang, K.; Liu, H. G.; Li, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) was developed to simulate deuteron/triton transportation and reaction coupled problem. The 'Forced particle production' variance reduction technique was used to improve the simulation speed, which made the secondary product play a major role. The mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source was employed as a validation. Then the thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor was studied with our tool. Moreover, an in-core conversion efficiency measurement experiment was performed with {sup 6}LiD and {sup 6}LiH converters. Threshold activation foils was used to indicate the fast and fusion neutron flux. Besides, two other pivotal parameters were calculated theoretically. Finally, the conversion efficiency of {sup 6}LiD is obtained as 1.97x10{sup -4}, which matches well with the theoretical result. (authors)

  12. Triton College and General Motors: The Partnership Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonte, Richard; Magnesen, Vernon

    1983-01-01

    The cooperative training program between Illinois's Triton College and General Motors is described. Illustrates the mutual benefits of this problem and recommends that other colleges follow suit. (NJ)

  13. On the microphysical state of the surface of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz

    1991-01-01

    The microphysical processes involved in the pressureless sintering of particulate materials and the physical conditions likely to prevail on Triton are examined in order to investigate the processes leading to the frost metamorphism on Triton. It is argued that the presence of a well-annealed transparent nitrogen layer offers a natural explanation for most of what is seen on the surface of Triton; results of observations suggest that such a layer can form on Triton at 37 K on a seasonal time scale (about 100 earth years), provided the initial grain diameter is less than 1 micron. Grains up to 10 microns are allowed if grain growth does not hinder densification.

  14. Malignant triton tumor (MTT) of the neck.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Kristine Bjørndal; Godballe, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2006-03-01

    Malignant Triton Tumor (MTT) is a rare, malignant periphere nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. One third of described MTT's were located at the head and neck region. One third of these are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. MTT most often appears in the third decade. MTT's are very aggressive tumors with early metastases and the overall survival is poor (26%). Therefore, early diagnosis and correct treatment is of utmost importance. We report a case of MTT of the left supraclavicular region in a 41-year-old man. We present the pathological findings, both light and immunohistochemically. PMID:16185834

  15. Triton,... electron,... cosmon,...: An infinite regression?

    PubMed

    Dehmelt, H

    1989-11-01

    I propose an elementary particle model in which the simplest near-Dirac particles triton, proton, and electron are members of the three top layers of a bottomless stack. Each particle is a composite of three particles from the next layer below in an infinite regression approaching Dirac point particles. The cosmon, an immensely heavy lower layer subquark, is the elementary particle. The world-atom, a tightly bound cosmon/anticosmon pair of zero relativistic total mass, arose from the nothing state in a quantum jump. Rapid decay of the pair launched the big bang and created the universe. PMID:16594084

  16. Phase separation temperatures of mixtures of Triton X-114 and Triton X-45: application to protein separation.

    PubMed

    Ganong, B R; Delmore, J P

    1991-02-15

    Triton X-114 solutions separate above 22 degrees C into two immiscible aqueous phases. The more dense phase is enriched in detergent, and the less dense phase is depleted of detergent, relative to the original single phase. This phenomenon has been used to partition proteins according to hydrophobicity. The phase separation temperature is sensitive to the length of the polyoxyethylene headgroup. When Triton X-45, with a shorter headgroup, is mixed with Triton X-114 in various proportions, the phase transition temperature can be adjusted anywhere between 0 and 22 degrees C. Partitioning properties of the resulting mixtures are similar to those of Triton X-114 alone.

  17. Global color and albedo variations on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1990-01-01

    Global multispectral mosaics of Triton have been produced from Voyager approach images; six spectral units are defined and mapped. The margin of the south polar cap (SPC) is scalloped and ranges in latitude from + 10 deg to -30 deg. A bright fringe is closely associated with the cap's margin; form it, diffuse bright rays extend north-northeast for hundreds of kilometers. Thus, the rays may consist of fringe materials that were redistributed by northward-going Coriolis-deflected winds. From 1977 to 1989, Triton's full-disk spectrum changed from markedly red and UV-dark to nearly neutral white and UV-bright. This spectral change can be explained by new deposition of nitrogen frost over both the northern hemisphere and parts of a formerly redder SPC. Frost deposition in the southern hemisphere during southern summer is possible over relatively high albedo areas of the cap (Stansberry et al., 1990), which helps to explain the apparent stability of the unexpectedly large SPC and the presence of the bright fringe.

  18. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  19. Ultraviolet spectrometer observations of neptune and triton.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, A L; Atreya, S K; Bertaux, J L; Blamont, J E; Dessler, A J; Donahue, T M; Forrester, W T; Hall, D T; Herbert, F; Holberg, J B; Hunter, D M; Krasnopolsky, V A; Linick, S; Lunine, J I; McConnell, J C; Moos, H W; Sandel, B R; Schneider, N M; Shemansky, D E; Smith, G R; Strobel, D F; Yelle, R V

    1989-12-15

    Results from the occultation of the sun by Neptune imply a temperature of 750 +/- 150 kelvins in the upper levels of the atmosphere (composed mostly of atomic and molecular hydrogen) and define the distributions of methane, acetylene, and ethane at lower levels. The ultraviolet spectrum of the sunlit atmosphere of Neptune resembles the spectra of the Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus atmospheres in that it is dominated by the emissions of H Lyman alpha (340 +/- 20 rayleighs) and molecular hydrogen. The extreme ultraviolet emissions in the range from 800 to 1100 angstroms at the four planets visited by Voyager scale approximately as the inverse square of their heliocentric distances. Weak auroral emissions have been tentatively identified on the night side of Neptune. Airglow and occultation observations of Triton's atmosphere show that it is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, with a trace of methane near the surface. The temperature of Triton's upper atmosphere is 95 +/- 5 kelvins, and the surface pressure is roughly 14 microbars. PMID:17756000

  20. Diapirs and cantaloupes: Layering and overturn of Triton's crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, P.; Jackson, M. P. A.

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that cantaloupe terrain formed as a result of instability and overturn (i.e., diapirism) of Triton's crust. Morphologic evidence implicates compositional layering within Triton's crust as the driving mechanism for the overturn. Here, we review the morphologic evidence for this origin and evaluate some of the implications.

  1. Three-triton states in {sup 9}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Muta, K.; Furumoto, T.; Ichikawa, T.; Itagaki, N.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate whether three-triton states appear or not in excited states of {sup 9}Li. We also search for a signature of the gaslike three-triton state, which is partly an analogy to the the case of the three-{alpha} state in {sup 12}C (Hoyle state). For this purpose, we use both three-triton and {alpha}+t+n+n wave functions to describe the low-lying states of {sup 9}Li and take into account the coupling effect between them. We show that the states in which the three-triton components dominate indeed appear below the three-triton threshold energy, although the root-mean-square radii of those states are not so much expanded in comparison with the gaslike state of three {alpha}'s.

  2. New astrometric observations of Triton in 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, R. C.; Zhang, H. Y.; Dourneau, G.; Yu, Y.; Yan, D.; Shen, K. X.; Cheng, X.; Xi, X. J.; Hu, X. Y.; Wang, S. H.

    2014-06-01

    Astrometric positions of the Neptunian satellite Triton with a visual magnitude of 13.5 were obtained during three successive oppositions in 2007, 2008 and 2009. A total of 1095 new observed positions of Triton were collected during 46 nights of observations, involving eight missions and three telescopes. We compared our observations to the best ephemerides of Triton available now. This comparison has shown that our observations present a high level of accuracy as they provide standard deviations of residuals hardly higher than 50 mas and mean residuals lower than 30 mas, corresponding to about only 500 km in the position of the very distant satellite Triton. Moreover, we have compared most of the different planetary ephemerides of Neptune available now as well as two recent orbit models of Triton. These new comparisons have clearly shown the differences between all of these ephemerides which can be significant and that are presented in this work.

  3. Triton, Pluto, and the origin of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1993-08-01

    Planets may represent a commmon by-product of star formation, and thus may be a source of physical and chemical clues to the origin of the solar system. This paper discusses the molecular composition of Triton and Pluto, two of the most distant objects of the solar system. Particular consideration is given to the new findings (Cruikshank et al., 1993; Owen et al., 1993) of methane ice in concentrations from 0.05 percent (Triton) to 1.5 percent (Pluto) and carbon monoxide ice in concentrations from 0.1 percent (Triton) to 0.5 percent (Pluton), relative to nitrogen ice. The high abundance of nitrogen suggests a scenario of early outgassing of both Triton and Pluto, followed by substantial loss of CO. The nitrogen seen today on the two bodies must have been produced later in the histories of Pluto and Triton from a nitrogen-bearing molecule much less volatile than molecular nitrogen.

  4. Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils

    DOEpatents

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Knighton, Gaven C.; Clark, Curtis R.

    2006-09-05

    A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

  5. X-ray fiducial foils

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, C.; Serduke, F.; Makowiecki, D.; Jankowski, A.; Wall, M.

    1991-03-13

    An x-ray spectrum from a laser fusion experiment was passed through an Al, Si, Y multilayer foil. The position of the absorption edges of the Al, Si, and Y was used to calibrate the x-ray energy spectrum recorded on photographic film. The foil consisted of 4000 {angstrom} of Al, 6000 {angstrom} of Si and 4000 {angstrom} of Y sputter deposited on a 1.5 {mu}m thick Mylar{reg sign} film. It was necessary to layer the structure in order to achieve the required mechanical strength and dimensional stability. The results include analysis of the x-ray energy spectrum and microstructural characterization of the foil using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  6. On the thermal structure of Triton's thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Summers, Michael E.; Yelle, Roger V.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of the Voyager 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer solar occultation data obtained at Triton is consistent with a spherically symmetric, isothermal thermosphere above 400 km at T(infinity) = 96 K. A detailed calculation of energy loss processes in a pure N2 atmosphere indicates that solar heating, with calculated T(infinity) = 70 K, is insufficient to account for the inferred T(infinity) = 96 K. The magnetosphere must deposit twice as much power as the sun to heat the thermosphere to 96 K and generate the observed N2 tangential column densities above 450 km. The thermal escape of H and N atoms and the downward diffusion of N atoms to recombine below 130 km results in local ionospheric heating efficiency of 24 percent. An upper limit on the tropopause CO mixing ratio of 2 x 10 exp -4 is inferred in the absence of aerosol heating to balance its efficient cooling by LTE rotational line emission.

  7. The Thermal Structure of Triton's Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Strobel, D. F.; Zhu, X.; Stansberry, J. A.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric structure of Triton in the altitude range 25-150 kilometers shows an unexpectedly steep thermal gradient of 0.26 K per kilometer above 50 kilometer altitude, with a nearly isothermal profile below. The upper part of the profile can be explained by downward conduction of heat deposited by magnetospheric electrons and solar UV. However, the atmospheric temperature below 50 kilometers is too cold for identified radiative processes to dispose of the inferred heat flux (0.0012 erg per square centimeter per second) from the upper atmosphere. This implies that either the atmosphere is not in a steady state and/or an unidentified cooling mechanism is at work in the altitude range 25-50 kilometers. When extrapolated to the surface, the inversion results yield a pressure of 19.0 sup (+1.8) sub (-1.5), mubar, about 5mubar greater than that observed by Voyager.

  8. The Triton: Design concepts and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Singer, Michael; Vanryn, Percy; Brown, Rhonda; Tella, Gustavo; Harvey, Bob

    1992-01-01

    During the design of the C & P Aerospace Triton, a few problems were encountered that necessitated changes in the configuration. After the initial concept phase, the aspect ratio was increased from 7 to 7.6 to produce a greater lift to drag ratio (L/D = 13) which satisfied the horsepower requirements (118 hp using the Lycoming O-235 engine). The initial concept had a wing planform area of 134 sq. ft. Detailed wing sizing analysis enlarged the planform area to 150 sq. ft., without changing its layout or location. The most significant changes, however, were made just prior to inboard profile design. The fuselage external diameter was reduced from 54 to 50 inches to reduce drag to meet the desired cruise speed of 120 knots. Also, the nose was extended 6 inches to accommodate landing gear placement. Without the extension, the nosewheel received an unacceptable percentage (25 percent) of the landing weight. The final change in the configuration was made in accordance with the stability and control analysis. In order to reduce the static margin from 20 to 13 percent, the horizontal tail area was reduced from 32.02 to 25.0 sq. ft. The Triton meets all the specifications set forth in the design criteria. If time permitted another iteration of the calculations, two significant changes would be made. The vertical stabilizer area would be reduced to decrease the aircraft lateral stability slope since the current value was too high in relation to the directional stability slope. Also, the aileron size would be decreased to reduce the roll rate below the current 106 deg/second. Doing so would allow greater flap area (increasing CL(sub max)) and thus reduce the overall wing area. C & P would also recalculate the horsepower and drag values to further validate the 120 knot cruising speed.

  9. Lattice physics capabilities of the SCALE code system using TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes ongoing calculations used to validate the TRITON depletion module in SCALE for light water reactor (LWR) fuel lattices. TRITON has been developed to provide improved resolution for lattice physics mixed-oxide fuel assemblies as programs to burn such fuel in the United States begin to come online. Results are provided for coupled TRITON/PARCS analyses of an LWR core in which TRITON was employed for generation of appropriately weighted few-group nodal cross-sectional sets for use in core-level calculations using PARCS. Additional results are provided for code-to-code comparisons for TRITON and a suite of other depletion packages in the modeling of a conceptual next-generation boiling water reactor fuel assembly design. Results indicate that the set of SCALE functional modules used within TRITON provide an accurate means for lattice physics calculations. Because the transport solution within TRITON provides a generalized-geometry capability, this capability is extensible to a wide variety of non-traditional and advanced fuel assembly designs. (authors)

  10. Distribution and nature of UV absorbers on Triton's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that a UV Spectrally Absorbing Material (UV-SAM) exists on Triton's surface. This evidence is found in the positive slope in Triton's spectrum from the UV to the near-IR, and the increasing contrast in Triton's light curve in the blue and UV. Although it is now widely-thought that UV-SAM's exist on Triton, little is known about their distribution and spectral properties. The goal of this NDAP Project is to determine the spatial distribution and geological context of the UV-SAM material. We hope to determine if UV-SAM's on Triton are correlated with geologic wind streaks, craters, calderas, geomorphic/topographic units, regions containing (or lacking) volatile frosts, or some other process (e.g., magnetospheric interactions). Once the location and distribution of UV-SAM's has been determined, further constraints on their composition can be made by analyzing the spectrographic data set. To accomplish these goals, various data sets will be used, including Voyager 2 UV and visible images of Triton's surface, IUE and HST spectra of Triton, and a geologic map of the surface based on Voyager 2 and spectrophotometric data. The results of this research will be published in the planetary science literature.

  11. Distribution and nature of UV absorbers on Triton's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1995-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that a UV spectrally Absorbing Material (UV-SAM) exists on Triton's surface. This evidence is found in the positive slope in Triton's spectrum from the UV to the near-IR, and the increasing contrast in Triton's light curve in the blue and UV. Although it is now widely-thought that UV-SAMs exist on Triton, little is known about their distribution and spectral properties. The goal of this NDAP Project is to determine the spatial distribution and geological context of the UV-SaM material. We hope to determine if UV-SAMs on Triton are correlated with geologic wind streaks, craters, calderas, geomorphic/topographic units, regions containing (or lacking) volatile frosts, or some other process (e.g., magnetospheric interactions). Once the location and distribution of UV-SAMs has been determined, further constraints on their composition cable made by analyzing the spectrographic data set. To accomplish these goals, various data sets will be used, including Voyager 2 UV and visible images of Triton's surface, IUE and HST spectra of Triton, and a geologic map of the surface based on voyager 2 and spectrophotometric data. The results of this research will be published in the planetary science literature.

  12. Carbon foils for space plasma instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, F.; Ebert, R. W.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon foils have been successfully used for several decades in space plasma instruments to detect ions and neutral atoms. These instruments take advantage of two properties of the particle-foil interaction: charge conversion of neutral atoms and/or secondary electron emission. This interaction also creates several adverse effects for the projectile exiting the foil, such as angular scattering and energy straggling, which usually act to reduce the sensitivity and overall performance of an instrument. The magnitude of these effects mainly varies with the incident angle, energy, and mass of the incoming projectile and the foil thickness. In this paper, we describe these effects and the properties of the interaction. We also summarize results from recent studies with graphene foils, which can be made thinner than carbon foils due to their superior strength. Graphene foils may soon replace carbon foils in space plasma instruments and open new opportunities for space research in the future.

  13. Geology of Triton and some comparative-planetological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevskii, A. T.; Ivanov, M. A.; Borozdin, V. K.

    1992-11-01

    Three major terrain complexes obtained from the photogeological analysis of Triton images are described which include canteloupe terrains of enigmatic origin, various plains formed by essentially aqueous volcanism, and seasonal south polar cap. It is concluded that Triton is a differentiated icy-rocky body with a long and complicated endogenetic life and noticeable recent exogenetic activity. The evident traces of deformations and melting-flooding episodes on the Triton surface mimic many tectonic and volcanic features of the terrestial planets. The seasonal life of CH4-N2 snow covers mimic the seasonal circulation of volatiles (H2O and CO2) on earth and Mars.

  14. The photochemistry of methane in the atmosphere of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, Darrell F.; Summers, Michael E.; Herbert, Floyd; Sandel, Bill R.

    1990-01-01

    The model of Summers and Strobel (1989) for photochemical reactions in the Uranus atmosphere was modified and used for quantitative calculations of methane in the atmosphere of Triton. The principal adjustable parameters in the new model are the surface CH4 concentrations and the vigor of vertical mixing in Triton's lower atmosphere. It is shown the rate of methane photolysis that was calculated is sufficient to generate a smog of condensed C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, and C4H2 particles in the lowest 30 km of Triton's atmosphere, with an optical depth consistent with the Voyager imaging results.

  15. Metal Foil Sandwiched Multiple Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, E.; Hatori, M.

    1982-11-01

    A new method to obtain simultaneously two or three radiographs with a wide dynamic range was studied. This is to divide the transmitted X-ray energy spectra through a human body into lower and higher parts than K absorption edge by a metal foil (Pb, Ta, Gd) and give radiographs using two or three pairs of an one-side coated film and an intensifying screen. The backward film has the informations filtered by the metal foil. The forward film before the metal foil, if the film density is same, relatively contains the informations of lower parts of the transmitted X-ray spectra through a human body. Secondly, a metal foil can make shadows of thin parts and thick parts of a human body displace on high region of film, respectively and separatedly. These radiographs of thin parts were useful to be observed superposing two films with a wide dynamic range. As to thick parts it was useful to view two films hanging side by side. This technique was appreciated to be applied to the organs such as extremities, knee and elbow, head and neck, lung and etc.

  16. Foil Patches Seal Small Vacuum Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Kirk W.; Reed, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discloses technique to patch holes in nickel-alloy rocket-engine nozzle parts prior to vacuum brazing. Technique involves lightly spot-welding nickel foil 0.002 in. thick over hole patched, then spot-welding corrosion-resistant steel foil of same thickness over nickel foil. Once patches subject to pressure and temperature of vacuum brazing, nickel foil diffuses to bond with nickel-alloy nozzle, making vacuum-tight seal.

  17. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  18. Neutral particle measurements of fusion tritons in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Khudoleev, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    A neutral particle analyzer [A.D. Izvozchikov et al., JET Report No. JET-R(91)-12, 1991] operating in the MeV energy range was used to measure the flux of neutralized d-d fusion tritons emitted from the hot-ion H-mode deuterium plasma heated by deuterium neutral beams. It was found that tritons in the energy range of 0.3-1.1 MeV were largely neutralized by the beam atoms and the beam halo atoms. This enabled us to find the localized energy distribution function of the fusion tritons in the central plasma region. Simulation of the triton energy distribution function shows that MeV ions in the JET hot-ion H-mode plasma behave classically.

  19. The Revised Pole Model and New Observations of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.-Y.; Shen, K.-X.; Qiao, R.-Ch; Dourneau, G.; Yu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We used 3108 Earth-based astrometric observations from the Natural Satellite Data Center (NSDC) over more than 30 years time span from 1975 to 2006 for determining the epoch state vectors of the Neptunes largest satellite Triton. In integrating the perturbation equation, the barycentric frame of Neptune-Triton system is adopted, and in considering the oblateness perturbation due to Neptune, a revised pole model describing the precession of the Neptune's pole is used in our calculation. Moreover, a total of 1095 new observed positions of Triton were collected during 46 nights of observations in 2007, 2008 and 2009. We compared our observations to two ephemerides of Triton and most of the available planetary ephemerides of Neptune.

  20. A predicted Triton plasma torus in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delitsky, Mona L.; Eviatar, Aharon; Richardson, John D.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of the formation of a plasma torus generated by the satellite Triton in the magnetosphere of Neptune is investigated. A set of coupled differential equations is solved that describe the evolution of material sputtered from the surface of atmosphere of Triton in the conditions likely to exist in an assumed Neptunian magnetosphere for various combinations of nitrogen and methane that may exist on Triton. The model assumes a mechanism for transport that gives upper limits for predicted torus concentrations. It is concluded that a successful detection of plasma by the Voyager Plasma Science instrument may be possible and could be an important source of information about the composition of Triton's surface and atmosphere.

  1. Voyager IRIS Measurements of Triton's Thermal Emission: Impllications for Pluto?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansberry, John A.; Spencer, John; Linscott, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    The New Horizons Pluto encounter data set includes unique observations obtained using the Radio Science experiment to measure the night-side thermal emission at centimeter wavelengths, well beyond the emission peak (in the 70 to 100 micron range). 26 years ago the Voyager 2 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) obtained spectra in the 30 - 50 micron wavelength range to try and detect thermal emission from Pluto's sibling, Triton. Conrath etal. (1989) analyzed 16 of the IRIS spectra of Triton's dayside and derived a weak limit of 36 K - 41 K. We have analysed those, and an additional 75 spectra, to refine the limits on the temperature of Triton's surface, and to explore diurnal differences in the thermal emission. Triton results from other Voyager instruments provide important constraints on our interpretation of the IRIS data, as do Spitzer measurements of Pluto's thermal emission.For unit-emissivity, average temperature is 34 K, inconsistent with the pressure of Triton's atmosphere (13 - 19 microbar), the presence of beta-phase nitrogen ice on the surface, and the likely presence ofwarm regions on the surface. The atmospheric pressure requires nitrogen ice temperatures of 37.4 K - 38.1 K, which in turn requires emissivity of 0.31--0.53. Such a low emissivity in this spectral region might be expected if the surface is dominated by nitrogen or methane ice. Averages of data subsets show evidence for brightness temperature variations across Triton's surface. Surprisingly, the data seem to indicate that Triton's nightside equatorial region was warmer than on the dayside.These Voyager results for Triton provide a useful context for interpreting New Horizons and ALMA observations of emission from Pluto in the sub-millimeter and centimeter region. JWST will be capable of detecting Triton's and Pluto's 10 - 28 micron thermal emission, although scattered light from Neptune may be an issue for the Triton. Combined with new capabilities of ALMA to measure the sub

  2. Discovery of a Remarkable Opposition Surge on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Bauer, J.; Hicks, M.; Herbert, B.; Schmidt, B.; Cobb, B.; Ward, J.

    2006-05-01

    The large Neptunian satellite Triton is one of three moons in the outer Solar System that exhibit volcanism. Triton's volcanoes appear to be driven by solar heating. In addition, significant seasonal volatile is expected to occur on Triton. To understand the nature and extent of activity on Triton, including volcanism and seasonal volatile transport, we have undertaken a program of deriving the surface properties of Triton through time by means of ground- based observations. Another motivation for our work is to closely study a body that may bear a strong resemblance to the planet Pluto and the swarm of icy bodies in the outer Solar System now known as Kuiper Belt Objects. One important measurement is the solar phase curve, or the brightness as a function of the angle between the observer, the object being observed, and the sun. Most significant are observations at large solar phase angles, which probe the roughness of the surface, and small angles, which characterize the fluffiness of the surface and give clues to optical phenomena such as coherent backscatter. For Triton, large phase angles are not observable from Earth, but the 2004 season presented an opportunity in which the solar phase angle reached the exceedingly low value of 0.002 degrees. During the 2004 season, photometric observations of Triton's phase curve were obtained in the astronomical BVRI filters, spanning wavelengths from 0.45 to 0.89 microns. Triton exhibits a large increase in its brightness as the solar phase angle approaches zero. There is a wavelength dependence to this opposition surge, the term commonly used to describe the non-linear increase in brightness observed on almost all airless bodies.

  3. A structural origin for the cantaloupe terrain of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Cantaloupe terrain is unique to Triton. It is Triton's oldest terrain and includes about 250,000 km sq. region displaying sparsely cratered, closely spaced, nearly circular dimples about 30-40 km across. This terrain is found on no other planet because, only on Triton the final major global thermal pulse (1) caused completed (or nearly) interior melting resulting in a cooling history where large thermal stresses shattered and contorted a thin, weak lithosphere, and (2) occurred after heavy bombardment so that the surface features were preserved. The cantaloupe terrain is composed of intersecting sets of structures (folds and/or faults) that have developed as a result of global compression generated by volumetric changes associated with cooling of Triton's interior. Further, it is proposed that these structures developed after the period of heavy bombardment, and resulted from the last major global thermal epoch in Triton's unique history (either caused by tidal or radio metric heating). Initially, as the body cooled and the structures formed, their surface topography was most likely modified by thermal relaxation of the warm surface ices. In other bodies like Mercury, thermal stresses generated from global cooling and contraction have resulted in widely spaced thrust faults, whereas on Triton, thermal stresses produced more closely-spaced folds and faults sets. This difference in structural style is probably due to differences in lithospheric properties (thickness, strength, etc.), the magnitude of stress (directly dependent on the thermal history), and when the structures formed, relative to the period of heavy bombardment.

  4. The Origin of the Moon and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, F. M.

    2004-12-01

    In 1879, George Darwin(1) had proposed that the moon originated from a rapidly spinning Earth on which equatorial gravitative attraction was nearly overcome by centrifical force. During a 1964 conference, D.U. Wise(2) and others analyzed this hypothesis in greater detail. However, recent studies warranted a fundamentally new approach with regards to the origin of the solar system. A re-examination of the spin-off (fission) hypothesis of the moon from the earth, using slightly different assumptions than scientists had previously used (allowing for a more extreme version of an expanding earth), provided the earth's original radius (357 km), density (3.13 x 104 g/cc) and spin rate (0.132 radians/sec.). It was found that Neptune underwent a similar development with the fission of Triton. The remarkably large initial densities, of both Earth and Neptune (7.2 x 105 gm/cc) are consistent with the overall theory(3,4) previously discussed regarding the evolution of the solar system from a neutron star type proto-sun's dense core. The primary calculations involve conservation of angular momentum of each of the rotating and revolving planetary systems. (1) Darwin, G. H. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. (London) 170, 1 (1879) (2) D.U. Wise, ``The Earth-Moon System" p. 213, Marsden and Cameron Eds. Plenum Press (1966) (3) Fred M. Johnson, ``Voyage Into Astronomy", Kendall/ Hunt Publ., (1977) (4) Fred M. Johnson, Mem. Soc. Roy. des Sciences de Liége, 6th series, vol. III, p. 609-627 (1972).

  5. Historical photometric evidence for volatile migration on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Goguen, Jay D.; Gibson, James; Mosher, Joel

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of CCD images of Triton obtained with the 1.5-m telescope on Palomar Mountain shows that in the time period surrounding the Voyager 2 encounter with the satellite (1985-1990), no changes in the satellite's visual albedo or color occurred. The published observations of Triton in the 0.35- to 0.60-micrometer spectral region obtained between 1950 and 1990 were reanalyzed to detect historical variability in both its albedo and visual color. Analysis of the photometry indicates that there is little, if any, change in Triton's visual geometric albedo. This result is consistent with the albedo pattern observed by Voyager and the change in sub-Earth latitude. Two distinct types of color changes are evident: a significant secular increase in the blue region of the visual spectrum since at least the 1950s, and the reported dramatic reddening of Triton's spectrum in the late 1970s. The latter change can be explained only by a short-lived geological phenomenon. Triton's changing pole orientation with respect to a terrestrial observer cannot explain the secular color changes. These changes imply volatile transport on a global scale on Triton's surface during the past 4 decades. We present two models which show that either removal of a red volatile from Triton's polar cap or deposition of a blue volatile in the equatorial regions can explain the secular color changes. A third possibility is that the changes are the result of the alpha-beta phase transition of nitrogen and subsequent fracturing of the polar cap region (N. S. Duxbury and R. H. Brown (1993).

  6. A model of Triton's role in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Cheng, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    Escape of neutral hydrogen (H) and nitrogen (N) from Triton's maintains a large neutral cloud, called the Triton torus, in Neptune's magnetosphere. We have developed the first detailed Monte Carlo simulation model of the Triton torus that includes the collisionality, the complex geometry, the injection of two neutral species from Triton (H and N), and the combined effects of photoionization, electron impact ionization, and charge exchange. Ionization in Neptune's plasma sheet was modeled using Voyager plasma observations. Collisions cause both the H and N neutral clouds to become more radially extended, both toward Neptune and out beyond the magnetopause, as well as more extended in latitude, when compared with collisionless models. Moreover, collisions of H with the much more massive N greatly enhance the collisional ejection of H from the system and into Neptune's atmosphere. This effect decreases the probability of H ionization within the magnetosphere relative to that for N, and furthermore causes model results for two-species injection from Triton to differ significantly from those for H injection alone. For a hydrogen escape rate from Triton of 5 x 10(exp 25)/s, as given by photo-chemical models of Triton's upper atmosphere, a nitrogen escape rate of 5 x 10(exp 24)/s gives proton and N(+) sources of 5.6 x 10(exp 24)/s and 3.3 x 10(exp 24)/s, respectively, whose ratio is close to the observed ratio of protons to heavies. A nitrogen escape rate of 2 x 10(exp 25)/s, yields an N(+) source more than twice that of protons, inconsistent with the Voyager data.

  7. Foil bearing research at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpino, Marc

    1993-11-01

    Foil journal bearings consist of a compliant metal shell or foil which supports a rigid journal by means of a fluid film. Foil bearings are considered to be a potential alternative to rolling element or traditional rigid surface bearings in cryogenic turbomachinery applications. The prediction of foil bearing performance requires the coupled solution of the foil deflection and the fluid flow in the bearing clearance between the rotor and the foil. The investigations being conducted in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Penn State are focused in three areas: theoretical prediction of steady state bearing performance, modeling of the dynamic bearing characteristics to determine performance in rotor systems, and experimental verification of analysis codes. The current status and results from these efforts will be discussed.

  8. Seasonal Variations in Triton's Atmospheric Mass and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Condensed phases of gases which make up the bulk of Triton's atmosphere are likely to exist on Triton's surface in the form of solid or liquid polar caps which extend as far as 55 deg from the poles. The mass of Triton's atmosphere is governed by the energy balance between the sunlight these caps absorb and the heat they radiate to space. The polar cap temperatures should be approximately equal and uniform over their surfaces. Because of the rapid precession of Triton's orbit about Neptune's pole, the insolation and, therefore, the temperature of the polar caps must vary in a complex fashion. The variations in the temperature of the polar caps will also cause seasonal variations in the mixing ratio of the volatile atmospheric gases owing to the different behaviors of their saturation vapor pressures with temperature. Triton's visible hemisphere is approaching a major southern summer with solstices. If the polar caps are not too thin a dramatic increase in the CH4 column abundance would occur.

  9. Pluto and Triton: Interactions Between Volatiles and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    2001-01-01

    Volatiles moving across the surfaces of Pluto and Triton can give rise to interesting dynamical consequences. Conversely, measurement of dynamical states can help constrain the movement of volatiles and interior structure of both bodies. Polar wander may theoretically occur on both Triton and Pluto. Triton's obliquity is low, so that the equatorial regions receive more insolation than the poles. Hence there is a tendency for nitrogen ice to sublime at the equator and condense at the poles, creating polar caps. If the nitrogen supply is large enough, then these caps could move in approximately 10(exp 5) years the global equivalent of 200 m of ice to the poles. At this point the equatorial moment of inertia becomes larger than the moment of inertia measured about the rotation axis, so that Triton overbalances and becomes dynamically unstable. The satellite then undergoes polar wander, restoring stability when the new equator contains the excess matter. Hence the pole may be continually wandering. Neptune raises a permanent tidal bulge on Triton, so that the satellite's surface is elongated like a football, with the long axis pointing at Neptune. This is expected to be the axis about which the pole wanders. Volatile migration would resurface the satellite to some depth and wandering would disturb leading side/trailing side crater statistics. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. The Surface Compositions of Triton, Pluto, and Charon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Roush, Ted L.; Owen, Tobias C.; Quirico, Eric; DeBergh, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Neptune's satellite Triton, and the planet-satellite binary Pluto and Charon, are the most distant planetary bodies on which ices have been directly detected. Triton and Pluto have very similar dimensions and mean densities, suggesting a similar or common origin. Through earth-based spectroscopic observations in the near-infrared, solid N2, CH4, and CO have been found on both bodies, with the additional molecule C02 on Triton. N2 dominates both surfaces, although the coverage is not spatially uniform. On Triton, the CH4 and CO are mostly or entirely frozen in the N2 matrix, while CO2 may be spatially segregated. On Pluto, some CH4 and the CO are frozen in the N2 matrix, but there is evidence for additional CH4 in a pure state, perhaps lying as a lag deposit on a subsurface layer of N2. Despite their compositional and dimensional similarities, Pluto and Triton are quite different from one another in detail. Additional hydrocarbons and other volatile ices have been sought spectroscopically but not yet have been detected. The only molecule identified on Pluto's satellite Charon is solid H2O, but the spectroscopic data are of low precision and admit the presence of other ices such as CH4.

  11. Pluto and Triton: Interactions Between Volatiles and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    2001-01-01

    Volatiles moving across the surfaces of Pluto and Triton can give rise to interesting dynamical consequences. Conversely, measurement of dynamical states can help constrain the movement of volatiles and interior structure of both bodies. Polar wander may theoretically occur on both Triton and Pluto. Triton's obliquity is low, so that the equatorial regions receive more insolation than the poles. Hence there is a tendency for nitrogen ice to sublime at the equator and condense at the poles, creating polar caps. If the nitrogen supply is large enough, then these caps could move in approximately 105 years the global equivalent of 200 m of ice to the poles. At this point the equatorial moment of inertia becomes larger than the moment of inertia measured about the rotation axis, so that Triton overbalances and becomes dynamically unstable. The satellite then undergoes polar wander, restoring stability when the new equator contains the excess matter. Hence the pole may be continually wandering. Neptune raises a permanent tidal bulge on Triton, so that the satellite's surface is elongated like a football, with the long axis pointing at Neptune. This is expected to be the axis about which the pole wanders. Volatile migration would resurface the satellite to some depth and wandering would disturb leading side/trailing side crater statistics. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Wind turbine with adjustable air foils

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, D.H.

    1983-05-17

    A wind turbine has axially aligned, spaced, rotatable support flanges with a plurality of vertically aligned air foils having opposed ends journaled thereto. The air foils are pivoted respective to the wind by a pitch flange mounted eccentrically respective to the support flanges. The pitch flange moves the air foils into an aligned relationship respective to the wind to optimize the energy derived from the blowing wind.

  13. Efficiency and lifetime of carbon foils

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Kostin, M.; Tang, Z.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Charge-exchange injection by means of carbon foils is a widely used method in accelerators. This paper discusses two critical issues concerning the use of carbon foils: efficiency and lifetime. An energy scaling of stripping efficiency was suggested and compared with measurements. Several factors that determine the foil lifetime--energy deposition, heating, stress and buckling--were studied by using the simulation codes MARS and ANSYS.

  14. Technical Development Path for Foil Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are in widespread commercial use in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and microturbine generators and are emerging in more challenging applications such as turbochargers, auxiliary power units and propulsion gas turbines. Though not well known, foil bearing technology is well over fifty years old. Recent technological developments indicate that their full potential has yet to be realized. This paper investigates the key technological developments that have characterized foil bearing advances. It is expected that a better understanding of foil gas bearing development path will aid in future development and progress towards more advanced applications.

  15. Triton's Summer Sky of Methane and Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    According to the first ever infrared analysis of the atmosphere of Neptune's moon Triton, summer is in full swing in its southern hemisphere. The European observing team used ESO's Very Large Telescope and discovered carbon monoxide and made the first ground-based detection of methane in Triton's thin atmosphere. These observations revealed that the thin atmosphere varies seasonally, thickening when warmed. "We have found real evidence that the Sun still makes its presence felt on Triton, even from so far away. This icy moon actually has seasons just as we do on Earth, but they change far more slowly," says Emmanuel Lellouch, the lead author of the paper reporting these results in Astronomy & Astrophysics. On Triton, where the average surface temperature is about minus 235 degrees Celsius, it is currently summer in the southern hemisphere and winter in the northern. As Triton's southern hemisphere warms up, a thin layer of frozen nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide on Triton's surface sublimates into gas, thickening the icy atmosphere as the season progresses during Neptune's 165-year orbit around the Sun. A season on Triton lasts a little over 40 years, and Triton passed the southern summer solstice in 2000. Based on the amount of gas measured, Lellouch and his colleagues estimate that Triton's atmospheric pressure may have risen by a factor of four compared to the measurements made by Voyager 2 in 1989, when it was still spring on the giant moon. The atmospheric pressure on Triton is now between 40 and 65 microbars - 20 000 times less than on Earth. Carbon monoxide was known to be present as ice on the surface, but Lellouch and his team discovered that Triton's upper surface layer is enriched with carbon monoxide ice by about a factor of ten compared to the deeper layers, and that it is this upper "film" that feeds the atmosphere. While the majority of Triton's atmosphere is nitrogen (much like on Earth), the methane in the atmosphere, first detected by

  16. Energy Sources for Triton's Geyser-Like Plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H; Kirk, R L; Johnson, T V; Soderblom, L A

    1990-10-19

    Four geyser-like plumes were discovered near Triton's south pole in areas now in permanent sunlight. Because Triton's southern hemisphere is nearing a maximum summer solstice, insolation as a driver or a trigger for Triton's geyser-like plumes is an attractive hypothesis. Trapping of solar radiation in a translucent, low-conductivity surface layer (in a solid-state greenhouse), which is subsequently released in the form of latent heat of sublimation, could provide the required energy. Both the classical solid-state greenhouse consisting of exponentially absorbed insolation in a gray, translucent layer of solid nitrogen, and the "super" greenhouse consisting of a relatively transparent solid-nitrogen layer over an opaque, absorbing layer are plausible candidates. Geothermal heat may also play a part if assisted by the added energy input of seasonal cycles of insolation.

  17. Triton burnup measurements in KSTAR using a neutron activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jungmin; Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, T.; Kim, Junghee; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of the time-integrated triton burnup for deuterium plasma in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) have been performed following the simultaneous detection of the d-d and d-t neutrons. The d-d neutrons were measured using a 3He proportional counter, fission chamber, and activated indium sample, whereas the d-t neutrons were detected using activated silicon and copper samples. The triton burnup ratio from KSTAR discharges is found to be in the range 0.01%-0.50% depending on the plasma conditions. The measured burnup ratio is compared with the prompt loss fraction of tritons calculated with the Lorentz orbit code and the classical slowing-down time. The burnup ratio is found to increase as plasma current and classical slowing-down time increase.

  18. Energy sources for Triton's geyser-like plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Johnson, T. V.; Kirk, R. L.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Four geyser-like plumes were discovered near Triton's south pole in areas now in permanent sunlight. Because Triton's southern hemisphere is nearing a maximum summer solstice, insolation as a driver or a trigger for Triton's geyser-like plumes is an attractive hypothesis. Trapping of solar radiation in a translucent, low-conductivity surface layer (in a solid-state greenhouse), which is subsequently released in the form of latent heat of sublimation, could provide the required energy. Both the classical solid-state greenhouse consisting of exponentially absorbed insolation in a gray, translucent layer of solid nitrogen, and the 'super' greenhouse consisting of a relatively transparent solid-nitrogen layer over an opaque, absorbing layer are plausible candidates. Geothermal heat may also play a part if assisted by the added energy input of seasonal cycles of insolation.

  19. Energy Sources for Triton's Geyser-Like Plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H; Kirk, R L; Johnson, T V; Soderblom, L A

    1990-10-19

    Four geyser-like plumes were discovered near Triton's south pole in areas now in permanent sunlight. Because Triton's southern hemisphere is nearing a maximum summer solstice, insolation as a driver or a trigger for Triton's geyser-like plumes is an attractive hypothesis. Trapping of solar radiation in a translucent, low-conductivity surface layer (in a solid-state greenhouse), which is subsequently released in the form of latent heat of sublimation, could provide the required energy. Both the classical solid-state greenhouse consisting of exponentially absorbed insolation in a gray, translucent layer of solid nitrogen, and the "super" greenhouse consisting of a relatively transparent solid-nitrogen layer over an opaque, absorbing layer are plausible candidates. Geothermal heat may also play a part if assisted by the added energy input of seasonal cycles of insolation. PMID:17793021

  20. Large quasi-circular features beneath frost on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Veverka, Joseph; McCarthy, Derek; Lee, Pascal; Hillier, John

    1992-02-01

    Specially processed Voyager 2 images of Neptune's largest moon, Triton, reveal three large quasi-circular features ranging in diameter from 280 to 935 km within Triton's equatorial region. The largest of these features contains a central irregularly shaped area of comparatively low albedo about 380 km in diameter, surrounded by crudely concentric annuli of higher albedo materials. None of the features exhibit significant topographic expression, and all appear to be primarily albedo markings. The features are located within a broad equatorial band of anomalously transparent frost that renders them nearly invisible at the large phase angles (alpha greater than 90 deg) at which Voyager obtained its highest resolution coverage of Triton. The features can be discerned at smaller phase angles (alpha = 66 deg) at which the frost only partially masks underlying albedo contrasts. The origin of the features is uncertain but may have involved regional cryovolcanic activity.

  1. Energy sources for triton's geyser-like plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.H.; Kirk, R.L.; Johnson, T.V.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Four geyser-like plumes were discovered near Triton's south pole in areas now in permanent sunlight. Because Triton's southern hemisphere is nearing a maximum summer solstice, insolation as a driver or a trigger for Triton's geyser-like plumes is an attractive hypothesis. Trapping of solar radiation in a translucent, low-conductivity surface layer (in a solid-state greenhouse), which is subsequently released in the form of latent heat of sublimation, could provide the required energy. Both the classical solid-state greenhouse consisting of exponentially absorbed insolation in a gray, translucent layer of solid nitrogen, and the "super" greenhouse consisting of a relatively transparent solid-nitrogen layer over an opaque, absorbing layer are plausible candidates. Geothermal heat may also play a part if assisted by the added energy input of seasonal cycles of insolation.

  2. A thermal model for the seasonal nitrogen cycle on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal N2-cycle model presently used to characterize such observed phenomena on Triton as atmospheric pressure and surface albedo features at the time of the Voyager encounter incorporates diurnal and seasonal subsurface heat conduction, and can account for the heat capacity of N2 frost deposits. The results obtained by this model differ from those of previous studies in that they do not predict the seasonal freezing-out of the Triton atmosphere; even for a wide range of input parameters, the bright southern polar cap is seen as rather unlikely to be N2. The results support the microphysical arguments for the presence of either dark or smooth translucent N2 frosts on the Triton surface.

  3. Large quasi-circular features beneath frost on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Veverka, Joseph; Mccarthy, Derek; Lee, Pascal; Hillier, John

    1992-01-01

    Specially processed Voyager 2 images of Neptune's largest moon, Triton, reveal three large quasi-circular features ranging in diameter from 280 to 935 km within Triton's equatorial region. The largest of these features contains a central irregularly shaped area of comparatively low albedo about 380 km in diameter, surrounded by crudely concentric annuli of higher albedo materials. None of the features exhibit significant topographic expression, and all appear to be primarily albedo markings. The features are located within a broad equatorial band of anomalously transparent frost that renders them nearly invisible at the large phase angles (alpha greater than 90 deg) at which Voyager obtained its highest resolution coverage of Triton. The features can be discerned at smaller phase angles (alpha = 66 deg) at which the frost only partially masks underlying albedo contrasts. The origin of the features is uncertain but may have involved regional cryovolcanic activity.

  4. Neptune and Triton: A Study in Future Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, M. D.; Malaska, M. J.; Hosseini, S.; Mcgranaghan, R.; Fernandes, P. A.; Fougere, N.; Clegg, R. N.; Scully, J.; Alibay, F.; Ries, P.; Craig, P. L.; Hutchins, M. L.; Leonard, J.; Uckert, K.; Patthoff, A.; Girazian, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Neptune provides a unique natural laboratory for studying the dynamics of ice giants. Last visited by Voyager 2 in 1989, Neptune and its moon Triton hold important clues to the evolution of the solar system. The Voyager 2 flyby revealed Neptune to be a dynamic world with large storms, unparalleled wind speeds, and an unusual magnetic field. Triton, Neptune's largest satellite, is believed to be a captured Kuiper Belt Object with a thin atmosphere and possible sub-surface ocean. Further study of the farthest planet in our solar system could offer new insights into the dynamics of ice-giant exoplanets, and help us understand their complex atmospheres. The diverse science questions associated with Neptune and Triton motivate the complex and exciting mission proposed in this study. The proposed mission follows the guidelines of the 2013-2022 Planetary Science Decadal Survey, and optimizes the number of high priority science goals achieved, while still maintaining low mission costs. High priority science goals include understanding the structure, composition, and dynamics of Neptune's atmosphere and magnetosphere, as well as analyzing the surface of Triton. With a budget of $1.5 billion, the mission hosts an atmospheric probe and suite of instruments equipped with technologies significantly more advanced than those carried by Voyager 2. Additionally, the mission offers improved spatial coverage and higher resolution measurements than any previously achieved at Neptune. The proposed spacecraft would complete an orbital tour of Neptune and execute several close flybys of Triton. Further study of Neptune and Triton will provide exciting insights into what lies on the edge of our solar system and beyond. This study was prepared in conjunction with Jet Propulsion Laboratory's 2013 Planetary Science Summer School.

  5. Grain metamorphism in polar nitrogen ice on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    The rate of nitrogen grain growth on putative N2-rich polar caps on Triton is calculated. For most plausible assumptions of independent variables, mean grain sizes in polar N2 are meter-scale. Triton's polar caps should constitute the definitive solar-system test bed for the process of ice grain metamorphism. Interpretation of data already in hand may require long path length through condensed N2, possibly due to grain growth. Upcoming Voyager data may clarify the situation, although possible complications in detecting a glaze of N2 ice exist.

  6. Configuration space Faddeev calculations. I. Triton ground state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, G. L.; Friar, J. L.; Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.

    1980-08-01

    The formulation of Faddeev-type equations in configuration space is discussed. Numerical solutions are obtained using splines and the method of orthogonal collocation. Triton observables and wave-function probabilities are calculated for s-wave NN interaction models of Malfliet and Tjon and the tensor force model of Reid. Comparison with previously published triton results is made; our full five-channel results for the Reid soft-core potential are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Afnan and Birrell using separable expansion methods. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 3H, Faddeev calculations configuration space.

  7. Rheology of solid methane and nitrogen - Applications of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Stevenson, David J.

    1990-01-01

    The existing information about the rheological properties of solid methane and nitrogen is reviewed. The main limitation is the absence of creep data for solid nitrogen, but estimated properties are derived on the basis of simple scaling arguments for van der Waals bonded materials. On Triton solid methane and most likely nitrogen are too soft to support any topography over billions of years. Topographic support by water ice-rich materials seems almost certain. Nitrogen and methane do not intermix by solid-state diffusion. The weakness (absence?) of the opposition effect on Triton can be explained by annealing of nitrogen grains, provided the latter have sizes characteristic of freshly deposited frost.

  8. Triton's cratering record and its time of capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, R. G.; Croft, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Recent impact crater counts on the Voyager 2 high resolution images of Triton have resulted in a more accurate crater size/frequency distribution down to about 3 km diameter. These counts reveal a size/frequency distribution characterized by a differential -4 slope. This is consistent with the observation that there are no craters larger than 27 km diameter on the 20 percent of Triton viewed at resolutions capable of detecting them. A -4 slope is deficient in large craters and at the very low crater density on Triton no craters larger than about 30 km are expected on just 20 percent of the satellite. The Triton size distribution is significantly different from the differential -3 slope of the fresh crater population on Miranda, but both show leading/trailing asymmetries. Since Miranda is in prograde orbit this crater population is probably due to objects in heliocentric orbit, i.e., comets. If this crater population is due to comets, then the significantly different crater population on Triton is probably due to some other population of impacting objects. The most likely origin of these objects is planetesimals in planetocentric orbits. Because Triton is in retrograde orbit, objects in prograde planetocentric orbits will also produce a leading/trailing asymmetry. If the Triton craters are largely the result of objects in planetocentric orbit, then where are the comet craters that should be there if they have a differential -3 distribution function as inferred from the Miranda fresh crater population? The most likely answer is that they are there, but at such a low density that they can not be distinguished from the planetocentric population. An upper bound on this density can be estimated by determining the density of a crater population with a differential -3 slope where no craters larger than 27 km would be expected on the 20 percent of Triton viewed by Voyager at resolutions sufficient to detect them. This density is at the density of the largest crater. At this

  9. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  10. Grain metamorphism in polar nitrogen ice on triton

    SciTech Connect

    Zent, A.P.; McKay, C.P.; Pollack, J.B.; Cruikshank, D.P. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors calculate the rate of nitrogen grain growth on putative N{sub 2}-rich polar caps on Triton. For most plausible assumptions of independent variables, mean grain sizes in polar N{sub 2} are meter-scale. Triton's polar caps should constitute the definitive solar-system test bed for the process of ice grain metamorphism. Interpretation of data already in hand many require long path length through condensed N{sub 2}, possibly due to grain growth. Upcoming Voyager data may clarify the situation, although possible complications in detecting a glaze of N{sub 2} ice exist.

  11. Triton's Summer Sky of Methane and Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    According to the first ever infrared analysis of the atmosphere of Neptune's moon Triton, summer is in full swing in its southern hemisphere. The European observing team used ESO's Very Large Telescope and discovered carbon monoxide and made the first ground-based detection of methane in Triton's thin atmosphere. These observations revealed that the thin atmosphere varies seasonally, thickening when warmed. "We have found real evidence that the Sun still makes its presence felt on Triton, even from so far away. This icy moon actually has seasons just as we do on Earth, but they change far more slowly," says Emmanuel Lellouch, the lead author of the paper reporting these results in Astronomy & Astrophysics. On Triton, where the average surface temperature is about minus 235 degrees Celsius, it is currently summer in the southern hemisphere and winter in the northern. As Triton's southern hemisphere warms up, a thin layer of frozen nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide on Triton's surface sublimates into gas, thickening the icy atmosphere as the season progresses during Neptune's 165-year orbit around the Sun. A season on Triton lasts a little over 40 years, and Triton passed the southern summer solstice in 2000. Based on the amount of gas measured, Lellouch and his colleagues estimate that Triton's atmospheric pressure may have risen by a factor of four compared to the measurements made by Voyager 2 in 1989, when it was still spring on the giant moon. The atmospheric pressure on Triton is now between 40 and 65 microbars - 20 000 times less than on Earth. Carbon monoxide was known to be present as ice on the surface, but Lellouch and his team discovered that Triton's upper surface layer is enriched with carbon monoxide ice by about a factor of ten compared to the deeper layers, and that it is this upper "film" that feeds the atmosphere. While the majority of Triton's atmosphere is nitrogen (much like on Earth), the methane in the atmosphere, first detected by

  12. Photochemistry of Triton's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1995-01-01

    The photochemistry of 32 neutral and 21 ion species in Triton's atmosphere is considered. Parent species N2, CH4, and CO (with a mixing ratio of 3 x 10(exp -4) in our basic model) sublime from the ice with rates of 40, 208, and 0.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Chemistry below 50 km is driven mostly by photolysis of methane by the solar and interstellar medium Lyman-alpha photons, producing hydrocarbons C2H4, C2H6, and C2H2 which form haze particles with precipitation rates of 135, 28, and 1.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Some processes are discussed which increase the production of HCN (by an order of magnitude to a value of 29 g/sq cm/b.y.) and involve indirect photolysis of N2 by neutrals. Reanalysis of the measured methane profiles gives an eddy diffusion coefficient K = 4 x 10(exp 3) sq cm/s above the tropopause and a more accurate methane number density near the surface, (3.1 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp 11)/cc cm. Chemistry above 200 km is driven by the solar EUV radiation (lambda less than 1000 A)) and by precipitation of magnetospheric electrons with a total energy input of 10(exp 8) W (based on thermal balance calculations). The most abundant photochemical species are N, H2, H, O, and C. They escape with the total rates of 7.7 x 10(exp 24)/ s, 4.5 x 10(exp 25)/ s, 2.4 x 10(exp 25)/ s, 4.4 x 10(exp 22)/ s, and 1.1 x 10(exp 24)/ s, respectively. Atomic species are transported to a region of 50-200 km and drive the chemistry there. Iono- spheric chemistry explains the formation of an E region at 150-240 km with HCO(+) as a major ion, and of an F region above 240 km with a peak at 320 km and C(+) as a major ion. The ionosphere above 500 km consists of almost equal densities of C(+) and N(+) ions. The model profiles agree with the measured atomic nitrogen and electron density profiles. A number of other models with varying rate coefficients of some reactions, differing properties of the haze particles (chemically passive or active), etc., were developed. These models show

  13. Photochemistry of Triton's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1995-01-01

    The photochemistry of 32 neutral and 21 ion species in Triton's atmosphere is considered. Parent species N2, CH4, and CO (with a mixing ratio of 3 x 10(exp -4) in our basic model) sublime from the ice with rates of 40, 208, and 0.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Chemistry below 50 km is driven mostly by photolysis of methane by the solar and interstellar medium Lyman-alpha photons, producing hydrocarbons C2H4, C2H6, and C2H2 which form haze particles with precipitation rates of 135, 28, and 1.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Some processes are discussed which increase the production of HCN (by an order of magnitude to a value of 29 g/sq cm/b.y.) and involve indirect photolysis of N2 by neutrals. Reanalysis of the measured methane profiles gives an eddy diffusion coefficient K = 4 x 10(exp 3)sq cm/s above the tropopause and a more accurate methane number density near the surface, (3.1 +/- 0.8)x IO(exp 11)/cu cm. Chemistry above 200 km is driven by the solar EUV radiation (lambda less than 1000 A) and by precipitation of magnetospheric electrons with a total energy input of 10(exp 8) W (based on thermal balance calculations). The most abundant photochemical species are N, H2, H, 0, and C. They escape with the total rates of 7.7 x 10(exp 24)/ s, 4.5 x 10(exp 25)/s, 2.4 x 10(exp 25)/s, 4.4 x 10(exp 22)/s, and 1.1 x 10(exp 24), respectively. Atomic species are transported to a region of 50-200 km and drive the chemistry there. Ionospheric chemistry explains the formation of an E region at 150-240 km with HCO(+) as a major ion, and of an F region above 240 km with a peak at 320 km and C(+) as a major ion. The ionosphere above 500 km consists of almost equal densities of C(+) and N(+) ions. The model profiles agree with the measured atomic nitrogen and electron density profiles. A number of other models with varying rate coefficients of some reactions, differing properties of the haze particles (chemically passive or active), etc., were developed. These models show that there

  14. Chromic acid anodizing of aluminum foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, H.

    1988-01-01

    The success of the Space Station graphite/epoxy truss structure depends on its ability to endure long-term exposure to the LEO environment, primarily the effects of atomic oxygen and the temperture cycling resulting from the 94 minute orbit. This report describes the development and evaluation of chromic acid anodized (CAA) aluminum foil as protective coatings for these composite tubes. Included are: development of solar absorptance and thermal emittance properties required of Al foil and development of CAA parameters to achieve these optical properties; developing techniques to CAA 25 ft lengths of Al foil; developing bonding processes for wrapping the Al foil to graphite/epoxy tubes; and atomic oxygen testing of the CAA Al foil. Two specifications were developed and are included in the report: Chromic Acid Anodizing of Aluminum Foil Process Specification and Bonding of Anodized Aluminum Foil to Graphite/Epoxy Tubes. Results show that CAA Al foil provides and excellent protective and thermal control coating for the Space Station truss structure.

  15. A Preliminary Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.; Bruckner, Robert J.; Howard, S. Adam

    2006-01-01

    Recent breakthrough improvements in foil gas bearing load capacity, high temperature tribological coatings and computer based modeling have enabled the development of increasingly larger and more advanced Oil-Free Turbomachinery systems. Successful integration of foil gas bearings into turbomachinery requires a step wise approach that includes conceptual design and feasibility studies, bearing testing, and rotor testing prior to full scale system level demonstrations. Unfortunately, the current level of understanding of foil gas bearings and especially their tribological behavior is often insufficient to avoid developmental problems thereby hampering commercialization of new applications. In this paper, a new approach loosely based upon accepted hydrodynamic theory, is developed which results in a "Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map" to guide the integration process. This performance map, which resembles a Stribeck curve for bearing friction, is useful in describing bearing operating regimes, performance safety margins, the effects of load on performance and limiting factors for foil gas bearings.

  16. Predicted Foil Temperatures in the Brookhaven NSNS Accumulator Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, J. P.

    1997-05-01

    An investigation has been carried out into the peak equilibrium stripping foil temperatures that could be expected in the 1 GeV NSNS Accumulator Ring proposed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. A Graphite foil is assumed. Computed foil temperature distributions on the foil's surface would be presented, as well as the predicted relationships between foil temperature and quantities such as the average number of recirculated proton hits, linac current, and foil mass per unit area used.

  17. The Impact of Developmental Education at Triton College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chand, Sunil

    1985-01-01

    Describes the following aspects of the Developmental Education Program at Triton College: student placement, courses, faculty selection, reading and writing instruction, mathematics instruction, the Learning Assistance Center (LAC), LAC tutoring, LAC special projects, LAC management, special needs assistance program for disabled students, and…

  18. Benign triton tumor: multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Thakrar, Raj; Robson, Caroline D; Vargas, Sara O; Meara, John G; Rahbar, Reza; Smith, Edward R

    2014-01-01

    Benign Triton tumor (neuromuscular choristoma) is a rare mass that most commonly occurs as a multinodular expansion of tissue in or around large nerves. Intracranial occurrence is uncommon. We report on a 4-year-old girl presenting with a right-sided facial mass and trismus. Imaging revealed a large, complex mass extending from the ventral aspect of the pons, along the trigeminal nerve, through the foramen ovale, and into the right infratemporal fossa. The lesion was partially enhancing, invaded adjacent infratemporal musculature, was associated with marked overgrowth of the right coronoid process, and induced bony erosion of the middle cranial fossa. After needle biopsy, a multidisciplinary team, including plastic surgery, otolaryngology, and neurosurgery, performed a combined, multistep, single-day surgical approach for resection. Unique to this case was the resection of the coronoid process, a modified middle fossa intradural and extradural approach, coupled with a transfacial infratemporal approach. Microscopically, the resected tissue showed skeletal muscle, fibrous tissue, and nerve in a disorganized arrangement characteristic of a benign Triton tumor. We present this case to illustrate diagnostic clues and pitfalls in the preoperative evaluation of a benign Triton tumor. We also highlight the pathologist's role as a partner in a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment of this rare pediatric mass, potentially the largest Triton tumor in the head reported to date.

  19. Triton College: A Review of the Student Personnel Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyerl, Merrill C.; And Others

    This report presents the findings and recommendations of a review of the student personnel services program at Triton College (Illinois), conducted by a team from the Consulting Service of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. The report briefly describes the college and its administration and suggests a reorganization of…

  20. Comparative Planetary Nitrogen Atmospheres: Titan, Triton and Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Darrell F.; Zhu, Xun

    2016-06-01

    Titan has a massive atmosphere in comparison to Triton and Pluto which are widely regarded as the largest endmembers of Kuiper-Belt objects and as 'twins' with thin buffered N2 atmospheres controlled by interactions with surface ices, primarily N2 and CH4 frost. But one can compare them with Titan's upper atmosphere by noting that 14 microbars on Titan is at an altitude of approximately 400 km. At this level Titan has haze layers as Pluto does and less so on Triton. The talk will emphasize the fundamental role that CH4 plays in controlling the thermal structure of these atmospheres and is one of the principal reasons for the differences in the thermal structure of Pluto's and Triton's atmospheres. Titan and Pluto have in common photochemical production of nitriles at detectable abundances, whereas Triton does not. The cold upper atmosphere of Pluto remains a mystery as the reported abundances of HCN are insufficient to cool the atmosphere in contrast to Titan's thermosphere.

  1. A TENTATIVE IDENTIFICATION OF HCN ICE ON TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdorf, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Sekiguchi, T.; Nakamura, R.; Orton, G.; Quirico, E.; Schmitt, B.

    2010-08-01

    Spectra of Triton between 1.8 and 5.5 {mu}m, obtained in 2007 May and 2009 November, have been analyzed to determine the global surface composition. The spectra were acquired with the grism and the prism of the Infrared Camera on board AKARI with spectral resolutions of 135 and 22, respectively. The data from 4 to 5 {mu}m are shown in this Letter and compared to the spectra of N{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}, i.e., all the known ices on this moon that have distinct bands in this previously unexplored wavelength range. We report the detection of a 4{sigma} absorption band at 4.76 {mu}m (2101 cm{sup -1}), which we attribute tentatively to the presence of solid HCN. This is the sixth ice to be identified on Triton and an expected component of its surface because it is a precipitating photochemical product of Triton's thin N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} atmosphere. It is also formed directly by irradiation of mixtures of N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} ices. Here we consider only pure HCN, although it might be dissolved in N{sub 2} on the surface of Triton because of the evaporation and recondensation of N{sub 2} over its seasonal cycle. The AKARI spectrum of Triton also covers the wavelengths of the fundamental (1-0) band of {beta}-phase N{sub 2} ice (4.296 {mu}m, 2328 cm{sup -1}), which has never been detected in an astronomical body before, and whose presence is consistent with the overtone (2-0) band previously reported. Fundamental bands of CO and CO{sub 2} ices are also present.

  2. On the surface composition of Triton's southern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, B. J.; Young, L. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Olkin, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of an investigation to determine the longitudinal (zonal) distributions and temporal evolution of ices on the surface of Triton. Between 2002 and 2014, we obtained 63 nights of near-infrared (0.67-2.55 μ m) spectra using the SpeX instrument at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Triton has spectral features in this wavelength region from N2, CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O. Absorption features of ethane (C2H6) and 13CO are coincident at 2.405 μ m, a feature that we detect in our spectra. We calculated the integrated band area (or fractional band depth in the case of H2O) in each nightly average spectrum, constructed longitudinal distributions, and quantified temporal evolution for each of the chosen absorption bands. The volatile ices (N2, CO, CH4) show significant variability over one Triton rotation and have well-constrained longitudes of peak absorption. The non-volatile ices (CO2, H2O) show poorly-constrained peak longitudes and little variability. The longitudinal distribution of the 2.405 μ m band shows little variability over one Triton rotation and is 97 ± 44 ° and 92 ± 44 ° out of phase with the 1.58 μ m and 2.35 μ m CO bands, respectively. This evidence indicates that the 2.405 μ m band is due to absorption from non-volatile ethane. CH4 absorption increased over the period of the observations while absorption from all other ices showed no statistically significant change. We conclude from these results that the southern latitudes of Triton are currently dominated by non-volatile ices and as the sub-solar latitude migrates northwards, a larger quantity of volatile ice is coming into view.

  3. Tilted foils polarization at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnqvist, H.; Sotty, C.; Balabanski, D.; Dhal, A.; Georgiev, G.; Hass, M.; Heinz, A.; Hirayama, Y.; Imai, N.; Johansson, H.; Kowalska, M.; Kusoglu, A.; Nilsson, T.; Stuchbery, A.; Wenander, F.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    The tilted-foils nuclear-spin polarization method has been evaluated using the REX-ISOLDE linear accelerator at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. A beam of 8Li delivered with an energy of 300 keV/u traversed through one Mylar foil to degrade the beam energy to 200 keV/u and consequently through 10 thin diamond-like carbon foils to polarize the nuclear spin. The attained nuclear spin polarization of 3.6±0.3% was measured with a β-NMR setup.

  4. Polar Wander on Triton and Pluto Due to Volatile Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2002-01-01

    Polar wander may occur on Triton and Pluto because of volatile migration. Triton, with its low obliquity, can theoretically sublimate volatiles (mostly nitrogen) at the rate of approximately 10(exp 14) kilograms per year from the equatorial regions and deposit them at the poles. Assuming Triton to be rigid on the sublimation timescale, after approximately 10(exp 5) years the polar caps would become large enough to cancel the rotational flattening, with a total mass equivalent to a global layer approximately 120-250 m in depth. At this point the pole wanders about the tidal bulge axis, which is the line joining Triton and Neptune. Rotation about the bulge axis might be expected to disturb the leading side/trailing side cratering statistics. Because no such disturbance is observed, it may be that Triton's mantle viscosity is too high but its surface volatile inventory is too low to permit wander. On the other hand, its mantle viscosity might be low, so that any uncompensated cap load might be expected to wander toward the tidal bulge axis. In this case, the axis of wander passes through the equator from the leading side to the trailing side; rotation about this wander axis would not disturb the cratering statistics. Low-viscosity polar wander may explain the bright southern hemisphere: this is the pole which is wandering toward the equator. In any case the permanent polar caps may be geologically very young. Polar wander may possibly take place on Pluto, due to its obliquity oscillations and perihelion-pole geometry. However, Pluto is probably not experiencing any wander at present. The Sun has been shining strongly on the poles over the last half of the obliquity cycle, so that volatiles should migrate to the equator, stabilizing the planet against wander. Spacecraft missions to Triton and Pluto which measure the dynamical flattening could give information about the accumulation of volatiles at the poles. Such information is best obtained by measuring gravity and

  5. Stray Electric Field Due to the Carbon Foil Resistance in Hydrogen Beam-Foil-Spectroscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Dehaes, J. C.; Carmeliet, J.

    1980-01-01

    We have measured the linear polarization of the Hβ transition at 486.1 nm excited by passage of a 110 keV proton beam through perpendicular carbon foils. We have observed that the polarization depends upon the beam intensity and on the relative position of the foil and its holder. We have shown that these dependences are linked to the presence of a stray electric field at the immediate vicinity of the foil. The field is due to the potential distribution at the foil surface resulting from the electron radial flow in the high foil electric resistance (about 50 kΩ). It introduces a perturbation which in our case is more important than the temperature effect observed by Gay and Berry (Phys. Rev. A19, 952 (1979)). The field is proportional to the beam current density and is reduced for large foil and beam diameters.

  6. Radioactivity analysis in niobium activation foils

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G.E.

    1995-06-01

    The motivation for this study was to measure and analyze the activity of six (6) niobium (Nb) foils (the x-rays from an internal transition in Nb-93m) and apply this information with previously obtained activation foil data. The niobium data was used to determine the epithermal to MeV range for the neutron spectrum and fluence. The foil activation data was re-evaluated in a spectrum analysis code (STAY`SL) to provide new estimates of the exposure at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF). The activity of the niobium foils was measured and analyzed at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) under the direction of Professor William Miller. The spectrum analysis was performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) by Professor Gary Mueller.

  7. Charge-exchange reactions with a radioactive triton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenecke, J.

    1998-12-21

    A high-resolution (t, {sup 3}He) test experiment has been performed recently by making use of a secondary triton beam produced by fragmentation of {alpha}-particles. The purpose of this charge-exchange experiment was to achieve good energy resolution in an (n,p)-type reaction at intermediate bombarding energies. The experiment was carried out with the K1200 cyclotron at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the A1200 beam-analysis system and the S800 magnetic spectrometer. The beam-analysis system was used to transport the energy-dispersed radioactive triton beam from the production target to the target position, and the magnetic spectrometer was used to focus the dispersion-matched {sup 3}He particles from the (t, {sup 3}He) reaction at 0 degree sign onto the focal plane of the spectrometer. An energy resolution of 200-250 keV was achieved.

  8. Triton - Scattering models and surface/atmosphere constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. R.

    1989-08-01

    Modeling of Triton's spectrum indicates a bright scattering layer of optical depth tau about 3 overlying an optically deep layer of CH4 with high absorption and little scattering. UV absorption in the spectrum indicates tau about 0.3 of red-yellow haze, although some color may also arise from complex organics partially visible on the surface. An analysis of this and other (spectro)photometric evidence indicates that Triton most likely has a bright surface, which was partially visible in 1977-1980. Geometric albedo p = 0.62 + 0.18 or - 0.12 radius r = 1480 + or - 180 km, and temperature T = 48 + or - 6 K. With scattering optical depths of 0.3-3 and about 1-10 mb of N2, a Mars-like atmospheric density and surface visibility pertain.

  9. Cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor, triton tumor variant: case report.

    PubMed

    Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Peralta-Olvera, Fabiola; Marhx-Bracho, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Jurado, Rodolfo; De Leon-Bojorge, Beatriz

    2003-01-01

    A case of a cerebral malignant triton tumor in a 3-year-old boy with a 2-month history of frontal headache and no clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis is reported. The computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large, irregular tumor in the right parietooccipital lobe. A partial surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor was highly cellular and consisted of spindle cells with hyperchromatic and pleomorphic nuclei. Focally, neoplastic cells with rhabdomyoblastic features were found. The immunohistochemical study showed that tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein and CD57, and the rhabdomyoblasts expressed desmin, Myo-D1, and myoglobin. During the postoperative period, a massive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was identified and surgical drainage was performed. The patient worsened and died 10 days after the first surgery. Postmortem study was not authorized. Six cases of cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor have been described; however, primary intraparenchymal malignant triton tumor has not been previously described.

  10. Investigation of Energy Harvesting Using Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mivehchi, Amin; Persichetti, Amanda; Dunham, Brandon; Dahl, Jason M.

    2013-11-01

    When harvesting kinetic energy using a flapping foil, the separation of coherent structures in the wake is crucial for determining forces on the body. Applications for utilizing energy harvesting with a flapping foil include powering of local, low power equipment and recharging AUV batteries that use flapping foils for propulsion and maneuvering. In each of these cases, it is critical to accurately predict the physical behavior and location of vortices in relation to the motion of the body in order to maximize energy output. A two-dimensional open source boundary data immersion method (LilyPad) is used for simulating the flapping motion of a foil for energy harvesting in a current. Forced motion of the flapping body indicates theoretical efficiencies for energy harvesting near 43 percent under specific flapping conditions. A simple control scheme based on pressure sensing on the surface of the foil is developed to control pitch of the foil while energy harvesting occurs in the heave direction. The control scheme is tested through real time numerical simulation. Comparisons are made with physical laboratory experiments, demonstrating high efficiencies in energy harvesting.

  11. Triton and Nereid astrographic observations from Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the reduced astrographic observations of Triton and Nereid derived from Voyager 2 imaging data. The data set contains 496 sets of spacecraft-centered fight ascension and declination observations and includes all of the observations used in Voyager encounter operations. The details of the conversion process from imaging to astrographic observations are given. The effect of using the astrographic rather than imaging form in ephemeris improvement is evaluated.

  12. A NEPtune/Triton Vision Mission Using Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienstock, B.; Atkinson, D. H.; Baines, K.; Mahaffy, P.; Atreya, S.; Stern, A.; Steffes, P.; Wright, M.; Ball Collaboration; Boeing Collaboration

    2005-08-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system divide into two distinct classes: the ``Gas Giants" Jupiter and Saturn, and the ``Ice Giants" Uranus and Neptune. While the Gas Giants primarily comprise hydrogen and helium, the Ice Giants appear fundamentally different, containing significant amounts of the heavier elements including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur. Comparisons of the internal structure and overall composition of the Gas and Ice Giants will yield valuable insights into the processes that formed our solar system and possibly extrasolar systems. By 2012 detailed studies of the chemical and physical properties of Jupiter and Saturn will have been completed by the Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, and Juno missions. A Neptune Orbiter with Probes mission would deliver the corresponding key data for an Ice Giant. Such a mission to study Triton, Nereid, the other icy satellites of Neptune, Neptune's system of rings, and the deep Neptune atmosphere to pressures ranging from several hundred bars to possibly several kilobars has been studied. Power and propulsion would be provided using nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technologies. This ambitious mission requires a number of technical issues be investigated and resolved, including: (1) developing a reasonable mission design that allows proper targeting and timing of the entry probe(s) while offering adequate opportunities for Triton, small icy satellite, and ring science, (2) giant-planet atmospheric probe thermal protection system (TPS) design, (3) deep probe design including pressure vessel, seals, windows, penetrations and inlets, (4) deep probe telecommunications through Neptune's dense and absorbing atmosphere, 5) Triton lander design to conduct extended surface science, and (6) defining an appropriate suite of science instruments for the Orbiter, Probes and Landers to explore the depths of the Neptune atmosphere, magnetic field, Triton, and the icy satellites utilizing the ample mass and power

  13. Neptune's Triton: A moon rich in dry ice and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prentice, A. J. R.

    1989-01-01

    The encounter of the spacecraft Voyager 2 with Neptune and its large satellite Triton in August 1989 will provide a crucial test of ideas regarding the origin and chemical composition of the outer solar system. In this pre-encounter publication, the possibility is quantified that Titron is a captured moon which, like Pluto and Charon, originally condensed as a major planetesimal within the gas ring that was shed by the contracting protosolar cloud at Neptune's orbit. Ideas of supersonic convective turbulence are used to compute the gas pressure, temperature and rat of catalytic synthesis of CH4, CO2, and C(s) within the protosolar cloud, assuming that all C is initially present as CO. The calculations lead to a unique composition for Triton, Pluto, Charon: each body consists of, by mass, 18 1/2 percent solid CO2 ice, 4 percent graphite, 1/2 percent CH4 ice, 29 percent methanated water ice and 48 percent of anhydrous rock. This mix has a density consistent with that of the Pluto-Charon system and yields a predicted mean density for Triton of 2.20 + or - 0.5 g/cu cm, for satellite radius equal to 1,750 km.

  14. Extraction of brain capillary membrane proteins using Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, J F; Béliveau, R

    1994-12-01

    Brain capillaries contain a great variety of membrane proteins involved in the transport of hydrophilic nutrients or in the reception of hormonal signals. The use of Triton X-114 fractionation to purify membrane proteins according to their degree of hydrophobicity was investigated. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a distinct polypeptide composition for each fraction. Most of the proteins (68%) were solubilized by Triton X-114 and, of these proteins, the majority (74%) was found in the detergent-poor phase. Alkaline phosphatase which possesses a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor partitioned in the pellet of insoluble proteins where it was enriched 2.3-fold. In contrast, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, the GLUT1 glucose transporter and P-glycoprotein, three integral membrane proteins, and p21ras and a 42 kDa G protein alpha subunit, both covalently modified by lipids, were efficiently solubilized and fractionated in the detergent-rich fraction where they were enriched 3.5-, 4.8-, 4.4-, 4.5- and 4.7-fold, respectively. Triton X-114 fractionation could therefore be used as a first step in the purification of many blood-brain barrier membrane proteins.

  15. Pitch jnd and the tritone paradox: The linguistic nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Kourosh

    2002-11-01

    Previous research has shown a connection between absolute pitch (the ability to name a specific pitch in the absence of any reference) and native competence in a tone language (Deutsch, 1990). In tone languages, tone is one of the features which determines the lexical meaning of a word. This study investigates the relationship between native competence in a tone language and the just noticeable difference of pitch. Furthermore, the tritone paradox studies have shown that subjects hear two tritones (with bell-shaped spectral envelopes) as either ascending or descending depending on their linguistic backgrounds (Deutsch, 1987). It is hypothesized that the native speakers of tone languages have a higher JND for pitch, and hear the two tones of the tritone paradox as ascending, whereas, native speakers of nontone languages hear them as descending. This study will indicate the importance of early musical training for the development of acute tone sensitivity. It will also underline the importance of language and culture in the way it shapes our musical understanding. The significance of this study will be in the areas of music education and pedagogy.

  16. Neptune's Triton: A moon rich in dry ice and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, A.J.R.

    1989-08-01

    The encounter of the spacecraft Voyager 2 with Neptune and its large satellite Triton in August 1989 will provide a crucial test of ideas regarding the origin and chemical composition of the outer solar system. In this pre-encounter publication, the possibility is quantified that Titron is a captured moon which, like Pluto and Charon, originally condensed as a major planetesimal within the gas ring that was shed by the contracting protosolar cloud at Neptune's orbit. Ideas of supersonic convective turbulence are used to compute the gas pressure, temperature and rat of catalytic synthesis of CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and C(s) within the protosolar cloud, assuming that all C is initially present as CO. The calculations lead to a unique composition for Triton, Pluto, Charon: each body consists of, by mass, 18 1/2% solid CO{sub 2} ice, 4 percent graphite, 1/2% CH{sub 4} ice, 29 percent methanated water ice and 48 percent of anhydrous rock. This mix has a density consistent with that of the Pluto-Charon system and yields a predicted mean density for Triton of 2.20 + or - 0.5 g/cu cm, for satellite radius equal to 1,750 km.

  17. Psychoanalytic and musical ambiguity: the tritone in gee, officer krupke.

    PubMed

    Jaffee Nagel, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The poignant and timeless Broadway musical West Side Story is viewed from the standpoint of taking musical forms as psychoanalytic data. The musical configuration of notes called the tritone (or diabolus in musica) is taken as a sonic metaphor expressing ambiguity both in musical vocabulary and in mental life. The tritone, which historically and harmonically represents instability, is heard throughout the score and emphasizes the intrapsychic, interpersonal, and social dramas that unfold within and between the two gangs in West Side Story. Particular emphasis is given to the comic but exceedingly sober song Gee, Officer Krupke. Bernstein's sensitivity to the ambiguity and tension inherent in the tritone in West Side Story is conceptualized as an intersection of music theory and theories of mind; this perspective holds implications for clinical practice and transports psychoanalytic concepts from the couch to the Broadway stage and into the community to address the complexities of love, hate, aggression, prejudice, and violence. Ultimately, West Side Story cross-pollinates music and theater, as well as music and psychoanalytic concepts. PMID:20234007

  18. Neptune and Triton: Essential pieces of the Solar System puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Achilleos, N.; Agnor, C. B.; Campagnola, S.; Charnoz, S.; Christophe, B.; Coates, A. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Jones, G. H.; Lamy, L.; Marzari, F.; Nettelmann, N.; Ruiz, J.; Ambrosi, R.; Andre, N.; Bhardwaj, A.; Fortney, J. J.; Hansen, C. J.; Helled, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Orton, G.; Ray, L.; Reynaud, S.; Sergis, N.; Srama, R.; Volwerk, M.

    2014-12-01

    The planet Neptune and its largest moon Triton hold the keys to major advances across multiple fields of Solar System science. The ice giant Neptune played a unique and important role in the process of Solar System formation, has the most meteorologically active atmosphere in the Solar System (despite its great distance from the Sun), and may be the best Solar System analogue of the dominant class of exoplanets detected to date. Neptune's moon Triton is very likely a captured Kuiper Belt object, holding the answers to questions about the icy dwarf planets that formed in the outer Solar System. Triton is geologically active, has a tenuous nitrogen atmosphere, and is predicted to have a subsurface ocean. However, our exploration of the Neptune system remains limited to a single spacecraft flyby, made by Voyager 2 in 1989. Here, we present the high-level science case for further exploration of this outermost planetary system, based on a white paper submitted to the European Space Agency (ESA) for the definition of the second and third large missions in the ESA Cosmic Vision Programme 2015-2025. We discuss all the major science themes that are relevant for further spacecraft exploration of the Neptune system, and identify key scientific questions in each area. We present an overview of the results of a European-led Neptune orbiter mission analysis. Such a mission has significant scope for international collaboration, and is essential to achieve our aim of understanding how the Solar System formed, and how it works today.

  19. Psychoanalytic and musical ambiguity: the tritone in gee, officer krupke.

    PubMed

    Jaffee Nagel, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The poignant and timeless Broadway musical West Side Story is viewed from the standpoint of taking musical forms as psychoanalytic data. The musical configuration of notes called the tritone (or diabolus in musica) is taken as a sonic metaphor expressing ambiguity both in musical vocabulary and in mental life. The tritone, which historically and harmonically represents instability, is heard throughout the score and emphasizes the intrapsychic, interpersonal, and social dramas that unfold within and between the two gangs in West Side Story. Particular emphasis is given to the comic but exceedingly sober song Gee, Officer Krupke. Bernstein's sensitivity to the ambiguity and tension inherent in the tritone in West Side Story is conceptualized as an intersection of music theory and theories of mind; this perspective holds implications for clinical practice and transports psychoanalytic concepts from the couch to the Broadway stage and into the community to address the complexities of love, hate, aggression, prejudice, and violence. Ultimately, West Side Story cross-pollinates music and theater, as well as music and psychoanalytic concepts.

  20. Planetary objectives of Odyssey2 Mission: Neptune and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoir, Benjamin; Lenoir, B.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.; Touboul, P.; Lévy, A.; Léon-Hirtz, S.; Biancale, R.; Sohl, F.; Dittus, H.; van Zoest, T.; Courty, J.-M.; Reynaud, S.; Lamine, B.; Métris, G.; Wolf, P.; Lümmerzahl, C.; Selig, H.

    Odyssey2 Mission will be proposed for the next call of M3 missions for Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. It will aim at Neptune and Triton and the interplanetary cruise will be used for testing General Relativity, and in particular its scale dependence. To do so, the satellite will carry on board the following instruments: • a high-precision 3 axis electrostatic accelerometer, with bias calibration system, which will measure the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft; • a radio-science instrument, for a precise range and Doppler measurement, with additional VLBI equipment; • a one-way laser ranging, which will improve the range and Doppler measurement made by radio-science; • an Ultra Stable Oscillator (USO), used for laser and radio-science measurement. During the encounters with Neptune and Triton, these instruments will be use in order to increase the scientific return on the gravity field and atmosphere of these two bodies. Indeed, the atmospheric drag for example, which will be measured by the accelerometer, has a non-negligible impact on the trajectory of the spacecraft and therefore on the Doppler signature of the trajectory. If no data are available on the non-gravitational forces, the retrieval of the gravity potential coefficients can be put in jeopardy. Concerning the knowledge of the atmosphere, the direct measurement of atmospheric drag can be used, with the outputs of other instruments, to enhance our knowledge of the atmosphere of these two bodies. Moreover, the radio-link and the USO can be used together to measure the time delay of the radio beam and infer some characteristics of the atmosphere. Several instruments dedicated to planetology are under study. The choice between them will be an output of the Phase 0 study performed by CNES for this mission: • a magnetometer to measure intrinsic fields on Neptune and induced fields on Triton; • an infrared mapping capability, which was not available during the Voyager flyby, to determine

  1. Voyager radio science observations of neptune and triton.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Sweetnam, D N; Anderson, J D; Borutzki, S E; Campbell, J K; Eshleman, V R; Gresh, D L; Gurrola, E M; Hinson, D P; Kawashima, N; Kursinski, E R; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Lyons, J R; Marouf, E A; Rosen, P A; Simpson, R A; Wood, G E

    1989-12-15

    The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptune system included radio science investigations of the masses and densities of Neptune and Triton, the low-order gravitational harmonics of Neptune, the vertical structures of the atmospheres and ionospheres of Neptune and Triton, the composition of the atmosphere of Neptune, and characteristics of ring material. Demanding experimental requirements were met successfully, and study of the large store of collected data has begun. The initial search of the data revealed no detectable effects of ring material with optical depth tau [unknown] 0.01. Preliminary representative results include the following: 1.0243 x 10(26) and 2.141 x 10(22) kilograms for the masses of Neptune and Triton; 1640 and 2054 kilograms per cubic meter for their respective densities; 1355 +/- 7 kilometers, provisionally, for the radius of Triton; and J(2) = 3411 +/- 10(x 10(-6)) and J(4) = -26(+12)(-20)(x10(-6)) for Neptune's gravity field (J>(2) and J(4) are harmonic coefficients of the gravity field). The equatorial and polar radii of Neptune are 24,764 +/- 20 and 24,340 +/- 30 kllometers, respectively, at the 10(5)-pascal (1 bar) pressure level. Neptune's atmosphere was probed to a pressure level of about 5 x 10(5) pascals, and effects of a methane cloud region and probable ammonia absorption below the cloud are evident in the data. Results for the mixing ratios of helium and ammonia are still being investigated; the methane abundance below the clouds is at least 1 percent by volume. Derived temperature-pressure profiles to 1.2 x 10(5) pascals and 78 kelvins (K) show a lapse rate corresponding to "frozen" equilibrium of the para- and ortho-hydrogen states. Neptune's ionosphere exhibits an extended topside at a temperature of 950 +/- 160 K if H(+) is the dominant ion, and narrow ionization layers of the type previously seen at the other three giant planets. Triton has a dense ionosphere with a peak electron concentration of 46 x 10(9) per cubic meter at an

  2. Voyager radio science observations of neptune and triton.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Sweetnam, D N; Anderson, J D; Borutzki, S E; Campbell, J K; Eshleman, V R; Gresh, D L; Gurrola, E M; Hinson, D P; Kawashima, N; Kursinski, E R; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Lyons, J R; Marouf, E A; Rosen, P A; Simpson, R A; Wood, G E

    1989-12-15

    The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptune system included radio science investigations of the masses and densities of Neptune and Triton, the low-order gravitational harmonics of Neptune, the vertical structures of the atmospheres and ionospheres of Neptune and Triton, the composition of the atmosphere of Neptune, and characteristics of ring material. Demanding experimental requirements were met successfully, and study of the large store of collected data has begun. The initial search of the data revealed no detectable effects of ring material with optical depth tau [unknown] 0.01. Preliminary representative results include the following: 1.0243 x 10(26) and 2.141 x 10(22) kilograms for the masses of Neptune and Triton; 1640 and 2054 kilograms per cubic meter for their respective densities; 1355 +/- 7 kilometers, provisionally, for the radius of Triton; and J(2) = 3411 +/- 10(x 10(-6)) and J(4) = -26(+12)(-20)(x10(-6)) for Neptune's gravity field (J>(2) and J(4) are harmonic coefficients of the gravity field). The equatorial and polar radii of Neptune are 24,764 +/- 20 and 24,340 +/- 30 kllometers, respectively, at the 10(5)-pascal (1 bar) pressure level. Neptune's atmosphere was probed to a pressure level of about 5 x 10(5) pascals, and effects of a methane cloud region and probable ammonia absorption below the cloud are evident in the data. Results for the mixing ratios of helium and ammonia are still being investigated; the methane abundance below the clouds is at least 1 percent by volume. Derived temperature-pressure profiles to 1.2 x 10(5) pascals and 78 kelvins (K) show a lapse rate corresponding to "frozen" equilibrium of the para- and ortho-hydrogen states. Neptune's ionosphere exhibits an extended topside at a temperature of 950 +/- 160 K if H(+) is the dominant ion, and narrow ionization layers of the type previously seen at the other three giant planets. Triton has a dense ionosphere with a peak electron concentration of 46 x 10(9) per cubic meter at an

  3. Cryostat with Foil and MLI

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Peter K.F.; Gung, Chen-yu

    2005-10-06

    Induction cores are used to accelerate heavy ion beam array, which are built around the outer diameter of the cryostat housing the superconducting quadruple array. Compact cryostat is highly desirable to reduce the cost of the induction cores. Recent experiences in fabrication of a cryostat for single beam transport revealed that it is possible to reduce the spacing in the cryostat vacuum jacket by using low-emissivity thermal insulation material instead of conventional MLI. However, it is labor-intensive to install the new type of insulation as compared with using MLI. It is promising to build a cost-effective compact cryostat for quadruple magnet array for heavy ion beam array transport by using low-emissivity material combined with conventional MLI as radiation insulation. A matrix of insulation designs and tests will be performed as the feasibility study and for the selection of the optimal thermal insulation as the Phase I work. The selected mixed insulation will be used to build prototype compact cryostats in the Phase II project, which are aiming for housing quadruple doublet array. In this STTR phase I study, a small cryostat has been designed and built to perform calorimetric characterization of the heat load in a liquid helium vessel insulated with a vacuum layer with a nominal clearance of 3.5 mm. The vacuum clearance resembled that used in the warm-bore beam tube region in a prototype cryostat previously built for the heavy ion beam transport experiment. The vacuum clearance was geometrically restricted with a heater shell with the temperature controlled at near 300 K. Various combinations of radiation and thermal shields were installed in the tight vacuum clearance for heat load measurements. The measured heat loads are reported and compared with previous test result using a compact vacuum layer. Further developments of the thermal insulations used in the present study are discussed. The compact cryostat with foil and MLI insulation may be used in the

  4. The first UV spectrum of Triton - IUE observations from 2600 to 3200 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Skinner, T. E.; Brosch, N.; Van Santvoort, J.; Trafton, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the first observations of Triton's spectrum below 3300 A are reported. Triton's 2700 A geometric albedo is found to be 0.28 + or - 0.04. The albedo increases monotonically from 2600 to 3200 A, with a slope of 0.13 + or - 0.03 per 1000 A. This positive slope is qualitatively similar to, but shallower than, Triton's visible albedo slope and argues against a strong Rayleigh scattering signature. Triton's integrated flux is found to be 1.5 times Pluto's, indicating Triton to be either more reflective in the UV, or bigger, or both. The redness of Triton's visible and UV colors argues against an extremely bright surface and for a larger radius than Pluto's. A lower limit on the radius of 1240 + or - 90 km is derived. The spectrum observed by IUE is consistent with either an icy surface or a suspended aerosol layer which preferentially absorbs UV light.

  5. Automated searching of Stardust interstellar foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Leitner, Jan; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2012-04-01

    The Al foils lining the aerogel tiles of the Stardust interstellar tray represent approximately 13% of the total collecting area, about 15,300 mm2. Although the flux is poorly constrained, fewer than 100 impacts are expected in all the Al foils on the collector, and most of these are likely to be less than 1 μm in diameter. Secondary electron (SE) images of the foils at a resolution of approximately 50 nm per pixel are being collected during the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination, resulting in more than two million images that will eventually need to be searched for impact craters. The unknown and complicated nature of 3-dimensional interstellar tracks in aerogel necessitated the use of a massively distributed human search to locate only a few interstellar tracks. The 2-dimensional nature of the SE images makes the problem of searching for craters tractable for algorithmic approaches. Using templates of craters from cometary impacts into Stardust foils, we present a computer algorithm for the identification of impact craters in the Stardust interstellar foils using normalized cross-correlation and template matching. We address the speed, sensitivity, and false-positive rate of the algorithm. The search algorithm can be adapted for use in other applications. The program is freely available for download at .

  6. Additional security features for optically variable foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Allan C.; Russo, Frank

    1998-04-01

    For thousands of years, man has exploited the attraction and radiance of pure gold to adorn articles of great significance. Today, designers decorate packaging with metallic gold foils to maintain the prestige of luxury items such as perfumes, chocolates, wine and whisky, and to add visible appeal and value to wide range of products. However, today's products do not call for the hand beaten gold leaf of the Ancient Egyptians, instead a rapid production technology exists which makes use of accurately coated thin polymer films and vacuum deposited metallic layers. Stamping Foils Technology is highly versatile since several different layers may be combined into one product, each providing a different function. Not only can a foil bring visual appeal to an article, it can provide physical and chemical resistance properties and also protect an article from human forms of interference, such as counterfeiting, copying or tampering. Stamping foils have proved to be a highly effective vehicle for applying optical devices to items requiring this type of protection. Credit cards, bank notes, personal identification documents and more recently high value packaged items such as software and perfumes are protected by optically variable devices applied using stamping foil technology.

  7. Degrader foils for the CARIBU project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, John P.; Savard, Guy; Pardo, Richard C.; Baker, Samuel I.; Levand, Anthony F.; Zabransky, Bruce J.

    2011-11-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) project was conceived to provide neutron rich beams originating from the 3% fission decay branch of a 252Cf source to be accelerated by the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS). This 1Ci 252Cf source will be housed in a movable shielded cask, from which it can be directly transferred into a large helium gas stopper cell. Within the gas stopper, the CARIBU 252Cf source is positioned behind an aluminum degrader foil where the radioactive recoils of interest lose most of their energy before being stopped in the helium gas. To stop recoils over the full fission mass range effectively, three degraders of increasing thickness are required, one to cover the light fission peak and two for the isotopes in the heavy fission peak. The geometry of the source within the gas cell would ideally require a hemispherically shaped degrader foil for uniform energy loss of the fission products. The fabrication of a thin foil of such a shape proved to be exceedingly difficult and, therefore, a compromise "top hat" arrangement was designed. In addition, the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment necessary for the gas cell to function properly prevented the use of any epoxy due to vacuum outgassing. Handling, assembling of the foils and mounting must be done under clean room conditions. Details of early attempts at producing these foils as well as handling and mounting will be discussed.

  8. Role of Triton X-100 in chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassays capable of diagnosing genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Chong, Richard; Rho, Jee-Eun R; Yoon, Hye-Joo; Park, Paul S; Rho, Tae-Ho D; Park, Jee Y; Park, Lucienne; Kim, Young-Hwan; Lee, Ji Hoon

    2013-11-15

    The use of Triton X surfactants in developing 1,1'-oxalylimidazole chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassays (ODI CEIs) with extended linear response range for the quantification of unconjugated estriol (uE3), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is reported for the first time. The wider linear dynamic range in ODI CLEIA results from Triton X series (e.g., Triton X-100, -114, -405, -705) acting as an inhibitor in the interaction between Amplex Red (hydrophobic substrate) and horseradish peroxidase (hydrophilic enzyme) to produce resorufin (hydrophobic fluorescent dye). Triton X-100 acts as the appropriate inhibitor in ODI CLEIA. The maximum concentrations of AFP and hCG quantified with sandwich ODI CLEIA in the presence of Triton X-100 were 8 times higher than when analyzed with the same system in the absence of Triton X-100. In addition, the lowest concentration of uE3 determined using competitive ODI CLEIA in the presence of Triton X-100 was 20 times lower than that measured with competitive ODI CLEIA in the absence of Triton X-100. These results indicate that rapid quantification of AFP, uE3, and hCG using cost effective and highly sensitive ODI CLEIAs in the presence of Triton X-100 can be applied as an accurate, precise, and reproducible method to diagnose genetic disorders (e.g., trisomy 18 and trisomy 21) in fetuses.

  9. Neuroprotection of Grape Seed Extract and Pyridoxine against Triton-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Heba M; Wahby, Mayssaa M

    2016-01-01

    Triton WR-1339 administration causes neurotoxicity. Natural products and herbal extracts can attenuate cerebral injury. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective role of grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 against triton-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-five adult male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 140-145 g, were divided into five groups: control, triton, grape seed extract + triton, grape seed extract + triton + vitamin B6, and vitamin B6 + triton. The hematological and biochemical analyses were carried out. Alteration in iNOS mRNA gene expression was determined using reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis. In addition, qualitative DNA fragmentation was examined using agarose gel electrophoresis. Triton-treatment caused significant disturbances in the hematological parameters, the neurological functions, and the antioxidant profile. Also, triton significantly increased the iNOS mRNA expression and DNA damage. Our results showed that grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 could attenuate all the examined parameters. These natural substances could exhibit protective effects against triton-induced neurological damage because of their antioxidative and antiapoptotic capacities.

  10. Removing endotoxin from plasmid samples by Triton X-114 isothermal extraction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zhao, Jun; Du, Hui-Cong; Tian, Shuang; Li, Li-Wen

    2012-05-15

    Triton X-114 temperature transition extraction has been considered to be a simple and cost-effective strategy to eliminate endotoxin from plasmid preparations. However, a repeated cooling-heating process may promote the degradation of plasmid DNA. Based on the finding that the cloud point of Triton X-114 solution increases substantially in the presence of small amounts of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and that electrolytes decrease the cloud point of Triton X-114-SDS solution drastically, we designed a Triton X-114 isothermal extraction method for removing endotoxin from plasmid samples and found that it has the same endotoxin removal efficiency when compared with the temperature transition extraction method.

  11. Rotationally resolved midultraviolet studies of Triton and the Pluto/Charon system. I - IUE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. A.; Brosch, Noah; Barker, Edwin S.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The present uniform analysis of the full set of IUE spectra of Pluto + Charon and Triton attempts to characterize these objects' UV photometric properties variation with rotational phase, giving attention to the 2550-3200 A range. The visible-UV color differentiation increases as Pluto reaches its maximum bolometric brightness; the IUE data suggests that this could be due to a UV surface absorption feature on Pluto or Charon. Typical UV albedos are found on Triton which agree with Voyager photopolarimeter results; Pluto's albedo is much lower than that of Triton, but the amplitude of the Pluto UV lightcurve is greater than that of Triton.

  12. Neuroprotection of Grape Seed Extract and Pyridoxine against Triton-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Heba M.

    2016-01-01

    Triton WR-1339 administration causes neurotoxicity. Natural products and herbal extracts can attenuate cerebral injury. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective role of grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 against triton-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-five adult male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 140–145 g, were divided into five groups: control, triton, grape seed extract + triton, grape seed extract + triton + vitamin B6, and vitamin B6 + triton. The hematological and biochemical analyses were carried out. Alteration in iNOS mRNA gene expression was determined using reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis. In addition, qualitative DNA fragmentation was examined using agarose gel electrophoresis. Triton-treatment caused significant disturbances in the hematological parameters, the neurological functions, and the antioxidant profile. Also, triton significantly increased the iNOS mRNA expression and DNA damage. Our results showed that grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 could attenuate all the examined parameters. These natural substances could exhibit protective effects against triton-induced neurological damage because of their antioxidative and antiapoptotic capacities. PMID:27293516

  13. Triton's surface properties - A preliminary analysis from ground-based, Voyager photopolarimeter subsystem, and laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Lane, A. L.; Gibson, J.; Burrows, H.; Nelson, R. M.; Bliss, D.; Smythe, W.; Garkanian, V.; Wallis, B.

    1991-01-01

    The surface properties of Triton were investigated using data from the ground-based and Voyager photopolarimeter subsystem (PPS) observations of Triton's phase curve. The results indicate that Triton has a high single-scattering albedo (0.96 +/-0.01 at 0.75 micron) and an unusually compacted surface, possibly similar to that of Europa. Results also suggest that Triton's single-particle phase function and the macroscopically rough character of its surface are similar to those of most other icy satellites.

  14. Neuroprotection of Grape Seed Extract and Pyridoxine against Triton-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Heba M; Wahby, Mayssaa M

    2016-01-01

    Triton WR-1339 administration causes neurotoxicity. Natural products and herbal extracts can attenuate cerebral injury. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective role of grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 against triton-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-five adult male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 140-145 g, were divided into five groups: control, triton, grape seed extract + triton, grape seed extract + triton + vitamin B6, and vitamin B6 + triton. The hematological and biochemical analyses were carried out. Alteration in iNOS mRNA gene expression was determined using reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis. In addition, qualitative DNA fragmentation was examined using agarose gel electrophoresis. Triton-treatment caused significant disturbances in the hematological parameters, the neurological functions, and the antioxidant profile. Also, triton significantly increased the iNOS mRNA expression and DNA damage. Our results showed that grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 could attenuate all the examined parameters. These natural substances could exhibit protective effects against triton-induced neurological damage because of their antioxidative and antiapoptotic capacities. PMID:27293516

  15. Two High-Temperature Foil Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2006-01-01

    An enlarged, high-temperature-compliant foil bearing has been built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of such bearings for use in aircraft gas turbine engines. Foil bearings are attractive for use in some machines in which (1) speeds of rotation, temperatures, or both exceed maximum allowable values for rolling-element bearings; (2) conventional lubricants decompose at high operating temperatures; and/or (3) it is necessary or desirable not to rely on conventional lubrication systems. In a foil bearing, the lubricant is the working fluid (e.g., air or a mixture of combustion gases) in the space between the journal and the shaft in the machine in which the bearing is installed.

  16. Status of Genesis Mo-Pt Foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Allton, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Butterworth, A. L.; Caffee, M. W.; Clark, B.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Komura, K.; Westphal, A. J.; Welten, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 8,000 sq cm of Mo-coated Pt foils were exposed to solar wind for 884 days by the Genesis mission. Solar wind ions were captured in the surface of the Mo. Our objective is the measurement of long-lived radionuclides, such as Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, and Mn-53, and short-lived radionuclides, such as Na-22 and Mn-54, in the captured sample of solar wind. The expected flux of these nuclides in the solar wind is 100 atom/sq cm yr or less. The hard landing of the SRC (Sample Return Capsule) at UTTR (Utah Test and Training Range) has resulted in contaminated and crumpled foils. Here we present a status report and revised plan for processing the foils.

  17. Steel Foil Improves Performance Of Blasting Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Perry, Ronnie; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1990-01-01

    Blasting caps, which commonly include deep-drawn aluminum cups, give significantly higher initiation performance by application of steel foils on output faces. Steel closures 0.005 in. (0.13 mm) thick more effective than aluminum. Caps with directly bonded steel foil produce fragment velocities of 9,300 ft/s (2.8 km/s) with large craters and unpredictable patterns to such degree that no attempts made to initiate explosions. Useful in military and aerospace applications and in specialized industries as mining and exploration for oil.

  18. Method of high-density foil fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Blue, Craig A.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Ohriner, Evan K.

    2003-12-16

    A method for preparing flat foils having a high density includes the steps of mixing a powdered material with a binder to form a green sheet. The green sheet is exposed to a high intensity radiative source adapted to emit radiation of wavelengths corresponding to an absorption spectrum of the powdered material. The surface of the green sheet is heated while a lower sub-surface temperature is maintained. An apparatus for preparing a foil from a green sheet using a radiation source is also disclosed.

  19. Energy balance and plume dynamics in Triton's lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I.; Hunten, D.M. )

    1991-02-01

    The present study of the thermal balance-affecting relationships among Triton lower atmosphere thermal conduction, eddy mixing, condensation, and radiative heating indicates that, while the temperature gradient is negative in the lower atmosphere, it becomes positive at higher altitudes due to the downward conduction of ionospheric heat. This temperature profile is essentially consistent with radio-occultation experiment data; the geyser-like plumes observed by Voyager suggest that the Trioton atmosphere's convective and conductive regions join near 10-km altitude, and that the values inferred for the eddy diffusion and heat-transport coefficients indicate a profile reminiscent of the earth's. 28 refs.

  20. Routine production of a triton beam for an FN accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, J.W.; Ashbaugh, P.G.; Stark, J.W.

    1985-10-01

    The use of triton beams from tritiated titanium inserts in a sputter ion source has become a significant part of the McMaster Nuclear Physics programme. Tritium beams have been run on the McMaster University FN Tandem since 1978 on the basis of one scheduled running period per year accumulating a total of over 4000 hours of running time. Beams of up to one microamp are routinely put on target. Procedures for safe maintenance and operation of such a source have been developed, and techniques for handling up to 40 TBq (about 1000 Ci) of tritium have been approved by the Atomic Energy Control Board.

  1. Triton's geyser-like plumes - Discovery and basic characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, L. A.; Becker, T. L.; Kieffer, S. W.; Brown, R. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Johnson, T. V.

    1990-01-01

    One model for the mechanism driving the plumes of the four active geyser-like eruptions observed by Voyager 2 on Triton is a heating up of nitrogen ice in a subsurface greenhouse environment, where nitrogen gas pressurized by solar heating explosively vents to the surface carrying clouds of ice and dark particles into the atmosphere. A temperature increase of less than 4 K above the ambient surface value of 38 + or - 3 K suffices to drive the plumes to 8-km altitude. Each eruption may last a year or more, over the course of which 0.1 cu km of ice is sublimed.

  2. Energy balance and plume dynamics in Triton's lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Hunten, Donald M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study of the thermal balance-affecting relationships among Triton lower atmosphere thermal conduction, eddy mixing, condensation, and radiative heating indicates that, while the temperature gradient is negative in the lower atmosphere, it becomes positive at higher altitudes due to the downward conduction of ionospheric heat. This temperature profile is essentially consistent with radio-occultation experiment data; the geyser-like plumes observed by Voyager suggest that the Trioton atmosphere's convective and conductive regions join near 10-km altitude, and that the values inferred for the eddy diffusion and heat-transport coefficients indicate a profile reminiscent of the earth's.

  3. Geology of the southern hemisphere of Triton: No polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, P.; Moore, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The bright southern hemisphere, comprising Uhlanga Regio, is perhaps the most poorly understood geologic province on Triton. The entire bright southern hemisphere has been described as a bright polar 'cap', implying a seasonal origin, or as a permanent geologic terrain distinct from the equatorial terrains. Also, thermal models have predicted seasonal migration of frosts and ices from the presently sun-lit south latitudes to the dark northern latitudes. The distribution of frosts and geologic history of this region must be determined observationally. We reexamine the geology of this terrain with the goal of answering these questions.

  4. Diapirism on Triton - A record of crustal layering and instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul; Jackson, M. P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cantaloupe terrain on Neptune's large, icy satellite Triton comprises an organized cellular pattern of noncircular dimples that structurally and geologically most closely resemble salt diapirs exposed on Earth. The mean separation of these cells is 47 km. Modeling of the cells as compositionally driven diapirs suggests that cantaloupe terrain forms by gravity-driven overturn within an ice crust about 20 km thick with a maximum viscosity of 10 exp 22 Pa s. These diapirs probably formed as a result of a density inversion in a layered crust composed partly of ice phases other than water ice.

  5. Spallation Neutron Source SNS Diamond Stripper Foil Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Robert W; Plum, Michael A; Wilson, Leslie L; Feigerle, Charles S.; Borden, Michael J.; Irie, Y.; Sugai, I; Takagi, A

    2007-01-01

    Diamond stripping foils are under development for the SNS. Freestanding, flat 300 to 500 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} foils as large as 17 x 25 mm{sup 2} have been prepared. These nano-textured polycrystalline foils are grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition in a corrugated format to maintain their flatness. They are mechanically supported on a single edge by a residual portion of their silicon growth substrate; fine foil supporting wires are not required for diamond foils. Six foils were mounted on the SNS foil changer in early 2006 and have performed well in commissioning experiments at reduced operating power. A diamond foil was used during a recent experiment where 15 {micro}C of protons, approximately 64% of the design value, were stored in the ring. A few diamond foils have been tested at LANSCE/PSR, where one foil was in service for a period of five months (820 C of integrated injected charge) before it was replaced. Diamond foils have also been tested in Japan at KEK (640 keV H{sup -}) where their lifetimes slightly surpassed those of evaporated carbon foils, but fell short of those for Sugai's new hybrid boron carbon (HBC) foils.

  6. Tight, Flat, Smooth, Ultrathin Metal Foils for Locating Synchrotron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Connie S.; Stoner, John O.

    2007-01-01

    It is often desired to locate a synchrotron x-ray beam precisely in space with minimal disturbance of its spatial profile and spectral content. This can be done by passing the beam through an ultrathin, flat, smooth metal foil having well-defined composition, preferably a single chemical element such as chromium, titanium or aluminum. Localized fluorescence of the foil at characteristic x-ray lines where the x-ray beam passes through the foil serves to locate the beam in two dimensions. Use of two such foils along the beam direction locates the x-ray beam spatially and identifies precisely its direction. The accuracy of determining these parameters depends in part upon high uniformity in the thickness of the foil(s), good planarity, and smoothness of the foil(s). In practice, several manufacturing steps to produce a foil must be carried out with precision. The foil must be produced on a smooth removable substrate in such a way that its thickness (or areal density) is as uniform as possible. The foil must be fastened to a support ring that maintains the foil's surface quality, and it must be then stretched onto a frame that produces the desired mirror flatness. These steps are illustrated and some of the parameters specifying the quality of the resulting foils are identified.

  7. Scatterers in Triton's atmosphere - Implications for the seasonal volatile cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Schwartz, Joel M.; Rages, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    Nitrogen and methane ices on the surface of Triton, Neptune's largest satellite, are exchanged between the summer and winter hemispheres on a seasonal time scale. Images of the satellite's sky obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft show the presence of several types of scattering materials that provide insights into this seasonal cycle of volatiles. Discrete clouds, probably composed of N2 ice particles, arise in regions of active sublimation. They are found chiefly poloward of 30 deg S in the southern, summer hemisphere. Haze particles, probably made of hydrocarbon ices, are present above most, but not all places. Recent snowfall may have occurred at low southern latitudes in places where they are absent. The latent heat released in the formation of the discrete clouds may have a major impact on the thermal balance of the lower atmosphere. Triton may have been less red at the time of the Voyager flyby than 12 years earlier due to recent N2 snowfall at a wide range of latitudes.

  8. Scatterers in Triton's Atmosphere: Implications for the Seasonal Volatile Cycle.

    PubMed

    Pollack, J B; Schwartz, J M; Rages, K

    1990-10-19

    Nitrogen and methane ices on the surface of Triton, Neptune's largest satellite, are exchanged between the summer and winter hemispheres on a seasonal time scale. Images of the satellite's sky obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft show the presence of several types of scattering materials that provide insights into this seasonal cycle of volatiles. Discrete clouds, probably composed of N(2) ice particles, arise in regions of active sublimation. They are found chiefly poleward of 30 degrees S in the southern, summer hemisphere. Haze particles, probably made of hydrocarbon ices, are present above most, but not all places. Recent snowfall may have occurred at low southern latitudes in places where they are absent. The latent heat released in the formation of the discrete clouds may have a major impact on the thermal balance of the lower atmosphere. Triton may have been less red at the time of the Voyager flyby than 12 years earlier due to recent N(2) snowfall at a wide range of latitudes.

  9. The role of nonuniform internal heating in Triton's energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Brown, R. H.

    1991-06-01

    Triton's large heliocentric distance and high albedo, combined with its unusually large silicate mass fraction, make internal heating more important in its energy budget than in that of any other icy satellite. Brown et al. have recently estimated that the average radiogenic heat flux (which is probably between 3.3 and 6.6 mW/sq m depending on core size and composition) may equal 5 to 20 pct. of the average absorbed insolation. On a global scale, this additional energy input appreciably increases the thermal emissivity required to be consistent with the observed surface temperature. Brown et al. also speculated that spatial variations of the internal flux may change the local sublimation deposition balance enough to lead to observable modifications of the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface. An attempt is made to estimate the magnitude of internal heat flux variations due to the insulating effect of the polar caps, to mantle convection, and to cryovolcanism; the importance is evaluated of these variations in modifying the volatile distribution.

  10. The role of nonuniform internal heating in Triton's energy budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Brown, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    Triton's large heliocentric distance and high albedo, combined with its unusually large silicate mass fraction, make internal heating more important in its energy budget than in that of any other icy satellite. Brown et al. have recently estimated that the average radiogenic heat flux (which is probably between 3.3 and 6.6 mW/sq m depending on core size and composition) may equal 5 to 20 pct. of the average absorbed insolation. On a global scale, this additional energy input appreciably increases the thermal emissivity required to be consistent with the observed surface temperature. Brown et al. also speculated that spatial variations of the internal flux may change the local sublimation deposition balance enough to lead to observable modifications of the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface. An attempt is made to estimate the magnitude of internal heat flux variations due to the insulating effect of the polar caps, to mantle convection, and to cryovolcanism; the importance is evaluated of these variations in modifying the volatile distribution.

  11. The nature of the hydrogen tori of Titan and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Marconi, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of the hydrogen tori of Titan and Triton is examined. Critical time scales of the two tori are discussed. For the Titan torus, where atom-atom collisions are not important, the time scale for solar radiation pressure to act on the system is shown to be comparable to the hydrogen lifetime due to ionization and charge exchange losses by solar, magnetospheric, and solar wind processes. The solar radiation pressure then provides a mechanism which destroys the initial azimuthal symmetry of the hydrogen atom orbits about the planet and causes atom orbits to move inward and to collide with the planet on its dusk side. For Triton, the atom-atom collision time scale dominates all other time scales in the system. The evolution of the torus is then an inherently nonlinear problem that depends upon the collisional redistribution of atom-orbit velocities in the presence of a planetary gravitational force field. This nonlinear process introduces an expansion mechanism into the torus problem which dramatically alters its structure.

  12. Foil Panel Mirrors for Nonimaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuyper, D. J.; Castillo, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Large durable, lightweight mirrors made by bonding thick aluminum foil to honeycomb panels or other rigid, flat backings. Mirrors suitable for use as infrared shields, telescope doors, solar-furnance doors, advertising displays, or other reflectors that require low thermal emissivity and high specularity but do not require precise surface figure necessary for imaging.

  13. Thermal Sensitive Foils in Physics Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek; Konecný, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a set of physics demonstration experiments where thermal sensitive foils are used for the detection of the two dimensional distribution of temperature. The method is used for the demonstration of thermal conductivity, temperature change in adiabatic processes, distribution of electromagnetic radiation in a microwave oven and…

  14. Hydrogen and Palladium Foil: Two Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    In these two classroom demonstrations, students observe the reaction between H[subscript 2] gas and Pd foil. In the first demonstration, hydrogen and palladium combine within one minute at 1 atm and room temperature to yield the non-stoichiometric, interstitial hydride with formula close to the maximum known value, PdH[subscript 0.7]. In the…

  15. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  16. The Fluid Foil: The Seventh Simple Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple machine does one of two things: create a mechanical advantage (lever) or change the direction of an applied force (pulley). Fluid foils are unique among simple machines because they not only change the direction of an applied force (wheel and axle); they convert fluid energy into mechanical energy (wind and Kaplan turbines) or vice versa,…

  17. Strong field electrodynamics of a thin foil

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Rykovanov, Sergey G.; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2013-12-15

    Exact solutions describing the nonlinear electrodynamics of a thin double layer foil are presented. These solutions correspond to a broad range of problems of interest for the interaction of high intensity laser pulses with overdense plasmas, such as frequency upshifting, high order harmonic generation, and high energy ion acceleration.

  18. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  19. [Sorption behavior of Triton X-100 on loess and affecting factors].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jin-Kui; Zhao, Bao-Wei; Zhu, Kun; Qian, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Jie-Xi

    2013-03-01

    Batch experiments involving soil-aqueous systems were conducted to determine sorption of Triton X-100 onto natural loess as a function of equilibrium time, Triton X-100 concentration, ionic strength, and pH value. The results showed that the equilibration time for sorption of Triton X-100 onto loess was about 30 min. The sorption kinetics of Triton X-100 fitted well to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the corresponding parameters Q(e), k1, and r2 were 3.041 mg x g(-1), 0.102 min(-1), and 0.9934, respectively. Sorption isotherm was found to be distinctly nonlinear. The Sips model provided the best fitting to the experimental data among the four isothermal models tested. Q(max) and r2 of Sips model were 3.202 mg x g(-1) and 0.998 7, respectively. It was found that the ionic strength and the pH of the solution had a significant influence on the sorption of Triton X-100 onto loess. The amount of Triton X-100 sorbed onto the loess increased significantly with increasing concentration of NaCl. Sorption of Triton X-100 onto loess was influenced greatly by pH, the amount of Triton X-100 sorbed decreased as the pH increased.

  20. The utilization of Triton X-100 for enhanced two-dimensional liquid-phase proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mina; Lee, Sang-Hee; Min, Jiho; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Um, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges in proteomics lies in obtaining a high level of reproducible fractionation of the protein samples. Automated two-dimensional liquid phase fractionation (PF2D) system manufactured by Beckman Coulter provides a process well suited for proteome studies. However, the protein recovery efficiency of such system is low when a protocol recommended by the manufacturer is used for metaproteome profiling of environmental sample. In search of an alternative method that can overcome existing limitations, this study replaced manufacturer's buffers with Triton X-100 during the PF2D evaluation of Escherichia coli K12. Three different Triton X-100 concentrations-0.1%, 0.15%, and 0.2%-were used for the first-dimension protein profiling. As the first-dimension result was at its best in the presence of 0.15% Triton X-100, second-dimension protein fractionation was performed using 0.15% Triton X-100 and the standard buffers. When 0.15% Triton X-100 was used, protein recovery increased as much as tenfold. The elution reliability of 0.15% Triton X-100 determined with ribonuclease A, insulin, α-lactalbumin, trypsin inhibitor, and cholecystokinin (CCK) affirmed Triton X-100 at 15% can outperform the standard buffers without having adverse effects on samples. This novel use of 0.15% Triton X-100 for PF2D can lead to greater research possibilities in the field of proteomics.

  1. Stability of Triton's Albedo from 1985 Through 1997: Implications for the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, Heidi B.

    2000-01-01

    Recent occultation results indicate that an increase in temperature may have occurred in the atmosphere of Triton during the past 8 years (Elliot et al. 1998; Olkin et al. 1997). The atmosphere is thought to be in vapor pressure equilibrium with the surface frosts, hence changes in frost coverage can have significant implications for atmospheric stability. We have a long- term set of multiwavelength data on Triton spanning more than a decade (the data were obtained for Neptune observations, but Triton is visible in most of the images). Over that time, the data were obtained with nearly identical filters. Thus far, only one year's worth of one wavelength has been analyzed for Triton (Lark et al. 1989). We proposed to complete a comprehensive and self-consistent analysis of the complete Triton data set. One year was funded of a requested three-year program.

  2. A search for ethane on Pluto and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, Francesca E.; Dumas, Christophe; de Bergh, Catherine; Protopapa, Silvia; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro; Merlin, Frédéric; Barucci, Maria A.

    2010-07-01

    We present here a search for solid ethane, C 2H 6, on the surfaces of Pluto and Triton, based on near-infrared spectral observations in the H and K bands (1.4-2.45 μm) using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). We model each surface using a radiative transfer model based on Hapke theory (Hapke, B. [1993]. Theory of Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK) with three basic models: without ethane, with pure ethane, and with ethane diluted in nitrogen. On Pluto we detect weak features near 2.27, 2.405, 2.457, and 2.461 μm that match the strongest features of pure ethane. An additional feature seen at 2.317 μm is shifted to longer wavelengths than ethane by at least 0.002 μm. The strength of the features seen in the models suggests that pure ethane is limited to no more than a few percent of the surface of Pluto. On Triton, features in the H band could potentially be explained by ethane diluted in N, however, the lack of corresponding features in the K band makes this unlikely (also noted by Quirico et al. (Quirico, E., Doute, S., Schmitt, B., de Bergh, C., Cruikshank, D.P., Owen, T.C., Geballe, T.R., Roush, T.L. [1999]. Icarus 139, 159-178)). While Cruikshank et al. (Cruikshank, D.P., Mason, R.E., Dalle Ore, C.M., Bernstein, M.P., Quirico, E., Mastrapa, R.M., Emery, J.P., Owen, T.C. [2006]. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 38, 518) find that the 2.406-μm feature on Triton could not be completely due to 13CO, our models show that it could not be accounted for entirely by ethane either. The multiple origin of this feature complicates constraints on the contribution of ethane for both bodies.

  3. Interpreting the Shifted CH4 Spectra of Pluto and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trafton, Laurence M.

    2013-10-01

    It is known that the concentration of methane in Pluto’s atmosphere and surface ice is significantly greater than for Triton. The spectra of both bodies show methane lines shifted in wavelength relative to the laboratory spectrum by an amount that is characteristic of a solid solution of methane dissolved in nitrogen. In addition, Pluto shows an unshifted methane spectrum that is not seen for Triton. Moreover, the relative amounts of CH4, N2, and CO have been reported to vary with longitude for Pluto. The lack of a wavelength shift and the continent-sized variations have sometimes been interpreted to mean that the pure species exist and can relocate separately. This view simplifies the interpretation of the vapor pressure of each ice component because the vapor pressure is then assumed to be simply a function of the temperature. However, because the interaction between the atmosphere and volatile ice tends to move towards a dynamic equilibrium, it is likely that each pair of these species exits in both phases of a binary solid solution. At low temperature, the phase diagram of a solid solution of CH4 and N2 shows that saturation occurs at relatively dilute concentrations, about 3.5% and 5%, respectively, at 38 K. Therefore, N2 dissolved in CH4 should coexist with CH4 dissolved in N2 while exhibiting an essentially unshifted CH4 spectrum owing to the dominance of CH4 in this phase. Thus, the presence of both shifted and unshifted CH4 lines in Pluto’s spectrum suggests that there is more than enough CH4 to saturate N2 ice so that the leftover CH4 forms a saturated CH4-rich phase. In thermal equilibrium, both phases are saturated and no other phase exists. In Triton’s case, the ice CH4 inventory is not high enough to result in detectable unshifted CH4 lines in Triton’s spectrum. Raoult’s law does not apply near saturation, where activity matters. Laboratory experiments are needed for the vapor pressures in saturated solid solution mixtures to understand the

  4. A Neptune/Triton Vision Mission Using Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, P.; Bienstock, B.; Atkinson, D. H.; Baines, K.; Mahaffey, P.; Atreya, S.; Stern, A.; Wright, M.

    2004-12-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system divide into two distinct classes: the `gas giants' Jupiter and Saturn, primarily comprising hydrogen and helium; and the `ice giants' Uranus and Neptune that are believed to contain significant amounts of the heavier elements including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur. Detailed comparisons of the internal structures and compositions of the gas giants with those of the ice giants will yield valuable insights into the processes that formed the solar system and, perhaps, extrasolar systems. By 2012, Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, and possibly a New Frontiers Jupiter mission will have yielded significant information on the chemical and physical properties of Jupiter and Saturn. A Neptune mission would deliver the corresponding key data for an ice giant planet. A Neptune Orbiter with Probes mission utilizing nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) to study Triton, Nereid, the other icy satellites of Neptune, Neptune's system of rings, and the deep Neptune atmosphere to pressures ranging from several hundred bars to possibly several kilobars is being examined. Power and propulsion would be provided using nuclear electric technologies. Such an ambitious mission requires a number of technical issues be investigated and resolved, including: (1) developing a realizable mission design that allows proper targeting and timing of the entry probe(s) while offering adequate opportunities for detailed measurements of Triton, the other icy satellites and ring science, (2) giant-planet atmospheric probe thermal protection system (TPS) design, (3) descent probe design including seals, windows, penetrations and inlets, and pressure vessel, (4) probe telecommunications through the dense and absorbing Neptunian atmosphere, and (5) within NEP mass and power constraints, defining an appropriate suite of science instruments to explore the depths of the Neptune atmosphere, magnetic field, Triton, and the icy satellites. Another driving factor in

  5. Optical and electrical performance of commercially manufactured large GEM foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posik, M.; Surrow, B.

    2015-12-01

    With interest in large area GEM foils increasing and CERN being the only main distributor, keeping up with the demand for GEM foils will be difficult. Thus the commercialization of GEMs is being established by Tech-Etch of Plymouth, MA, USA using single-mask techniques. We report here on the first of a two step quality verification of the commercially produced 10×10 cm2 and 40×40 cm2 GEM foils, which includes characterizing their electrical and geometrical properties. We have found that the Tech-Etch foils display excellent electrical properties, as well as uniform and consistent hole diameters comparable to established foils produced by CERN.

  6. Surface and airborne evidence for plumes and winds on triton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; McEwen, A.S.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Terrile, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Aeolian features on Triton that were imaged during the Voyager Mission have been grouped. The term "aeolian feature" is broadly defined as features produced by or blown by the wind, including surface and airborne materials. Observations of the latitudinal distributions of the features probably associated with current activity (known plumes, crescent streaks, fixed terminator clouds, and limb haze with overshoot) all occur from latitude -37?? to latitude -62??. Likely indicators of previous activity (dark surface streaks) occur from latitude -5?? to -70??, but are most abundant from -15?? to -45??, generally north of currently active features. Those indicators which give information on wind direction and speed have been measured. Wind direction is a function of altitude. The predominant direction of the surface wind streaks is found to be between 40?? and 80?? measured clockwise from north. The average orientation of streaks in the northeast quadrant is 59??. Winds at 1- to 3-kilometer altitude are eastward, while those at >8 kilometers blow west.

  7. Origin of the Earths's Moon and Neptune's Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Fred

    2015-08-01

    In view of the recently reported chemical similarities between lunar and earth specimen, interest in the lunar origin has been reawakened. A new approach is presented here. A necessary condition for a lunar spin-off requires that the primitive earth has expanded since its inception. Then, utilizing the non-controversial conservation of total angular momentum of the earth-moon system, one can readily derive the initial physical conditions for the moon's escape (spin-off) from the upper surface of a rapidly spinning, diminutive earth. Detailed calculations will be presented for both the Moon-Earth and Triton-Neptune's early evolutionary developments. The results have implications to theories relating the origin of the solar system.

  8. The effect of surface roughness on Triton's volatile distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, Roger V.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of radiative equilibrium temperatures on Triton's rough surface suggest that significant condensation of N2 may be occurring in the northern equatorial regions, despite their relatively dark appearance. The bright frost is not apparent in the Voyager images because it tends to be concentrated in relatively unilluminated facets of the surface. This patchwork of bright frost-covered regions and darker bare ground may be distributed on scales smaller than that of the Voyager resolution; as a result the northern equatorial regions may appear relatively dark. This hypothesis also accounts for the observed wind direction in the Southern Hemisphere because it implies that the equatorial regions are warmer than the south polar regions.

  9. Properties of haze in the atmosphere of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Sandel, B. R.; Herbert, F.

    1992-01-01

    Voyager UV spectrometer measurements of CH4 and haze of the Triton atmosphere combined with the haze brightness profile determined by the narrow angle camera are used to infer a haze optical thickness of 0.024 at 1500 A and 0.0078 in the spectral range of the narrow angle camera centered at 4700A, rho/gamma = 0.36 +/- 0.1 g/cu cm (gamma is the quantum yield of condensate), and values of r(c) varying from 0.1 +/- 0.02 micron at 30 km to 0.15 +/- 0.03 micron near the surface. Other auxiliary properties of the haze are also determined. The value found for rho/gamma corresponds to a packing coefficient of 0.6 gamma if C2H4 is the main condensible species.

  10. Impact of GEM foil hole geometry on GEM detector gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Nolvi, A.; Veenhof, R.; Tuominen, E.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed 3D imaging of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foil hole geometry was realized. Scanning White Light Interferometry was used to examine six topological parameters of GEM foil holes from both sides of the foil. To study the effect of the hole geometry on detector gain, the ANSYS and Garfield ++ software were employed to simulate the GEM detector gain on the basis of SWLI data. In particular, the effective gain in a GEM foil with equally shaped holes was studied. The real GEM foil holes exhibited a 4% lower effective gain and 6% more electrons produced near the exit electrode of the GEM foil than the design anticipated. Our results indicate that the GEM foil hole geometry affects the gain performance of GEM detectors.

  11. Low energy ignition of HMX using a foil bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Ewick, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The use of an etched foil bridge to initiate the deflagration of high-density HMX is described. Two foil bridges were evaluated, each having a cross-sectional area approximately equal to that of a 0.0034-in. diameter bridgewire. One foil was 0.11 in. wide and 0.0008 in. thick; the other was 0.022 in. wide and 0.0004 in. thick. The all-fire current for the 0.022-in. wide foil bridge was roughly 15% greater than that of the 0.011-in. wide foil, which in turn was approximately 7% greater than the round wire bridge. The no-fire current for the 0.022-in. wide foil bridge was roughly 26% greater than that of the 0.011-in. wide foil, which in turn was approximately 10% greater than the round wire bridge. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Proteome analysis of the triton-insoluble erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Basu, Avik; Harper, Sandra; Pesciotta, Esther N; Speicher, Kaye D; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Speicher, David W

    2015-10-14

    Erythrocyte shape and membrane integrity is imparted by the membrane skeleton, which can be isolated as a Triton X-100 insoluble structure that retains the biconcave shape of intact erythrocytes, indicating isolation of essentially intact membrane skeletons. These erythrocyte "Triton Skeletons" have been studied morphologically and biochemically, but unbiased proteome analysis of this substructure of the membrane has not been reported. In this study, different extraction buffers and in-depth proteome analyses were used to more fully define the protein composition of this functionally critical macromolecular complex. As expected, the major, well-characterized membrane skeleton proteins and their associated membrane anchors were recovered in good yield. But surprisingly, a substantial number of additional proteins that are not considered in erythrocyte membrane skeleton models were recovered in high yields, including myosin-9, lipid raft proteins (stomatin, flotillin1 and 2), multiple chaperone proteins (HSPs, protein disulfide isomerase and calnexin), and several other proteins. These results show that the membrane skeleton is substantially more complex than previous biochemical studies indicated, and it apparently has localized regions with unique protein compositions and functions. This comprehensive catalog of the membrane skeleton should lead to new insights into erythrocyte membrane biology and pathogenic mutations that perturb membrane stability. Biological significance Current models of erythrocyte membranes describe fairly simple homogenous structures that are incomplete. Proteome analysis of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton shows that it is quite complex and includes a substantial number of proteins whose roles and locations in the membrane are not well defined. Further elucidation of interactions involving these proteins and definition of microdomains in the membrane that contain these proteins should yield novel insights into how the membrane skeleton

  13. Proteome analysis of the triton-insoluble erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Basu, Avik; Harper, Sandra; Pesciotta, Esther N; Speicher, Kaye D; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Speicher, David W

    2015-10-14

    Erythrocyte shape and membrane integrity is imparted by the membrane skeleton, which can be isolated as a Triton X-100 insoluble structure that retains the biconcave shape of intact erythrocytes, indicating isolation of essentially intact membrane skeletons. These erythrocyte "Triton Skeletons" have been studied morphologically and biochemically, but unbiased proteome analysis of this substructure of the membrane has not been reported. In this study, different extraction buffers and in-depth proteome analyses were used to more fully define the protein composition of this functionally critical macromolecular complex. As expected, the major, well-characterized membrane skeleton proteins and their associated membrane anchors were recovered in good yield. But surprisingly, a substantial number of additional proteins that are not considered in erythrocyte membrane skeleton models were recovered in high yields, including myosin-9, lipid raft proteins (stomatin, flotillin1 and 2), multiple chaperone proteins (HSPs, protein disulfide isomerase and calnexin), and several other proteins. These results show that the membrane skeleton is substantially more complex than previous biochemical studies indicated, and it apparently has localized regions with unique protein compositions and functions. This comprehensive catalog of the membrane skeleton should lead to new insights into erythrocyte membrane biology and pathogenic mutations that perturb membrane stability. Biological significance Current models of erythrocyte membranes describe fairly simple homogenous structures that are incomplete. Proteome analysis of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton shows that it is quite complex and includes a substantial number of proteins whose roles and locations in the membrane are not well defined. Further elucidation of interactions involving these proteins and definition of microdomains in the membrane that contain these proteins should yield novel insights into how the membrane skeleton

  14. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOEpatents

    Webb, B.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Prater, J.T.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed. 11 figs.

  15. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  16. FoilSim: Basic Aerodynamics Software Created

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth A.

    1999-01-01

    FoilSim is interactive software that simulates the airflow around various shapes of airfoils. The graphical user interface, which looks more like a video game than a learning tool, captures and holds the students interest. The software is a product of NASA Lewis Research Center s Learning Technologies Project, an educational outreach initiative within the High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP).This airfoil view panel is a simulated view of a wing being tested in a wind tunnel. As students create new wing shapes by moving slider controls that change parameters, the software calculates their lift. FoilSim also displays plots of pressure or airspeed above and below the airfoil surface.

  17. Analytical theory of motion and new ephemeris of Triton from observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, N. V.; Samorodov, M. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    Modelling the motion of Triton, the main satellite of Neptune, is specific. Earlier researchers built Triton's ephemeris by numerical integration of the equations of its motion. However, these ephemeris can be accessed only by using online ephemeris server or by borrowing a special calculating program and huge data file from authors of the ephemeris. In addition, the interval of the earlier ephemeris is limited. In this paper, simple and easily programmable formulae are presented for computing Triton's ephemeris for any instant of time. The formulae are based on a new analytical theory of Triton's motion all necessary perturbing factors being taken into consideration. The parameters of the theory are fit to all published observations made from 1847 to 2012 (10 254 observations in total). After the parameters were fit to observations, the root-mean-square residuals were 0.228 arcsec, the weighted average residual being 0.036 arcsec. The new ephemeris of Triton slightly differs from those produced by other authors because of differences in the sets of used observations. The new ephemeris of Triton are put on our online ephemeris server. It is shown that the available observations do not allow to determine reliably the quadratic term in the orbital longitude of Triton. Such a term would be an additional indicator of the accuracy of the theory and observations.

  18. Surfactant-enhanced remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated aquifer. 1. Transport of triton X-100

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J.A.; Sahoo, D.; Mclellan, H.M.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.

    1997-01-01

    Transport of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) at aqueous concentrations less than 400 mg/L through a trichloroethene-contaminated sand-and-gravel aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, has been studied through a series of laboratory and field experiments. In the laboratory, batch and column experiments were conducted to quantify the rate and amount of Triton X-100 sorption to the aquifer sediments. In the field, a 400 mg/L aqueous Triton X-100 solution was injected into the aquifer at a rate of 26.5 L/min for a 35-d period. The transport of Triton X-100 was monitored by sampling and analysis of groundwater at six locations surrounding the injection well. Equilibrium batch sorption experiments showed that Triton X-100 sorbs strongly and nonlinearly to the field soil with the sharpest inflection point of the isotherm occurring at an equilibrium aqueous Triton X-100 concentration close to critical micelle concentration. Batch, soil column, and field experimental data were analyzed with zero-, one-, and two- dimensional (respectively) transient solute transport models with either equilibrium or rate-limited sorption. These analyses reveal that Triton X- 100 sorption to the aquifer solids is slow relative to advective and dispersive transport and that an equilibrium sorption model cannot simulate accurately the observed soil column and field data. Comparison of kinetic sorption parameters from batch, column, and field transport data indicate that both physical heterogeneities and Triton X-100 mass transfer between water and soil contribute to the kinetic transport effects.Transport of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) at aqueous concentrations less than 400 mg/L through a trichloroethene-contaminated sand-and-gravel aquifer was studied. Equilibrium batch sorption experiments showed that Triton X-100 sorbs strongly and nonlinearly to the field soil with the sharpest inflection point of the isotherm occurring at an equilibrium aqueous Triton X-100 concentration close to

  19. The influence of thermal inertia on temperatures and frost stability on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    It is presently argued, in view of (1) a thermal inertia model for the surface of Triton which (like previous ones) predicts a monotonic recession of permanent N2 deposits toward the poles and very little seasonal N2 frost in the southern hemisphere, and (2) new spectroscopic evidence for nonvolatile CO2 on Triton's bright southern hemisphere, that much of that bright southern material is not N2. Such bright southern hemisphere volatiles may allow the formation of seasonal frosts, thereby helping to explain the observed spectroscopic changes of Triton during the last decade.

  20. Carbon stripper foils used in the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, M.J.; Plum, M.A.; Sugai, I.

    1997-12-01

    Carbon stripper foils produced by the modified controlled ACDC arc discharge method (mCADAD) at the Institute for Nuclear Study have been tested and used for high current 800-MeV beam production in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) since 1993. Two foils approximately 110 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} each are sandwiched together to produce an equivalent 220 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} foil. The foil sandwitch is supported by 4-5 {mu}m diameter carbon filters attached to an aluminum frame. These foils have survived as long as five months during PSR normal beam production of near 70 {mu}A average current on target. Typical life-times of other foils vary from seven to fourteen days with lower on-target average current. Beam loss data also indicate that these foils have slower shrinkage rates than standard foils. Equipment has been assembled and used to produce foils by the mCADAD method at Los Alamos. These foils will be tested during 1997 operation.

  1. The Effect of Journal Roughness and Foil Coatings on the Performance of Heavily Loaded Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Foil air bearing load capacity tests were conducted to investigate if a solid lubricant coating applied to the surface of the bearing's top foil can function as a break-in coating. Two foil coating materials, a conventional soft polymer film (polyimide) and a hard ceramic (alumina), were independently evaluated against as-ground and worn (run-in) journals coated with NASA PS304, a high-temperature solid lubricant composite coating. The foil coatings were evaluated at journal rotational speeds of 30,000 rpm and at 25 C. Tests were also performed on a foil bearing with a bare (uncoated) nickel-based superalloy top foil to establish a baseline for comparison. The test results indicate that the presence of a top foil solid lubricant coating is effective at increasing the load capacity performance of the foil bearing. Compared to the uncoated baseline, the addition of the soft polymer coating on the top foil increased the bearing load coefficient by 120% when operating against an as-ground journal surface and 85 percent against a run-in journal surface. The alumina coating increased the load coefficient by 40% against the as-ground journal but did not have any affect when the bearing was operated with the run-in journal. The results suggest that the addition of solid lubricant films provide added lubrication when the air film is marginal indicating that as the load capacity is approached foil air bearings transition from hydrodynamic to mixed and boundary lubrication.

  2. Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    An involute-foil regenerator was designed, microfabricated, and tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. The concept consists of stacked involute-foil nickel disks (see figure) microfabricated via a lithographic process. Test results yielded a performance of about twice that of the 90-percent random-fiber currently used in small Stirling converters. The segmented nature of the involute- foil in both the axial and radial directions increases the strength of the structure relative to wrapped foils. In addition, relative to random-fiber regenerators, the involute-foil has a reduced pressure drop, and is expected to be less susceptible to the release of metal fragments into the working space, thus increasing reliability. The prototype nickel involute-foil regenerator was adequate for testing in an engine with a 650 C hot-end temperature. This is lower than that required by larger engines, and high-temperature alloys are not suited for the lithographic microfabrication approach.

  3. Method of forming a thin unbacked metal foil

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, David V.; Barthell, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of forming a thin (<2 .mu.m) unbacked metal foil having a desired curviplanar shape, a soluble polymeric film, preferably comprising polyvinyl alcohol, is formed on a supporting structure having a shape that defines the desired shape of the foil product. A layer of metal foil is deposited onto one side of the soluble film, preferably by vacuum vapor deposition. The metallized film is then immersed in a suitable solvent to dissolve the film and thereby leave the metal foil as an unbacked metal foil element mounted on the supporting structure. Aluminum foils less than 0.2 .mu.m (2,000 .ANG.) thick and having an areal density of less than 54 .mu.g/cm.sup.2 have been obtained.

  4. Effects of Aluminum Foil Packaging on Elemental Analysis of Bone.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lyniece; Christensen, Angi M

    2016-03-01

    Burned skeletal material is often very fragile and at high risk for fragmentation during packaging and transportation. One method that has been suggested to protect bones in these cases is to carefully wrap them in aluminum foil. Traces of aluminum, however, are known to transfer from foil packaging materials to food products. If such transfer occurs between aluminum foil and bones, it could interfere with subsequent chemical, elemental and isotopic analyses, which are becoming more common in forensic anthropological investigations. This study examined aluminum levels in bones prior to and following the use of aluminum foil packaging and storage for a 6-week period. Results indicate no significant change in the detected levels of aluminum (p > 0.05), even when packaged in compromised foil and exposed to elevated temperatures. Aluminum foil can therefore continue to be recommended as a packaging medium without affecting subsequent chemical examinations. PMID:27404616

  5. Effects of Aluminum Foil Packaging on Elemental Analysis of Bone.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lyniece; Christensen, Angi M

    2016-03-01

    Burned skeletal material is often very fragile and at high risk for fragmentation during packaging and transportation. One method that has been suggested to protect bones in these cases is to carefully wrap them in aluminum foil. Traces of aluminum, however, are known to transfer from foil packaging materials to food products. If such transfer occurs between aluminum foil and bones, it could interfere with subsequent chemical, elemental and isotopic analyses, which are becoming more common in forensic anthropological investigations. This study examined aluminum levels in bones prior to and following the use of aluminum foil packaging and storage for a 6-week period. Results indicate no significant change in the detected levels of aluminum (p > 0.05), even when packaged in compromised foil and exposed to elevated temperatures. Aluminum foil can therefore continue to be recommended as a packaging medium without affecting subsequent chemical examinations.

  6. Ectomesenchymoma with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and ganglioneuroma, arising in association with benign triton tumor of the tongue.

    PubMed

    VandenHeuvel, Katherine A; Carpentieri, David F; Chen, Jie; Fung, Kar-Ming; Parham, David M

    2014-01-01

    Soft-tissue tumors known as "triton" tumors are rare lesions containing neural tissue and skeletal muscle at varying levels of maturity and malignant potential. Benign triton tumors, also called "neuromuscular choristomas" or "neuromuscular hamartomas," consist of neural tissue containing mature skeletal muscle in intimate relationship with peripheral nerve. These tumors are rare in the head and neck in children. Ectomesenchymomas are similar tumors consisting of a malignant mesenchymal component, usually embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and a neuroectodermal component represented by mature ganglion cells or primitive neuroblastic/neuroectodermal foci (primitive ectomesenchymoma). Benign triton tumors have been regarded as benign, whereas ectomesenchymomas have been operationally considered to be variants of rhabdomyosarcoma. We present here a unique case that combines features of these 2 entities in a recurrent lesion on the tongue of a 35-month-old girl. This lesion raises questions about the "benign" nature of benign triton tumor and its possible relationship to ectomesenchymoma.

  7. The effect of n-butanol on Triton X-114 phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Behdan, A; Snow, L D

    1997-01-01

    n-Butanol interferes with the fractionation of amphiphilic and hydrophilic molecules during the Triton X-114 phase separation procedure. The indicators oil red (hydrophobic) and p-nitrophenol (hydrophilic) were useful for predicting the effectiveness of the Triton X-114 partition method. For n-butanol extracts containing oil red, 5'-nucleotidase, or alkaline phosphatase, the hydrophobic molecules and Triton X-114 were retained in the aqueous phase during incubations at 30 degrees C. The n-butanol interference was concentration-dependent and was reduced by lowering the final n-butanol concentration of the sample to 1.5% (v/v) or less. The results demonstrate how buffer-diluted n-butanol extracts of 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphatase can be successfully employed for subsequent Triton X-114 fractionation of the enzymes.

  8. Temperature and thermal emissivity of the surface of Neptune's satellite Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.; Wallis, Brad D.; Horn, Linda J.; Lane, Arthur L.; Mayo, Marvin J.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the preliminary results from the Voyager mission to the Neptune system has provided the scientific community with several methods by which the temperature of Neptune's satellite Triton may be determined. If the 37.5 K surface temperature reported by several Voyager investigations is correct, then the photometry reported by the imaging experiment on Voyager requires that Triton's surface have a remarkably low emissivity. Such a low emissivity is not required in order to explain the photometry from the photopolarimeter experiment on Voyager. A low emissivity would be inconsistent with Triton having a rough surface at the about 100-micron scale as might be expected given the active renewal processes which appear to dominate Triton's surface.

  9. Living on the Edge: The Habitability of Triton and Other Large Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.

    2014-02-01

    Triton, with its more volatile- and organic-rich composition, deep ocean/ice layer, protective atmosphere, and likely history of “insane” tidal heating, offers a fascinating comparison with Europa in terms of habitability.

  10. Spectroscopic determination of the phase composition and temperature of nitrogen ice on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryka, K. A.; Brown, R. H.; Anicich, V.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Owen, T. C.

    1993-08-01

    Laboratory spectra of the first overtone band (2.1480 microns, 4655.4 reciprocal cm) of solid nitrogen show additional structure at 2.1618 microns (4625.8 reciprocal cm) over a limited temperature range. The spectrum of Neptune's satellite Triton shows the nitrogen overtone band as well as the temperature-sensitive component. The temperature dependence of this band may be used in conjunction with ground-based observations of Triton as an independent means of determining the temperature of surface deposits of nitrogen ice. The surface temperature of Triton is found to be 38.0 +2.0 or -1.0 K, in agreement with previous temperature estimates and measurements. There is no spectral evidence for the presence of alpha-nitrogen on Triton's surface, indicating that there is less than 10 percent carbon monoxide in solid solution with the nitrogen on the surface.

  11. A new spectrum of Triton near the time of the Voyager encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundy, William M.; Fink, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    A 5200-10,000 A spectrum of Triton that was telescopically obtained during the summer of 1989, just before the Voyager II encounter with the Neptune system, exhibits a measurable 8900 A CH4 ice absorption band. A combination of these data with those of Voyager indicates that the absorption is caused solely by Triton surface CH4 ice. A Hapke-type model for the Triton spectrum (1) sets a 20-micron lower limit on the CH4 ice's mean grain size (although it is suspected that actual grain size is closer to 100 microns), and (2) indicates that CH4 ice is widely distributed on the southern-hemisphere surface of Triton.

  12. Nucleon and triton production from nucleon-induced reactions on 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Guo, Hairui; Nagaoka, Kohei; Matsumoto, Takuma; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Nucleon (N) and triton production from nucleon-induced reactions on 7Li at an incident energy of 14 MeV are analyzed by using three-body continuum discretized coupled channels method (CDCC), final state interaction (FSI) model, and sequential decay (SD) model. The CDCC is used to describe nucleon and triton production via breakup continuum channels, 7Li(N,N')7Li*→ t + α. Triton production from p(n) + 7Li → t + 5Li(5He) channel and nucleon production from sequential decay of the ground-state 5Li(5He) are calculated by the FSI model and the SD model, respectively. The calculated double differential cross sections for both nucleon and triton production are in good agreement with experimental ones except at relatively low nucleon emission energies.

  13. Spectroscopic determination of the phase composition and temperature of nitrogen ice on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryka, Kimberly A.; Brown, Robert H.; Anicich, Vincent; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Owen, Tobias C.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory spectra of the first overtone band (2.1480 microns, 4655.4 reciprocal cm) of solid nitrogen show additional structure at 2.1618 microns (4625.8 reciprocal cm) over a limited temperature range. The spectrum of Neptune's satellite Triton shows the nitrogen overtone band as well as the temperature-sensitive component. The temperature dependence of this band may be used in conjunction with ground-based observations of Triton as an independent means of determining the temperature of surface deposits of nitrogen ice. The surface temperature of Triton is found to be 38.0 +2.0 or -1.0 K, in agreement with previous temperature estimates and measurements. There is no spectral evidence for the presence of alpha-nitrogen on Triton's surface, indicating that there is less than 10 percent carbon monoxide in solid solution with the nitrogen on the surface.

  14. Neptune's capture of its moon Triton in a binary-planet gravitational encounter.

    PubMed

    Agnor, Craig B; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2006-05-11

    Triton is Neptune's principal satellite and is by far the largest retrograde satellite in the Solar System (its mass is approximately 40 per cent greater than that of Pluto). Its inclined and circular orbit lies between a group of small inner prograde satellites and a number of exterior irregular satellites with both prograde and retrograde orbits. This unusual configuration has led to the belief that Triton originally orbited the Sun before being captured in orbit around Neptune. Existing models for its capture, however, all have significant bottlenecks that make their effectiveness doubtful. Here we report that a three-body gravitational encounter between a binary system (of approximately 10(3)-kilometre-sized bodies) and Neptune is a far more likely explanation for Triton's capture. Our model predicts that Triton was once a member of a binary with a range of plausible characteristics, including ones similar to the Pluto-Charon pair. PMID:16688170

  15. Foil fabrication and barrier layer application for monolithic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Glenn A. Clark, Curtis R.; Jue, J.-F.; Swank, W. David; Haggard, D.C.; Chapple, Michael D.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2008-07-15

    This presentation provides details of recent UMo fuel developments efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory. Processing of monolithic fuel foil, the friction bonding process, and hot isostatic press (HIP) sample preparation will be presented. Details of the hot rolling, foil annealing, zirconium barrier-layer application to U10Mo fuel foils via the hot-rolling process and application of silicon rich aluminum interfacial-layers via a thermal spray process will be presented. (author)

  16. Optical temperature sensing on flexible polymer foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Stanislav; Xiao, Yanfen; Hofmann, Meike; Schmidt, Thomas; Gleissner, Uwe; Zappe, Hans

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to established semiconductor waveguide-based or glass fiber-based integrated optical sensors, polymerbased optical systems offer tunable material properties, such as refractive index or viscosity, and thus provide additional degrees of freedom for sensor design and fabrication. Of particular interest in sensing applications are fully-integrated optical waveguide-based temperature sensors. These typically rely on Bragg gratings which induce a periodic refractive index variation in the waveguide so that a resonant wavelength of the structure is reflected.1,2 With broad-band excitation, a dip in the spectral output of the waveguide is thus generated at a precisely-defined wavelength. This resonant wavelength depends on the refractive index of the waveguide and the grating period, yet both of these quantities are temperature dependent by means of the thermo-optic effect (change in refractive index with temperature) and thermal expansion (change of the grating period with temperature). We show the design and fabrication of polymer waveguide-integrated temperature sensors based on Bragggratings, fabricated by replication technology on flexible PMMA foil substrates. The 175 μm thick foil serves as lower cladding for a polymeric waveguide fabricated from a custom-made UV-crosslinkable co-monomer composition. The fabrication of the grating structure includes a second replication step into a separate PMMA-foil. The dimensions of the Bragg-gratings are determined by simulations to set the bias point into the near infrared wavelength range, which allows Si-based detectors to be used. We present design considerations and performance data for the developed structures. The resulting sensor's signal is linear to temperature changes and shows a sensitivity of -306 nm/K, allowing high resolution temperature measurements.

  17. Energy expectation value of the two-pion-exchange three-body force in the triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bömelburg, A.

    1983-07-01

    The energetic shift caused by the two-pion-exchange three-nucleon force in the triton is estimated in first order perturbation theory. The triton wave function ψ is gained through a Faddeev calculation using the Reid potential. Within the restricted presentation of ψ strong cancellations between terms of the order of 1 MeV lead to an unimportant small effect. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Energy expectation value of the two-pion-exchange three-nuclear force, Faddeev calculation.

  18. Composition, Physical State, and Distribution of Ices at the Surface of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBergh, Catherine; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Owen, Tobias C.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Roush, Ted L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of near-infrared observations of the icy surface of Triton, recorded on 1995 September 7, with the cooled grating spectrometer CGS4 at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (Mauna Kea, HI). This analysis was performed in two steps. The step consisted of identifying the molecules composing Triton's surface by comparing the observations with laboratory transmission spectra (direct spectral analysis ); this also gives information on the physical state of the components.

  19. SNS STRIPPER FOIL FAILURE MODES AND THEIR CURES

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Luck, Chris; Plum, Michael A; Shaw, Robert W; Ladd, Peter; Raparia, Deepak; Macek, Robert James; Kim, Sang-Ho; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom

    2010-01-01

    The diamond stripper foils in use at the Spallation Neutron Source worked successfully with no failures until May 3, 2009, when we started experiencing a rash of foil system failures after increasing the beam power to ~840 kW. The main contributors to the failures are thought to be 1) convoy electrons, stripped from the incoming H beam, that strike the foil bracket and may also reflect back from the electron catcher, and 2) vacuum breakdown from the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  20. Ti foil light in the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.R.; Chong, Y.P.; Goosman, D.R.; Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    An experiment is in progress to characterize the visible light produced when a Ti foil is immersed in the ATA 2 kA, 43 MeV beam. Results obtained to date indicate that the optical condition of the foil surface is a critical determinant of these characteristics, with a very narrow angular distribution obtained when a highly polished and flat foil is used. These data are consistent with the present hypothesis that the light is produced by transition radiation. Incomplete experiments to determine the foil angle dependence of the detected light and its polarization are summarized and remaining experiments are described.

  1. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, Paul T.; Fisher, Robert W.; Hosking, Floyd M.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone.

  2. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, P.T.; Fisher, R.W.; Hosking, F.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1996-08-20

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone. 6 figs.

  3. Characterization of U-Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Danny J.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Henager, Charles H.; Burkes, Douglas; Senor, David J.

    2012-11-07

    Twelve AFIP in-process foil samples, fabricated by either Y-12 or LANL, were shipped from LANL to PNNL for potential characterization using optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Of these twelve, nine different conditions were examined to one degree or another using both techniques. For this report a complete description of the results are provided for one archive foil from each source of material, and one unirradiated piece of a foil of each source that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Additional data from two other LANL conditions are summarized in very brief form in an appendix. The characterization revealed that all four characterized conditions contained a cold worked microstructure to different degrees. The Y-12 foils exhibited a higher degree of cold working compared to the LANL foils, as evidenced by the highly elongated and obscure U-Mo grain structure present in each foil. The longitudinal orientations for both of the Y-12 foils possesses a highly laminar appearance with such a distorted grain structure that it was very difficult to even offer a range of grain sizes. The U-Mo grain structure of the LANL foils, by comparison, consisted of a more easily discernible grain structure with a mix of equiaxed and elongated grains. Both materials have an inhomogenous grain structure in that all of the characterized foils possess abnormally coarse grains.

  4. Mounting stripper foils on forks for maximum lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Connie S.; Stoner, John O.

    2008-06-01

    While research and development continue to produce forms of carbon for longer lasting stripper foils, relatively little attention has been paid to other factors that affect their survival in use. It becomes apparent that the form of carbon is only part of the issue. Specific mounting methods increase the lifetimes of carbon stripper foils. These methods are determined in part by the specific use and carbon type for a foil. With careful handling, appropriate adhesive, and slack mounting, premature breakage can be avoided. Foil lifetimes are then primarily affected by less easily controlled factors such as high-temperature expansion, shrinkage and evaporation.

  5. Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils

    DOEpatents

    Leigh, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

  6. Triton's Geyser-Like Plumes: Discovery and Basic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Soderblom, L A; Kieffer, S W; Becker, T L; Brown, R H; Cook, A F; Hansen, C J; Johnson, T V; Kirk, R L; Shoemaker, E M

    1990-10-19

    At least four active geyser-like eruptions were discovered in Voyager 2 images of Triton, Neptune's large satellite. The two best documented eruptions occur as columns of dark material rising to an altitude of about 8 kilometers where dark clouds of material are left suspended to drift downwind over 100 kilometers. The radii of the rising columns appear to be in the range of several tens of meters to a kilometer. One model for the mechanism to drive the plumes involves heating of nitrogen ice in a subsurface greenhouse environment; nitrogen gas pressurized by the solar heating explosively vents to the surface carrying clouds of ice and dark partides into the atmosphere. A temperature increase of less than 4 kelvins above the ambient surface value of 38 +/- 3 kelvins is more than adequate to drive the plumes to an 8-kilometer altitude. The mass flux in the trailing clouds is estimated to consist of up to 10 kilograms of fine dark particles per second or twice as much nitrogen ice and perhaps several hundred or more kilograms of nitrogen gas per second. Each eruption may last a year or more, during which on the order of a tenth of a cubic kilometer of ice is sublimed.

  7. Malignant Triton Tumors in Sisters with Clinical Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Alina, Basnet; Sebastian, Jofre A.; Gerardo, Capo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant triton tumors (MTTs) are rare and aggressive sarcomas categorized as a subgroup of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). MTTs arise from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves or existing neurofibromas and have elements of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. We report the occurrence of MTTs in two sisters. The first patient is a 36-year-old female who presented with left sided chest wall swelling. She also had clinical features consistent with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). Debulking of the mass showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with skeletal muscle differentiation (MTT). The patient was treated with ifosfamide and adriamycin along with radiation. Four years after treatment, she still has no evidence of disease recurrence. Her sister subsequently presented to us at the age of 42 with left sided lateral chest wall pain. Imaging showed a multicompartmental retroperitoneal cystic mass with left psoas involvement. The tumor was resected and, similarly to her sister, it showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (MTT). The patient was started on chemotherapy and radiation as described above. PMID:26114002

  8. New constraints on the surface properties of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, Frederic; Lellouch, E.; Quirico, E.; Barucci, A.; Schmitt, B.; Perna, D.; Dumas, C.

    2014-11-01

    Triton is one of the largest satellites of the solar system and was probably captured from the transneptunian population. The global composition, size and orbit of this object lead to the formation, as in the case of Pluto, of a thin N2 rich atmosphere, with CH4 and CO traces (Lellouch et al. 2011 Msngr145 , Greaves et al.2011 RAS 414). Sublimation of these species could lead to geographical and temporal chemical variation (Grundy et al. 2010 Icarus 205) as well as the formation of complex chemical compounds mainly formed from irradiation of N2 :CH4 :CO layers (Moore and Hudson 2003 Icarus 161). Quirico et al. (1999 Icarus 139), for instance, mentioned unidentified features possibly due to the presence of such material. New observations have been obtained at the VLT-ESO with SINFONI and will be presented in order to comment on new constraints on the chemical and physical properties of the surface from H and K band spectroscopy at different longitudes. Our analyses confirm the strong longitudinal variation of N2 and CO species and indicate temporal variation too. Several models based on the Hapke theory (1981) have also been tested in order to constrain the temperature, size, abundance and state of the major ices (N2, CH4, CO, CO2 and H2O ) as well as an attempt to identify other species (NH3, C2H2, C2H6).

  9. Triton's Geyser-Like Plumes: Discovery and Basic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Soderblom, L A; Kieffer, S W; Becker, T L; Brown, R H; Cook, A F; Hansen, C J; Johnson, T V; Kirk, R L; Shoemaker, E M

    1990-10-19

    At least four active geyser-like eruptions were discovered in Voyager 2 images of Triton, Neptune's large satellite. The two best documented eruptions occur as columns of dark material rising to an altitude of about 8 kilometers where dark clouds of material are left suspended to drift downwind over 100 kilometers. The radii of the rising columns appear to be in the range of several tens of meters to a kilometer. One model for the mechanism to drive the plumes involves heating of nitrogen ice in a subsurface greenhouse environment; nitrogen gas pressurized by the solar heating explosively vents to the surface carrying clouds of ice and dark partides into the atmosphere. A temperature increase of less than 4 kelvins above the ambient surface value of 38 +/- 3 kelvins is more than adequate to drive the plumes to an 8-kilometer altitude. The mass flux in the trailing clouds is estimated to consist of up to 10 kilograms of fine dark particles per second or twice as much nitrogen ice and perhaps several hundred or more kilograms of nitrogen gas per second. Each eruption may last a year or more, during which on the order of a tenth of a cubic kilometer of ice is sublimed. PMID:17793016

  10. Surface and airborne evidence for plumes and winds on triton.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C J; McEwen, A S; Ingersoll, A P; Terrile, R J

    1990-10-19

    Aeolian features on Triton that were imaged during the Voyager Mission have been grouped. The term "aeolian feature" is broadly defined as features produced by or blown by the wind, including surface and airborne materials. Observations of the latitudinal distributions of the features probably associated with current activity (known plumes, crescent streaks, fixed terminator clouds, and limb haze with overshoot) all occur from latitude -37 degrees to latitude -62 degrees . Likely indicators of previous activity (dark surface streaks) occur from latitude -5 degrees to -70 degrees , but are most abundant from -15 degrees to -45 degrees , generally north of currently active features. Those indicators which give information on wind direction and speed have been measured. Wind direction is a function of altitude. The predominant direction of the surface wind streaks is found to be between 40 degrees and 80 degrees measured clockwise from north. The average orientation of streaks in the northeast quadrant is 59 degrees . Winds at 1- to 3- kilometer altitude are eastward, while those at &8 kilometers blow west.

  11. The Neptune/Triton Explorer Mission: A Concept Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    Technological advances over the next 10 to 15 years promise to enable a number of smaller, more capable science missions to the outer planets. With the inception of miniaturized spacecraft for a wide range of applications, both in large clusters around Earth, and for deep space missions, NASA is currently in the process of redefining the way science is being gathered. Technologies such as 3-Dimensional Multi-Chip Modules, Micro-machined Electromechanical Devices, Multi Functional Structures, miniaturized transponders, miniaturized propulsion systems, variable emissivity thermal coatings, and artificial intelligence systems are currently in research and development, and are scheduled to fly (or have flown) in a number of missions. This study will leverage on these and other technologies in the design of a lightweight Neptune orbiter unlike any other that has been proposed to date. The Neptune/Triton Explorer (NExTEP) spacecraft uses solar electric earth gravity assist and aero capture maneuvers to achieve its intended target orbit. Either a Taurus or Delta-class launch vehicle may be used to accomplish the mission.

  12. Triton's geyser-like plumes: Discovery and basic characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Kieffer, S.W.; Becker, T.L.; Brown, R.H.; Cook, A.F.; Hansen, C.J.; Johnson, T.V.; Kirk, R.L.; Shoemaker, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    At least four active geyser-like eruptions were discovered in Voyager 2 images of Triton, Neptune's large satellite. The two best documented eruptions occur as columns of dark material rising to an altitude of about 8 kilometers where dark clouds of material are left suspended to drift downwind over 100 kilometers. The radii of the rising columns appear to be in the range of several tens of meters to a kilometer. One model for the mechanism to drive the plumes involves heating of nitrogen ice in a sub-surface greenhouse environment; nitrogen gas pressurized by the solar heating explosively vents to the surface carrying clouds of ice and dark particles into the atmosphere. A temperature increase of less than 4 kelvins above the ambient surface value of 38 ?? 3 kelvins is more than adequate to drive the plumes to an 8-kilometer altitude. The mass flux in the trailing clouds is estimated to consist of up to 10 kilograms of fine dark particles per second or twice as much nitrogen ice and perhaps several hundred or more kilograms of nitrogen gas per second. Each eruption may last a year or more, during which on the order of a tenth of a cubic kilometer of ice is sublimed.

  13. The Neptune/Triton Explorer mission: A concept feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esper, Jaime

    2006-10-01

    Technological advances over the next 10 15 years promise to enable a number of smaller, more capable science missions to the outer planets. With the inception of miniaturized spacecraft for a wide range of applications, both in large clusters around Earth, and for deep space missions, NASA is currently in the process of redefining the way science is being gathered. Technologies such as 3-dimensional multi-chip modules, micro-machined electromechanical devices, multi functional structures, miniaturized transponders, miniaturized propulsion systems, variable emissivity thermal coatings, and artificial intelligence systems are currently in research and development, and are scheduled to fly (or have flown) in a number of missions. This study will leverage on these and other technologies in the design of a lightweight Neptune orbiter unlike any other that has been proposed to date. The Neptune/Triton Explorer (NExTEP) spacecraft uses solar electric earth gravity assist and aero capture maneuvers to achieve its intended target orbit. Either a Taurus or Delta-class launch vehicle may be used to accomplish the mission.

  14. The Neptune/Triton Explorer mission: a concept feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esper, Jaime

    2003-11-01

    Technological advances over the next 10 to 15 years promise to enable a number of smaller, more capable science missions to the outer planets. With the inception of miniaturized spacecraft for a wide range of applications, both in large clusters around Earth, and for deep space missions, NASA is currently in the process of redefining the way science is being gathered. Technologies such as 3-Dimensional Multi- Chip Modules, Micro-machined Electromechanical Devices, Multi Functional Structures, miniaturized transponders, miniaturized propulsion systems, variable emissivity thermal coatings, and artificial intelligence systems are currently in research and development, and are scheduled to fly (or have flown) in a number of missions. This study will leverage on these and other technologies in the design of a lightweight Neptune orbiter unlike any other that has been proposed to date. The Neptune/Triton Explorer (NExTEP) spacecraft uses solar electric earth gravity assist and aero capture maneuvers to achieve its intended target orbit. Either a Taurus or Delta-class launch vehicle may be used to accomplish the mission.

  15. Surface and airborne evidence for plumes and winds on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Terrile, R. J.; Mcewen, A.; Ingersoll, A.

    1990-01-01

    Aeolian features on Triton that were imaged during the Voyager Mission have been grouped. The term 'aeolian feature' is broadly defined as features produced by or blown by the wind, including surface and airborne materials. Observations of the latitudinal distributions of the features probably associated with current activity (known plumes, crescent streaks, fixed terminator clouds, and limb haze with overshoot) all occur from latitude -37 deg to latitude -62 deg. Likely indicators of previous activity (dark surface streaks) occur from latitude -5 deg to -70 deg, but are most abundant from -15 deg to -45 deg, generally north of currently active features. Those indicators which give information on wind direction and speed have been measured. Wind direction is a function of altitude. The predominant direction of the surface wind streaks is found to be between 40 deg and 80 deg measured clockwise from north. The average orientation of streaks in the northeast quadrant is 59 deg. Winds at 1- to 3-kilometer altitude are eastward, while those at more than 8 kilometers blow west.

  16. Studies of the Gas Tori of Titan and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Marconi, M. L.

    1997-01-01

    A model for the spatial distribution of hydrogen in the Saturn system including a Titan source, an interior source for the rings and inner icy satellites, and a Saturn source has been applied to the best available Voyager 1 and 2 UVS Lyman-alpha observations presented by Shemansky and Hall. Although the model-data comparison is limited by the quality of the observational data, source rates for a Titan source of 3.3 - 4.8 x 10(exp 27) H atoms/s and, for the first time, source rates larger by about a factor of four for the interior source of 1.4 - 1.9 x 10(exp 27) H atoms/s were determined. Outside the immediate location of the planet, the Saturn source is only a minor contribution of hydrogen. A paper describing this research in more detail has been submitted to The Astrophysical Journal for publication and is included in the Appendix. Limited progress in the development of a model for the collisional gas tori of Triton is also discussed.

  17. Stellar Occultation Studies of Pluto, Triton, Charon, and Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2002-01-01

    Bodies inhabiting the outer solar system are of interest because, due to the colder conditions, they exhibit unique physical processes. Also, some of the lessons learned from them can be applied to understanding what occurred in the outer solar system during its formation and early evolution. The thin atmospheres of Pluto and Triton have structure that is not yet understood, and they have been predicted to undergo cataclysmic seasonal changes. Charon may have an atmosphere - we don't know. Chiron exhibits cometary activity so far from the sun (much further than most comets), so that H2O sublimation cannot be the driving mechanism. Probing these bodies from Earth with a spatial resolution of a few kilometers can be accomplished only with the stellar occultation technique. In this program we find and predict stellar occultation events by small outer-solar system bodies and then attempt observations of the ones that can potentially answer interesting questions. We also develop new methods of data analysis for occultations and secure other observations that are necessary for interpretation of the occultation data.

  18. Direct UV Spectrophotometry and HPLC Determination of Triton X-100 in Split Virus Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Bojana; Cvijetić, Nataša; Dragačević, Luka; Ivković, Branka; Vujić, Zorica; Kuntić, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    One of the most commonly used surfactants in the production of split virus influenza vaccine is nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. After splitting of the virus is accomplished, Triton X-100 is removed from the vaccine by subsequent production steps. Because of toxicity of Triton X-100, which remains in the vaccine in residual amounts, a sufficiently sensitive method for its detection and quantification needs to be defined. Two methods for determination of Triton X-100 residuals were developed: the UV-spectrophotometry and HPLC methods. For both methods, preparation of vaccine samples and removal of proteins and virus particles were crucial: samples were treated with methanol (1:1) and then centrifuged at 25 000 × g for 30 min. After such treatment, the majority of vaccine components that interfered in the UV region were removed, and diluted samples could be directly measured. The chromatographic system included C18 column, step methanol gradient, and detection at 225 nm with a single peak of Triton X-100 at 12.6 min. Both methods were validated and gave satisfactory results for accuracy, precision, specificity, linearity, and robustness. LOQ was slightly lower for the HPLC method. Hence, it was shown that both methods are suitable for analysis of residual amounts of Triton X-100, with the advantages of the UV method being its simplicity and availability in most laboratories.

  19. Molecular Modeling of Triton X Micelles: Force Field Parameters, Self-Assembly, and Partition Equilibria.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, D; Smirnova, I; Jakobtorweihen, S

    2015-05-12

    Nonionic surfactants of the Triton X-series find various applications in extraction processes and as solubilizing agents for the purification of membrane proteins. However, so far no optimized parameters are available to perform molecular simulations with a biomolecular force field. Therefore, we have determined the first optimized set of CHARMM parameters for the Triton X-series, enabling all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In order to validate the new parameters, micellar sizes (aggregation numbers) of Triton X-114 and Triton X-100 have been investigated as a function of temperature and surfactant concentration. These results are comparable with experimental results. Furthermore, we have introduced a new algorithm to obtain micelle structures from self-assembly MD simulations for the COSMOmic method. This model allows efficient partition behavior predictions once a representative micelle structure is available. The predicted partition coefficients for the systems Triton X-114/water and Triton X-100/water are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Therefore, this method can be applied as a screening tool to find optimal solute-surfactant combinations or suitable surfactant systems for a specific application.

  20. Association of nerve growth factor receptors with the triton X-100 cytoskeleton of PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Ignatius, M.J.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-10-01

    Triton X-100 solubilizes membranes of PC12 cells and leaves behind a nucleus and an array of cytoskeletal filaments. Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors are associated with this Triton X-100-insoluble residue. Two classes of NGF receptors are found on PC12 cells which display rapid and slow dissociating kinetics. Although rapidly dissociating binding is predominant (greater than 75%) in intact cells, the majority of binding to the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton is slowly dissociating (greater than 75%). Rapidly dissociating NGF binding on intact cells can be converted to a slowly dissociating form by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). This lectin also increases the number of receptors which associate with the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton by more than 10-fold. SVI-NGF bound to receptors can be visualized by light microscopy autoradiography in Triton X-100-insoluble residues of cell bodies, as well as growth cones and neurites. The WGA-induced association with the cytoskeleton, however, is not specific for the NGF receptor. Concentrations of WGA which change the Triton X-100 solubility of membrane glycoproteins are similar to those required to alter the kinetic state of the NGF receptor. Both events may be related to the crossbridging of cell surface proteins induced by this multivalent lectin.

  1. Direct UV Spectrophotometry and HPLC Determination of Triton X-100 in Split Virus Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Bojana; Cvijetić, Nataša; Dragačević, Luka; Ivković, Branka; Vujić, Zorica; Kuntić, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    One of the most commonly used surfactants in the production of split virus influenza vaccine is nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. After splitting of the virus is accomplished, Triton X-100 is removed from the vaccine by subsequent production steps. Because of toxicity of Triton X-100, which remains in the vaccine in residual amounts, a sufficiently sensitive method for its detection and quantification needs to be defined. Two methods for determination of Triton X-100 residuals were developed: the UV-spectrophotometry and HPLC methods. For both methods, preparation of vaccine samples and removal of proteins and virus particles were crucial: samples were treated with methanol (1:1) and then centrifuged at 25 000 × g for 30 min. After such treatment, the majority of vaccine components that interfered in the UV region were removed, and diluted samples could be directly measured. The chromatographic system included C18 column, step methanol gradient, and detection at 225 nm with a single peak of Triton X-100 at 12.6 min. Both methods were validated and gave satisfactory results for accuracy, precision, specificity, linearity, and robustness. LOQ was slightly lower for the HPLC method. Hence, it was shown that both methods are suitable for analysis of residual amounts of Triton X-100, with the advantages of the UV method being its simplicity and availability in most laboratories. PMID:26960682

  2. Solvation dynamics in triton-X-100 and triton-X-165 micelles: effect of micellar size and hydration.

    PubMed

    Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Pal, Haridas

    2004-09-22

    Dynamic Stokes' shift measurements using coumarin 153 as the fluorescence probe have been carried out to study solvation dynamics in two nonionic micelles, viz., triton-X-100 (TX-100) and triton-X-165 (TX-165). In both the micelles, the solvent relaxation dynamics is biexponential in nature. While the fast solvation time tau(s1) is seen to be almost similar for both the micelles, the slow solvation time tau(s2) is found to be appreciably smaller in TX-165 than in TX-100 micelle. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicate that the TX-165 micelles are substantially smaller in size than that of TX-100. Assuming similar core size for both the micelles, as expected from the similar chemical structures of the nonpolar ends for both the surfactants, the Palisade layer is also indicated to be substantially thinner for TX-165 micelles than that of TX-100. The aggregation number of TX-165 micelles is also found to be substantially smaller than that of TX-100 micelles. Fluorescence spectral studies of C153 dye in the two micelles indicate that the Palisade layer of TX-165 micelles is more polar than that of TX-100 micelles. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicate that the microviscosity in the Palisade layer of TX-165 micelles is also lower than that of TX-100 micelles. Based on these results it is inferred that the structure of the Palisade layer of TX-165 micelles is quite loose and have higher degree hydration in comparison to that of TX-100 micelles. Due to these structural differences in the Palisade layers of TX-165 and TX-100 micelles the solvation dynamics is faster in the former micelles than in the latter. It has been further inferred that in the present systems the collective response of the water molecules at somewhat away from the probes is responsible for the faster component of the solvation time, which does not reflect much of the structural changes of the micellar Palisade layer. On the contrary, the slower solvation time component, which is mainly

  3. Method of making porous conductive supports for electrodes. [by electroforming and stacking nickel foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaer, G. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Porous conductive supports for electrochemical cell electrodes are made by electroforming thin corrugated nickel foil, and by stacking pieces of the corrugated foil alternatively with pieces of thin flat nickel foil. Corrugations in successive corrugated pieces are oriented at different angles. Adjacent pieces of foil are bonded by heating in a hydrogen atmosphere and then cutting the stack in planes perpendicular to the foils.

  4. Actinide Foil Production for MPACT Research

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Denis

    2012-10-30

    Sensitive fast-neutron detectors are required for use in lead slowing down spectrometry (LSDS), an active interrogation technique for used nuclear fuel assay for Materials Protection, Accounting, and Controls Technologies (MPACT). During the past several years UNLV sponsored a research project at RPI to investigate LSDS; began development of fission chamber detectors for use in LSDS experiments in collaboration with INL, LANL, and Oregon State U.; and participated in a LSDS experiment at LANL. In the LSDS technique, research has demonstrated that these fission chamber detectors must be sensitive to fission energy neutrons but insensitive to thermal-energy neutrons. Because most systems are highly sensitive to large thermal neutron populations due to the well-known large thermal cross section of 235U, even a miniscule amount of this isotope in a fission chamber will overwhelm the small population of higher-energy neutrons. Thus, fast-fission chamber detectors must be fabricated with highly depleted uranium (DU) or ultra-pure thorium (Th), which is about half as efficient as DU. Previous research conducted at RPI demonstrated that the required purity of DU for assay of used nuclear fuel using LSDS is less than 4 ppm 235U, material that until recently was not available in the U.S. In 2009 the PI purchased 3 grams of ultra-depleted uranium (uDU, 99.99998% 238U with just 0.2 ± 0.1 ppm 235U) from VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. We received the material in the form of U3O8 powder in August of 2009, and verified its purity and depletion in a FY10 MPACT collaboration project. In addition, chemical processing for use in FC R&D was initiated, fission chamber detectors and a scanning alpha-particle spectrometer were developed, and foils were used in a preliminary LSDS experiment at a LANL/LANSCE in Sept. of 2010. The as-received U3O8 powder must be chemically processed to convert it to another chemical form while maintaining its purity, which then must be used to electro-deposit U

  5. Aerocapture Performance Analysis for a Neptune-Triton Exploration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Brett R.; Westhelle, Carlos H.; Masciarelli, James P.

    2004-01-01

    A systems analysis has been conducted for a Neptune-Triton Exploration Mission in which aerocapture is used to capture a spacecraft at Neptune. Aerocapture uses aerodynamic drag instead of propulsion to decelerate from the interplanetary approach trajectory to a captured orbit during a single pass through the atmosphere. After capture, propulsion is used to move the spacecraft from the initial captured orbit to the desired science orbit. A preliminary assessment identified that a spacecraft with a lift to drag ratio of 0.8 was required for aerocapture. Performance analyses of the 0.8 L/D vehicle were performed using a high fidelity flight simulation within a Monte Carlo executive to determine mission success statistics. The simulation was the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) modified to include Neptune specific atmospheric and planet models, spacecraft aerodynamic characteristics, and interplanetary trajectory models. To these were added autonomous guidance and pseudo flight controller models. The Monte Carlo analyses incorporated approach trajectory delivery errors, aerodynamic characteristics uncertainties, and atmospheric density variations. Monte Carlo analyses were performed for a reference set of uncertainties and sets of uncertainties modified to produce increased and reduced atmospheric variability. For the reference uncertainties, the 0.8 L/D flatbottom ellipsled vehicle achieves 100% successful capture and has a 99.87 probability of attaining the science orbit with a 360 m/s V budget for apoapsis and periapsis adjustment. Monte Carlo analyses were also performed for a guidance system that modulates both bank angle and angle of attack with the reference set of uncertainties. An alpha and bank modulation guidance system reduces the 99.87 percentile DELTA V 173 m/s (48%) to 187 m/s for the reference set of uncertainties.

  6. Outdoor weathering and dissolution of TNT and Tritonal.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Lever, James H; Fadden, Jennifer; Perron, Nancy; Packer, Bonnie

    2009-11-01

    Low-order detonations of military munitions scatter cm-sized chunks of high-explosives onto military range soils, where rainfall can dissolve and then transport the explosives to groundwater. We present 1 year of mass-loss data obtained from cm-sized chunks of the frequently used explosives TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and Tritonal (an 80:20 mixture of TNT and aluminum flakes) exposed outdoors to weather and dissolve under natural conditions. The explosive chunks rested on glass frits in individual funnels and all precipitation interacting with them was collected and analyzed. Mass balance data reveal that TNT in the water samples accounts for only about one-third of the TNT lost from the chunks. The creation of photo-transformation products on the solid chunks, and their subsequent dissolution or sublimation, probably accounts for the other two-thirds. Although these products cannot, as yet, be quantified they are intrinsic to the outdoor weathering and fate of TNT-based explosives. TNT in our water samples was not photo-transformed. Thus, we used the yearlong, dissolved-mass time-series to validate a drop-impingement dissolution model for TNT. The model used measured rainfall and air temperature data as input, and the results agreed remarkably well with TNT dissolved-mass time-series measured for the year. This model can estimate annual TNT influx into range soils using annual rainfall and particle-size distributions. Nevertheless, large uncertainties remain in the numbers and sizes of TNT particles scattered on military ranges and the identities and fates of the photo-transformation products.

  7. Triton X-114 phase separation of platelet membrane glycoproteins from normal subjects and a patient with type I thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Khanduri, U; Clark, S; Walker, I D; Chamberlain, K G; Penington, D G

    1986-02-28

    Surface-labelled normal and thrombasthenic platelets have been subjected to phase separation in Triton X-114. Triton-rich and Triton-poor fractions have been analysed by SDS-PAGE and IEF-SDS-PAGE. Partitioning characteristics of the major glycoproteins have been defined. The Triton-rich fraction contained GPIIb, III, IV, VI, VII, VIII, GP38 and the IIb beta subunit. In contrast, the Triton-poor fraction contained the HMWGP, GPIa, Ib, IIb, III, V and GPIX. Analysis of the platelet membrane glycoproteins of a patient with Type 1 thrombasthenia has been carried out using Triton X-114. The value of the method in diagnosis of this condition and differences between our findings and those published previously are discussed.

  8. Insulating effectiveness of self-spacing dimpled foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are graphed for determining conductive heat losses of multilayer insulation as function of number of foil layers. Foil was 0.0051 cm thick Nb, 1% Zr refractory alloy, dimpled to 0.0254 cm with approximately 28 dimples/sq cm. Heat losses were determined at 0.1 microtorr between 700 and 1089 K.

  9. ORIC stripping foil positioner for tandem beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ludemann, C.A.; Lord, R.S.; Hudson, E.D.; Irwin, F.; Beckers, R.M.; Haynes, D.L.; Casstevens, B.J.; Mosko, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) is used as an energy booster for heavy ions from a 25 MV tandem accelerator. This operation requires precise placement of a stripping foil in the cyclotron for capture of the injected ions into an acceleration orbit. The mechanical design and control of the foil positioning device are described.

  10. Foil fabrication for the ROMANO event. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Romo, J.G. Jr.; Weed, J.W.; Griggs, G.E.; Brown, T.G.; Tassano, P.L.

    1984-06-13

    The Vacuum Processes Lab (VPL), of LLNL's M.E. Dept. - Material Fabrication Division (MFD), conducted various vacuum related support activities for the ROMANO nuclear physics experiment. This report focuses on the foil fabrication activities carried out between July and November 1983 for the ROMANO event. Other vacuum related activities for ROMANO, such as outgassing tests of materials, are covered in separate documentation. VPL was asked to provide 270 coated Parylene foils for the ROMANO event. However, due to the developmental nature of some of the procedures, approximately 400 coated foils were processed. In addition, VPL interacted with MFD's Plastics Shop to help supply Parylene substrates to other organizations (i.e., LBL and commercial vendors) which had also been asked to provide coated foils for ROMANO. The purposes of this report are (A) to document the processes developed and the techniques used to produce the foils, and (B) to suggest future directions. The report is divided into four sections describing: (1) nuclear target foil fabrication, (2) Parylene substrate preparation and production, (3) calibration foil fabrication, and (4) foil and substrate inspections.

  11. Triton X-114 phase fractionation of membrane proteins of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2.

    PubMed

    Bricker, T M; Sherman, L A

    1984-11-15

    The thylakoid polypeptides of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2 were analyzed by Triton X-114 phase fractionation [C. Bordier (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 1604-1607, as adapted for photosynthetic membranes by T.M. Bricker and L.A. Sherman (1982) FEBS Lett. 149, 197-202]. In this procedure, polypeptides with extensive hydrophobic regions (i.e., intrinsic proteins) form mixed micelles with Triton X-114, and are separated from extrinsic proteins by temperature-mediated precipitation of the mixed Triton X-114-intrinsic protein micelles. The polypeptide pattern after phase fractionation was highly complementary, with 62 of the observed 110 polypeptide components partitioning into the Triton X-114-enriched fraction. Identified polypeptides fractionating into the Triton X-114 phase included the apoproteins for Photosystems I and II, cytochromes f and b6, and the herbicide-binding protein. Identified polypeptides fractioning into the Triton X-114-depleted (aqueous) phase included the large and small subunits of RuBp carboxylase, cytochromes c550 and c554, and ferredoxin. Enzymatic radioiodination of the photosynthetic membranes followed by Triton X-114 phase fractionation allowed direct identification of intrinsic polypeptide components which possess surface-exposed regions susceptible to radioiodination. The most prominent of these polypeptides was a 34-kDa component which was associated with photosystem II. This phase partitioning procedure has been particularly helpful in the clarification of the identity of the membrane-associated cytochromes, and of photosystem II components. When coupled with surface-probing techniques, this procedure is very useful in identifying intrinsic proteins which possess surface-exposed domains. Phase fractionation, in conjunction with the isolation of specific membrane components and complexes, has allowed the identification of many of the important intrinsic thylakoid membrane proteins of A. nidulans R2.

  12. Gas Foil Bearing Misalignment and Unbalance Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of misalignment and unbalance on gas foil bearings are presented. The future of U.S. space exploration includes plans to conduct science missions aboard space vehicles, return humans to the Moon, and place humans on Mars. All of these endeavors are of long duration, and require high amounts of electrical power for propulsion, life support, mission operations, etc. One potential source of electrical power of sufficient magnitude and duration is a nuclear-fission-based system. The system architecture would consist of a nuclear reactor heat source with the resulting thermal energy converted to electrical energy through a dynamic power conversion and heat rejection system. Various types of power conversion systems can be utilized, but the Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turboalternator is one of the leading candidates. In the CBC, an inert gas heated by the reactor drives a turboalternator, rejects excess heat to space through a heat exchanger, and returns to the reactor in a closed loop configuration. The use of the CBC for space power and propulsion is described in more detail in the literature (Mason, 2003). In the CBC system just described, the process fluid is a high pressure inert gas such as argon, krypton, or a helium-xenon mixture. Due to the closed loop nature of the system and the associated potential for damage to components in the system, contamination of the working fluid is intolerable. Since a potential source of contamination is the lubricant used in conventional turbomachinery bearings, Gas Foil Bearings (GFB) have high potential for the rotor support system. GFBs are compliant, hydrodynamic journal and thrust bearings that use a gas, such as the CBC working fluid, as their lubricant. Thus, GFBs eliminate the possibility of contamination due to lubricant leaks into the closed loop system. Gas foil bearings are currently used in many commercial applications, both terrestrial and aerospace. Aircraft Air Cycle Machines (ACMs) and ground

  13. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  14. Qualification of diode foil materials for excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. G.; Shurter, R. P.; Rose, E. A.

    The Aurora facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses KrF excimer lasers to produce 248 nm light for inertial confinement fusion applications. Diodes in each amplifier produce relativistic electron beams to pump a Kr-F-Ar gas mixture. A foil is necessary to separate the vacuum diode from the laser gas. High tensile strength, high electron transmission, low ultraviolet reflectivity, and chemical compatibility with fluorine have been identified as requisite foil properties. Several different materials were acquired and tested for use as diode foils. Transmission and fluorine compatibility tests were performed using the Electron Gun Test Facility (EGTF) at Los Alamos. Off-line tests of tensile strength and reflectivity were performed. Titanium foil, which is commonly used as a diode foil, was found to generate solid and gaseous fluoride compounds, some of which are highly reactive in contact with water vapor.

  15. Foil Gas Thrust Bearings for High-Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Brian; DellaCorte, Christopher; Dykas, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the design and construction of simple foil thrust bearings intended for parametric performance testing and low marginal costs, supporting continued development of oil-free turbomachinery. A bearing backing plate is first machined and surface-ground to produce flat and parallel faces. Partial-arc slots needed to retain the foil components are then machined into the plate by wire electrical discharge machining. Slot thicknesses achievable by a single wire pass are appropriate to accommodate the practical range of foil thicknesses, leaving a small clearance in this hinged joint to permit limited motion. The backing plate is constructed from a nickel-based superalloy (Inconel 718) to allow heat treatment of the entire assembled bearing, as well as to permit hightemperature operation. However, other dimensionally stable materials, such as precipitation-hardened stainless steel, can also be used for this component depending on application. The top and bump foil blanks are cut from stacks of annealed Inconel X-750 foil by the same EDM process. The bump foil has several azimuthal slits separating it into five individual bump strips. This configuration allows for variable bump spacing, which helps to accommodate the effects of the varying surface velocity, thermal crowning, centrifugal dishing, and misalignment. Rectangular tabs on the foil blanks fit into the backing plate slots. For this application, a rather traditional set of conventionally machined dies is selected, and bump foil blanks are pressed into the dies for forming. This arrangement produces a set of bump foil dies for foil thrust bearings that provide for relatively inexpensive fabrication of various bump configurations, and employing methods and features from the public domain.

  16. Large-area beryllium metal foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, J. O., Jr.

    1997-02-01

    To manufacture beryllium filters having diameters up to 82 mm and thicknesses in the range 0.1-1 μm, it was necessary to construct apparatus in which the metal could safely be evaporated, and then to find an acceptable substrate and evaporation procedure. The metal was evaporated resistively from a tantalum dimple boat mounted in a baffled enclosure that could be placed in a conventional vacuum bell jar, obviating the need for a dedicated complete vacuum system. Substrates were 102 mm × 127 mm × 0.05 mm cleaved mica sheets, coated with 0.1 μm of NaCl, then with approximately 50 μg/cm 2 of cellulose nitrate. These were mounted on poly(methyl methacrylate) sheets 3 mm thick that were in turn clamped to a massive aluminum block for thermal stability. Details of the processes for evaporation, float off, and mounting are given, and the resulting foils described.

  17. Complexation of serum albumins and triton X-100: Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and analysis of the rotational diffusion of complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, I. M.; Vlasov, A. A.; Saletskii, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    The polarized and nonpolarized fluorescence of bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin in Triton X-100 solutions is studied at different pH values. Analysis of the constants of fluorescence quenching for BSA and HSA after adding Triton X-100 and the hydrodynamic radii of BSA/HSA-detergent complexes show that the most effective complexation between both serum albumins and Triton X-100 occurs at pH 5.0, which lies near the isoelectric points of the proteins. Complexation between albumin and Triton X-100 affects the fluorescence of the Trp-214 residing in the hydrophobic pockets of both BSA and HSA.

  18. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: Control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, A.; Hansen, S. R.; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2014-07-01

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment.

  19. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness.

    PubMed

    Vivek, A; Hansen, S R; Daehn, Glenn S

    2014-07-01

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment. PMID:25085167

  20. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: Control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek, A. Hansen, S. R.; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2014-07-15

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment.

  1. Zonally averaged thermal balance and stability models for nitrogen polar caps on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansberry, John A.; Lunine, J. I.; Porco, C. C.; Mcewen, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    Voyager four-color imaging data of Triton are analyzed to calculate the bolometric hemispheric albedo as a function of latitude and longitude. Zonal averages of these data have been incorporated into a thermal balance model involving insolation, reradiation, and latent heat of sublimation of N2 ice for the surface. The current average bolometric albedo of Triton's polar caps is 0.8, implying an effective temperature of 34.2 K and a surface pressure of N2 of 1.6 microbar for unit emissivity. This pressure is an order of magnitude lower than the surface pressure of 18 microbar inferred from Voyager data (Broadfoot et al., 1989; Conrath et al., 1989), a discrepancy that can be reconciled if the emissivity of the N2 on Triton's surface is 0.66. The model predicts that Triton's surface north of 15 deg N latitude is experiencing deposition of N2 frosts, as are the bright portions of the south polar cap near the equator. This result explains why the south cap covers nearly the entire southern hemisphere of Triton.

  2. Infrared spectoscopy of Triton and Pluto ice analogs: The case for saturated hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, Robert B.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1994-01-01

    The infrared transmission spectra and photochemical behavior of various organic compounds isolated in solid N2 ices, appropriate for applications to Triton ad Pluto, are presented. It is shown that excess absorption in the surface spectra of Triton and Pluto, i.e., absorption not explained by present models incorporating molecules already identified on these bodies (N2, CH4, CO, and CO2), that starts near 4450/cm (2.25 microns) and extends to lower frequencies, may be due to alkanes (C(n)H(2n+2)) and related molecules frozen in the nitrogen. Branched and linear alkanes may be responsible. Experiments in which the photochemstry of N2: CH4 and N2: CH4: CO ices was explored demonsrtrate that the surface ices of Triton and Pluto may contain a wide variety of additional species containing H, C, O, and N. Of these, the reactive molecule diazomethane, CH2N2, is particularly important since it may be largely responsible for the synthesis of larger alkanes from CH4 and other small alkanes. Diazomethane would also be expected to drive chemical reactions involving organics in the surface ices of Triton and Pluto toward saturation, i.e., to reduce multiple CC bonds. The positions and intrinsic strengths (A values) of many of the infrared absorption bands of N2 matrix-isolated molecules of relevance to Triton and Pluto have also been determined. These can be used to aid in their search and to place constraints on their abundances.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Finite Aspect-Ratio Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, R.; Najjar, F.; Bozkurttas, M.

    2003-11-01

    Most wings and fins found in nature tend to be of low aspect-ratio. However, despite this preponderence of low aspect-ratio foils in nature, most experimental and numerical studies in this area of bio-hydrodynamics have focussed on examining infinite aspect-ratio flapping foils. Here we have used numerical simulations to investigate the flow associated with finite aspect-ratio foils. Particular focus of the study is on examining the effect of aspect-ratio on the thrust chracteristics and the wake topology of the foil. The simulations employ a newly developed Cartesian grid method which allows us to simulate flows with complex three-dimensional bodies on fixed Cartesian grids. The simulations indicate that the wake topology of these relatively low aspect-ratio foils is significantly different from that observed for infinite-aspect-ratio foils. The simulations also allow us to assess the advantage/disadvantage that the lower aspect ratio might confer on the performance of a flapping foil. Results from this study will be presented.

  4. Producing Foils From Direct Cast Titanium Alloy Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, T. A.; Gaspar, T. A.; Sukonnik, I. M.; Semiatan, S. L.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J. A.; Fraser, H. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of producing high-quality, thin-gage, titanium foil from direct cast titanium strip. Melt Overflow Rapid Solidification Technology (MORST) was used to cast several different titanium alloys into 500 microns thick strip, 10 cm wide and up to 3 m long. The strip was then either ground, hot pack rolled or cold rolled, as appropriate, into foil. Gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) was cast and ground to approximately 100 microns thick foil and alpha-2 titanium aluminide (Ti3AI) was cast and hot pack rolled to approximately 70 microns thick foil. CP Ti, Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo, and Ti22AI23Nb (Orthorhombic), were successfully cast and cold-rolled into good quality foil (less than 125 microns thick). The foils were generally fully dense with smooth surfaces, had fine, uniform microstructures, and demonstrated mechanical properties equivalent to conventionally produced titanium. By eliminating many manufacturing steps, this technology has the potential to produce thin gage, titanium foil with good engineering properties at significantly reduced cost relative to conventional ingot metallurgy processing.

  5. Compliant Foil Journal Bearing Performance at Alternate Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Puleo, Bernadette J.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental test program has been conducted to determine the highly loaded performance of current generation gas foil bearings at alternate pressures and temperatures. Typically foil bearing performance has been reported at temperatures relevant to turbomachinery applications but only at an ambient pressure of one atmosphere. This dearth of data at alternate pressures has motivated the current test program. Two facilities were used in the test program, the ambient pressure rig and the high pressure rig. The test program utilized a 35 mm diameter by 27 mm long foil journal bearing having an uncoated Inconel X-750 top foil running against a shaft with a PS304 coated journal. Load capacity tests were conducted at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 krpm at temperatures from 25 to 500 C and at pressures from 0.1 to 2.5 atmospheres. Results show an increase in load capacity with increased ambient pressure and a reduction in load capacity with increased ambient temperature. Below one-half atmosphere of ambient pressure a dramatic loss of load capacity is experienced. Additional lightly loaded foil bearing performance in nitrogen at 25 C and up to 48 atmospheres of ambient pressure has also been reported. In the lightly loaded region of operation the power loss increases for increasing pressure at a fixed load. Knowledge of foil bearing performance at operating conditions found within potential machine applications will reduce program development risk of future foil bearing supported turbomachines.

  6. Phase separation of integral membrane proteins in Triton X-114 solution.

    PubMed

    Bordier, C

    1981-02-25

    A solution of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 is homogeneous at 0 degrees C but separates in an aqueous phase and a detergent phase above 20 degrees C. The extent of this detergent phase separation increases with the temperature and is sensitive to the presence of other surfactants. The partition of proteins during phase separation in solutions of Triton X-114 is investigated. Hydrophilic proteins are found exclusively in the aqueous phase, and integral membrane proteins with an amphiphilic nature are recovered in the detergent phase. Triton X-114 is used to solubilize membranes and whole cells, and the soluble material is submitted to phase separation. Integral membrane proteins can thus be separated from hydrophilic proteins and identified as such in crude membrane or cellular detergent extracts.

  7. Removal of endotoxin from protein solutions by phase separation using Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Aida, Y; Pabst, M J

    1990-09-14

    Endotoxin contamination of protein solutions was reduced by a phase separation technique using the detergent, Triton X-114. Protein solutions containing endotoxin were treated with Triton X-114 on ice. The solution was then warmed to 37 degrees C, whereupon two phases formed. The Triton X-114 phase, containing the endotoxin, was precipitated by centrifugation. The first cycle of phase separation produced a 1000-fold reduction of endotoxin from contaminated preparations of cytochrome c, catalase and albumin. Complete removal of endotoxin could be achieved by further cycles of phase separation. Each cycle of phase separation resulted in only a 2% loss of protein, and could be completed within 15 min. The small amount of detergent (0.018%) that persisted in protein solution could be removed by gel filtration or absorption. Proteins treated by this procedure retained normal functions. This phase separation technique provides a rapid and gentle method for removing endotoxin from protein solutions.

  8. A photochemical study of uranyl ion interaction with the Triton X-100 micellar system

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.K.; Ganguly, B.N.

    1996-06-25

    This is a report on the spectroscopic characteristics of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in the excited state in Triton X-100 micellar medium. It also indicates some important results of viscosity and surface tension measurements of the system which have direct relevance to the spectroscopic investigation in the excited state. The quenching of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} fluorescence due to Triton X-100, upon micellization in the aqueous medium, reveals two kinds of microenvironments of the fluorophore from the Stern-Volmer plot. This has been verified by flash photolytic measurements. A blue shift of the quenched emission spectrum is ascribed to the collisional encounter of UO{sub 2}1{sub +} with the head groups of Triton X-100.

  9. A Preliminary Investigation of Aerogravity Assist at Triton for Capture into Orbit About Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Philip; Lyne, James Evans

    2005-01-01

    Previous work by our group has shown that an aerogravity assist maneuver at the moon Triton might be used to capture a spacecraft into a closed orbit about Neptune if a nominal atmospheric density profile at Triton is assumed. The present study extends that work and examines the impact of atmospheric dispersions, especially important in light of the very low density and large degree of uncertainty of Triton s atmosphere. Additional variables that are analyzed in the current study include ballute size and cut time and variations in the final target orbit. Results indicate that while blunt-body, rigid aeroshells penetrate too closely to the surface to be practical, ballutes of modest size show promise for this maneuver. Future studies will examine the application of inflatable aeroshells and rigid aeroshells with higher lift-to-drag ratios such as biconics and lifting bodies.

  10. DIRECT DETECTION OF SEASONAL CHANGES ON TRITON WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, James M.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, Joel A.; Hicks, Michael D.; Goguen, Jay D.; Li Jianyang; Schmidt, Britney E. E-mail: Bonnie.Buratti@jpl.nasa.go E-mail: hicksm@scn.jpl.nasa.go E-mail: jyli@astro.umd.ed

    2010-11-01

    Triton is one of the few bodies in the solar system with observed cryo-volcanic activity, in the form of plumes at its south pole, which suggests large-scale surface volatile transport over time. Triton's large variations in obliquity have motivated prior predictions of changing atmospheric column densities of several orders of magnitude, driven by seasonal evaporation of surface volatiles. Using the Hubble Space Telescope, we directly imaged Triton's surface and have detected large-scale differences in increased and decreased reflectance when compared with Voyager data at UV, visual, and methane-band wavelengths. Our surface map shows regions of increased brightness at near-equatorial latitudes and near the Neptune-facing side, and darkened regions near longitudes of {+-}180{sup 0}, indicating the presence of ongoing seasonal volatile transport.

  11. Burnup of fusion produced tritons and /sup 3/He ions in PLT and PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Chrien, R.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    The d(d,p)t and d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reactions produce 1 MeV tritons and 0.8 MeV /sup 3/He ions which can subsequently undergo d(t,n)..cap alpha.. and d(/sup 3/He,p)..cap alpha.. fusion reactions. The magnitude of this triton and /sup 3/He ion burnup was measured on the PLT and PDX tokamaks by detection of the 14 MeV neutron and 15 MeV proton emission. In discharges with B/sub phi/ greater than or equal to 2 T, the measured /sup 3/He burnup agrees well with predictions based on classical theories of ion confinement and slowing down, while the triton burnup was about four times lower than theoretically predicted. In discharges with weaker toroidal fields, the burnup of both ions fell by more than a factor of ten.

  12. Detergent extraction of erythrocyte ghosts. Comparison of residues after cholate and Triton X-100 treatments.

    PubMed

    Coleman, R; Holdsworth, G; Finean, J B

    1976-06-01

    1. Human erythrocyte ghosts were extracted with individual free and conjugated bile salts and, for comparison, with Triton X-100 under conditions approximating to physiological temperature, pH and tonicity. 2. Treatment with cholate, glycocholate, taurocholate, or with Triton X-100 gave lipid-depleted residues. These could still be seen as ghost-like profiles by phase contrast microscopy. Deopxycholate brought about complete membrane dissolutiom. 3. The cholate residue gave a trilamellar image by electron microscopy and in condensed form gave a smaller membrane repeat than untreated membranes. It had a polypeptide composition representing mainly integral proteins. 4. The Triton X-100 residue had a granular profile in the electron microscope and a polypeptide composition largely representing peripheral proteins.

  13. Fast-ion diffusion measurements from radial triton burn up studies

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, J.S.; Budny, R.; McCune, D.; Strachan, J.D.

    1993-08-01

    A fast-ion diffusion coefficient of 0.1 {plus_minus} 0.1 m{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1} has been deduced from the triton burnup neutron emission profile measured by a collimated array of helium-4 spectrometers. The experiment was performed with high-power deuterium discharges produced by Princeton University`s Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The fast ions monitored were the 1.0 MeV tritons produced from the d(d,t)p. These tritons ``burn up`` with deuterons and emit a 14 MeV neutron by the d(t,{alpha})n reaction. The ratio of the measured to calculated DT yield is typically 70%. The measured DT profile width is comparable to that predicted by the TRANSP transport code during neutral beam heating and narrower after the beam heating ended.

  14. Study on metal foil explosion using high current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Takayuki; Matsuo, N.; Otsuka, M.; Itoh, S.

    2009-12-01

    In the high energy processing using explosive, there are variety of application examples which is explosion welding of differential metallic plate and powder compaction of diamond. However a rule legal to explosives is severe and needs many efforts for handling qualification acquisition, maintenance, and security. In this research, the metallic foil explosion using high current is paid my attention to the method to obtain linear or planate explosive initiation easily, and the main evaluation of metallic foil explosion was conducted. The explosion power was evaluated by observing optically the underwater shock wave generated from the metallic foil explosion.

  15. Study on metal foil explosion using high current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Takayuki; Matsuo, N.; Otsuka, M.; Itoh, S.

    2010-03-01

    In the high energy processing using explosive, there are variety of application examples which is explosion welding of differential metallic plate and powder compaction of diamond. However a rule legal to explosives is severe and needs many efforts for handling qualification acquisition, maintenance, and security. In this research, the metallic foil explosion using high current is paid my attention to the method to obtain linear or planate explosive initiation easily, and the main evaluation of metallic foil explosion was conducted. The explosion power was evaluated by observing optically the underwater shock wave generated from the metallic foil explosion.

  16. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  17. A novel carbon coating technique for foil bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, U. A.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Nespoli, F.

    2016-11-01

    Naked foil bolometers can reflect a significant fraction of incident energy and therefore cannot be used for absolute measurements. This paper outlines a novel coating approach to address this problem by blackening the surface of gold foil bolometers using physical vapour deposition. An experimental bolometer was built containing four standard gold foil bolometers, of which two were coated with 100+ nm of carbon. All bolometers were collimated and observed the same relatively high temperature, ohmically heated plasma. Preliminary results showed 13%-15% more incident power was measured by the coated bolometers and this is expected to be much higher in future TCV detached divertor experiments.

  18. Mechanical properties of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond foils

    PubMed Central

    Lodes, M. A.; Kachold, F. S.; Rosiwal, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond coating of suitable template materials and subsequent delamination allows for the manufacturing of free-standing diamond foil. The evolution of the microstructure can be influenced by secondary nucleation via control of process conditions in the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process. Bending tests show extraordinarily high strength (more than 8 GPa), especially for diamond foils with nanocrystalline structure. A detailed fractographic analysis is conducted in order to correlate measured strength values with crack-initiating defects. The size of the failure causing flaw can vary from tens of micrometres to tens of nanometres, depending on the diamond foil microstructure as well as the loading conditions. PMID:25713455

  19. Functional multi-band THz meta-foils

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfeng; Moser, Herbert O.; Xu, Su; Jian, Linke; Banas, Agnieszka; Banas, Krzysztof; Chen, Hongsheng; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Breese, Mark B. H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first experimental demonstration of double- and triple-band negative refraction index meta-foils in the terahertz (THz) region. Multi-band meta-foils constructed by multi-cell S-string resonators in a single structure exhibit simultaneously negative permittivity and negative permeability responses at multiple frequencies. The phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The flexible, freestanding multi-band meta-foils provide a promising candidate for the development of multi-frequency THz materials and devices. PMID:24346309

  20. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  1. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  2. Synchronization and Phase Dynamics of Oscillating Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkel, Cyndee L.

    In this work, a two-dimensional model representing the vortices that animals produce, when they are ying/swimming, was constructed. A D{shaped cylinder and an oscillating airfoil were used to mimic these body{shed and wing{generated vortices, respectively. The parameters chosen are based on the Reynolds numbers similar to that which is observed in nature (˜10 4). In order to imitate the motion of ying/swimming, the entire system was suspended into a water channel from frictionless air{bearings. The position of the apparatus in the channel was regulated with a linear, closed loop PI controller. Thrust/drag forces were measured with strain gauges and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to examine the wake structure that develops. The Strouhal number of the oscillating airfoil was compared to the values observed in nature as the system transitions between the accelerated and steady states. The results suggest that self-regulation restricts the values of the Strouhal number to a certain range where no other external sensory input is necessary. As suggested by previous work, this self-regulation is a result of a limit cycle process that stems from nonlinear periodic oscillations. The limit cycles were used to examine the synchronous conditions due to the coupling of the foil and wake vortices. Noise is a factor that can mask details of the synchronization. In order to control its effect, we study the locking conditions using an analytic technique that only considers the phases. Our results show that the phase locking indices are dependent on the Strouhal value as it converges to a frequency locking ratio of ≃0:5. This indicates that synchronization occurs during cruising between the motion of the foil and the measured thrust/drag response of the uid forces. The results suggest that Strouhal number selection in steady forward natural swimming and ying is the result of a limit cycle process and not actively controlled by an organism. An implication of this is

  3. The Prediction and Observation of the 1997 July 18 Stellar Occultation by Triton: More Evidence for Distortion and Increasing Pressure in Triton's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Person, M. J.; McDonald, S. W.; Buie, M. W.; Dunham, E. W.; Millis, R. L.; Nye, R. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Young, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    We used CCD (charge coupled device) astrometric data to predict where the occultation path of the star Tr 176 was located, on July 18, 1997. It could be seen from northern Australia and the southern section of North America. We set up an array of portable and mixed telescopes which had high-speed photometric equipment to observe the occultation. Goals included the following: (1) mapping the central flash; (2) obtaining light curves for the signal-to-noise ratio; (3) acquiring light curves from Triton's disk. We combined these with data from others to find the radius and geometry of the half-light surface of the atmosphere, as well as the equivalent-isothermal temperature latitudes below the occultation on Triton.

  4. Pseudomonas toxin binds triton X-114 at low pH.

    PubMed

    Sandvig, K; Moskaug, J O

    1987-08-01

    Pseudomonas toxin was found to bind Triton X-114 at pH values below pH 5.0, whereas much less binding was observed at higher pH values. The toxin bound Triton X-114 at a higher pH value in the presence of 0.14 M-NaCl, -KCl or -NaNO3 than at low salt concentrations. The results suggest that low pH in an intracellular compartment facilitates the transport of Pseudomonas toxin across the membrane and into the cytosol by inducing a conformational change in the molecule.

  5. The Effects of Tidal Dissipation on the Thermal Evolution of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeman, J.; Hier-Majumder, S.; Roberts, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    This work explores the coupled structural, thermal, and orbital evolution of Neptune's icy satellite, Triton. Recent geyser activity, ridge formation, and volatile transport, observed on Triton's surface, indicate possible activity within Triton's interior [1,2]. Triton is hypothesized to have been captured from an initially heliocentric orbit. During the circularization of Triton's orbit following its capture by Neptune, intense tidal heating likely contributed to the formation of a subsurface ocean [3]. Although the time of Triton's capture is not exactly known, it is likely that the event took place earlier in the history of our solar system, when the probability of binary capture was higher [4, 5]. This work examines the thermal evolution of Triton by employing a coupled tidal and two-phase thermal evolution model, for both an early and late capture scenario. Thermal evolution of a solid crust underlain by an H2O-NH3 mushy layer is driven by the evolution of tidal heating, as Triton's orbital eccentricity evolves following its capture. The governing equations for tidal heating are solved using the propagator matrix method [6, 7], while the governing equation for the coupled crust-multiphase layer thermal evolution were numerically solved using a finite volume discretization. The results indicate that the existence of a subsurface ocean is strongly dependent on ammonia content as larger concentrations of ammonia influence liquidus temperature and density contrast between solid and liquid phases [8]. Preliminary results indicate that an ocean likely exists for compositions containing a relatively high percentage of ammonia for both early and late capture of the satellite. In contrast, the subsurface ocean freezes completely for lower ammonia content. [1] Brown, R. H., Kirk, R. L. (1994). Journal of Geophysical Research 99, 1965-981. [2] Prockter, L. M., Nimmo, F., Pappalardo, R. T. (2005). Geophysical Research Letters 32, L14202. [3] Ross, M. N., Schubert, G

  6. [The use of prasugrel in STEMI and NSTEMI: TRITON TIMI 38 study and subgroup analyses].

    PubMed

    Abaci, Adnan

    2015-10-01

    Prasugrel, a third generation P2Y12 receptor inhibitor, is more powerful than clopidogrel. TRITON-TIMI 38 trial compared the effectiveness of prasugrel with clopidogrel in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. This paper examined the main TRITON-TIMI 38 trial and subgroup analyses of the trial to determine patient subgroups in which prasugrel is superior to clopidogrel in preventing clinical events without an additional increase in bleeding risk. In such patients, one might expect to derive optimal benefit from prasugrel without a significant increase in bleeding. PMID:27326444

  7. Characterization of Electrodeposited Technetium on Gold Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Hartmann, Thomas; Droessler, Janelle; Czerwinski, Ken

    2011-11-17

    The reduction and electrodeposition of TcO{sub 4}{sup -} on a smooth gold foil electrode with an exposed area of 0.25 cm{sup 2} was performed in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} supporting electrolyte using bulk electrolysis with a constant current density of 1.0 A/cm{sup 2} at a potential of -2.0 V. Significant hydrogen evolution accompanied the formation of Tc deposits. Tc concentrations consisted of 0.01 M and 2 x 10{sup -3} M and were electrodeposited over various times. Deposited fractions of Tc were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with the capability to measure semiquantitative elemental compositions by energy-dispersive x-ray emission spectroscopy. Results indicate the presence of Tc metal on all samples as the primary electrodeposited constituent for all deposition times and Tc concentrations. Thin films of Tc have been observed followed by the formation of beads that are removable by scratching. After 2000, the quantity of Tc removed from solution and deposited was 0.64 mg Tc per cm{sup 2}. The solution, after electrodeposition, showed characteristic absorbances near 500 nm corresponding to hydrolyzed Tc(IV) produced during deposition of Tc metal. No detectable Tc(IV) was deposited to the cathode.

  8. Indium foil with beryllia washer improves transistor heat dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, J.; John, J. E. A.

    1964-01-01

    Indium foil, used as an interface material in transistor mountings, greatly reduces the thermal resistance of beryllia washers. This method improves the heat dissipation of power transistors in a vacuum environment.

  9. Stratification in Al and Cu foils exploded in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Baksht, R. B.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Artyomov, A. P.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-10-15

    An experiment with exploding foils was carried out at a current density of 0.7 × 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} through the foil with a current density rise rate of about 10{sup 15} A/cm{sup 2} s. To record the strata arising during the foil explosions, a two-frame radiographic system was used that allowed tracing the dynamics of strata formation within one shot. The original striation wavelength was 20–26 μm. It was observed that as the energy deposition to a foil stopped, the striation wavelength increased at a rate of ∼(5–9) × 10{sup 3} cm/s. It is supposed that the most probable reason for the stratification is the thermal instability that develops due to an increase in the resistivity of the metal with temperature.

  10. Planar Foil MRT Instability Measurements Using a 1-MA LTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Chalenski, D. A.; Patel, S. G.; French, D. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Steiner, A. M.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Weis, M. R.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Lopez, M. R.; Cuneo, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    Initial dynamic load experiments were performed on UM's 1-MA linear transformer driver (LTD) facility, MAIZE, to characterize magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability growth and plasma dynamics on planar-foil plasmas. The loads utilized a double current return plate geometry with a 400 nm-thick Al foil positioned between the return plates. Magnetic pressure accelerated the foil plasma to drive MRT instability that was measured using shadowgraphy. Plasma dynamics were observed to be dominated by an initial expansion phase where both foil interfaces were found to be MRT unstable with 85-105 ns e-folding times. This research was supported by US DoE award number DE-SC0002590, US DoE through SNL award numbers 240985 and 768225 to UM, and from NSF award number PHY 0903340 to UM. JC Zier and SG Patel were supported by NPSC fellowships through SNL.

  11. Study of a gold-foil-based multisphere neutron spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Hutchinson, J D; Hertel, N E; Burgett, E; Howell, R M

    2008-01-01

    Multisphere neutron spectrometers with active thermal neutron detectors cannot be used in high-intensity radiation fields due to pulse pile-up and dead-time effects. Thus, a multisphere spectrometer using a passive detection system, specifically gold foils, has been investigated in this work. The responses of a gold-foil-based Bonner sphere neutron spectrometer were studied for two different gold-foil holder designs; an aluminium-polyethylene holder and a polyethylene holder. The responses of the two designs were calculated for four incident neutron beam directions, namely, parallel, perpendicular and at +/-45 degrees relative to the flat surface of the foil. It was found that the use of polyethylene holder resulted in a more isotropic response to neutrons for the four incident directions considered. The computed responses were verified by measuring the neutron spectrum of a 252Cf source with known strength.

  12. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... Substances Prohibited From Indirect Addition to Human Food Through Food-Contact Surfaces § 189.301 Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on...

  13. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... Substances Prohibited From Indirect Addition to Human Food Through Food-Contact Surfaces § 189.301 Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on...

  14. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... Substances Prohibited From Indirect Addition to Human Food Through Food-Contact Surfaces § 189.301 Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on...

  15. Fluid-film foil bearings control engine heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Leo

    1993-05-01

    The state-of-the-art of fluid-film foil bearings and their current and prospective applications are briefly reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the general design of fluid-film foil bearings, the materials used, and bearing performance. The applications discussed include launch vehicle turbopumps, turbines used to cool aircraft cabins, and turbocompressors and turboexpanders used in the processing of cryogenic fluids. Future applications may include turbochargers, textile spindles, cryocoolers, motor blowers, heat pumps, and solar chillers.

  16. Evidence of muonium formation using thin gold foils in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, B. A.; Chang, C. Y.; Steinberg, P.; Yodh, G. B.; Orr, H. D.; Carroll, J. B.; Eckhause, M.; Kane, J. R.; Spence, C. B.; Hsieh, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    The production of thermal muonium in a vacuum region has been investigated using an array of 200 thin (about 1000 A thick) gold foils exposed to a stopping positive-muon beam. By examining the observed time dependence of the positive-muon decay spectra in various transverse magnetic field, it is estimated that the lower limit of the probability of muonium formation by these gold foils placed in vacuum was 0.28 plus or minus 0.05.

  17. Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Tube Lined With Aluminum Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernet, Nelson J.; Kerr, Gregory K.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-fiber/epoxy composite tube lined with welded aluminum foil useful as part of lightweight heat pipe in which working fluid ammonia. Aluminum liner provides impermeability for vacuum seal, to contain ammonia in heat pipe, and to prevent flow of noncondensable gases into heat pipe. Similar composite-material tubes lined with foils also incorporated into radiators, single- and two-phase thermal buses, tanks for storage of cryogenic materials, and other plumbing required to be lightweight.

  18. FeN foils by nitrogen ion-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Wang, Jian-Ping; Al Mehedi, Md; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-05-07

    Iron nitride samples in foil shape (free standing, 500 nm in thickness) were prepared by a nitrogen ion-implantation method. To facilitate phase transformation, the samples were bonded on the substrate followed by a post-annealing step. By using two different substrates, single crystal Si and GaAs, structural and magnetic properties of iron nitride foil samples prepared with different nitrogen ion fluences were characterized. α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase in iron nitride foil samples was obtained and confirmed by the proposed approach. A hard magnetic property with coercivity up to 780 Oe was achieved for the FeN foil samples bonded on Si substrate. The feasibility of using nitrogen ion implantation techniques to prepare FeN foil samples up to 500 nm thickness with a stable martensitic phase under high ion fluences has been demonstrated. A possible mechanism was proposed to explain this result. This proposed method could potentially be an alternative route to prepare rare-earth-free FeN bulk magnets by stacking and pressing multiple free-standing thick α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} foils together.

  19. Globally shed wakes for three distinct retracting foil geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Stephanie; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In quickly retracting foils at an angle of attack, the boundary layer vorticity along with the added mass energy is immediately and globally shed from the body into the surrounding fluid. The deposited vorticity quickly reforms into lasting vortex structures, which could be used for purposes such as manipulating or exploiting the produced flow structures by additional bodies in the fluid. The globally shed wake thus entrains the added mass energy provided by the initially moving body, reflected by the value of the circulation left in the wake. In studying experimentally as well as numerically this phenomenon, we find that the three different tested geometries leave behind distinct wakes. Retracting a square-ended foil is undesirable because the deposited wake is complicated by three-dimensional ring vorticity effects. Retracting a tapered, streamlined-tipped foil is also undesirable because the shape-changing aspect of the foil geometry actually induces energy recovery back to the retracting foil, leaving a less energetic globally shed wake. Finally, a retracting hollow foil geometry avoids both of these detrimental effects, leaving relatively simple, yet energetic, vortex structures in the wake.

  20. Electrospray ionization with aluminum foil: A versatile mass spectrometric technique.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-03-19

    In this study, we developed a novel electrospray ionization (ESI) technique based on household aluminum foil (Al foil) and demonstated the desirable features and applications of this technique. Al foil can be readily cut and folded into desired configuration for effective ionization and for holding sample solution in bulk to allowing acquisition of durable ion signals. The present technique was demonstrated to be applicable in analysis of a wide variety of samples, ranging from pure chemical and biological compounds, e.g., organic compounds and proteins, to complex samples in liquid, semi-solid, and solid states, e.g., beverages, skincare cream, and herbal medicines. The inert, hydrophobic and impermeable surface of Al foil allows convenient and effective on-target extraction of solid samples and on-target sample clean-up, i.e., removal of salts and detergents from proteins and peptides, extending ESI device from usually only for sample loading and ionization to including sample processing. Moreover, Al foil is an excellent heat-conductor and highly heat-tolerant, permitting direct monitoring of thermal reactions, e.g., thermal denaturation of proteins. Overall, the present study showed that Al-foil ESI could be an economical and versatile method that allows a wide range of applications. PMID:24594810

  1. Induction Bonding of Prepreg Tape and Titanium Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messier, Bernadette C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid structural laminates made of titanium foil and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite offer a potential for improved performance in aircraft structural applications. To obtain information needed for the automated fabrication of hybrid laminates, a series of bench scale tests were conducted of the magnetic induction bonding of titanium foil and thermoplastic prepreg tape. Foil and prepreg specimens were placed in the gap of a toroid magnet mounted in a bench press. Several magnet power supplies were used to study power at levels from 0.5 to 1.75 kW and frequencies from 50 to 120 kHz. Sol-gel surface-treated titanium foil, 0.0125 cm thick, and PIXA/IM7 prepreg tape were used in several lay-up configurations. Data were obtained on wedge peel bond strength, heating rate, and temperature ramp over a range of magnet power levels and frequencies at different "power-on" times for several magnet gap dimensions. These data will be utilized in assessing the potential for automated processing. Peel strengths of foil-tape bonds depended on the maximum temperature reached during heating and on the applied pressure. Maximum peel strengths were achieved at 1.25kW and 8OkHz. Induction heating of the foil appears to be capable of good bonding up to 10 plies of tape. Heat transfer calculations indicate that a 20-40 C temperature difference exists across the tape thickness during heat-up.

  2. Odyssey2 Mission: a Deep Space Gravity Explorer towards Neptune and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    The Odyssey2 mission will be proposed for the next call of M3 missions for Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. It will perform accurate spacecraft navigation during its interplanetary cruise to Neptune and Triton for testing General Relativity in the deep space, in particular its scale dependence. At arrival, its instrumentation will be use for increasing our knowledge of the gravity and atmosphere of Neptune and Triton. The instrumentation for fundamental physics objectives consists in • A high-precision accelerometer, with bias-rejection system, measuring the deviation of the trajectory from the geodesics, that is also giving "drag" forces applied on the spacecraft; • Radio-science instrument, for a precise range and Doppler measurement, with additional VLBI equipment; • One-way laser ranging, which would allow one to improve the range and Doppler measurement. • Ultra Stable Oscillator (USO), using for laser and radio-science measurement. This instrumentation can also be used for planetary objectives on Neptune and Triton, for measuring a precise gravity field (radio-science + accelerometer) or the atmosphere (USO + accelerometer).Depending on the outputs of the Phase 0 performed by CNES, additional instrumentation could be carried in order to increase the scientific return on Neptune and Triton.

  3. Renewal for the Eighties: A Proposal for Maintaining Curricular Excellence at Triton College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    The results of a study conducted at Triton College to assess its curriculum in light of current educational research are presented in this report. The first section describes the structure and charge of the Curriculum Study Committee, as well as its activities, which included a month of individual study of several books and articles relating to…

  4. Role of triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment on the morphological features of nanoporous hydroxyapatite nanorods.

    PubMed

    Iyyappan, E; Wilson, P; Sheela, K; Ramya, R

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) particles were synthesized using Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4 as precursors with varying contents of non-ionic surfactant viz., triton X-100 (organic modifier) via co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. The prepared HA particles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX), High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiments. The XRD and FTIR studies indicate the formation of HA phase in all the synthesized samples. The specific roles of triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment in dispersing and in directing the crystal growth respectively have been discussed by comparing the observations from individual experiments using triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment with that of combined protocol involving both. The plausible mechanism for the individual roles of both triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment have been proposed.

  5. An Assessment of Triton College Student Retention: Fall 1978--Spring 1979. Vol. XIV, Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakshis, Robert

    A survey of two random samples of 500 students drawn from lists of returning and non-returning students at Triton College was conducted to study student retention between Fall 1978 and Spring 1979. Data, gathered from 248 returning and 159 non-returning respondents, were analyzed in terms of: (1) student educational intent, (2) reasons for…

  6. Photometric Monitoring of Triton at Sommers-Bausch Observatory in 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.; Bullock, M. A.; Colwell, W. B.; Durda, D. D.; Gleason, K.; Parker, J. W.; Stern, S. A.; Terrell, D.; Young, E. F.

    2001-01-01

    We undertook pilot program to develop an observing and analysis strategy that can be used to measure Triton's B and V albedos with 0.05 magnitude accuracy at moderate-to-small telescopes, under moderate-to-poor seeing conditions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. SU-E-T-151: Enhanced Radiation Attenuation with Multi-Layer Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Warmington, L; Watanabe, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of increasing the number of thin high Z foils on the dose enhancement and the overall radiation attenuation with a 24MV photon beam. Methods: DOSXYZnrc was used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of multi-layer lead foil configurations. The foil size was 7cm x 7cm. and the foil thickness was adjusted to give a combined thickness of 1mm. The number of foils used was 4, 6, 8, and 10. The separation between foils was also varied from 3 to 9 mm. The Mohan 24MV energy spectrum was used as a photon source. The field size was 5cm x 5cm and SSD was 100 cm. The phantom size was 16cm × 16cm × 28cm. The number of histories ranged from 1 to 2 billion. The percentage difference of the dose between the medium with foils and the homogeneous water was computed along the beam axis. The minimum dose enhancement and the change of integrated dose between the foils were determined. Results: Increasing the number of foils resulted in a decrease in the minimum dose enhancement. The highest dose region occurred in the last section for the 4 and 6 foil cases, whereas the 8 and 10 foil configurations showed the maximum dose region towards the center of the foil group. Increasing the number of foils increased the total integrated dose between foils. For example, the total integrated dose increase between the first and the last foils with a 3mm foil separation were 34.2, 43.4, 57.4, and 64.7% for 4, 6, 8 and 10 foils, respectively. Conclusion: This work showed the degree of dose enhancement around multiple thin lead foils. The results suggest that the total attenuation of photon beam can be increased by increasing the number of foils with a fixed total foil thickness.

  8. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles. 189... lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on one or both sides with a thin layer of tin. Tin-coated lead foil has been used as a capsule (i.e., as...

  9. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  10. Selective release of the Treponema pallidum outer membrane and associated polypeptides with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, T M; Walker, E M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1988-12-01

    The effects of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 on the ultrastructure of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum are presented in this study. Treatment of Percoll-purified motile T. pallidum with a 1% concentration of Triton X-114 resulted in cell surface blebbing followed by lysis of blebs and a decrease in diameter from 0.25-0.35 micron to 0.1-0.15 micron. Examination of thin sections of untreated Percoll-purified T. pallidum showed integrity of outer and cytoplasmic membranes. In contrast, thin sections of Triton X-114-treated treponemes showed integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane but loss of the outer membrane. The cytoplasmic cylinders generated by detergent treatment retained their periplasmic flagella, as judged by electron microscopy and immunoblotting. Recently identified T. pallidum penicillin-binding proteins also remained associated with the cytoplasmic cylinders. Proteins released by Triton X-114 at 4 degrees C were divided into aqueous and hydrophobic phases after incubation at 37 degrees C. The hydrophobic phase had major polypeptide constituents of 57, 47, 38, 33-35, 23, 16, and 14 kilodaltons (kDa) which were reactive with syphilitic serum. The 47-kDa polypeptide was reactive with a monoclonal antibody which has been previously shown to identify a surface-associated T. pallidum antigen. The aqueous phase contained the 190-kDa ordered ring molecule, 4D, which has been associated with the surface of the organisms. Full release of the 47- and 190-kDa molecules was dependent on the presence of a reducing agent. These results indicate that 1% Triton X-114 selectively solubilizes the T. pallidum outer membrane and associated proteins of likely outer membrane location.

  11. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM. During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90 percent random fiber currently used in small approx.100 W Stirling space-power convertors-in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50 to 100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6 to 9 percent; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to 1200 C

  12. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terry; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Wood, Gary; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM (electric discharge machining). During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90% random fiber currently used in small 100 W Stirling space-power convertors in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50-100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6-9%; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to

  13. Investigating the micellization of the triton-X surfactants: A non-invasive fluorometric and calorimetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Sunidhi; Mondal, Ramakanta; Paul, Deena; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2016-02-01

    Using intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence approaches, we have studied the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of three non-ionic surfactants namely, Triton X-114 (TX-114), Triton X-100 (TX-100) and Triton X-165 (TX-165) which differ in number of polyethylene oxide (PEO) groups. We have established that for TX-114 and TX-100, the external fluorophores C-153 and ANS support our intrinsic approach, whereas, for TX-165, the same is perhaps not true. This has been attributed to the different numbers of PEO groups constituting the surfactant systems. We have also studied the CMC using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) which is in excellent harmony with our intrinsic approach.

  14. On the lack of a magnetic signature of Triton's magnetospheric interaction on the Voyager 2 flyby trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Luettgen, Andrea; Ness, N. F.

    1991-01-01

    There is strong, albeit indirect, evidence for a sub-Alfvenic and transonic interaction between Triton and the Neptunian magnetosphere. A new inspection of magnetic field data around Triton encounter shows no evidence for the interaction. It is shown that this is due to the geometry of Triton's Alfvenic wings, which were probably too far from the spacecraft during the encounter. The situation is complicated by finite ion gyroradius effects, which tend to smear out the simple Alfven wings such as encountered at Io.

  15. Gas Foil Bearings for Space Propulsion Nuclear Electric Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The choice of power conversion technology is critical in directing the design of a space vehicle for the future NASA mission to Mars. One candidate design consists of a foil bearing supported turbo alternator driven by a helium-xenon gas mixture heated by a nuclear reactor. The system is a closed-loop, meaning there is a constant volume of process fluid that is sealed from the environment. Therefore, foil bearings are proposed due to their ability to use the process gas as a lubricant. As such, the rotor dynamics of a foil bearing supported rotor is an important factor in the eventual design. The current work describes a rotor dynamic analysis to assess the viability of such a system. A brief technology background, assumptions, analyses, and conclusions are discussed in this report. The results indicate that a foil bearing supported turbo alternator is possible, although more work will be needed to gain knowledge about foil bearing behavior in helium-xenon gas.

  16. Misalignment in Gas Foil Journal Bearings: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    As gas foil journal bearings become more prevalent in production machines, such as small gas turbine propulsion systems and microturbines, system-level performance issues must be identified and quantified in order to provide for successful design practices. Several examples of system-level design parameters that are not fully understood in foil bearing systems are thermal management schemes, alignment requirements, balance requirements, thrust load balancing, and others. In order to address some of these deficiencies and begin to develop guidelines, this paper presents a preliminary experimental investigation of the misalignment tolerance of gas foil journal bearing systems. Using a notional gas foil bearing supported rotor and a laser-based shaft alignment system, increasing levels of misalignment are imparted to the bearing supports while monitoring temperature at the bearing edges. The amount of misalignment that induces bearing failure is identified and compared to other conventional bearing types such as cylindrical roller bearings and angular contact ball bearings. Additionally, the dynamic response of the rotor indicates that the gas foil bearing force coefficients may be affected by misalignment.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy of Triton and Pluto ice analogs: the case for saturated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bohn, R B; Sandford, S A; Allamandola, L J; Cruikshank, D P

    1994-09-01

    The infrared transmission spectra and photochemical behavior of various organic compounds isolated in solid N2 ices, appropriate for applications to Triton and Pluto, are presented. It is shown that excess absorption in the surface spectra of Triton and Pluto, i.e., absorption not explained by present models incorporating molecules already identified on these bodies (N2, CH4, CO, and CO2), that starts near 4450 cm-1 (2.25 micrometers) and extends to lower frequencies, may be due to alkanes (C(n)H2n+2) and related molecules frozen in the nitrogen. Branched and linear alkanes may be responsible. Experiments in which the photochemistry of N2:CH4 and N(2):CH4:CO ices was explored demonstrate that the surface ices of Triton and Pluto may contain a wide variety of additional species containing H, C, O, and N. Of these, the reactive molecule diazomethane, CH2N2, is particularly important since it may be largely responsible for the synthesis of larger alkanes from CH4 and other small alkanes. Diazomethane would also be expected to drive chemical reactions involving organics in the surface ices of Triton and Pluto toward saturation, i.e., to reduce multiple CC bonds. The positions and intrinsic strengths (A values) of many of the infrared absorption bands of N2 matrix-isolated molecules of relevance to Triton and Pluto have also been determined. These can be used to aid in their search and to place constraints on their abundances. For example, using these A values the abundance ratios CH4/N2 approximately 1.3 x 10(-3), C2H4/N2 < or = 9.5 x 10(-7) and H2CO/N2 < or = 7.8 x 10(-7) are deduced for Triton and CH4/N2 approximately 3.1 x 10(-3), C2H4/N2 < or = 4.1 x 10(-6), and H2CO/N2 < or = 5.2 x 10(-6) deduced for Pluto. The small amounts of C2H4 and H2CO in the surface ices of these bodies are in disagreement with the large abundances expected from many theoretical models.

  18. Nanowire LEDs grown directly on flexible metal foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Brelon J.; Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Myers, Roberto C.

    2016-04-01

    Using molecular beam epitaxy, self-assembled AlGaN nanowires are grown directly on Ta and Ti foils. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the nanowires are locally textured with the underlying metallic grains. Photoluminescence spectra of GaN nanowires grown on metal foils are comparable to GaN nanowires grown on single crystal Si wafers. Similarly, photoluminescence lifetimes do not vary significantly between these samples. Operational AlGaN light emitting diodes are grown directly on flexible Ta foil with an electroluminescence peak emission of ˜350 nm and a turn-on voltage of ˜5 V. These results pave the way for roll-to-roll manufacturing of solid state optoelectronics.

  19. Laser shock microforming of aluminum foil with fs laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yunxia; Feng, Yayun; Xuan, Ting; Hua, Xijun; Hua, Yinqun

    2014-12-01

    Laser shock microforming of Aluminum(Al) foil through fs laser has been researched in this paper. The influences of confining layer, clamping method and impact times on induced dent depths were investigated experimentally. Microstructure of fs laser shock forming Al foil was observed through Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Under the condition of tightly clamping, the dent depths increase with impact times and finally tend to saturating. Another new confining layer, the main component of which is polypropylene, was applied and the confining effect of it is better because of its higher impedance. TEM results show that dislocation is one of the main deformation mechanisms of fs laser shock forming Al foil. Specially, most of dislocations exist in the form of short and discrete dislocation lines. Parallel straight dislocation slip line also were observed. We analyzed that these unique dislocation arrangements are due to fs laser-induced ultra high strain rate.

  20. Fabrication of antiferroelectric PLZT films on metal foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, B.; Kwon, D.-K.; Narayanan, M.; Balachandran, U.; Energy Systems

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of high-dielectric-strength antiferroelectric (AFE) films on metallic foils is technically important for advanced power electronics. To that end, we have deposited crack-free Pb{sub 0.92}La{sub 0.08}Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (PLZT 8/95/5) films on nickel foils by chemical solution deposition. To eliminate the parasitic effect caused by the formation of a low-permittivity interfacial oxide, a conductive buffer layer of lanthanum nickel oxide (LNO) was coated by chemical solution deposition on the nickel foil before the deposition of PLZT. Use of the LNO buffer allowed high-quality film-on-foil capacitors to be processed in air. With the PLZT 8/95/5 deposited on LNO-buffered Ni foils, we observed field- and thermal-induced phase transformations of AFE to ferroelectric (FE). The AFE-to-FE phase transition field, E{sub AF} = 225 kV/cm, and the reverse phase transition field, E{sub FA} = 190 kV/cm, were measured at room temperature on a {approx}1.15 {micro}m-thick PLZT 8/95/5 film grown on LNO-buffered Ni foils. The relative permittivities of the AFE and FE states were {approx}600 and {approx}730, respectively, with dielectric loss {approx}0.04 at room temperature. The Curie temperature was {approx}210 C. The thermal-induced transition of AFE-to-FE phase occurred at {approx}175 C. Breakdown field strength of 1.2 MV/cm was measured at room temperature.

  1. Fabrication of antiferroelectric PLZT films on metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Beihai Kwon, Do-Kyun; Narayanan, Manoj; Balachandran, U.

    2009-01-08

    Fabrication of high-dielectric-strength antiferroelectric (AFE) films on metallic foils is technically important for advanced power electronics. To that end, we have deposited crack-free Pb{sub 0.92}La{sub 0.08}Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (PLZT 8/95/5) films on nickel foils by chemical solution deposition. To eliminate the parasitic effect caused by the formation of a low-permittivity interfacial oxide, a conductive buffer layer of lanthanum nickel oxide (LNO) was coated by chemical solution deposition on the nickel foil before the deposition of PLZT. Use of the LNO buffer allowed high-quality film-on-foil capacitors to be processed in air. With the PLZT 8/95/5 deposited on LNO-buffered Ni foils, we observed field- and thermal-induced phase transformations of AFE to ferroelectric (FE). The AFE-to-FE phase transition field, E{sub AF} = 225 kV/cm, and the reverse phase transition field, E{sub FA} = 190 kV/cm, were measured at room temperature on a {approx}1.15 {mu}m-thick PLZT 8/95/5 film grown on LNO-buffered Ni foils. The relative permittivities of the AFE and FE states were {approx}600 and {approx}730, respectively, with dielectric loss {approx}0.04 at room temperature. The Curie temperature was {approx}210 deg. C. The thermal-induced transition of AFE-to-FE phase occurred at {approx}175 deg. C. Breakdown field strength of 1.2 MV/cm was measured at room temperature.

  2. Method and apparatus for tensile testing of metal foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, O. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method for obtaining accurate and reproducible results in the tensile testing of metal foils in tensile testing machines is described. Before the test specimen are placed in the machine, foil side edges are worked until they are parallel and flaw free. The specimen are also aligned between and secured to grip end members. An aligning apparatus employed in the method is comprised of an alignment box with a longitudinal bottom wall and two upright side walls, first and second removable grip end members at each end of the box, and a means for securing the grip end members within the box.

  3. Effect of Smoked Foil Thickness and Location on Detonation Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, K. M.; Wen, C. S.

    Smoked foil has been employed to visualize triple point pattern (or cell width), indicating detonation phenomena. However, the aluminum sheet also corresponds to sudden contraction in a smooth tube. It might induce early trigger on detonation initiation and result in a reduction in deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) run-up distance. Test results showed the thickness of aluminum sheet of less than 1.3 mm is required to eliminate the effect of smoked foil. A reduction in Xdtt is observed when the thickness of aluminum sheet increases.

  4. Prediction of forming limit strains of thin foils using shim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Sanket Vivek; Bade, Rohit A.; Narasimhan, K.

    2013-12-01

    Thin foils of metallic alloys find utility in metallic thermal protection systems, such as honeycomb structures. Understanding the formability of these thin foils becomes imperative so as to design accurate tooling and also to ensure mechanical robustness of the honeycomb structures during service. It has been found that, obtaining the precise limit strains of these foils directly using the conventional limiting dome test tooling is difficult, because of the excessive draw in and wrinkling that occurs during the punch travel, resulting in erroneous measurement or prediction of limit strains. To address this issue, the blank over blank stacking methodology was developed, which helped keep the draw-in and wrinkling at negligible and thus acceptable levels. Although the blank over blank stacking methodology offers a way to predict and measure limit strains, the same may not be accurate enough due to the effect the substrate properties may impose on the thin foil. To avoid this effect, a different methodology has been proposed herein, which uses a shim stacked over the blank to avoid draw in of these foil blanks and thus help accurate clamping of the blank between the die and blank holder. It is thus understood that either a critical local or global increase in the thickness of the blank material in and around the draw bead is essential to obtain effective clamping of foil and to avoid draw-in and wrinkling. Although, miniaturized hemispherical dome tests may be beneficial for obtaining limit strains as far as foils are concerned, the methodologies proposed herein provide a route to obtaining the same using available equipment, thus saving resources and time involved in development of new miniaturized testing devices. The forming limit strains of thin foils of IN 718 (inconel) alloy having a thickness of 50μm, C263 (nimonic) alloy having a thickness of 100μm and CP Ti (commercially pure titanium) having a thickness of 200μm have been predicted using this methodology

  5. Induction of hypocrellin production by Triton X-100 under submerged fermentation with Shiraia sp. SUPER-H168.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujie; Liao, Xiangru; Liang, Xiaohui; Ding, Yanrui; Sun, Jun; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-10-01

    Hypocrellins are important photodynamic therapy compounds for cancer disease. The effect of surfactants on hypocrellin production of Shiraia sp. SUPER-H168 was evaluated under submerged fermentation condition. The production of hypocrellins could reach 780.6 mg/l with the addition of Triton X-100, confirmed by color reaction, high performance liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. According to our observation, treatment of the culture at the beginning of the fermentation was most effective, and the yield of hypocrellins was much lower with the addition of Triton X-100 during the log phase and stationary phase. Shiraia sp. SUPER-H168 could not produce hypocrellin with the addition of other tested surfactants, such as Tween 40, Triton X-114 and SDS. The experimental results indicated that Shiraia sp. SUPER-H168 could not produce hypocrellins without Triton X-100 under submerged fermentation condition.

  6. High-Fidelity Lattice Physics Capabilities of the SCALE Code System Using TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    Increasing complexity in reactor designs suggests a need to reexamine of methods applied in spent-fuel characterization. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as space reactors and Generation IV power reactors also require calculational methods that provide accurate prediction of the isotopic inventory. New high-fidelity physics methods will be required to better understand the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light-water reactor designs. The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for reactor physics analysis. This paper provides a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations.

  7. Vaccination of mice against Taenia taeniaeformis using antigen fractions partitioned with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Schnieder, T; Bøgh, H O; Lightowlers, M W; Rickard, M D

    1996-01-01

    Taenia taeniaeformis oncosphere and metacestode antigens were fractioned using Triton X-114 into insoluble, aqueous and detergent rich fractions. These fractions were analysed in SDS-PAGE and immunoblots and used in vaccination trials against infection with T. taeniaeformis in mice. Qualitative differences were apparent in the spectrum of antigens partitioning into the different detergent phases but host-prospective antigens were present in all three fractions. The presence of individual antigenic components in the phases did not correlate with the degree of protection afforded by these fractions in the vaccination trials. Host protective immunogenicity of T. taeniaeformis oncosphere and metacestode extracts may be due to multiple protective antigens which partition into the different Triton X-114 fractions.

  8. Anomalous interaction of the acetylcholine receptor protein with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Maher, P A; Singer, S J

    1985-02-01

    Integral membrane proteins that form water-filled channels through membranes often exist as aggregates of similar or identical subunits spanning the membrane. It has been suggested that the insertion into the membrane of the channel-forming domains of the subunits may impart unusual structural features to the membrane-intercalated portions of the protein. To test this proposal, we have investigated the interaction of a multisubunit channel-forming integral membrane protein, the acetylcholine receptor protein, with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114. Whereas non-channel-forming integral membrane proteins that have heretofore been studied form mixed micelles with the detergent, the acetylcholine receptor was excluded from the Triton X-114 micelles. The structural implications of this result are discussed.

  9. Isolation of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase using phase separation with Triton X-114 and monoclonal immunosorbent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum, O J; Selmer, J; Hangaard, J; Larsen, F

    1985-01-01

    A generally applicable approach to the preparative isolation of amphiphilic membrane proteins that follow the Triton X-114 phase during a temperature-dependent phase separation is described. The phase separations were performed direct on whole blood and a 650-fold purification of human erythrocyte membrane acetylcholinesterase (AchE) was obtained. Thus, 0.2 mg enzyme was isolated per 1 liter of blood, with a specific activity of 13 IU/mg, the major contaminants being glycophorin and hemoglobin. The protein material was isolated from the detergent phase by Cu2+ chelate chromatography. This material was used to raise monoclonal anti-AchE antibodies which, when applied to immunosorbent chromatography of washed Triton X-100-lysed erythrocytes in one step, allowed a 246,000-fold purification of AchE with a yield of 88% and a specific activity of 3800 IU/mg.

  10. Assessment of the effect of triton X-114 on the physicochemical properties of an antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Malpiedi, Luciana P; Nerli, Bibiana B; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Triton X-114 on the physicochemical properties of a single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) has been studied. According to the far UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, the secondary structure of the recombinant antibody was not significantly affected by the presence of Triton. From the antibody tertiary structure analysis, it was found that the surfactant could be located around the tryptophan molecules accessible to the solvent, diminishing the polarity of its environment but maintaining most of the protein structure integrity. However, in certain conditions of high temperature and high concentration of denaturant molecules, the presence of TX could compromise the antibody fragment stability. These results represent a previous step in designing scFv purification protocols and should be considered prior to developing scFv liquid-liquid extraction procedures.

  11. Anomalous Interaction of the Acetylcholine Receptor Protein with the Nonionic Detergent Triton X-114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Pamela A.; Singer, S. J.

    1985-02-01

    Integral membrane proteins that form water-filled channels through membranes often exist as aggregates of similar or identical subunits spanning the membrane. It has been suggested that the insertion into the membrane of the channel-forming domains of the subunits may impart unusual structural features to the membrane-intercalated portions of the protein. To test this proposal, we have investigated the interaction of a multisubunit channel-forming integral membrane protein, the acetylcholine receptor protein, with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114. Whereas non-channel-forming integral membrane proteins that have heretofore been studied from mixed micelles with the detergent, the acetylcholine receptor was excluded from the Triton X-114 micelles. The structural implications of this result are discussed.

  12. Separation of membrane proteins according to their hydropathy by serial phase partitioning with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    González de la Vara, Luis E; Lino Alfaro, Bárbara

    2009-04-15

    The detergent Triton X-114, because of its convenient cloud point temperature (22 degrees C), has been used extensively to extract membrane proteins and to separate them in two phases according to their hydropathy. The upper detergent-poor phase contains mostly hydrophilic proteins, whereas hydrophobic ones are found mainly in the lower detergent-rich phase. In this work, we developed a method to fractionate membrane proteins and estimate their hydropathy based on a series of cloud point partitions with Triton X-114. With this method, beetroot plasma membrane proteins were separated in different fractions according to their hydropathy, following the binomial distribution law as expected. This method revealed the presence of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases in those membranes. At least five distinct Ca(2+)-dependent kinases were observed in in-gel kinase activity assays. This separation procedure was also used as the first step in the purification of a hydrophobic 60-kDa kinase.

  13. Narrow-band spectrophotometry of Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. E.; Greene, T. F.; Shorthill, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The spectral reflectances of Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon, and Triton were measured in 28 bandpasses between lambda 326 and lambda 976 nm on the night of 28/29 June 1974. These observations were made with the 200-in. Hale telescope and multichannel spectrometer. Bandpasses of 8 nm from lambda 326 to lambda 566 nm and 16 nm from lambda 592 to lambda 976 nm were employed. The spectral reflectances of Ariel, Oberon, and Titania increase from lambda 342 to lambda 534 nm and are relatively flat from lambda 550 to lambda 976 nm. Umbriel's reflectance decreases monotonically with increasing wavelength through the entire range of measured wavelengths. Triton is found to have a constant spectral reflectance.

  14. Fractal morphology of Beta vulgaris L. cell suspension culture permeabilized with Triton X-100®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas-Ocampo, M.; Alamilla-Beltrán, L.; Vanegas-Espinoza, P. E.; Camacho-Díaz, B. H.; Campos-Mendiola, R.; Gutiérrez-López, G.; Jiménez-Aparicio, A.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, morphology of Beta vulgaris L. cells permeabilized with 0.7mM of Triton X-100® was evaluated using digital image processing and concepts of fractal dimension (perimeter- area relations). Important morphometric changes were found when the contact-time with chemical agent was increased. The size of cells decreased, the cells lost the roundness and their shape was more sinuous; this behaviour was a result of a probable shrinkage caused by the excess of exposure with the permeabilization agent. Morphology of B. vulgaris cells after permeabilization, exhibited a fractal nature since the slope of the ratio of the logarithm of the perimeter vs logarithm of the area was higher than unit. Fractal geometry of the cell morphology was affected as a result of the exposure to Triton X-100®. Those changes can be attributed to the loss of turgor and structure of the cell wall.

  15. Triton's atmosphere - A source of N and H for Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Michael E.; Strobel, Darrell F.

    1991-01-01

    Mass loading of the Neptunian magnetosphere occurs primarily by thermal escape of H, H2, and N from Triton's upper atmosphere. The global escape rate of hydrogen is about 7 x 10 exp 25/s, determined by the global average methane photolysis rate, whereas the escape rate of nitrogen for the present preferred model is about 3.4 x 10 exp 25/s, and is controlled by the global and orbital average energy deposition rate due to precipitating magnetospheric electrons. The escape rate of H(+) and N(+) is less than 4 percent of the neutral escape rate and implies that mass loading of the Neptunian magnetosphere is not localized to Triton's corona. The ratio of hydrogen to nitrogen escape rates for the present preferred model is about 2:1, comparable to the H(+)/N(+) abundance ratio inferred for Neptune's magnetosphere.

  16. Phase separation in Triton X-114 of antigens of transmission blocking immunity in Plasmodium gallinaceum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N

    1985-12-01

    The distribution of proteins of mosquito midgut forms of Plasmodium gallinaceum in the detergent-free (aqueous) and detergent-enriched phases was studied using a phase separation technique in Triton X-114. Of the three surface proteins on gametes and newly fertilized zygotes (240, 56, and 54 kDa) immunoprecipitated by transmission blocking monoclonal antibodies, 240 kDa protein was recovered in the aqueous phase, whereas 56 and 54 kDa proteins were found preferentially in the detergent phase. The hydrophobic properties of the 56 and 54 kDa proteins were also shown by their strong tendency to interact with the lipid bilayers and a hydrophobic matrix phenyl-Sepharose. Monoclonal antibody IID3B3 immunoprecipitated all the three proteins from the whole Triton extract but in the phase-separated extracts reacted only with the 240 kDa protein in the aqueous phase and not with the 56 and 54 kDa doublet in the detergent phase. In Western blot analysis also monoclonal antibody IID3B3 reacted only with the 240 kDa protein. The 240 kDa protein in the aqueous phase was retained by monoclonal antibody IID3B3 linked to Sepharose 4B beads and could be eluted either with 0.1 M acetic acid or 50 mM diethylamine. The 56 and 54 kDa doublet in the detergent phase could be bound to and eluted from Sepharose 4B beads-linked monoclonal antibody IID4 or rabbit anti-male P. gallinaceum gamete serum. Two stage-specific glycoproteins of 26 and 28 kDa on the surface of ookinetes of P. gallinaceum were also separated in the detergent phase following Triton X-114 extraction. Phase separation in Triton X-114 offers a simple approach to the separation of a select group of proteins from the bulk of the cellular proteins.

  17. Composition and evolution of Triton's icy surface between 2002-2014 from SpeX/IRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Bryan J.; Young, Leslie A.; Grundy, William M.; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2015-11-01

    We observed Triton in the near-infrared (0.7-2.5 μm) over 63 nights using the SpeX instrument at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) between 2002 and 2014. Triton’s spectrum has absorption features due to N2, CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O in this wavelength range. We calculated the equivalent width (or fractional band depth for H2O) of select absorption bands in each of the 63 night-averaged spectra. Longitudinal distributions for the volatile ices (N2, CO, CH4) show large rotational amplitude, while the non-volatile ices (CO2, H2O) show little amplitude over one Triton rotation. Absorption from N2 and CH4 increased over the period of the observations, whereas absorption from the non-volatile ices remained constant. The sub-solar latitude on Triton is currently at -42 degrees south, so some areas of Triton are visible for a full rotation. Combined with our findings, this suggests that the southern latitudes are dominated by non-volatile ices, with larger concentrations of volatile ices found in the observable region north of the equator. Changing viewing geometry over the period of the observations explains the increase in volatile absorption: As the sub-solar point moves northwards, more of the volatile-rich northern regions are coming directly into view. Geological evidence from Voyager 2 pointed to a southern hemisphere dominated by volatile ices; significant changes have occurred over the intervening quarter century.

  18. Deuteron and triton magnetic moments from NMR spectra of the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    We present a theory and calculations of the nuclear magnetic shielding with finite nuclear mass effects and determine the magnetic moments of deuteron and triton using the known NMR spectra of HD and HT molecules. The results μd=0.857 438 234 6 (53 ) μN and μt=2.978 962 471 (10 ) μN are more accurate and in good agreement with the currently accepted values.

  19. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, F. B.; Adams, J. M.; Bond, D. S.; Hone, M. A.; Howarth, P. J. A.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G. J.; Van Belle, P.; Watkins, N.

    1994-05-01

    The JET neutron emission profile monitor is used to measure the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line integrals before and after sawtooth crashes in high d-d neutron yield, hot ion H mode plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). Deuterium-deuterium (d-d) fusion produces 2.5 MeV neutrons and 1 MeV tritons (t) at nearly equal rates from its two reaction channels. A plasma current of 3 MA is sufficiently high to contain most of the fusion product tritons, which have birth orbit gyroradii and velocity space distributions similar to those of the 3.5 MeV or particles from d-t fusion. By examining neutron emission line integrals and tomographically deduced local emissivity profiles, an upper limit of 10% can be placed on the net fraction of fusion product tritons which are displaced from the plasma axis by those sawtooth crashes studied. This is a much smaller net fraction than that typically observed, 35-55%, for displaced injected neutral beam deuterium ions. A study of the response of beam injected deuterium ions to a sawtooth crash shows that the change in their axial density depends on the precrash spatial width of the neutron emissivity profile. The fusion product tritons, which have a large precrash spatial width, respond weakly to a crash. This weak response is consistent with the behaviour of the analogous d-d beam thermal neutrons when extrapolated to the corresponding emissivity spatial width. The implication of these observations is that beam ions and 3.5 MeV alpha particles in JET may be relatively resilient to sawtooth clashes, when the spatial width of their density is sufficiently large

  20. Solid methane on Triton and Pluto - 3- to 4-micron spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Buie, Marc W.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.

    1990-01-01

    Methane has been identified in the Pluto/Charon system on the basis of absorption features in the reflectance spectrum at 1.5 and 2.3 microns; attention is presently given to observations of a 3.25 micron-centered deep absorption feature in Triton and Pluto/Charon system reflectance spectra. This absorption may indicate the presence of solid methane, constituting either the dominant surface species or a mixture with a highly transparent substance, such as N2 frost.

  1. Binding of adenovirus and its external proteins to Triton X-114. Dependence on pH.

    PubMed

    Seth, P; Willingham, M C; Pastan, I

    1985-11-25

    35S-Labeled adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) (10 ng/ml) was incubated with 1% Triton X-114 at various pH values varying from 3.0 to 8.0. The detergent phase was separated from the aqueous phase by centrifugation, and the amounts of Ad2 were determined in the two phases. At pH 7.0-8.0, less than 5% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase; at pH 5.0 or below, about 60% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase. When a mixture of 35S-labeled capsid proteins was used at pH 7.0, 60-70% of the total proteins were associated with the detergent at pH 5.0, but less than 5% of the proteins interacted with detergent at pH 7.0. Among the three major external proteins (hexon, penton base, and fiber), penton base had the highest association with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0. Both intact virus and the capsid proteins that were associated with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0 were released into the aqueous phase on subsequent incubation at pH 7.0. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that mildly acidic pH induces amphiphilic properties in adenovirus capsid proteins and may help Ad2 escape from acidic endocytic vesicles.

  2. Fractionation of renal brush border membrane proteins with Triton X-114 phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Vachon, V; Pouliot, J F; Laprade, R; Béliveau, R

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of brush border membrane proteins by gel electrophoresis has revealed a complex polypeptide composition. We have investigated the use of Triton X-114 phase partitioning to fractionate such proteins on the basis of their degree of hydrophobicity. Each of the fractions was composed of a complex but distinct set of proteins. Most proteins were solubilized by Triton X-114 and partitioned into the detergent-poor fraction. Trehalase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and leucine aminopeptidase were well solubilized (greater than 80%) and enriched 5.1-, 3.9-, and 2.5-fold in the detergent-rich fraction. In contrast, alkaline phosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase were poorly solubilized. The specific activities of these enzymes were increased 2.7- and 2.3-fold in the insoluble protein fraction. Maltase was almost completely solubilized and partitioned into the detergent-poor fraction with a small enrichment factor (1.3). These results suggest that Triton X-114 phase partitioning could be useful as a first step in the purification of many brush border membrane proteins.

  3. Purification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins by modified triton X-114 partitioning and preparative gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y G; Thompson, G A

    1995-01-01

    Triton X-114 phase partitioning has frequently been used to obtain preparations enriched in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and other hydrophobic proteins from crude cellular homogenates. We have developed a new modification of this phase-partitioning technique which allows two distinct GPI-anchored proteins of Tetrahymena mimbres to be separated from other hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic proteins and recovered in approximately 90% yield. The unique feature of the new method is a 24-h incubation of the first Triton X-114 extract at -20 degrees C. This improves the partitioning of GPI-anchored proteins into the detergent phase while promoting the aggregation of other hydrophobic proteins. Individual GPI-anchored proteins in the detergent phase are then purified to near homogeneity by one-step preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. By substituting Triton X-114/water mixtures for the conventional SDS buffer used to collect proteins eluting from the preparative gel, the purified GPI-anchored protein can be rapidly concentrated from relatively large volumes of eluate by phase partitioning at 32 degrees C. The method is also effective in separating mammalian GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase from other proteins. It is likely to be of general utility in characterizing the GPI anchor structures associated with nonabundant and abundant GPI-anchored proteins coexisting within the same cell type.

  4. Binding of adenovirus and its external proteins to Triton X-114. Dependence on pH

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, P.; Willingham, M.C.; Pastan, I.

    1985-11-25

    TVS-Labeled adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) (10 ng/ml) was incubated with 1% Triton X-114 at various pH values varying from 3.0 to 8.0. The detergent phase was separated from the aqueous phase by centrifugation, and the amounts of Ad2 were determined in the two phases. At pH 7.0-8.0, less than 5% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase; at pH 5.0 or below, about 60% of Ad2 was associated with the detergent phase. When a mixture of TVS-labeled capsid proteins was used at pH 7.0, 60-70% of the total proteins were associated with the detergent at pH 5.0, but less than 5% of the proteins interacted with detergent at pH 7.0. Among the three major external proteins (hexon, penton base, and fiber), penton base had the highest association with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0. Both intact virus and the capsid proteins that were associated with Triton X-114 at pH 5.0 were released into the aqueous phase on subsequent incubation at pH 7.0. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that mildly acidic pH induces amphiphilic properties in adenovirus capsid proteins and may help Ad2 escape from acidic endocytic vesicles.

  5. Astrometry of Single-Chord Occultations: Application to the 1993 Triton Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olkin, Catherine B.; Elliot, J. L.; Bus, Schelte J.; McDonald, Stephen W.; Dahn, Conrad C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper outlines a method for reducing astrometric data to derive the closest approach time and distance to the center of an occultation shadow for a single observer. The method applies to CCD frames, strip scans or photographic plates and uses a set of field stars of unknown positions to define a common coordinate system for all frames. The motion of the occulting body is used to establish the transformation between this common coordinate system and the celestial coordinate system of the body's ephemeris. This method is demonstrated by application to the Tr6O occultation by Triton on 1993 July 10 UT. Over an interval of four nights that included the occultation time, 80 frames of Triton and Tr6O were taken near the meridian with the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) 61-inch astrometric reflector. Application of the method presented here to these data yields a closest approach distance of 359 +/- 133 km (corresponding to 0.017 +/- 0.006 arcsec) for the occultation chord obtained with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). Comparison of the astrometric closest approach time with the KAO light-curve midtime shows a difference of 2.2 +/- 4.1 s. Relative photometry of Triton and Tr6O, needed for photometric calibration of the occultation light curve, is also presented.

  6. Simulated rainfall-driven dissolution of TNT, Tritonal, Comp B and Octol particles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Lever, James H; Fadden, Jennifer; Perron, Nancy; Packer, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Live-fire military training can deposit millimeter-sized particles of high explosives (HE) on surface soils when rounds do not explode as intended. Rainfall-driven dissolution of the particles then begins a process whereby aqueous HE solutions can enter the soil and groundwater as contaminants. We dripped water onto individual particles of TNT, Tritonal, Comp B and Octol to simulate how surface-deposited HE particles might dissolve under the action of rainfall and to use the data to verify a model that predicts HE dissolution as a function of particle size, particle composition and rainfall rate. Particle masses ranged from 1.1 to 17 mg and drip rates corresponded to nominal rainfall rates of 6 and 12 mmh(-1). For the TNT and Tritonal particles, TNT solubility governed dissolution time scales, whereas the lower-solubility of RDX controlled the dissolution time of both RDX and TNT in Comp B. The large, low-solubility crystals of HMX slowed but did not control the dissolution of TNT in Octol. Predictions from a drop-impingement dissolution model agree well with dissolved-mass timeseries for TNT, Tritonal and Comp B, providing some confidence that the model will also work well when applied to the rainfall-driven, outdoor dissolution of these HE particles.

  7. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Open Source Generation I and II Compliant Hydrodynamic Gas Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.; Bruckner, Robert J.; Howard, S. Adam

    2007-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost top foil layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while a layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. Foil bearings are used in many lightly loaded, high-speed turbo-machines such as compressors used for aircraft pressurization, and small micro-turbines. Foil gas bearings provide a means to eliminate the oil system leading to reduced weight and enhanced temperature capability. The general lack of familiarity of the foil bearing design and manufacturing process has hindered their widespread dissemination. This paper reviews the publicly available literature to demonstrate the design, fabrication and performance testing of both first and second generation bump style foil bearings. It is anticipated that this paper may serve as an effective starting point for new development activities employing foil bearing technology.

  8. ICE MINERALOGY ACROSS AND INTO THE SURFACES OF PLUTO, TRITON, AND ERIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tegler, S. C.; Grundy, W. M.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Romanishin, W.; Cornelison, D. M.; Khodadadkouchaki, R. E-mail: W.Grundy@lowell.edu E-mail: layoung@boulder.swri.edu E-mail: DavidCornelison@MissouriState.edu

    2012-05-20

    We present three near-infrared spectra of Pluto taken with the Infrared Telescope Facility and SpeX, an optical spectrum of Triton taken with the MMT and the Red Channel Spectrograph, and previously published spectra of Pluto, Triton, and Eris. We combine these observations with a two-phase Hapke model and gain insight into the ice mineralogy on Pluto, Triton, and Eris. Specifically, we measure the methane-nitrogen mixing ratio across and into the surfaces of these icy dwarf planets. In addition, we present a laboratory experiment that demonstrates it is essential to model methane bands in spectra of icy dwarf planets with two methane phases-one highly diluted by nitrogen and the other rich in methane. For Pluto, we find bulk, hemisphere-averaged, methane abundances of 9.1% {+-} 0.5%, 7.1% {+-} 0.4%, and 8.2% {+-} 0.3% for sub-Earth longitudes of 10 Degree-Sign , 125 Degree-Sign , and 257 Degree-Sign . Application of the Wilcoxon rank sum test to our measurements finds these small differences are statistically significant. For Triton, we find bulk, hemisphere-averaged, methane abundances of 5.0% {+-} 0.1% and 5.3% {+-} 0.4% for sub-Earth longitudes of 138 Degree-Sign and 314 Degree-Sign . Application of the Wilcoxon rank sum test to our measurements finds the differences are not statistically significant. For Eris, we find a bulk, hemisphere-averaged, methane abundance of 10% {+-} 2%. Pluto, Triton, and Eris do not exhibit a trend in methane-nitrogen mixing ratio with depth into their surfaces over the few centimeter range probed by these observations. This result is contrary to the expectation that since visible light penetrates deeper into a nitrogen-rich surface than the depths from which thermal emission emerges, net radiative heating at depth would drive preferential sublimation of nitrogen leading to an increase in the methane abundance with depth.

  9. Using Aluminum Foil to Record Structures in Sedimentary Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Aluminum foil can be used to make impressions of structures preserved in sedimentary rock. The impressions can be projected onto a screen, photographed, or a Plaster of Paris model can be made from them. Impressions of ripple marks, mudcracks, and raindrop impressions are provided in photographs illustrating the technique. (Author/JN)

  10. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  11. Age Differences in Depth of Retrieval: Memory for Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, L.L.; Shimizu, Y.; Velanova, K.; Rhodes, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Control over memory can be achieved in two ways: by constraining retrieval such that only sought after information comes to mind or, alternatively, by means of post-access monitoring. We used a memory-for-foils paradigm to gain evidence of differences in retrieval constraints. In this paradigm, participants studied words under deep or shallow…

  12. Modified Monkman-Grant relationship for austenitic stainless steel foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Ali, Hassan; Tamin, Mohd Nasir

    2013-02-01

    Characteristics of creep deformation for austenitic stainless steel foils are examined using the modified Monkman-Grant equation. A series of creep tests are conducted on AISI 347 steel foils at 700 °C and different stress levels ranging from 54 to 221 MPa. Results showed that at lower stress levels below 110 MPa, the creep life parameters ɛ, ɛr, tr can be expressed using the modified Monkman-Grant equation with exponent m'= 0.513. This indicates significant deviation of the creep behavior from the first order reaction kinetics theory for creep (m' = 1.0). The true tertiary creep damage in AISI 347 steel foil begins after 65.9% of the creep life of the foil has elapsed at stress levels above 150 MPa. At this high stress levels, Monkman-Grant ductility factor λ' saturates to a value of 1.3 with dislocation-controlled deformation mechanisms operating. At low stress levels, λ' increases drastically (λ'=190 at 54 MPa) when slow diffusion-controlled creep is dominant.

  13. Fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2004-09-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanoparticles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  14. Fullurene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2005-03-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene - oxygen - iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanopartickles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  15. Fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2004-06-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanoparticles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  16. Tribalism as a Foiled Factor of Africa Nation-Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okogu, J. O.; Umudjere, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper tends to examine tribalism as a foiled factor on Africa nation-building and proffers useful tips to salvaging the Africa land from this deadly social problem. Africans in times past had suffered enormous attacks, injuries, losses, deaths, destruction of properties and human skills and ideas due to the presence of tribalistic views in…

  17. Geometry-function relationship in meta-foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, H. O.; Jian, L. K.; Chen, H. S.; Kalaiselvi, S. M. P.; Virasawmy, S.; Cheng, X. X.; Banas, A.; Banas, K.; Heussler, S. P.; Bahou, M.; Wu, B.-I.; Hua, Wei; Yi, Zhu

    2010-04-01

    Meta-foils are all-metal free-standing electromagnetic metamaterials based on interconnected S-string architecture. They provide a versatile applications' platform. Lacking any substrate or embedding matrix, they feature arrays of parallel upright S-strings with each string longitudinally shifted by half an S compared to its neighbour to form capacitance-inductance loops. Geometric parameters include length a, width b, thickness t, and height h of an S, the gap between adjacent S-strings d, and the periodicity p of the interconnecting lines. Equidistant strings at p=1 form a 1SE meta-foil. Grouped in pairs of gap d, exhibiting a gap dp between pairs, they are named 2SP. Geometric parameters a, b, t, h, d, dp, pS(E or P) and materials' properties like electric conductivity, Young's modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity determine the electromagnetic, mechanical, and thermal properties of meta-foils including the spectral dependence of resonance frequencies, refractive index, transmission, reflection, and bending. We show how the frequency and transmission of left-handed pass-bands depend on a, p, and dp, the pSP geometry exhibiting higher resonance frequency and transmission. Equivalent circuit considerations serve to explain physical reasons. We also demonstrate mechanical behavior versus p and dp justifying the design of a cylindrical hyperlens depending on bent meta-foils.

  18. Validation of calculated self-shielding factors for Rh foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaćimović, R.; Trkov, A.; Žerovnik, G.; Snoj, L.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2010-10-01

    Rhodium foils of about 5 mm diameter were obtained from IRMM. One foil had thickness of 0.006 mm and three were 0.112 mm thick. They were irradiated in the pneumatic transfer system and in the carousel facility of the TRIGA reactor at the Jožef Stefan Institute. The foils were irradiated bare and enclosed in small cadmium boxes (about 2 g weight) of 1 mm thickness to minimise the perturbation of the local neutron flux. They were co-irradiated with 5 mm diameter and 0.2 mm thick Al-Au (0.1%) alloy monitor foils. The resonance self-shielding corrections for the 0.006 and 0.112 mm thick samples were calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation and amount to about 10% and 60%, respectively. The consistency of measurements confirmed the validity of self-shielding factors. Trial estimates of Q0 and k0 factors for the 555.8 keV gamma line of 104Rh were made and amount to 6.65±0.18 and (6.61±0.12)×10 -2, respectively.

  19. Characteristic Differences Between Wire and Foil X-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Gilbert; Valenzuela, Julio; Krasheninnikov, Igor; Beg, Farhat; Wei, Mingsheng

    2015-11-01

    We conducted X-pinch experiments using laser-cut Ni and Cu foils on the 250kA GenASIS current driver at UC San Diego. General Atomics' Laser Micro-Machining (LMM) Center manufactured the X's. To characterize the foil X-pinches, we measured and compared the evolution, emission spectra, yield, and source size of these new arrays to that of comparably massed wire X-pinches on the same driver. Diagnostics included Si PN diodes and diamond PCDs, optical probing, X-ray spectroscopy, an XUV framing camera, a slit-wire camera, and current probes. We used novel structures machined into the crosspoint in an effort to better understand the effects of the initial geometry on the final pinch and to spatially confine the source location. Some designs entirely prohibited pinching. In other designs, when pinching occurred, the sources were comparable to ideal wire shots on GenASIS both in size (at or less than five microns) and X-ray flux (5-10 MW @ 1-10 keV). The data collected here also show considerable differences between successful foil and wire pinches. The X-ray spectra are not identical, and we find that the foil X's produce a single >2.5 keV emission pulse with none of the additional later and longer-lasting hard emission pulses found in wire X-pinches.

  20. Exploding metallic foil fuse modeling at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Goforth, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A ''first-principles'' computational model of exploding metallic foil behavior has been developed at Los Alamos. The model couples zero-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with ohmic heating and electrical circuit equations and uses the Los Alamos SESAME atomic data base computer library to determine the foil material's temperature- and density-dependent pressure, specific energy, and electrical conductivity. The model encompasses many previously successful empirical models and offers plausible physical explanations of phenomena not treated by the empirical models. In addition to addressing the electrical circuit performance of an exploding foil, the model provides information on the temporal evolution of the foil material's density, temperature, pressure, electrical conductivity, and expansion and translational velocities. In this paper, we report the physical insight gained by computational studies of two opening switch concepts being developed for application in an FCG-driven 1-MJ-class imploding plasma z-pinch experiment. The first concept considered is a ''conventional'' electrically exploded fuse, which has been demonstrated to operate at 16 MA driven by the 15-MJ-class FCG to be used in the 1 MJ implosion experiment. The second concept considered is a Type 2 explosively formed fuse (EFF), which has been demonstrated to operate at the 8 MA level by a 1-MJ-class FCG.

  1. Foil Bearing Starting Considerations and Requirements for Rotorcraft Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Foil gas bearings under development for rotorcraft-sized, hot core engine applications have been susceptible to damage from the slow acceleration and rates typically encountered during the pre-ignition stage in conventional engines. Recent laboratory failures have been assumed to be directly linked to operating foil bearings below their lift-off speed while following conventional startup procedures for the engines. In each instance, the continuous sliding contact between the foils and shaft was believed to thermally overload the bearing and cause the engines to fail. These failures highlight the need to characterize required acceleration rates and minimum operating speeds for these applications. In this report, startup experiments were conducted with a large, rotorcraft engine sized foil bearing under moderate load and acceleration rates to identify the proper start procedures needed to avoid bearing failure. The results showed that a bearing under a 39.4 kPa static load can withstand a modest acceleration rate of 500 rpm/s and excessive loitering below the bearing lift-off speed provided an adequate solid lubricant is present.

  2. Exploding metallic foil fuse modeling at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, Irvin R.; Reinovsky, Robert E.; Goforth, James H.

    A first-principles computational model of exploding metallic foil behavior was developed at Los Alamos. The model couples zero-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with ohmic heating and electrical circuit equations and uses the Los Alamos SESAME atomic data base computer library to determine the foil material's temperature- and density-dependent pressure, specific energy, and electrical conductivity. The model encompasses many previously successful empirical models and offers plausible physical explanations of phenomena not treated by the empirical models. In addition to addressing the electrical circuit performance of an exploding foil, the model provides information on the temporal evolution of the foil material's density, temperature, pressure, electrical conductivity, and expansion and translational velocities. The physical insight gained by computational studies of two opening switch concepts being developed for application in an FCG-driven 1-MJ-class imploding plasma z-pinch experiment are reported. The first concept considered is a conventional electrically exploded fuse, which was demonstrated to operate at 16 MA driven by the 15-MJ-class FCG to be used in the 1 MJ implosion experiment. The second concept considered is a Type 2 explosively formed fuse (EFF), which was demonstrated to operate at the 8 MA level by a 1-MJ-class FCG.

  3. Foil bearing performance in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genge, Gary G.; Saville, Marshall; Gu, Alston

    1993-01-01

    Space transfer vehicles and other power and propulsion systems require long-life turbopumps. Rolling-element bearings used in current turbopumps do not have sufficient life for these applications. Process fluid foil bearings have established long life, with exceptional reliability, over a wide range of temperatures and fluids in many high-speed turbomachinery applications. However, actual data on bearing performance in cryogenic fluids has been minimal. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems and Equipment (ASE) have attempted to characterize the leaf-type compliant foil bearing in oxygen and nitrogen. The work performed under a joint internal research and development program between Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and ASE demonstrated that the foil bearing has load capacities of at least 266 psi in liquid oxygen and 352 psi in liquid nitrogen. In addition, the bearing demonstrated a direct damping coefficient of 40 to 50 lb-sec/in. with a damping ratio of .7 to 1.4 in. liquid nitrogen using a bearing sized for upper-stage turbopumps. With the results from this testing and the years of successful use in air cycle machines and other applications, leaf-type compliant foil bearings are ready for testing in liquid oxygen turbopumps.

  4. Plastic foils as primary hydrogen standards for nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, W.; Bauer, C.; Brankoff, K.; Grambole, D.; Grötzschel, R.; Heiser, C.; Herrmann, F.

    1986-04-01

    Plastic materials like polypropylene, polyester (Mylar) and polycarbonate (Lexan or Makrofol E) contain large amounts of hydrogen and their compositions are well known. However, these materials are not stable during ion bombardment. Using the 1H( 15N,αγ) 12C and 1H( 19F, αγ) 16O nuclear resonance reaction at energies EN = 6.50 MeV and EF = 6.83 MeV, respectively, we have investigated the behaviour of plastic foils during 15N and 19F ion bombardment. By means of a rotating sample holder low current densities of 1-2 {nA}/{cm 2} and large irradiated foil areas of up to 10 cm 2 were realized. Under these measuring conditions the γ-ray yields change only slightly and the initial yields, which correspond to the known compositions of the foils, can be determined with good accuracy. In this way the plastic foils can be used as primary standards for hydrogen content calibration. The method was employed to calibrate an a-Si(H) reference target.

  5. Secret in the Margins: Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Sevgi; Hanuscin, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a lesson that uses the 5E Learning Cycle to help students not only understand the atomic model but also how Ernest Rutherford helped develop it. The lesson uses Rutherford's gold foil experiment to focus on three aspects of the nature of science: the empirical nature of science, the tentativeness of scientific…

  6. Laser-induced structure formation on stretched polymer foils

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, Nikita; Arnold, Nikita; Baeuerle, Dieter; Arenholz, Enno

    2007-04-15

    Noncoherent structures that develop during UV laser ablation of stretched semicrystalline polymer foils are a very general phenomenon. A thermodynamic model based on stress relaxation within the modified layer of the polymer surface describes the main features of the observed phenomena, and, in particular, the dependence of the period of structures on laser wavelength, fluence, and number of laser pulses.

  7. Large deflection analysis of a tension-foil bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are as follows: rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's. CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contacts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exist for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. Recently, a new tension-foil bearing configuration has been proposed for turbomachinery applications.

  8. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... Addition to Human Food Through Food-Contact Surfaces § 189.301 Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on one or both sides with a thin...

  9. Improvements in Fabrication of Elastic Scattering Foils Used to Measure Neutron Yield by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Reynolds, H. G.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M. P.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Bionta, R. M.; Frenje, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic recoil spectrometer uses a deuterated polyethylene polymer (CD2) foil to measure neutron yield in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Higher neutron yields in recent experiments have resulted in primary signal saturation in the detector CR-39 foils, necessitating the fabrication of thinner CD2 foils than established methods could provide. A novel method of fabricating deuterated polymer foils is described. The resulting foils are thinner, smoother, and more uniform in thickness than the foils produced by previous methods. Here, these new foils have successfully been deployed at the National Ignition Facility, enabling higher neutron yield measurements than previous foils, with nomore » primary signal saturation.« less

  10. Ink-jet printed colorimetric gas sensors on plastic foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbat, Jerome; Briand, Danick; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2010-08-01

    An all polymeric colorimetric gas sensor with its associated electronics for ammonia (NH3) detection targeting low-cost and low-power applications is presented. The gas sensitive layer was inkjet printed on a plastic foil. The use of the foil directly as optical waveguide simplified the fabrication, made the device more cost effective and compatible with large scale fabrication techniques, such as roll to roll processes. Concentrations of 500 ppb of NH3 in nitrogen with 50% of RH were measured with a power consumption of about 868 μW in an optical pulsed mode of operation. Such sensors foresee applications in the field of wireless systems, for environmental and safety monitoring. The fabrication of the planar sensor was based on low temperature processing. The waveguide was made of PEN or PET foil and covered with an ammonia sensitive layer deposited by inkjet printing, which offered a proper and localized deposition of the film. The influence of the substrate temperature and its surface pretreatment were investigated to achieve the optimum deposition parameters for the printed fluid. To improve the light coupling from the light source (LED) to the detectors (photodiodes), polymeric micro-mirrors were patterned in an epoxy resin. With the printing of the colorimetric film and additive patterning of polymeric micro-mirrors on plastic foil, a major step was achieved towards the implementation of full plastic selective gas sensors. The combination with printed OLED and PPD would further lead to an integrated all polymeric optical transducer on plastic foil fully compatible with printed electronics processes.

  11. Terahertz radiation generation by nonlinear mixing of two laser beams over a thin foil

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, Santosh; Parashar, J.

    2015-07-31

    Terahertz radiation generation via nonlinear mixing of two laser beams incident over a thin metal foil is explored. The lasers exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons of metal foil at beat frequency which lies in the terahertz range. The metal foil acts as antenna, producing terahertz radiations, highly directional in nature.

  12. Tidal interaction: A possible explanation for geysers and other fluid phenomena in the Neptune-Triton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, W. D.; Wood, C. L.

    1993-03-01

    Discovery of geyser-like plumes on the surface of Triton was a highlight of Voyager 2's passage through the Neptune planetary system. Remarkable as these observations were, they were not entirely without precedent. Considering the confirmed predictions for the 1979 Voyager Jovian passage, it was logical to consider other solar system bodies beside Io where tidal effects could be a significant factor in surface processes. It was our intuition that the Neptune-Triton gravitational bond acting at high inclination to the Neptune equator and the fact that Neptune was a fluid body was significant oblateness would produce tidal and mechanical forces that could be transformed into thermal energy vented on Triton's surface. Prior to the Voyager flyby, others have noted that capture and evolution of Triton's orbit from extreme eccentricity to near circular state today would have resulted in significant tidal heating, but these analysts disregard current day forces. Our calculations indicate that the time varying forces between Neptune-Triton fall midway between those exerted in the Earth-Moon and Jupiter-Io systems, and considering the low level of other energy inputs, this source of internal energy should not be ignored when seeking an explanation for surface activity. In each planet-satellite case, residual or steady-state eccentricity causes time-varying stresses on internal satellite strata. In the case of Jupiter the residual eccentricity is due largely to Galilean satellite interactions, particularly Io-Europa, but in the case of Neptune-Triton, it is the effect of Triton's inclined orbit about an oblate primary.

  13. Tidal interaction: A possible explanation for geysers and other fluid phenomena in the Neptune-Triton system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. D.; Wood, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Discovery of geyser-like plumes on the surface of Triton was a highlight of Voyager 2's passage through the Neptune planetary system. Remarkable as these observations were, they were not entirely without precedent. Considering the confirmed predictions for the 1979 Voyager Jovian passage, it was logical to consider other solar system bodies beside Io where tidal effects could be a significant factor in surface processes. It was our intuition that the Neptune-Triton gravitational bond acting at high inclination to the Neptune equator and the fact that Neptune was a fluid body was significant oblateness would produce tidal and mechanical forces that could be transformed into thermal energy vented on Triton's surface. Prior to the Voyager flyby, others have noted that capture and evolution of Triton's orbit from extreme eccentricity to near circular state today would have resulted in significant tidal heating, but these analysts disregard current day forces. Our calculations indicate that the time varying forces between Neptune-Triton fall midway between those exerted in the Earth-Moon and Jupiter-Io systems, and considering the low level of other energy inputs, this source of internal energy should not be ignored when seeking an explanation for surface activity. In each planet-satellite case, residual or steady-state eccentricity causes time-varying stresses on internal satellite strata. In the case of Jupiter the residual eccentricity is due largely to Galilean satellite interactions, particularly Io-Europa, but in the case of Neptune-Triton, it is the effect of Triton's inclined orbit about an oblate primary.

  14. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. S.; Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  15. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-19

    A method is described for welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads. 7 figs.

  16. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method of welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads.

  17. The characterization of plasma membrane-bound tubulin of cauliflower using Triton X-114 fractionation.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, A; Berglund, M; Staxén, I; Widell, S

    1997-11-01

    The cortical microtubules determine how cellulose microfibrils are deposited in the plant cell wall and are thus important for the control of cell expansion. To understand how microtubules can control microfibril deposition, the components that link the microtubules to the plasma membrane (PM) of plant cells must be isolated. To obtain information on the properties of the tubulin-membrane associations, cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) PM was subjected to Triton X-114 fractionation, and the distribution of alpha- and beta-tubulin was analyzed using immunoblotting. Approximately one-half of the PM-associated tubulin was solubilized by Triton X-114 and 10 to 15% of both alpha- and beta-tubulin was recovered in the detergent phase (indicative of hydrophobic properties) and 30 to 40% was recovered in the aqueous phase. The hydrophobic tubulin could be released from the membrane by high pH extraction with preserved hydrophobicity. A large part of the PM-associated tubulin was found in the Triton-insoluble fraction. When this insoluble material was extracted a second time, a substantial amount of hydrophobic tubulin was released if the salt concentration was increased, suggesting that the hydrophobic tubulin was linked to a high-salt-sensitive protein aggregate that probably includes other components of the cytoskeleton. The hydrophobicity of a fraction of PM-associated tubulin could reflect a direct or indirect interaction of this tubulin with the lipid bilayer or with an integral membrane protein and may represent the anchoring of the cortical microtubules to the PM, a key element in the regulation of cell expansion.

  18. Origin and Evolution of Nitrogen on Titan, Enceladus, Triton, and Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Niemann, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen, together with carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur (CHNOPS), plays a central role in life as we know it. Indeed, molecular nitrogen is the most abundant component of the terrestrial atmosphere, and second only to carbon dioxide on Mars and Venus. The Voyager and Cassini-Huygens observations show that copious nitrogen is present on Titan also, comprising some 95% by volume of this moon's 1500 millibar atmosphere. After water vapor, it may be the most abundant (4%) of the gases around tiny Enceladus, as revealed by the recent Cassini observations. A thin nitrogen atmosphere is found even on the coldest of the solar system bodies, Triton and Pluto. The available evidence on nitrogen isotopes and the heavy noble gases suggests that Titan acquired its nitrogen largely in the form of ammonia. Subsequent chemical evolution, beginning with the photolysis of NH3 on primordial Titan, led to the nitrogen atmosphere we see on Titan today. This is also the scenario for the origin of nitrogen on the terrestrial planets. Contrary to Titan, the colder outer solar system objects, Triton and Pluto, neither had the luxury of receiving much arnmonia in the first place, nor of photolyzing whatever little ammonia they did receive in the planetesimals that formed them. On the other hand, it is plausible the planetesimals were capable of trapping and delivering molecular nitrogen directly to Triton and Pluto, unlike Titan. The origin of nitrogen on Enceladus is somewhat enigmatic. A scenario similar to Titan's, but with a role for the interior processes, may be at work. In this paper, we will discuss the source and loss of nitrogen for the above objects, and why Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, is nitrogen starved.

  19. Comparative study of the interaction of CHAPS and Triton X-100 with the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Rodi, P M; Bocco Gianello, M D; Corregido, M C; Gennaro, A M

    2014-03-01

    The zwitterionic detergent CHAPS, a derivative of the bile salts, is widely used in membrane protein solubilization. It is a "facial" detergent, having a hydrophilic side and a hydrophobic back. The objective of this work is to characterize the interaction of CHAPS with a cell membrane. To this aim, erythrocytes were incubated with a wide range of detergent concentrations in order to determine CHAPS partition behavior, and its effects on membrane lipid order, hemolytic effects, and the solubilization of membrane phospholipids and cholesterol. The results were compared with those obtained with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. It was found that CHAPS has a low affinity for the erythrocyte membrane (partition coefficient K=0.06mM(-1)), and at sub-hemolytic concentrations it causes little effect on membrane lipid order. CHAPS hemolysis and phospholipid solubilization are closely correlated. On the other side, binding of Triton X-100 disorders the membrane at all levels, and has independent mechanisms for hemolysis and solubilization. Differential behavior was observed in the solubilization of phospholipids and cholesterol. Thus, the detergent resistant membranes (DRM) obtained with the two detergents will have different composition. The behaviors of the two detergents are related to the differences in their molecular structures, suggesting that CHAPS does not penetrate the lipid bilayer but binds in a flat position on the erythrocyte surface, both in intact and cholesterol depleted erythrocytes. A relevant result for Triton X-100 is that hemolysis is not directly correlated with the solubilization of membrane lipids, as it is usually assumed.

  20. Introduction of new database reflected tritone algorithm for application in mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmeyer, Thomas; Schmalfuss, Heiko; Heumann, Jan; Lang, Michael

    2008-04-01

    At Photomask Japan 2007 the new algorithm of Fast Integrated die-to-die T+R (DDTR) for the views of P90 and P72 for the KLA Tencor TeraScanHR mask inspection system was presented. At the same time a new algorithm for P72 in database tritone mode for reflected light (DBRt) was introduced. Both modes can be used together as one combined inspection to detect pattern and contamination defects on production masks. It was shown that these new algorithms allow for creation of a new inspection strategy with improved throughput and a reduced amount of inspections. Currently an inspection strategy has to cover at first a pattern inspection (normally a combination of die-to-die and additional database inspections) for finding hard defects on a mask and then as second step a contamination inspection (STARlight2 TM). The hard defects have to be repaired and the contaminations can be cleaned. The new inspection strategy allows for detection of all critical hard and contamination defects on a mask with one single combined inspection, enhancing productivity. At BACUS 2007 the first evaluation of this new kind of inspection strategy for manufacturing of masks was described for two production plates of different design. At that time only the database reflected tritone algorithm for the view of P72 was available. The changes in inspection strategy could only go together with a change of view from P90 to P72. With view P72 higher overall sensitivity could be reached and smaller secondary features could be inspected. However, these improvements may not be necessary for all plates and may need more time than a comparable P90 inspection. Today the standard contamination inspection for critical masks is the P90 STARlight2 TM (SL2). To do a time effective parallel combo inspection with DDTR and DBRt the same view has to be used. An extension of the database reflected tritone algorithm to the P90 view is now available. This gives the mask manufacturer the flexibility to change the

  1. The origin of dark/light aureole areas on Neptune's satellite Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trego, K. D.

    1991-01-01

    The findings of Smith et al. (1989) concerning the existence of dark areas in floors of impact craters on the Uranian satellite Oberon are reviewed. It is noted that Smith et al. concluded that dark streaks in the south polar region of Triton were the result of geyser-like eruptions perhaps triggered by solar heating of nitrogenous material and dark methane ice. It is suggested that endogenic effusion of a two layered deposit in the crust onto the surface, a much milder eruption process, may be responsible for the dark/light aureole areas.

  2. The reaction proton deuteron yields triton pion at 470 and 590 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollhopf, W.; Lunke, C.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Roberts, W. K.; Kitching, P.; Olsen, W. C.; Priest, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary results from a study of the deuteron (proton, positive pion)triton reaction are reported. The differential cross section for this reaction was measured for a number of center of mass angles from 37 deg to 160 deg at incident proton energies of 470 and 590 MeV. The cross sections measured at 590 MeV agree with predictions made considering a two-nucleon process. The 470 MeV data shows a peak in the backward direction which is not predicted by this mechanism.

  3. Explanation of 3He and triton rates in the alpha breakup inclusive cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, R.; Baur, G.; Budzanowski, A.; Bojowald, J.; Dabrowski, H.; Mayer-Böricke, C.; Oelert, W.; Riepe, G.; Rogge, M.; Turek, P.; Rösel, F.; Trautmann, D.

    1983-05-01

    (α, 3He) and (α, t) continuum inclusive spectra are measured on target nuclei ranging from 58Ni to 209Bi. Systematic differences in the absolute magnitudes of the 3He and triton spectra are found. To explain these differences the distorted-wave Born approximation calculations in the post form for inclusive breakup reactions are performed. It is shown that Coulomb effects are responsible for these differences. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (α, t), (α, 3He) breakup reactions: measured d2σd Ω dE; targets: 58Ni, 90Zr, 120Sn, 209Bi; post form DWBA breakup theory.

  4. Solid methane on Triton and Pluto - 3- to 4-micron spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.R.; Buie, M.W.; Bjoraker, G.L. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-12-01

    Methane has been identified in the Pluto/Charon system on the basis of absorption features in the reflectance spectrum at 1.5 and 2.3 microns; attention is presently given to observations of a 3.25 micron-centered deep absorption feature in Triton and Pluto/Charon system reflectance spectra. This absorption may indicate the presence of solid methane, constituting either the dominant surface species or a mixture with a highly transparent substance, such as N2 frost. 35 refs.

  5. Temperature, N2, and N density profiles of Triton's atmosphere - Observations and model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Sandel, B. R.; Herbert, F.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Improved analysis of the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer observations of the solar occultation by Triton yields the isothermal temperature and N2 number densities in the altitude range 475-675 km. The signature of atomic nitrogen in the occultation spectra is identified, its density profile is derived, and an experimental value of the escape rate of N atoms is given. The one-dimensional thermal conductivity equation for a spherical atmosphere is solved, taking into account CO heating and cooling and heating by precipitating electrons, solar radiation, and chemical effects. Finally, profiles of number densities of N, H2, and H are calculated.

  6. Temperature Measurements at Material Interfaces with Thin-Foil Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Mike J.; Chapman, David J.; Proud, William G.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements of shock heating are important in determining Equations of State that incorporate entropic effects. The use of thin-foil nickel gauges to measure shock heating in material was proposed by Rosenberg et al. in the 1980s. This research investigates the use of such commercial thin-foil gauges at interfaces between materials of different thermal and shock properties. The technique requires analysis of the resistance changes of the gauge which is a function of both temperature and stress. The response of manganin gauges to shock loading is well understood, and was used to calibrate for the piezoresistive effect in nickel. Results are presented for a variety of well-characterised materials and the applicability of the proposed method discussed.

  7. Temperature measurements at material interfaces with thin-foil gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Mike; Chapman, David; Proud, William

    2009-06-01

    Measurements of shock heating are important in determining Equations of State that incorporate entropic effects. The use of thin-foil nickel gauges to measure shock heating in material was proposed by Rosenberg et al. in the 1980s. This research investigates the use of such commercial thin-foil gauges at interfaces between materials of different thermal and shock properties. The technique requires analysis of the resistance changes of the gauge which is a function of both temperature and stress. The response of manganin gauges to shock loading is well understood, and was used to calibrate for the piezoresistive effect in nickel. Results are presented for a variety of well-characterised materials and the applicability of the proposed method discussed.

  8. Reduction of Viologen Bisphosphonate Dihalide with Aluminum Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeta Iyere, Peter

    1996-05-01

    An elegant undergraduate experiment similar to the popular "Iodine Clock Reaction" employs the reduction of methyl viologen by hydroxide ion. A major problem with the hydroxide reduction demonstration is that the mechanism is complicated by the existence of competing reaction pathways. It has been suggested that layered metal viologen phosphonates could be used in the design and construction of molecular materials. The active unit in the reversible photocoloration of these layered materials is the viologen bisphosphonate dihalide (VPX). During our study of these phoshponate systems, we discovered the reduction of viologen bisphosphonate dihalide by aluminum foil, mossy zinc, or magnesium turnings in dilute aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution. When we demonstrated this phenomenon with aluminum foil and VPBr in the classroom, the response of our students was enthusiastic. This demonstration can be used as prelaboratory discussion for an undergraduate kinetic experiment based on the same phenomenon.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL PROPERTIES AND BOND STRENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    D E Burkes; D D Keiser; D M Wachs; J S Larson; M D Chapple

    2007-03-01

    Understanding fuel foil mechanical properties, and fuel / cladding bond quality and strength in monolithic plates is an important area of investigation and quantification. Specifically, what constitutes an acceptable monolithic fuel – cladding bond, how are the properties of the bond measured and determined, and what is the impact of fabrication process or change in parameters on the level of bonding? Currently, non-bond areas are quantified employing ultrasonic determinations that are challenging to interpret and understand in terms of irradiation impact. Thus, determining mechanical properties of the fuel foil and what constitutes fuel / cladding non-bonds is essential to successful qualification of monolithic fuel plates. Capabilities and tests related to determination of these properties have been implemented at the INL and are discussed, along with preliminary results.

  10. Gas Foil Bearing Technology Advancements for Closed Brayton Cycle Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; Bruckner, Robert J.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbine systems are under consideration for future space electric power generation. CBC turbines convert thermal energy from a nuclear reactor, or other heat source, to electrical power using a closed-loop cycle. The operating fluid in the closed-loop is commonly a high pressure inert gas mixture that cannot tolerate contamination. One source of potential contamination in a system such as this is the lubricant used in the turbomachine bearings. Gas Foil Bearings (GFB) represent a bearing technology that eliminates the possibility of contamination by using the working fluid as the lubricant. Thus, foil bearings are well suited to application in space power CBC turbine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center is actively researching GFB technology for use in these CBC power turbines. A power loss model has been developed, and the effects of a very high ambient pressure, start-up torque, and misalignment, have been observed and are reported here.

  11. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Bartsch, R. R.; Benage, J. R.; Forman, P. R.; Gribble, R. F.; Ladish, J. S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J. V.; Scudder, D. W.; Shlachter, J. S.

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground Experiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (greater than 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  12. Direct drive foil implosion experiments on Pegasus 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Bartsch, R. R.; Benage, J. F.; Forman, P. R.; Gribble, R. F.; Hockaday, M. Y. P.; Hockaday, R. G.; Ladish, J. S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J. V.

    Pegasus 2 is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos Above Ground Experiments (AGEX) program. The goal of the program is to produce an intense (greater than 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the KE of a 1 to 10 MJ collapsing plasma source. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several tens of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. This paper addresses z-pinch experiments done on a capacitor bank where the radiating plasma source is formed by an imploding annular aluminum foil driven by the J X B forces generated by the current flowing through the foil.

  13. Direct Drive Foil Implosion Experiments on Pegasus II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Bartsch, R. R.; Benage, J. F.; Forman, P. R.; Gribble, R. F.; Hockaday, M. Y. P.; Hockaday, R. G.; Ladish, L. S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J. V.; Shlachter, J. S.; Wysocki, F. J.

    1994-03-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos Above Ground Experiments (AGEX) program. The goal of the program is to produce an intense (>100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the KE of a 1 to 10 MJ collapsing plasma source. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several tens of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. This paper addresses z-pinch experiments done on a capacitor bank where the radiating plasma source is formed by an imploding annular aluminum foil driven by the JxB forces generated by the current flowing through the foil.

  14. Silicon Foils Growth by Interface-controlled Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, D.

    1984-01-01

    During interface controlled crystallization (ICC) the chance to accelerate the removal of crystallization heat is the basis for high pulling rates of about 100 mm/min. The forced heat flow from the extended crystallization front to a cooling ramp is controlled by a lubricating melt film which also influences the crystallization behavior by suppressing nucleation centers. The basic principles of this full casting technique are presented and the influences of process parameters on the morphology of prepared silicon foils are demonstrated. Three different types of crystalline structure were found in silicon foils grown to ICC technique: dendritic, coarse granular and monocrystalline with (111) 211 orientation. The criteria for their appearance of process variables are discussed.

  15. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  16. Comparison of EXAFS Foil Spectra from Around the World

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Bare, S. R.; Greenlay, N.; Azevedo, G.; Balasubramanian, M.; Barton, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Fakra, S.; Johannessen, B.; Newville, M.; Pena, J.; Pokrovski, G. S; Proux, O.; Priolkar, K.; Ravel, B.; Webb, S. M.

    2010-07-16

    The EXAFS spectra of Cu and Pd foil from many different beamlines and synchrotrons are compared to address the dependence of the amplitude reduction factor (S{sub 0}{sup 2}) on beamline specific parameters. Even though S{sub 0}{sup 2} is the same parameter as the EXAFS coordination number, the value for S{sub 0}{sup 2} is given little attention, and is often unreported. The S{sub 0}{sup 2} often differs for the same material due to beamline and sample attributes, such that no importance is given to S{sub 0}{sup 2}-values within a general range of 0.7 to 1.1. EXAFS beamlines have evolved such that it should now be feasible to use standard S{sub 0}{sup 2} values for all EXAFS measurements of a specific elemental environment. This would allow for the determination of the imaginary energy (Ei) to account for broadening of the EXAFS signal rather than folding these errors into an effective S{sub 0}{sup 2}-value. To test this concept, we model 11 Cu-foil and 6 Pd-foil EXAFS spectra from around the world to compare the difference in S{sub 0}{sup 2}- and Ei-values.

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of foils made of nanocrystalline beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhigalina, O. M.; Semenov, A. A.; Zabrodin, A. V.; Khmelenin, D. N.; Brylev, D. A.; Lizunov, A. V.; Nebera, A. L.; Morozov, I. A.; Anikin, A. S.; Orekhov, A. S.; Kuskova, A. N.; Mishin, V. V.; Seryogin, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The phase composition and structural features of (45-90)-μm-thick foils obtained from nanocrystalline beryllium during multistep thermomechanical treatment have been established using electron microscopy, electron diffraction, electron backscattering diffraction, and energy-dispersive analysis. This treatment is shown to lead to the formation of a structure with micrometer- and submicrometer-sized grains. The minimum average size of beryllium grains is 352 nm. The inclusions of beryllium oxide (BeO) of different modifications with tetragonal (sp. gr. P42/ mnm) and hexagonal (sp. gr. P63/ mmc) lattices are partly ground during deformation to a size smaller than 100 nm and are located along beryllium grain boundaries in their volume, significantly hindering migration during treatment. The revealed structural features of foils with submicrometer-sized crystallites provide the thermal stability of their structural state. Beryllium with this structure is a promising material for X-ray instrument engineering and for the production of ultrathin (less than 10 μm) vacuum-dense foils with very high physicomechanical characteristics.

  18. Material Parameters for Creep Rupture of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.

    2014-08-01

    Creep rupture properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 °C in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with rupture lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher rupture ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.

  19. Aluminium contents in baked meats wrapped in aluminium foil.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Sadettin

    2006-12-01

    In this investigation, the effect of cooking treatments (60min at 150°C, 40min at 200°C, and 20min at 250°C) on aluminium contents of meats (beef, water buffalo, mutton, chicken and turkey) baked in aluminium foil were evaluated. Cooking increased the aluminium concentration of both the white and red meats. The increase was 89-378% in red meats and 76-215% in poultry. The least increase (76-115%) was observed in the samples baked for 60min at 150°C, while the highest increase (153-378%) was in samples baked for 20min at 250°C. It was determined that the fat content of meat in addition to the cooking process affected the migration of aluminium (r(2)=0.83; P<0.01). It was also found that raw chicken and turkey breast meat contained higher amounts of aluminium than the raw chicken and turkey leg meat, respectively. Regarding the suggested provisional tolerable daily intake of 1mg Al/kg body weight per day of the FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, there are no evident risks to the health of the consumer from using aluminium foil to cook meats. However, eating meals prepared in aluminium foil may carry a risk to the health by adding to other aluminium sources.

  20. The evolution of nitrogen in the atmospheres of Pluto, Titan and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, Kathleen; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Mousis, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The origin and evolution of nitrogen in solar system bodies is an important question for understanding processes that took place during the formation of the planets and solar system bodies. The most abundant molecule in the Earth's, Titan's, Pluto's and Triton's atmospheres is molecular nitrogen. The nitrogen isotope ratio, 14N/15N, is an important tracer of the origin of nitrogen on these solar system bodies. By modeling the evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratio from its primordial value to its current value, we can determine if this nitrogen originated as molecular nitrogen or is derived from ammonia in the protosolar nebula. We evaluate the potential impact of escape and photochemistry on 14N/15N in these atmospheres to determine constraints for the origin of nitrogen on these bodies. These results have implications for formation processes in the outer solar system and provide guidance for measurements needed by future a future Ice Giants mission to study Triton and any mission to follow New Horizons and Cassini in exploring Pluto and Titan.

  1. SCALE Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Depletion with Parallel KENO in TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, Sedat; Bekar, Kursat B; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system is a powerful and robust tool for performing multigroup (MG) reactor physics analysis using either the 2-D deterministic solver NEWT or the 3-D Monte Carlo transport code KENO. However, as with all MG codes, the accuracy of the results depends on the accuracy of the MG cross sections that are generated and/or used. While SCALE resonance self-shielding modules provide rigorous resonance self-shielding, they are based on 1-D models and therefore 2-D or 3-D effects such as heterogeneity of the lattice structures may render final MG cross sections inaccurate. Another potential drawback to MG Monte Carlo depletion is the need to perform resonance self-shielding calculations at each depletion step for each fuel segment that is being depleted. The CPU time and memory required for self-shielding calculations can often eclipse the resources needed for the Monte Carlo transport. This summary presents the results of the new continuous-energy (CE) calculation mode in TRITON. With the new capability, accurate reactor physics analyses can be performed for all types of systems using the SCALE Monte Carlo code KENO as the CE transport solver. In addition, transport calculations can be performed in parallel mode on multiple processors.

  2. Isolation of flagella from the archaebacterium Methanococcus voltae by phase separation with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Kalmokoff, M L; Jarrell, K F; Koval, S F

    1988-04-01

    The flagella of Methanococcus voltae were isolated by using three procedures. Initially, cells were sheared to release the filaments, which were purified by differential centrifugation and banding in KBr gradients. Flagella were also prepared by solubilization of cells with 1% (vol/vol) Triton X-100 and purified as described above. Both of these techniques resulted in variable recovery and poor yield of flagellar filaments. Purification of intact flagella (filament, hook, and basal body) was achieved by using phase transition separation with Triton X-114. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified flagella revealed two major proteins, with molecular weights of 33,000 and 31,000. This result indicates the likely presence of two flagellins. The filament had a diameter of 13 nm. The basal structure consisted of a small knob, while a slight thickening of the filament immediately adjacent to this area was the only evidence of a hook region. Flagella from three other Methanococcus species were isolated by this technique and found to have the same ultrastructure as flagella from M. voltae. Isolation of flagella from three eubacteria and another methanogen (Methanospirillum hungatei [M. hungatii]) by the phase separation technique indicated that the detergent treatment did not affect the structure of basal bodies. Intact ring structures and well-differentiated hook regions were apparent in each of these flagellar preparations.

  3. Ciliary membrane tubulin and associated proteins: a complex stable to Triton X-114 dissociation.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R E

    1985-12-19

    When either membranes from scallop gill cilia or reconstituted membranes from the same source are solubilized with Triton X-114 and the detergent is condensed by warming, no significant fraction of any major membrane protein partitions into the micellar detergent. Rather, most of the membrane lipids condense with the detergent phase, forming mixed micelles from which nearly pure lipid vesicles may be produced by adsorption of detergent with polystyrene beads. One minor membrane protein, with a molecular weight of about 20 000, is associated consistently with these vesicles. The aqueous phase contains a fairly homogeneous protein-Triton X-114 micelle sedimenting at 2.6 S in the analytical ultracentrifuge. Sucrose gradient velocity analysis in a detergent-free gradient indicates moderate size polydispersity but constant polypeptide composition throughout the sedimenting protein zone. Sucrose gradient equilibrium analysis (also in a detergent-free gradient) results in a protein-detergent complex banding at a density of 1.245 g/cm3. Sedimentation of the protein-detergent complex in the ultracentrifuge, followed by fixation and normal processing for electron microscopy, reveals a fine, reticular material consisting of 5-10-nm granules. These data are consistent with previous evidence that membrane tubulin and most other membrane proteins exist together as a discrete lipid-protein complex in molluscan gill ciliary membranes.

  4. Phase separation of the receptor for immunoglobulin E and its subunits in Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, G; Kinet, J P; Kumar, N; Wank, S A; Metzger, H

    1984-12-10

    Above its critical micelle concentration, Triton X-114 in solution forms two phases at room temperature: a lower phase containing supramicellar aggregates and an upper phase largely depleted of detergent. This property of the detergent is potentially useful for separating under mild conditions proteins that bind detergent from those that do not (Bordier, C. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 1604-1607). We studied the distribution of the receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE) and its subunits in the two phases. IgE and IgE complexed either with intact receptors or with the alpha chains of the receptor alone are principally partitioned into the upper phase, whereas the unliganded receptor as well as the isolated alpha, and especially the beta and gamma chains of the receptor, preferentially partition into the lower detergent phase. Chromatography of IgE and of the subunits of the receptor on a hydrophobic support showed that the beta and gamma chains have a considerably greater hydrophobic surface than the alpha chains or IgE. These results indicate that the distribution of a protein in the two phases of phase-separated Triton X-114 is not an all-or-none effect based upon whether it binds detergent or not. Rather, it reflects the overall balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties of the protein's surface.

  5. Triton Emission Spectra in Some Target Nuclei Irradiated by Ultra-Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Büyükuslu, H.; Demirkol, İ.; Arasoğlu, A.

    2010-08-01

    High-current proton accelerator technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. The produced neutrons are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, triton emission spectra by using ultra-fast neutrons (incident neutron energy >50 MeV), the ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 56Fe, 59Co, 208Pb and 209Bi have been investigated. In the calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA1235 Aluminum Foil Stocks Produced Directly from Electrolytic Aluminum Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Yu, Kun; Wen, Li; Yao, Sujuan; Dai, Yilong; Wang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    A new process is developed to obtain high-quality AA1235 aluminum foil stocks and to replace the traditional manufacture process. During the new manufacture process, AA1235 aluminum sheets are twin-roll casted directly through electrolytic aluminum melt (EAM), and subsequently the sheets are processed into aluminum foil stocks by cold rolling and annealing. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the AA1235 aluminum sheets produced through such new process are investigated in each state by optimal microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, orientation imaging microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc. The results show that compared with the traditional AA1235 aluminum foil stocks produced through re-melted aluminum melt (RAM), the amount of impurities is decreased in the EAM aluminum foil stocks. The EAM aluminum foil stock obtains less β-FeSiAl5 phases, but more α-Fe2SiAl8 phases. The elongation of EAM aluminum foil stocks is improved significantly owing to more cubic orientation. Especially, the elongation value of the EAM aluminum foil stocks is approximately 25 pct higher than that of the RAM aluminum foil stocks. As a result, the EAM aluminum foil stocks are at an advantage in increasing the processing performance for the aluminum foils during subsequent processes.

  7. The absorption coefficient of the liquid N2 2.15-micron band and application to Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundy, William M.; Fink, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The present measurements of the temperature dependence exhibited by the liquid N2 2.15-micron 2-0 collision-induced band's absorption coefficient and integrated absorption show the latter to be smaller than that of the N2 gas, and to decrease with decreasing temperature. Extrapolating this behavior to Triton's nominal surface temperature yields a new estimate of the N2-ice grain size on the Triton south polar cap; a mean N2 grain size of 0.7-3.0 cm is consistent with grain growth rate calculation results.

  8. Triton College 1999 NCA Self-Study Report. Prepared for the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Institutions of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    The primary purpose of this report is to demonstrate that Triton College meets the North Central Association's (NCA's) twenty-four General Institutional Requirements and satisfies NCA's five criteria of Educational Excellence. To achieve this goal, the report presents a comprehensive picture of Triton College's mission, organization, programs, and…

  9. Glycerol allows low-temperature phase separation of membrane proteins solubilized in Triton X-114: application to the purification of plant cytochromes P-450 and b5.

    PubMed

    Werck-Reichhart, D; Benveniste, I; Teutsch, H; Durst, F; Gabriac, B

    1991-08-15

    The potentiality of the Triton X-114 phase separation technique for the purification of proteins from plant microsomal membranes has been investigated. It was shown that glycerol significantly lowers the cloud point of Triton X-114 solutions in water and of Triton X-114 solubilizates from microsomal membranes. It was also established that solubilized membrane components decrease the temperature of Triton X-114 micellar aggregation. Solubilization of microsomal membrane using detergent to protein ratios lower than 3.5, however, resulted in complete inhibition of detergent phase separation. Phase partitioning of Triton X-114 microsomal solubilizates, performed at low temperature (4 degrees C), in the presence of glycerol, provided a very fast and efficient step for the purification of cytochromes P-450 and b5. Conditions allowing optimal recoveries of these cytochromes have been defined.

  10. Measurement of the radon diffusion through a nylon foil for different air humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan; Smolek, Karel

    2015-08-01

    The dependency of the radon penetration through a nylon foil on air humidity was measured. Such information is needed for the tracking part of the SuperNEMO detector, which is planned to be shielded against radon by nylon foil and in which the air humidity is not negligible. The long term measurements of radon penetration through nylon foils for different air humidities were performed with the radon diffusion setup constructed at the IEAP, CTU in Prague. The setup consists of two stainless steel hemispheres with Si detector in each of them. Both hemispheres are separated by the tested foil. While the left hemisphere contains high Rn activity, the right part contains only activity caused by the radon penetration through the tested foil. Obtained results of this study with a nylon foil with the thickness of 50 µm are presented.

  11. Beam Loss due to Foil Scattering in the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the contribution of scattering from the primary stripper foil to losses in the SNS ring, we have carried out calculations using the ORBIT Code aimed at evaluating these losses. These calculations indicate that the probability of beam loss within one turn following a foil hit is ~1.8 10-8 , where is the foil thickness in g/cm2, assuming a carbon foil. Thus, for a typical SNS stripper foil of thickness = 390 g/cm2, the probability of loss within one turn of a foil hit is ~7.0 10-6. This note describes the calculations used to arrive at this result, presents the distribution of these losses around the SNS ring, and compares the calculated results with observed ring losses for a well-tuned production beam.

  12. Measurement of the radon diffusion through a nylon foil for different air humidities

    SciTech Connect

    Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan; Smolek, Karel

    2015-08-17

    The dependency of the radon penetration through a nylon foil on air humidity was measured. Such information is needed for the tracking part of the SuperNEMO detector, which is planned to be shielded against radon by nylon foil and in which the air humidity is not negligible. The long term measurements of radon penetration through nylon foils for different air humidities were performed with the radon diffusion setup constructed at the IEAP, CTU in Prague. The setup consists of two stainless steel hemispheres with Si detector in each of them. Both hemispheres are separated by the tested foil. While the left hemisphere contains high Rn activity, the right part contains only activity caused by the radon penetration through the tested foil. Obtained results of this study with a nylon foil with the thickness of 50 µm are presented.

  13. Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-08-02

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  14. Pu-Zr alloy for high-temperature foil-type fuel

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron reflux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  15. Efficient laser-proton acceleration from an insulating foil with an attached small metal disk

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Kazuto; Tokita, Shigeki; Nishoji, Toshihiko; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2011-10-17

    Efficient proton acceleration by the interaction of an intense femtosecond laser pulse with a solid foil has been demonstrated. An aluminum coating (thickness: 0.2 {mu}m) on a polyethylene (PE) foil was irradiated at 2 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. The protons from the aluminum-disk (diameter: 150 {mu}m to 15 mm) foil were accelerated to much higher energy in comparison with conventional targets such as PE and aluminum-coated PE foils. The fast electron signal along the foil surface was significantly higher from the aluminum-coated PE foil. The laser-proton acceleration appeared to be affected to the size of surrounding conductive material.

  16. Direct observation of spin-like reaction fronts in planar energetic multilayer foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David Price; Hodges, V. Carter; Jones, Eric D., Jr.; McDonald, Joel Patrick

    2008-10-01

    Propagating reactions in initially planar cobalt/aluminum exothermic multilayer foils have been investigated using high-speed digital photography. Real-time observations of reactions indicate that unsteady (spinlike) reaction propagation leads to the formation of highly periodic surface morphologies with length scales ranging from 1 {micro}m to 1 mm. The characteristics of propagating spinlike reactions and corresponding reacted foil morphologies depend on the bilayer thickness of multilayer foils.

  17. Beam-foil-gas spectroscopy - A technique for studying steady-state non-equilibrium processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickel, W. S.; Veje, E.; Carriveau, G.; Anderson, N.

    1971-01-01

    When a thin foil is inserted in the beam of a beam-gas experiment, the beam particle state populations are driven far from their beam-gas equilibrium values. Downstream from the foil, the 'new beam' and gas species interact to produce a new equilibrium, usually different from the beam-gas equilibrium. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate this effect and to show how relative cross-section measurements can be used to study the beam-foil interaction.

  18. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  19. Analysis of cartilage-polydioxanone foil composite grafts.

    PubMed

    Kim, James H; Wong, Brian

    2013-12-01

    This study presents an analytical investigation into the mechanical behavior of a cartilage-polydioxanone (PDS) plate composite grafts. Numerical methods are used to provide a first-order, numerical model of the flexural stiffness of a cartilage-PDS graft. Flexural stiffness is a measure of resistance to bending and is inversely related to the amount of deformation a structure may experience when subjected to bending forces. The cartilage-PDS graft was modeled as a single composite beam. Using Bernoulli-Euler beam theory, a closed form equation for the theoretical flexural stiffness of the composite graft was developed. A parametric analysis was performed to see how the flexural properties of the composite model changed with varying thicknesses of PDS foil. The stiffness of the cartilage-PDS composite using 0.15-mm-thick PDS was four times higher than cartilage alone. The composite with a 0.5-mm-thick PDS graft was only 1.7 times stiffer than the composite with the 0.15-mm-thick PDS graft. Although a thicker graft material will yield higher flexural stiffness for the composite, the relationship between composite stiffness and PDS thickness is nonlinear. After a critical point, increments in graft thickness produce gradually smaller improvements in flexural stiffness. The small increase in stiffness when using the thicker PDS foils versus the 0.15 mm PDS foil may not be worth the potential complications (prolonged foreign body reaction, reduction in nutrient diffusion to cartilage) of using thicker artificial grafts. PMID:24327249

  20. Recycling of aluminum foil from post-consumer beverage cartons

    SciTech Connect

    Charlier, P.; Sjoeberg, G.

    1995-12-31

    Recycling of aluminium contained in used aseptic beverage cartons is a difficult task which has nevertheless to be tackled by modern societies. Techniques have earlier been developed by the paper and pulp industry for the recycling of the board fibers from collected post-consumer beverage cartons. A joint technical feasibility study by Graenges and a leading beverage carton producer has dealt with different techniques for handling residues from repulsing facilities. The aluminium obtained can be used as raw material for the production of thin gauge foil, thus closing the recycling loop.

  1. Prediction of Gas Lubricated Foil Journal Bearing Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpino, Marc; Talmage, Gita

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress in the first eight months of the project. The objectives of this research project are to theoretically predict the steady operating conditions and the rotor dynamic coefficients of gas foil journal bearings. The project is currently on or ahead of schedule with the development of a finite element code that predicts steady bearing performance characteristics such as film thickness, pressure, load, and drag. Graphical results for a typical bearing are presented in the report. Project plans for the next year are discussed.

  2. Foil system fatigue load environments for commercial hydrofoil operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrofoil fatigue loads environment in the open sea is examined. The random nature of wave orbital velocities, periods and heights plus boat heading, speed and control system design are considered in the assessment of structural fatigue requirements. Major nonlinear load events such as hull slamming and foil unwetting are included in the fatigue environment. Full scale rough water load tests, field experience plus analytical loads work on the model 929 Jetfoil commercial hydrofoil are discussed. The problem of developing an overall sea environment for design is defined. State of the art analytical approaches are examined.

  3. Promising HE for explosive welding of thin metallic foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deribas, A. A.; Mikhaylov, A. L.; Titova, N. N.; Zocher, Marvin A.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results are presented on the development of a high explosive (HE) suitable for the welding of thin metallic foils. The explosive is formed from a mixture of brisant HE (RDX or PETN) and an inert material, namely sodium bicarbonate. Sodium bicarbonate releases a rather large quantity of gas during decomposition, the effects of which are discussed. Measurements of detonation velocity and critical thickness for specific mixture combinations are presented. It is shown that particle size (of the RDX or PETN component) has a significant effect upon detonation velocity and critical thickness. Compositions were developed which have a stable detonation velocity ~2 km/s with a layer thickness ~ 2 mm.

  4. Reactive multilayer synthesis of hard ceramic foils and films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Holt, Joseph B.

    1996-01-01

    A method for synthesizing hard ceramic materials such as carbides, borides nd aluminides, particularly in the form of coatings provided on another material so as to improve the wear and abrasion performance of machine tools, for example. The method involves the sputter deposition of alternating layers of reactive metals with layers of carbon, boron, or aluminum and the subsequent reaction of the multilayered structure to produce a dense crystalline ceramic. The material can be coated on a substrate or formed as a foil which can be coild as a tape for later use.

  5. Reactive multilayer synthesis of hard ceramic foils and films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Holt, J.B.

    1996-02-13

    A method is disclosed for synthesizing hard ceramic materials such as carbides, borides and aluminides, particularly in the form of coatings provided on another material so as to improve the wear and abrasion performance of machine tools, for example. The method involves the sputter deposition of alternating layers of reactive metals with layers of carbon, boron, or aluminum and the subsequent reaction of the multilayered structure to produce a dense crystalline ceramic. The material can be coated on a substrate or formed as a foil which can be coiled as a tape for later use.

  6. Laser Proton acceleration from mass limited silicon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Kraft, S.; Richter, T.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Fuchs, J.; Buffechoux, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present recent studies on laser proton acceleration experiments using mass limited silicon targets. Small micro machined silicon foils with 2 μm thickness and 20x20 μm2 to 100x100μm2 size mounted on very tiny stalks were shot with the 100 TW LULI Laser (long pulse 150 fs) and with the new 150 TW DRACO Laser facility (short pulse 30 fs) of the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf. The experiments were carried out using high contrast levels. Proton spectra have been measured with magnetic spectrometers and radio chromic film stacks.

  7. Critical mass experiment using U-235 foils and lucite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Butterfield, K.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.

    1998-05-01

    The main objective of this experiment was to show how the multiplication of the system increases as moderated material is placed between highly enriched uranium foils. In addition, this experiment served to demonstrate the hand-stacking techniques, and approach to criticality by remote operation. This experiment was designed by Tom McLaughlin in the mid seventies as part of the criticality safety course that is taught at Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF). The W-U-235 ratio for this experiment was 215 which is where the minimum critical mass for this configuration occurs.

  8. Comparison of carbon stripper foils under operational conditions at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Spickerman, Thomas; Borden, Michael J; Macek, Robert J; Sugai, Isao

    2008-01-01

    At the 39{sup th} ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop HB 2006 and the 23{sup rd} INTDS World Conference we reported on first results of a test of nanocrystalline diamond foils developed at ORNL under operational conditions at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). We have continued these tests during the 2006 and 2007 run cycles and have been able to compare the diamond foils with the foils that are normally in use in PSR, which were originally developed by Sugai at KEK. We have gathered valuable information regarding foil lifetime, foil related beam losses and electron emission at the foil. Additional insight was gained under unusual beam conditions where the foiIs are subjected to higher temperatures. In the 2007 run cycle we also tested a Diamond-like-Carbon foil developed at TRIUMF. A Hybrid-Boron-Carbon foil, also developed by Sugai, is presently in use with the PSR production beam. We will summarize our experience with these different foil types.

  9. Composite thin-foil bandpass filter for EUV astronomy Titanium-antimony-titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Martin, C.; Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Steele, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thin metallic foils of antimony and titanium have been investigated in an attempt to develop an EUV filter with a bandpass from 350 to 550 A. A composite filter has been developed composed of antimony sandwiched between two titanium foils. The transmissions of sample composite foils and of pure titanium foils from 130 to 1216 A are presented. The absorption coefficients of anatimony and titanium and the effect of titanium oxide on the transmission are derived. The composite filter has been found to be quite stable and mechanically rugged. Among other uses, the filter shows substantial promise for EUV astronomy.

  10. Role of induced vortex interaction in a semi-active flapping foil based energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Chen, Y. L.; Zhao, N.

    2015-09-01

    The role of induced vortex interaction in a semi-active flapping foil based energy harvester is numerically examined in this work. A NACA0015 airfoil, which acts as an energy harvester, is placed in a two-dimensional laminar flow. It performs an imposed pitching motion that subsequently leads to a plunging motion. Two auxiliary smaller foils, which rotate about their centers, are arranged above and below the flapping foil, respectively. As a consequence, the vortex interaction between the flapping foil and the rotating foil is induced. At a Reynolds number of 1100 and the position of the pitching axis at one-third chord, the effects of the distance between two auxiliary foils, the phase difference between the rotating motion and the pitching motion as well as the frequency of pitching motion on the power extraction performance are systematically investigated. It is found that compared to the single flapping foil, the efficiency improvement of overall power extraction for the flapping foil with two auxiliary foils can be achieved. Based on the numerical analysis, it is indicated that the enhanced power extraction, which is caused by the increased lift force, thanks to the induced vortex interaction, directly benefits the efficiency enhancement.

  11. Goal-directed mechanisms that constrain retrieval predict subsequent memory for new "foil" information.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, David A; Bonnici, Heidi M; Bergström, Zara M; Ranganath, Charan; Simons, Jon S

    2016-08-01

    To remember a previous event, it is often helpful to use goal-directed control processes to constrain what comes to mind during retrieval. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that incidental learning of new "foil" words in a recognition test is superior if the participant is trying to remember studied items that were semantically encoded compared to items that were non-semantically encoded. Here, we applied subsequent memory analysis to fMRI data to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the "foil effect". Participants encoded information during deep semantic and shallow non-semantic tasks and were tested in a subsequent blocked memory task to examine how orienting retrieval towards different types of information influences the incidental encoding of new words presented as foils during the memory test phase. To assess memory for foils, participants performed a further surprise old/new recognition test involving foil words that were encountered during the previous memory test blocks as well as completely new words. Subsequent memory effects, distinguishing successful versus unsuccessful incidental encoding of foils, were observed in regions that included the left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior parietal cortex. The left inferior frontal gyrus exhibited disproportionately larger subsequent memory effects for semantic than non-semantic foils, and significant overlap in activity during semantic, but not non-semantic, initial encoding and foil encoding. The results suggest that orienting retrieval towards different types of foils involves re-implementing the neurocognitive processes that were involved during initial encoding.

  12. Goal-directed mechanisms that constrain retrieval predict subsequent memory for new "foil" information.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, David A; Bonnici, Heidi M; Bergström, Zara M; Ranganath, Charan; Simons, Jon S

    2016-08-01

    To remember a previous event, it is often helpful to use goal-directed control processes to constrain what comes to mind during retrieval. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that incidental learning of new "foil" words in a recognition test is superior if the participant is trying to remember studied items that were semantically encoded compared to items that were non-semantically encoded. Here, we applied subsequent memory analysis to fMRI data to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the "foil effect". Participants encoded information during deep semantic and shallow non-semantic tasks and were tested in a subsequent blocked memory task to examine how orienting retrieval towards different types of information influences the incidental encoding of new words presented as foils during the memory test phase. To assess memory for foils, participants performed a further surprise old/new recognition test involving foil words that were encountered during the previous memory test blocks as well as completely new words. Subsequent memory effects, distinguishing successful versus unsuccessful incidental encoding of foils, were observed in regions that included the left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior parietal cortex. The left inferior frontal gyrus exhibited disproportionately larger subsequent memory effects for semantic than non-semantic foils, and significant overlap in activity during semantic, but not non-semantic, initial encoding and foil encoding. The results suggest that orienting retrieval towards different types of foils involves re-implementing the neurocognitive processes that were involved during initial encoding. PMID:27431039

  13. Crude soybean hull peroxidase treatment of phenol in synthetic and real wastewater: enzyme economy enhanced by Triton X-100.

    PubMed

    Steevensz, Aaron; Madur, Sneha; Feng, Wei; Taylor, Keith E; Bewtra, Jatinder K; Biswas, Nihar

    2014-02-01

    Soybean peroxidase (SBP)-catalyzed removal of phenol from wastewater has been demonstrated as a feasible wastewater treatment strategy and a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100, has the potential for increasing the enzyme economy of the process. Systematic studies on the enzyme-surfactant system have been lacking as well as demonstration of its applicability to industrial wastewater. This paper addresses those two gaps, the latter based on real wastewater from alkyd resin manufacture. The minimum effective Triton X-100 concentrations for crude SBP-catalyzed phenol conversion (≥95%) over 1-10 mM showed a linear trend. To illustrate translation of such lab results to real-world samples, this data were used to optimize crude SBP needed for phenol conversion over that concentration range. Triton X-100 increases enzyme economy by 10- to 13-fold. This treatment protocol was directly applied to tote-scale (700-1000 L) treatment of alkyd resin wastewater, with phenol ranging from 7 to 28 mM and total organic carbon content of >40 g/L, using a crude SBP extract derived from dry soybean hulls by simple aqueous elution. This extract can be used to remove phenol from a complex industrial wastewater and the process is markedly more efficient in the presence of Triton X-100. The water is thus rendered amenable to conventional biological treatment whilst the hulls could still be used in feed, thus adding further value to the crop.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT: TRITON SYSTEMS, LLC SOLID BOWL CENTRIFUGE, MODEL TS-5000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Triton Systems, LLC Solid Bowl Centrifuge Model TS-5000 (TS-5000) was conducted at the Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory Swine Educational Unit in Raleigh, North Carolina. The TS-5000 was 48" in diameter and 30" deep, with a bowl capacity of 16 ft3. ...

  15. Morphological and physiological changes in Tetrahymena pyriformis for the in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of Triton X-100.

    PubMed

    Dias, Nicolina; Mortara, Renato A; Lima, Nelson

    2003-06-01

    Non-ionic surfactants such as Triton X-100 have been widely used in industrial processing and in cleaning products for almost 50 years, being effective and economic emulsifying, wetting agents, dispersants and solubilizers. Cleaning products containing these surfactants are disposed of mainly by discharge into wastewater, which receives biological treatment in wastewater treatment systems. However, surface-active agents interact with eukaryotic cell membranes leading to biological damage at high concentrations. Tetrahymena pyriformis was used here as model organism to assess the effects of Triton X-100 through a series of in vitro cytotoxicity tests. Growth rates and morphological changes were, by their simplicity and reproducibility, the simplest toxicological assays. Cytoskeleton analysis seemed to be related with phagocytosis rate. Viability was evaluated by two different tests. Calcein AM/EthD-1 was used to assess T. pyriformis membrane damage during the 48-h experiment. The colorimetric MTT assay proved to be highly sensitive even at very short periods of Triton X-100 exposure. Tests performed in this study included simple and fast bioassays that provide overall information on the morphological and physiological state of cells exposed to different non-lytic and lytic concentrations of Triton X-100.

  16. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF A SATELLITE BY TIDAL EFFECT: APPLICATION TO TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, Alexandre C. M.

    2009-10-10

    Some of the satellites in the solar system, including the Moon, appear to have been captured from heliocentric orbits at some point in their past, and then have evolved to the present configurations. The exact process of how this trapping occurred is unknown, but the dissociation of a planetesimal binary in the gravitational field of the planet, gas drag, or a massive collision seem to be the best candidates. However, all these mechanisms leave the satellites in elliptical orbits that need to be damped to the present almost circular ones. Here, we give a complete description of the secular tidal evolution of a satellite just after entering a bounding state with the planet. In particular, we take into account the spin evolution of the satellite, which has often been assumed synchronous in previous studies. We apply our model to Triton and successfully explain some geophysical properties of this satellite, as well as the main dynamical features observed for the Neptunian system.

  17. 3D calculation of Tucson-Melbourne 3NF effect in triton binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hadizadeh, M. R.; Tomio, L.; Bayegan, S.

    2010-08-04

    As an application of the new realistic three-dimensional (3D) formalism reported recently for three-nucleon (3N) bound states, an attempt is made to study the effect of three-nucleon forces (3NFs) in triton binding energy in a non partial wave (PW) approach. The spin-isospin dependent 3N Faddeev integral equations with the inclusion of 3NFs, which are formulated as function of vector Jacobi momenta, specifically the magnitudes of the momenta and the angle between them, are solved with Bonn-B and Tucson-Melbourne NN and 3N forces in operator forms which can be incorporated in our 3D formalism. The comparison with numerical results in both, novel 3D and standard PW schemes, shows that non PW calculations avoid the very involved angular momentum algebra occurring for the permutations and transformations and it is more efficient and less cumbersome for considering the 3NF.

  18. Isolation of lumenal proteins from spinach thylakoid membranes by triton X-114 phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Bricker, T M; Prevost, M; Vu, V; Laborde, S; Womack, J; Frankel, L K

    2001-01-19

    The proteins present in the thylakoid lumen of higher plant chloroplasts have not been rigorously examined. In this communication we present a simple and rapid procedure for the isolation of the soluble proteins and extrinsic membrane proteins present in the thylakoid lumen from spinach. Our procedure involves extensive washing of the thylakoid membranes followed by Triton X-114 phase partitioning. When analyzed by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), we obtain results which are very similar to those obtained by Kieselbach et al. using more classical methods [T. Kieselbach, A. Hagman, B. Andersson, W.P. Schroder, J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 6710-6716]. About 25 major proteins are observed upon Coomassie blue staining. Upon two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE and either Coomassie blue or silver staining, however, numerous other protein components are resolved. Our findings indicate that the total number of proteins (soluble and extrinsic membrane) present in the lumen may exceed 150.

  19. Phase separation of rat intestinal brush border membrane proteins using Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Tiruppathi, C; Alpers, D H; Seetharam, B

    1986-03-01

    Rat intestinal microvillus membrane contains at least 24 polypeptides, of which 18 can be solubilized using Triton X-114 at 4 degrees C. Upon phase separation at 32 degrees C, 11 proteins separated nearly completely into the detergent-rich phase, while 9 proteins were found exclusively in the aqueous phase. Enzymes which were uniquely included in the detergent phase were alkaline phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase. The proteins which were excluded from the detergent phase and found exclusively in the aqueous phase included the disaccharidases (glucoamylase, sucrase-isomaltase, trehalase, lactase) and the ileal receptor for the intrinsic factor-cobalamin complex. Integral membrane proteins can thus be separated during solubilization into two groups prior to further purification or characterization.

  20. The TRITON Project: Design and Implementation of an Integrative Translational Research Information Management Platform.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O; Borlawsky, Tara B; Stephens, William; Barrett, Matthew C; Nguyen-Pham, Tri; Greaves, Andrew W

    2010-11-13

    Multi-site consortia have become the preferred setting for team-based translational research programs. Such consortia are able to facilitate increased breadth and depth of basic science and clinical research activities, but also present numerous challenges related to data collection, analysis, storage, and exchange. The Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Research Consortium (CRC), a s a prototypical instance of such a consortia, uses numerous loosely coupled web applications to address its informatics needs. Over a decade of operations have allowed the CRC to identify usability and computational limitations relative to the preceding information management architecture. In response, the CRC has launched the TRITON project, with the ultimate objective of developing an open-source, extensible, and fully integrative translational research information management platform. In this manuscript, we describe the architecture, design processes, and initial implementation of thatplatform.