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Sample records for domain interaction partners

  1. Characterization of the Connexin45 Carboxyl-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Molecular Partners

    PubMed Central

    Kopanic, Jennifer L.; Al-mugotir, Mona H.; Kieken, Fabien; Zach, Sydney; Trease, Andrew J.; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    interacted within one intrinsically disordered region (P278-P285). This domain has similarities with other cardiac connexins, and we propose they constitute a master regulatory domain, which contains overlapping molecular partner binding, cis-trans proline isomerization, and phosphorylation sites. PMID:24853747

  2. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  3. AIP and its interacting partners.

    PubMed

    Trivellin, Giampaolo; Korbonits, Márta

    2011-08-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene (AIP) predispose to young-onset pituitary tumours, most often to GH- or prolactin-secreting adenomas, and most of these patients belong to familial isolated pituitary adenoma families. The molecular pathway initiated by the loss-of-function AIP mutations leading to pituitary tumour formation is unknown. AIP, a co-chaperone of heat-shock protein 90 and various nuclear receptors, belongs to the family of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing proteins. It has three antiparallel α-helix motifs (TPR domains) that mediate the interaction of AIP with most of its partners. In this review, we summarise the known interactions of AIP described so far. The identification of AIP partners and the understanding of how AIP interacts with these proteins might help to explain the specific phenotype of the families with heterozygous AIP mutations, to gain deeper insight into the pathological process of pituitary tumour formation and to identify novel drug targets.

  4. Sequence Analysis of LRPPRC and Its SEC1 Domain Interaction Partners Suggests Roles in Cytoskeletal Organization, Vesicular Trafficking, Nucleocytosolic Shuttling and Chromosome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Leyuan; McKeehan, Wallace L.

    2011-01-01

    LRPPRC (originally called LRP130) is an intracellular 130-kDa leucine-rich protein that co-purifies with the FGF receptor from liver cell extracts and has been detected in diverse multi-protein complexes from the cell membrane, cytoskeleton and nucleus. Here we report results of a sequence homology analysis of LRPPRC and its SEC1 domain interactive partners. Twenty-three copies of tandem repeats that are similar to PPR, TPR and HEAT repeats characterize the LRPPRC sequence. The N-terminus exhibits multiple copies of leucine-rich nuclear transport signals followed by ENTH, DUF28 and SEC1 homology domains. We used the SEC1 domain to trap interactive partners expressed from a human liver cDNA library. Interactive C19ORF5 (XP_038600) exhibited a strong homology to microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) and a potential arginine-rich mRNA binding motif. UXT (XP_033860) exhibited α-helical properties homologous to the actin-associated spectrin repeat and L/I heptad repeats in mobile transcription factors. C6ORF34 (XP_004305) was homologous to the non-DNA binding C-terminus of the E. coli Rob transcription factor. CECR2 (AAK15343) exhibited a transcription factor AT-hook motif next to two bromodomains and a homology to guanylate-binding protein 1. Taken together these features suggest a regulatory role of LRPPRC and its SEC1 domain-interactive partners in integration of cytoskeletal networks with vesicular trafficking, nucleocytosolic shuttling, chromosome remodeling and transcription. PMID:11827465

  5. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of pseudo death-effector domain of HIPPI, a molecular partner of Huntingtin-interacting protein HIP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Manisha; Majumder, Pritha; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Dattagupta, Jiban K.; Sen, Udayaditya

    2006-12-01

    A pseudo death-effector domain (pDED) of HIPPI, a partner of Huntingtin-interacting protein HIP1, has been cloned, overexpressed and crystallized. The crystals of pDED-HIPPI diffracted to 2.2 Å. The formation of a heterodimer between Huntingtin-interacting protein-1 (HIP-1) and its novel partner HIPPI (HIP-1 protein interactor) through their pseudo death-effector domains (pDEDs) is a key step that recruits caspase-8 and initiates apoptosis. This could be one of the pathways by which apoptosis is increased in Huntington’s disease (HD). A construct consisting of the pDED of HIPPI has been cloned and overexpressed as 6NH-tagged protein and purified by Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals of the pDED of HIPPI were grown in space group P4{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 77.42, c = 33.31 Å and a calculated Matthews coefficient of 1.88 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} (33% solvent content) with two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  6. Forkhead-Associated Domain of Yeast Xrs2, a Homolog of Human Nbs1, Promotes Nonhomologous End Joining Through Interaction With a Ligase IV Partner Protein, Lif1

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are repaired through two different pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Yeast Xrs2, a homolog of human Nbs1, is a component of the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex required for both HR and NHEJ. Previous studies showed that the N-terminal forkhead-associated (FHA) domain of Xrs2/Nbs1 in yeast is not involved in HR, but is likely to be in NHEJ. In this study, we showed that the FHA domain of Xrs2 plays a critical role in efficient DSB repair by NHEJ. The FHA domain of Xrs2 specifically interacts with Lif1, a component of the ligase IV complex, Dnl4-Nej1-Lif1 (DNL). Lif1, which is phosphorylated in vivo, contains two Xrs2-binding regions. Serine 383 of Lif1 plays an important role in the interaction with Xrs2 as well as in NHEJ. Interestingly, the phospho-mimetic substitutions of serine 383 enhance the NHEJ activity of Lif1. Our results suggest that the phosphorylation of Lif1 at serine 383 is recognized by the Xrs2 FHA domain, which in turn may promote recruitment of the DNL complex to DSB for NHEJ. The interaction between Xrs2 and Lif1 through the FHA domain is conserved in humans; the FHA domain Nbs1 interacts with Xrcc4, a Lif1 homolog of human. PMID:18458108

  7. Identification of candidates for interacting partners of the tail domain of DcNMCP1, a major component of the Daucus carota nuclear lamina-like structure.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Ryota; Tsugama, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Michihiro; Fujino, Kaien; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2017-02-01

    NMCP/CRWN (NUCLEAR MATRIX CONSTITUENT PROTEIN/CROWDED NUCLEI) is a major component of a protein fibrous meshwork (lamina-like structure) on the plant inner nuclear membrane. NMCP/CRWN contributes to regulating nuclear shape and nuclear functions. An NMCP/CRWN protein in Daucus carota (DcNMCP1) is localized to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells, and surrounds chromosomes in cells in metaphase and anaphase. The N-terminal region and the C-terminal region of DcNMCP1 are both necessary for localizing DcNMCP1 to the nuclear periphery. Here candidate interacting partners of the amino acid position 975-1053 of DcNMCP1 (T975-1053), which is present in the C-terminal region and contains a conserved sequence that plays a role in localizing DcNMCP1 to the nuclear periphery, are screened for. Arabidopsis thaliana nuclear proteins were subjected to far-Western blotting with GST-fused T975-1053 as a probe, and signals were detected at the positions corresponding to ∼70, ∼40, and ∼18 kDa. These ∼70, ∼40, and ∼18 kDa nuclear proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, and subjected to a yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) analysis with T975-1053 as bait. In this analysis, the ∼40 kDa protein ARP7, which is a nuclear actin-related protein possibly involved in regulating chromatin structures, was confirmed to interact with T975-1053. Independently of the far-Western blotting, a Y2H screen was performed using T975-1053 as bait. Targeted Y2H assays confirmed that 3 proteins identified in the screen, MYB3, SINAT1, and BIM1, interact with T975-1053. These proteins might have roles in NMCP/CRWN protein-mediated biologic processes.

  8. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dwyer, Robert S.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein−protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multiprotein complexes and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners, causing their sequences to be correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify, from sequence data alone, which proteins are specific interaction partners. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the 3D structures of proteins from sequences. Thus inspired, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from two protein families whose members are known to interact. We first assess the algorithm’s performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. We obtain a striking 0.93 true positive fraction on our complete dataset without any a priori knowledge of interaction partners, and we uncover the origin of this success. We then apply the algorithm to proteins from ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter complexes, and obtain accurate predictions in these systems as well. Finally, we present two metrics that accurately distinguish interacting protein families from noninteracting ones, using only sequence data. PMID:27663738

  9. Identification of cofilin and LIM-domain-containing protein kinase 1 as novel interaction partners of 14-3-3 zeta.

    PubMed Central

    Birkenfeld, Jörg; Betz, Heinrich; Roth, Dagmar

    2003-01-01

    Proteins of the 14-3-3 family have been implicated in various physiological processes, and are thought to function as adaptors in various signal transduction pathways. In addition, 14-3-3 proteins may contribute to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton by interacting with as yet unidentified actin-binding proteins. Here we show that the 14-3-3 zeta isoform interacts with both the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin and its regulatory kinase, LIM (Lin-11/Isl-1/Mec-3)-domain-containing protein kinase 1 (LIMK1). In both yeast two-hybrid assays and glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, these proteins bound efficiently to 14-3-3 zeta. Deletion analysis revealed consensus 14-3-3 binding sites on both cofilin and LIMK1. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of 14-3-3 zeta inhibited the binding of cofilin to actin in co-sedimentation experiments. Upon co-transfection into COS-7 cells, 14-3-3 zeta-specific immunoreactivity was redistributed into characteristic LIMK1-induced actin aggregations. Our data are consistent with 14-3-3-protein-induced changes to the actin cytoskeleton resulting from interactions with cofilin and/or LIMK1. PMID:12323073

  10. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  11. The N- and C-terminal domains of MecA recognize different partners in the competence molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Persuh, M; Turgay, K; Mandic-Mulec, I; Dubnau, D

    1999-08-01

    ComK is a transcription factor required for the expression of competence genes in Bacillus subtilis. Binding to MecA targets ComK for degradation by the ClpCP protease. MecA therefore acts as an adapter protein recruiting a regulatory protein for proteolysis. However, when ComS is synthesized, ComK is released from binding by MecA and thereby protected from degradation. MecA binds to three protein partners during these processes: ComK, ClpC and ComS. Using limited proteolysis, we have defined N- and C-terminal structural domains of MecA and evaluated the interactions of these domains with the protein partners of MecA. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have determined that the N-terminal domain of MecA interacts with ComK and ComS and the C-terminal domain with ClpC. MecA is shown to exist as a dimer with dimerization sites on both the N- and C-terminal domains. The C-terminal domain stimulates the ATPase activity of ClpC and is degraded by the ClpCP protease, while the N-terminal domain is inactive in both of these assays. In vivo data were consistent with these findings, as comG-lacZ expression was decreased in a strain overproducing the N-terminal domain, indicating reduced ComK activity. We propose a model in which binding of ClpC to the C-terminal domain of MecA induces a conformational change enabling the N-terminal domain to bind ComK with enhanced affinity. MecA is widespread among Gram-positive organisms and may act generally as an adapter protein, targeting proteins for regulated degradation.

  12. Virtual Partner Interaction (VPI): Exploring Novel Behaviors via Coordination Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, J. A. Scott; de Guzman, Gonzalo C.; Reveley, Colin; Tognoli, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by the dynamic clamp of cellular neuroscience, this paper introduces VPI—Virtual Partner Interaction—a coupled dynamical system for studying real time interaction between a human and a machine. In this proof of concept study, human subjects coordinate hand movements with a virtual partner, an avatar of a hand whose movements are driven by a computerized version of the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) equations that have been shown to govern basic forms of human coordination. As a surrogate system for human social coordination, VPI allows one to examine regions of the parameter space not typically explored during live interactions. A number of novel behaviors never previously observed are uncovered and accounted for. Having its basis in an empirically derived theory of human coordination, VPI offers a principled approach to human-machine interaction and opens up new ways to understand how humans interact with human-like machines including identification of underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:19492044

  13. Identification of new interacting partners of the shuttling protein ubinuclein (Ubn-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Lupo, Julien; Conti, Audrey; Sueur, Charlotte; Coly, Pierre-Alain; Coute, Yohann; Hunziker, Walter; Burmeister, Wim P.; Germi, Raphaelle; Manet, Evelyne; Gruffat, Henri; and others

    2012-03-10

    We have previously characterized ubinuclein (Ubn-1) as a NACos (Nuclear and Adherent junction Complex components) protein which interacts with viral or cellular transcription factors and the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1. The purpose of the present study was to get more insights on the binding partners of Ubn-1, notably those present in the epithelial junctions. Using an in vivo assay of fluorescent protein-complementation assay (PCA), we demonstrated that the N-terminal domains of the Ubn-1 and ZO-1 proteins triggered a functional interaction inside the cell. Indeed, expression of both complementary fragments of venus fused to the N-terminal parts of Ubn-1 and ZO-1 was able to reconstitute a fluorescent venus protein. Furthermore, nuclear expression of the chimeric Ubn-1 triggered nuclear localization of the chimeric ZO-1. We could localize this interaction to the PDZ2 domain of ZO-1 using an in vitro pull-down assay. More precisely, a 184-amino acid region (from amino acids 39 to 223) at the N-terminal region of Ubn-1 was responsible for the interaction with the PDZ2 domain of ZO-1. Co-imunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy experiments also revealed the tight junction protein cingulin as a new interacting partner of Ubn-1. A proteomic approach based on mass spectrometry analysis (MS) was then undertaken to identify further binding partners of GST-Ubn-1 fusion protein in different subcellular fractions of human epithelial HT29 cells. LYRIC (Lysine-rich CEACAM1-associated protein) and RACK-1 (receptor for activated C-kinase) proteins were validated as bona fide interacting partners of Ubn-1. Altogether, these results suggest that Ubn-1 is a scaffold protein influencing protein subcellular localization and is involved in several processes such as cell-cell contact signalling or modulation of gene activity.

  14. Nonergodic subdiffusion from transient interactions with heterogeneous partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C.; Muñoz-Gil, G.; Celi, A.; Garcia-Parajo, M. F.; Lewenstein, M.; Manzo, C.; García-March, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    Spatiotemporal disorder has been recently associated to the occurrence of anomalous nonergodic diffusion of molecular components in biological systems, but the underlying microscopic mechanism is still unclear. We introduce a model in which a particle performs continuous Brownian motion with changes of diffusion coefficients induced by transient molecular interactions with diffusive binding partners. In spite of the exponential distribution of waiting times, the model shows subdiffusion and nonergodicity similar to the heavy-tailed continuous time random walk. The dependence of these properties on the density of binding partners is analyzed and discussed. Our work provides an experimentally testable microscopic model to investigate the nature of nonergodicity in disordered media.

  15. Identification of novel MYO18A interaction partners required for myoblast adhesion and muscle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian-Meng; Cheng, Xiao-Ning; Li, Shang-Qi; Heller, Stefan; Xu, Zhi-Gang; Shi, De-Li

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional myosin MYO18A that contains a PDZ domain is required for muscle integrity during zebrafish development. However, the mechanism by which it functions in myofibers is not clear. The presence of a PDZ domain suggests that MYO18A may interact with other partners to perform muscle-specific functions. Here we performed double-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation to identify MYO18A-interacting proteins, and have identified p190RhoGEF and Golgin45 as novel partners for the MYO18A PDZ domain. We have also identified Lurap1, which was previously shown to bind MYO18A. Functional analyses indicate that, similarly as myo18a, knockdown of lurap1, p190RhoGEF and Golgin45 by morpholino oligonucleotides disrupts dystrophin localization at the sarcolemma and produces muscle lesions. Simultaneous knockdown of myo18a with either of these genes severely disrupts myofiber integrity and dystrophin localization, suggesting that they may function similarly to maintain myofiber integrity. We further show that MYO18A and its interaction partners are required for adhesion of myoblasts to extracellular matrix, and for the formation of the Golgi apparatus and organization of F-actin bundles in myoblast cells. These findings suggest that MYO18A has the potential to form a multiprotein complex that links the Golgi apparatus to F-actin, which regulates muscle integrity and function during early development. PMID:27824130

  16. Phage display library screening for identification of interacting protein partners.

    PubMed

    Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Rao, Suryadevara; Hunt, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a versatile high-throughput screening method employed to understand and improve the chemical biology, be it production of human monoclonal antibodies or identification of interacting protein partners. A majority of cell proteins operate in a concerted fashion either by stable or transient interactions. Such interactions can be mediated by recognition of small amino acid sequence motifs on the protein surface. Phage display can play a crucial role in identification of such motifs. This report describes the use of phage display for the identification of high affinity sequence motifs that could be responsible for interactions with a target (bait) protein.

  17. Polycomb Group Targeting through Different Binding Partners of RING1B C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renjing; Taylor, Alexander B.; Leal, Belinda Z.; Chadwell, Linda V.; Ilangovan, Udayar; Robinson, Angela K.; Schirf, Virgil; Hart, P. John; Lafer, Eileen M.; Demeler, Borries; Hinck, Andrew P.; McEwen, Donald G.; Kim, Chongwoo A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RING1B, a Polycomb Group (PcG) protein, binds methylated chromatin through its association with another PcG protein called Polycomb (Pc). However, RING1B can associate with nonmethylated chromatin suggesting an alternate mechanism for RING1B interaction with chromatin. Here, we demonstrate that two proteins with little sequence identity between them, the Pc cbox domain and RYBP, bind the same surface on the C-terminal domain of RING1B (C-RING1B). Pc cbox and RYBP each fold into a nearly identical, intermolecular beta sheet with C-RING1B and a loop structure which are completely different in the two proteins. Both the beta sheet and loop are required for stable binding and transcription repression. Further, a mutation engineered to disrupt binding on the Drosophila dRING1 protein prevents chromatin association and PcG function in vivo. These results suggest that PcG targeting to different chromatin locations relies, in part, on binding partners of C-RING1B that are diverse in sequence and structure. PMID:20696397

  18. Cellular localization and characterization of cytosolic binding partners for Gla domain-containing proteins PRRG4 and PRRG2.

    PubMed

    Yazicioglu, Mustafa N; Monaldini, Luca; Chu, Kirk; Khazi, Fayaz R; Murphy, Samuel L; Huang, Heshu; Margaritis, Paris; High, Katherine A

    2013-09-06

    The genes encoding a family of proteins termed proline-rich γ-carboxyglutamic acid (PRRG) proteins were identified and characterized more than a decade ago, but their functions remain unknown. These novel membrane proteins have an extracellular γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) protein domain and cytosolic WW binding motifs. We screened WW domain arrays for cytosolic binding partners for PRRG4 and identified novel protein-protein interactions for the protein. We also uncovered a new WW binding motif in PRRG4 that is essential for these newly found protein-protein interactions. Several of the PRRG-interacting proteins we identified are essential for a variety of physiologic processes. Our findings indicate possible novel and previously unidentified functions for PRRG proteins.

  19. [HPV diagnosis: woman's process of interaction with her partner].

    PubMed

    Vargens, Octavio Muniz da Costa; Silva, Carla Marins; Azevedo E Silva, Gulnar; Girianelli, Vânia Reis

    2013-01-01

    This is a descriptive research, with qualitative approach, which aimed at analyze the interaction process between woman and her partner starting from the diagnosis of infection by the human papilomavirus (HPV). It was accomplished in 13 communities in the cities of Duque de Caxias and Nova Iguaçu, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, from October/2006 to September/2008. Twenty women, diagnosed with HPV infection related to oncogenic high risk, were interviewed. The Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory perspectives guided data collection and analysis. The results revealed that the HPV diagnosis means serious challenges in the women's relationship with her partner mainly regarding to the adoption of preventive initiatives. It is concluded that these issues lead to the need of a humanized care in order to favor the women's empowerment.

  20. Partnering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    to meet the de- successful despite the site challenges and sign intent, business changes during the project. (Groves was acquired by the Torno ...34 Complete the contract without need for America company during construction- litigation. Torno embraced Partnering and continued the process which was

  1. Discovering interacting domains and motifs in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ng, See-Kiong

    2013-01-01

    Many important biological processes, such as the signaling pathways, require protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that are designed for fast response to stimuli. These interactions are usually transient, easily formed, and disrupted, yet specific. Many of these transient interactions involve the binding of a protein domain to a short stretch (3-10) of amino acid residues, which can be characterized by a sequence pattern, i.e., a short linear motif (SLiM). We call these interacting domains and motifs domain-SLiM interactions. Existing methods have focused on discovering SLiMs in the interacting proteins' sequence data. With the recent increase in protein structures, we have a new opportunity to detect SLiMs directly from the proteins' 3D structures instead of their linear sequences. In this chapter, we describe a computational method called SLiMDIet to directly detect SLiMs on domain interfaces extracted from 3D structures of PPIs. SLiMDIet comprises two steps: (1) interaction interfaces belonging to the same domain are extracted and grouped together using structural clustering and (2) the extracted interaction interfaces in each cluster are structurally aligned to extract the corresponding SLiM. Using SLiMDIet, de novo SLiMs interacting with protein domains can be computationally detected from structurally clustered domain-SLiM interactions for PFAM domains which have available 3D structures in the PDB database.

  2. Characterizing WW domain interactions of tumor suppressor WWOX reveals its association with multiprotein networks.

    PubMed

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Huang, Haiming; Kim, TaeHyung; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib K; Sudol, Marius; Reichmann, Dana; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kim, Philip M; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-03-28

    WW domains are small modules present in regulatory and signaling proteins that mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain. Based on its ligand recognition motifs, the WW domain family is classified into four groups. The largest one, to which WWOX belongs, recognizes ligands with a PPXY motif. To pursue the functional properties of the WW domains of WWOX, we employed mass spectrometry and phage display experiments to identify putative WWOX-interacting partners. Our analysis revealed that the first WW (WW1) domain of WWOX is the main functional interacting domain. Furthermore, our study uncovered well known and new PPXY-WW1-interacting partners and shed light on novel LPXY-WW1-interacting partners of WWOX. Many of these proteins are components of multiprotein complexes involved in molecular processes, including transcription, RNA processing, tight junction, and metabolism. By utilizing GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays, we validated that WWOX is a substrate of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, which contains two LPXY motifs. We found that ITCH mediates Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination of WWOX, leading to its nuclear localization and increased cell death. Our data suggest that the WW1 domain of WWOX provides a versatile platform that links WWOX with individual proteins associated with physiologically important networks.

  3. Characterizing WW Domain Interactions of Tumor Suppressor WWOX Reveals Its Association with Multiprotein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Huang, Haiming; Kim, TaeHyung; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib K.; Sudol, Marius; Reichmann, Dana; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kim, Philip M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2014-01-01

    WW domains are small modules present in regulatory and signaling proteins that mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain. Based on its ligand recognition motifs, the WW domain family is classified into four groups. The largest one, to which WWOX belongs, recognizes ligands with a PPXY motif. To pursue the functional properties of the WW domains of WWOX, we employed mass spectrometry and phage display experiments to identify putative WWOX-interacting partners. Our analysis revealed that the first WW (WW1) domain of WWOX is the main functional interacting domain. Furthermore, our study uncovered well known and new PPXY-WW1-interacting partners and shed light on novel LPXY-WW1-interacting partners of WWOX. Many of these proteins are components of multiprotein complexes involved in molecular processes, including transcription, RNA processing, tight junction, and metabolism. By utilizing GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays, we validated that WWOX is a substrate of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, which contains two LPXY motifs. We found that ITCH mediates Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination of WWOX, leading to its nuclear localization and increased cell death. Our data suggest that the WW1 domain of WWOX provides a versatile platform that links WWOX with individual proteins associated with physiologically important networks. PMID:24550385

  4. FERM Domain Interaction Promotes FAK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dunty, Jill M.; Gabarra-Niecko, Veronica; King, Michelle L.; Ceccarelli, Derek F. J.; Eck, Michael J.; Schaller, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    From the results of deletion analyses, the FERM domain of FAK has been proposed to inhibit enzymatic activity and repress FAK signaling. We have identified a sequence in the FERM domain that is important for FAK signaling in vivo. Point mutations in this sequence had little effect upon catalytic activity in vitro. However, the mutant exhibits reduced tyrosine phosphorylation and dramatically reduced Src family kinase binding. Further, the abilities of the mutant to transduce biochemical signals and to promote cell migration were severely impaired. The results implicate a FERM domain interaction in cell adhesion-dependent activation of FAK and downstream signaling. We also show that the purified FERM domain of FAK interacts with full-length FAK in vitro, and mutation of this sequence disrupts the interaction. These findings are discussed in the context of models of FAK regulation by its FERM domain. PMID:15169899

  5. New Reactions and Products Resulting from Alternative Interactions between the P450 Enzyme and Redox Partners

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are capable of catalyzing a great variety of synthetically useful reactions such as selective C–H functionalization. Surrogate redox partners are widely used for reconstitution of P450 activity based on the assumption that the choice of these auxiliary proteins or their mode of action does not affect the type and selectivity of reactions catalyzed by P450s. Herein, we present an exceptional example to challenge this postulate. MycG, a multifunctional biosynthetic P450 monooxygenase responsible for hydroxylation and epoxidation of 16-membered ring macrolide mycinamicins, is shown to catalyze the unnatural N-demethylation(s) of a range of mycinamicin substrates when partnered with the free Rhodococcus reductase domain RhFRED or the engineered Rhodococcus-spinach hybrid reductase RhFRED-Fdx. By contrast, MycG fused with the RhFRED or RhFRED-Fdx reductase domain mediates only physiological oxidations. This finding highlights the larger potential role of variant redox partner protein–protein interactions in modulating the catalytic activity of P450 enzymes. PMID:24521145

  6. THE PARITY PARTNER OF THE NUCLEON IN QUENCHED QCD WITH DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI,S.

    2000-07-12

    The authors present preliminary results for the mass spectrum of the nucleon and its low-lying excited states from quenched lattice QCD using the domain wall fermion method which preserves the chiral symmetry at finite lattice cutoff. Definite mass splitting is observed between the nucleon and its parity partner. This splitting grows with decreasing valence quark mass. They also present preliminary data regarding the first positive-parity excited state.

  7. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire.

  8. CONTESTED DOMAINS, VERBAL 'AMPLIFIERS,' AND INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN YOUNG ADULTHOOD.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Peggy C; Copp, Jennifer E; Longmore, Monica A; Manning, Wendy D

    2015-12-01

    We draw on structured and qualitative data to examine relationship dynamics associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) that occurs during the young adult period. Relying on a symbolic interactionist perspective, we identify specific contested domains associated with what has been called 'situational couple violence,' and explore the degree to which certain forms of communication about contested areas ('verbal amplifiers') exacerbate the risk of violence. Consistent with this relational focus, measures index respondent as well as partner concerns and use of these negative forms of communication. Results of analyses of interview data from a large, diverse sample of young adults show that net of family background, history of antisocial behavior, and other controls, concerns about the partner's or individual's own economic viability, disagreements about time spent with friends, and issues of infidelity are significantly related to IPV perpetration. Yet the analyses indicate that infidelity is particularly central as a source of conflict associated with violence, and the use of verbal amplifiers explained additional variance. Further, while research has highlighted important differences in the meaning and consequences of male and female IPV, findings point to some areas of overlap in the relationship concerns and communication processes associated with variations in self-reports of the use of violence. In-depth "relationship history narratives" elicited from a subset of respondents and a sample of their partners support the quantitative results, but also highlight variations within the sample, the sequencing of these interrelated processes, and ways in which gender may have influenced respondents' perspectives and behavior.

  9. The interaction of transverse domain walls.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Benjamin

    2012-01-18

    The interaction between transverse domain walls is calculated analytically using a multipole expansion up to third order. Starting from an analytical expression for the magnetization in the wall, the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole moments are derived and their impact on the interaction is investigated using the surface and volume charges. The surface charges are important for the dipole moment while the volume charges constitute the monopole and quadrupole moments. For domain walls that are situated in different wires it is found that there is a strong deviation from the interaction of two monopoles. This deviation is caused by the interaction of the monopole of the wall in the first wire with the dipole of the wall in the second wire and vice versa. The dipole-dipole and the quadrupole-monopole interactions are found to be also of considerable size and non-negligible. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows a good agreement.

  10. Institutional, individual, and socio-cultural domains of partnerships: a typology of USDA Forest Service recreation partners.

    PubMed

    Seekamp, Erin; Cerveny, Lee K; McCreary, Allie

    2011-09-01

    Federal land management agencies, such as the USDA Forest Service, have expanded the role of recreation partners reflecting constrained growth in appropriations and broader societal trends towards civic environmental governance. Partnerships with individual volunteers, service groups, commercial outfitters, and other government agencies provide the USDA Forest Service with the resources necessary to complete projects and meet goals under fiscal constraints. Existing partnership typologies typically focus on collaborative or strategic alliances and highlight organizational dimensions (e.g., structure and process) defined by researchers. This paper presents a partner typology constructed from USDA Forest Service partnership practitioners' conceptualizations of 35 common partner types. Multidimensional scaling of data from unconstrained pile sorts identified 3 distinct cultural dimensions of recreation partners--specifically, partnership character, partner impact, and partner motivations--that represent institutional, individual, and socio-cultural cognitive domains. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis provides further insight into the various domains of agency personnel's conceptualizations. While three dimensions with high reliability (RSQ = 0.83) and corresponding hierarchical clusters illustrate commonality between agency personnel's partnership suppositions, this study also reveals variance in personnel's familiarity and affinity for specific partnership types. This real-world perspective on partner types highlights that agency practitioners not only make strategic choices when selecting and cultivating partnerships to accomplish critical task, but also elect to work with partners for the primary purpose of providing public service and fostering land stewardship.

  11. The Different Roles of Aggrecan Interaction Domains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aggregating proteoglycans of the lectican family are important components of extracellular matrices. Aggrecan is the most well studied of these and is central to cartilage biomechanical properties and skeletal development. Key to its biological function is the fixed charge of the many glycosaminoglycan chains, that provide the basis for the viscoelastic properties necessary for load distribution over the articular surface. This review is focused on the globular domains of aggrecan and their role in anchoring the proteoglycans to other extracellular matrix components. The N-terminal G1 domain is vital in that it binds the proteoglycan to hyaluronan in ternary complex with link protein, retaining the proteoglycan in the tissue. The importance of the C-terminal G3 domain interactions has recently been emphasized by two different human hereditary disorders: autosomal recessive aggrecan-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and autosomal dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans. In these two conditions, different missense mutations in the aggrecan C-type lectin repeat have been described. The resulting amino acid replacements affect the ligand interactions of the G3 domain, albeit with widely different phenotypic outcomes. PMID:23019016

  12. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Feng; Shi, Jian-Jun; Guan, Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases.

  13. Characterization of domain-peptide interaction interface: prediction of SH3 domain-mediated protein-protein interaction network in yeast by generic structure-based models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingjun; Li, Nan; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-04

    Determination of the binding specificity of SH3 domain, a peptide recognition module (PRM), is important to understand their biological functions and reconstruct the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. In the present study, the SH3-peptide interactions for both class I and II SH3 domains were characterized by the intermolecular residue-residue interaction network. We developed generic MIEC-SVM models to infer SH3 domain-peptide recognition specificity that achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. By investigating the domain-peptide recognition mechanisms at the residue level, we found that the class-I and class-II binding peptides have different binding modes even though they occupy the same binding site of SH3. Furthermore, we predicted the potential binding partners of SH3 domains in the yeast proteome and constructed the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. Comparison with the experimentally determined interactions confirmed the effectiveness of our approach. This study showed that our sophisticated computational approach not only provides a powerful platform to decipher protein recognition code at the molecular level but also allows identification of peptide-mediated protein interactions at a proteomic scale. We believe that such an approach is general to be applicable to other domain-peptide interactions.

  14. CONTESTED DOMAINS, VERBAL ‘AMPLIFIERS,’ AND INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN YOUNG ADULTHOOD

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Peggy C.; Copp, Jennifer E.; Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.

    2015-01-01

    We draw on structured and qualitative data to examine relationship dynamics associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) that occurs during the young adult period. Relying on a symbolic interactionist perspective, we identify specific contested domains associated with what has been called ‘situational couple violence,’ and explore the degree to which certain forms of communication about contested areas (‘verbal amplifiers’) exacerbate the risk of violence. Consistent with this relational focus, measures index respondent as well as partner concerns and use of these negative forms of communication. Results of analyses of interview data from a large, diverse sample of young adults show that net of family background, history of antisocial behavior, and other controls, concerns about the partner’s or individual’s own economic viability, disagreements about time spent with friends, and issues of infidelity are significantly related to IPV perpetration. Yet the analyses indicate that infidelity is particularly central as a source of conflict associated with violence, and the use of verbal amplifiers explained additional variance. Further, while research has highlighted important differences in the meaning and consequences of male and female IPV, findings point to some areas of overlap in the relationship concerns and communication processes associated with variations in self-reports of the use of violence. In-depth “relationship history narratives” elicited from a subset of respondents and a sample of their partners support the quantitative results, but also highlight variations within the sample, the sequencing of these interrelated processes, and ways in which gender may have influenced respondents’ perspectives and behavior. PMID:26617420

  15. Institutional, Individual, and Socio-Cultural Domains of Partnerships: A Typology of USDA Forest Service Recreation Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekamp, Erin; Cerveny, Lee K.; McCreary, Allie

    2011-09-01

    Federal land management agencies, such as the USDA Forest Service, have expanded the role of recreation partners reflecting constrained growth in appropriations and broader societal trends towards civic environmental governance. Partnerships with individual volunteers, service groups, commercial outfitters, and other government agencies provide the USDA Forest Service with the resources necessary to complete projects and meet goals under fiscal constraints. Existing partnership typologies typically focus on collaborative or strategic alliances and highlight organizational dimensions (e.g., structure and process) defined by researchers. This paper presents a partner typology constructed from USDA Forest Service partnership practitioners' conceptualizations of 35 common partner types. Multidimensional scaling of data from unconstrained pile sorts identified 3 distinct cultural dimensions of recreation partners—specifically, partnership character, partner impact, and partner motivations—that represent institutional, individual, and socio-cultural cognitive domains. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis provides further insight into the various domains of agency personnel's conceptualizations. While three dimensions with high reliability (RSQ = 0.83) and corresponding hierarchical clusters illustrate commonality between agency personnel's partnership suppositions, this study also reveals variance in personnel's familiarity and affinity for specific partnership types. This real-world perspective on partner types highlights that agency practitioners not only make strategic choices when selecting and cultivating partnerships to accomplish critical task, but also elect to work with partners for the primary purpose of providing public service and fostering land stewardship.

  16. Interacting protein partners of Arabidopsis RNA-binding protein AtRBP45b.

    PubMed

    Muthuramalingam, M; Wang, Y; Li, Y; Mahalingam, R

    2017-05-01

    RNA binding proteins, important players in post-transcriptional gene regulation, usually exist in ribonuclear complexes. However, even in model systems like Arabidopsis characterisation of RBP associated proteins is limited. In this study, we investigated the interacting proteins of the Arabidopsis AtRBP45b, which is involved in stress signalling. In vivo localisation of AtRBP45b was conducted using 35S-GFP. FLAG-tagged AtRBP45b under control of the 35S promoter in the Atrbp45b-1 mutant background was used to pull down AtRBP45b interacting proteins. Yeast two-hybrid analysis, fluorescence energy resonance transfer assays were used to confirm the veracity of the AtRBP45b interacting proteins. In planta GFP-tagging indicated AtRBP45b is localised to the nucleus and the cytosol. AtRBP45b protein has a N-terminal proline-rich region and a C-terminal glutamine-rich domain that are usually involved in protein-protein interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing led to identification of 30 proteins that interacted with AtRBP45b. Using information from interactome databases (BIOGRID, INTACT and STRING), pull-down assays and localisation data, 12 putative interacting proteins were selected for yeast two-hybrid analysis. Cap-binding protein (CBP20, At5g44200) and polyA-binding protein (PAB8, At1g49760) were shown to interact with AtRBP45b. Based on its interacting partners we speculate that AtRBP45b may play an important role in RNA metabolism, especially in aspects related to mRNA stability and translation initiation during stress conditions in plants.

  17. When an Intramolecular Disulfide Bridge Governs the Interaction of DUOX2 with Its Partner DUOXA2

    PubMed Central

    Carré, Aurore; Louzada, Ruy A.N.; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Morand, Stanislas; Ogryzko, Vasily; de Carvalho, Denise Pires; Grasberger, Helmut; Leto, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) protein belongs to the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family. As H2O2 generator, it plays a key role in both thyroid hormone biosynthesis and innate immunity. DUOX2 forms with its maturation factor, DUOX activator 2 (DUOXA2), a stable complex at the cell surface that is crucial for the H2O2-generating activity, but the nature of their interaction is unknown. The contribution of some cysteine residues located in the N-terminal ectodomain of DUOX2 in a surface protein–protein interaction is suggested. We have investigated the involvement of different cysteine residues in the formation of covalent bonds that could be of critical importance for the function of the complex. Results: We report the identification and the characterization of an intramolecular disulfide bond between cys-124 of the N-terminal ectodomain and cys-1162 of an extracellular loop of DUOX2, which has important functional implications in both export and activity of DUOX2. This intramolecular bridge provides structural support for the formation of interdisulfide bridges between the N-terminal domain of DUOX2 and the two extracellular loops of its partner, DUOXA2. Innovation: Both stability and function of the maturation factor, DUOXA2, are dependent on the oxidative folding of DUOX2, indicating that DUOX2 displays a chaperone-like function with respect to its partner. Conclusions: The oxidative folding of DUOX2 that takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) appears to be a key event in the trafficking of the DUOX2/DUOXA2 complex as it promotes an appropriate conformation of the N-terminal region, which is propitious to subsequent covalent interactions with the maturation factor, DUOXA2. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 724–733. PMID:25761904

  18. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) reduces reinsertion rates of interaction partners sorted to Rab11-dependent slow recycling pathway.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Thorsen, Thor S; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Eriksen, Jacob; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-04-06

    The scaffolding protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain and a central lipid-binding Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain. PICK1 is thought to regulate trafficking of its PDZ binding partners but different and even opposing functions have been suggested. Here, we apply ELISA-based assays and confocal microscopy in HEK293 cells with inducible PICK1 expression to assess in an isolated system the ability of PICK1 to regulate trafficking of natural and engineered PDZ binding partners. The dopamine transporter (DAT), which primarily sorts to degradation upon internalization, did not form perinuclear clusters with PICK1, and PICK1 did not affect DAT internalization/recycling. However, transfer of the PICK1-binding DAT C terminus to the β(2)-adrenergic receptor, which sorts to recycling upon internalization, led to formation of PICK1 co-clusters in Rab11-positive compartments. Furthermore, PICK1 inhibited Rab11-mediated recycling of the receptor in a BAR and PDZ domain-dependent manner. In contrast, transfer of the DAT C terminus to the δ-opioid receptor, which sorts to degradation, did not result in PICK1 co-clusters or any change in internalization/recycling. Further support for a role of PICK1 determined by its PDZ cargo was obtained for the PICK1 interaction partner prolactin-releasing peptide receptor (GPR10). GPR10 co-localized with Rab11 and clustered with PICK1 upon constitutive internalization but co-localized with the late endosomal marker Rab7 and did not cluster with PICK1 upon agonist-induced internalization. Our data suggest a selective role of PICK1 in clustering and reducing the recycling rates of PDZ domain binding partners sorted to the Rab11-dependent recycling pathway.

  19. Conformational selectivity in cytochrome P450 redox partner interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Scott A.; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Nguyen, Brian D.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The heme iron of cytochromes P450 must be reduced to bind and activate molecular oxygen for substrate oxidation. Reducing equivalents are derived from a redox partner, which requires the formation of a protein–protein complex. A subject of increasing discussion is the role that redox partner binding plays, if any, in favoring significant structural changes in the P450s that are required for activity. Many P450s now have been shown to experience large open and closed motions. Several structural and spectral studies indicate that the well-studied P450cam adopts the open conformation when its redox partner, putidaredoxin (Pdx), binds, whereas recent NMR studies indicate that this view is incorrect. Given the relevance of this discrepancy to P450 chemistry, it is important to determine whether Pdx favors the open or closed form of P450cam. Here, we have used both computational and experimental isothermal titration calorimetry studies that unequivocally show Pdx favors binding to the open form of P450cam. Analyses of molecular-dynamic trajectories also provide insights into intermediate conformational states that could be relevant to catalysis. PMID:27439869

  20. The Good, the Bad, and the Rare: Memory for Partners in Social Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Volstorf, Jenny; Rieskamp, Jörg; Stevens, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    For cooperation to evolve via direct reciprocity, individuals must track their partners' behavior to avoid exploitation. With increasing size of the interaction group, however, memory becomes error prone. To decrease memory effort, people could categorize partners into types, distinguishing cooperators and cheaters. We explored two ways in which people might preferentially track one partner type: remember cheaters or remember the rare type in the population. We assigned participants to one of three interaction groups which differed in the proportion of computer partners' types (defectors rare, equal proportion, or cooperators rare). We extended research on both hypotheses in two ways. First, participants experienced their partners repeatedly by interacting in Prisoner's Dilemma games. Second, we tested categorization of partners as cooperators or defectors in memory tests after a short and long retention interval (10 min and 1 week). Participants remembered rare partner types better than they remembered common ones at both retention intervals. We propose that the flexibility of responding to the environment suggests an ecologically rational memory strategy in social interactions. PMID:21559490

  1. Structural characterization of ANGPTL8 (betatrophin) with its interacting partner lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Siddiqa, Amnah; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Amjad; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Bibi, Zurah; Aslam, Babar

    2016-04-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 8 (ANGPTL8) (also known as betatrophin) is a newly identified secretory protein with a potential role in autophagy, lipid metabolism and pancreatic beta-cell proliferation. Its structural characterization is required to enhance our current understanding of its mechanism of action which could help in identifying its receptor and/or other binding partners. Based on the physiological significance and necessity of exploring structural features of ANGPTL8, the present study is conducted with a specific aim to model the structure of ANGPTL8 and study its possible interactions with Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to predict 3-dimensional (3D) structure of ANGPTL8. Three different approaches were used for modeling of ANGPTL8 including homology modeling, de-novo structure prediction and their amalgam which is then proceeded by structure verification using ERRATT, PROSA, Qmean and Ramachandran plot scores. The selected models of ANGPTL8 were further evaluated for protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis with LPL using CPORT and HADDOCK server. Our results have shown that the crystal structure of iSH2 domain of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85β subunit (PDB entry: 3mtt) is a good candidate for homology modeling of ANGPTL8. Analysis of inter-molecular interactions between the structure of ANGPTL8 and LPL revealed existence of several non-covalent interactions. The residues of LPL involved in these interactions belong from its lid region, thrombospondin (TSP) region and heparin binding site which is suggestive of a possible role of ANGPTL8 in regulating the proteolysis, motility and localization of LPL. Besides, the conserved residues of SE1 region of ANGPTL8 formed interactions with the residues around the hinge region of LPL. Overall, our results support a model of inhibition of LPL by ANGPTL8 through the steric block of its catalytic site which will be further explored using wet lab

  2. A beta-sheet interaction interface directs the tetramerisation of the Miz-1 POZ domain.

    PubMed

    Stead, Mark A; Trinh, Chi H; Garnett, James A; Carr, Stephen B; Baron, Andrew J; Edwards, Thomas A; Wright, Stephanie C

    2007-11-02

    The POZ/BTB domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif found in approximately 40 zinc-finger transcription factors (POZ-ZF factors). Several POZ-ZF factors are implicated in human cancer, and POZ domain interaction interfaces represent an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Miz-1 (Myc-interacting zinc-finger protein) is a POZ-ZF factor that regulates DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest and plays an important role in human cancer by virtue of its interaction with the c-Myc and BCL6 oncogene products. The Miz-1 POZ domain mediates both self-association and the recruitment of non-POZ partners. POZ-ZF factors generally function as homodimers, although higher-order associations and heteromeric interactions are known to be physiologically important; crucially, the interaction interfaces in such large complexes have not been characterised. We report here the crystal structure of the Miz-1 POZ domain up to 2.1 A resolution. The tetrameric organisation of Miz-1 POZ reveals two types of interaction interface between subunits; an interface of alpha-helices resembles the dimerisation interface of reported POZ domain structures, whereas a novel beta-sheet interface directs the association of two POZ domain dimers. We show that the beta-sheet interface directs the tetramerisation of the Miz-1 POZ domain in solution and therefore represents a newly described candidate interface for the higher-order homo- and hetero-oligomerisation of POZ-ZF proteins in vivo.

  3. When Humanoid Robots Become Human-Like Interaction Partners: Corepresentation of Robotic Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenzel, Anna; Chinellato, Eris; Bou, Maria A. Tirado; del Pobil, Angel P.; Lappe, Markus; Liepelt, Roman

    2012-01-01

    In human-human interactions, corepresenting a partner's actions is crucial to successfully adjust and coordinate actions with others. Current research suggests that action corepresentation is restricted to interactions between human agents facilitating social interaction with conspecifics. In this study, we investigated whether action…

  4. Adamantyl-Substituted Retinoid-Derived Molecules That Interact with the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Small Heterodimer Partner: Effects of Replacing the 1-Adamantyl or Hydroxyl Group on Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth, Induction of Cancer Cell Apoptosis, and Inhibition of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin; Jiang, Tao; Ye, Mao; Fontana, Joseph A.; Farhana, Lulu; Patel, Bhaumik; Xue, Li Ping; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Nuti, Roberto; Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Han, Young-Hoon; Tautz, Lutz; Hobbs, Peter D.; Jong, Ling; Waleh, Nahid; Chao, Wan-ru; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Pang, Yuhong; Su, Ying

    2014-01-01

    (E)-4-[3-(1-Adamantyl)-4′-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3-Cl-AHPC) induces the cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia and cancer cells. Studies demonstrated that 3-Cl-AHPC bound to the atypical orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP). Although missing a DNA-binding domain, SHP heterodimerizes with the ligand-binding domains of other nuclear receptors to repress their abilities to induce or inhibit gene expression. 3-Cl-AHPC analogues having the 1-adamantyl and phenolic hydroxyl pharmacophoric elements replaced with isosteric groups were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibition of proliferation and induction of human cancer cell apoptosis. Structure–anticancer activity relationship studies indicated the importance of both groups to apoptotic activity. Docking of 3-Cl-AHPC and its analogues to an SHP computational model that was based on the crystal structure of ultraspiracle complexed with 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoylglycero-3-phosphoethanolamine suggested why these 3-Cl-AHPC groups could influence SHP activity. Inhibitory activity against Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) was also assessed. The most active Shp-2 inhibitor was found to be the 3′-(3,3-dimethylbutynyl) analogue of 3-Cl-AHPC. PMID:18759424

  5. Expert-Novice Interactions: Influence of Partner Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verba, Mina; Winnykamen, Fajda

    1992-01-01

    Presents study results showing that a range of modes of interactive organization coexist in expert-novice problem-solving activity and vary with the asymmetry of the relationships. Reports that by combining high achieving status with task-related expertise, the resulting interactive dynamic is guidance/tutoring. Argues for multidimensional…

  6. Interaction between Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities and Their Partners: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostyn, Ine; Maes, Bea

    2009-01-01

    Background: High quality interactions are of crucial importance for quality of life of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This literature review describes and synthesises studies addressing the interaction between persons with PIMD and their partners. Method: A computerised literature search using defined…

  7. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Assay for Assessing LIM Domain-Peptide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Neil O; Shah, Manan; Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2016-10-10

    We have developed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based experiments for measuring the binding affinity, off-rates, and inferred on-rates for interactions between a family of transcriptional regulators and their intrinsically disordered binding partners. It was difficult to evaluate these interactions previously, as the transcriptional regulators are obligate binding proteins that aggregate in the absence of a binding partner. The assays rely on fusion constructs where binding domains are linked by a flexible tether containing a specific protease site, with fluorescent proteins at either end that display FRET when the complex is formed. Loss of FRET is monitored after cutting the tether followed by dilution or competition with a non-fluorescent peptide. These methods allowed a wide range of binding affinities (10(-9) -10(-5)  m) to be determined. Our data indicate that interactions of closely related proteins can have surprisingly different binding properties.

  8. Domain Interaction Studies of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Tegument Protein UL16 Reveal Its Interaction with Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Pooja; Sarfo, Akua; Zhang, Dan; Abraham, Thomas; Carmichael, Jillian; Han, Jun; Wills, John W

    2017-01-15

    The UL16 tegument protein of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is conserved among all herpesviruses and plays many roles during replication. This protein has an N-terminal domain (NTD) that has been shown to bind to several viral proteins, including UL11, VP22, and glycoprotein E, and these interactions are negatively regulated by a C-terminal domain (CTD). Thus, in pairwise transfections, UL16 binding is enabled only when the CTD is absent or altered. Based on these results, we hypothesized that direct interactions occur between the NTD and the CTD. Here we report that the separated and coexpressed functional domains of UL16 are mutually responsive to each other in transfected cells and form complexes that are stable enough to be captured in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, we found that the CTD can associate with itself. To our surprise, the CTD was also found to contain a novel and intrinsic ability to localize to specific spots on mitochondria in transfected cells. Subsequent analyses of HSV-infected cells by immunogold electron microscopy and live-cell confocal imaging revealed a population of UL16 that does not merely accumulate on mitochondria but in fact makes dynamic contacts with these organelles in a time-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the domain interactions of UL16 serve to regulate not just the interaction of this tegument protein with its viral binding partners but also its interactions with mitochondria. The purpose of this novel interaction remains to be determined.

  9. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  10. Appraisal distortions and intimate partner violence: gender, power, and interaction.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Jason B; Oka, Megan; Fife, Stephen T

    2012-06-01

    In relationships characterized by control, abuse, or violence, many appraisal distortions occur including denial and minimization. However, the nature of the distortion varies depending on the individual's role in the relationship (i.e., abuser or victim). Reducing these distortions is an important component in treatment success and involves accepting responsibility for actions and attributions. This study used constructivist grounded theory methods to explore the following questions: (1) What are the types of distortions that are used by individuals who have been in violent or abusive relationships? (2) What are the gender and power differences in the appraisal distortions used? (3) What are the functions and interactions of the distortions in the relationship dynamics? Qualitative analysis of interviews with 29 individuals who had been in abusive relationships found that there were several types of distortions used by participants, but there were differences in the function of the distortion, depending on the individual's role in the abuse. These generally corresponded to power and gender, where the male as perpetrator used different distortions (or used similar distortions for different reasons) than did the female as victim. Suggestions for research as well as treatment implications for both offenders and survivors of abuse are given.

  11. Effects of MyTeachingPartner-Math/Science on Teacher-Child Interactions in Prekindergarten Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Jessica Vick; Kinzie, Mable B.; Williford, Amanda; DeCoster, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the impact of MyTeachingPartner-Math/Science, a system of math and science curricula and professional development, on the quality of teachers' interactions with children in their classrooms. Schools were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 intervention conditions (Basic: curricula providing within-activity, embedded…

  12. Domain specificity in social interactions, social thought, and social development.

    PubMed

    Turiel, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) have taken good steps in formulating a domain-specific view of parent-child interactions. This commentary supports the introduction of domain specificity to analyses of parenting. Their formulation is an advance over formulations that characterized parental practices globally. This commentary calls for inclusion of definitions of the classification system of domain-specific interactions and criteria for each domain. It is also maintained that Grusec and Davidov's domains of social interaction imply that processes of development are involved, along with socialization; that bidirectionality in parent-child relations needs to be extended to include mutual influences and the construction of domains of social thought; and that conflicts and opposition within families coexist with compliance and social harmony.

  13. Thermotoga maritima NusG: domain interaction mediates autoinhibition and thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Schneider, Christin; Schweimer, Kristian; Strauß, Martin; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.; Rösch, Paul; Knauer, Stefan H.

    2017-01-01

    NusG, the only universally conserved transcription factor, comprises an N- and a C-terminal domain (NTD, CTD) that are flexibly connected and move independently in Escherichia coli and other organisms. In NusG from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima (tmNusG), however, NTD and CTD interact tightly. This closed state stabilizes the CTD, but masks the binding sites for the interaction partners Rho, NusE and RNA polymerase (RNAP), suggesting that tmNusG is autoinhibited. Furthermore, tmNusG and some other bacterial NusGs have an additional domain, DII, of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that tmNusG is indeed autoinhibited and that binding to RNAP may stabilize the open conformation. We identified two interdomain salt bridges as well as Phe336 as major determinants of the domain interaction. By successive weakening of this interaction we show that after domain dissociation tmNusG-CTD can bind to Rho and NusE, similar to the Escherichia coli NusG-CTD, indicating that these interactions are conserved in bacteria. Furthermore, we show that tmNusG-DII interacts with RNAP as well as nucleic acids with a clear preference for double stranded DNA. We suggest that tmNusG-DII supports tmNusG recruitment to the transcription elongation complex and stabilizes the tmNusG:RNAP complex, a necessary adaptation to high temperatures. PMID:27899597

  14. Differential effects of intranasal oxytocin on sexual experiences and partner interactions in couples.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Behnoush; Heinrichs, Markus; Bergmann, Wiebke; Jung, Stefanie; Germann, Janine; Schedlowski, Manfred; Hartmann, Uwe; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge about the effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) on human sexual behaviors and partner interactions remains limited. Based on our previous studies, we hypothesize that OXT should be able to positively influence parameters of sexual function and couple interactions. Employing a naturalistic setting involving 29 healthy heterosexual couples (n=58 participants), we analyzed the acute effects of intranasally administered OXT (24IU) on sexual drive, arousal, orgasm and refractory aspects of sexual behavior together with partner interactions. Data were assessed by psychometric instruments (Acute Sexual Experiences Scale, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale) as well as biomarkers, such as cortisol, α-amylase and heart rate. Intranasal OXT administration did not alter "classical" parameters of sexual function, such as sexual drive, arousal or penile erection and lubrication. However, analysis of variance and a hierarchical linear model (HLM) revealed specific effects related to the orgasmic/post-orgasmic interval as well as parameters of partner interactions. According to HLM analysis, OXT increased the intensity of orgasm, contentment after sexual intercourse and the effect of study participation. According to ANOVA analysis, these effects were more pronounced in men. Men additionally indicated higher levels of sexual satiety after sexual intercourse with OXT administration. Women felt more relaxed and subgroups indicated better abilities to share sexual desires or to empathize with their partners. The effect sizes were small to moderate. Biomarkers indicated moderate psychophysiological activation but were not affected by OXT, gender or method of contraception. Using a naturalistic setting, intranasal OXT administration in couples exerted differential effects on parameters of sexual function and partner interactions. These results warrant further investigations, including subjects with sexual and relationship problems.

  15. Thermodynamics of heme-induced conformational changes in hemopexin: role of domain-domain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. L.; Morgan, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hemopexin is a serum glycoprotein that binds heme with high affinity and delivers heme to the liver cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. A hinge region connects the two non-disulfide-linked domains of hemopexin, a 35-kDa N-terminal domain (domain I) that binds heme, and a 25-kDa C-terminal domain (domain II). Although domain II does not bind heme, it assumes one structural state in apo-hemopexin and another in heme-hemopexin, and this change is important in facilitating the association of heme-hemopexin with its receptor. In order to elucidate the structure and function of hemopexin, it is important to understand how structural information is transmitted to domain II when domain I binds heme. Here we report a study of the protein-protein interactions between domain I and domain II using analytical ultracentrifugation and isothermal titration calorimetry. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis showed that domain I associates with domain II both in the presence and absence of heme with Kd values of 0.8 microM and 55 microM, respectively. The interaction between heme-domain I and domain II has a calorimetric enthalpy of +11 kcal/mol, a heat capacity (delta Cp) of -720 cal/mol.K, and a calculated entropy of +65 cal/mol.K. By varying the temperature of the centrifugation equilibrium runs, a van't Hoff plot with an apparent change in enthalpy (delta H) of -3.6 kcal/mol and change in entropy (delta S) of +8.1 cal/mol.K for the association of apo-domain I with domain II was obtained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7773173

  16. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning, and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds, and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g., night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson's disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors' C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners.

  17. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments.

  18. Domain Specificity in Social Interactions, Social Thought, and Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turiel, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) have taken good steps in formulating a domain-specific view of parent-child interactions. This commentary supports the introduction of domain specificity to analyses of parenting. Their formulation is an advance over formulations that characterized parental practices globally. This commentary calls for…

  19. Membrane-Mediated Interactions Measured Using Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Stefan; Idema, Timon; Schmidt, Thomas; Storm, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cell membrane organization is the result of the collective effect of many driving forces. Several of these, such as electrostatic and van der Waals forces, have been identified and studied in detail. In this article, we investigate and quantify another force, the interaction between inclusions via deformations of the membrane shape. For electrically neutral systems, this interaction is the dominant organizing force. As a model system to study membrane-mediated interactions, we use phase-separated biomimetic vesicles that exhibit coexistence of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered lipid domains. The membrane-mediated interactions between these domains lead to a rich variety of effects, including the creation of long-range order and the setting of a preferred domain size. Our findings also apply to the interaction of membrane protein patches, which induce similar membrane shape deformations and hence experience similar interactions. PMID:19527649

  20. Quantum Oscillations of Interacting Nanoscale Structural Inhomogeneities in a Domain Wall of Magnetic Stripe Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Barabash, Maksym

    2016-10-01

    It was established that at low temperatures, quantum oscillations of a pair of interacting nanoscale structural inhomogeneities (vertical Bloch lines) occur in a domain wall of stripe domain in uniaxial ferromagnetic film. The effective mass of vertical Bloch line and conditions for this effect were determined. The effect can be used in the hybrid storage devices bit + q-bit.

  1. Using interactive theater to create socioculturally relevant community-based intimate partner violence prevention.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Mieko; Tolman, Richard M

    2015-03-01

    This article describes the use of interactive theater, audience response assessment, and peer educators to create community-generated approaches for bystander interventions (i.e., actions taken by people who become aware of controlling, abusive and violent behavior of others) to prevent intimate partner violence (IPV) and to foster change in community norms. We include a case example of an ongoing university-community partnership, which mobilizes community members to develop and implement socioculturally relevant IPV prevention programs in multiple Asian communities. We used interactive theater at a community event--a walk to raise awareness about IPV in South Asian communities--and examined how the enacted bystander interventions reflect specific community contexts. We detail the challenges and limitations we have encountered in our attempts to implement this approach in collaboration with our community partners.

  2. Solution structure and intermolecular interactions of the third metal-binding domain of ATP7A, the Menkes disease protein.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Cantini, Francesca; DellaMalva, Nunzia; Herrmann, Torsten; Rosato, Antonio; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-09-29

    The third metal-binding domain of the human Menkes protein (MNK3), a copper(I)-transporting ATPase, has been expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in solution. The solution structure of MNK3, its copper(I)-binding properties, and its interaction with the physiological partner, HAH1, have been studied. MNK3 is the domain most dissimilar in structure from the other domains of the Menkes protein. This is reflected in a significant rearrangement of the last strand of the four-stranded beta-sheet when compared with the other known homologous proteins or protein domains. MNK3 is also peculiar with respect to its interaction with the copper(I) ion, as it was found to be a comparatively weak binder. Copper(I) transfer from metal-loaded HAH1 was observed experimentally, but the metal distribution was shifted toward binding by HAH1. This is at variance with what is observed for the other Menkes domains.

  3. Positive Interactions and Avoidant and Anxious Representations in Relationships with Parents, Friends, and Romantic Partners.

    PubMed

    Furman, Wyndol; Stephenson, J Claire; Rhoades, Galena K

    2014-12-01

    We examined associations between positive interactions and avoidant and anxious representations in relationships with parents, friends, and romantic partners. Two hundred adolescents completed questionnaires, observations, and attachment interviews. From a between-person perspective, those adolescents with more positive interactions overall had less avoidant representations. Within persons, more positive interactions were relative to one's own average level in relationships, the less avoidant representations were for that type of relationship. Adolescents were less anxious about a particular type of relationship if they have positive interactions in their other types of relationships. Finally, representations were primarily predicted by interactions in the same type of relationship; interactions in other relationships contributed little. The findings underscore the importance of examining representations of particular types of relationships.

  4. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis.

  5. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  6. Rsp5 WW domains interact directly with the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Chang, A; Cheang, S; Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    2000-07-07

    RSP5 is an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was recently shown to form a physical and functional complex with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II). The amino-terminal half of Rsp5 consists of four domains: a C2 domain, which binds membrane phospholipids; and three WW domains, which are protein interaction modules that bind proline-rich ligands. The carboxyl-terminal half of Rsp5 contains a HECT (homologous to E6-AP carboxyl terminus) domain that catalytically ligates ubiquitin to proteins and functionally classifies Rsp5 as an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. The C2 and WW domains are presumed to act as membrane localization and substrate recognition modules, respectively. We report that the second (and possibly third) Rsp5 WW domain mediates binding to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA pol II large subunit. The CTD comprises a heptamer (YSPTSPS) repeated 26 times and a PXY core that is critical for interaction with a specific group of WW domains. An analysis of synthetic peptides revealed a minimal CTD sequence that is sufficient to bind to the second Rsp5 WW domain (Rsp5 WW2) in vitro and in yeast two-hybrid assays. Furthermore, we found that specific "imperfect" CTD repeats can form a complex with Rsp5 WW2. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of this minimal CTD sequence on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues acts as a negative regulator of the Rsp5 WW2-CTD interaction. In view of the recent data pertaining to phosphorylation-driven interactions between the RNA pol II CTD and the WW domain of Ess1/Pin1, we suggest that CTD dephosphorylation may be a prerequisite for targeted RNA pol II degradation.

  7. Interacting Regions of CD81 and Two of Its Partners, EWI-2 and EWI-2wint, and Their Effect on Hepatitis C Virus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Montpellier, Claire; Tews, Birke Andrea; Poitrimole, Julien; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; D'Arienzo, Valentina; Potel, Julie; Zhang, Xin A.; Rubinstein, Eric; Dubuisson, Jean; Cocquerel, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    CD81 is a tetraspanin protein that is involved in several essential cellular functions, as well as in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. CD81 interacts with a high stoichiometry with its partner proteins EWI-2, EWI-2wint, and EWI-F. These latter proteins modify the functions of CD81 and can thereby potentially inhibit infection or modulate cell migration. Here, we characterized the cleavage of EWI-2 leading to the production of EWI-2wint, which has been shown to inhibit HCV infection. We determined the regions of EWI-2/EWI-2wint and CD81 that are important for their interaction and their functionality. More precisely, we identified a glycine zipper motif in the transmembrane domain of EWI-2/EWI-2wint that is essential for the interaction with CD81. In addition, we found that palmitoylation on two juxtamembranous cysteines in the cytosolic tail of EWI-2/EWI-2wint is required for their interaction with CD81 as well as with CD9, another tetraspanin. Thus, we have shown that palmitoylation of a tetraspanin partner protein can influence the interaction with a tetraspanin. We therefore propose that palmitoylation not only of tetraspanins, but also of their partner proteins is important in regulating the composition of complexes in tetraspanin networks. Finally, we identified the regions in CD81 that are necessary for its functionality in HCV entry and we demonstrated that EWI-2wint needs to interact with CD81 to exert its inhibitory effect on HCV infection. PMID:21343309

  8. CFTR chloride channel in the apical compartments: spatiotemporal coupling to its interacting partners.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2010-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel located primarily at the apical or luminal surfaces of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, kidney, sweat gland, as well as male reproductive tract, where it plays a crucial role in transepithelial fluid homeostasis. CFTR dysfunction can be detrimental and may result in life-threatening disorders. CFTR hypofunctioning because of genetic defects leads to cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, whereas CFTR hyperfunctioning resulting from various infections evokes secretory diarrhea, the leading cause of mortality in early childhood. Therefore, maintaining a dynamic balance between CFTR up-regulating processes and CFTR down-regulating processes is essential for maintaining fluid and body homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that protein-protein interactions play a critical role in the fine-tuned regulation of CFTR function. A growing number of proteins have been reported to interact directly or indirectly with CFTR chloride channel, suggesting that CFTR might be coupled spatially and temporally to a wide variety of interacting partners including ion channels, receptors, transporters, scaffolding proteins, enzyme molecules, signaling molecules, and effectors. Most interactions occur primarily between the opposing terminal tails (amino or carboxyl) of CFTR protein and its binding partners, either directly or mediated through various PDZ scaffolding proteins. These dynamic interactions impact the channel function, as well as localization and processing of CFTR protein within cells. This article reviews the most recent progress and findings about the interactions between CFTR and its binding partners through PDZ scaffolding proteins, as well as the spatiotemporal regulation of CFTR-containing macromolecular signaling complexes in the apical compartments of polarized cells lining the secretory epithelia.

  9. Evaluation by Expert Dancers of a Robot That Performs Partnered Stepping via Haptic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiffany L; Bhattacharjee, Tapomayukh; McKay, J Lucas; Borinski, Jacquelyn E; Hackney, Madeleine E; Ting, Lena H; Kemp, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to enable a robot to engage in partner dance for use in rehabilitation therapy, assessment, diagnosis, and scientific investigations of two-person whole-body motor coordination. Partner dance has been shown to improve balance and gait in people with Parkinson's disease and in older adults, which motivates our work. During partner dance, dance couples rely heavily on haptic interaction to convey motor intent such as speed and direction. In this paper, we investigate the potential for a wheeled mobile robot with a human-like upper-body to perform partnered stepping with people based on the forces applied to its end effectors. Blindfolded expert dancers (N=10) performed a forward/backward walking step to a recorded drum beat while holding the robot's end effectors. We varied the admittance gain of the robot's mobile base controller and the stiffness of the robot's arms. The robot followed the participants with low lag (M=224, SD=194 ms) across all trials. High admittance gain and high arm stiffness conditions resulted in significantly improved performance with respect to subjective and objective measures. Biomechanical measures such as the human hand to human sternum distance, center-of-mass of leader to center-of-mass of follower (CoM-CoM) distance, and interaction forces correlated with the expert dancers' subjective ratings of their interactions with the robot, which were internally consistent (Cronbach's α=0.92). In response to a final questionnaire, 1/10 expert dancers strongly agreed, 5/10 agreed, and 1/10 disagreed with the statement "The robot was a good follower." 2/10 strongly agreed, 3/10 agreed, and 2/10 disagreed with the statement "The robot was fun to dance with." The remaining participants were neutral with respect to these two questions.

  10. Evaluation by Expert Dancers of a Robot That Performs Partnered Stepping via Haptic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tiffany L.; Bhattacharjee, Tapomayukh; McKay, J. Lucas; Borinski, Jacquelyn E.; Hackney, Madeleine E.; Ting, Lena H.; Kemp, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to enable a robot to engage in partner dance for use in rehabilitation therapy, assessment, diagnosis, and scientific investigations of two-person whole-body motor coordination. Partner dance has been shown to improve balance and gait in people with Parkinson's disease and in older adults, which motivates our work. During partner dance, dance couples rely heavily on haptic interaction to convey motor intent such as speed and direction. In this paper, we investigate the potential for a wheeled mobile robot with a human-like upper-body to perform partnered stepping with people based on the forces applied to its end effectors. Blindfolded expert dancers (N=10) performed a forward/backward walking step to a recorded drum beat while holding the robot's end effectors. We varied the admittance gain of the robot's mobile base controller and the stiffness of the robot's arms. The robot followed the participants with low lag (M=224, SD=194 ms) across all trials. High admittance gain and high arm stiffness conditions resulted in significantly improved performance with respect to subjective and objective measures. Biomechanical measures such as the human hand to human sternum distance, center-of-mass of leader to center-of-mass of follower (CoM-CoM) distance, and interaction forces correlated with the expert dancers' subjective ratings of their interactions with the robot, which were internally consistent (Cronbach's α=0.92). In response to a final questionnaire, 1/10 expert dancers strongly agreed, 5/10 agreed, and 1/10 disagreed with the statement "The robot was a good follower." 2/10 strongly agreed, 3/10 agreed, and 2/10 disagreed with the statement "The robot was fun to dance with." The remaining participants were neutral with respect to these two questions. PMID:25993099

  11. Interacting partners of FEN1 and its role in the development of anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kathera, Chandrasekhar; Zhang, Jing; Janardhan, Avilala; Sun, Hongfang; Ali, Wajid; Zhou, Xiaolong; He, Lingfeng; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-02-07

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays a key role in cellular communication, Protein-protein interaction connected with each other with hubs and nods involved in signaling pathways. These interactions used to develop network based biomarkers for early diagnosis of cancer. FEN1(Flap endonuclease 1) is a central component in cellular metabolism, over expression and decrease of FEN1 levels may cause cancer, these regulation changes of Flap endonuclease 1reported in many cancer cells, to consider this data may needs to develop a network based biomarker. The current review focused on types of PPI, based on nature, detection methods and its role in cancer. Interacting partners of Flap endonuclease 1 role in DNA replication repair and development of anticancer therapeutics based on Protein-protein interaction data.

  12. In vivo analysis of human nucleoporin repeat domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), assembled from ∼30 proteins termed nucleoporins (Nups), mediates selective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. A subset of nucleoporins bear a domain with multiple phenylalanine–glycine (FG) motifs. As binding sites for transport receptors, FG Nups are critical in translocation through the NPC. Certain FG Nups are believed to associate via low-affinity, cohesive interactions to form the permeability barrier of the pore, although the form and composition of this functional barrier are debated. We used green fluorescent protein–Nup98/HoxA9 constructs with various numbers of repeats and also substituted FG domains from other nucleoporins for the Nup98 domain to directly compare cohesive interactions in live cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). We find that cohesion is a function of both number and type of FG repeats. Glycine–leucine–FG (GLFG) repeat domains are the most cohesive. FG domains from several human nucleoporins showed no interactions in this assay; however, Nup214, with numerous VFG motifs, displayed measurable cohesion by FRAP. The cohesive nature of a human nucleoporin did not necessarily correlate with that of its yeast orthologue. The Nup98 GLFG domain also functions in pore targeting through binding to Nup93, positioning the GLFG domain in the center of the NPC and supporting a role for this nucleoporin in the permeability barrier. PMID:23427268

  13. Co-evolutionary Analysis of Domains in Interacting Proteins Reveals Insights into Domain–Domain Interactions Mediating Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Raja; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Tasneem, Asba; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in functional genomics have helped generate large-scale high-throughput protein interaction data. Such networks, though extremely valuable towards molecular level understanding of cells, do not provide any direct information about the regions (domains) in the proteins that mediate the interaction. Here, we performed co-evolutionary analysis of domains in interacting proteins in order to understand the degree of co-evolution of interacting and non-interacting domains. Using a combination of sequence and structural analysis, we analyzed protein–protein interactions in F1-ATPase, Sec23p/Sec24p, DNA-directed RNA polymerase and nuclear pore complexes, and found that interacting domain pair(s) for a given interaction exhibits higher level of co-evolution than the noninteracting domain pairs. Motivated by this finding, we developed a computational method to test the generality of the observed trend, and to predict large-scale domain–domain interactions. Given a protein–protein interaction, the proposed method predicts the domain pair(s) that is most likely to mediate the protein interaction. We applied this method on the yeast interactome to predict domain–domain interactions, and used known domain–domain interactions found in PDB crystal structures to validate our predictions. Our results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed method is statistically significant. Comparison of our prediction results with those from two other methods reveals that only a fraction of predictions are shared by all the three methods, indicating that the proposed method can detect known interactions missed by other methods. We believe that the proposed method can be used with other methods to help identify previously unrecognized domain–domain interactions on a genome scale, and could potentially help reduce the search space for identifying interaction sites. PMID:16949097

  14. Asymmetric interaction and indeterminate fitness correlation between cooperative partners in the fig–fig wasp mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Sun, Bao-Fa; Zheng, Qi; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Lixing

    2011-01-01

    Empirical observations have shown that cooperative partners can compete for common resources, but what factors determine whether partners cooperate or compete remain unclear. Using the reciprocal fig–fig wasp mutualism, we show that nonlinear amplification of interference competition between fig wasps—which limits the fig wasps' ability to use a common resource (i.e. female flowers)—keeps the common resource unsaturated, making cooperation locally stable. When interference competition was manually prevented, the fitness correlation between figs and fig wasps went from positive to negative. This indicates that genetic relatedness or reciprocal exchange between cooperative players, which could create spatial heterogeneity or self-restraint, was not sufficient to maintain stable cooperation. Moreover, our analysis of field-collected data shows that the fitness correlation between cooperative partners varies stochastically, and that the mainly positive fitness correlation observed during the warm season shifts to a negative correlation during the cold season owing to an increase in the initial oviposition efficiency of each fig wasp. This implies that the discriminative sanction of less-cooperative wasps (i.e. by decreasing the egg deposition efficiency per fig wasp) but reward to cooperative wasps by fig, a control of the initial value, will facilitate a stable mutualism. Our finding that asymmetric interaction leading to an indeterminate fitness interaction between symbiont (i.e. cooperative actors) and host (i.e. recipient) has the potential to explain why conflict has been empirically observed in both well-documented intraspecific and interspecific cooperation systems. PMID:21490005

  15. Analysing discourse in the traumatic brain injury population: telephone interactions with different communication partners.

    PubMed

    Togher, L; Hand, L; Code, C

    1997-03-01

    A range of discourse analyses are effective in identifying features which are aberrant following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined the exchanges of five traumatically brain-injured subjects and five matched controls across four speaking situations which included speaking to a therapist, to the bus timetable information service, to the police, and to their mothers on the telephone. Transcripts were analysed using the exchange structure analysis of systemic functional grammar. This analysis provided an indication of information giving (K1 moves per minute); information requesting and receiving (K2 moves per minute) and the amount of negotiation that was needed for the messages to be conveyed (dynamic moves per minute). Results indicated that the TBI subjects performed differently across the four conditions, and were differentiated from the matched controls on a number of measures. The role of different communication partners is also addressed. Communication partners were noted to interact differently with TBI subjects when compared with controls. This included increased information-giving to control subjects; more requests for information by police from TBI subjects and a greater use of dynamic moves by therapists with controls. The potential of exchange structure analysis is discussed as a useful way of examining the discourse of TBI subjects and their communication partners. Exchange structure analysis highlighted the dynamic nature of information exchange and the subtle ways speakers responded to familiarity and power imbalance in social interaction. This study has implications for family and community education regarding communication with people with TBI.

  16. Asymmetric interaction and indeterminate fitness correlation between cooperative partners in the fig-fig wasp mutualism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Sun, Bao-Fa; Zheng, Qi; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Lixing

    2011-10-07

    Empirical observations have shown that cooperative partners can compete for common resources, but what factors determine whether partners cooperate or compete remain unclear. Using the reciprocal fig-fig wasp mutualism, we show that nonlinear amplification of interference competition between fig wasps-which limits the fig wasps' ability to use a common resource (i.e. female flowers)-keeps the common resource unsaturated, making cooperation locally stable. When interference competition was manually prevented, the fitness correlation between figs and fig wasps went from positive to negative. This indicates that genetic relatedness or reciprocal exchange between cooperative players, which could create spatial heterogeneity or self-restraint, was not sufficient to maintain stable cooperation. Moreover, our analysis of field-collected data shows that the fitness correlation between cooperative partners varies stochastically, and that the mainly positive fitness correlation observed during the warm season shifts to a negative correlation during the cold season owing to an increase in the initial oviposition efficiency of each fig wasp. This implies that the discriminative sanction of less-cooperative wasps (i.e. by decreasing the egg deposition efficiency per fig wasp) but reward to cooperative wasps by fig, a control of the initial value, will facilitate a stable mutualism. Our finding that asymmetric interaction leading to an indeterminate fitness interaction between symbiont (i.e. cooperative actors) and host (i.e. recipient) has the potential to explain why conflict has been empirically observed in both well-documented intraspecific and interspecific cooperation systems.

  17. Cholesterol and the interaction of proteins with membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol is not uniformly distributed in biological membranes. One of the factors influencing the formation of cholesterol-rich domains in membranes is the unequal lateral distribution of proteins in membranes. Certain proteins are found in cholesterol-rich domains. In some of these cases, it is as a consequence of the proteins interacting directly with cholesterol. There are several structural features of a protein that result in the protein preferentially associating with cholesterol-rich domains. One of the best documented of these is certain types of lipidations. In addition, however, there are segments of a protein that can preferentially sequester cholesterol. We discuss two examples of these cholesterol-recognition elements: the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain and the sterol-sensing domain (SSD). The requirements for a CRAC motif are quite flexible and predict that a large number of sequences could recognize cholesterol. There are, however, certain proteins that are known to interact with cholesterol-rich domains of cell membranes that have CRAC motifs, and synthetic peptides corresponding to these segments also promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains. Modeling studies have provided a rationale for certain requirements of the CRAC motif. The SSD is a larger protein segment comprising five transmembrane domains. The amino acid sequence YIYF is found in several SSD and in certain other proteins for which there is evidence that they interact with cholesterol-rich domains. The CRAC sequences as well as YIYF are generally found adjacent to a transmembrane helical segment. These regions appear to have a strong influence of the localization of certain proteins into domains in biological membranes. In addition to the SSD, there is also a domain found in soluble proteins, the START domain, that binds lipids. Certain proteins with START domains specifically bind cholesterol and are believed to function in

  18. Reconstituting Protein Interaction Networks Using Parameter-Dependent Domain-Domain Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-07

    Superfamily ( SF ) [33], and SMART [34,35]. PFAM domains: FH2, Drf_FH3, and two Drf_GBD domains; SF domains: Formin homology 2 domain (FH2 domain) and ARM...annotation data from six commonly used annotation databases: PFAM-A (release 25.0) [32], Superfamily ( SF ) [33], SMART [34,35], PRODOM [36], TIGRFAM [37... SF 3,651 62.1 962,602 33.0 1,355 1,307 0.79 SMART 3,023 51.4 455,523 15.6 392 379 0.66 PRODOM 146 2.5 19,760 0.7 111 111 0.02 TIGRFAM 3,019 51.3

  19. Identification of protein interaction partners in mammalian cells using SILAC-immunoprecipitation quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Emmott, Edward; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-07-06

    Quantitative proteomics combined with immuno-affinity purification, SILAC immunoprecipitation, represent a powerful means for the discovery of novel protein:protein interactions. By allowing the accurate relative quantification of protein abundance in both control and test samples, true interactions may be easily distinguished from experimental contaminants. Low affinity interactions can be preserved through the use of less-stringent buffer conditions and remain readily identifiable. This protocol discusses the labeling of tissue culture cells with stable isotope labeled amino acids, transfection and immunoprecipitation of an affinity tagged protein of interest, followed by the preparation for submission to a mass spectrometry facility. This protocol then discusses how to analyze and interpret the data returned from the mass spectrometer in order to identify cellular partners interacting with a protein of interest. As an example this technique is applied to identify proteins binding to the eukaryotic translation initiation factors: eIF4AI and eIF4AII.

  20. Electroweak interactions in the nuclear domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of electroweak interactions with nucleons and nuclei is considered as a means to yield tests of the Standard Model, to provide measurements of hadronic structure, and to serve as a guide to experimental efforts. In Part I, single nucleon elastic electroweak processes are studied. The general formalism is outlined, and formulae are presented for cross section for e{sup {minus}} and {upsilon} neutral current processes, {epsilon} charge-changing events, and parity violation. Means have been found to extract both vector and axial form factors from experiment, at arbitrary q{sup 2}. Numerical predictions are presented for these processes, assuming a set of phenomenological form factors. Low every structure in charge-changing reactions would provide tests of CVC and a measurement of the pseudoscalar form factor. Relations between the processes which yield tests of the Standard Model and provide an experimental means to determine the effects of intrinsic parity violation, isospin breaking, and heavy quark content are presented. Parity violation is discussed as a means to measure sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 2} in the low energy quark-lepton sector, and to measure the weak form factors of the nucleon. Sources of uncertainity are considered, including poorly known electromagnetic neutron form factors, and axial weak form factors. A means to detect anomalous effective axial isoscalar current is provided and the bounds on extra heavy neutral Z bosons a CEBAF parity experiment would provide are discussed. In Part II, coincidence cross sections are studied. The formalism for electroweak single-particle coincidence experiments is outlined. The general angular distribution for single-nucleon coincidence measurements on a deuterium (spin 1) target is derived.

  1. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Greenleaf, Arno L.

    2010-06-18

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  2. PP2A binds to the LIM domains of lipoma-preferred partner through its PR130/B″ subunit to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Veerle; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Rossé, Carine; Petit, Marleen M. R.; Goris, Jozef; Parker, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we identify the LIM protein lipoma-preferred partner (LPP) as a binding partner of a specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimer that is characterised by the regulatory PR130/B″α1 subunit (encoded by PPP2R3A). The PR130 subunit interacts with the LIM domains of LPP through a conserved Zn2+-finger-like motif in the differentially spliced N-terminus of PR130. Isolated LPP-associated PP2A complexes are catalytically active. PR130 colocalises with LPP at multiple locations within cells, including focal contacts, but is specifically excluded from mature focal adhesions, where LPP is still present. An LPP–PR130 fusion protein only localises to focal adhesions upon deletion of the domain of PR130 that binds to the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A/C), suggesting that PR130–LPP complex formation is dynamic and that permanent recruitment of PP2A activity might be unfavourable for focal adhesion maturation. Accordingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PR130 increases adhesion of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells onto collagen I and decreases their migration in scratch wound and Transwell assays. Complex formation with LPP is mandatory for these PR130-PP2A functions, as neither phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of a PR130 mutant that no longer binds to LPP. Our data highlight the importance of specific, locally recruited PP2A complexes in cell adhesion and migration dynamics. PMID:26945059

  3. Secretory production of antimicrobial peptides in Escherichia coli using the catalytic domain of a cellulase as fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huili; Li, Haoran; Gao, Dongfang; Gao, Cuijuan; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-11-20

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules which serve as essential components of the innate immune system in various organisms. AMPs possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. However, the scaled production of such peptides in Escherichia coli faces many difficulties because of their small size and toxicity to the host. Here, we described a new fusion strategy to extracellularly produce significant amounts of these antimicrobial peptides in recombinant E. coli at significant amount. Employing the catalytic domain of a cellulase (Cel-CD) from Bacillus subtilis KSM-64 as the fusion partner, five recombinant antimicrobial peptides were confirmed to accumulate in the culture medium at concentrations ranging from 184 mg/L to 297 mg/L. The radical diffusion experiment demonstrated that the released model antimicrobial peptide, bombinin, had antibacterial activities against both E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This strategy will be suitable for the production of antimicrobial peptides and other toxicity proteins.

  4. New insights into the activation, interaction partners and possible functions of MK5/PRAK.

    PubMed

    Perander, Maria; Keyse, Stephen M; Seternes, Ole-Morten

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 5 (MK5) was first described as a downstream target of the p38 MAP kinase pathway leading to its alternative acronym of p38-regulated/activated protein kinase (PRAK). However, since the discovery that MK5 is a bona fide interaction partner of the atypical MAP kinases ERK3 and ERK4 and that this interaction leads to both the activation and subcellular relocalisation of MK5, there has been considerable debate as to the relative roles of these MAPK pathways in mediating the activation and biological functions of MK5. Here we discuss recent progress in defining novel upstream components of the ERK3/ERK4 signalling pathway, our increased understanding of the mechanism by which MK5 interacts with and is activated by ERK3 and ERK4, and the discovery of novel interaction partners for MK5. Finally, we review recent literature that suggests novel biological functions for MK5 in a range of physiological and pathophysiological conditions including neuronal function and cancer.

  5. Identification of a novel putative interaction partner of the nucleoporin ALADIN

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Dana; Huebner, Angela; Koehler, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been shown that the nucleoporin ALADIN plays a significant role in the redox homeostasis of the cell, but its function in steroidogenesis contributing to adrenal atrophy in triple A syndrome remains largely unknown. In an attempt to identify new interaction partners of ALADIN, co-immunoprecipitation followed by proteome analysis was conducted in different expression models using the human adrenocortical tumour cell line NCI-H295R. Our results suggest an interaction of ALADIN with the microsomal protein PGRMC2. PGRMC2 is shown to be activity regulator of CYP P450 enzymes and, therefore, to be a possible target for adrenal dysregulation in triple A syndrome. We show that there is a sexual dimorphism regarding the expression of Pgrmc2 in adrenals and gonads of wild-type (WT) and Aaas knock-out (KO) mice. Female Aaas KO mice are sterile due to delayed oocyte maturation and meiotic spindle assembly. A participation in meiotic spindle assembly confirms the recently investigated involvement of ALADIN in mitosis and emphasises an interaction with PGRMC2 which is a regulator of the cell cycle. By identification of a novel interaction partner of ALADIN, we provide novel aspects for future research of the function of ALADIN during cell cycle and for new insights into the pathogenesis of triple A syndrome. PMID:27754849

  6. Interaction matters: A perceived social partner alters the neural processing of human speech.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine; Redcay, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that social interaction changes how communicative behaviors (e.g., spoken language, gaze) are processed, but the precise neural bases by which social-interactive context may alter communication remain unknown. Various perspectives suggest that live interactions are more rewarding, more attention-grabbing, or require increased mentalizing-thinking about the thoughts of others. Dissociating between these possibilities is difficult because most extant neuroimaging paradigms examining social interaction have not directly compared live paradigms to conventional "offline" (or recorded) paradigms. We developed a novel fMRI paradigm to assess whether and how an interactive context changes the processing of speech matched in content and vocal characteristics. Participants listened to short vignettes--which contained no reference to people or mental states--believing that some vignettes were prerecorded and that others were presented over a real-time audio-feed by a live social partner. In actuality, all speech was prerecorded. Simply believing that speech was live increased activation in each participant's own mentalizing regions, defined using a functional localizer. Contrasting live to recorded speech did not reveal significant differences in attention or reward regions. Further, higher levels of autistic-like traits were associated with altered neural specialization for live interaction. These results suggest that humans engage in ongoing mentalizing about social partners, even when such mentalizing is not explicitly required, illustrating how social context shapes social cognition. Understanding communication in social context has important implications for typical and atypical social processing, especially for disorders like autism where social difficulties are more acute in live interaction.

  7. TolA central domain interacts with Escherichia coli porins.

    PubMed Central

    Derouiche, R; Gavioli, M; Bénédetti, H; Prilipov, A; Lazdunski, C; Lloubès, R

    1996-01-01

    TolA is an inner membrane protein with three domains: a transmembrane N-terminus and periplasmic central and C-terminal domains. The interaction of TolA with outer membrane porins of Escherichia coli was investigated. Western blot analyses of cell extracts with anti-TolA antibodies indicated that TolA forms high molecular weight complexes specifically with trimeric OmpF, OmpC, PhoE and LamB, but not with OmpA. The interaction of purified TolA domains with purified porins was also studied. TolA interacted with OmpF, PhoE and LamB porins via its central domain, but not with either their denatured monomeric forms or OmpA. Moreover, the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharides associated with trimeric porins did not modify the interactions. These results suggest that the specific interaction of TolA with outer membrane porins might be relevant to the function of Tol proteins. Images PMID:8978668

  8. The toxofilin-actin-PP2C complex of Toxoplasma: identification of interacting domains.

    PubMed

    Jan, Gaelle; Delorme, Violaine; David, Violaine; Revenu, Celine; Rebollo, Angelita; Cayla, Xavier; Tardieux, Isabelle

    2007-02-01

    Toxofilin is a 27 kDa protein isolated from the human protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which causes toxoplasmosis. Toxofilin binds to G-actin, and in vitro studies have shown that it controls elongation of actin filaments by sequestering actin monomers. Toxofilin affinity for G-actin is controlled by the phosphorylation status of its Ser53, which depends on the activities of a casein kinase II and a type 2C serine/threonine phosphatase (PP2C). To get insights into the functional properties of toxofilin, we undertook a structure-function analysis of the protein using a combination of biochemical techniques. We identified a domain that was sufficient to sequester G-actin and that contains three peptide sequences selectively binding to G-actin. Two of these sequences are similar to sequences present in several G- and F-actin-binding proteins, while the third appears to be specific to toxofilin. Additionally, we identified two toxofilin domains that interact with PP2C, one of which contains the Ser53 substrate. In addition to characterizing the interacting domains of toxofilin with its partners, the present study also provides information on an in vivo-based approach to selectively and competitively disrupt the protein-protein interactions that are important to parasite motility.

  9. "Why can't you control this?" How women's interactions with intimate partners define menopause and family.

    PubMed

    Dillaway, Heather E

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explore women's discussions of the interactions that families have about menopause and, thus, attempt to broaden feminist knowledge of women's experiences of menopause within families. Data on which this article is based were collected in 61 in-depth interviews with menopausal women in a midwest state in 2001. Findings suggest that biomedical definitions of menopause are often reaffirmed within interactions between intimate partners. Thus, women reported negative familial interactions about menopause, as they were encouraged to define symptoms as problematic and seek medical treatment. Alternatively, some interviewees reported positive interactions about menopause, as a few partners helped them soothe symptoms and follow health regimens. Women interpreted these latter interactions as support or care, rather than surveillance or monitoring. The author concludes that familial interactions bolster dominant constructions of both menopause and family because, as menopause is discussed between intimate partners, definitions of gendered familial roles and responsibilities are cemented.

  10. Soluble protein expression in E. coli cells using IgG-binding domain of protein A as a solubilizing partner in the cold induced system.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara, Yuiko

    2008-11-21

    We constructed a cold induced expression vector in Escherichia coli cells that consists of a histidine tag sequence for nickel chelate affinity purification, IgG-binding domain of protein A (ZZ-domain) and the multiple cloning sites. The role of ZZ-domain as a solubilizing partner at 15 degrees C was demonstrated by expressing the imidazopyrazinone-type luciferases of Renilla, Oplophorus, Gaussia, and Vargula (Cypridina) as well as the calcium-binding photoproteins and firefly luciferase. The fused protein with ZZ-domain was expressed efficiently as a soluble form in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells at low temperature.

  11. CD6-ligand interactions: a paradigm for SRCR domain function?

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Bowen, M A; Patel, D D; Haynes, B F; Starling, G C; Gebe, J A; Bajorath, J

    1997-10-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily, which includes proteins expressed by leukocytes, can be subdivided into groups A and B. Group B contains the lymphocyte cell-surface receptor CD6. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the interaction between CD6 and its ligand, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM). Analysis of the CD6-ALCAM interaction may help to understand how other SRCR domains bind to their ligands.

  12. Time-domain Ramsey interferometry with interacting Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Christian; Pupillo, Guido; Takei, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Shuntaro; Tanaka, Akira; Ohmori, Kenji; Genes, Claudiu

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of a gas of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms subject to a time-domain Ramsey interferometry protocol. The many-body dynamics is governed by an Ising-type Hamiltonian with long-range interactions of tunable strength. We analyze and model the contrast degradation and phase accumulation of the Ramsey signal and identify scaling laws for varying interrogation times, ensemble densities, and ensemble dimensionalities.

  13. Cannibalism as an interacting phenotype: precannibalistic aggression is influenced by social partners in the endangered Socorro Isopod (Thermosphaeroma thermophilum).

    PubMed

    Bleakley, B H; Welter, S M; McCauley-Cole, K; Shuster, S M; Moore, A J

    2013-04-01

    Models for the evolution of cannibalism highlight the importance of asymmetries between individuals in initiating cannibalistic attacks. Studies may include measures of body size but typically group individuals into size/age classes or compare populations. Such broad comparisons may obscure the details of interactions that ultimately determine how socially contingent characteristics evolve. We propose that understanding cannibalism is facilitated by using an interacting phenotypes perspective that includes the influences of the phenotype of a social partner on the behaviour of a focal individual and focuses on variation in individual pairwise interactions. We investigated how relative body size, a composite trait between a focal individual and its social partner, and the sex of the partners influenced precannibalistic aggression in the endangered Socorro isopod, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum. We also investigated whether differences in mating interest among males and females influenced cannibalism in mixed sex pairs. We studied these questions in three populations that differ markedly in range of body size and opportunities for interactions among individuals. We found that relative body size influences the probability of and latency to attack. We observed differences in the likelihood of and latency to attack based on both an individual's sex and the sex of its partner but found no evidence of sexual conflict. The instigation of precannibalistic aggression in these isopods is therefore a property of both an individual and its social partner. Our results suggest that interacting phenotype models would be improved by incorporating a new conditional ψ, which describes the strength of a social partner's influence on focal behaviour.

  14. Assessing the co-occurrence of intimate partner violence domains across the life-course: relating typologies to mental health

    PubMed Central

    Armour, Cherie; Sleath, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Background The inter-generational transmission of violence (ITV) hypothesis and polyvictimisation have been studied extensively. The extant evidence suggests that individuals from violent families are at increased risk of subsequent intimate partner violence (IPV) and that a proportion of individuals experience victimisation across multiple rather than single IPV domains. Both ITV and polyvictimisation are shown to increase the risk of psychiatric morbidity, alcohol use, and anger expression. Objective The current study aimed to 1) ascertain if underlying typologies of victimisation across the life-course and over multiple victimisation domains were present and 2) ascertain if groupings differed on mean scores of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, alcohol use, and anger expression. Method University students (N=318) were queried in relation to victimisation experiences and psychological well-being. Responses across multiple domains of IPV spanning the life-course were used in a latent profile analysis. ANOVA was subsequently used to determine if profiles differed in their mean scores on PTSD, depression, alcohol use, and anger expression. Results Three distinct profiles were identified; one of which comprised individuals who experienced “life-course polyvictimisation,” another showing individuals who experienced “witnessing parental victimisation,” and one which experienced “psychological victimisation only.” Life-course polyvictims scored the highest across most assessed measures. Conclusion Witnessing severe physical aggression and injury in parental relationships as a child has an interesting impact on the ITV into adolescence and adulthood. Life-course polyvictims are shown to experience increased levels of psychiatric morbidity and issues with alcohol misuse and anger expression. PMID:25279106

  15. The Interactive Effects of Emotion Regulation and Alcohol Intoxication on Lab-Based Intimate Partner Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Laura E.; DiLillo, David; Maldonado, Rosalita C.

    2015-01-01

    This study draws on Finkel and Eckhardt’s (2013) I3 framework to examine the interactive effects of two emotion regulation strategies, anger rumination (an impellance factor) and reappraisal (an inhibition factor), and alcohol intoxication (a disinhibition factor), on intimate partner aggression (IPA) perpetration as measured with an analogue aggression task. Participants were 69 couples recruited from a large Midwestern university (total N = 138). Participants’ trait rumination and reappraisal were measured by self-report. Participants were randomized individually to an alcohol or placebo condition, then recalled an anger event while employing one of three randomly assigned emotion regulation conditions (rumination, reappraisal, or uninstructed). Following this, participants completed an analogue aggression task involving ostensibly assigning white noise blasts to their partner. Participants in the alcohol condition displayed greater IPA than participants in the placebo condition for provoked IPA, but not unprovoked IPA. Results also revealed interactions such that for those in the alcohol and rumination group, higher trait reappraisal was related to lower unprovoked IPA. For provoked IPA, higher trait rumination was related to greater IPA among those in the alcohol and rumination condition and those in the placebo and uninstructed condition. In general, results were consistent with I3 theory, suggesting that alcohol disinhibits, rumination impels, and trait reappraisal inhibits IPA. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed in the context of current knowledge about the influence of alcohol intoxication and emotion regulation strategies on IPA perpetration. PMID:25844831

  16. The interactive effects of emotion regulation and alcohol intoxication on lab-based intimate partner aggression.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Laura E; DiLillo, David; Maldonado, Rosalita C

    2015-09-01

    This study draws on Finkel and Eckhardt's (2013) I³ framework to examine the interactive effects of 2 emotion regulation strategies-anger rumination (an impellance factor) and reappraisal (an inhibition factor), and alcohol intoxication (a disinhibition factor)-on intimate partner aggression (IPA) perpetration as measured with an analogue aggression task. Participants were 69 couples recruited from a large Midwestern university (total N = 138). Participants' trait rumination and reappraisal were measured by self-report. Participants were randomized individually to an alcohol or placebo condition, then recalled an anger event while using 1 of 3 randomly assigned emotion regulation conditions (rumination, reappraisal, or uninstructed). Following this, participants completed an analogue aggression task involving ostensibly assigning white noise blasts to their partner. Participants in the alcohol condition displayed greater IPA than participants in the placebo condition for provoked IPA, but not unprovoked IPA. Results also revealed interactions such that for those in the alcohol and rumination group, higher trait reappraisal was related to lower unprovoked IPA. For provoked IPA, higher trait rumination was related to greater IPA among those in the alcohol and rumination condition and those in the placebo and uninstructed condition. In general, results were consistent with I³ theory, suggesting that alcohol disinhibits, rumination impels, and trait reappraisal inhibits IPA. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed in the context of current knowledge about the influence of alcohol intoxication and emotion regulation strategies on IPA perpetration.

  17. Proteome analysis of microtubule-associated proteins and their interacting partners from mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Frank; Riaz, Tahira; DeBonis, Salvatore; Koehler, Christian J; Kroening, Mario; Panse, Isabel; Strozynski, Margarita; Donaldson, Ian M; Thiede, Bernd

    2011-07-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for a variety of cellular processes. MTs are finely regulated by distinct classes of MT-associated proteins (MAPs), which themselves bind to and are regulated by a large number of additional proteins. We have carried out proteome analyses of tubulin-rich and tubulin-depleted MAPs and their interacting partners isolated from bovine brain. In total, 573 proteins were identified giving us unprecedented access to brain-specific MT-associated proteins from mammalian brain. Most of the standard MAPs were identified and at least 500 proteins have been reported as being associated with MTs. We identified protein complexes with a large number of subunits such as brain-specific motor/adaptor/cargo complexes for kinesins, dynein, and dynactin, and proteins of an RNA-transporting granule. About 25% of the identified proteins were also found in the synaptic vesicle proteome. Analysis of the MS/MS data revealed many posttranslational modifications, amino acid changes, and alternative splice variants, particularly in tau, a key protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Bioinformatic analysis of known protein-protein interactions of the identified proteins indicated that the number of MAPs and their associated proteins is larger than previously anticipated and that our database will be a useful resource to identify novel binding partners.

  18. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P.; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, CT; Surjit, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66th,67th isoleucine and 101st,102nd leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV. PMID:27113483

  19. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Surjit, Milan

    2016-04-26

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66(th),67(th) isoleucine and 101(st),102(nd) leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV.

  20. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  1. Kelch Domain of Gigaxonin Interacts with Intermediate Filament Proteins Affected in Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Kerner, Bethany L.; Garcia Diaz, Alejandro; Ekins, Sean; Wichterle, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    Patients with giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) show progressive loss of motor and sensory function starting in childhood and typically live for less than 30 years. GAN is caused by autosomal recessive mutations leading to low levels of gigaxonin (GIG), a ubiquitously-expressed BTB/Kelch cytoplasmic protein believed to be an E3 ligase substrate adaptor. GAN pathology is characterized by aggregates of intermediate filaments (IFs) in multiple tissues. To delineate the molecular pathway between GIG deficiency and IF pathology, we undertook a proteomic screen to identify the normal binding partners of GIG. Prominent among them were several classes of IFs, including the neurofilament subunits whose accumulation leads to the axonal swellings for which GAN is named. We showed these interactions were dependent on the Kelch domain of GIG. Furthermore, we identified the E3 ligase MYCBP2 and the heat shock proteins HSP90AA1/AB1 as interactors with the BTB domain that may result in the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of intermediate filaments. Our open-ended proteomic screen provides support to GIG’s role as an adaptor protein, linking IF proteins through its Kelch domain to the ubiquitin pathway proteins via its BTB domain, and points to future approaches for reversing the phenotype in human patients. PMID:26460568

  2. The Myb-domain protein ULTRAPETALA1 INTERACTING FACTOR 1 controls floral meristem activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Fanny; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Blanvillain, Robert; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François; Morel, Patrice; Trehin, Christophe; Carles, Cristel C

    2016-04-01

    Higher plants continuously and iteratively produce new above-ground organs in the form of leaves, stems and flowers. These organs arise from shoot apical meristems whose homeostasis depends on coordination between self-renewal of stem cells and their differentiation into organ founder cells. This coordination is stringently controlled by the central transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS), which is both necessary and sufficient for stem cell specification in Arabidopsis thaliana ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) was previously identified as a plant-specific, negative regulator of WUS expression. However, molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation remain unknown. ULT1 protein contains a SAND putative DNA-binding domain and a B-box, previously proposed as a protein interaction domain in eukaryotes. Here, we characterise a novel partner of ULT1, named ULT1 INTERACTING FACTOR 1 (UIF1), which contains a Myb domain and an EAR motif. UIF1 and ULT1 function in the same pathway for regulation of organ number in the flower. Moreover, UIF1 displays DNA-binding activity and specifically binds to WUS regulatory elements. We thus provide genetic and molecular evidence that UIF1 and ULT1 work together in floral meristem homeostasis, probably by direct repression of WUS expression.

  3. Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps (UBAITs) identify E3 ligase binding partners.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Hazel F; Lyon, Nancy; Leung, Justin W; Agarwal, Poonam; Swaim, Caleb D; Miller, Kyle M; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new class of reagents for identifying substrates, adaptors, and regulators of HECT and RING E3s. UBAITs (Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps) are E3-ubiquitin fusion proteins and, in an E1- and E2-dependent manner, the C-terminal ubiquitin moiety forms an amide linkage to proteins that interact with the E3, enabling covalent co-purification of the E3 with partner proteins. We designed UBAITs for both HECT (Rsp5, Itch) and RING (Psh1, RNF126, RNF168) E3s. For HECT E3s, trapping of interacting proteins occurred in vitro either through an E3 thioester-linked lariat intermediate or through an E2 thioester intermediate, and both WT and active-site mutant UBAITs trapped known interacting proteins in yeast and human cells. Yeast Psh1 and human RNF126 and RNF168 UBAITs also trapped known interacting proteins when expressed in cells. Human RNF168 is a key mediator of ubiquitin signaling that promotes DNA double-strand break repair. Using the RNF168 UBAIT, we identify H2AZ--a histone protein involved in DNA repair--as a new target of this E3 ligase. These results demonstrate that UBAITs represent powerful tools for profiling a wide range of ubiquitin ligases.

  4. The intervening domain from MeCP2 enhances the DNA affinity of the methyl binding domain and provides an independent DNA interaction site

    PubMed Central

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Morales-Chueca, Ignacio; Jorge-Torres, Olga C.; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Esteller, Manel; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) preferentially interacts with methylated DNA and it is involved in epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodelling. Mutations in MeCP2 are linked to Rett syndrome, the leading cause of intellectual retardation in girls and causing mental, motor and growth impairment. Unstructured regions in MeCP2 provide the plasticity for establishing interactions with multiple binding partners. We present a biophysical characterization of the methyl binding domain (MBD) from MeCP2 reporting the contribution of flanking domains to its structural stability and dsDNA interaction. The flanking disordered intervening domain (ID) increased the structural stability of MBD, modified its dsDNA binding profile from an entropically-driven moderate-affinity binding to an overwhelmingly enthalpically-driven high-affinity binding. Additionally, ID provided an additional site for simultaneously and autonomously binding an independent dsDNA molecule, which is a key feature linked to the chromatin remodelling and looping activity of MeCP2, as well as its ability to interact with nucleosomes replacing histone H1. The dsDNA interaction is characterized by an unusually large heat capacity linked to a cluster of water molecules trapped within the binding interface. The dynamics of disordered regions together with extrinsic factors are key determinants of MeCP2 global structural properties and functional capabilities. PMID:28139759

  5. Interactions of adolescent social experiences and dopamine genes to predict physical intimate partner violence perpetration

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Edith A.; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We examined the interactions between three dopamine gene alleles (DAT1, DRD2, DRD4) previously associated with violent behavior and two components of the adolescent environment (exposure to violence, school social environment) to predict adulthood physical intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration among white men and women. Methods We used data from Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a cohort study following individuals from adolescence to adulthood. Based on the prior literature, we categorized participants as at risk for each of the three dopamine genes using this coding scheme: two 10-R alleles for DAT1; at least one A-1 allele for DRD2; at least one 7-R or 8-R allele for DRD4. Adolescent exposure to violence and school social environment was measured in 1994 and 1995 when participants were in high school or middle school. Intimate partner violence perpetration was measured in 2008 when participants were 24 to 32 years old. We used simple and multivariable logistic regression models, including interactions of genes and the adolescent environments for the analysis. Results Presence of risk alleles was not independently associated with IPV perpetration but increasing exposure to violence and disconnection from the school social environment was associated with physical IPV perpetration. The effects of these adolescent experiences on physical IPV perpetration varied by dopamine risk allele status. Among individuals with non-risk dopamine alleles, increased exposure to violence during adolescence and perception of disconnection from the school environment were significantly associated with increased odds of physical IPV perpetration, but individuals with high risk alleles, overall, did not experience the same increase. Conclusion Our results suggested the effects of adolescent environment on adulthood physical IPV perpetration varied by genetic factors. This analysis did not find a direct link between risk alleles

  6. Characterization of Domain–Peptide Interaction Interface: Prediction of SH3 Domain-Mediated Protein–Protein Interaction Network in Yeast by Generic Structure-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tingjun; Li, Nan; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Determination of the binding specificity of SH3 domain, a peptide recognition module (PRM), is important to understand their biological functions and reconstruct the SH3-mediated protein–protein interaction network. In the present study, the SH3-peptide interactions for both class I and II SH3 domains were characterized by the intermolecular residue–residue interaction network. We developed generic MIEC-SVM models to infer SH3 domain-peptide recognition specificity that achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. By investigating the domain–peptide recognition mechanisms at the residue level, we found that the class-I and class-II binding peptides have different binding modes even though they occupy the same binding site of SH3. Furthermore, we predicted the potential binding partners of SH3 domains in the yeast proteome and constructed the SH3-mediated protein–protein interaction network. Comparison with the experimentally determined interactions confirmed the effectiveness of our approach. This study showed that our sophisticated computational approach not only provides a powerful platform to decipher protein recognition code at the molecular level but also allows identification of peptide-mediated protein interactions at a proteomic scale. We believe that such an approach is general to be applicable to other domain–peptide interactions. PMID:22468754

  7. Learning in Interactive Work Situations: It Takes Two to Tango; Why Not Invite Both Partners to Dance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopmans, Hanneke; Doombos, Anja J.; van Eekelen, Ilse M.

    2006-01-01

    Learning that arises from interactions at work is the focus of this study. More specifically, the concrete activities of adult learners and their interaction partners were of interest because such learning activities largely determine the quality of learning outcomes. The results of the study are summarized in the form of a typology of interactive…

  8. NMR assignments of the FKBP-type PPIase domain of the human aryl-hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP).

    PubMed

    Linnert, Miriam; Haupt, Katja; Lin, Yi-Jan; Kissing, Sandra; Paschke, Anne-Katrin; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias; Lücke, Christian

    2012-10-01

    The aryl-hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) interacts with several protein binding partners and has been associated with pituitary tumor development. Here, we report nearly complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments for the N-terminal AIP(2-166) segment, which has been predicted to represent a FKBP-type PPIase domain. Sequence alignment with the prototypic FKBP12, however, reveals disagreements between the AIP chemical shift index consensus and the corresponding FKBP12 secondary structure elements.

  9. WW domain interactions regulate the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-01-01

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis in Drosophila and mammalians. Although the signaling of the core kinases is relatively well understood, less is known about the upstream inputs, downstream outputs and regulation of the whole cascade. Enrichment of the Hippo pathway components with WW domains and their cognate proline-rich interacting motifs provides a versatile platform for further understanding the mechanisms that regulate organ growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we review recently discovered mechanisms of WW domain-mediated interactions that contribute to the regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. We further discuss new insights and future directions on the emerging role of such regulation. PMID:21677687

  10. WW domain interactions regulate the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Salah, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-06-16

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis in Drosophila and mammalians. Although the signaling of the core kinases is relatively well understood, less is known about the upstream inputs, downstream outputs and regulation of the whole cascade. Enrichment of the Hippo pathway components with WW domains and their cognate proline-rich interacting motifs provides a versatile platform for further understanding the mechanisms that regulate organ growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we review recently discovered mechanisms of WW domain-mediated interactions that contribute to the regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. We further discuss new insights and future directions on the emerging role of such regulation.

  11. Elucidating nitric oxide synthase domain interactions by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Scott A; Holden, Jeffrey K; Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is a multidomain enzyme that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidizing L-Arg to NO and L-citrulline. NO production requires multiple interdomain electron transfer steps between the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and heme domain. Specifically, NADPH-derived electrons are transferred to the heme-containing oxygenase domain via the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FMN containing reductase domains. While crystal structures are available for both the reductase and oxygenase domains of NOS, to date there is no atomic level structural information on domain interactions required for the final FMN-to-heme electron transfer step. Here, we evaluate a model of this final electron transfer step for the heme-FMN-calmodulin NOS complex based on the recent biophysical studies using a 105-ns molecular dynamics trajectory. The resulting equilibrated complex structure is very stable and provides a detailed prediction of interdomain contacts required for stabilizing the NOS output state. The resulting equilibrated complex model agrees well with previous experimental work and provides a detailed working model of the final NOS electron transfer step required for NO biosynthesis.

  12. SARAH Domain-Mediated MST2-RASSF Dimeric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Matallanas, David; Romano, David; Nguyen, Lan K.; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Rosta, Edina; Kolch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    RASSF enzymes act as key apoptosis activators and tumor suppressors, being downregulated in many human cancers, although their exact regulatory roles remain unknown. A key downstream event in the RASSF pathway is the regulation of MST kinases, which are main effectors of RASSF-induced apoptosis. The regulation of MST1/2 includes both homo- and heterodimerization, mediated by helical SARAH domains, though the underlying molecular interaction mechanism is unclear. Here, we study the interactions between RASSF1A, RASSF5, and MST2 SARAH domains by using both atomistic molecular simulation techniques and experiments. We construct and study models of MST2 homodimers and MST2-RASSF SARAH heterodimers, and we identify the factors that control their high molecular stability. In addition, we also analyze both computationally and experimentally the interactions of MST2 SARAH domains with a series of synthetic peptides particularly designed to bind to it, and hope that our approach can be used to address some of the challenging problems in designing new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27716844

  13. Characterization of HelD, an interacting partner of RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wiedermannová, Jana; Sudzinová, Petra; Kovaľ, Tomaš; Rabatinová, Alžbeta; Šanderova, Hana; Ramaniuk, Olga; Rittich, Šimon; Dohnálek, Jan; Fu, Zhihui; Halada, Petr; Lewis, Peter; Krásny, Libor

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is an essential multisubunit protein complex required for gene expression. Here, we characterize YvgS (HelD) from Bacillus subtilis, a novel binding partner of RNAP. We show that HelD interacts with RNAP-core between the secondary channel of RNAP and the alpha subunits. Importantly, we demonstrate that HelD stimulates transcription in an ATP-dependent manner by enhancing transcriptional cycling and elongation. We demonstrate that the stimulatory effect of HelD can be amplified by a small subunit of RNAP, delta. In vivo, HelD is not essential but it is required for timely adaptations of the cell to changing environment. In summary, this study establishes HelD as a valid component of the bacterial transcription machinery.

  14. The neuronal RhoA GEF, Tech, interacts with the synaptic multi-PDZ-domain-containing protein, MUPP1.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Marcel A; Henderson, Jennifer A; Ahn, David; Zhu, Xin-Ran; Poschmann, Gereon; Lübbert, Hermann; Marx, Ruth; Baraban, Jay M

    2008-08-01

    Tech is a RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that is highly enriched in hippocampal and cortical neurons. To help define its function, we have conducted studies aimed at identifying partner proteins that bind to its C-terminal PDZ ligand motif. Yeast two hybrid studies using the Tech C-terminal segment as bait identified MUPP1, a protein that contains 13 PDZ domains and has been localized to the post-synaptic compartment, as a candidate partner protein for Tech. Co-transfection of Tech and MUPP1 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells confirmed that these full-length proteins interact in a PDZ-dependent fashion. Furthermore, we confirmed that endogenous Tech co-precipitates with MUPP1, but not PSD-95, from hippocampal and cortical extracts prepared from rat brain. In addition, immunostaining of primary cortical cultures revealed co-localization of MUPP1 and Tech puncta in the vicinity of synapses. In assessing which PDZ domains of MUPP1 mediate binding to Tech, we found that Tech can bind to either PDZ domain 10 or 13 of MUPP1 as mutation of both these domains is needed to disrupt their interaction. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Tech binds to MUPP1 and suggest that it regulates RhoA signaling pathways in the vicinity of synapses.

  15. Using support vector machine for improving protein-protein interaction prediction utilizing domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Mudita; Shah, Anuj R.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-10-02

    Understanding protein interactions is essential to gain insights into the biological processes at the whole cell level. The high-throughput experimental techniques for determining protein-protein interactions (PPI) are error prone and expensive with low overlap amongst them. Although several computational methods have been proposed for predicting protein interactions there is definite room for improvement. Here we present DomainSVM, a predictive method for PPI that uses computationally inferred domain-domain interaction values in a Support Vector Machine framework to predict protein interactions. DomainSVM method utilizes evidence of multiple interacting domains to predict a protein interaction. It outperforms existing methods of PPI prediction by achieving very high explanation ratios, precision, specificity, sensitivity and F-measure values in a 10 fold cross-validation study conducted on the positive and negative PPIs in yeast. A Functional comparison study using GO annotations on the positive and the negative test sets is presented in addition to discussing novel PPI predictions in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  16. Differential binding partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE domains regulates the Mis18 complex recruitment to centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Knippler, Christina M.; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2). Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α directly interacts with the N-terminus of Mis18BP1; whereas, Mis18β directly interacts with CENP-C during G1 phase, revealing that these proteins have evolved to serve distinct functions in centromeres of higher eukaryotes. The N-terminus of Mis18BP1, containing both the Mis18α and CENP-C binding domains, is necessary and sufficient for centromeric localization. Therefore, the Mis18 complex contains dual CENP-C recognition motifs that are combinatorially required to generate robust centromeric localization that leads to CENP-A deposition. PMID:27239045

  17. Tropomyosin is an interaction partner of the Drosophila coiled coil protein yuri gagarin.

    PubMed

    Texada, Michael J; Simonette, Rebecca A; Deery, William J; Beckingham, Kathleen M

    2011-02-15

    The Drosophila gene yuri gagarin is a complex locus encoding three protein isoform classes that are ubiquitously expressed in the organism. Mutations to the gene affect processes as diverse as gravitactic behavior and spermatogenesis. The larger Yuri isoforms contain extensive coiled-coil regions. Our previous studies indicate that one of the large isoform classes (Yuri-65) is required for formation of specialized F-actin-containing structures generated during spermatogenesis, including the so-called actin "cones" that mediate spermatid individualization. We used the tandem affinity purification of a tagged version of Yuri-65 (the TAP-tagging technique) to identify proteins associated with Yuri-65 in the intact organism. Tropomyosin, primarily as the 284-residue isoform derived from the ubiquitously expressed Tropomyosin 1 gene was thus identified as a major Yuri interaction partner. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed this interaction. We have established that the stable F-actin cones of spermatogenesis contain Tropomyosin 1 (Tm1) and that in mutant yuri(F64), failure of F-actin cone formation is associated with failure of Tm1 to accumulate at the cone initiation sites. In investigating possible interactions of Tm1 and Yuri in other tissues, we discovered that Tm1 and Yuri frequently colocalize with the endoplasmic reticulum. Tropomyosin has been implicated in actin-mediated membrane trafficking activity in other systems. Our findings suggest that Yuri-Tm1 complexes participate in related functions.

  18. TROPOMYOSIN IS AN INTERACTION PARTNER OF THE DROSOPHILA COILED COIL PROTEIN YURI GAGARIN

    PubMed Central

    Texada, Michael J.; Simonette, Rebecca A.; Deery, William J.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila gene yuri gagarin is a complex locus encoding three protein isoform classes that are ubiquitously expressed in the organism. Mutations to the gene affect processes as diverse as gravitactic behavior and spermatogenesis. The larger Yuri isoforms contain extensive coiled-coil regions. Our previous studies indicate that one of the large isoform classes (Yuri-65) is required for formation of specialized F-actin-containing structures generated during spermatogenesis, including the so-called actin “cones” that mediate spermatid individualization. We used tandem affinity purification of a tagged version of Yuri-65 (the TAP-tagging technique) to identify proteins associated with Yuri-65 in the intact organism. Tropomyosin, primarily as the 284-residue isoform derived from the ubiquitously expressed Tropomyosin 1 gene was thus identified as a major Yuri interaction partner. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed this interaction. We have established that the stable F-actin cones of spermatogenesis contain Tropomyosin 1 (Tm1) and that in mutant yuriF64, failure of F-actin cone formation is associated with failure of Tm1 to accumulate at the cone initiation sites. In investigating possible interactions of Tm1 and Yuri in other tissues, we discovered that Tm1 and Yuri frequently colocalize with the endoplasmic reticulum. Tropomyosin has been implicated in actin-mediated membrane trafficking activity in other systems. Our findings suggest that Yuri-Tm1 complexes participate in related functions. PMID:21126519

  19. Microbes in the coral holobiont: partners through evolution, development, and ecological interactions

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Janelle R.; Rivera, Hanny E.; Closek, Collin J.; Medina, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, genetic and genomic studies have revealed the astonishing diversity and ubiquity of microorganisms. Emergence and expansion of the human microbiome project has reshaped our thinking about how microbes control host health—not only as pathogens, but also as symbionts. In coral reef environments, scientists have begun to examine the role that microorganisms play in coral life history. Herein, we review the current literature on coral-microbe interactions within the context of their role in evolution, development, and ecology. We ask the following questions, first posed by McFall-Ngai et al. (2013) in their review of animal evolution, with specific attention to how coral-microbial interactions may be affected under future environmental conditions: (1) How do corals and their microbiome affect each other's genomes? (2) How does coral development depend on microbial partners? (3) How is homeostasis maintained between corals and their microbial symbionts? (4) How can ecological approaches deepen our understanding of the multiple levels of coral-microbial interactions? Elucidating the role that microorganisms play in the structure and function of the holobiont is essential for understanding how corals maintain homeostasis and acclimate to changing environmental conditions. PMID:25621279

  20. Identification of a cytoplasmic interaction partner of the large regulatory proteins Rep78/Rep68 of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weger, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.weger@charite.de; Hammer, Eva; Goetz, Anne; Heilbronn, Regine

    2007-05-25

    Through yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we have identified a novel cellular AAV-2 Rep78/Rep68 interaction partner located predominantly in the cytoplasm. In public databases, it has been assigned as KCTD5, because of a region of high similarity to the cytoplasmic tetramerization domain of voltage-gated potassium channels. Whereas Rep/KCTD5 interaction relied on the region surrounding the Rep nuclear localization signal, nuclear accumulation of Rep was not required. Wildtype Rep78/Rep68 proteins induced the translocation of large portions of KCTD5 into the nucleus pointing to functional interactions both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In line with an anticipated functional interference in the cytoplasm, KCTD5 overexpression completely abrogated Rep68-mediated posttranscriptional activation of a HIV-LTR driven luciferase reporter gene. Our study expands the panel of already identified nuclear Rep interaction partners to a cytoplasmic protein, which raises the awareness that important steps in the AAV life cycle may be regulated in this compartment.

  1. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen structure and interactions: too many partners for one dancer?

    PubMed

    De Biasio, Alfredo; Blanco, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    PCNA is the DNA sliding clamp found in eukaryotes and archaebacteria. Sliding clamps were first described as processivity factors in DNA replication. They consist of multimeric, toroidal-shaped structures with pseudo-sixfold symmetry that encircle the DNA duplex and tether the replicative polymerases to the genomic template. Later, it was found that PCNA serves as a docking platform where other proteins dock to carry out different DNA metabolic processes. The structure of the bacterial clamp bound to a short primed DNA shows a tilted duplex in the central channel, which is lined by α-helices with net positive charges. Many of the proteins reported to interact with PCNA do so via the PCNA Interaction Protein sequence (PIP-box). The structures of several proteins and peptides bound to PCNA show a common binding mode, but it is still unknown how the many different partners compete for binding and exert their enzymatic and regulatory functions. Furthermore, the literature contains many reports on proteins that directly bind to PCNA as detected by different methods, but only few of the putative complexes have been examined in detail by quantitative analytical techniques or high-resolution structural methods. Some of the reported interactions are not observed in solution using the pure proteins, indicating that the direct interaction is nonexistent or very weak and is likely mediated by other factors. We review here the current knowledge on PCNA interactions from a structural point of view, with a focus on human proteins and highlighting the questions that remain to be answered.

  2. Brain transcriptome-wide screen for HIV-1 Nef protein interaction partners reveals various membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Kammula, Ellen C; Mötter, Jessica; Gorgels, Alexandra; Jonas, Esther; Hoffmann, Silke; Willbold, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 Nef protein contributes essentially to the pathology of AIDS by a variety of protein-protein-interactions within the host cell. The versatile functionality of Nef is partially attributed to different conformational states and posttranslational modifications, such as myristoylation. Up to now, many interaction partners of Nef have been identified using classical yeast two-hybrid screens. Such screens rely on transcriptional activation of reporter genes in the nucleus to detect interactions. Thus, the identification of Nef interaction partners that are integral membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins or other proteins that do not translocate into the nucleus is hampered. In the present study, a split-ubiquitin based yeast two-hybrid screen was used to identify novel membrane-localized interaction partners of Nef. More than 80% of the hereby identified interaction partners of Nef are transmembrane proteins. The identified hits are GPM6B, GPM6A, BAP31, TSPAN7, CYB5B, CD320/TCblR, VSIG4, PMEPA1, OCIAD1, ITGB1, CHN1, PH4, CLDN10, HSPA9, APR-3, PEBP1 and B3GNT, which are involved in diverse cellular processes like signaling, apoptosis, neurogenesis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking or quality control. For a subfraction of the hereby identified proteins we present data supporting their direct interaction with HIV-1 Nef. We discuss the results with respect to many phenotypes observed in HIV infected cells and patients. The identified Nef interaction partners may help to further elucidate the molecular basis of HIV-related diseases.

  3. Spin torque and interactions in ferromagnetic semiconductor domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatski, Elizabeth Ann

    transmission spectrum with many of the similar features from the 2pi wall. Looking at the individual walls, we find an interesting interaction that has three distinct regimes: (1) repulsion, where the left wall moves to the left and the right wall to the right; (2) motion together, where the two walls both move to the right, even at the same velocity for one special value of separation; and (3) attraction, where the left wall moves to the right and the right wall moves to the left. This speaks to a kind of natural equilibrium distance between the domain walls. This is of major interest for device purposes as it means that stacks of domain walls could be self-correcting in their motions along a track. Much experimental work needs to be done to make this a reality, however.

  4. The SH3 domain of UNC-89 (obscurin) interacts with paramyosin, a coiled-coil protein, in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle

    PubMed Central

    Qadota, Hiroshi; Mayans, Olga; Matsunaga, Yohei; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Wilson, Kristy J.; Kwon, Grace E.; Stanford, Rachel; Deehan, Kevin; Tinley, Tina L.; Ngwa, Verra M.; Benian, Guy M.

    2016-01-01

    UNC-89 is a giant polypeptide located at the sarcomeric M-line of Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. The human homologue is obscurin. To understand how UNC-89 is localized and functions, we have been identifying its binding partners. Screening a yeast two-hybrid library revealed that UNC-89 interacts with paramyosin. Paramyosin is an invertebrate-specific coiled-coil dimer protein that is homologous to the rod portion of myosin heavy chains and resides in thick filament cores. Minimally, this interaction requires UNC-89’s SH3 domain and residues 294–376 of paramyosin and has a KD of ∼1.1 μM. In unc-89 loss-of-function mutants that lack the SH3 domain, paramyosin is found in accumulations. When the SH3 domain is overexpressed, paramyosin is mislocalized. SH3 domains usually interact with a proline-rich consensus sequence, but the region of paramyosin that interacts with UNC-89’s SH3 is α-helical and lacks prolines. Homology modeling of UNC-89’s SH3 suggests structural features that might be responsible for this interaction. The SH3-binding region of paramyosin contains a “skip residue,” which is likely to locally unwind the coiled-coil and perhaps contributes to the binding specificity. PMID:27009202

  5. Structural Analyses of Zinc Finger Domains for Specific Interactions with DNA.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ki Seong; Cheong, Jin Sung; Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-12-28

    Zinc finger proteins are among the most extensively applied metalloproteins in the field of biotechnology owing to their unique structural and functional aspects as transcriptional and translational regulators. The classical zinc fingers are the largest family of zinc proteins and they provide critical roles in physiological systems from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Two cysteine and two histidine residues (Cys₂His₂) coordinate to the zinc ion for the structural functions to generate a ββα fold, and this secondary structure supports specific interactions with their binding partners, including DNA, RNA, lipids, proteins, and small molecules. In this account, the structural similarity and differences of well-known Cys₂His₂-type zinc fingers such as zinc interaction factor 268 (ZIF268), transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), GAGA, and Ros will be explained. These proteins perform their specific roles in species from archaea to eukaryotes and they show significant structural similarity; however, their aligned amino acids present low sequence homology. These zinc finger proteins have different numbers of domains for their structural roles to maintain biological progress through transcriptional regulations from exogenous stresses. The superimposed structures of these finger domains provide interesting details when these fingers are applied to specific gene binding and editing. The structural information in this study will aid in the selection of unique types of zinc finger applications in vivo and in vitro approaches, because biophysical backgrounds including complex structures and binding affinities aid in the protein design area.

  6. BAR Domain-Containing FAM92 Proteins Interact with Chibby1 To Facilitate Ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Qian; Chen, Xingwang; Fisher, Cody; Siller, Saul S.; Zelikman, Klara; Kuriyama, Ryoko

    2016-01-01

    Chibby1 (Cby1) is a small, conserved coiled-coil protein that localizes to centrioles/basal bodies and plays a crucial role in the formation and function of cilia. During early stages of ciliogenesis, Cby1 is required for the efficient recruitment of small vesicles at the distal end of centrioles to facilitate basal body docking to the plasma membrane. Here, we identified family with sequence similarity 92, member A (FAM92A) and FAM92B, which harbor predicted lipid-binding BAR domains, as novel Cby1-interacting partners using tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. We found that in cultured cell lines, FAM92A colocalizes with Cby1 at the centrioles/basal bodies of primary cilia, while FAM92B is undetectable. In airway multiciliated cells, both FAM92A and -92B colocalize with Cby1 at the base of cilia. Notably, the centriolar localization of FAM92A and -92B depends largely on Cby1. Knockdown of FAM92A in RPE1 cells impairs ciliogenesis. Consistent with the membrane-remodeling properties of BAR domains, FAM92A and -92B in cooperation with Cby1 induce deformed membrane-like structures containing the small GTPase Rab8 in cultured cells. Our results therefore suggest that FAM92 proteins interact with Cby1 to promote ciliogenesis via regulation of membrane-remodeling processes. PMID:27528616

  7. Responses to intimate partner violence in Kakuma refugee camp: refugee interactions with agency systems.

    PubMed

    Horn, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognised as a significant problem amongst forcibly displaced communities, and great progress has been made by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) in responding to IPV and other forms of sexual and gender based violence. However, they have not always effectively engaged refugee communities in these activities, with potentially negative consequences for the health and protection of women. This study was conducted in Kakuma refugee camp, north-west Kenya. Eighteen focus group discussions were conducted with 157 refugees from various nationalities, including Sudanese, Somali, Ethiopian, and Congolese. They focused on the nature and consequences of IPV in Kakuma. The aim of this paper is to explore how refugees in Kakuma talk about the ways that IPV is dealt with, focusing particularly on the ways that community responses are said to interact with formal response systems established by UNHCR and its implementing partners. Refugees talked about using a 'hierarchy of responses' to IPV, with only particularly serious or intransigent cases reaching UNHCR or its implementing agencies. Some male refugees described being mistrustful of agency responses, because agencies were believed to favour women and to prioritise protecting the woman at all costs, even if that means separating her from the family. Whilst community responses to IPV might often be appropriate and helpful, the findings of the current study suggest that in Kakuma they do not necessarily result in the protection of women. Yet women in Kakuma are reported to be reluctant to report their cases to UNHCR and its implementing agencies. A more effective protection response from UNHCR might involve closer co-operation with individuals and structures within the refugee communities to develop a co-ordinated response to IPV.

  8. Evaluation of Nod-Like Receptor (NLR) Effector Domain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kufer, Thomas A.; Schwarzenbacher, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family recognize intracellular pathogens and recruit a variety of effector molecules, including pro-caspases and kinases, which in turn are implicated in cytokine processing and NF-κB activation. In order to elucidate the intricate network of NLR signaling, which is still fragmentary in molecular terms, we applied comprehensive yeast two-hybrid analysis for unbiased evaluation of physical interactions between NLRs and their adaptors (ASC, CARD8) as well as kinase RIPK2 and inflammatory caspases (C1, C2, C4, C5) under identical conditions. Our results confirmed the interaction of NOD1 and NOD2 with RIPK2, and between NLRP3 and ASC, but most importantly, our studies revealed hitherto unrecognized interactions of NOD2 with members of the NLRP subfamily. We found that NOD2 specifically and directly interacts with NLRP1, NLRP3 and NLRP12. Furthermore, we observed homodimerization of the RIPK2 CARD domains and identified residues in NOD2 critical for interaction with RIPK2. In conclusion, our work provides further evidence for the complex network of protein-protein interactions underlying NLR function. PMID:19337385

  9. Quantification of interaction strengths between chaperones and tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Regina; Soll, Jürgen; Jung, Kirsten; Heermann, Ralf; Schwenkert, Serena

    2013-10-18

    The three tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing docking proteins Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 reside in the chloroplast, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. They are suggested to act during post-translational protein import by association with chaperone-bound preprotein complexes. Here, we performed a detailed biochemical, biophysical, and computational analysis of the interaction between Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 and the five cytosolic chaperones HSP70.1, HSP90.1, HSP90.2, HSP90.3, and HSP90.4. We used surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy in combination with Interaction Map® analysis to distinguish between chaperone oligomerization and docking protein-chaperone interactions and to calculate binding affinities for all tested interactions. Complementary to this, we applied pulldown assays as well as microscale thermophoresis as surface immobilization independent techniques. The data revealed that OM64 prefers HSP70 over HSP90, whereas Toc64 binds all chaperones with comparable affinities. We could further show that AtTPR7 is able to bind HSP90 in addition to HSP70. Moreover, differences between the HSP90 isoforms were detected and revealed a weaker binding for HSP90.1 to AtTPR7 and OM64, showing that slight differences in the amino acid composition or structure of the chaperones influence binding to the tetratricopeptide repeat domain. The combinatory approach of several methods provided a powerful toolkit to determine binding affinities of similar interaction partners in a highly quantitative manner.

  10. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  11. Interaction of FUN14 domain containing 1, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, with kinesin light chain 1 via the tetratricopeptide repeat domain

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Hee; Jeong, Young Joo; Choi, Sun Hee; Urm, Sang-Hwa; Seog, Dae-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Kinesin 1 is a member of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) of microtubule-dependent molecular motor proteins that transport organelles and protein complexes in cells. Kinesin 1 consists of a homo- or hetero-dimer of kinesin heavy chains (KHCs), often, although not always, associated with two kinesin light chains (KLCs). KLCs are non-motor proteins that associate with many different binding proteins and cargoes, but their binding partners have not yet been fully identified. In the present study, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify proteins that interact with the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of KLC1. The results of the current study revealed an interaction between the TPR domain of KLC1 and FUN14 domain-containing protein 1 (FUNDC1), which is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein mediating hypoxia-induced mitophagy. FUNDC1 bound to the six TPR motif-containing regions of KLC1 and did not interact with KIF5B (a motor subunit of kinesin 1) and KIF3A (a motor subunit of kinesin 2) in the yeast two-hybrid assay. The cytoplasmic amino N-terminal domain of FUNDC1 is essential for interaction with KLC1. When co-expressed in HEK-293T cells, FUNDC1 co-localized with KLC1 and co-immunoprecipitated with KLC1, but not KIF5B. Collectively, these results indicate that KLC1 may potentially compete with LC3, a key component for autophagosome formation, to interact with FUNDC1. PMID:28123706

  12. The PDZ3 domain of the cellular scaffolding protein MAGI-1 interacts with the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR).

    PubMed

    Yan, Ran; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Martin, Sterling C T; Readler, James M; Kotha, Poornima L N; Hostetler, Heather A; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2015-04-01

    The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is an essential cellular protein that is involved in cell-cell adhesion, protein trafficking, and viral infection. The major isoform of CAR is selectively sorted to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells where it co-localizes with the cellular scaffolding protein membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted domain structure-1 (MAGI-1). Previously, we demonstrated CAR interacts with MAGI-1 through a PDZ-domain dependent interaction. Here, we show that the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 is exclusively responsible for the high affinity interaction between the seven exon isoform of CAR and MAGI-1 using yeast-two-hybrid analysis and confirming this interaction biochemically and in cellular lysates by in vitro pull down assay and co-immunoprecipitation. The high affinity interaction between the PDZ3 domain and CAR C-terminus was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Further, we investigated the biological relevance of this high affinity interaction between CAR and the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 and found that it does not alter CAR-mediated adenovirus infection. By contrast, interruption of this high affinity interaction altered the localization of MAGI-1 indicating that CAR is able to traffic MAGI-1 to cell junctions. These data deepen the molecular understanding of the interaction between CAR and MAGI-1 and indicate that although CAR plays a role in trafficking PDZ-based scaffolding proteins to cellular junctions, association with a high affinity intracellular binding partner does not significantly alter adenovirus binding and entry via CAR.

  13. Human Peroxiredoxins 1 and 2 and Their Interacting Protein Partners; Through Structure Toward Functions of Biological Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Mariarita

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in the mid-nineties, peroxiredoxins have drawn much attention and the number of papers publications on different Prxs has been multiplied. The rise in interest in this topic is probably due, at least in part, to the large and further increasing functions attributed to the members of this family of ubiquitous proteins, including many redox and non-redox physiological functions. This review presents a Since their discovery in the mid-nineties, peroxiredoxins have drawn much attention and the number of publications on different Prxs has been multiplied. The rise in interest in this topic is probably due, at least in part, to the large and further increasing functions attributed to the members of this family of ubiquitous proteins, including many redox and non-redox physiological functions. This review presents a literature survey of the protein partners of the human Peroxiredoxin-1 and Peroxiredoxin- 2 of the Peroxiredoxin 1 subfamily, the most abundant class. Three sequence motifs, or combinations thereof, were found in the protein partners, namely, CXXC, PXXP, and LXXLL. These findings are discussed in light of i) protein partner localization, function and biological pathways and ii) the peroxiredoxins regions important for partner interaction, as revealed by the Peroxiredoxin-1-Sulfiredoxin-1 complex structure. The outcome of these analyses is expected to unravel some common molecular bases underlying peroxiredoxins propensity to bind a partner, as well as to propose a functional role for this interaction that could help to widen the biological role of this important class of enzymes.

  14. STAC3 stably interacts through its C1 domain with CaV1.1 in skeletal muscle triads

    PubMed Central

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptor protein STAC3 is essential for skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and a mutation in the STAC3 gene has been linked to a severe muscle disease, Native American myopathy (NAM). However the function of STAC3, its interaction partner, and the mode of interaction within the EC-coupling complex remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that STAC3 forms a stable interaction with the voltage-sensor of EC-coupling, CaV1.1, and that this interaction depends on a hitherto unidentified protein-protein binding pocket in the C1 domain of STAC3. While the NAM mutation does not affect the stability of the STAC3-CaV1.1 interaction, mutation of two crucial residues in the C1 binding pocket increases the turnover of STAC3 in skeletal muscle triads. Thus, the C1 domain of STAC3 is responsible for its stable incorporation into the CaV1.1 complex, whereas the SH3 domain containing the NAM mutation site may be involved in low-affinity functional interactions in EC-coupling. PMID:28112192

  15. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  16. Conformational instability of the MARK3 UBA domain compromises ubiquitin recognition and promotes interaction with the adjacent kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James M.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Briant, Douglas J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Sicheri, Frank; Kay, Lewis E.; Pawson, Tony

    2012-10-23

    The Par-1/MARK protein kinases play a pivotal role in establishing cellular polarity. This family of kinases contains a unique domain architecture, in which a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain is located C-terminal to the kinase domain. We have used a combination of x-ray crystallography and NMR dynamics experiments to understand the interaction of the human (h) MARK3 UBA domain with the adjacent kinase domain as compared with ubiquitin. The x-ray crystal structure of the linked hMARK3 kinase and UBA domains establishes that the UBA domain forms a stable intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. However, solution-state NMR studies of the isolated UBA domain indicate that it is highly dynamic, undergoing conformational transitions that can be explained by a folding-unfolding equilibrium. NMR titration experiments indicated that the hMARK3 UBA domain has a detectable but extremely weak affinity for mono ubiquitin, which suggests that conformational instability of the isolated hMARK3 UBA domain attenuates binding to ubiquitin despite the presence of residues typically involved in ubiquitin recognition. Our data identify a molecular mechanism through which the hMARK3 UBA domain has evolved to bind the kinase domain, in a fashion that stabilizes an open conformation of the N- and C-terminal lobes, at the expense of its capacity to engage ubiquitin. These results may be relevant more generally to the 30% of UBA domains that lack significant ubiquitin-binding activity, and they suggest a unique mechanism by which interaction domains may evolve new binding properties.

  17. Resolution of Disagreements between Romantic Partners, among Adolescents, and Young Adults: Qualitative Analysis of Interaction Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuval-Mashiach, Rivka; Shulman, Shmuel

    2006-01-01

    The study was designed to explore qualitatively developmental differences in disagreement negotiation and resolution skills between adolescent and young adult romantic partners. Twenty adolescent and 20 young adult couples participated in the study. The Knox inventory was used to measure the level of disagreement between partners on ten domains…

  18. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  19. Diminished degradation of yeast cytochrome c by interactions with its physiological partners.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, D A; Sherman, F

    1995-01-01

    The level and structure of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c and iso-2-cytochrome c, encoded by the nuclear genes CYC1 and CYC7, respectively, are normally not altered in rho- mutants, which completely lack the cytochromes a.a3 subunits and cytochrome b that are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. In contrast, iso-cytochromes c containing the amino acid change Thr-78-->Ile (T78I) were observed at the normal or near-normal wild-type level in rho+ strains but were completely absent in rho- mutants. We have demonstrated with the "global" suppressor mutation Asn-52-->Ile and by pulse-chase labeling that the T78I iso-1-cytochrome c undergoes rapid cellular degradation in rho- mutants. Furthermore, specific mutations revealed that the deficiency of T78I iso-1 cytochrome c can be caused by the lack of cytochrome a.a3 or cytochrome c1, but not by the lack of cytochrome b. Thus, this and certain other, but not all, labile forms of cytochrome c are protected from degradation by the interaction with its physiological partners. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7731975

  20. Peptide labeling with photoactivatable trifunctional cadaverine derivative and identification of interacting partners by biotin transfer.

    PubMed

    App, Christine; Knop, Jana; Huff, Thomas; Seebahn, Angela; Becker, Cord-Michael; Iavarone, Federica; Castagnola, Massimo; Hannappel, Ewald

    2014-07-01

    A new photoactivatable trifunctional cross-linker, cBED (cadaverine-2-[6-(biotinamido)-2-(p-azidobenzamido) hexanoamido]ethyl-1,3'-dithiopropionate), was synthesized by chemical conversion of sulfo-SBED (sulfosuccinimidyl-2-[6-(biotinamido)-2-(p-azidobenzamido) hexanoamido]ethyl-1,3'-dithiopropionate) with cadaverine. This cross-linker was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis. cBED is based on sulfo-SBED that has a photoactivatable azido group, a cleavable disulfide bond for label transfer methods, and a biotin moiety for highly sensitive biotin/avidin detection. By ultraviolet (UV) light, the azido group is converted to a reactive nitrene, transforming transient bindings of interacting structures to covalent bonds. In contrast to the sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) moiety of sulfo-SBED, which attaches quite unspecifically to amino groups, cBED includes a cadaverine moiety that can be attached by transglutaminase more specifically to certain glutamine residues. For instance, thymosin β4 can be labeled with cBED using tissue transglutaminase. By high-resolution HPLC/ESI-MS (electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) and tandem MS (MS/MS) of the trypsin digest, it was established that glutamine residues at positions 23 and 36 were labeled, whereas Q39 showed no reactivity. The covalent binding of cBED to thymosin β4 did not influence its G-actin sequestering activity, and the complex could be used to identify new interaction partners. Therefore, cBED can be used to better understand the multifunctional role of thymosin β4 as well as of other proteins and peptides.

  1. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 Regulates Protein Partner Interactions and Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Taylor, Kylie M.; Gunning, Peter W.; Hardeman, Edna C.; Palmer, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    GTF2IRD1 is one of the genes implicated in Williams-Beuren syndrome, a disease caused by haploinsufficiency of certain dosage-sensitive genes within a hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7. GTF2IRD1 is a prime candidate for some of the major features of the disease, presumably caused by abnormally reduced abundance of this putative transcriptional repressor protein. GTF2IRD1 has been shown to interact with the E3 SUMO ligase PIASxβ, but the significance of this relationship is largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GTF2IRD1 can be SUMOylated by the SUMO E2 ligase UBC9 and the level of SUMOylation is enhanced by PIASxβ. A major SUMOylation site was mapped to lysine 495 within a conserved SUMO consensus motif. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 alters the affinity of the protein for binding partners that contain SUMO-interacting motifs, including a novel family member of the HDAC repressor complex, ZMYM5, and PIASxβ itself. In addition, we show that GTF2IRD1 is targeted for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Cross regulation by SUMOylation modulates this process, thus potentially regulating the level of GTF2IRD1 protein in the cell. These findings, concerning post-translational control over the activity and stability of GTF2IRD1, together with previous work showing how GTF2IRD1 directly regulates its own transcription levels suggest an evolutionary requirement for fine control over GTF2IRD1 activity in the cell. PMID:23145142

  2. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 regulates protein partner interactions and ubiquitin-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Taylor, Kylie M; Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Palmer, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    GTF2IRD1 is one of the genes implicated in Williams-Beuren syndrome, a disease caused by haploinsufficiency of certain dosage-sensitive genes within a hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7. GTF2IRD1 is a prime candidate for some of the major features of the disease, presumably caused by abnormally reduced abundance of this putative transcriptional repressor protein. GTF2IRD1 has been shown to interact with the E3 SUMO ligase PIASxβ, but the significance of this relationship is largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GTF2IRD1 can be SUMOylated by the SUMO E2 ligase UBC9 and the level of SUMOylation is enhanced by PIASxβ. A major SUMOylation site was mapped to lysine 495 within a conserved SUMO consensus motif. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 alters the affinity of the protein for binding partners that contain SUMO-interacting motifs, including a novel family member of the HDAC repressor complex, ZMYM5, and PIASxβ itself. In addition, we show that GTF2IRD1 is targeted for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Cross regulation by SUMOylation modulates this process, thus potentially regulating the level of GTF2IRD1 protein in the cell. These findings, concerning post-translational control over the activity and stability of GTF2IRD1, together with previous work showing how GTF2IRD1 directly regulates its own transcription levels suggest an evolutionary requirement for fine control over GTF2IRD1 activity in the cell.

  3. Designing Interaction as a Learning Process: Supporting Users' Domain Knowledge Development in Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jung-Min

    2010-01-01

    The primary concern in current interaction design is focused on how to help users solve problems and achieve goals more easily and efficiently. While users' sufficient knowledge acquisition of operating a product or system is considered important, their acquisition of problem-solving knowledge in the task domain has largely been disregarded. As a…

  4. Strategic Sexual Signals: Women's Display versus Avoidance of the Color Red Depends on the Attractiveness of an Anticipated Interaction Partner.

    PubMed

    Niesta Kayser, Daniela; Agthe, Maria; Maner, Jon K

    2016-01-01

    The color red has special meaning in mating-relevant contexts. Wearing red can enhance perceptions of women's attractiveness and desirability as a potential romantic partner. Building on recent findings, the present study examined whether women's (N = 74) choice to display the color red is influenced by the attractiveness of an expected opposite-sex interaction partner. Results indicated that female participants who expected to interact with an attractive man displayed red (on clothing, accessories, and/or makeup) more often than a baseline consisting of women in a natural environment with no induced expectation. In contrast, when women expected to interact with an unattractive man, they eschewed red, displaying it less often than in the baseline condition. Findings are discussed with respect to evolutionary and cultural perspectives on mate evaluation and selection.

  5. Experimental assessment of the contribution of electrodynamic interactions to long-distance recruitment of biomolecular partners: Theoretical basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preto, Jordane; Floriani, Elena; Nardecchia, Ilaria; Ferrier, Pierre; Pettini, Marco

    2012-04-01

    Highly specific spatiotemporal interactions between cognate molecular partners essentially sustain all biochemical transactions in living matter. That such an exquisite level of accuracy may result from encountering forces solely driven by thermal diffusive processes is unlikely. Here we propose a yet unexplored strategy to experimentally tackle the long-standing question of a possibly active recruitment at a distance of cognate partners of biomolecular reactions via the action of resonant electrodynamic interactions. We considered two simplified models for a preliminary feasibility investigation of the devised methodology. By taking advantage of advanced experimental techniques nowadays available, we propose to measure the characteristic encounter time scales of dually interacting biopartners and to compare them with theoretical predictions worked out in both the presence and absence of putative long-range electromagnetic forces.

  6. Strategic Sexual Signals: Women's Display versus Avoidance of the Color Red Depends on the Attractiveness of an Anticipated Interaction Partner

    PubMed Central

    Maner, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    The color red has special meaning in mating-relevant contexts. Wearing red can enhance perceptions of women’s attractiveness and desirability as a potential romantic partner. Building on recent findings, the present study examined whether women’s (N = 74) choice to display the color red is influenced by the attractiveness of an expected opposite-sex interaction partner. Results indicated that female participants who expected to interact with an attractive man displayed red (on clothing, accessories, and/or makeup) more often than a baseline consisting of women in a natural environment with no induced expectation. In contrast, when women expected to interact with an unattractive man, they eschewed red, displaying it less often than in the baseline condition. Findings are discussed with respect to evolutionary and cultural perspectives on mate evaluation and selection. PMID:26960135

  7. Identification of Novel Death-Associated Protein Kinase 2 Interaction Partners by Proteomic Screening Coupled with Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation.

    PubMed

    Geering, Barbara; Zokouri, Zina; Hürlemann, Samuel; Gerrits, Bertran; Ausländer, David; Britschgi, Adrian; Tschan, Mario P; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase 2 (DAPK2) is a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent Ser/Thr kinase that possesses tumor-suppressive functions and regulates programmed cell death, autophagy, oxidative stress, hematopoiesis, and motility. As only few binding partners of DAPK2 have been determined, the molecular mechanisms governing these biological functions are largely unknown. We report the identification of 180 potential DAPK2 interaction partners by affinity purification-coupled mass spectrometry, 12 of which are known DAPK binding proteins. A small subset of established and potential binding proteins detected in this screen was further investigated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, a method to visualize protein interactions in living cells. These experiments revealed that α-actinin-1 and 14-3-3-β are novel DAPK2 binding partners. The interaction of DAPK2 with α-actinin-1 was localized at the plasma membrane, resulting in massive membrane blebbing and reduced cellular motility, whereas the interaction of DAPK2 with 14-3-3-β was localized to the cytoplasm, with no impact on blebbing, motility, or viability. Our results therefore suggest that DAPK2 effector functions are influenced by the protein's subcellular localization and highlight the utility of combining mass spectrometry screening with bimolecular fluorescence complementation to identify and characterize novel protein-protein interactions.

  8. Identification of Novel Death-Associated Protein Kinase 2 Interaction Partners by Proteomic Screening Coupled with Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Zokouri, Zina; Hürlemann, Samuel; Gerrits, Bertran; Ausländer, David; Britschgi, Adrian; Tschan, Mario P.; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase 2 (DAPK2) is a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent Ser/Thr kinase that possesses tumor-suppressive functions and regulates programmed cell death, autophagy, oxidative stress, hematopoiesis, and motility. As only few binding partners of DAPK2 have been determined, the molecular mechanisms governing these biological functions are largely unknown. We report the identification of 180 potential DAPK2 interaction partners by affinity purification-coupled mass spectrometry, 12 of which are known DAPK binding proteins. A small subset of established and potential binding proteins detected in this screen was further investigated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, a method to visualize protein interactions in living cells. These experiments revealed that α-actinin-1 and 14-3-3-β are novel DAPK2 binding partners. The interaction of DAPK2 with α-actinin-1 was localized at the plasma membrane, resulting in massive membrane blebbing and reduced cellular motility, whereas the interaction of DAPK2 with 14-3-3-β was localized to the cytoplasm, with no impact on blebbing, motility, or viability. Our results therefore suggest that DAPK2 effector functions are influenced by the protein's subcellular localization and highlight the utility of combining mass spectrometry screening with bimolecular fluorescence complementation to identify and characterize novel protein-protein interactions. PMID:26483415

  9. EHD4 and CDH23 are interacting partners in cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Soma; George, Manju; Miller, Katharine K; Naik, Khurram; Chou, Jonathan; Cheatham, Mary Ann; Dallos, Peter; Naramura, Mayumi; Band, Hamid; Zheng, Jing

    2009-07-24

    Cadherin 23 (CDH23), a transmembrane protein localized near the tips of hair cell stereocilia in the mammalian inner ear, is important for delivering mechanical signals to the mechano-electric transducer channels. To identify CDH23-interacting proteins, a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid screen of an outer hair cell (OHC) cDNA library was performed. EHD4, a member of the C-terminal EH domain containing a protein family involved in endocytic recycling, was identified as a potential interactor. To confirm the interaction, we first demonstrated the EHD4 mRNA expression in hair cells using in situ hybridization. Next, we showed that EHD4 co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with CDH23 in mammalian cells. Interestingly, the co-immunoprecipitation was found to be calcium-sensitive. To investigate the role of EHD4 in hearing, compound action potentials were measured in EHD4 knock-out (KO) mice. Although EHD4 KO mice have normal hearing sensitivity, analysis of mouse cochlear lysates revealed a 2-fold increase in EHD1, but no increase in EHD2 or EHD3, in EHD4 KO cochleae compared with wild type, suggesting that a compensatory increase in EHD1 levels may account for the absence of a hearing defect in EHD4 KO mice. Taken together, these data indicate that EHD4 is a novel CDH23-interacting protein that could regulate CDH23 trafficking/localization in a calcium-sensitive manner.

  10. Structure determination of the functional domain interaction of a chimeric nonribosomal peptide synthetase from a challenging crystal with noncrystallographic translational symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sundlov, Jesse A.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2013-08-01

    The structure of the functional interaction of NRPS adenylation and carrier protein domains, trapped with a mechanism-based inhibitor, is described. Crystals exhibit translational non-crystallographic symmetry, which challenged structure determination and refinement. The nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are a family of modular proteins that contain multiple catalytic domains joined in a single protein. Together, these domains work to produce chemically diverse peptides, including compounds with antibiotic activity or that play a role in iron acquisition. Understanding the structural mechanisms that govern the domain interactions has been a long-standing goal. During NRPS synthesis, amino-acid substrates are loaded onto integrated carrier protein domains through the activity of NRPS adenylation domains. The structures of two adenylation domain–carrier protein domain complexes have recently been determined in an effort that required the use of a mechanism-based inhibitor to trap the domain interaction. Here, the continued analysis of these proteins is presented, including a higher resolution structure of an engineered di-domain protein containing the EntE adenylation domain fused with the carrier protein domain of its partner EntB. The protein crystallized in a novel space group in which molecular replacement and refinement were challenged by noncrystallographic pseudo-translational symmetry. The structure determination and how the molecular packing impacted the diffraction intensities are reported. Importantly, the structure illustrates that in this new crystal form the functional interface between the adenylation domain and the carrier protein domain remains the same as that observed previously. At a resolution that allows inclusion of water molecules, additional interactions are observed between the two protein domains and between the protein and its ligands. In particular, a highly solvated region that surrounds the carrier protein cofactor is described.

  11. Jmjd6, a JmjC Dioxygenase with Many Interaction Partners and Pleiotropic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Janice; O’Shea, Marie; Hume, David A.; Lengeling, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Lysyl hydroxylation and arginyl demethylation are post-translational events that are important for many cellular processes. The jumonji domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6) has been reported to catalyze both lysyl hydroxylation and arginyl demethylation on diverse protein substrates. It also interacts directly with RNA. This review summarizes knowledge of JMJD6 functions that have emerged in the last 15 years and considers how a single Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing enzyme can target so many different substrates. New links and synergies between the three main proposed functions of Jmjd6 in histone demethylation, promoter proximal pause release of polymerase II and RNA splicing are discussed. The physiological context of the described molecular functions is considered and recently described novel roles for JMJD6 in cancer and immune biology are reviewed. The increased knowledge of JMJD6 functions has wider implications for our general understanding of the JmjC protein family of which JMJD6 is a member. PMID:28360925

  12. Interaction of myosin VI and its binding partner DOCK7 plays an important role in NGF-stimulated protrusion formation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Magdalena; Chumak, Vira; Pomorski, Paweł; Wojtera, Emilia; Majewski, Łukasz; Nowak, Jolanta; Yamauchi, Junji; Rędowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2016-07-01

    DOCK7 (dedicator of cytokinesis 7) is a guanidine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rac1 GTPase that is involved in neuronal polarity and axon generation as well in Schwann cell differentiation and myelination. Recently, we identified DOCK7 as the binding partner of unconventional myosin VI (MVI) in neuronal-lineage PC12 cells and postulated that this interaction could be important in vivo [Majewski et al. (2012) Biochem Cell Biol., 90:565-574]. Herein, we found that MVI-DOCK7 interaction takes also place in other cell lines and demonstrated that MVI cargo domain via its RRL motif binds to DOCK7 C-terminal M2 and DHR2 domains. In MVI knockdown cells, lower Rac1 activity and a decrease of DOCK7 phosphorylation on Tyr1118 were observed, indicating that MVI could contribute to DOCK7 activity. MVI and DOCK7 co-localization was maintained during NGF-stimulated PC12 cell differentiation and observed also in the outgrowths. Also, during differentiation an increase in phosphorylation of DOCK7 as well as of its downstream effector JNK kinase was detected. Interestingly, overexpression of GFP-tagged MVI cargo domain (GFP-GT) impaired protrusion formation indicating that full length protein is important for this process. Moreover, a transient increase in Rac activity observed at 5min of NGF-stimulated differentiation of PC12 cells (overexpressing either GFP or GFP-MVI) was not detected in cells overexpressing the cargo domain. These data indicate that MVI-DOCK7 interaction could have functional implications in the protrusion outgrowth, and full length MVI seems to be important for delivery and maintenance of DOCK7 along the protrusions, and exerting its GEF activity.

  13. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  14. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as “junk” sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in

  15. Small molecule mimetics of an interferon-α receptor interacting domain.

    PubMed

    Bello, Angelica M; Wei, Lianhu; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Salum, Noruê; Purohit, Meena K; Fish, Eleanor N; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2014-02-01

    Small molecules that mimic IFN-α epitopes that interact with the cell surface receptor, IFNAR, would be useful therapeutics. One such 8-amino acid region in IFN-α2, designated IRRP-1, was used to derive 11 chemical compounds that belong to 5 distinct chemotypes, containing the molecular features represented by the key residues Leu30, Arg33, and Asp35 in IRRP-1. Three of these compounds exhibited potential mimicry to IRRP-1 and, in cell based assays, as predicted, effectively inhibited IFNAR activation by IFN-α. Of these, compound 3 did not display cell toxicity and reduced IFN-α-inducible STAT1 phosphorylation and STAT-DNA binding. Based on physicochemical properties' analyses, our data suggest that moieties with acidic pKa on the small molecule may be a necessary element for mimicking the carboxyl group of Asp35 in IRRP-1. Our data confirm the relevance of this strategy of molecular mimicry of ligand-receptor interaction domains of protein partners for small molecule drug discovery.

  16. Subtype-specific roles of phospholipase C-β via differential interactions with PDZ domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Lim, Seyoung; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Jae Ho; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2011-01-01

    Since we first identified the PLC-β isozyme, enormous studies have been conducted to investigate the functional roles of this protein (Min et al., 1993; Suh et al.,1988). It is now well-known that the four PLC-β subtypes are major effector molecules in GPCR-mediated signaling, especially for intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Nonetheless, it is still poorly understood why multiple PLC-β subtype exist. Most cells express multiple subtypes of PLC-β in different combinations, and each subtype is involved in somewhat different signaling pathways. Therefore, studying the differential roles of each PLC-β subtype is a very interesting issue. In this regard, we focus here on PDZ domain proteins which are novel PLC-β interacting proteins. As scaffolders, PDZ domain proteins recruit various target proteins ranging from membrane receptors to cytoskeletal proteins to assemble highly organized signaling complexes; this can give rise to efficiency and diversity in cellular signaling. Because PLC-β subtypes have different PDZ-binding motifs, it is possible that they are engaged with different PDZ domain proteins, and in turn participate in distinct physiological responses. To date, several PDZ domain proteins, such as the NHERF family, Shank2, and Par-3, have been reported to selectively interact with certain PLC-β subtypes and GPCRs. Systematic predictions of potential binding partners also suggests differential binding properties between PLC-β subtypes. Furthermore, we elucidated parallel signaling processes for multiple PLC-β subtypes, which still perform distinct functions resulting from differential interactions with PDZ domain proteins within a single cell. Therefore, these results highlight the novel function of PDZ domain proteins as intermediaries in subtype-specific role of PLC-β in GPCR-mediated signaling. Future studies will focus on the physiological meanings of this signaling complex formation by different PDZ domain proteins and PLC-β subtypes. It has been

  17. Signal Activation and Inactivation by the Gα Helical Domain: A Long-Neglected Partner in G Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Henrik G.; Jones, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) are positioned at the top of many signal transduction pathways. The G protein α subunit is composed of two domains, one that resembles Ras and another that is composed entirely of α helices. Historically, most attention has focused on the Ras-like domain, but emerging evidence reveals that the helical domain is an active participant in G protein signaling. PMID:22649098

  18. Structure of the SPRY domain of the human RNA helicase DDX1, a putative interaction platform within a DEAD-box protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kellner, Julian N.; Meinhart, Anton

    2015-08-25

    The structure of the SPRY domain of the human RNA helicase DDX1 was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The SPRY domain provides a putative protein–protein interaction platform within DDX1 that differs from other SPRY domains in its structure and conserved regions. The human RNA helicase DDX1 in the DEAD-box family plays an important role in RNA processing and has been associated with HIV-1 replication and tumour progression. Whereas previously described DEAD-box proteins have a structurally conserved core, DDX1 shows a unique structural feature: a large SPRY-domain insertion in its RecA-like consensus fold. SPRY domains are known to function as protein–protein interaction platforms. Here, the crystal structure of the SPRY domain of human DDX1 (hDSPRY) is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals two layers of concave, antiparallel β-sheets that stack onto each other and a third β-sheet beneath the β-sandwich. A comparison with SPRY-domain structures from other eukaryotic proteins showed that the general β-sandwich fold is conserved; however, differences were detected in the loop regions, which were identified in other SPRY domains to be essential for interaction with cognate partners. In contrast, in hDSPRY these loop regions are not strictly conserved across species. Interestingly, though, a conserved patch of positive surface charge is found that may replace the connecting loops as a protein–protein interaction surface. The data presented here comprise the first structural information on DDX1 and provide insights into the unique domain architecture of this DEAD-box protein. By providing the structure of a putative interaction domain of DDX1, this work will serve as a basis for further studies of the interaction network within the hetero-oligomeric complexes of DDX1 and of its recruitment to the HIV-1 Rev protein as a viral replication factor.

  19. Interacting vs. non-interacting single domain behavior in natural and synthetic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisowski, S.

    1981-01-01

    The disparity in response to high alternating field (AF) demagnetization for samples containing fine magnetic carriers is apparently related to the degree of interactions between those carriers. The presence of interaction fields between single domain (SD) grains can be tested by plotting isothermal remanence (IRM) acquisition vs. saturation remanence (SIRM) demagnetization. For the case of noninteracting SD grains, the two curves will be symmetrical. For the interacting SD case, the acquisition curve will be steepest at higher field, and the demagnetization curve steepest at lower fields, resulting in nonsymmetry. The point of intersection of the two curves approximates the remanent coercive force (H sub RC) field for all cases. Minor hysteresis loops and anhysteretic remanence (ARM) acquisition curves are also strongly influenced by interaction fields. Because of the difficulty in dispersing strongly magnetic grains, fine grained synthetic samples made with highly magnetic materials will not display equivalent AF stability to natural samples with fine, dispersed grains.

  20. Rab3A is a new interacting partner of synaptotagmin I and may modulate synaptic membrane fusion through a competitive mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chunliang; Li, Jianglin; Guo, Tianyao; Yan, Yizhong; Tang, Cheng; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rab3A has been found to be a novel interacting protein of synaptotagmin I. • Rab3A binds to synaptotagmin I in a Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner. • KKKK motif in C2B domain of synaptotagmin I is a key site for Rab3A binding. • Rab3A competitively inhibits the binding of C2B in synaptotagmin I to syntaxin 1B. • Rab3A may regulate synaptic membrane fusion and exocytosis in a competitive manner. - Abstract: Rab3 and synaptotagmin have been reported to be the key proteins that have opposite actions but cooperatively play critical regulatory roles in selecting and limiting the number of vesicles released at central synapses. However, the exact mechanism has not been fully understood. In this study, Rab3A and synaptotagmin I, the most abundant isoforms of Rab3 and synaptotagmin, respectively, in brain were for the first time demonstrated to directly interact with each other in a Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner, and the KKKK motif in the C2B domain of synaptotagmin I was a key site for the Rab3A binding, which was further confirmed by the competitive inhibition of inositol hexakisphosphate. Further studies demonstrated that Rab3A competitively affected the synaptotagmin I interaction with syntaxin 1B that was involved in membrane fusion during the synaptic vesicle exocytosis. These data indicate that Rab3A is a new synaptotagmin I interacting partner and may participate in the regulation of synaptic membrane fusion and thus the vesicle exocytosis by competitively modulating the interaction of synaptotagmin with syntaxin of the t-SNARE complex in presynaptic membranes.

  1. Identification of a multifunctional docking site on the catalytic unit of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) that is utilised by multiple interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Houslay, Kirsty F.; Christian, Frank; MacLeod, Ruth; Adams, David R.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) enzymes underpin compartmentalised cAMP signalling by localising to distinct signalling complexes. PDE4 long isoforms can be phosphorylated by mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), which attenuates activation of such enzymes through their phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Here we show that MK2 interacts directly with PDE4 long isoforms and define the sites of interaction. One is a unique site that locates within the regulatory upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1) domain and contains a core Phe141, Leu142 and Tyr143 (FLY) cluster (PDE4A5 numbering). Located with the second site is a critical core Phe693, Glu694, Phe695 (FQF) motif that is also employed in the sequestering of PDE4 long forms by an array of other signalling proteins, including the signalling scaffold β-arrestin, the tyrosyl kinase Lyn, the SUMOylation E2 ligase UBC9, the dynein regulator Lis1 (PAFAH1B1) and the protein kinase Erk. We propose that the FQF motif lies at the heart of a multifunctional docking (MFD) site located within the PDE4 catalytic unit. It is clear from our data that, as well as aiding fidelity of interaction, the MFD site confers exclusivity of binding between PDE4 and a single specific partner protein from the cohort of signalling proteins whose interaction with PDE4 involves the FQF motif. PMID:27993970

  2. An Interactional Perspective on the Relationship of Immigration to Intimate Partner Violence in a Representative Sample of Help-Seeking Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bo Vatnar, Solveig Karin; Bjorkly, Stal

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a study of the possible impact of immigration on interactional aspects of intimate partner violence (IPV) among help-seeking women. Are there differences concerning (a) IPV categories, (b) IPV severity, frequency, duration, regularity, and predictability, (c) guilt and shame, (d) partners' ethnicity, and (e) children being…

  3. Identification of FUSE-binding proteins as interacting partners of TIA proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, Francoise; Gueydan, Cyril; Bellefroid, Eric; Huez, Georges; Kruys, Veronique . E-mail: vkruys@ulb.ac.be

    2006-04-28

    TIA-1 and TIAR are closely related RNA-binding proteins involved in several mechanisms of RNA metabolism, including alternative hnRNA splicing and mRNA translation regulation. In particular, TIA-1 represses tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA translation by binding to the AU-rich element (ARE) present in the mRNA 3' untranslated region. Here, we demonstrate that TIA proteins interact with FUSE-binding proteins (FBPs) and that fbp genes are co-expressed with tia genes during Xenopus embryogenesis. FBPs participate in various steps of RNA processing and degradation. In Cos cells, FBPs co-localize with TIA proteins in the nucleus and migrate into TIA-enriched cytoplasmic granules upon oxidative stress. Overexpression of FBP2-KH3 RNA-binding domain fused to EGFP induces the specific sequestration of TIA proteins in cytoplasmic foci, thereby precluding their nuclear accumulation. In cytosolic RAW 264.7 macrophage extracts, FBPs are found associated in EMSA to the TIA-1/TNF-ARE complex. Together, our results indicate that TIA and FBP proteins may thus be relevant biological involved in common events of RNA metabolism occurring both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

  4. Partner-Specific Interpretation of Maintained Referential Precedents during Interactive Dialog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    In dialog settings, conversational partners converge on similar names for referents. These "lexically entrained" terms [Garrod, S., & Anderson, A. (1987). "Saying what you mean in dialog: A study in conceptual and semantic co-ordination." "Cognition, 27," 181-218] are part of the common ground between the particular individuals who established the…

  5. Interaction domains of p62: a bridge between p62 and selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaolong; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Yue; Ma, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Kai; He, Xinglan; Wang, Zuo

    2013-05-01

    p62 is a multidomain protein that contains different kinds of protein-protein interaction domains, including an N-terminal PB1 domain, a ZZ-type zinc finger domain, a nuclear localization signal (NLS), an export motif (NES), the LC3-interacting region (LIR), the KEAP1-interacting region (KIR), and a C-terminal Ub-associated domain (UBA). p62 is involved in the degradation of protein aggregates and cytoplasmic bodies via selective autophagy through its PB1, LIR, and UBA domains to maintain homeostasis in the cell. Moreover, NES, NLS, KIR, and ZZ domains have been found to be linked to ubiquitinated protein degradation by autophagy. Therefore, understanding the functional domains of p62 is important. In this review, we attempt to expound the mechanism of connection between p62 and selective autophagy to illustrate how the domains of p62 regulate selective autophagy, and to provide a new direction and perspective on selective autophagy research.

  6. Remarriage Beliefs as Predictors of Marital Quality and Positive Interaction in Stepcouples: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Chelsea L; Higginbotham, Brian; Adler-Baeder, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Using an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model, we examined remarriage beliefs as predictors of marital quality and positive interaction in a sample of 179 stepcouples. Three beliefs were measured using subscales from the Remarriage Belief Inventory (RMBI) including success is slim, children are the priority, and finances should be pooled. Several significant actor and partner effects were found for both wives' and husbands' beliefs. Wives' marital quality was positively associated with their own beliefs that finances should be pooled and negatively associated with their own beliefs that success is slim. Wives' reports of their own and spouses' positive interaction were both positively associated with their beliefs that finances should be pooled. Their reports of spouses' positive interaction were also negatively associated with husbands' beliefs that success is slim. Husbands' marital quality was positively associated with wives' beliefs that children are the priority, positively associated with their own beliefs that finances should be pooled, and negatively with success is slim. Positive interaction for husbands was positively associated with wives' beliefs that finances should be pooled and negatively associated with their own beliefs that success is slim. Finally, husbands' reports of positive interaction for their spouses were positively associated with wives' beliefs that finances should be pooled. Implications for future research utilizing dyadic data analysis with stepcouples are addressed.

  7. A domain shared by the Polycomb group proteins Scm and ph mediates heterotypic and homotypic interactions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, A J; Kyba, M; Bornemann, D; Morgan, K; Brock, H W; Simon, J

    1997-11-01

    The Sex comb on midleg (Scm) and polyhomeotic (ph) proteins are members of the Polycomb group (PcG) of transcriptional repressors. PcG proteins maintain differential patterns of homeotic gene expression during development in Drosophila flies. The Scm and ph proteins share a homology domain with 38% identity over a length of 65 amino acids, termed the SPM domain, that is located at their respective C termini. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro protein-binding assays, we show that the SPM domain mediates direct interaction between Scm and ph. Binding studies with isolated SPM domains from Scm and ph show that the domain is sufficient for these protein interactions. These studies also show that the Scm-ph and Scm-Scm domain interactions are much stronger than the ph-ph domain interaction, indicating that the isolated domain has intrinsic binding specificity determinants. Analysis of site-directed point mutations identifies residues that are important for SPM domain function. These binding properties, predicted alpha-helical secondary structure, and conservation of hydrophobic residues prompt comparisons of the SPM domain to the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains used for homotypic and heterotypic protein interactions in other transcriptional regulators. In addition to in vitro studies, we show colocalization of the Scm and ph proteins at polytene chromosome sites in vivo. We discuss the possible roles of the SPM domain in the assembly or function of molecular complexes of PcG proteins.

  8. Multiple interactions of the intrinsically disordered region between the helicase and nuclease domains of the archaeal Hef protein.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Kitamura, Makoto; Kodera, Noriyuki; Mori, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Shyogo; Ando, Toshio; Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2014-08-01

    Hef is an archaeal protein that probably functions mainly in stalled replication fork repair. The presence of an unstructured region was predicted between the two distinct domains of the Hef protein. We analyzed the interdomain region of Thermococcus kodakarensis Hef and demonstrated its disordered structure by CD, NMR, and high speed atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate the functions of this intrinsically disordered region (IDR), we screened for proteins interacting with the IDR of Hef by a yeast two-hybrid method, and 10 candidate proteins were obtained. We found that PCNA1 and a RecJ-like protein specifically bind to the IDR in vitro. These results suggested that the Hef protein interacts with several different proteins that work together in the pathways downstream from stalled replication fork repair by converting the IDR structure depending on the partner protein.

  9. A variably spliced region in the type 1 ryanodine receptor may participate in an inter-domain interaction.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Pace, Suzy M; Wei, Lan; Beard, Nicole A; Dirksen, Robert T; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine residues that are variably spliced in the juvenile and adult isoforms of the skeletal-muscle RyR1 (type 1 ryanodine receptor). The juvenile ASI(-) splice variant is less active than the adult ASI(+) variant and is overexpressed in patients with DM (myotonic dystrophy) [Kimura, Nakamori, Lueck, Pouliquin, Aoike, Fujimura, Dirksen, Takahashi, Dulhunty and Sakoda (2005) Hum. Mol. Genet. 14, 2189-2200]. In the present study, we explore the ASI region using synthetic peptides corresponding to rabbit RyR1 residues Thr3471-Gly3500 either containing [PASI(+)] or lacking [PASI(-)] the ASI residues. Both peptides increased [3H]ryanodine binding to rabbit RyR1s, increased Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reti-culum vesicles and increased single RyR1 channel activity. The peptide PASI(-) was more active in each case than PASI(+). [3H]Ryanodine binding to recombinant ASI(+)RyR1 or ASI(-)-RyR1 was enhanced more by PASI(-) than PASI(+), with the greatest increase seen when PASI(-) was added to ASI(-)RyR1. The activation of the RyR channels is consistent with the hypo-thesis that the peptides interrupt an inhibitory inter-domain inter-action and that PASI(-) is more effective at interrupting this interaction than PASI(+). We therefore suggest that the ASI(-) sequence interacts more tightly than the ASI(+) sequence with its binding partner, so that the ASI(-)RyR1 is more strongly inhibited (less active) than the ASI(+)RyR1. Thus the affinity of the binding partners in this inter-domain interaction may deter-mine the activities of the mature and juvenile isoforms of RyR1 and the stronger inhibition in the juvenile isoform may contribute to the myopathy in DM.

  10. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  11. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  12. Interaction partners for human ZNF384/CIZ/NMP4-zyxin as a mediator for p130CAS signaling?

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Hilde; Marynen, Peter . E-mail: Peter.Marynen@med.kuleuven.be

    2006-04-15

    Transcription factor ZNF384/CIZ/NMP4 was first cloned in rat as a p130Cas-binding protein and has a role in bone metabolism and spermatogenesis. It is recurrently involved in translocations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Translocations t(12;17) and t(12;22) fuse ZNF384 to RNA-binding proteins TAF15 and EWSR1, while a translocation t(12;19) generates an E2A/ZNF384 fusion. We screened for ZNF384 interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid technology. In contrast to its rat homolog, human ZNF384 does not interact with p130CAS. Zyxin, PCBP1, and vimentin, however, were identified as ZNF384-binding partners. Given the interaction between human zyxin and p130CAS, these results suggest that zyxin indirectly enables the interaction of ZNF384 with p130CAS which is described in rat.

  13. Structural basis of interactions between epidermal growth factor receptor and SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Longo, G M; Koland, J G

    1993-02-26

    The structural basis of the interactions between the activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and SH2 domain proteins was investigated. The c-src SH2 domain (second domain of src homology) was expressed as a recombinant fusion protein, and an in vitro assay was developed to monitor EGF receptor/SH2 domain interactions. EGF receptor tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) forms expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell system were shown to bind to the SH2 domain when phosphorylated. These TKD/SH2 domain interactions were characterized by dissociation constants of 60-320 nM. Deletion analysis indicated that the entire SH2 domain was required for recognition of the phosphorylated TKD. The binding of a highly truncated TKD protein to the SH2 domain suggested that the sites recognized by the SH2 domain included the EGF receptor autophosphorylation site, tyr992. A phosphorylated EGF receptor peptide containing tyr992 was also shown to interact with the SH2 domain. This residue may therefore mediate interactions between the EGF receptor and tyrosine kinases in the src family.

  14. Interaction of ultrasonic waves with domain walls on nanocrystalline YIG.

    PubMed

    Murthy, S R

    2014-02-01

    The nanocrystalline YIG samples with different particle sizes (20-40 nm) has been prepared using microwave-hydrothermal method. As synthesized powders were characterized using XRD and TEM. The powders were pressed and sintered at three different temperatures i.e., 700 °C/30 min, 800 °C/30 min, 900 °C/30 min, using microwave furnace. The sintered samples were characterized using XRD and TEM. The sintered samples are monophasic in nature with average grain size ranging in between 72 nm and 90 nm. The thermal variation of ultrasonic velocities [longitudinal (V(l)) and transverse (V(S))] and longitudinal attenuation (α(l)) has been measured on sintered samples by the pulse transmissionmethod at 1 MHz, in the temperature range of 300-600 K. The room temperature velocity is found to be grain size dependent and decreases with increasing temperature, except near the Curie temperature, T(C), where a small anomaly is observed. The longitudinal attenuation (α(1)) at room temperature is also found to be more sample dependent. The temperature variation of ultrasonic longitudinal attenuation exhibits a sharp maximum just below Curie temperature (T(C)). The above observations were carried on in the demagnetized state, on the application of a saturation field of 380 mT, the anomaly observed in the thermal variation of velocities (longitudinal and transverse) and attenuation is found to disappears. The observed interaction of ultrasonic velocity with domain walls has been qualitatively explained with the help oftemperature variation of magneto-crystalline anisotropy constant (k(1)) and Landau's theory.

  15. A frequent kinase domain mutation that changes the interaction between PI3K[alpha] and the membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelker, Diana; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Zhu, Jiuxiang; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in oncogenes often promote tumorigenesis by changing the conformation of the encoded proteins, thereby altering enzymatic activity. The PIK3CA oncogene, which encodes p110{alpha}, the catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha (PI3K{alpha}), is one of the two most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancers. We report the structure of the most common mutant of p110{alpha} in complex with two interacting domains of its regulatory partner (p85{alpha}), both free and bound to an inhibitor (wortmannin). The N-terminal SH2 (nSH2) domain of p85{alpha} is shown to form a scaffold for the entire enzyme complex, strategically positioned to communicate extrinsic signals from phosphopeptides to three distinct regions of p110{alpha}. Moreover, we found that Arg-1047 points toward the cell membrane, perpendicular to the orientation of His-1047 in the WT enzyme. Surprisingly, two loops of the kinase domain that contact the cell membrane shift conformation in the oncogenic mutant. Biochemical assays revealed that the enzymatic activity of the p110{alpha} His1047Arg mutant is differentially regulated by lipid membrane composition. These structural and biochemical data suggest a previously undescribed mechanism for mutational activation of a kinase that involves perturbation of its interaction with the cellular membrane.

  16. Binding partners of the kinase domains in Drosophila obscurin and their effect on the structure of the flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Katzemich, Anja; West, Ryan J H; Fukuzawa, Atsushi; Sweeney, Sean T; Gautel, Mathias; Sparrow, John; Bullard, Belinda

    2015-09-15

    Drosophila obscurin (Unc-89) is a titin-like protein in the M-line of the muscle sarcomere. Obscurin has two kinase domains near the C-terminus, both of which are predicted to be inactive. We have identified proteins binding to the kinase domains. Kinase domain 1 bound Bällchen (Ball, an active kinase), and both kinase domains 1 and 2 bound MASK (a 400-kDa protein with ankyrin repeats). Ball was present in the Z-disc and M-line of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) and was diffusely distributed in the sarcomere. MASK was present in both the M-line and the Z-disc. Reducing expression of Ball or MASK by siRNA resulted in abnormalities in the IFM, including missing M-lines and multiple Z-discs. Obscurin was still present, suggesting that the kinase domains act as a scaffold binding Ball and MASK. Unlike obscurin in vertebrate skeletal muscle, Drosophila obscurin is necessary for the correct assembly of the IFM sarcomere. We show that Ball and MASK act downstream of obscurin, and both are needed for development of a well defined M-line and Z-disc. The proteins have not previously been identified in Drosophila muscle.

  17. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and its binding partners in the cartilage extracellular matrix: interaction, regulation and role in chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chitrangada; Yik, Jasper H N; Kishore, Ashleen; Van Dinh, Victoria; Di Cesare, Paul E; Haudenschild, Dominik R

    2014-07-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are widely known as a family of five calcium-binding matricellular proteins. While these proteins belong to the same family, they are encoded by different genes, regulate different cellular functions and are localized to specific regions of the body. TSP-5 or Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) is the only TSP that has been associated with skeletal disorders in humans, including pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). The pentameric structure of COMP, the evidence that it interacts with multiple cellular proteins, and the recent reports of COMP acting as a 'lattice' to present growth factors to cells, inspired this review of COMP and its interacting partners. In our review, we have compiled the interactions of COMP with other proteins in the cartilage extracellular matrix and summarized their importance in maintaining the structural integrity of cartilage as well as in regulating cellular functions.

  18. Experimental observation of the interaction of propagating spin waves with Néel domain walls in a Landau domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pirro, P.; Sebastian, T.; Leven, B.; Hillebrands, B.; Koyama, T.; Brächer, T.

    2015-06-08

    The interaction of propagating dipolar spin waves with magnetic domain walls is investigated in square-shaped microstructures patterned from the Heusler compound Co{sub 2}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}Si. Using magnetic force microscopy, the reversible preparation of a Landau state with four magnetic domains separated by Néel domain walls is confirmed. A local spin-wave excitation using a microstructured antenna is realized in one of the domains. It is shown by Brillouin light scattering microscopy that the domain structure in the remanence state has a strong influence on the spin-wave excitation and propagation. The domain walls strongly reflect the spin waves and can be used as spin-wave reflectors. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows that the strong reflection is due to the long-range dipolar interaction which has important implications for the use of these spin waves for exerting an all-magnonic spin-transfer torque.

  19. Energetics of Calmodulin Domain Interactions with the Calmodulin Binding Domain of CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. Idil Apak; Shea, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic calcium receptor that regulates many kinases, including CaMKII. Calcium-depleted CaM does not bind to CaMKII under physiological conditions. However, binding of (Ca2+)4-CaM to a basic amphipathic helix in CaMKII releases auto-inhibition of the kinase. The crystal structure of CaM bound to CaMKIIp, a peptide representing the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of CaMKII, shows an anti-parallel interface: the C-domain of CaM primarily contacts the N-terminal half of the CaMBD. The two domains of calcium-saturated CaM are believed to play distinct roles in releasing auto-inhibition. To investigate the underlying mechanism of activation, calcium-dependent titrations of isolated domains of CaM binding to CaMKIIp were monitored using fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CaMKIIp for the domains of CaM increased upon saturation with calcium, with a 35-fold greater increase observed for the C-domain than the N-domain. Because the interdomain linker of CaM regulates calcium-binding affinity and contribute to conformational change, the role of each CaM domain was explored further by investigating effects of CaMKIIp on site-knockout mutants affecting the calcium-binding sites of a single domain. Investigation of the thermodynamic linkage between saturation of individual calcium-binding sites and CaM-domain binding to CaMKIIp showed that calcium binding to sites III and IV was sufficient to recapitulate the behavior of (Ca2+)4-CaM. The magnitude of favorable interdomain cooperativity varied depending on which of the four calcium-binding sites were mutated, emphasizing differential regulatory roles for the domains of CaM, despite the high degree of homology among the four EF-hands of CaM. PMID:19089983

  20. Identification of the WW domain-interaction sites in the unstructured N-terminal domain of EBV LMP 2A.

    PubMed

    Seo, Min-Duk; Park, Sung Jean; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Bong Jin

    2007-01-09

    Epstein-Barr virus latency is maintained by the latent membrane protein (LMP) 2A, which mimics the B-cell receptor (BCR) and perturbs BCR signaling. The cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of LMP2A is composed of 119 amino acids. The N-terminal domain of LMP2A (LMP2A NTD) contains two PY motifs (PPPPY) that interact with the WW domains of Nedd4 family ubiquitin-protein ligases. Based on our analysis of NMR data, we found that the LMP2A NTD adopts an overall random-coil structure in its native state. However, the region between residues 60 and 90 was relatively ordered, and seemed to form the hydrophobic core of the LMP2A NTD. This region resides between two PY motifs and is important for WW domain binding. Mapping of the residues involved in the interaction between the LMP2A NTD and WW domains was achieved by chemical shift perturbation, by the addition of WW2 and WW3 peptides. Interestingly, the binding of the WW domains mainly occurred in the hydrophobic core of the LMP2A NTD. In addition, we detected a difference in the binding modes of the two PY motifs against the two WW peptides. The binding of the WW3 peptide caused the resonances of five residues (Tyr(60), Glu(61), Asp(62), Trp(65), and Gly(66)) just behind the N-terminal PY motif of the LMP2A NTD to disappear. A similar result was obtained with WW2 binding. However, near the C-terminal PY motif, the chemical shift perturbation caused by WW2 binding was different from that due to WW3 binding, indicating that the residues near the PY motifs are involved in selective binding of WW domains. The present work represents the first structural study of the LMP2A NTD and provides fundamental structural information about its interaction with ubiquitin-protein ligase.

  1. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  2. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca2+-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca2+. Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14211.001 PMID:27083046

  3. Arm-domain interactions in AraC.

    PubMed

    Saviola, B; Seabold, R; Schleif, R F

    1998-05-08

    N-terminal deletions extending beyond the sixth amino acid of the Escherichia coli regulator of the l-arabinose operon, AraC, were found to generate constitutive regulatory behavior of the promoter pBAD. Mutagenesis of the DNA coding for the first 20 amino acids of the protein and screening for constitutives yielded mutants across the region whereas screening for mutants that cannot induce pBAD, even in the presence of arabinose, yielded none. These results indicate that the N-terminal arm is not essential for transcription activation, but that it plays an important and active role in holding the system in a non-activating state. Despite the fact that arabinose binds to the N-terminal domain of AraC, mutations were found in the C-terminal domain that weaken the binding of arabinose to the protein. The effects of the mutations could be suppressed by specific mutation in the N-terminal arm or by deletion of the arm. These results, in conjunction with the crystal structures of the N-terminal domain determined in the presence and absence of arabinose, indicate that in the absence of arabinose, the N-terminal arms of the protein bind to the C-terminal DNA binding domains to hold them in a state where the protein prefers to loop. When arabinose is added, the arms are pulled off the C-terminal domains, thereby releasing them to bind to adjacently located DNA half-sites and activate transcription.

  4. OsSRO1a Interacts with RNA Binding Domain-Containing Protein (OsRBD1) and Functions in Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shweta; Kaur, Charanpreet; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.; Sopory, Sudhir K.

    2016-01-01

    SRO1 is an important regulator of stress and hormonal response in plants and functions by interacting with transcription factors and several other proteins involved in abiotic stress response. In the present study, we report OsRBD1, an RNA binding domain 1- containing protein as a novel interacting partner of OsSRO1a from rice. The interaction of OsSRO1a with OsRBD1 was shown in yeast as well as in planta. Domain–domain interaction study revealed that C-terminal RST domain of OsSRO1a interacts with the N-terminal RRM1 domain of OsRBD1 protein. Both the proteins were found to co-localize in nucleus. Transcript profiling under different stress conditions revealed co-regulation of OsSRO1a and OsRBD1 expression under some abiotic stress conditions. Further, co-transformation of both OsSRO1a and OsRBD1 in yeast conferred enhanced tolerance toward salinity, osmotic, and methylglyoxal treatments. Our study suggests that the interaction of OsSRO1a with OsRBD1 confers enhanced stress tolerance in yeast and may play an important role under abiotic stress responses in plants. PMID:26870074

  5. Interactions between the S-Domain Receptor Kinases and AtPUB-ARM E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Suggest a Conserved Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Marcus A.; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Salt, Jennifer N.; Delmas, Frédéric; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Chilelli, Andrea; Goring, Daphne R.

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome encompasses multiple receptor kinase families with highly variable extracellular domains. Despite their large numbers, the various ligands and the downstream interacting partners for these kinases have been deciphered only for a few members. One such member, the S-receptor kinase, is known to mediate the self-incompatibility (SI) response in Brassica. S-receptor kinase has been shown to interact and phosphorylate a U-box/ARM-repeat-containing E3 ligase, ARC1, which, in turn, acts as a positive regulator of the SI response. In an effort to identify conserved signaling pathways in Arabidopsis, we performed yeast two-hybrid analyses of various S-domain receptor kinase family members with representative Arabidopsis plant U-box/ARM-repeat (AtPUB-ARM) E3 ligases. The kinase domains from S-domain receptor kinases were found to interact with ARM-repeat domains from AtPUB-ARM proteins. These kinase domains, along with M-locus protein kinase, a positive regulator of SI response, were also able to phosphorylate the ARM-repeat domains in in vitro phosphorylation assays. Subcellular localization patterns were investigated using transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells and changes were detected in the presence of interacting kinases. Finally, potential links to the involvement of these interacting modules to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated. Interestingly, AtPUB9 displayed redistribution to the plasma membrane of BY-2 cells when either treated with ABA or coexpressed with the active kinase domain of ARK1. As well, T-DNA insertion mutants for ARK1 and AtPUB9 lines were altered in their ABA sensitivity during germination and acted at or upstream of ABI3, indicating potential involvement of these proteins in ABA responses. PMID:18552232

  6. Autoinhibitory structure of the WW domain of HYPB/SETD2 regulates its interaction with the proline-rich region of huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Guang; Yang, Hui; Zhao, Jian; Jiang, Ya-Jun; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2014-03-04

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomally dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. Htt yeast two-hybrid protein B (HYPB/SETD2), a histone methyltransferase, directly interacts with Htt and is involved in HD pathology. Using NMR techniques, we characterized a polyproline (polyP) stretch at the C terminus of HYPB, which directly interacts with the following WW domain and leads this domain predominantly to be in a closed conformational state. The solution structure shows that the polyP stretch extends from the back and binds to the WW core domain in a typical binding mode. This autoinhibitory structure regulates interaction between the WW domain of HYPB and the proline-rich region (PRR) of Htt, as evidenced by NMR and immunofluorescence techniques. This work provides structural and mechanistic insights into the intramolecular regulation of the WW domain in Htt-interacting partners and will be helpful for understanding the pathology of HD.

  7. CC chemokine receptor 10 cell surface presentation in melanocytes is regulated by the novel interaction partner S100A10

    PubMed Central

    Hessner, F.; Dlugos, C. P.; Chehab, T.; Schaefer, C.; Homey, B.; Gerke, V.; Weide, T.; Pavenstädt, H.; Rescher, U.

    2016-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) conveys signals in response to various endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Consequently, GPCRs are the most important drug targets. CCR10, the receptor for the chemokines CCL27/CTACK and CCL28/MEC, belongs to the chemokine receptor subfamily of GPCRs and is thought to function in immune responses and tumour progression. However, there is only limited information on the intracellular regulation of CCR10. We find that S100A10, a member of the S100 family of Ca2+ binding proteins, binds directly to the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of CCR10 and that this interaction regulates the CCR10 cell surface presentation. This identifies S100A10 as a novel interaction partner and regulator of CCR10 that might serve as a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26941067

  8. Impact of interaction with a partner or friend on the exposure effects of pornography and erotica.

    PubMed

    Senn, Charlene Y; Desmarais, Serge

    2004-12-01

    Past studies on the effects of sexually explicit materials on women have tended to study them alone, in pairs, or in groups of strangers. By contrast, our study randomly assigned women to bring either a same-sex friend or a male partner to reflect more natural viewing conditions. Discussion between the participant and her companion followed exposure to the sexual images. Women who viewed pornography maintained their (quite high) level of negative mood, whereas women who viewed erotica experienced a substantial improvement in mood. The sex of the companion did not have a direct influence on participants' mood, with discussion improving mood across the board. However, participants' ratings of their satisfaction with the discussion were significantly influenced by the sex of their companion. We suggest that future research should focus more on the interpersonal aspects of male-female relationships when exploring the effects of sexually explicit materials on heterosexual women.

  9. Smooth Muscle Titin Zq Domain Interaction with the Smooth Muscle α-Actinin Central Rod*

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard J.; Simon, Alanna R.; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Felix, Augustine; Keller, Thomas C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-myosin II filament-based contractile structures in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and nonmuscle cells contain the actin filament-cross-linking protein α-actinin. In striated muscle Z-disks, α-actinin interacts with N-terminal domains of titin to provide a structural linkage crucial for the integrity of the sarcomere. We previously discovered a long titin isoform, originally smitin, hereafter sm-titin, in smooth muscle and demonstrated that native sm-titin interacts with C-terminal EF hand region and central rod R2-R3 spectrin-like repeat region sites in α-actinin. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of RNA from human adult smooth muscles and cultured rat smooth muscle cells and Western blot analysis with a domain-specific antibody presented here revealed that sm-titin contains the titin gene-encoded Zq domain that may bind to the α-actinin R2-R3 central rod domain as well as Z-repeat domains that bind to the EF hand region. We investigated whether the sm-titin Zq domain binds to α-actinin R2 and R3 spectrin repeat-like domain loops that lie in proximity with two-fold symmetry on the surface of the central rod. Mutations in α-actinin R2 and R3 domain loop residues decreased interaction with expressed sm-titin Zq domain in glutathione S-transferase pull-down and solid phase binding assays. Alanine mutation of a region of the Zq domain with high propensity for α-helix formation decreased apparent Zq domain dimer formation and decreased Zq interaction with the α-actinin R2-R3 region in surface plasmon resonance assays. We present a model in which two sm-titin Zq domains interact with each other and with the two R2-R3 sites in the α-actinin central rod. PMID:18519573

  10. GAIA: a gram-based interaction analysis tool – an approach for identifying interacting domains in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kelvin X; Ouellette, BF Francis

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play important roles in many biological functions. Protein domains, which are defined as independently folding structural blocks of proteins, physically interact with each other to perform these biological functions. Therefore, the identification of Domain-Domain Interactions (DDIs) is of great biological interests because it is generally accepted that PPIs are mediated by DDIs. As a result, much effort has been put on the prediction of domain pair interactions based on computational methods. Many DDI prediction tools using PPIs network and domain evolution information have been reported. However, tools that combine the primary sequences, domain annotations, and structural annotations of proteins have not been evaluated before. Results In this study, we report a novel approach called Gram-bAsed Interaction Analysis (GAIA). GAIA extracts peptide segments that are composed of fixed length of continuous amino acids, called n-grams (where n is the number of amino acids), from the annotated domain and DDI data set in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and identifies a list of n-grams that may contribute to DDIs and PPIs based on the frequencies of their appearance. GAIA also reports the coordinate position of gram pairs on each interacting domain pair. We demonstrate that our approach improves on other DDI prediction approaches when tested against a gold-standard data set and achieves a true positive rate of 82% and a false positive rate of 21%. We also identify a list of 4-gram pairs that are significantly over-represented in the DDI data set and may mediate PPIs. Conclusion GAIA represents a novel and reliable way to predict DDIs that mediate PPIs. Our results, which show the localizations of interacting grams/hotspots, provide testable hypotheses for experimental validation. Complemented with other prediction methods, this study will allow us to elucidate the interactome of cells. PMID:19208164

  11. Does It Make Any Difference if She Is a Mother? An Interactional Perspective on Intimate Partner Violence with a Focus on Motherhood and Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vatnar, Solveig Karin Bo; Bjorkly, Stal

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the impact of motherhood and pregnancy on interactional aspects of intimate partner violence (IPV) among help-seeking women. Is having children a protective or a risk factor for IPV severity, injury, duration, frequency, and mortal danger, controlling for sociodemographics? Regarding interactional aspects of IPV, do survivors…

  12. Hsp70A and GlsA interact as partner chaperones to regulate asymmetric division in Volvox.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qian; Pappas, Valeria; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M

    2005-10-15

    GlsA, a J-protein chaperone, is required for the asymmetric divisions that set aside germ and somatic cell precursors during embryogenesis in Volvox carteri, and previous evidence indicated that this function requires an intact Hsp70-binding site. To determine if Hsp70A, the only known cytoplasmic Hsp70 in V. carteri, is the chaperone partner of GlsA, we investigated the localization of the two proteins during critical stages of embryogenesis and tested their capacity to interact. We found that a substantial fraction of Hsp70A co-localizes with GlsA, both in interphase and mitotic blastomeres. In addition, Hsp70A coimmunoprecipitated with GlsA, and co-expression of GlsA and Hsp70A variants partially rescued the Gls phenotype of a glsA mutant, whereas neither variant by itself rescued the mutant phenotype. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that GlsA is about equally abundant in all blastomeres at all cleavage stages examined but that Hsp70A is more abundant in anterior (asymmetrically dividing) blastomeres than in posterior (symmetrically dividing) blastomeres during the period of asymmetric division. We conclude that Hsp70A and GlsA function as chaperone partners that regulate asymmetric division and that the relative abundance of Hsp70A in asymmetrically dividing embryos may determine which blastomeres divide asymmetrically and which do not.

  13. When training with a partner is inferior to training alone: the importance of dyad type and interaction quality.

    PubMed

    Crook, Amy E; Beier, Margaret E

    2010-12-01

    Dyad training, where trainees learn in pairs but ultimately perform individually, has been shown to be an effective method for training some skills. The effectiveness of this approach, however, may be tied to the type of task to be trained and the quality of the interaction in the dyad. We report two studies on the effectiveness of dyad training and the role of metacognitive activity for learning a software program. In Study 1, participants completed training alone or with a partner. Performance was assessed individually immediately after training and again after a 1-week nonuse interval. Results of Study 1 suggested that learning retention is superior when people are trained individually. Study 2 examined performance for individuals, task-switching dyads, and interdependent dyads. Results also showed that performance for individuals was superior to dyads and that the type of dyad collaboration did not affect performance. However, partner-prompted metacognitive activity was helpful for interdependent dyads and harmful for task-switching dyads, suggesting that the quality of collaboration varies by dyad type. Our findings suggest that dyad training may not be effective for all types of tasks. Possible boundary conditions for effective dyad training are discussed.

  14. Structure of the SPRY domain of the human RNA helicase DDX1, a putative interaction platform within a DEAD-box protein.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Julian N; Meinhart, Anton

    2015-09-01

    The human RNA helicase DDX1 in the DEAD-box family plays an important role in RNA processing and has been associated with HIV-1 replication and tumour progression. Whereas previously described DEAD-box proteins have a structurally conserved core, DDX1 shows a unique structural feature: a large SPRY-domain insertion in its RecA-like consensus fold. SPRY domains are known to function as protein-protein interaction platforms. Here, the crystal structure of the SPRY domain of human DDX1 (hDSPRY) is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals two layers of concave, antiparallel β-sheets that stack onto each other and a third β-sheet beneath the β-sandwich. A comparison with SPRY-domain structures from other eukaryotic proteins showed that the general β-sandwich fold is conserved; however, differences were detected in the loop regions, which were identified in other SPRY domains to be essential for interaction with cognate partners. In contrast, in hDSPRY these loop regions are not strictly conserved across species. Interestingly, though, a conserved patch of positive surface charge is found that may replace the connecting loops as a protein-protein interaction surface. The data presented here comprise the first structural information on DDX1 and provide insights into the unique domain architecture of this DEAD-box protein. By providing the structure of a putative interaction domain of DDX1, this work will serve as a basis for further studies of the interaction network within the hetero-oligomeric complexes of DDX1 and of its recruitment to the HIV-1 Rev protein as a viral replication factor.

  15. The PUB domain: a putative protein-protein interaction domain implicated in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Park, H; Till, E A; Lennarz, W J

    2001-10-12

    Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme which may be involved in the proteasome-dependent pathway for degradation of misfolded glycoproteins formed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are exported into the cytoplasm. A cytoplasmic PNGase found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Png1p, is widely distributed in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast (Suzuki, T., et al. J. Cell Biol. 149, 1039-1051, 2000). The recently uncovered complete genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana prompted us to search for the protein homologue of Png1p in this organism. Interestingly, when the mouse Png1p homologue sequence was used as a query, not only a Png1p homologue containing a transglutaminase-like domain that is believed to contain a catalytic triad for PNGase activity, but also four proteins which had a domain of 46 amino acids in length that exhibited significant similarity to the N-terminus of mouse Png1p were identified. Moreover, three of these homologous proteins were also found to possess a UBA or UBX domain, which are found in various proteins involved in the ubiquitin-related pathway. We name this newly found homologous region the PUB (Peptide:N-glycanase/UBA or UBX-containing proteins) domain and propose that this domain may mediate protein-protein interactions.

  16. Computational and informatics strategies for identification of specific protein interaction partners in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments

    PubMed Central

    Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of protein interaction networks and protein complexes using affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP/MS) is among most commonly used and successful applications of proteomics technologies. One of the foremost challenges of AP/MS data is a large number of false positive protein interactions present in unfiltered datasets. Here we review computational and informatics strategies for detecting specific protein interaction partners in AP/MS experiments, with a focus on incomplete (as opposite to genome-wide) interactome mapping studies. These strategies range from standard statistical approaches, to empirical scoring schemes optimized for a particular type of data, to advanced computational frameworks. The common denominator among these methods is the use of label-free quantitative information such as spectral counts or integrated peptide intensities that can be extracted from AP/MS data. We also discuss related issues such as combining multiple biological or technical replicates, and dealing with data generated using different tagging strategies. Computational approaches for benchmarking of scoring methods are discussed, and the need for generation of reference AP/MS datasets is highlighted. Finally, we discuss the possibility of more extended modeling of experimental AP/MS data, including integration with external information such as protein interaction predictions based on functional genomics data. PMID:22611043

  17. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-01

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation. PMID:28028215

  18. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Ginger Binds with Importin-α through Its Junction Domain for Nuclear Localization, and Further Interacts with NAC Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Sreekumar, Sweda; Sivakumar, K. C.; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are important sensors of Ca2+ elevations in plant cells regulating the gene expression linked with various cellular processes like stress response, growth and development, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Ginger is an extensively used spice due to its unique flavor and immense medicinal value. The two major threats that interfere with the large scale production of ginger are the salinity and drought stress. ZoCDPK1 (Zingiber officinale Calcium-dependent protein kinase 1) is a salinity and drought-inducible CDPK gene isolated from ginger and undergoes dynamic subcellular localization during stress conditions. ZoCDPK1, with signature features of a typical Ca2+ regulated kinase, also possesses a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in its junction domain (JD). A striking feature in ZoCDPK1 is the rare occurrence of a coupling between the NLS in JD and consensus sequences in regulatory domain. Here, we further identified its nature of nuclear localization and its interaction partners. In the homology model generated for ZoCDPK1, the regulatory domain mimics the crystal structure of the regulatory domain in Arabidopsis CDPK1. Molecular docking simulation of importin (ZoIMPα), an important protein involved in nuclear translocation, into the NLS of ZoCDPK1 was well-visualized. Furthermore, the direct interaction of ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα proteins was studied by the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) system, which confirmed that junction domain (JD) is an important interaction module required for ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα binding. The probable interacting partners of ZoCDPK1 were also identified using Y2H experiment. Of the 10 different stress-related interacting partners identified for ZoCDPK1, NAC transcription factor (TF) needs special mention, especially in the context of ZoCDPK1 function. The interaction between ZoCDPK1 and NAC TF, in fact, corroborate with the results of gene expression and over-expression studies of ZoCDPK1. Hence

  19. Correlation between magnetic interactions and domain structure in A1 FePt ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, N.; Sallica Leva, E.; Valente, R. C.; Vásquez Mansilla, M.; Gómez, J.; Milano, J.; Butera, A.

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the relationship between the domain structure and the magnetic interactions in a series of FePt ferromagnetic thin films of varying thickness. As-made films grow in the magnetically soft and chemically disordered A1 phase that may have two distinct domain structures. Above a critical thickness dcr ˜ 30 nm the presence of an out of plane anisotropy induces the formation of stripes, while for d < dcr planar domains occur. Magnetic interactions have been characterized using the well known DC demagnetization - isothermal remanent magnetization remanence protocols, δM plots, and magnetic viscosity measurements. We have observed a strong correlation between the domain configuration and the sign of the magnetic interactions. Planar domains are associated with positive exchange-like interactions, while stripe domains have a strong negative dipolar-like contribution. In this last case we have found a close correlation between the interaction parameter and the surface dipolar energy of the stripe domain structure. Using time dependent magnetic viscosity measurements, we have also estimated an average activation volume for magnetic reversal, ⟨Vac⟩˜1.37×104 nm3, which is approximately independent of the film thickness or the stripe period.

  20. Multiple protein domains mediate interaction between Bcl10 and MALT1.

    PubMed

    Langel, Felicia D; Jain, Nidhi A; Rossman, Jeremy S; Kingeter, Lara M; Kashyap, Anuj K; Schaefer, Brian C

    2008-11-21

    Bcl10 and MALT1 are essential mediators of NF-kappaB activation in response to the triggering of a diverse array of transmembrane receptors, including antigen receptors. Additionally, both proteins are translocation targets in MALT lymphoma. Thus, a detailed understanding of the interaction between these mediators is of considerable biological importance. Previous studies have indicated that a 13-amino acid region downstream of the Bcl10 caspase recruitment domain (CARD) is responsible for interacting with the immunoglobulin-like domains of MALT1. We now provide evidence that the death domain of MALT1 and the CARD of Bcl10 also contribute to Bcl10-MALT1 interactions. Although a direct interaction between the MALT1 death domain and Bcl10 cannot be detected via immunoprecipitation, FRET data strongly suggest that the death domain of MALT1 contributes significantly to the association between Bcl10 and MALT1 in T cells in vivo. Furthermore, analysis of point mutants of conserved residues of Bcl10 shows that the Bcl10 CARD is essential for interaction with the MALT1 N terminus. Mutations that disrupt proper folding of the Bcl10 CARD strongly impair Bcl10-MALT1 interactions. Molecular modeling and functional analyses of Bcl10 point mutants suggest that residues Asp(80) and Glu(84) of helix 5 of the Bcl10 CARD directly contact MALT1. Together, these data demonstrate that the association between Bcl10 and MALT1 involves a complex interaction between multiple protein domains. Moreover, the Bcl10-MALT1 interaction is the second reported example of interactions between a CARD and a non-CARD protein region, which suggests that many signaling cascades may utilize CARD interactions with non-CARD domains.

  1. Nephrocystin-1 Forms a Complex with Polycystin-1 via a Polyproline Motif/SH3 Domain Interaction and Regulates the Apoptotic Response in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Wodarczyk, Claas; Bricoli, Barbara; Muorah, Mordi; Spitaleri, Andrea; Mannella, Valeria; Ricchiuto, Piero; Pema, Monika; Castelli, Maddalena; Casanova, Ariel E.; Mollica, Luca; Banzi, Manuela; Boca, Manila; Antignac, Corinne; Saunier, Sophie; Musco, Giovanna; Boletta, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1), cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2). Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3). A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1) as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP). We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation. PMID:20856870

  2. Nephrocystin-1 forms a complex with polycystin-1 via a polyproline motif/SH3 domain interaction and regulates the apoptotic response in mammals.

    PubMed

    Wodarczyk, Claas; Distefano, Gianfranco; Rowe, Isaline; Gaetani, Massimiliano; Bricoli, Barbara; Muorah, Mordi; Spitaleri, Andrea; Mannella, Valeria; Ricchiuto, Piero; Pema, Monika; Castelli, Maddalena; Casanova, Ariel E; Mollica, Luca; Banzi, Manuela; Boca, Manila; Antignac, Corinne; Saunier, Sophie; Musco, Giovanna; Boletta, Alessandra

    2010-09-14

    Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1), cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2). Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3). A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1) as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP). We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation.

  3. HIV-1 p6-Another viral interaction partner to the host cellular protein cyclophilin A.

    PubMed

    Solbak, Sara M Ø; Reksten, Tove R; Röder, Rene; Wray, Victor; Horvli, Ole; Raae, Arnt J; Henklein, Petra; Henklein, Peter; Fossen, Torgils

    2012-04-01

    The 52-amino acid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p6 protein has previously been recognized as a docking site for several cellular and viral binding factors and is important for the formation of infectious viruses. A particular structural feature of p6 is the notably high relative content of proline residues, located at positions 5, 7, 10, 11, 24, 30, 37 and 49 in the sequence. Proline cis/trans isomerism was detected for all these proline residues to such an extent that more than 40% of all p6 molecules contain at least one proline in a cis conformation. 2D (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of full-length HIV-1 p6 and p6 peptides established that cyclophilin A (CypA) interacts as a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase with all proline residues of p6. Only catalytic amounts of CypA were necessary for the interaction with p6 to occur, strongly suggesting that the observed interaction is highly relevant in vivo. In addition, surface plasmon resonance studies revealed binding of full-length p6 to CypA, and that this binding was significantly stronger than any of its N- or C-terminal peptides. This study demonstrates the first identification of an interaction between HIV-1 p6 and the host cellular protein CypA. The mode of interaction involves both transient enzyme-substrate interactions and a more stable binding. The binding motifs of p6 to Tsg-101, ALIX and Vpr coincide with binding regions and catalytic sites of p6 to CypA, suggesting a potential role of CypA in modulating functional interactions of HIV-1.

  4. Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory Interaction Observation Schedule (SCIOS): A System for Analyzing Teacher-Pupil Interaction in the Affective Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemis, Katherine A.; Liberty, Paul G.

    The Southwestern Cooperative Interaction Observation Schedule (SCIOS) is a classroom observation instrument designed to record pupil-teacher interaction. The classification of pupil behavior is based on Krathwohl's (1964) theory of the three lowest levels of the affective domain. The levels are (1) receiving: the learner should be sensitized to…

  5. Identification of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 as a new interaction partner of cyclin D3

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Maoyun; Wei Yuanyan; Yao Luyang; Xie Jianhui; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Hanzhou; Jiang Jianhai; Gu Jianxin . E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-02-03

    Cyclin D3, like cyclin D1 and D2 isoforms, is a crucial component of the core cell cycle machinery in mammalian cells. It also exhibits its unique properties in many other physiological processes. In the present study, using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified ERK3, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as a cyclin D3 binding partner. GST pull-down assays showed that cyclin D3 interacts directly and specifically with ERK3 in vitro. The binding of cyclin D3 and ERK3 was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Moreover, carboxy-terminal extension of ERK3 was responsible for its association with intact cyclin D3. These findings further expand distinct roles of cyclin D3 and suggest the potential activity of ERK3 in cell proliferation.

  6. The role of DNA helicases and their interaction partners in genome stability and meiotic recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2011-03-01

    DNA helicases are enzymes that are able to unwind DNA by the use of the energy-equivalent ATP. They play essential roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination in all organisms. As homologous recombination occurs in somatic and meiotic cells, the same proteins may participate in both processes, albeit not necessarily with identical functions. DNA helicases involved in genome stability and meiotic recombination are the focus of this review. The role of these enzymes and their characterized interaction partners in plants will be summarized. Although most factors are conserved in eukaryotes, plant-specific features are becoming apparent. In the RecQ helicase family, Arabidopsis thaliana RECQ4A has been shown before to be the functional homologue of the well-researched baker's yeast Sgs1 and human BLM proteins. It was surprising to find that its interaction partners AtRMI1 and AtTOP3α are absolutely essential for meiotic recombination in plants, where they are central factors of a formerly underappreciated dissolution step of recombination intermediates. In the expanding group of anti-recombinases, future analysis of plant helicases is especially promising. While no FBH1 homologue is present, the Arabidopsis genome contains homologues of both SRS2 and RTEL1. Yeast and mammals, on the other hand. only possess homologues of either one or the other of these helicases. Plants also contain several other classes of helicases that are known from other organisms to be involved in the preservation of genome stability: FANCM is conserved with parts of the human Fanconi anaemia proteins, as are homologues of the Swi2/Snf2 family and of PIF1.

  7. A Brownian Dynamics Study of the Effects of Cytochrome f Structure and Deletion of Its Small Domain in Interactions with Cytochrome c6 and Plastocyanin in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gross, Elizabeth L.

    2006-01-01

    The availability of seven different structures of cytochrome f (cyt f) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii allowed us, using Brownian dynamics simulations, to model interactions between these molecules and their redox partners, plastocyanin (PC) and cytochrome c6 (cyt c6) in the same species to study the effect of cyt f structure on its function. Our results showed that different cyt f structures, which are very similar, produced different reaction rates in interactions with PC and cyt c6. We were able to attribute this to structural differences among these molecules, particularly to a small flexible loop between A-184 and G-191 (which has some of the highest crystallographic temperature factors in all of the cyt f structures) on the cyt f small domain. We also showed that deletion of the cyt f small domain affected cyt c6 more than PC, due to their different binding positions on cyt f. One function of the small domain in cyt f may be to guide PC or cyt c6 to a uniform dock with cyt f, especially due to electrostatic interactions with K-188 and K-189 on this domain. Our results could serve as a good guide for future experimental work on these proteins to understand better the electron transfer process between them. Also, these results demonstrated the sensitivity and the power of the Brownian dynamics simulations in the study of molecular interactions. PMID:16239335

  8. Evolution of domain-peptide interactions to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Abdellali; Levy, Emmanuel D; Michnick, Stephen W

    2016-07-05

    Evolution of complexity in eukaryotic proteomes has arisen, in part, through emergence of modular independently folded domains mediating protein interactions via binding to short linear peptides in proteins. Over 30 years, structural properties and sequence preferences of these peptides have been extensively characterized. Less successful, however, were efforts to establish relationships between physicochemical properties and functions of domain-peptide interactions. To our knowledge, we have devised the first strategy to exhaustively explore the binding specificity of protein domain-peptide interactions. We applied the strategy to SH3 domains to determine the properties of their binding peptides starting from various experimental data. The strategy identified the majority (∼70%) of experimentally determined SH3 binding sites. We discovered mutual relationships among binding specificity, binding affinity, and structural properties and evolution of linear peptides. Remarkably, we found that these properties are also related to functional diversity, defined by depth of proteins within hierarchies of gene ontologies. Our results revealed that linear peptides evolved to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity of domain-peptide interactions. Thus, domain-peptide interactions follow human-constructed gene ontologies, which suggest that our understanding of biological process hierarchies reflect the way chemical and thermodynamic properties of linear peptides and their interaction networks, in general, have evolved.

  9. Molecular Basis of Interactions Between SH3 Domain-Containing Proteins and the Proline-Rich Region of the Ubiquitin Ligase Itch.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Guillaume; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Ton, Anh-Tien; Ayoubi, Riham; Serohijos, Adrian; Omichinski, James G; Angers, Annie

    2017-02-24

    The ligase Itch plays major roles in signalling pathways by inducing ubiquitylation-dependent degradation of several substrates. Substrate recognition and binding is critical for the regulation of this reaction. Like closely related ligases, Itch can interact with proteins containing a PPxY motif via its WW domains. In addition to these WW domains, Itch possesses a proline-rich region (PRR) that has been shown to interact with several Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain-containing proteins. We have previously established that despite the apparent surface uniformity and conserved fold of SH3 domains, they display different binding mechanisms and affinities for their interaction with the PRR of Itch. Here, we attempt to determine the molecular bases underlying the wide range of binding properties of the Itch PRR. Using pull-down assays combined with mass spectrometry analysis, we show that the Itch PRR preferentially forms complexes with Endophilins, Amphyphisins and Pacsins, but can also target a variety of other SH3 domain-containing proteins. In addition, we map the binding sites of these proteins using a combination of PRR sub-sequences and mutants. We find that different SH3 domains target distinct proline-rich sequences overlapping significantly. We also structurally analyze these protein complexes using crystallography and molecular modelling. These structures depict the position of Itch PRR engaged in a 1:2 protein complex with β-PIX and a 1:1 complex with the other SH3 domain-containing proteins. Taken together, these results reveal the binding preferences of the Itch PRR towards its most common SH3 domain-containing partners, and demonstrate that the PRR region is sufficient for binding.

  10. Comparative structural and energetic analysis of WW domain-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Schleinkofer, Karin; Wiedemann, Urs; Otte, Livia; Wang, Ting; Krause, Gerd; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Wade, Rebecca C

    2004-11-26

    WW domains are small globular protein interaction modules found in a wide spectrum of proteins. They recognize their target proteins by binding specifically to short linear peptide motifs that are often proline-rich. To infer the determinants of the ligand binding propensities of WW domains, we analyzed 42 WW domains. We built models of the 3D structures of the WW domains and their peptide complexes by comparative modeling supplemented with experimental data from peptide library screens. The models provide new insights into the orientation and position of the peptide in structures of WW domain-peptide complexes that have not yet been determined experimentally. From a protein interaction property similarity analysis (PIPSA) of the WW domain structures, we show that electrostatic potential is a distinguishing feature of WW domains and we propose a structure-based classification of WW domains that expands the existent ligand-based classification scheme. Application of the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), GRID/GOLPE and comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analysis methods permitted the derivation of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) that aid in identifying the specificity-determining residues within WW domains and their ligand-recognition motifs. Using these QSARs, a new group-specific sequence feature of WW domains that target arginine-containing peptides was identified. Finally, the QSAR models were applied to the design of a peptide to bind with greater affinity than the known binding peptide sequences of the yRSP5-1 WW domain. The prediction was verified experimentally, providing validation of the QSAR models and demonstrating the possibility of rationally improving peptide affinity for WW domains. The QSAR models may also be applied to the prediction of the specificity of WW domains with uncharacterized ligand-binding properties.

  11. A Time Domain Analysis of Gust-Cascade Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Hixon, R.; Sawyer, S. D.; Dyson, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    The gust response of a 2 D cascade is studied by solving the full nonlinear Euler equations employing higher order accurate spatial differencing and time stepping techniques. The solutions exhibit the exponential decay of the two circumferential mode orders of the cutoff blade passing frequency (BPF) tone and propagation of one circumferential mode order at 2BPF, as would be expected for the flow configuration considered. Two frequency excitations indicate that the interaction between the frequencies and the self interaction contribute to the amplitude of the propagating mode.

  12. Bilingualism interacts with domain in a working memory task: evidence from aging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lin; Craik, Fergus I M; Moreno, Sylvain; Bialystok, Ellen

    2013-03-01

    Younger and older adults who were either monolingual or bilingual were tested with verbal and spatial working memory (WM) span tasks. Aging was associated with a greater decline in spatial WM than in verbal WM, but the age-related declines were equivalent in both language groups. The bilingual participants outperformed the monolinguals in spatial WM, but achieved lower levels of performance than monolinguals in verbal WM. This interaction between bilingualism and WM domain was also consistent across the adult life span. These results are discussed in terms of the interactions between a domain-general executive processing advantage for bilinguals and the domain-specific content of particular WM tasks.

  13. Phosphopeptide interactions with BRCA1 BRCT domains: More than just a motif.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Jubb, Harry; Blundell, Tom L

    2015-03-01

    BRCA1 BRCT domains function as phosphoprotein-binding modules for recognition of the phosphorylated protein-sequence motif pSXXF. While the motif interaction interface provides strong anchor points for binding, protein regions outside the motif have recently been found to be important for binding affinity. In this review, we compare the available structural data for BRCA1 BRCT domains in complex with phosphopeptides in order to gain a more complete understanding of the interaction between phosphopeptides and BRCA1-BRCT domains.

  14. Dynamic combinatorial interactions of RUNX1 and cooperating partners regulates megakaryocytic differentiation in cell line models.

    PubMed

    Pencovich, Niv; Jaschek, Ram; Tanay, Amos; Groner, Yoram

    2011-01-06

    Specific interactions of transcription factors (TFs) with their targets are crucial for specifying gene expression programs during cell differentiation. How specificity is maintained despite limited selectivity of individual TF-DNA interactions is not fully understood. RUNX1 TF is among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemia and an important regulator of megakaryopoiesis. We used megakaryocytic cell lines to characterize the network of RUNX1 targets and cooperating TFs in differentiating megakaryocytes and demonstrated how dynamic partnerships between RUNX1 and cooperating TFs facilitated regulatory plasticity and specificity during this process. After differentiation onset, RUNX1 directly activated a large number of genes through interaction with preexisting and de novo binding sites. Recruitment of RUNX1 to de novo occupied sites occurred at H3K4me1-marked preprogrammed enhancers. A significant number of these de novo bound sites lacked RUNX motif but were occupied by AP-1 TFs. Reciprocally, AP-1 TFs were up-regulated by RUNX1 after 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induction and recruited to RUNX1-occupied sites lacking AP-1 motifs. At other differentiation stages, additional combinatorial interactions occurred between RUNX1 and its coregulators, GATA1 and ETS. The findings suggest that in differentiating megakaryocytic cell lines, RUNX1 cooperates with GATA1, AP-1, and ETS to orchestrate cell-specific transcription programs through dynamic TF partnerships.

  15. The interplay of communication device output mode and interaction style between nonspeaking persons and their speaking partners.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, D J

    1989-08-01

    This study sought to determine how augmentative communication device output modes differentially affected various aspects of interactions between nonspeaking persons (NSPs) and their speaking partners (SPs). It was hypothesized that when an electronic output display (EOD) was added to a communication board, the semipermanent display of information would lessen the dyad's need to adopt specialized turn and message formulation conventions, permitting the NSP to construct more complex messages with fewer communication breakdowns. A series of 10 interactional teaching tasks were recorded for two adult male nonhandicapped dyads performing under the two output conditions (+/- EOD). Interaction transcripts were analyzed with regard to quantitative differences within and between dyads with respect to turn taking, message formulation, propositional content, and several types of insertion sequences (guessing, confirmation queries, message reformulations). With the exception of message reformulation, changes due to output mode were nonexistent or inconsistent for the variables measured within and across dyads. The addition of the EOD significantly lowered the rate of message reformulation and the total number of reformulation-related turns. Results are discussed with regard to research and clinical implications for augmentative communication.

  16. Interacting partners of macrophage-secreted cathepsin B contribute to HIV-induced neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    CANTRES-ROSARIO, Yisel M.; HERNANDEZ, Natalia; NEGRON, Karla; PEREZ-LASPIUR, Juliana; LESZYK, John; SHAFFER, Scott A.; MELENDEZ, Loyda M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-1 infection of macrophages increases cathepsin B secretion and induces neuronal apoptosis, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Design We identified macrophage secreted cathepsin B protein interactions extracellularly and their contribution to neuronal death in vitro. Methods Cathepsin B was immunoprecipitated from monocyte-derived macrophage supernatants after 12 days post-infection. The cathepsin B interactome was quantified by label-free tandem mass spectrometry and compared to uninfected supernatants. Proteins identified were validated by western blot. Neurons were exposed to macrophage-conditioned media in presence or absence of antibodies against cathepsin B and interacting proteins. Apoptosis was measured using TUNEL labeling. Immunohistochemistry of post-mortem brain tissue samples from healthy, HIV-infected, and Alzheimer’s disease patients was performed to observe the ex vivo expression of the proteins identified. Results Nine proteins co-immunoprecipitated differentially with cathepsin B between uninfected and HIV-infected macrophages. Serum amyloid p component (SAPC) -cathepsin B interaction increased in HIV-infected macrophage supernatants, while matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9) -cathepsin B interaction decreased. Pre-treatment of HIV-infected macrophage-conditioned media with antibodies against cathepsin B and SAPC decreased neuronal apoptosis. The addition of MMP-9 antibodies was not protective. SAPC was over-expressed in post-mortem brain tissue from HIV-positive neurocognitive impaired patients compared to HIV positive with normal cognition and healthy controls, while MMP-9 expression was similar in all tissues. Conclusions Inhibiting SAPC-cathepsin B interaction protects against HIV–induced neuronal death and may help to find alternative treatments for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26208400

  17. Interaction between categorical knowledge and episodic memory across domains

    PubMed Central

    Hemmer, Pernille; Persaud, Kimele

    2014-01-01

    Categorical knowledge and episodic memory have traditionally been viewed as separate lines of inquiry. Here, we present a perspective on the interrelatedness of categorical knowledge and reconstruction from memory. We address three underlying questions: what knowledge do people bring to the task of remembering? How do people integrate that knowledge with episodic memory? Is this the optimal way for the memory system to work? In the review of five studies spanning four category domains (discrete, continuous, temporal, and linguistic), we evaluate the relative contribution and the structure of influence of categorical knowledge on long-term episodic memory. These studies suggest a robustness of peoples’ knowledge of the statistical regularities of the environment, and provide converging evidence of the quality and influence of category knowledge on reconstructive memory. Lastly, we argue that combining categorical knowledge and episodic memory is an efficient strategy of the memory system. PMID:24966848

  18. Forms of Social Interaction and Domains of Social Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nucci, Larry P.

    The five observational studies reported in this paper provide consistent and interlocking testimony for the view that moral events differ qualitatively from social conventional events, and that these two aspects of the social world are associated with qualitatively differing individual-environment interactions. Each of the five studies focuses on…

  19. DEP domains: structurally similar but functionally different.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Sarah V; Maurice, Madelon M; Bos, Johannes L

    2014-05-01

    The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain is a globular protein domain that is present in about ten human protein families with well-defined structural features. A picture is emerging that DEP domains mainly function in the spatial and temporal control of diverse signal transduction events by recruiting proteins to the plasma membrane. DEP domains can interact with various partners at the membrane, including phospholipids and membrane receptors, and their binding is subject to regulation.

  20. Interaction dynamics of multiple autonomous mobile robots in bounded spatial domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1989-01-01

    A general navigation strategy for multiple autonomous robots in a bounded domain is developed analytically. Each robot is modeled as a spherical particle (i.e., an effective spatial domain about the center of mass); its interactions with other robots or with obstacles and domain boundaries are described in terms of the classical many-body problem; and a collision-avoidance strategy is derived and combined with homing, robot-robot, and robot-obstacle collision-avoidance strategies. Results from homing simulations involving (1) a single robot in a circular domain, (2) two robots in a circular domain, and (3) one robot in a domain with an obstacle are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  1. The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: Probing interactions with protein and RNA binding partners using cyclic dinucleotide analogs

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Carly A.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to adapt to a changing environment is essential for their survival. One mechanism used to facilitate behavioral adaptations is the second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). c-di-GMP is widespread throughout the bacterial domain and plays a vital role in regulating the transition between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state. This second messenger also controls the virulence response of pathogenic organisms and is thought to be connected to quorum sensing, the process by which bacteria communicate with each other. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is tightly regulated by the opposing enzymatic activities of diguanlyate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which synthesize and degrade the second messenger, respectively. The change in the intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is directly sensed by downstream targets of the second messenger, both protein and RNA, which induce the appropriate phenotypic response. This review will summarize our current state of knowledge of c-di-GMP signaling in bacteria with a focus on protein and RNA binding partners of the second messenger. Efforts towards the synthesis of c-di-GMP and its analogs are discussed as well as studies aimed at targeting these macromolecular effectors with chemically synthesized cyclic dinucleotide analogs. PMID:23108253

  2. The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: probing interactions with protein and RNA binding partners using cyclic dinucleotide analogs.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Carly A; Strobel, Scott A

    2012-12-14

    The ability of bacteria to adapt to a changing environment is essential for their survival. One mechanism used to facilitate behavioral adaptations is the second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). c-di-GMP is widespread throughout the bacterial domain and plays a vital role in regulating the transition between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state. This second messenger also controls the virulence response of pathogenic organisms and is thought to be connected to quorum sensing, the process by which bacteria communicate with each other. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is tightly regulated by the opposing enzymatic activities of diguanlyate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which synthesize and degrade the second messenger, respectively. The change in the intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is directly sensed by downstream targets of the second messenger, both protein and RNA, which induce the appropriate phenotypic response. This review will summarize our current state of knowledge of c-di-GMP signaling in bacteria with a focus on protein and RNA binding partners of the second messenger. Efforts towards the synthesis of c-di-GMP and its analogs are discussed as well as studies aimed at targeting these macromolecular effectors with chemically synthesized cyclic dinucleotide analogs.

  3. Mg2+ mediates interaction between the voltage sensor and cytosolic domain to activate BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Hu, Lei; Shi, Jingyi; Delaloye, Kelli; Horrigan, Frank T; Cui, Jianmin

    2007-11-13

    The voltage-sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-dependent ion channels and enzymes is critical for cellular responses to membrane potential. The VSD can also be regulated by interaction with intracellular proteins and ligands, but how this occurs is poorly understood. Here, we show that the VSD of the BK-type K(+) channel is regulated by a state-dependent interaction with its own tethered cytosolic domain that depends on both intracellular Mg(2+) and the open state of the channel pore. Mg(2+) bound to the cytosolic RCK1 domain enhances VSD activation by electrostatic interaction with Arg-213 in transmembrane segment S4. Our results demonstrate that a cytosolic domain can come close enough to the VSD to regulate its activity electrostatically, thereby elucidating a mechanism of Mg(2+)-dependent activation in BK channels and suggesting a general pathway by which intracellular factors can modulate the function of voltage-dependent proteins.

  4. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate transcription of target genes. Whether the formation of functional tetramers is a widespread property of plant MADS domain proteins, or it is specific to few of these transcriptional regulators remains unclear. Results We analyzed the structure of the network of physical interactions among MADS domain proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined the abundance of subgraphs that represent the connection pattern expected for a MADS domain protein heterotetramer. These subgraphs were significantly more abundant in the MADS domain protein interaction network than in randomized analogous networks. Importantly, these subgraphs are not significantly frequent in a protein interaction network of TCP plant transcription factors, when compared to expectation by chance. In addition, we found that MADS domain proteins in tetramer-like subgraphs are more likely to be expressed jointly than proteins in other subgraphs. This effect is mainly due to proteins in the monophyletic MIKC clade, as there is no association between tetramer-like subgraphs and co-expression for proteins outside this clade. Conclusions Our results support that the tendency to form functional tetramers is widespread in the MADS domain protein-protein interaction network. Our observations also suggest that this trend is prevalent, or perhaps exclusive, for proteins in the MIKC clade. Because it is possible to retrodict several experimental results from our analyses, our work can be an important aid to make new predictions and facilitates experimental research on plant MADS domain proteins. PMID:24468197

  5. Structural Evidence for Direct Interactions Between the BRCT Domains of Human BRCA1 and a Phospho-Peptide from Human ACC1

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,Y.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    The tandem BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains are phospho-serine/threonine recognition modules essential for the function of BRCA1. Recent studies suggest that acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), an enzyme with crucial roles in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis and lipogenesis and essential for cancer cell survival, may be a novel binding partner for BRCA1, through interactions with its BRCT domains. We report here the crystal structure at 3.2 Angstroms resolution of human BRCA1 BRCT domains in complex with a phospho-peptide from human ACC1 (p-ACC1 peptide, with the sequence 1258-DSPPQ-pS-PTFPEAGH-1271), which provides molecular evidence for direct interactions between BRCA1 and ACC1. The p-ACC1 peptide is bound in an extended conformation, located in a groove between the tandem BRCT domains. There are recognizable and significant structural differences to the binding modes of two other phospho-peptides to these domains, from BACH1 and CtIP, even though they share a conserved pSer-Pro-(Thr/Val)-Phe motif. Our studies establish a framework for understanding the regulation of lipid biosynthesis by BRCA1 through its inhibition of ACC1 activity, which could be a novel tumor suppressor function of BRCA1.

  6. Higher risk of death among MEN1 patients with mutations in the JunD interacting domain: a Groupe d'etude des Tumeurs Endocrines (GTE) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Faivre, Laurence; Cardot-Bauters, Catherine; Calender, Alain; Murat, Arnaud; Giraud, Sophie; Niccoli, Patricia; Odou, Marie-Françoise; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Barlier, Anne; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Clauser, Eric; Tabarin, Antoine; Parfait, Béatrice; Chabre, Olivier; Castermans, Emilie; Beckers, Albert; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Le Bras, Morgane; Delemer, Brigitte; Bouchard, Philippe; Guilhem, Isabelle; Rohmer, Vincent; Goichot, Bernard; Caron, Philippe; Baudin, Eric; Chanson, Philippe; Groussin, Lionel; Du Boullay, Hélène; Weryha, Georges; Lecomte, Pierre; Penfornis, Alfred; Bihan, Hélène; Archambeaud, Françoise; Kerlan, Véronique; Duron, Françoise; Kuhn, Jean-Marc; Vergès, Bruno; Rodier, Michel; Renard, Michel; Sadoul, Jean-Louis; Binquet, Christine; Goudet, Pierre

    2013-05-15

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 (MEN1), which is secondary to mutation of the MEN1 gene, is a rare autosomal-dominant disease that predisposes mutation carriers to endocrine tumors. Although genotype-phenotype studies have so far failed to identify any statistical correlations, some families harbor recurrent tumor patterns. The function of MENIN is unclear, but has been described through the discovery of its interacting partners. Mutations in the interacting domains of MENIN functional partners have been shown to directly alter its regulation abilities. We report on a cohort of MEN1 patients from the Groupe d'étude des Tumeurs Endocrines. Patients with a molecular diagnosis and a clinical follow-up, totaling 262 families and 806 patients, were included. Associations between mutation type, location or interacting factors of the MENIN protein and death as well as the occurrence of MEN1-related tumors were tested using a frailty Cox model to adjust for potential heterogeneity across families. Accounting for the heterogeneity across families, the overall risk of death was significantly higher when mutations affected the JunD interacting domain (adjusted HR = 1.88: 95%-CI = 1.15-3.07). Patients had a higher risk of death from cancers of the MEN1 spectrum (HR = 2.34; 95%-CI = 1.23-4.43). This genotype-phenotype correlation study confirmed the lack of direct genotype-phenotype correlations. However, patients with mutations affecting the JunD interacting domain had a higher risk of death secondary to a MEN1 tumor and should thus be considered for surgical indications, genetic counseling and follow-up.

  7. The dipole moment of the electron carrier adrenodoxin is not critical for redox partner interaction and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hannemann, Frank; Guyot, Arnaud; Zöllner, Andy; Müller, Jürgen J; Heinemann, Udo; Bernhardt, Rita

    2009-07-01

    Dipole moments of proteins arise from helical dipoles, hydrogen bond networks and charged groups at the protein surface. High protein dipole moments were suggested to contribute to the electrostatic steering between redox partners in electron transport chains of respiration, photosynthesis and steroid biosynthesis, although so far experimental evidence for this hypothesis was missing. In order to probe this assumption, we changed the dipole moment of the electron transfer protein adrenodoxin and investigated the influence of this on protein-protein interactions and electron transfer. In bovine adrenodoxin, the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin of the adrenal glands, a dipole moment of 803 Debye was calculated for a full-length adrenodoxin model based on the Adx(4-108) and the wild type adrenodoxin crystal structures. Large distances and asymmetric distribution of the charged residues in the molecule mainly determine the observed high value. In order to analyse the influence of the resulting inhomogeneous electric field on the biological function of this electron carrier the molecular dipole moment was systematically changed. Five recombinant adrenodoxin mutants with successively reduced dipole moment (from 600 to 200 Debye) were analysed for their redox properties, their binding affinities to the redox partner proteins and for their function during electron transfer-dependent steroid hydroxylation. None of the mutants, not even the quadruple mutant K6E/K22Q/K24Q/K98E with a dipole moment reduced by about 70% showed significant changes in the protein function as compared with the unmodified adrenodoxin demonstrating that neither the formation of the transient complex nor the biological activity of the electron transfer chain of the endocrine glands was affected. This is the first experimental evidence that the high dipole moment observed in electron transfer proteins is not involved in electrostatic steering among the proteins in the redox chain.

  8. Domain structures and inter-domain interactions defining the holoenzyme architecture of archaeal d-family DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Ikuo; Matsui, Eriko; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Hideshi

    2013-07-05

    Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD) forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  9. {pi} and {rho} mesons, and their diquark partners, from a contact interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H. L. L.; Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Roberts, C. D.; Wilson, D. J.

    2011-06-15

    We present a unified Dyson-Schwinger equation treatment of static and electromagnetic properties of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, and scalar and axial-vector diquark correlations, based upon a vector-vector contact interaction. A basic motivation for this paper is the need to document a comparison between the electromagnetic form factors of mesons and those diquarks that play a material role in nucleon structure. A notable result, therefore, is the large degree of similarity between related meson and diquark form factors. The simplicity of the interaction enables computation of the form factors at arbitrarily large spacelike Q{sup 2}, which enables us to expose a zero in the {rho}-meson electric form factor at z{sub Q}{sup {rho}}{approx_equal}{radical}6m{sub {rho}}. Notably, r{sub {rho}}zQ{sup {rho}}{approx_equal}r{sub D}z{sub Q}{sup D}, where r{sub {rho}} and r{sub D} are, respectively, the electric radii of the {rho}-meson and deuteron.

  10. Pinning induced by inter-domain wall interactions in planar magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T.J.; Bryan, M.T.; Fry, P.W.; Fundi, P.M.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D.A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-10-30

    We have investigated pinning potentials created by inter-domain wall magnetostatic interactions in planar magnetic nanowires. We show that these potentials can take the form of an energy barrier or an energy well depending on the walls' relative monopole moments, and that the applied magnetic fields required to overcome these potentials are significant. Both transverse and vortex wall pairs are investigated and it is found that transverse walls interact more strongly due to dipolar coupling between their magnetization structures. Simple analytical models which allow the effects of inter-domain wall interactions to be estimated are also presented.

  11. Bacterial interactomes: Interacting protein partners share similar function and are validated in independent assays more frequently than previously reported.

    DOE PAGES

    Shatsky, Maxim; Allen, Simon; Gold, Barbara; ...

    2016-05-01

    Numerous affinity purification – mass-spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens have each defined thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions (PPIs), most between functionally unrelated proteins. The accuracy of these networks, however, is under debate. Here we present an AP-MS survey of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris together with a critical reanalysis of nine published bacterial Y2H and AP-MS screens. We have identified 459 high confidence PPIs from D. vulgaris and 391 from Escherichia coli. Compared to the nine published interactomes, our two networks are smaller; are much less highly connected; have significantly lower false discovery rates; and are much moremore » enriched in protein pairs that are encoded in the same operon, have similar functions, and are reproducibly detected in other physical interaction assays. Lastly, our work establishes more stringent benchmarks for the properties of protein interactomes and suggests that bona fide PPIs much more frequently involve protein partners that are annotated with similar functions or that can be validated in independent assays than earlier studies suggested.« less

  12. Bacterial interactomes: Interacting protein partners share similar function and are validated in independent assays more frequently than previously reported.

    SciTech Connect

    Shatsky, Maxim; Allen, Simon; Gold, Barbara; Liu, Nancy L.; Juba, Thomas R.; Elias, Dwayne A; Reveco, Sonia A.; Prathapam, Ramadevi; He, Jennifer; Yang, Wenhong; Szakal, Evelin D.; Liu, Haichuan; Singer, Mary E.; Geller, Jil T.; Lam, Bonita R.; Saini, Avneesh; Trotter, Valentine V.; Hall, Steven C.; Fisher, Susan J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Chhabra, Swapnil; Hazen, Terry C.; Wall, Judy D.; Witkowska, Ewa; Biggin, Mark D.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Butland, Gareth

    2016-05-01

    Numerous affinity purification – mass-spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens have each defined thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions (PPIs), most between functionally unrelated proteins. The accuracy of these networks, however, is under debate. Here we present an AP-MS survey of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris together with a critical reanalysis of nine published bacterial Y2H and AP-MS screens. We have identified 459 high confidence PPIs from D. vulgaris and 391 from Escherichia coli. Compared to the nine published interactomes, our two networks are smaller; are much less highly connected; have significantly lower false discovery rates; and are much more enriched in protein pairs that are encoded in the same operon, have similar functions, and are reproducibly detected in other physical interaction assays. Lastly, our work establishes more stringent benchmarks for the properties of protein interactomes and suggests that bona fide PPIs much more frequently involve protein partners that are annotated with similar functions or that can be validated in independent assays than earlier studies suggested.

  13. Dual regulatory switch through interactions of Tcf7l2/Tcf4 with stage-specific partners propels oligodendroglial maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chuntao; Deng, Yaqi; Liu, Lei; Yu, Kun; Zhang, Liguo; Wang, Haibo; He, Xuelian; Wang, Jincheng; Lu, Changqing; Wu, Laiman N; Weng, Qinjie; Mao, Meng; Li, Jianrong; van Es, Johan H; Xin, Mei; Parry, Lee; Goldman, Steven A; Clevers, Hans; Lu, Q. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin inhibits oligodendrocyte myelination. Tcf7l2/Tcf4, a β-catenin transcriptional partner, is required for oligodendrocyte differentiation. How Tcf7l2 modifies β-catenin signalling and controls myelination remains elusive. Here we define a stage-specific Tcf7l2-regulated transcriptional circuitry in initiating and sustaining oligodendrocyte differentiation. Multistage genome occupancy analyses reveal that Tcf7l2 serially cooperates with distinct co-regulators to control oligodendrocyte lineage progression. At the differentiation onset, Tcf7l2 interacts with a transcriptional co-repressor Kaiso/Zbtb33 to block β-catenin signalling. During oligodendrocyte maturation, Tcf7l2 recruits and cooperates with Sox10 to promote myelination. In that context, Tcf7l2 directly activates cholesterol biosynthesis genes and cholesterol supplementation partially rescues oligodendrocyte differentiation defects in Tcf712 mutants. Together, we identify stage-specific co-regulators Kaiso and Sox10 that sequentially interact with Tcf7l2 to coordinate the switch at the transitions of differentiation initiation and maturation during oligodendrocyte development, and point to a previously unrecognized role of Tcf7l2 in control of cholesterol biosynthesis for CNS myelinogenesis. PMID:26955760

  14. Tctex-1, a Novel Interaction Partner of Rab3D, Is Required for Osteoclastic Bone Resorption ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pavlos, Nathan J.; Cheng, Tak Sum; Qin, An; Ng, Pei Ying; Feng, Hao-Tian; Ang, Estabelle S. M.; Carrello, Amerigo; Sung, Ching-Hwa; Jahn, Reinhard; Zheng, Ming-Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular transport along microtubules must be strictly regulated to sustain the unique structural and functional polarization of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the molecular mechanisms bridging these vesicle-microtubule interactions remain largely obscure. Rab3D, a member of the Rab3 subfamily (Rab3A/B/C/D) of small exocytotic GTPases, represents a core component of the osteoclastic vesicle transport machinery. Here, we identify a new Rab3D-interacting partner, Tctex-1, a light chain of the cytoplasmic dynein microtubule motor complex, by a yeast two-hybrid screen. We demonstrate that Tctex-1 binds specifically to Rab3D in a GTP-dependent manner and co-occupies Rab3D-bearing vesicles in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Tctex-1 and Rab3D intimately associate with the dynein motor complex and microtubules in osteoclasts. Finally, targeted disruption of Tctex-1 by RNA interference significantly impairs bone resorption capacity and mislocalizes Rab3D vesicles in osteoclasts, attesting to the notion that components of the Rab3D-trafficking pathway contribute to the maintenance of osteoclastic resorptive function. PMID:21262767

  15. Membrane interaction of the factor VIIIa discoidin domains in atomistic detail

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jesper J.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Peters, Günther H.; Faber, Johan H.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Olsen, Ole H.

    2016-01-01

    A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor (F)VIIIa, the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipid membrane by partial or full insertion of their extruding loops (the spikes). However, the two domains adopted different molecular orientations in their membrane-bound states; FVIII C2 roughly positioned normal to the membrane plane, while FVIII C1 displayed a multitude of tilted orientations. The results indicate that FVIII C1 may be important in modulating the orientation of the FVIIIa molecule to optimize the interaction with FIXa, which is anchored to the membrane via its γ-carboxyglutamic acid-rich (Gla)-domain. Additionally, a structural change was observed in FVIII C1 in the coiled main chain leading the first spike. A tight interaction with one lipid per domain, similar to what has been suggested for the homologous FVa C2, is characterized. Finally, we rationalize known FVIII antibody epitopes and the scarcity of documented hemophilic missense mutations related to improper membrane binding of FVIIIa, based on the prevalent non-specificity of ionic interactions in the simulated membrane-bound states of FVIII C1 and FVIII C2. PMID:26346528

  16. Calsequestrin interacts directly with the cardiac ryanodine receptor luminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Handhle, Ahmed; Ormonde, Chloe E.; Thomas, N. Lowri; Bralesford, Catherine; Williams, Alan J.; Lai, F. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac muscle contraction requires sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release mediated by the quaternary complex comprising the ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2), calsequestrin 2 (CSQ2), junctin (encoded by ASPH) and triadin. Here, we demonstrate that a direct interaction exists between RyR2 and CSQ2. Topologically, CSQ2 binding occurs at the first luminal loop of RyR2. Co-expression of RyR2 and CSQ2 in a human cell line devoid of the other quaternary complex proteins results in altered Ca2+-release dynamics compared to cells expressing RyR2 only. These findings provide a new perspective for understanding the SR luminal Ca2+ sensor and its involvement in cardiac physiology and disease. PMID:27609834

  17. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on X-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with R osetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several R osetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions.

  18. Apolipoprotein E4 domain interaction accelerates diet-induced atherosclerosis in hypomorphic Arg-61 Apoe mice

    PubMed Central

    Eberlé, Delphine; Kim, Roy Y.; Luk, Fu Sang; de Mochel, Nabora Soledad Reyes; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Birkeland, Andrew C.; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis, but the structural components underlying this association remain unclear. ApoE4 is characterized by two biophysical properties: domain interaction and molten globule state. Substituting Arg-61 for Thr-61 in mouse apoE introduces domain interaction without molten globule state, allowing us to delineate potential pro-atherogenic effects of domain interaction in vivo. Methods and Results We studied atherosclerosis susceptibility of hypomorphic Apoe mice expressing either Thr-61 or Arg-61 apoE (ApoeTh/h or ApoeRh/h mice). On a chow diet, both mouse models were normo-lipidemic with similar levels of plasma apoE and lipoproteins. However, on a high cholesterol diet, ApoeRh/h mice displayed increased levels of total plasma cholesterol and VLDL as well as larger atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic root, arch and descending aorta compared to ApoeTh/h mice. In addition, evidence of cellular dysfunction was identified in peritoneal ApoeRh/h macrophages which released lower amounts of apoE in culture medium and displayed increased expression of MHC class II molecules. Conclusions These data indicate that domain interaction mediates pro-atherogenic effects of apoE4 in part by modulating lipoprotein metabolism and macrophage biology. Pharmaceutical targeting of domain interaction could lead to new treatments for atherosclerosis in apoE4 individuals. PMID:22441102

  19. Using siRNA to define functional interactions between melanopsin and multiple G Protein partners.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Steven; Jagannath, Aarti; Hickey, Doron; Gatti, Silvia; Wood, Matthew; Peirson, Stuart N; Foster, Russell G; Hankins, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) represent a third class of ocular photoreceptors and mediate a range of non-image forming responses to light. Melanopsin is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and existing data suggest that it employs a membrane bound signalling cascade involving Gnaq/11 type G proteins. However, to date the precise identity of the Gα subunits involved in melanopsin phototransduction remains poorly defined. Here we show that Gnaq, Gna11 and Gna14 are highly co-expressed in pRGCs of the mouse retina. Furthermore, using RNAi based gene silencing we show that melanopsin can signal via Gnaq, Gna11 or Gna14 in vitro, and demonstrate that multiple members of the Gnaq/11 subfamily, including Gna14 and at least Gnaq or Gna11, can participate in melanopsin phototransduction in vivo and contribute to the pupillary light responses of mice lacking rod and cone photoreceptors. This diversity of G protein interactions suggests additional complexity in the melanopsin phototransduction cascade and may provide a basis for generating the diversity of light responses observed from pRGC subtypes.

  20. Defective interactions of protein partner with ion channels and transporters as alternative mechanisms of membrane channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    The past twenty years have revealed the existence of numerous ion channel mutations resulting in human pathology. Ion channels provide the basis of diverse cellular functions, ranging from hormone secretion, excitation-contraction coupling, cell signaling, immune response, and trans-epithelial transport. Therefore, the regulation of biophysical properties of channels is vital in human physiology. Only within the last decade has the role of non-ion channel components come to light in regard to ion channel spatial, temporal, and biophysical regulation in physiology. A growing number of auxiliary components have been determined to play elemental roles in excitable cell physiology, with dysfunction resulting in disorders and related manifestations. This review focuses on the broad implications of such dysfunction, focusing on disease-causing mutations that alter interactions between ion channels and auxiliary ion channel components in a diverse set of human excitable cell disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé

  1. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM.

  2. Application of histone modification-specific interaction domains as an alternative to antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kungulovski, Goran; Kycia, Ina; Tamas, Raluca; Jurkowska, Renata Z.; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Henry, Chisato; Reinhardt, Richard; Labhart, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones constitute a major chromatin indexing mechanism, and their proper characterization is of highest biological importance. So far, PTM-specific antibodies have been the standard reagent for studying histone PTMs despite caveats such as lot-to-lot variability of specificity and binding affinity. Herein, we successfully employed naturally occurring and engineered histone modification interacting domains for detection and identification of histone PTMs and ChIP-like enrichment of different types of chromatin. Our results demonstrate that histone interacting domains are robust and highly specific reagents that can replace or complement histone modification antibodies. These domains can be produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli at low cost and constant quality. Protein design of reading domains allows for generation of novel specificities, addition of affinity tags, and preparation of PTM binding pocket variants as matching negative controls, which is not possible with antibodies. PMID:25301795

  3. Structures of and Interactions Between Domains of Trigger Factor from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hackert,E.; Hendrickson, W.

    2007-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a eubacterial chaperone that associates with ribosomes at the peptide-exit tunnel and also occurs in excess free in the cytosol. TF is a three-domain protein that appears to exist in a dynamic equilibrium of oligomerization states and interdomain conformations. X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking were used to study the roles of the N- and C-terminal domains of Thermotoga maritima TF in TF oligomerization and chaperone activity. The structural conservation of both the N- and C-terminal TF domains was unambiguously established. The biochemical and crystallographic data reveal a tendency for these domains to partake in diverse and apparently nonspecific protein-protein interactions. It is found that the T. maritima and Escherichia coli TF surfaces lack evident exposed hydrophobic patches. Taken together, these data suggest that TF chaperones could interact with nascent proteins via hydrophilic surfaces.

  4. 14-3-3 and its binding partners are regulators of protein–protein interactions during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shengyi; Wong, Elissa W P; Li, Michelle W M; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, spermiation takes place at the adluminal edge of the seminiferous epithelium at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during which fully developed spermatids (i.e. spermatozoa) detach from the epithelium in adult rat testes. This event coincides with the migration of preleptotene/leptotene spermatocytes across the blood–testis barrier from the basal to the apical (or adluminal) compartment. At stage XIV of the epithelial cycle, Pachytene spermatocytes (diploid, 2n) differentiate into diplotene spermatocytes (tetraploid, 4n) in the apical compartment of the epithelium, which begin meiosis I to be followed by meiosis II to form spermatids (haploid, 1n) at stage XIVof the epithelial cycle. These spermatids, in turn, undergo extensive morphological changes and traverse the seminiferous epithelium until they differentiate into elongated spermatids. Thus, there are extensive changes at the Sertoli–Sertoli and Sertoli–germ cell interface via protein ‘coupling’ and ‘uncoupling’ between cell adhesion protein complexes, as well as changes in interactions between integral membrane proteins and their peripheral adaptors, regulatory protein kinases and phosphatases, and the cytoskeletal proteins. These precisely coordinated protein–protein interactions affect cell adhesion and cell movement. In this review, we focus on the 14-3-3 protein family, whose members have different binding partners in the seminiferous epithelium. Recent studies have illustrated that 14-3-3 affects protein–protein interactions in the seminiferous epithelium, and regulates cell adhesion possibly via its effects on intracellular protein trafficking and cell-polarity proteins. This review provides a summary on the latest findings regarding the role of 14-3-3 family of proteins and their potential implications on spermatogenesis. We also highlight research areas that deserve attentions by investigators. PMID:19366886

  5. Integrating natural language processing and web GIS for interactive knowledge domain visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangming

    Recent years have seen a powerful shift towards data-rich environments throughout society. This has extended to a change in how the artifacts and products of scientific knowledge production can be analyzed and understood. Bottom-up approaches are on the rise that combine access to huge amounts of academic publications with advanced computer graphics and data processing tools, including natural language processing. Knowledge domain visualization is one of those multi-technology approaches, with its aim of turning domain-specific human knowledge into highly visual representations in order to better understand the structure and evolution of domain knowledge. For example, network visualizations built from co-author relations contained in academic publications can provide insight on how scholars collaborate with each other in one or multiple domains, and visualizations built from the text content of articles can help us understand the topical structure of knowledge domains. These knowledge domain visualizations need to support interactive viewing and exploration by users. Such spatialization efforts are increasingly looking to geography and GIS as a source of metaphors and practical technology solutions, even when non-georeferenced information is managed, analyzed, and visualized. When it comes to deploying spatialized representations online, web mapping and web GIS can provide practical technology solutions for interactive viewing of knowledge domain visualizations, from panning and zooming to the overlay of additional information. This thesis presents a novel combination of advanced natural language processing - in the form of topic modeling - with dimensionality reduction through self-organizing maps and the deployment of web mapping/GIS technology towards intuitive, GIS-like, exploration of a knowledge domain visualization. A complete workflow is proposed and implemented that processes any corpus of input text documents into a map form and leverages a web

  6. Crystal structure and interaction studies of the human FBxo3 ApaG domain

    PubMed Central

    Krzysiak, Troy C.; Chen, Bill B.; Lear, Travis; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of proinflammatory cytokines, mediated by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs), is in part triggered by the degradation of the F-box protein, FBxl2, via an E3 ligase that contains another F-box protein, FBxo3. The ApaG domain of FBxo3 is required for the interaction with and degradation of FBxl2 [Mallampalli RK et al., (2013) J Immunol 191, 5247–5255]. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the human FBxo3 ApaG domain, residues 278–407, at 2.0 Å resolution. Like bacterial ApaG proteins, this domain is characterized by a classic Immunoglobin/Fibronectin III-type fold, comprising a seven-stranded β-sheet core, surrounded by four extended loops. Although cation binding had been proposed for bacterial ApaG proteins, no interactions with Mg2+ or Co2+ were detected for the human ApaG domain. In addition, dinucleotide polyphosphates, which have been reported to be second messengers in the inflammation response and targets of the bacterial apaG-containing operon, are not bound by the human ApaG domain. In the context of the full-length protein, loop 1, comprising residues 294–303, is critical for the interaction with FBxl2. However, titration of the individual ApaG domain with a 15-mer FBxl2 peptide that was phosphorylated on the crucial T404, as well as the inability of the ApaG domain to interact with full-length FBxl2, assessed by coimmunoprecipitation, indicate that the ApaG domain alone is necessary, but not sufficient for binding and degradation of FBxl2. PMID:27010866

  7. Investigating the Role of Large-Scale Domain Dynamics in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Delaforge, Elise; Milles, Sigrid; Huang, Jie-rong; Bouvier, Denis; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Sattler, Michael; Hart, Darren J.; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered linkers provide multi-domain proteins with degrees of conformational freedom that are often essential for function. These highly dynamic assemblies represent a significant fraction of all proteomes, and deciphering the physical basis of their interactions represents a considerable challenge. Here we describe the difficulties associated with mapping the large-scale domain dynamics and describe two recent examples where solution state methods, in particular NMR spectroscopy, are used to investigate conformational exchange on very different timescales. PMID:27679800

  8. Spontaneous domain nucleation under in-plane fields in ultrathin films with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Parnika; Bauer, Uwe; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we show that applying a hard axis field reduces the energy barrier for the spontaneous formation of a multi-domain state in magnetic ultrathin films sandwiched between a heavy metal and an oxide. This provides a simple technique to generate a metastable multi-domain state in magnetic films where the ground state is uniform. This approach could be particularly interesting in materials with strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as a means to realize metastable chiral textures.

  9. Two cell-cycle regulated SET-domain proteins interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Cécile; Sozzani, Rosangela; Glab, Nathalie; Domenichini, Séverine; Perennes, Claudette; Cella, Rino; Kondorosi, Eva; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2006-08-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) functions as a sliding clamp for DNA polymerase, and is thus a key actor in DNA replication. It is also involved in DNA repair, maintenance of heterochromatic regions throughout replication, cell cycle regulation and programmed cell death. Identification of PCNA partners is therefore necessary for understanding these processes. Here we identify two Arabidopsis SET-domain proteins that interact with PCNA: ATXR5 and ATXR6. A truncated ATXR5Deltaex2, incapable of interacting with PCNA, also occurs in planta. ATXR6, upregulated during the S phase, is upregulated by AtE2F transcription factors, suggesting that it is required for S-phase progression. The two proteins differ in their subcellular localization: ATXR5 has a dual localization in plastids and in the nucleus, whereas ATXR6 is solely nuclear. This indicates that the two proteins may play different roles in plant cells. However, overexpression of either ATXR5 or ATXR6 causes male sterility because of the degeneration of defined cell types. Taken together, our results suggest that both proteins may play a role in the cell cycle or DNA replication, and that the activity of ATXR5 may be regulated via its subcellular localization.

  10. Comparing domain interactions within antibody Fabs with kappa and lambda light chains

    PubMed Central

    Toughiri, Raheleh; Wu, Xiufeng; Ruiz, Diana; Huang, Flora; Crissman, John W.; Dickey, Mark; Froning, Karen; Conner, Elaine M.; Cujec, Thomas P.; Demarest, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT IgG antibodies are multi-domain proteins with complex inter-domain interactions. Human IgG heavy chains (HCs) associate with light chains (LCs) of the κ or λ isotype to form mature antibodies capable of binding antigen. The HC/LC interaction involves 4 domains: VH and CH1 from the HC and VL and CL from the LC. Human Fabs with κ LCs have been well characterized for their unfolding behaviors and demonstrate a significant level of cooperativity and stabilization when all 4 domains are intact. Very little is known regarding the thermodynamic properties of human Fabs with λ LCs. Here, we dissect the domain contributions to Fab stability for both κ and λ LC-containing Fabs. We find the cooperativity of unfolding between the constant domains, CH1/Cλ, and variable domains, VH/Vλ, within λ LC-containing Fabs is significantly weaker than that of κ LC-containing Fabs. The data suggests there may not be an evolutionary necessity for strong variable/constant domain cooperativity within λ LC-containing Fabs. After investigating the biophysical properties of Fabs with mismatched variable and constant domain subunits (e.g., VH/Vκ paired with CH1/Cλ or T cell receptor Cα/Cβ), the major role of the constant domains for both κ- and λ-containing Fabs may be to reduce the hydrophobic exposure at the VH/VL interface. Even though Fabs with these non-native pairings were thermodynamically less stable, they secreted well from mammalian cells as well behaved monodisperse proteins, which was in contrast to what was observed with the VH/Vκ and VH/Vλ scFvs that secreted as a mixture of monomer and aggregates. PMID:27454112

  11. Comparing domain interactions within antibody Fabs with kappa and lambda light chains.

    PubMed

    Toughiri, Raheleh; Wu, Xiufeng; Ruiz, Diana; Huang, Flora; Crissman, John W; Dickey, Mark; Froning, Karen; Conner, Elaine M; Cujec, Thomas P; Demarest, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    IgG antibodies are multi-domain proteins with complex inter-domain interactions. Human IgG heavy chains (HCs) associate with light chains (LCs) of the κ or λ isotype to form mature antibodies capable of binding antigen. The HC/LC interaction involves 4 domains: VH and CH1 from the HC and VL and CL from the LC. Human Fabs with κ LCs have been well characterized for their unfolding behaviors and demonstrate a significant level of cooperativity and stabilization when all 4 domains are intact. Very little is known regarding the thermodynamic properties of human Fabs with λ LCs. Here, we dissect the domain contributions to Fab stability for both κ and λ LC-containing Fabs. We find the cooperativity of unfolding between the constant domains, CH1/Cλ, and variable domains, VH/Vλ, within λ LC-containing Fabs is significantly weaker than that of κ LC-containing Fabs. The data suggests there may not be an evolutionary necessity for strong variable/constant domain cooperativity within λ LC-containing Fabs. After investigating the biophysical properties of Fabs with mismatched variable and constant domain subunits (e.g., VH/Vκ paired with CH1/Cλ or T cell receptor Cα/Cβ), the major role of the constant domains for both κ- and λ-containing Fabs may be to reduce the hydrophobic exposure at the VH/VL interface. Even though Fabs with these non-native pairings were thermodynamically less stable, they secreted well from mammalian cells as well behaved monodisperse proteins, which was in contrast to what was observed with the VH/Vκ and VH/Vλ scFvs that secreted as a mixture of monomer and aggregates.

  12. The measles virus phosphoprotein interacts with the linker domain of STAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Devaux, Patricia Priniski, Lauren; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-09-15

    The measles virus (MV) phosphoprotein (P) and V proteins block the interferon (IFN) response by impeding phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). We characterized how STAT1 mutants interact with P and JAK1 phosphorylation. Certain mutants of the linker, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2), or the transactivation domain had reduced or abolished phosphorylation through JAK1 after IFN treatment. Other mutants, mainly localized in the linker, failed to interact with P as documented by the lack of interference with nuclear translocation. Thus the functional footprint of P on STAT1 localizes mainly to the linker domain; there is also some overlap with the STAT1 phosphorylation functional footprint on the SH2 domain. Based on these observations, we discuss how the MV-P might operate to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway. - Highlights: • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for MV-P interaction. • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for STAT1 phosphorylation. • Residues interferring with both functions have similar location on STAT1. • The viral P and V proteins may operate in concert to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway.

  13. Systematic Analysis of Bacterial Effector-Postsynaptic Density 95/Disc Large/Zonula Occludens-1 (PDZ) Domain Interactions Demonstrates Shigella OspE Protein Promotes Protein Kinase C Activation via PDLIM Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-ryun; Allen, John E.; Russo, Brian; Lee, Soo Young; Heindl, Jason E.; Baxt, Leigh A.; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Kahoud, Emily; MacBeath, Gavin; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens depend on the activities of bacterial effector proteins that are delivered into eukaryotic cells via specialized secretion systems. Effector protein function largely depends on specific subcellular targeting and specific interactions with cellular ligands. PDZ domains are common domains that serve to provide specificity in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic systems. We show that putative PDZ-binding motifs are significantly enriched among effector proteins delivered into mammalian cells by certain bacterial pathogens. We use PDZ domain microarrays to identify candidate interaction partners of the Shigella flexneri effector proteins OspE1 and OspE2, which contain putative PDZ-binding motifs. We demonstrate in vitro and in cells that OspE proteins interact with PDLIM7, a member of the PDLIM family of proteins, which contain a PDZ domain and one or more LIM domains, protein interaction domains that participate in a wide variety of functions, including activation of isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). We demonstrate that activation of PKC during S. flexneri infection is attenuated in the absence of PDLIM7 or OspE proteins and that the OspE PDZ-binding motif is required for wild-type levels of PKC activation. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of OspE to PDLIM7 during infection regulates the activity of PKC isoforms that bind to the PDLIM7 LIM domain. PMID:25124035

  14. Krit 1 interactions with microtubules and membranes are regulated by Rap1 and integrin cytoplasmic domain associated protein-1.

    PubMed

    Béraud-Dufour, Sophie; Gautier, Romain; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Chardin, Pierre; Faurobert, Eva

    2007-11-01

    The small G protein Rap1 regulates diverse cellular processes such as integrin activation, cell adhesion, cell-cell junction formation and cell polarity. It is crucial to identify Rap1 effectors to better understand the signalling pathways controlling these processes. Krev interaction trapped 1 (Krit1), a protein with FERM (band four-point-one/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain, was identified as a Rap1 partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen, but this interaction was not confirmed in subsequent studies. As the evidence suggests a role for Krit1 in Rap1-dependent pathways, we readdressed this question. In the present study, we demonstrate by biochemical assays that Krit1 interacts with Rap1A, preferentially its GTP-bound form. We show that, like other FERM proteins, Krit1 adopts two conformations: a closed conformation in which its N-terminal NPAY motif interacts with its C-terminus and an opened conformation bound to integrin cytoplasmic domain associated protein (ICAP)-1, a negative regulator of focal adhesion assembly. We show that a ternary complex can form in vitro between Krit1, Rap1 and ICAP-1 and that Rap1 binds the Krit1 FERM domain in both closed and opened conformations. Unlike ICAP-1, Rap1 does not open Krit1. Using sedimentation assays, we show that Krit1 binds in vitro to microtubules through its N- and C-termini and that Rap1 and ICAP-1 inhibit Krit1 binding to microtubules. Consistently, YFP-Krit1 localizes on cyan fluorescent protein-labelled microtubules in baby hamster kidney cells and is delocalized from microtubules upon coexpression with activated Rap1V12. Finally, we show that Krit1 binds to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-P(2)-containing liposomes and that Rap1 enhances this binding. Based on these results, we propose a model in which Krit1 would be delivered by microtubules to the plasma membrane where it would be captured by Rap1 and ICAP-1.

  15. Tubulin domains for the interaction of microtubule associated protein DMAP-85 from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Henríquez, J P; Cambiazo, V; Maccioni, R B

    1996-05-24

    The interaction of microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) with the microtubule system has been characterized in depth in neuronal cells from various mammalian species. These proteins interact with well-defined domains within the acidic tubulin carboxyl-terminal regulatory region. However, there is little information on the mechanisms of MAPs-tubulin interactions in nonmammalian systems. Recently, a novel tau-like protein designated as DMAP-85 has been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, and the regulation of its interactions with cytoskeletal elements was analyzed throughout different developmental stages of this organism. In this report, the topographic domains involved in the binding of DMAP-85 with tubulin heterodimer were investigated. Affinity chromatography of DMAP-85 in matrixes of taxol-stabilized microtubules showed the reversible interaction of DMAP-85 with domains on the microtubular surface. Co-sedimentation studies using the subtilisin-treated tubulin (S-tubulin) indicated the lack of association of DMAP-85 to this tubulin moiety. Moreover, studies on affinity chromatography of the purified 4 kDa C-terminal tubulin peptide bound to an affinity column, confirmed that DMAP-85 interacts directly with this regulatory domain on tubulin subunits. Further studies on sequential affinity chromatography using a calmodulin affinity column followed by the microtubule column confirmed the similarities in the interaction behaviour of DMAP-85 with that of tau. DMAP-85 associated to both calmodulin and the microtubular polymer. These studies support the idea that the carboxyl-terminal region on tubulin constitutes a common binding domain for most microtubule-interacting proteins.

  16. Charting the Landscape of Tandem BRCT Domain-Mediated Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nicholas T.; Mesquita, Rafael D.; Sweet, Michael; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Li, Xueli; Liu, Yun; Nguyen, Huey; Thomas, C. Eric; Iversen, Edwin S.; Marsillac, Sylvia; Karchin, Rachel; Koomen, John; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved an intricate system to resolve DNA damage to prevent its transmission to daughter cells. This system, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) network, includes a large number of proteins responsible for detection of DNA damage, promotion of repair, and coordination with cell cycle progression. Because defects in this network can lead to cancer, this network constitutes a barrier against tumorigenesis. The BRCT domain is a modular protein domain critical for relaying signals in the DDR. We performed a systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions involving tandem BRCT domains (tBRCT) in the DDR by combining literature curation, yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens, and tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (TAP-MS). We identified one previously unrecognized BRCT protein and generated human protein-protein interaction network for this type of modular domain. This study also reveals several novel components in DNA damage signaling such as COMMD1 and mTORC2. Additionally, integration of tBRCT domain interactions with DDR phosphoprotein studies and analysis of kinase-substrate interactions revealed signaling subnetworks that may aid in understanding the involvement of tBRCT in disease and DNA repair. PMID:22990118

  17. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  18. Definition of a spliceosome interaction domain in yeast Prp2 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Edwalds-Gilbert, Gretchen; Kim, Dong-Ho; Silverman, Edward; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2004-02-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae splicing factor Prp2 is an RNA-dependent ATPase required before the first transesterification reaction in pre-mRNA splicing. Prp2 binds to the spliceosome in the absence of ATP and is released following ATP hydrolysis. It contains three domains: a unique N-terminal domain, a helicase domain that is highly conserved in the DExD/H protein family, and a C-terminal domain that is conserved in spliceosomal DEAH proteins Prp2, Prp16, Prp22, and Prp43. We examined the role of each domain of Prp2 by deletion mutagenesis. Whereas deletions of either the helicase or C-terminal domain are lethal, deletions in the N-terminal domain have no detectable effect on Prp2 activity. Overexpression of the C-terminal domain of Prp2 exacerbates the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a prp2(Ts) strain, suggesting that the C-domain interferes with the activity of the Prp2(Ts) protein. A genetic approach was then taken to study interactions between Prp2 and the spliceosome. Previously, we isolated dominant negative mutants in the helicase domain of Prp2 that inhibit the activity of wild-type Prp2 when the mutant protein is overexpressed. We mutagenized one prp2 release mutant gene and screened for loss of dominant negative function. Several weak binding mutants were isolated and mapped to the C terminus of Prp2, further indicating the importance of the C terminus in spliceosome binding. This study is the first to indicate that amino acid substitutions outside the helicase domain can abolish spliceosome contact and splicing activity of a spliceosomal DEAH protein.

  19. Fast and accurate multivariate Gaussian modeling of protein families: predicting residue contacts and protein-interaction partners.

    PubMed

    Baldassi, Carlo; Zamparo, Marco; Feinauer, Christoph; Procaccini, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo; Weigt, Martin; Pagnani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direct-coupling analysis, sparse inverse covariance estimation) have achieved a breakthrough towards this aim, and their predictions have been successfully implemented into tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction methods. However, due to the discrete nature of the underlying variable (amino-acids), exact inference requires exponential time in the protein length, and efficient approximations are needed for practical applicability. Here we propose a very efficient multivariate Gaussian modeling approach as a variant of direct-coupling analysis: the discrete amino-acid variables are replaced by continuous Gaussian random variables. The resulting statistical inference problem is efficiently and exactly solvable. We show that the quality of inference is comparable or superior to the one achieved by mean-field approximations to inference with discrete variables, as done by direct-coupling analysis. This is true for (i) the prediction of residue-residue contacts in proteins, and (ii) the identification of protein-protein interaction partner in bacterial signal transduction. An implementation of our multivariate Gaussian approach is available at the website http://areeweb.polito.it/ricerca/cmp/code.

  20. Meta-analysis of IDH-mutant cancers identifies EBF1 as an interaction partner for TET2.

    PubMed

    Guilhamon, Paul; Eskandarpour, Malihe; Halai, Dina; Wilson, Gareth A; Feber, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gomez, Valenti; Hergovich, Alexander; Tirabosco, Roberto; Fernanda Amary, M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Jundt, Gernot; Ross, Mark T; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Beck, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes 1 and 2 are frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), low-grade glioma, cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and chondrosarcoma (CS). For AML, low-grade glioma and CC, mutant IDH status is associated with a DNA hypermethylation phenotype, implicating altered epigenome dynamics in the aetiology of these cancers. Here we show that the IDH variants in CS are also associated with a hypermethylation phenotype and display increased production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, supporting the role of mutant IDH-produced 2-hydroxyglutarate as an inhibitor of TET-mediated DNA demethylation. Meta-analysis of the acute myeloid leukaemia, low-grade glioma, cholangiocarcinoma and CS methylation data identifies cancer-specific effectors within the retinoic acid receptor activation pathway among the hypermethylated targets. By analysing sequence motifs surrounding hypermethylated sites across the four cancer types, and using chromatin immunoprecipitation and western blotting, we identify the transcription factor EBF1 (early B-cell factor 1) as an interaction partner for TET2, suggesting a sequence-specific mechanism for regulating DNA methylation.

  1. UAP56 is a novel interacting partner of Bcr in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey D.

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 is an important regulator of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 binds to Bcr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between Bcr and UAP56 is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis. -- Abstract: Bcr is a serine/threonine kinase that is a critical regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell inflammation and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that Bcr acts in part via phosphorylation and inhibition of PPAR{gamma}. We have identified the RNA helicase UAP56 as another substrate of Bcr. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 blocks Bcr induced DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We also found that over expression of Bcr increased the expression of cyclin E and decreased the expression of p27. Knockdown of UAP56 reversed the effect of Bcr on cyclin E and p27 expression. Furthermore, we found that Bcr binds to UAP56 and demonstrate that binding of UAP56 to Bcr is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis in VSMC. Our data identify UAP56 as an important binding partner of Bcr and a novel target for inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  2. The Chloroplastic Protein THF1 Interacts with the Coiled-Coil Domain of the Disease Resistance Protein N′ and Regulates Light-Dependent Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Ken-Taro; Wallon, Thérèse; Sugiwaka, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2016-01-01

    One branch of plant immunity is mediated through nucleotide-binding/Leu-rich repeat (NB-LRR) family proteins that recognize specific effectors encoded by pathogens. Members of the I2-like family constitute a well-conserved subgroup of NB-LRRs from Solanaceae possessing a coiled-coil (CC) domain at their N termini. We show here that the CC domains of several I2-like proteins are able to induce a hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death associated with disease resistance. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified the chloroplastic protein Thylakoid Formation1 (THF1) as an interacting partner for several I2-like CC domains. Co-immunoprecipitations and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed that THF1 and I2-like CC domains interact in planta and that these interactions take place in the cytosol. Several HR-inducing I2-like CC domains have a negative effect on the accumulation of THF1, suggesting that the latter is destabilized by active CC domains. To confirm this model, we investigated N′, which recognizes the coat protein of most Tobamoviruses, as a prototypical member of the I2-like family. Transient expression and gene silencing data indicated that THF1 functions as a negative regulator of cell death and that activation of full-length N′ results in the destabilization of THF1. Consistent with the known function of THF1 in maintaining chloroplast homeostasis, we show that the HR induced by N′ is light-dependent. Together, our results define, to our knowledge, novel molecular mechanisms linking light and chloroplasts to the induction of cell death by a subgroup of NB-LRR proteins. PMID:26951433

  3. Interactions of ataxin-3 with its molecular partners in the protein machinery that sorts protein aggregates to the aggresome.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Marcella; Mazzucchelli, Serena; D'Urzo, Annalisa; Nardini, Marco; Konarev, Petr V; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Svergun, Dmitri I; Vanoni, Marco; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Ataxin-3 (AT3) is the protein that triggers the inherited neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 when its polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch close to the C-terminus exceeds a critical length. AT3 consists of the N-terminal globular Josephin domain (JD) and the C-terminal disordered one. It cleaves isopeptide bonds between ubiquitin monomers, an event involved in protein quality control mechanisms. AT3 has been implicated in the pathway that sorts aggregated protein to aggresomes via microtubules, in which dynein and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) also seem to be involved. By taking advantage of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we have investigated the interaction of AT3 with tubulin and HDAC6. Based on SAXS results, the AT3 oligomer, consisting of 6-7 subunits, tightly binds to the tubulin hexameric oligomer in a "parallel" fashion. By SPR analysis we have demonstrated that AT3 binds to tubulin dimer with a 50nM affinity. Binding fits with a Langmuir 1:1 model and involves a single binding interface. Nevertheless, the interaction surface consists of three distinct, discontinuous tubulin-binding regions (TBR), one located in the JD, and the two others in the disordered domain, upstream and downstream of the polyQ stretch. In the absence of any of the three TBRs, the affinity is drastically reduced. By SPR we have also provided the first evidence of direct binding of AT3 to HDAC6, with affinity in the range 0.1-1μM. These results shed light on the interactions among the components of the transport machinery that sorts aggregate protein to the aggresome, and pave the way to in vivo studies aimed at further clarifying their roles.

  4. A systematic, family-wide investigation reveals that ~30% of mammalian PDZ domains engage in PDZ-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bryan H.; Gujral, Taranjit S.; Karp, Ethan S.; BuKhalid, Raghida; Grantcharova, Viara P.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Summary PDZ domains are independently folded modules that typically mediate protein-protein interactions by binding to the C-termini of their target proteins. In a few instances, however, PDZ domains have been reported to dimerize with other PDZ domains. To investigate this noncanonical binding mode further, we used protein microarrays comprising virtually every mouse PDZ domain to systematically query all possible PDZ-PDZ pairs. We then used fluorescence polarization to retest and quantify novel interactions and co-affinity purification to test biophysically validated interactions in the context of their full-length proteins. Overall, we discovered 37 PDZ-PDZ interactions involving 46 PDZ domains (~30% of all PDZ domains tested), revealing that dimerization is a more frequently used binding mode than was previously appreciated. This suggests that many PDZ domains evolved to form multiprotein complexes by simultaneously interacting with more than one ligand. PMID:21944753

  5. The hemopexin domain of MMP3 is responsible for mammary epithelial invasion and morphogenesis through extracellular interaction with HSP90β

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Ana Luísa; Mori, Hidetoshi; Chen, Emily I.; Schmitt, Fernando C.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are crucial mediators in sculpting tissue architecture and are required for many physiological and pathological processes. MMP3 has been shown to regulate branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland. Ectopic expression of proteolytically active MMP3 in mouse mammary epithelia triggers supernumerary lateral branching and, eventually, tumors. Using a three-dimensional collagen-I (Col-1) gel assay that simulates epithelial invasion and branching, we show that it is the hemopexin domain that directs these processes. Using three different engineered constructs containing a variation on MMP3 structural domains, we confirmed the importance of the hemopexin domain also in primary organoids of the mammary gland. A proteomic screen of MMP3-binding partners surprisingly revealed that the intracellular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 β (HSP90β) is present extracellularly, and its interaction with the hemopexin domain of MMP3 is critical for invasion. Blocking of HSP90β with inhibitory antibodies added to the medium abolished invasion and branching. These findings shift the focus from the proteolytic activity of MMP3 as the central player to its hemopexin domain and add a new dimension to HSP90β's functions by revealing a hitherto undescribed mechanism of MMP3 regulation. Our data also may shed light on the failure of strategies to use MMP inhibitors in cancer treatment and other related disorders. PMID:23592797

  6. The expanded octarepeat domain selectively binds prions and disrupts homomeric prion protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Leliveld, Sirik Rutger; Dame, Remus Thei; Wuite, Gijs J L; Stitz, Lothar; Korth, Carsten

    2006-02-10

    Insertion of additional octarepeats into the prion protein gene has been genetically linked to familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease and hence to de novo generation of infectious prions. The pivotal event during prion formation is the conversion of the normal prion protein (PrPC) into the pathogenic conformer PrPSc, which subsequently induces further conversion in an autocatalytic manner. Apparently, an expanded octarepeat domain directs folding of PrP toward the PrPSc conformation and initiates a self-replicating conversion process. Here, based on three main observations, we have provided a model on how altered molecular interactions between wild-type and mutant PrP set the stage for familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease with octarepeat insertions. First, we showed that wild-type octarepeat domains interact in a copper-dependent and reversible manner, a "copper switch." This interaction becomes irreversible upon domain expansion, possibly reflecting a loss of function. Second, expanded octarepeat domains of increasing length gradually form homogenous globular multimers of 11-21 nm in the absence of copper ions when expressed as soluble glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Third, octarepeat domain expansion causes a gain of function with at least 10 repeats selectively binding PrPSc in a denaturant-resistant complex in the absence of copper ions. Thus, the combination of both a loss and gain of function profoundly influences homomeric interaction behavior of PrP with an expanded octarepeat domain. A multimeric cluster of prion proteins carrying expanded octarepeat domains may therefore capture and incorporate spontaneously arising short-lived PrPSc-like conformers, thereby providing a matrix for their conversion.

  7. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Jeremy D.; Hwang, Peter K.; Brodsky, Frances M.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  8. DEF- and GLO-like proteins may have lost most of their interaction partners during angiosperm evolution

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Rainer; Härter, Andrea; Rümpler, Florian; Kim, Sangtae; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Theißen, Günter

    2014-01-01

    flexibility of DEF- and GLO-like protein interactions in early-diverging angiosperms may be one reason for the highly diverse flower morphologies observed in these species. The results strengthen the hypothesis that a reduction in the number of interaction partners of DEF- and GLO-like proteins, with DEF–GLO heterodimers remaining the only DNA-binding dimers in core eudicots, contributed to developmental robustness, canalization of flower development and the diversification of angiosperms. PMID:24902716

  9. NMR Solution Structure, Stability, and Interaction of the Recombinant Bovine Fibrinogen αC-Domain Fragment†

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Robert A.; Tsurupa, Galina; Hantgan, Roy R.; Tjandra, Nico; Medved, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    According to the current hypothesis, in fibrinogen, the COOH-terminal portions of two Aα chains are folded into compact αC-domains that interact intramolecularly with each other and with the central region of the molecule; in fibrin, the αC-domains switch to an intermolecular interaction resulting in αC polymers. In agreement, our recent NMR study identified within the bovine fibrinogen Aα374-538 αC-domain fragment an ordered compact structure including a β-hairpin restricted at the base by a 423–453 disulfide linkage. To establish the complete structure of the αC-domain and to further test the hypothesis, we expressed a shorter αC-fragment, Aα406-483, and performed detailed analysis of its structure, stability, and interactions. NMR experiments on the Aα406-483 fragment identified a second loose β-hairpin formed by residues 459–476, yielding a structure consisting of an intrinsically unstable mixed parallel/anti-parallel β-sheet. Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that the Aα406-483 fragment forms soluble oligomers whose fraction increases with increasing concentration. This was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis, which also revealed that the addition of each monomer to an assembling αC oligomer substantially increases its stabilizing free energy. In agreement, unfolding experiments monitored by CD established that oligomerization of Aα406-483 results in increased thermal stability. Altogether, these experiments establish the complete NMR solution structure of the Aα406-483 αC-domain fragment, provide direct evidence for the intra- and intermolecular interactions between the αC-domains, and confirm that these interactions are thermodynamically driven. PMID:17590019

  10. Biochemical and functional significance of F-BAR domain proteins interaction with WASP/N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yolande; Aardema, Jorie; Corey, Seth J

    2013-04-01

    The Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain family of proteins includes groups which promote positive (classical BAR, N-BAR, and F-BAR) and negative (I-BAR) membrane deformation. Of these groups, the F-BAR subfamily is the most diverse in its biochemical properties. F-BAR domain proteins dimerize to form a tight scaffold about the membrane. The F-BAR domain provides a banana-shaped, alpha-helical structure that senses membrane curvature. Different types of F-BAR domain proteins contain tyrosine kinase or GTPase activities; some interact with phosphatases and RhoGTPases. Most possess an SH3 domain that facilitates the recruitment and activation of WASP/N-WASP. Thus, F-BAR domain proteins affect remodeling of both membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. The purpose of this review is to highlight the role of F-BAR proteins in coupling WASP/N-WASP to cytoskeletal remodeling. A role for F-BAR/WASP interaction in human diseases affecting nervous, blood, and neoplastic tissues is discussed.

  11. Using compound similarity and functional domain composition for prediction of drug-target interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; He, Zhi-Song; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2010-11-01

    Study of interactions between drugs and target proteins is an essential step in genomic drug discovery. It is very hard to determine the compound-protein interactions or drug-target interactions by experiment alone. As supplementary, effective prediction model using machine learning or data mining methods can provide much help. In this study, a prediction method based on Nearest Neighbor Algorithm and a novel metric, which was obtained by combining compound similarity and functional domain composition, was proposed. The target proteins were divided into the following groups: enzymes, ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors. As a result, four predictors with the optimal parameters were established. The overall prediction accuracies, evaluated by jackknife cross-validation test, for four groups of target proteins are 90.23%, 94.74%, 97.80%, and 97.51%, respectively, indicating that compound similarity and functional domain composition are very effective to predict drug-target interaction networks.

  12. Structure and function of the interacting domains of Spire and Fmn-family formins

    SciTech Connect

    Vizcarra, Christina L.; Kreutz, Barry; Rodal, Avital A.; Toms, Angela V.; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Wei; Quinlan, Margot E.; Eck, Michael J.

    2012-07-11

    Evidence for cooperation between actin nucleators is growing. The WH2-containing nucleator Spire and the formin Cappuccino interact directly, and both are essential for assembly of an actin mesh during Drosophila oogenesis. Their interaction requires the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain (KIND) domain of Spire and the C-terminal tail of the formin. Here we describe the crystal structure of the KIND domain of human Spir1 alone and in complex with the tail of Fmn2, a mammalian ortholog of Cappuccino. The KIND domain is structurally similar to the C-lobe of protein kinases. The Fmn2 tail is coordinated in an acidic cleft at the base of the domain that appears to have evolved via deletion of a helix from the canonical kinase fold. Our functional analysis of Cappuccino reveals an unexpected requirement for its tail in actin assembly. In addition, we find that the KIND/tail interaction blocks nucleation by Cappuccino and promotes its displacement from filament barbed ends providing insight into possible modes of cooperation between Spire and Cappuccino.

  13. Domain walls in finite-width nanowires with interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, M. D.; Livesey, K. L.

    2017-02-01

    It is widely known that the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) may stabilize Néel walls rather than Bloch walls in magnetic thin films. When the DMI is weak, it results in a "tilted" Bloch wall. However, for most applications, domain walls are in nanowires rather than thin films. Here we present a semianalytic two-parameter calculation for the static domain wall in a nanowire of finite width and thickness, with DMI. The DMI strength that is needed to force a Néel wall is smaller in nanowires than in films due to demagnetizing energy. Even nanowires that are hundreds of nanometers wide may have different domain wall solutions than thin films and so their finite size must be considered. The impact of this result on current experiments is briefly discussed. We extend the model to show that applying a weak magnetic field allows the domain wall type to be tuned.

  14. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction induced domain wall depinning anomaly in ferromagnetic nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheng Teoh, Han; Goolaup, Sarjoosing; Siang Lew, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic domain wall positional manipulation is usually through the introduction of potential trap. In this work, we show that the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinkii-Moriya interaction leads to a different static depinning field for Néel domain walls with the same handedness in a notched magnetic nanowire. The difference in static depinning field is due to the Néel domain wall spin orientation. The spin orientation leads to different torques being exerted on the localized magnetic moments. This inherently imposes a spin orientation dependent diode-like behavior for domain walls in a notched nanowire. An equation which relates the difference in static depinning field to the notch geometry is derived. Micromagnetic simulation with varying damping constant reveals the influence of damping constant on the strength of depinning anomaly.

  15. Determination of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange interaction from static domain size imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Parnika; Lemesh, Ivan; Schlotter, Sarah; Beach, Geoffrey

    Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) has been identified [1-2] as a necessary ingredient for the formation of chiral spin structures such as skyrmions and Néel domain walls in perpendicularly magnetized thin films. Various simulation and experimental studies have tried to quantify DMI from domain wall and skyrmion [3-4] motion with applied currents and magnetic fields. Here, a means to quantify DMI in multilayer films using only static magnetic characterizations is proposed. Static domain structure is observed using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) in multilayer stacks of [Pt(2.5-7.5nm)/CoFeB(0.8nm)/MgO(1.5nm)]15 where the thickness tpt of the Pt layer is systematically varied from 2.5 nm to 7.5 nm. A variation of domain size from ~300 nm to ~70 nm is seen in the labyrinthine demagnetized state as tpt is decreased. It is shown that the domain size as a function of tpt can be well-fitted analytically by a model in which the domain wall energy is the sole free parameter. Additional measurements of magnetic anisotropy of the film reveal the significant contribution of interfacial DMI (~1.4 mJ/m2) to the domain wall energy.

  16. Interactions among Domain-Specific Expectancies, Values, and Gender: Predictors of Test Anxiety during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selkirk, Laura C.; Bouchey, Heather A.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on the interaction between students' domain-specific expectancies and values as a predictor of test anxiety. A subsample of adolescents from the MSALT dataset are used in the current study; students complete measures during the spring of sixth grade and again during the spring of seventh grade. Overall, findings provide…

  17. A novel DFP tripeptide motif interacts with the coagulation factor XI apple 2 domain

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Szu S.; Østergaard, Søren; Hall, Gareth; Li, Chan; Williams, Philip M.; Stennicke, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Factor XI (FXI) is the zymogen of FXIa, which cleaves FIX in the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. FXI is known to exist as a dimer and interacts with multiple proteins via its 4 apple domains in the “saucer section” of the enzyme; however, to date, no complex crystal structure has been described. To investigate protein interactions of FXI, a large random peptide library consisting of 106 to 107 peptides was screened for FXI binding, which identified a series of FXI binding motifs containing the signature Asp-Phe-Pro (DFP) tripeptide. Motifs containing this core tripeptide were found in diverse proteins, including the known ligand high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK), as well as the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen V. To define the binding site on FXI, we determined the crystal structure of FXI in complex with the HK-derived peptide NPISDFPDT. This revealed the location of the DFP peptide bound to the FXI apple 2 domain, and central to the interaction, the DFP phenylalanine side-chain inserts into a major hydrophobic pocket in the apple 2 domain and the isoleucine occupies a flanking minor pocket. Two further structures of FXI in complex with the laminin-derived peptide EFPDFP and a DFP peptide from the random screen demonstrated binding in the same pocket, although in a slightly different conformation, thus revealing some flexibility in the molecular interactions of the FXI apple 2 domain. PMID:27006387

  18. Different non-synonymous polymorphisms modulate the interaction of the WRN protein to its protein partners and its enzymatic activities

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Lachapelle, Sophie; Garand, Chantal; Tsofack, Serges P.; Coulombe, Yan; Caron, Marie-Christine; Poirier, Guy G.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Lebel, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies including cancer. The protein defective in WS patients (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA replication and repair. Here, we present the results of a large-scale proteome analysis that has been undertaken to determine protein partners of different polymorphic WRN proteins found with relatively high prevalence in the human population. We expressed different fluorescently tagged-WRN (eYFP-WRN) variants in human 293 embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and used a combination of affinity-purification and mass spectrometry to identify different compositions of WRN-associated protein complexes. We found that a WRN variant containing a phenylalanine residue at position 1074 and an arginine at position 1367 (eYFP-WRN(F-R)) possesses more affinity for DNA-PKc, KU86, KU70, and PARP1 than a variant containing a leucine at position 1074 and a cysteine at position 1367 (eYFP-WRN(L-C)). Such results were confirmed in a WRN-deficient background using WS fibroblasts. Interestingly, the exonuclase activity of WRN recovered from immunoprecipitated eYFP-WRN(L-C) variant was lower than the eYFP-WRN(F-R) in WS cells. Finally, HEK293 cells and WS fibroblasts overexpressing the eYFP-WRN(F-R) variant were more resistant to the benzene metabolite hydroquinone than cells expressing the eYFP-WRN(L-C) variant. These results indicate that the protein-protein interaction landscape of WRN is subject to modulation by polymorphic amino acids, a characteristic associated with distinctive cell survival outcome. PMID:27863399

  19. Cognitive deficits and disruption of neurogenesis in a mouse model of apolipoprotein E4 domain interaction.

    PubMed

    Adeosun, Samuel O; Hou, Xu; Zheng, Baoying; Stockmeier, Craig; Ou, Xiaoming; Paul, Ian; Mosley, Thomas; Weisgraber, Karl; Wang, Jun Ming

    2014-01-31

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) allele is the major genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) due to the higher prevalence and earlier onset of AD in apoE4 carriers. Accumulating data suggest that the interaction between the N- and the C-terminal domains in the protein may be the main pathologic feature of apoE4. To test this hypothesis, we used Arg-61 mice, a model of apoE4 domain interaction, by introducing the domain interaction feature of human apoE4 into native mouse apoE. We carried out hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tests and related cellular and molecular assays on 12- and 3-month-old Arg-61 and age-matched background C57BL/6J mice. Learning and memory task performance were impaired in Arg-61 mice at both old and young ages compared with C57BL/6J mice. Surprisingly, young Arg-61 mice had more mitotic doublecortin-positive cells in the subgranular zone; mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB were also higher in 3-month-old Arg-61 hippocampus compared with C57BL/6J mice. These early-age neurotrophic and neurogenic (proliferative) effects in the Arg-61 mouse may be an inadequate compensatory but eventually detrimental attempt by the system to "repair" itself. This is supported by the higher cleaved caspase-3 levels in the young animals that not only persisted, but increased in old age, and the lower levels of doublecortin at old age in the hippocampus of Arg-61 mice. These results are consistent with human apoE4-dependent cognitive and neuro-pathologic changes, supporting the principal role of domain interaction in the pathologic effect of apoE4. Domain interaction is, therefore, a viable therapeutic/prophylactic target for cognitive impairment and AD in apoE4 subjects.

  20. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho; Ikeda, Masanori

    2015-12-15

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability. - Highlights: • I-mfa domain proteins, HIC and I-mfa, specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax. • HIC and I-mfa repress the Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR. • HIC represses the Tax-dependent transactivation of NF-κΒ. • HIC decreases the nuclear distribution of Tax. • HIC stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax.

  1. Improving protein-protein interaction article classification using biological domain knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifei; Guo, Hongjian; Liu, Feng; Manderick, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Interaction Article Classification (IAC) is a specific text classification application in biological domain that tries to find out which articles describe Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) to help extract PPIs from biological literature more efficiently. However, the existing text representation and feature weighting schemes commonly used for text classification are not well suited for IAC. We capture and utilise biological domain knowledge, i.e. gene mentions also known as protein or gene names in the articles, to address the problem. We put forward a new gene mention order-based approach that highlights the important role of gene mentions to represent the texts. Furthermore, we also incorporate the information concerning gene mentions into a novel feature weighting scheme called Gene Mention-based Term Frequency (GMTF). By conducting experiments, we show that using the proposed representation and weighting schemes, our Interaction Article Classifier (IACer) performs better than other leading systems for the moment.

  2. Interactive computer graphic surface modeling of three-dimensional solid domains for boundary element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perucchio, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the boundary element method (BEM) as a valid tool for solving problems in structural mechanics and in other fields of applied physics is discussed. The development of an integrated interactive computer graphic system for the application of the BEM to three dimensional problems in elastostatics is described. The integration of interactive computer graphic techniques and the BEM takes place at the preprocessing and postprocessing stages of the analysis process, when, respectively, the data base is generated and the results are interpreted. The interactive computer graphic modeling techniques used for generating and discretizing the boundary surfaces of a solid domain are outlined.

  3. Replication domains are self-interacting structural chromatin units of human chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Alain

    2011-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the replication program in different cell types. In silico analysis of nucleotide compositional skew has predicted the existence, in the germline, of replication N-domains bordered by putative replication origins and where the skew decreases rather linearly as the signature of a progressive inversion of the average fork polarity. Here, from the demonstration that the average fork polarity can be directly extracted from the derivative of replication timing profiles, we develop a wavelet-based pattern recognition methodology to delineate replication U-domains where the replication timing profile is shaped as a U and its derivative as a N. Replication U-domains are robustly found in seven cell lines as covering a significant portion (40-50%) of the human genome where the replication timing data actually displays some plasticity between cell lines. The early replication initiation zones at U-domains borders are found to be hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, to be associated with transcriptional activity and to present a significant enrichment in insular-binding proteins CTCF, the hallmark of an open chromatin structure. A comparative analysis of genome-wide chromatin interaction (HiC) data shows that replication-U domains correspond to self-interacting structural high order chromatin units of megabase characteristic size. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that the epigenetic compartmentalization of the human genome into autonomous replication U-domains comes along with an extensive remodelling of the threedimensional chromosome architecture during development or in specific diseases. The observed cell specific conservation of the replication timing between the human and mouse genomes strongly suggests that this chromosome organization into

  4. p75 neurotrophin receptor and its novel interaction partner, NIX, are involved in neuronal apoptosis after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiabing; Chen, Xiaomei; Li, Hongmei; Wang, Yang; Huo, Keke; Ke, Kaifu

    2017-04-01

    Recently, NIX, a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, was found to be a novel p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) binding protein by screening a human fetal brain two-hybrid library in our laboratory. We further study the interaction of these two proteins and the possible roles of p75(NTR) and NIX in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced neuronal death. Using the split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the "Copper" domain in p75(NTR) and the TM region in NIX were sufficient for the interaction of these two proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding assays demonstrated the direct interaction between p75(NTR) and NIX. NIX protein was stabilized by p75(NTR) at post-translational levels. Moreover, p75(NTR) was able to work together with NIX to promote apoptosis and affected the NIX-induced JNK-p53-Bax pathway in neuronal PC12 cells. Previous work has indicated that p75(NTR) and NIX are induced in neurons in human ICH and the rat ICH model, respectively. We confirm that both p75(NTR) and NIX levels were up-regulated in glutamate-treated primary cortical neurons (a cellular in vitro model for ICH) and in the rat ICH model. Glutamate exposure increased the association between p75(NTR) and NIX and elevated the activation of the JNK-p53-Bax pathway and neuronal apoptosis; all of these observations were similar in the rat ICH model. Importantly, p75(NTR) and NIX appeared to be involved in cortical neuronal apoptosis, because knockdown of p75(NTR) or NIX not only inhibited the JNK pathway but also impaired neuronal apoptosis. Thus, p75(NTR) and NIX may play critical roles in ICH-induced neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Interaction of the Intermembrane Space Domain of Tim23 Protein with Mitochondrial Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Munari, Francesca; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tim23 mediates protein translocation into mitochondria. Although inserted into the inner membrane, the dynamic association of its intermembrane space (IMS) domain with the outer membrane promotes protein import. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the IMS domain of Tim23 tightly associates with both inner and outer mitochondrial membrane-like membranes through a hydrophobic anchor at its N terminus. The structure of membrane-bound Tim23IMS is highly dynamic, allowing recognition of both the incoming presequence and other translocase components at the translocation contact. Cardiolipin enhances Tim23 membrane attachment, suggesting that cardiolipin can influence preprotein import. PMID:25349212

  6. Zyxin and cCRP: two interactive LIM domain proteins associated with the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Interaction with extracellular matrix can trigger a variety of responses by cells including changes in specific gene expression and cell differentiation. The mechanism by which cell surface events are coupled to the transcriptional machinery is not understood, however, proteins localized at sites of cell-substratum contact are likely to function as signal transducers. We have recently purified and characterized a low abundance adhesion plaque protein called zyxin (Crawford, A. W., and M. C. Beckerle. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:5847- 5853; Crawford, A. W., J. W. Michelsen, and M. C. Beckerle. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:1381-1393). We have now isolated and sequenced zyxin cDNA and we report here that zyxin exhibits an unusual proline-rich NH2- terminus followed by three tandemly arrayed LIM domains. LIM domains have previously been identified in proteins that play important roles in transcriptional regulation and cellular differentiation. LIM domains have been proposed to coordinate metal ions and we have demonstrated by atomic absorption spectroscopy that purified zyxin binds zinc, a result consistent with the idea that zyxin has zinc fingers. In addition, we have discovered that zyxin interacts in vitro with a 23-kD protein that also exhibits LIM domains. Microsequence analysis has revealed that the 23-kD protein (or cCRP) is the chicken homologue of the human cysteine- rich protein (hCRP). By double-label indirect immunofluorescence, we found that zyxin and cCRP are extensively colocalized in chicken embryo fibroblasts, consistent with the idea that they interact in vivo. We conclude that LIM domains are zinc-binding sequences that may be involved in protein-protein interactions. The demonstration that two cytoskeletal proteins, zyxin and cCRP, share a sequence motif with proteins important for transcriptional regulation raises the possibility that zyxin and cCRP are components of a signal transduction pathway that mediates adhesion-stimulated changes in gene

  7. Direct Association of Sprouty-related Protein with an EVH1 Domain (SPRED) 1 or SPRED2 with DYRK1A Modifies Substrate/Kinase Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Jackson, Rebecca A.; Yusoff, Permeen; Guy, Graeme R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian SPRED (Sprouty-related protein with an EVH1 domain) proteins include a family of three members, SPRED1–3. Currently, little is known about their biochemistry. The best described, SPRED1, has been shown to inhibit the Ras/ERK pathway downstream of Ras. All three SPREDs have a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) that has high homology to the CRD of the Sprouty family of proteins, several of which are also Ras/ERK inhibitors. In the belief that binding partners would clarify SPRED function, we assayed for their associated proteins. Here, we describe the direct and endogenous interaction of SPRED1 and SPRED2 with the novel kinase, DYRK1A. DYRK1A has become the subject of recent research focus as it plays a central role in Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte maturation and egg activation, and there is strong evidence that it could be involved in Down syndrome in humans. Both SPRED1 and SPRED2 inhibit the ability of DYRK1A to phosphorylate its substrates, Tau and STAT3. This inhibition occurs via an interaction of the CRD of the SPREDs with the kinase domain of DYRK1A. DYRK1A substrates must bind to the kinase to enable phosphorylation, and SPRED proteins compete for the same binding site to modify this process. Our accumulated evidence indicates that the SPRED proteins are likely physiological modifiers of DYRK1A. PMID:20736167

  8. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-07

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A.

  9. Crystal structure of the PDZ domain of mouse Dishevelled 1 and its interaction with CXXC5.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inhwan; Choi, Sooho; Yun, Ji-Hye; Seo, Seolhwa; Choi, Sehee; Choi, Kang-Yell; Lee, Weontae

    2016-12-05

    Dishevelled (Dvl) plays a crucial role in Wnt signaling by interacting with membrane-bound receptors and downstream molecules through its PDZ domain. CXXC5 is one of the key molecules that interacts with Dvl and negatively regulates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteoblast differentiation. Recently, the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction has been identified as an excellent target for osteoporosis treatment. Therefore, it is desirable to have detailed structural information for the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction. Although solution structures of the Dvl1 PDZ domain have been reported, a high-resolution crystal structure would provide detailed sidechain information that is essential for drug development. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of the Dvl-1 PDZ domain at a resolution of 1.76 Å, and compared it with its previously reported solution structure. The Dvl1 PDZ domain crystal belonged to the space group H32 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.837, c = 120.616, α = ß = 90.00, γ = 120.00. The crystal structure of Dvl1 PDZ shared its topology with the previously reported structure determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); however, the crystal structure was quite different from the solution structure in both the secondary structural region and the ligand-binding pocket. Molecular modeling based on NMR and X-ray crystallographic data yielded detailed information about the Dvl1/CXXC5 interaction, which will be useful for designing inhibitors.

  10. 3DIANA: 3D Domain Interaction Analysis: A Toolbox for Quaternary Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Sanchez-Garcia, Ruben; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Cuenca-Alba, Jesus; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S.; Carazo, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is experiencing a revolution with the advent of a new generation of Direct Electron Detectors, enabling a broad range of large and flexible structures to be resolved well below 1 nm resolution. Although EM techniques are evolving to the point of directly obtaining structural data at near-atomic resolution, for many molecules the attainable resolution might not be enough to propose high-resolution structural models. However, accessing information on atomic coordinates is a necessary step toward a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow proteins to perform specific tasks. For that reason, methods for the integration of EM three-dimensional maps with x-ray and NMR structural data are being developed, a modeling task that is normally referred to as fitting, resulting in the so called hybrid models. In this work, we present a novel application—3DIANA—specially targeted to those cases in which the EM map resolution is medium or low and additional experimental structural information is scarce or even lacking. In this way, 3DIANA statistically evaluates proposed/potential contacts between protein domains, presents a complete catalog of both structurally resolved and predicted interacting regions involving these domains and, finally, suggests structural templates to model the interaction between them. The evaluation of the proposed interactions is computed with DIMERO, a new method that scores physical binding sites based on the topology of protein interaction networks, which has recently shown the capability to increase by 200% the number of domain-domain interactions predicted in interactomes as compared to previous approaches. The new application displays the information at a sequence and structural level and is accessible through a web browser or as a Chimera plugin at http://3diana.cnb.csic.es. PMID:26772592

  11. Structural characterization of AS1-membrane interactions from a subset of HAMP domains

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Mäler, Lena; Draheim, Roger R.

    2011-01-01

    HAMP domains convert an extracellular sensory input into an intracellular signaling response in a wide variety of membrane-embedded bacterial proteins. These domains are almost invariably found adjacent to the inner leaflet of the cell membrane. We therefore examined the interaction of peptides corresponding to either AS1 or AS2 of four different, well-characterized HAMP domains with several membrane model systems. The proteins included an Archaeoglobus fulgidus protein (Af1503), the Escherichia coli osmosensor EnvZEc, the E. coli nitrate/nitrite sensor NarXEc, and the aspartate chemoreceptor of E. coli (TarEc). Far-UV CD and NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the induction of secondary structure upon association with neutral or acidic large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and bicelles. We observed significant increases in α-helicity within AS1 from NarXEc and TarEc but not in AS1 from the other proteins. To characterize these interactions further, we determined the solution structure of AS1 from TarEc associated with acidic bicelles. The bulk of AS1 formed an amphipathic α-helix, whereas the N-terminal control cable, the region between TM2 and AS1, remained unstructured. We observed that the conserved prolyl residue found in AS1 of many membrane-adjacent HAMP domains defined the boundary between the unstructured and helical regions. In addition, two positively charged residues that flank the hydrophobic surface of AS1 are thought to facilitate electrostatic interactions with the membrane. We interpret these results within the context of the helix-interaction model for HAMP signaling and propose roles for AS1-membrane interactions during the membrane assembly and transmembrane communication of HAMP-containing receptors. PMID:21763270

  12. Definition of a minimal munc18c domain that interacts with syntaxin 4.

    PubMed

    Grusovin, J; Stoichevska, V; Gough, K H; Nunan, K; Ward, C W; Macaulay, S L

    2000-09-15

    munc18c is a critical protein involved in trafficking events associated with syntaxin 4 and which also mediates inhibitory effects on vesicle docking and/or fusion. To investigate the domains of munc18c responsible for its interaction with syntaxin 4, fragments of munc18c were generated and their interaction with syntaxin 4 examined in vivo by the yeast two-hybrid assay. In vitro protein-protein interaction studies were then used to confirm that the interaction between the proteins was direct. Full-length munc18c(1-592), munc18c(1-139) and munc18c(1-225), but not munc18c(226-592), munc18c(1-100), munc18c(43-139) or munc18c(66-139), interacted with the cytoplasmic portion of syntaxin 4, Stx4(2-273), as assessed by yeast two-hybrid assay of growth on nutritionally deficient media and by beta-galactosidase reporter induction. The N-terminal predicted helix-a-helix-b-helix-c region of syntaxin 4, Stx4(29-157), failed to interact with full-length munc18c(1-592), indicating that a larger portion of syntaxin 4 is necessary for the interaction. The yeast two-hybrid results were confirmed by protein-protein interaction studies between Stx4(2-273) and glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins of munc18c. Full-length munc18c(1-592), munc18c(1-139) and munc18c(1-225) interacted with Stx4(2-273) whereas munc18c(1-100) did not, consistent with the yeast two-hybrid data. These data thus identify a region of munc18c between residues 1 and 139 as a minimal domain for its interaction with syntaxin 4.

  13. The pilus usher controls protein interactions via domain masking and is functional as an oligomer

    DOE PAGES

    Werneburg, Glenn T.; Li, Huilin; Henderson, Nadine S.; ...

    2015-06-08

    The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is responsible for biogenesis of organelles termed pili or fimbriae in Gram-negative bacteria. Type 1 pili expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli are prototypical structures assembled by the CU pathway. Assembly and secretion of pili by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and a multidomain outer membrane protein termed the usher (FimD). We show that the FimD C-terminal domains provide the high-affinity substrate binding site, but that these domains are masked in the resting usher. Domain masking requires the FimD plug domain, which served as a central switch controlling usher activation. In addition, we demonstratemore » that usher molecules can act in trans for pilus biogenesis, providing conclusive evidence for a functional usher oligomer. These results reveal mechanisms by which molecular machines such as the usher regulate and harness protein-protein interactions, and suggest that ushers may interact in a cooperative manner during pilus assembly in bacteria.« less

  14. The pilus usher controls protein interactions via domain masking and is functional as an oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Werneburg, Glenn T.; Li, Huilin; Henderson, Nadine S.; Portnoy, Erica B.; Sarowar, Samema; Hultgren, Scott J.; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-06-08

    The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is responsible for biogenesis of organelles termed pili or fimbriae in Gram-negative bacteria. Type 1 pili expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli are prototypical structures assembled by the CU pathway. Assembly and secretion of pili by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and a multidomain outer membrane protein termed the usher (FimD). We show that the FimD C-terminal domains provide the high-affinity substrate binding site, but that these domains are masked in the resting usher. Domain masking requires the FimD plug domain, which served as a central switch controlling usher activation. In addition, we demonstrate that usher molecules can act in trans for pilus biogenesis, providing conclusive evidence for a functional usher oligomer. These results reveal mechanisms by which molecular machines such as the usher regulate and harness protein-protein interactions, and suggest that ushers may interact in a cooperative manner during pilus assembly in bacteria.

  15. Dipolar interactions between domains in lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rufeil-Fiori, Elena; Wilke, Natalia; Banchio, Adolfo J

    2016-05-25

    A great variety of biologically relevant monolayers present phase coexistence characterized by domains formed by lipids in an ordered phase state dispersed in a continuous, disordered phase. From the difference in surface densities between these phases, inter-domain dipolar interactions arise. These interactions are relevant for the determination of the spacial distribution of domains as well as their dynamics. In this work, we propose a novel way of estimating the dipolar repulsion using a passive method that involves the analysis of images of the monolayer with phase coexistence. This method is based on the comparison of the pair correlation function obtained from experiments with that obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations of a model system. As an example, we determined the difference in dipolar density of a binary monolayer of DSPC/DMPC at the air-water interface from the analysis of the radial distribution of domains, and the results are compared with those obtained by surface potential determinations. A systematic analysis for the experimentally relevant parameter range is given, which may be used as a working curve for obtaining the dipolar repulsion in different systems.

  16. Cis-element, oriR, involved in the initiation of (-) strand poliovirus RNA: a quasi-globular multi-domain RNA structure maintained by tertiary ('kissing') interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Pilipenko, E V; Poperechny, K V; Maslova, S V; Melchers, W J; Slot, H J; Agol, V I

    1996-01-01

    The key steps in the replication of the poliovirus genome, initiation of (-) and (+) strands, require two different cis-acting elements, oriR and oriL, respectively. It has been proposed that the spatial organization of these elements is maintained by tertiary ('kissing') interactions between the loops of two constituent hairpins. Here, the putative partners of the kissing interaction within the oriR of the full-length poliovirus RNA were modified by site-directed mutagenesis. The destabilization of this interaction resulted in a severe suppression of the viral RNA synthesis, but the mutant transcripts proved to be infectious. With a single exception, the potential for the kissing interaction within the oriR of the recovered viruses was partially or completely restored due to either true reversions or second-site compensatory mutations. There was a good correlation between the restoration of this potential and the phenotypic properties of the viruses. It was concluded that the kissing interaction in the poliovirus oriR is functionally important. Using the above experimental data, a three-dimensional structure was derived by molecular modeling techniques, which demonstrated the overall feasibility of the proposed interactions and displayed the poliovirus oriR as a quasi-globular multi-domain structure. Images PMID:8895586

  17. Domain wall interactions due to vacuum Dirac field fluctuations in 2 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, C. D.; Mazzitelli, F. D.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate quantum effects due to a two-component Dirac field in 2 +1 spacetime dimensions, coupled to domain-wall-like defects with a smooth shape. We show that these effects induce nontrivial contributions to the (shape-dependent) energy of the domain walls. For a single defect, we study the divergences in the corresponding self-energy, and also consider the role of the massless zero mode—corresponding to the Callan-Harvey mechanism—by coupling the Dirac field to an external gauge field. For two defects, we show that the Dirac field induces a nontrivial, Casimir-like effect between them, and we provide an exact expression for that interaction in the case of two straight-line parallel defects. As is the case for the Casimir interaction energy, the result is finite and unambiguous.

  18. A physical model describing the interaction of nuclear transport receptors with FG nucleoporin domain assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Raphael; Osmanović, Dino; Ehret, Severin; Araya Callis, Carolina; Frey, Steffen; Stewart, Murray; You, Changjiang; Görlich, Dirk; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Richter, Ralf P

    2016-01-01

    The permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) controls bulk nucleocytoplasmic exchange. It consists of nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine motifs (FG domains). As a bottom-up nanoscale model for the permeability barrier, we have used planar films produced with three different end-grafted FG domains, and quantitatively analyzed the binding of two different nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), NTF2 and Importin β, together with the concomitant film thickness changes. NTR binding caused only moderate changes in film thickness; the binding isotherms showed negative cooperativity and could all be mapped onto a single master curve. This universal NTR binding behavior – a key element for the transport selectivity of the NPC – was quantitatively reproduced by a physical model that treats FG domains as regular, flexible polymers, and NTRs as spherical colloids with a homogeneous surface, ignoring the detailed arrangement of interaction sites along FG domains and on the NTR surface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14119.001 PMID:27058170

  19. Functional interaction between bases C1049 in domain II and G2751 in domain VI of 23S rRNA in Escherichia coli ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The factor-binding center within the Escherichia coli ribosome is comprised of two discrete domains of 23S rRNA: the GTPase-associated region (GAR) in domain II and the sarcin–ricin loop in domain VI. These two regions appear to collaborate in the factor-dependent events that occur during protein synthesis. Current X-ray crystallography of the ribosome shows an interaction between C1049 in the GAR and G2751 in domain VI. We have confirmed this interaction by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical probing. Disruption of this base pair affected not only the chemical modification of some bases in domains II and VI and in helix H89 of domain V, but also ribosome function dependent on both EF-G and EF-Tu. Mutant ribosomes carrying the C1049 to G substitution, which show enhancement of chemical modification at G2751, were used to probe the interactions between the regions around 1049 and 2751. Binding of EF-G-GDP-fusidic acid, but not EF-G-GMP-PNP, to the ribosome protected G2751 from modification. The G2751 protection was also observed after tRNA binding to the ribosomal P and E sites. The results suggest that the interactions between the bases around 1049 and 2751 alter during different stages of the translation process. PMID:18252772

  20. The endonuclease domain of MutL interacts with the β sliding clamp

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Monica C.; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Guarné, Alba

    2010-01-01

    Mismatch repair corrects errors that have escaped polymerase proofreading enhancing replication fidelity by at least two orders of magnitude. The β and PCNA sliding clamps increase the polymerase processivity during DNA replication and are important at several stages of mismatch repair. Both MutS and MutL, the two proteins that initiate the mismatch repair response, interact with β. Binding of MutS to β is important to recruit MutS and MutL to foci. Moreover, the endonuclease activity of human and yeast MutLα is stimulated by PCNA. However, the concrete functions of the processivity clamp in the repair steps preceding DNA resynthesis remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of MutL encompasses a bona fide β-binding motif that mediates a weak, yet specific, interaction between the two proteins. Mutation of this conserved motif correlates with defects in mismatch repair, demonstrating that the direct interaction with β is important for MutL function. The interaction between the C-terminal domain of MutL and β is conserved in both B. subtilis and E. coli, but the repair defects associated with mutation of this β-binding motif are more severe in the former, suggesting that this interaction may have a more prominent role in methyl-independent than methyl-directed mismatch repair systems. Together with previously published data, our work strongly suggests that β may stimulate the endonuclease activity of MutL through its direct interaction with the C-terminal domain of MutL. PMID:21050827

  1. Structural and biophysical characterization of the interactions between the death domain of Fas receptor and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Timothy F; Samal, Alexandra B; Bedwell, Gregory J; Chen, Yabing; Saad, Jamil S

    2013-07-26

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by cell surface death receptors such as Fas. Engagement of Fas by Fas ligand triggers a conformational change that allows Fas to interact with adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain (FADD) via the death domain, which recruits downstream signaling proteins to form the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells, suggesting a novel role of CaM in Fas-mediated signaling. CaM antagonists induce apoptosis through a Fas-related mechanism in cholangiocarcinoma and other cancer cell lines possibly by inhibiting Fas-CaM interactions. The structural determinants of Fas-CaM interaction and the underlying molecular mechanisms of inhibition, however, are unknown. Here we employed NMR and biophysical techniques to elucidate these mechanisms. Our data show that CaM binds to the death domain of Fas (FasDD) with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of ~2 μM and 2:1 CaM:FasDD stoichiometry. The interactions between FasDD and CaM are endothermic and entropically driven, suggesting that hydrophobic contacts are critical for binding. We also show that both the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM are important for binding. NMR and surface plasmon resonance data show that three CaM antagonists (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide, tamoxifen, and trifluoperazine) greatly inhibit Fas-CaM interactions by blocking the Fas-binding site on CaM. Our findings provide the first structural evidence for Fas-CaM interactions and mechanism of inhibition and provide new insight into the molecular basis for a novel role of CaM in regulating Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  2. A fictitious domain/mortar element method for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaijens, Frank P. T.

    2001-04-01

    A new method for the computational analysis of fluid-structure interaction of a Newtonian fluid with slender bodies is developed. It combines ideas of the fictitious domain and the mortar element method by imposing continuity of the velocity field along an interface by means of Lagrange multipliers. The key advantage of the method is that it circumvents the need for complicated mesh movement strategies common in arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods, usually used for this purpose. Copyright

  3. Aggregation of polyglutamine-expanded ataxin-3 sequesters its specific interacting partners into inclusions: Implication in a loss-of-function pathology

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Li, Jing-Jing; Liu, Shuai; Zhao, Jian; Jiang, Ya-Jun; Song, Ai-Xin; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) tract may cause protein misfolding and aggregation that lead to cytotoxicity and neurodegeneration, but the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. We applied ataxin-3 (Atx3), a polyQ tract-containing protein, as a model to study sequestration of normal cellular proteins. We found that the aggregates formed by polyQ-expanded Atx3 sequester its interacting partners, such as P97/VCP and ubiquitin conjugates, into the protein inclusions through specific interactions both in vitro and in cells. Moreover, this specific sequestration impairs the normal cellular function of P97 in down-regulating neddylation. However, expansion of polyQ tract in Atx3 does not alter the conformation of its surrounding regions and the interaction affinities with the interacting partners, although it indeed facilitates misfolding and aggregation of the Atx3 protein. Thus, we propose a loss-of-function pathology for polyQ diseases that sequestration of the cellular essential proteins via specific interactions into inclusions by the polyQ aggregates causes dysfunction of the corresponding proteins, and consequently leads to neurodegeneration. PMID:25231079

  4. Modeling the performance of the human (pilot) interaction in a synthetic flight domain: Information theoretic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ntuen, Celestine A.

    1992-01-01

    Current advances in computing technology are devoid of formal methods that describe the theories of how information is shared between humans and machines. Specifically, in the domain of human-machine interaction, a common mathematical foundation is lacking. The aim of this paper is to propose a formal method of human-machine (H-M) interaction paradigm from the information view point. The methods presented are interpretation- and context-free and can be used both in experimental analysis as well as in modeling problems.

  5. Interaction of human apolipoprotein A-I with model membranes exhibiting lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Arnulphi, Cristina; Sánchez, Susana A; Tricerri, M Alejandra; Gratton, Enrico; Jonas, Ana

    2005-07-01

    Several mechanisms for cell cholesterol efflux have been proposed, including membrane microsolubilization, suggesting that the existence of specific domains could enhance the transfer of lipids to apolipoproteins. In this work isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and two-photon microscopy are used to study the interaction of lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and sphingomyelin (SM), with and without cholesterol. Below 30 degrees C the calorimetric results show that apoA-I interaction with POPC/SM SUVs produces an exothermic reaction, characterized as nonclassical hydrophobic binding. The heat capacity change (DeltaCp degrees ) is small and positive, whereas it was larger and negative for pure POPC bilayers, in the absence of SM. Inclusion of cholesterol in the membranes induces changes in the observed thermodynamic pattern of binding and counteracts the formation of alpha-helices in the protein. Above 30 degrees C the reactions are endothermic. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of identical composition to the SUVs, and two-photon fluorescence microscopy techniques, were utilized to further characterize the interaction. Fluorescence imaging of the GUVs indicates coexistence of lipid domains under 30 degrees C. Binding experiments and Laurdan generalized-polarization measurements suggest that there is no preferential binding of the labeled apoA-I to any particular domain. Changes in the content of alpha-helix, binding, and fluidity data are discussed in the framework of the thermodynamic parameters.

  6. Structural Basis for Ca2+-mediated Interaction of the Perforin C2 Domain with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hiromasa; Conroy, Paul J.; Leung, Eleanor W. W.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Whisstock, James C.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes deploy perforin and granzymes to kill infected host cells. Perforin, secreted by immune cells, binds target membranes to form pores that deliver pro-apoptotic granzymes into the target cell. A crucial first step in this process is interaction of its C2 domain with target cell membranes, which is a calcium-dependent event. Some aspects of this process are understood, but many molecular details remain unclear. To address this, we investigated the mechanism of Ca2+ and lipid binding to the C2 domain by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Calcium titrations, together with dodecylphosphocholine micelle experiments, confirmed that multiple Ca2+ ions bind within the calcium-binding regions, activating perforin with respect to membrane binding. We have also determined the affinities of several of these binding sites and have shown that this interaction causes a significant structural rearrangement in CBR1. Thus, it is proposed that Ca2+ binding at the weakest affinity site triggers changes in the C2 domain that facilitate its interaction with lipid membranes. PMID:26306037

  7. The genetic consequences of ablating helicase activity and the Top3 interaction domain of Sgs1

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Justin; Rothstein, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    Sgs1, the RecQ helicase homolog, and Top3, the type-IA topoisomerase, physically interact and are required for genomic stability in budding yeast. Similarly, topoisomerase III genes physically pair with homologs of SGS1 in humans that are involved in the cancer predisposition and premature aging diseases Bloom, Werner, and Rothmund-Thompson syndromes. In the absence of Top1 activity, sgs1 mutants are severely growth impaired. Here, we investigate the role of Sgs1 helicase activity and its N-terminal Top3 interaction domain by using an allele replacement technique to integrate mutant alleles at the native SGS1 genomic locus. We compare the phenotype of helicase-defective (sgs1-hd) and N-terminal deletion (sgs1-NΔ) strains to wild-type and sgs1 null strains. Like the sgs1 null, sgs1-hd mutations suppress top3 slow growth, cause a growth defect in the absence of Srs2 helicase, and impair meiosis. However, for recombination and the synthetic interaction with top1Δ mutations, loss of helicase activity exhibits a less severe phenotype than the null. Interestingly, deletion of the Top3 interaction domain of Sgs1 causes a top3-like phenotype, and furthermore, this effect is dependent on helicase activity. These results suggest that the protein-protein interaction between these two DNA-metabolism enzymes, even in the absence of helicase activity, is important for their function in catalyzing specific changes in DNA topology. PMID:18272435

  8. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-11-29

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  9. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-12-01

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  10. Interactions between the Structural Domains of the RNA Replication Proteins of Plant-Infecting RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Erin K.; Wang, Zhaohui; French, Roy; Kao, C. Cheng

    1998-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, encodes two replication proteins: the 2a protein, which contains polymerase-like sequences, and the 1a protein, with N-terminal putative capping and C-terminal helicase-like sequences. These two proteins are part of a multisubunit complex which is necessary for viral RNA replication. We have previously shown that the yeast two-hybrid assay consistently duplicated results obtained from in vivo RNA replication assays and biochemical assays of protein-protein interaction, thus permitting the identification of additional interacting domains. We now map an interaction found to take place between two 1a proteins. Using previously characterized 1a mutants, a perfect correlation was found between the in vivo phenotypes of these mutants and their abilities to interact with wild-type 1a (wt1a) and each other. Western blot analysis revealed that the stabilities of many of the noninteracting mutant proteins were similar to that of wt1a. Deletion analysis of 1a revealed that the N-terminal 515 residues of the 1a protein are required and sufficient for 1a-1a interaction. This intermolecular interaction between the putative capping domain and itself was detected in another tripartite RNA virus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), suggesting that the 1a-1a interaction is a feature necessary for the replication of tripartite RNA viruses. The boundaries for various activities are placed in the context of the predicted secondary structures of several 1a-like proteins of members of the alphavirus-like superfamily. Additionally, we found a novel interaction between the putative capping and helicase-like portions of the BMV and CMV 1a proteins. Our cumulative data suggest a working model for the assembly of the BMV RNA replicase. PMID:9696810

  11. Transmembrane domains interactions within the membrane milieu: principles, advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fink, Avner; Sal-Man, Neta; Gerber, Doron; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions within the membrane are involved in many vital cellular processes. Consequently, deficient oligomerization is associated with known diseases. The interactions can be partially or fully mediated by transmembrane domains (TMD). However, in contrast to soluble regions, our knowledge of the factors that control oligomerization and recognition between the membrane-embedded domains is very limited. Due to the unique chemical and physical properties of the membrane environment, rules that apply to interactions between soluble segments are not necessarily valid within the membrane. This review summarizes our knowledge on the sequences mediating TMD-TMD interactions which include conserved motifs such as the GxxxG, QxxS, glycine and leucine zippers, and others. The review discusses the specific role of polar, charged and aromatic amino acids in the interface of the interacting TMD helices. Strategies to determine the strength, dynamics and specificities of these interactions by experimental (ToxR, TOXCAT, GALLEX and FRET) or various computational approaches (molecular dynamic simulation and bioinformatics) are summarized. Importantly, the contribution of the membrane environment to the TMD-TMD interaction is also presented. Studies utilizing exogenously added TMD peptides have been shown to influence in vivo the dimerization of intact membrane proteins involved in various diseases. The chirality independent TMD-TMD interactions allows for the design of novel short d- and l-amino acids containing TMD peptides with advanced properties. Overall these studies shed light on the role of specific amino acids in mediating the assembly of the TMDs within the membrane environment and their contribution to protein function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Folding in Membranes.

  12. A conserved interaction between the SDI domain of Bre2 and the Dpy-30 domain of Sdc1 is required for histone methylation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    South, Paul F; Fingerman, Ian M; Mersman, Douglas P; Du, Hai-Ning; Briggs, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4) is methylated by the Set1 complex (Set1C or COMPASS). Besides the catalytic Set1 subunit, several proteins that form the Set1C (Swd1, Swd2, Swd3, Spp1, Bre2, and Sdc1) are also needed to mediate proper H3K4 methylation. Until this study, it has been unclear how individual Set1C members interact and how this interaction may impact histone methylation and gene expression. In this study, Bre2 and Sdc1 are shown to directly interact, and it is shown that the association of this heteromeric complex is needed for proper H3K4 methylation and gene expression to occur. Interestingly, mutational and biochemical analysis identified the C terminus of Bre2 as a critical protein-protein interaction domain that binds to the Dpy-30 domain of Sdc1. Using the human homologs of Bre2 and Sdc1, ASH2L and DPY-30, respectively, we demonstrate that the C terminus of ASH2L also interacts with the Dpy-30 domain of DPY-30, suggesting that this protein-protein interaction is maintained from yeast to humans. Because of the functionally conserved nature of the C terminus of Bre2 and ASH2L, this region was named the SDI (Sdc1 Dpy-30 interaction) domain. Finally, we show that the SDI-Dpy-30 domain interaction is physiologically important for the function of Set1 in vivo, because specific disruption of this interaction prevents Bre2 and Sdc1 association with Set1, resulting in H3K4 methylation defects and decreases in gene expression. Overall, these and other mechanistic studies on how H3K4 methyltransferase complexes function will likely provide insights into how human MLL and SET1-like complexes or overexpression of ASH2L leads to oncogenesis.

  13. The factor VIIIa C2 domain (residues 2228-2240) interacts with the factor IXa Gla domain in the factor Xase complex.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Tetsuhiro; Nogami, Keiji; Nishiya, Katsumi; Takeyama, Masahiro; Ogiwara, Kenichi; Sakata, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Akira; Shima, Midori

    2009-02-06

    Factor VIIIa functions as a cofactor for factor IXa in the phospholipid surface-dependent activation of factor X. Both the C2 domain of factor VIIIa and the Gla domain of factor IXa are involved in phospholipid binding and are required for the activation of factor X. In this study, we have examined the close relationship between these domains in the factor Xase complex. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based and surface plasmon resonance-based assays in the absence of phospholipid showed that Glu-Gly-Arg active site-modified factor IXa bound to immobilized recombinant C2 domain (rC2) dose-dependently (Kd = 108 nm). This binding ability was optimal under physiological conditions. A monoclonal antibody against the Gla domain of factor IXa inhibited binding by approximately 95%, and Gla domainless factor IXa failed to bind to rC2. The addition of monoclonal antibody or rC2 with factor VIIIa inhibited factor IXa-catalyzed factor X activation in the absence of phospholipid. Inhibition was not evident, however, in similar experiments in the absence of factor VIIIa, indicating that the C2 domain interacted with the Gla domain of factor IXa. A fragment designated C2-(2182-2259), derived from V8 protease-cleaved rC2, bound to Glu-Gly-Arg active site-modified factor IXa. Competitive assays, using overlapping synthetic peptides encompassing residues 2182-2259, demonstrated that peptide 2228-2240 significantly inhibited both this binding and factor Xa generation, independently of phospholipid. Our results indicated that residues 2228-2240 in the factor VIIIa C2 domain constitutes an interactive site for the Gla domain of factor IXa. The findings provide the first evidence for an essential role for this interaction in factor Xase assembly.

  14. Identification of the interaction domains of white spot syndrome virus envelope proteins VP28 and VP24.

    PubMed

    Li, Zaipeng; Chen, Weiyu; Xu, Limei; Li, Fang; Yang, Feng

    2015-03-16

    VP28 and VP24 are two major envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The direct interaction between VP28 and VP24 has been described in previous studies. In this study, we confirmed this interaction and mapped the interaction domains of VP28 and VP24 by constructing a series of deletion mutants. By co-immunoprecipitation, two VP28-binding domains of VP24 were located at amino acid residues 46-61 and 148-160, while VP24-binding domain of VP28 was located at amino acid residues 31-45. These binding domains were further corroborated by peptide blocking assay, in which synthetic peptides spanning the binding domains were able to inhibit VP28-VP24 interaction, whereas same-size control peptides from non-binging regions did not.

  15. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene silencing in Arabidopsis by interacting with RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Parida, Adwaita Prasad; Sharma, Amrapali; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome from transposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG binding domain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind to methylated DNA. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 methyl CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins, but the molecular/biological functions of most of these proteins are still not clear. In the present study, we identified four proteins that interact with AtMBD6. Interestingly, three of them contain RNA binding domains and are co-localized with AtMBD6 in the nucleus. The interacting partners includes AtRPS2C (a 40S ribosomal protein), AtNTF2 (nuclear transport factor 2) and AtAGO4 (Argonoute 4). The fourth protein that physically interacts with AtMBD6 is a histone-modifying enzyme, histone deacetylase 6 (AtHDA6), which is a known component of the RNA-mediated gene silencing system. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation in the atmbd6, atrps2c and atntf2 mutants, using methylation-sensitive PCR detected decreased DNA methylation at miRNA/siRNA producing loci, pseudogenes and other targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation. Our results indicate that AtMBD6 is involved in RNA-mediated gene silencing and it binds to RNA binding proteins like AtRPS2C, AtAGO4 and AtNTF2. AtMBD6 also interacts with histone deacetylase AtHDA6 that might have a role in chromatin condensation at the targets of RdDM.

  16. Solution structure of the focal adhesion adaptor PINCH LIM1 domain and characterization of its interaction with the integrin-linked kinase ankyrin repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, A; Yang, Y; Wu, C; Qin, J

    2001-02-16

    PINCH is a recently identified adaptor protein that comprises an array of five LIM domains. PINCH functions through LIM-mediated protein-protein interactions that are involved in cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. The LIM1 domain of PINCH interacts with integrin-linked kinase (ILK), thereby mediating focal adhesions via a specific integrin/ILK signaling pathway. We have solved the NMR structure of the PINCH LIM1 domain and characterized its binding to ILK. LIM1 contains two contiguous zinc fingers of the CCHC and CCCH types and adopts a global fold similar to that of functionally distinct LIM domains from cysteine-rich protein and cysteine-rich intestinal protein families with CCHC and CCCC zinc finger types. Gel-filtration and NMR experiments demonstrated a 1:1 complex between PINCH LIM1 and the ankyrin repeat domain of ILK. A chemical shift mapping experiment identified regions in PINCH LIM1 that are important for interaction with ILK. Comparison of surface features between PINCH LIM1 and other functionally different LIM domains indicated that the LIM motif might have a highly variable mode in recognizing various target proteins.

  17. The activation domain of a basic helix-loop-helix protein is masked by repressor interaction with domains distinct from that required for transcription regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, P S; Hirst, K; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    While there are many examples of protein-protein interactions modulating the DNA-binding activity of transcription factors, little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the transcription activation function. Using a two-hybrid system we show here that transcription repression of the basic domain/helix-loop-helix factor PHO4 is mediated by complex formation with the PHO80 repressor. In contrast to other systems, such as inhibition of GAL4 by GAL80 or of p53 by MDM2, where repression is mediated by direct interaction at regions overlapping the transcription activation domain, interaction with PHO80 involves two regions of PHO4 distinct from those involved in transcription activation or DNA-binding and dimerization. The possibility that repression of PHO4 by PHO80 may represent a general mechanism of transcription control, including regulation of the cell-type-specific transcription activation domain of c-Jun, is discussed. Images PMID:8187772

  18. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Shuichi; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho; Ikeda, Masanori

    2015-12-01

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability.

  19. Drosophila BTB/POZ domains of "ttk group" can form multimers and selectively interact with each other.

    PubMed

    Bonchuk, Artem; Denisov, Stepan; Georgiev, Pavel; Maksimenko, Oksana

    2011-09-23

    The BTB (bric-a-brac, tramtrack and broad complex)/POZ (poxvirus and zinc finger) domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif contained in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodeling, insulator activity, and carcinogenesis. All well-studied mammalian BTB domains form obligate homodimers and, rarely, tetramers. Only the BTB domain of the Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF) has been shown to exist as higher-order multimers. The BTB domain of GAF belongs to the "ttk group" that contains several highly conserved sequences not found in other BTB domains. Here, we have shown by size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and nondenaturing PAGE that four additional BTB domains of the ttk group-Batman, Mod(mdg4), Pipsqueak, and Tramtrack-can form multimers, like GAF. Interestingly, the BTB domains of GAF and Batman have formed a wide range of complexes and interacted in the yeast two-hybrid assay with other BTB domains tested. In contrast, the BTB domains of Mod(mdg4), Pipsqueak, and Tramtrack have formed stable high-order multimer complexes and failed to interact with each other. The BTB domain of Drosophila CP190 protein does not belong to the ttk group. This BTB domain has formed stable dimers and has not interacted with domains of the ttk group. Previously, it was suggested that GAF oligomerization into higher-order complexes facilitates long-range activation by providing a protein bridge between an enhancer and a promoter. Unexpectedly, experiments in the Drosophila model system have not supported the role of GAF in organization of long-distance interaction between the yeast GAL4 activator and the white promoter.

  20. Structural characterization of the split pleckstrin homology domain in phospholipase C-gamma1 and its interaction with TRPC3.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wenyu; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2006-04-28

    Phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma is unique among the PLC enzymes because each PLC-gamma isozyme contains a split pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with an SH2SH2SH3 tandem repeat insertion (where SH indicates Src homology domain) in the middle of its sequence. Split PH domains exist in a number of other proteins that play crucial signaling roles. However, little is known about the structure and function of split PH domains. The C-terminal half of the PLC-gamma split PH domain has been implicated to interact directly with the TRPC3 calcium channel, thereby providing a direct coupling mechanism between PLC-gamma and agonist-induced calcium entry. However, this interaction has not been proved by direct biochemical or structural studies. Here we determined the three-dimensional structure of the split PH domain of PLC-gamma1, and we found that the split PH domain of the enzyme folds into a canonical PH domain fold with high thermostability. The SH2SH2SH3 insertion between the beta3 and beta4 strands does not change the structure of the split PH domain. In contrast to the majority of phospholipid-binding PH domains, the PLC-gamma1 split PH domain lacks the signature lipid-binding motif located between the beta1 and beta2 strands. Consistent with this structural feature, the split PH domain of PLC-gamma1 does not bind to phospholipids. Multiple biochemical and biophysical experiments have argued against a direct interaction between TRPC3 and the C-terminal half of the PLC-gamma1 split PH domain. Our data pointed to the existence of a yet to be elucidated interaction mechanism between TRPC3 and PLC-gamma1.

  1. Importance of the Linker Region in Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Domain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Warispreet; Fields, Gregg B.; Christov, Christo Z.; Karabencheva-Christova, Tatyana G.

    2016-01-01

    Collagenolysis is catalyzed by enzymes from the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family, where one of the most studied is MMP-1. The X-ray crystallographic structure of MMP-1 complexed with a collagen-model triple-helical peptide (THP) provided important atomistic information, but few details on the effects of the conformational flexibility on catalysis. In addition, the role of the linker region between the catalytic (CAT) and hemopexin-like (HPX) domains was not defined. In order to reveal the dynamics and correlations of MMP-1 comprehensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of an MMP-1•THP complex was performed. To examine the role of the linker region for MMP-1 function simulations with linker regions from MT1-MMP/MMP-14 and MMP-13 replacing the MMP-1 linker region were performed. The MD studies were in good agreement with the experimental observation that in the MMP-1•THP X-ray crystallographic structure MMP-1 is in a “closed” conformation. MD revealed that the interactions of the THP with the both the CAT and HPX domains of MMP-1 are dynamic in nature, and the linker region of MMP-1 influences the interactions and dynamics of both the CAT and HPX domains and collagen binding to MMP-1. PMID:26998255

  2. Intracellular domains interactions and gated motions of IKS potassium channel subunits

    PubMed Central

    Haitin, Yoni; Wiener, Reuven; Shaham, Dana; Peretz, Asher; Cohen, Enbal Ben-Tal; Shamgar, Liora; Pongs, Olaf; Hirsch, Joel A; Attali, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels co-assemble with auxiliary β subunits to form macromolecular complexes. In heart, assembly of Kv7.1 pore-forming subunits with KCNE1 β subunits generates the repolarizing K+ current IKS. However, the detailed nature of their interface remains unknown. Mutations in either Kv7.1 or KCNE1 produce the life-threatening long or short QT syndromes. Here, we studied the interactions and voltage-dependent motions of IKS channel intracellular domains, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer combined with voltage-clamp recording and in vitro binding of purified proteins. The results indicate that the KCNE1 distal C-terminus interacts with the coiled-coil helix C of the Kv7.1 tetramerization domain. This association is important for IKS channel assembly rules as underscored by Kv7.1 current inhibition produced by a dominant-negative C-terminal domain. On channel opening, the C-termini of Kv7.1 and KCNE1 come close together. Co-expression of Kv7.1 with the KCNE1 long QT mutant D76N abolished the K+ currents and gated motions. Thus, during channel gating KCNE1 is not static. Instead, the C-termini of both subunits experience molecular motions, which are disrupted by the D76N causing disease mutation. PMID:19521339

  3. Intracellular domains interactions and gated motions of I(KS) potassium channel subunits.

    PubMed

    Haitin, Yoni; Wiener, Reuven; Shaham, Dana; Peretz, Asher; Cohen, Enbal Ben-Tal; Shamgar, Liora; Pongs, Olaf; Hirsch, Joel A; Attali, Bernard

    2009-07-22

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels co-assemble with auxiliary beta subunits to form macromolecular complexes. In heart, assembly of Kv7.1 pore-forming subunits with KCNE1 beta subunits generates the repolarizing K(+) current I(KS). However, the detailed nature of their interface remains unknown. Mutations in either Kv7.1 or KCNE1 produce the life-threatening long or short QT syndromes. Here, we studied the interactions and voltage-dependent motions of I(KS) channel intracellular domains, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer combined with voltage-clamp recording and in vitro binding of purified proteins. The results indicate that the KCNE1 distal C-terminus interacts with the coiled-coil helix C of the Kv7.1 tetramerization domain. This association is important for I(KS) channel assembly rules as underscored by Kv7.1 current inhibition produced by a dominant-negative C-terminal domain. On channel opening, the C-termini of Kv7.1 and KCNE1 come close together. Co-expression of Kv7.1 with the KCNE1 long QT mutant D76N abolished the K(+) currents and gated motions. Thus, during channel gating KCNE1 is not static. Instead, the C-termini of both subunits experience molecular motions, which are disrupted by the D76N causing disease mutation.

  4. Does action planning moderate the intention-habit interaction in the exercise domain? A three-way interaction analysis investigation.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Rhodes, Ryan E; van Osch, Liesbeth

    2012-10-01

    Both habit strength and action planning have been found to moderate the intention-exercise behaviour relationship, but no research exists that has investigated how habit strength and action planning simultaneously influence this relationship. The present study was designed to explore this issue in a prospective sample of undergraduate students (N = 415): action planning, habit strength, intention, attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control were assessed at baseline and exercise behaviour was assessed 2 weeks later. Both habit strength and action planning moderated the intention-exercise relationship, with stronger relationship at higher levels of planning or habit strength. Decomposing a significant action planning × habit strength × intention interaction showed that the strength of the intention-exercise relationship progressed linearly through levels of action planning and habit strength. These novel results show that action planning strengthens the intention-habit strength interaction in the exercise domain: exercise interventions should therefore focus on simultaneously bolstering action planning and habit strength.

  5. A Novel C-Terminal Domain of RecJ is Critical for Interaction with HerA in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Chen, Xuanyi; Li, Tao; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) generates error-free repair products, which plays an important role in double strand break repair and replication fork rescue processes. DNA end resection, the critical step in HR, is usually performed by a series of nuclease/helicase. RecJ was identified as a 5′-3′ exonuclease involved in bacterial DNA end resection. Typical RecJ possesses a conserved DHH domain, a DHHA1 domain, and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold. However, RecJs from Deinococcus-Thermus phylum, such as Deinococcus radiodurans RecJ (DrRecJ), possess an extra C-terminal domain (CTD), of which the function has not been characterized. Here, we showed that a CTD-deletion of DrRecJ (DrRecJΔC) could not restore drrecJ mutant growth and mitomycin C (MMC)-sensitive phenotypes, indicating that this domain is essential for DrRecJ in vivo. DrRecJΔC displayed reduced DNA nuclease activity and DNA binding ability. Direct interaction was identified between DrRecJ-CTD and DrHerA, which stimulates DrRecJ nuclease activity by enhancing its DNA binding affinity. Moreover, DrNurA nuclease, another partner of DrHerA, inhibited the stimulation of DrHerA on DrRecJ nuclease activity by interaction with DrHerA. Opposing growth and MMC-resistance phenotypes between the recJ and nurA mutants were observed. A novel modulation mechanism among DrRecJ, DrHerA, and DrNurA was also suggested. PMID:26648913

  6. Preferential interaction of the core histone tail domains with linker DNA.

    PubMed

    Angelov, D; Vitolo, J M; Mutskov, V; Dimitrov, S; Hayes, J J

    2001-06-05

    Within chromatin, the core histone tail domains play critical roles in regulating the structure and accessibility of nucleosomal DNA within the chromatin fiber. Thus, many nuclear processes are facilitated by concomitant posttranslational modification of these domains. However, elucidation of the mechanisms by which the tails mediate such processes awaits definition of tail interactions within chromatin. In this study we have investigated the primary DNA target of the majority of the tails in mononucleosomes. The results clearly show that the tails bind preferentially to "linker" DNA, outside of the DNA encompassed by the nucleosome core. These results have important implications for models of tail function within the chromatin fiber and for in vitro structural and functional studies using nucleosome core particles.

  7. A PAS domain-containing regulator controls flagella-flagella interactions in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Mark; Periago, Paula M.; Mulholland, Francis; Brown, Helen L.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The bipolar flagella of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni confer motility, which is essential for virulence. The flagella of C. jejuni are post-translationally modified, but how this process is controlled is not well understood. In this work, we have identified a novel PAS-domain containing regulatory system, which modulates flagella-flagella interactions in C. jejuni. Inactivation of the cj1387c gene, encoding a YheO-like PAS6 domain linked to a helix-turn-helix domain, resulted in the generation of a tightly associated “cell-train” morphotype, where up to four cells were connected by their flagella. The morphotype was fully motile, resistant to vortexing, accompanied by increased autoagglutination, and was not observed in aflagellated cells. The Δcj1387c mutant displayed increased expression of the adjacent Cj1388 protein, which comprises of a single endoribonuclease L-PSP domain. Comparative genomics showed that cj1387c (yheO) orthologs in bacterial genomes are commonly linked to an adjacent cj1388 ortholog, with some bacteria, including C. jejuni, containing another cj1388-like gene (cj0327). Inactivation of the cj1388 and cj0327 genes resulted in decreased autoagglutination in Tween-20-supplemented media. The Δcj1388 and Δcj0327 mutants were also attenuated in a Galleria larvae-based infection model. Finally, substituting the sole cysteine in Cj1388 for serine prevented Cj1388 dimerization in non-reducing conditions, and resulted in decreased autoagglutination in the presence of Tween-20. We hypothesize that Cj1388 and Cj0327 modulate post-translational modification of the flagella through yet unidentified mechanisms, and propose naming Cj1387 the Campylobacter Flagella Interaction Regulator CfiR, and the Cj1388 and Cj0327 protein as CfiP and CfiQ, respectively. PMID:26284050

  8. Energy of the interaction between membrane lipid domains calculated from splay and tilt deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimzyanov, T. R.; Molotkovsky, R. J.; Kheyfets, B. B.; Akimov, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Specific domains, called rafts, are formed in cell membranes. Similar lipid domains can be formed in model membranes as a result of phase separation with raft size may remaining small (˜10-100 nm) for a long time. The characteristic lifetime of a nanoraft ensemble strongly depends on the nature of mutual raft interactions. The interaction energy between the boundaries of two rafts has been calculated under the assumption that the thickness of the raft bilayer is greater than that of the surrounding membrane, and elastic deformations appear in order to smooth the thickness mismatch at the boundary. When rafts approach each other, deformations from their boundaries overlap, making interaction energy profile sophisticated. It has been shown that raft merger occurs in two stages: rafts first merge in one monolayer of the lipid bilayer and then in another monolayer. Each merger stage requires overcoming of an energy barrier of about 0.08-0.12 k BT per 1 nm of boundary length. These results allow us to explain the stability of the ensemble of finite sized rafts.

  9. Quantitative interaction mapping reveals an extended UBX domain in ASPL that disrupts functional p97 hexamers

    PubMed Central

    Arumughan, Anup; Roske, Yvette; Barth, Carolin; Forero, Laura Lleras; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Redel, Alexandra; Kostova, Simona; McShane, Erik; Opitz, Robert; Faelber, Katja; Rau, Kirstin; Mielke, Thorsten; Daumke, Oliver; Selbach, Matthias; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Rocks, Oliver; Panáková, Daniela; Heinemann, Udo; Wanker, Erich E.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction mapping is a powerful strategy to elucidate the biological function of protein assemblies and their regulators. Here, we report the generation of a quantitative interaction network, directly linking 14 human proteins to the AAA+ ATPase p97, an essential hexameric protein with multiple cellular functions. We show that the high-affinity interacting protein ASPL efficiently promotes p97 hexamer disassembly, resulting in the formation of stable p97:ASPL heterotetramers. High-resolution structural and biochemical studies indicate that an extended UBX domain (eUBX) in ASPL is critical for p97 hexamer disassembly and facilitates the assembly of p97:ASPL heterotetramers. This spontaneous process is accompanied by a reorientation of the D2 ATPase domain in p97 and a loss of its activity. Finally, we demonstrate that overproduction of ASPL disrupts p97 hexamer function in ERAD and that engineered eUBX polypeptides can induce cell death, providing a rationale for developing anti-cancer polypeptide inhibitors that may target p97 activity. PMID:27762274

  10. How does a voltage sensor interact with a lipid bilayer? Simulations of a potassium channel domain.

    PubMed

    Sands, Zara A; Sansom, Mark S P

    2007-02-01

    The nature of voltage sensing by voltage-activated ion channels is a key problem in membrane protein structural biology. The way in which the voltage-sensor (VS) domain interacts with its membrane environment remains unclear. In particular, the known structures of Kv channels do not readily explain how a positively charged S4 helix is able to stably span a lipid bilayer. Extended (2 x 50 ns) molecular dynamics simulations of the high-resolution structure of the isolated VS domain from the archaebacterial potassium channel KvAP, embedded in zwitterionic and in anionic lipid bilayers, have been used to explore VS/lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The simulations reveal penetration of water into the center of the VS and bilayer. Furthermore, there is significant local deformation of the lipid bilayer by interactions between lipid phosphate groups and arginine side chains of S4. As a consequence of this, the electrostatic field is "focused" across the center of the bilayer.

  11. How Does a Voltage Sensor Interact with a Lipid Bilayer? Simulations of a Potassium Channel Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Zara A.; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The nature of voltage sensing by voltage-activated ion channels is a key problem in membrane protein structural biology. The way in which the voltage-sensor (VS) domain interacts with its membrane environment remains unclear. In particular, the known structures of Kv channels do not readily explain how a positively charged S4 helix is able to stably span a lipid bilayer. Extended (2 × 50 ns) molecular dynamics simulations of the high-resolution structure of the isolated VS domain from the archaebacterial potassium channel KvAP, embedded in zwitterionic and in anionic lipid bilayers, have been used to explore VS/lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The simulations reveal penetration of water into the center of the VS and bilayer. Furthermore, there is significant local deformation of the lipid bilayer by interactions between lipid phosphate groups and arginine side chains of S4. As a consequence of this, the electrostatic field is “focused” across the center of the bilayer. PMID:17292841

  12. Interaction of the sex-lethal RNA binding domains with RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaar, R; Lee, A L; Rudner, D Z; Wemmer, D E; Rio, D C

    1995-01-01

    Sex determination and X chromosome dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster are directed by the Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein. In part, Sxl functions by regulating the splicing of the transformer pre-mRNA by binding to a 3' splice site polypyrimidine tract. Polypyrimidine tracts are essential for splicing of metazoan pre-mRNAs. To unravel the mechanism of splicing regulation at polypyrimidine tracts we analyzed the interaction of Sxl with RNA. The RNA binding activity of Sxl was mapped to the two ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence domains of the protein. Quantitation of binding showed that both RNA binding domains (RBDs) were required in cis for site-specific RNA binding. Individual RBDs interacted with RNA more weakly and had lost the ability to discriminate between wild-type and mutant transformer polypyrimidine tracts. Structural elements in one of the RBDs that are likely to interact with a polypyrimidine tract were identified using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, our data suggest that multiple imino protons of the transformer polypyrimidine tract were involved in hydrogen bonding. Interestingly, in vitro Sxl bound with equal affinity to polypyrimidine tracts of pre-mRNAs that it does not regulate in vivo. We discuss the implications of this finding for the mechanism through which Sxl may gain selectivity for particular polypyrimidine tracts in vivo. Images PMID:7556096

  13. Intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal domain of the Shaker voltage-activated K+ channel modulates its interaction with scaffold proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magidovich, Elhanan; Orr, Irit; Fass, Deborah; Abdu, Uri; Yifrach, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of membrane-embedded voltage-activated potassium channels (Kv) with intracellular scaffold proteins, such as the postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) protein, is mediated by the channel C-terminal segment. This interaction underlies Kv channel clustering at unique membrane sites and is important for the proper assembly and functioning of the synapse. In the current study, we address the molecular mechanism underlying Kv/PSD-95 interaction. We provide experimental evidence, based on hydrodynamic and spectroscopic analyses, indicating that the isolated C-terminal segment of the archetypical Shaker Kv channel (ShB-C) is a random coil, suggesting that ShB-C belongs to the recently defined class of intrinsically disordered proteins. We show that isolated ShB-C is still able to bind its scaffold protein partner and support protein clustering in vivo, indicating that unfoldedness is compatible with ShB-C activity. Pulldown experiments involving C-terminal chains differing in flexibility or length further demonstrate that intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal segment of the Shaker channel modulates its interaction with the PSD-95 protein. Our results thus suggest that the C-terminal domain of the Shaker Kv channel behaves as an entropic chain and support a “fishing rod” molecular mechanism for Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins. The importance of intrinsically disordered protein segments to the complex processes of synapse assembly, maintenance, and function is discussed. PMID:17666528

  14. Interaction of the GTP-binding and GTPase-activating domains of ARD1 involves the effector region of the ADP-ribosylation factor domain.

    PubMed

    Vitale, N; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1997-02-14

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and members of the Ras superfamily, originally identified and purified by their ability to enhance the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and more recently recognized as critical participants in vesicular trafficking pathways and phospholipase D activation. ARD1 is a 64-kDa protein with an 18-kDa carboxyl-terminal ARF domain (p3) and a 46-kDa amino-terminal extension (p5) that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. Using recombinant proteins, we showed that p5, the amino-terminal domain of ARD1, stimulates the GTPase activity of p3, the ARF domain, and appears to be the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) component of this bifunctional protein, whereas in other members of the Ras superfamily a separate GAP molecule interacts with the effector region of the GTP-binding protein. p5 stimulated the GTPase activity of p3 but not of ARF1, which differs from p3 in several amino acids in the effector domain. After substitution of 7 amino acids from p3 in the appropriate position in ARF1, the chimeric protein ARF1(39-45p3) bound to p5, which increased its GTPase activity. Specifically, after Gly40 and Thr45 in the putative effector domain of ARF1 were replaced with the equivalent Asp and Pro, respectively, from p3, functional interaction of the chimeric ARF1 with p5 was increased. Thus, Asp25 and Pro30 of the ARF domain (p3) of ARD1 are involved in its functional and physical interaction with the GTPase-activating (p5) domain of ARD1. After deletion of the amino-terminal 15 amino acids from ARF1(39-45p3), its interaction with p5 was essentially equivalent to that of p3, suggesting that the amino terminus of ARF1(39-45p3) may interfere with binding to p5. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the GAP domain of ARD1 interacts with the effector region of the ARF domain and thereby stimulates GTP hydrolysis.

  15. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-01-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. PMID:24652590

  16. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-06-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification.

  17. Distinct self-interaction domains promote Multi Sex Combs accumulation in and formation of the Drosophila histone locus body.

    PubMed

    Terzo, Esteban A; Lyons, Shawn M; Poulton, John S; Temple, Brenda R S; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J

    2015-04-15

    Nuclear bodies (NBs) are structures that concentrate proteins, RNAs, and ribonucleoproteins that perform functions essential to gene expression. How NBs assemble is not well understood. We studied the Drosophila histone locus body (HLB), a NB that concentrates factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis at the replication-dependent histone gene locus. We coupled biochemical analysis with confocal imaging of both fixed and live tissues to demonstrate that the Drosophila Multi Sex Combs (Mxc) protein contains multiple domains necessary for HLB assembly. An important feature of this assembly process is the self-interaction of Mxc via two conserved N-terminal domains: a LisH domain and a novel self-interaction facilitator (SIF) domain immediately downstream of the LisH domain. Molecular modeling suggests that the LisH and SIF domains directly interact, and mutation of either the LisH or the SIF domain severely impairs Mxc function in vivo, resulting in reduced histone mRNA accumulation. A region of Mxc between amino acids 721 and 1481 is also necessary for HLB assembly independent of the LisH and SIF domains. Finally, the C-terminal 195 amino acids of Mxc are required for recruiting FLASH, an essential histone mRNA-processing factor, to the HLB. We conclude that multiple domains of the Mxc protein promote HLB assembly in order to concentrate factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis.

  18. Structural insight into dimeric interaction of the SARAH domains from Mst1 and RASSF family proteins in the apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eunha; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Pääkkönen, Kimmo; Güntert, Peter; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Lim, Dae-Sik; Lee, Jie-Oh; Jeon, Young Ho; Cheong, Chaejoon

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by the Ras → RASSF → MST pathway are controlled by the interaction of SARAH (for Salvador/Rassf/Hippo) domains in the C-terminal part of tumor suppressor proteins. The Mst1 SARAH domain interacts with its homologous domain of Rassf1 and Rassf5 (also known as Nore1) by forming a heterodimer that mediates the apoptosis process. Here, we describe the homodimeric structure of the human Mst1 SARAH domain and its heterotypic interaction with the Rassf5 and Salvador (Sav) SARAH domain. The Mst1 SARAH structure forms a homodimer containing two helices per monomer. An antiparallel arrangement of the long α-helices (h2/h2′) provides an elongated binding interface between the two monomers, and the short 310 helices (h1/h1′) are folded toward that of the other monomer. Chemical shift perturbation experiments identified an elongated, tight-binding interface with the Rassf5 SARAH domain and a 1:1 heterodimer formation. The linker region between the kinase and the SARAH domain is shown to be disordered in the free protein. These results imply a novel mode of interaction with RASSF family proteins and provide insight into the mechanism of apoptosis control by the SARAH domain. PMID:17517604

  19. Rational design of FRET sensor proteins based on mutually exclusive domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Merkx, Maarten; Golynskiy, Misha V; Lindenburg, Laurens H; Vinkenborg, Jan L

    2013-10-01

    Proteins that switch between distinct conformational states are ideal to monitor and control molecular processes within the complexity of biological systems. Inspired by the modular architecture of natural signalling proteins, our group explores generic design strategies for the construction of FRET-based sensor proteins and other protein switches. In the present article, I show that designing FRET sensors based on mutually exclusive domain interactions provides a robust method to engineer sensors with predictable properties and an inherently large change in emission ratio. The modularity of this approach should make it easily transferable to other applications of protein switches in fields ranging from synthetic biology, optogenetics and molecular diagnostics.

  20. Resonant modal interactions and adiabatic invariance for a nonlinear wave equation in a variable domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Li, H. K.

    1984-08-01

    The technique of isolating and order reducing transformations for computing adiabatic invariants in finite-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian sytems is extended to the case of the non-Hamiltonian modal representation of a wave equation with weak nonlinearities in a slowly varying domain. The mechanism of resonant interactions for two or more normal modes whereby the associated actions change rapidly in a short period is exhibited. In the Hamiltonian problem there are a number of global adiabatic invariants associated with each resonance. Conditions for which similar adiabatic invariants can be found for the non-Hamiltonian case are derived. The results are then verified by extensive numerical computations.

  1. Intrinsic asymmetry in chiral domain walls due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Yun; Kim, Duck-Ho; Choe, Sug-Bong

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical description of the energy density of chiral magnetic domain walls (DWs) that considers variations in DW width. Surprisingly, under the application of a longitudinal in-plane magnetic field, the DW width varies abnormally, resulting in an asymmetric variation of the DW energy density. Such asymmetry is attributable to the nonlinear contribution to the effective magnetic field from the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. The formation of such asymmetric DWs is confirmed by a micromagnetic simulation. The present prediction proposes a possible origin of the experimental asymmetry related to chiral damping.

  2. Investigation of ion acceleration mechanism through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altana, C.; Muoio, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Tudisco, S.; Brandi, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cristoforetti, G.; Fazzi, A.; Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L.; Giove, D.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Mascali, D.; Palla, D.; Schillaci, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in the femtosecond domain has been carried out at the ILIL facility at a laser intensity of up to 2×1019 W/cm2. A Thomson Parabola Spectrometer was used to identify different ion species and measure the energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters. We discuss the dependence of the protons spectra upon the structural characteristics of the targets (thickness and atomic mass) and the role of surface versus target bulk during acceleration process.

  3. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, sociodemographic and built environment) on preterm birth

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this ...

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of PDZ Domain Binding Reveals Inherent Functional Overlap within the PDZ Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J. W.; Sakalis, Philippe A.; Fowler, Donald A.; Bagowski, Christoph P.

    2011-01-01

    Binding selectivity and cross-reactivity within one of the largest and most abundant interaction domain families, the PDZ family, has long been enigmatic. The complete human PDZ domain complement (the PDZome) consists of 267 domains and we applied here a Bayesian selectivity model to predict hundreds of human PDZ domain interactions, using target sequences of 22,997 non-redundant proteins. Subsequent analysis of these binding scores shows that PDZs can be divided into two genome-wide clusters that coincide well with the division between canonical class 1 and 2 PDZs. Within the class 1 PDZs we observed binding overlap at unprecedented levels, mediated by two residues at positions 1 and 5 of the second α-helix of the binding pocket. Eight PDZ domains were subsequently selected for experimental binding studies and to verify the basics of our predictions. Overall, the PDZ domain class 1 cross-reactivity identified here implies that auxiliary mechanisms must be in place to overcome this inherent functional overlap and to minimize cross-selectivity within the living cell. Indeed, when we superimpose PDZ domain binding affinities with gene ontologies, network topology data and the domain position within a PDZ superfamily protein, functional overlap is minimized and PDZ domains position optimally in the binding space. We therefore propose that PDZ domain selectivity is achieved through cellular context rather than inherent binding specificity. PMID:21283644

  5. Cbl-c Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Is Increased via the Interaction of Its RING Finger Domain with a LIM Domain of the Paxillin Homolog, Hic 5

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Philip E.; Kales, Stephen C.; Yadavalli, Rajgopal; Nau, Marion M.; Zhang, Han; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Cbl proteins (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) are ubiquitin ligases that are critical regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling. In this study we identify a new Cbl-c interacting protein, Hydrogen peroxide Induced Construct 5 (Hic-5). The two proteins interact through a novel interaction mediated by the RING finger of Cbl-c and the LIM2 domain of Hic-5. Further, this interaction is mediated and dependent on specific zinc coordinating complexes within the RING finger and LIM domain. Binding of Hic-5 to Cbl-c leads to an increase in the ubiquitin ligase activity of Cbl-c once Cbl-c has been activated by Src phosphorylation or through an activating phosphomimetic mutation. In addition, co-transfection of Hic-5 with Cbl-c leads to an increase in Cbl-c mediated ubiquitination of the EGFR. These data suggest that Hic-5 enhances Cbl-c ubiquitin ligase activity once Cbl-c has been phosphorylated and activated. Interactions between heterologous RING fingers have been shown to activate E3s. This is the first demonstration of enhancement of ubiquitin ligase activity of a RING finger ubiquitin ligase by the direct interaction of a LIM zinc coordinating domain. PMID:23145173

  6. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  7. Membrane Anchoring and Interaction between Transmembrane Domains are Crucial for K+ Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Hoffgaard, Franziska; Hamacher, Kay; Kast, Stefan M.; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The small viral channel Kcv is a Kir-like K+ channel of only 94 amino acids. With this simple structure, the tetramer of Kcv represents the pore module of all complex K+ channels. To examine the structural contribution of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) to channel function, we performed Ala scanning mutagenesis of the two domains and tested the functionality of the mutants in a yeast complementation assay. The data reveal, in combination with computational models, that the upper halves of both TMDs, which face toward the external medium, are rather rigid, whereas the inner parts are more flexible. The rigidity of the outer TMD is conferred by a number of essential aromatic amino acids that face the membrane and probably anchor this domain in the bilayer. The inner TMD is intimately connected with the rigid part of the outer TMD via π···π interactions between a pair of aromatic amino acids. This structural principle is conserved within the viral K+ channels and also present in Kir2.2, implying a general importance of this architecture for K+ channel function. PMID:21310959

  8. Electrostatic interactions at the C-terminal domain of nucleoplasmin modulate its chromatin decondensation activity.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Aitor; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Bañuelos, Sonia; Prado, Adelina; Muga, Arturo

    2002-05-21

    The chromatin decondensation activity, thermal stability, and secondary structure of recombinant nucleoplasmin, of two deletion mutants, and of the protein isolated from Xenopus oocytes have been characterized. As previously reported, the chromatin decondensation activity of recombinant, unphosphorylated nucleoplasmin is almost negligible. Our data show that deletion of 50 residues at the C-terminal domain of the protein, containing the positively charged nuclear localization sequence, activates its chromatin decondensation ability and decreases its stability. Interestingly, both the decondensation activity and thermal stability of this deletion mutant resemble those of the phosphorylated protein isolated from Xenopus oocytes. Deletion of 80 residues at the C-terminal domain, containing the above-mentioned positively charged region and a poly(Glu) tract, inactivates the protein and increases its thermal stability. These findings, along with the effect of salt on the thermal stability of these proteins, suggest that electrostatic interactions between the positive nuclear localization sequence and the poly(Glu) tract, at the C-terminal domain, modulate protein activity and stability.

  9. Asymmetric domain expansion and dendrite formation in thin films with strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, Lucas; Mann, Maxwell; Tan, Aik-Jun; Beach, Geoffrey

    2015-03-01

    The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) at heavy-metal/ferromagnet interfaces can stabilize chiral spin textures. It has recently been shown that field-driven bubble domain expansion in perpendicularly-magnetized thin films is asymmetric under the application of an in-plane field, which can be used to quantify the DMI effective field in the (DW). We have imaged domain expansion in Pt(3nm)/Co(0.9nm)/Pt(x)/GdOx(3nm) films using wide-field Kerr microscopy to characterize this behavior systematically as a function of DMI strength. In the case of null or weak DMI, realized when top and bottom Pt layers are of similar thickness, the in-plane field dependence of the DW velocity is well-described by the simple expansion model derived in Ref.. However, in the case of strong DMI, we find a strongly nonmonotonic behavior due to flattening of the DW, minimizing Zeeman energy and DMI energy. Moreover, we show that when the ratio of the DMI effective field to the perpendicular anisotropy field is large, expanding bubble domains leave behind fine-scale dendritic structures, consisting of coupled 360 degree DWs. We present modeling that qualitatively describes these behaviors.

  10. Metastable multi-domain state in ultrathin films with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Parnika; Woo, Seonghoon; Beach, Geoffrey

    2015-03-01

    Helical spin structures such as skyrmions and chiral domain walls are stabilized in magnetic films with strong Dzyaloshinskii Moriya interaction (DMI). The chiral spin state is the ground state when the ratio of the effective DMI field to anisotropy field is greater than 2/pi. However, even when the DMI is too weak to generate a chiral ground state, such states can be metastable if the uniform state is appropriately perturbed.Here, we show that an in-plane applied field reduces the energy barrier for domain wall formation, and provides a simple technique to generate a multidomain state in uniform magnetic films. Further, we identify that the threshold between the stable single-domain state and the metastable multidomain state can be controlled by two parameters-demagnetizing energy and geometrical confinement. We use these parameters to create isolated geometrically confined magnetic bubbles in patterned discs of Pt/Co/GdOx multilayers. These bubbles may provide insight into the mechanism of creation of skyrmions in magnetic thin films with strong DMI.

  11. Identification of human protein interaction domains using an ORFeome-based yeast two-hybrid fragment library.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Selma; Koorman, Thijs; Kerver, Jana; Boxem, Mike

    2013-07-05

    Physical interactions between proteins are essential for biological processes. Hence, there have been major efforts to elucidate the complete networks of protein-protein interactions, or "interactomes", of various organisms. Detailed descriptions of protein interaction networks should include information on the discrete domains that mediate these interactions, yet most large-scale efforts model interactions between whole proteins only. We previously developed a yeast two-hybrid-based strategy to systematically map interaction domains and generated a domain-based interactome network for 750 proteins involved in C. elegans early embryonic development. Here, we expand the concept of Y2H-based interaction domain mapping to the genome-wide level. We generated a human fragment library by randomly fragmenting the full-length open reading frames (ORFs) present in the human ORFeome collection. Screens using several proteins required for cell division or polarity establishment as baits demonstrate the ability to accurately identify interaction domains for human proteins using this approach, while the experimental quality of the Y2H data was independently verified in coaffinity purification assays. The library generation strategy can easily be adapted to generate libraries from full-length ORF collections of other organisms.

  12. Comprehensive Binary Interaction Mapping of SH2 Domains via Fluorescence Polarization Reveals Novel Functional Diversification of ErbB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Mark F.; Chuu, Chih-pin; Jones, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    First-generation interaction maps of Src homology 2 (SH2) domains with receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) phosphosites have previously been generated using protein microarray (PM) technologies. Here, we developed a large-scale fluorescence polarization (FP) methodology that was able to characterize interactions between SH2 domains and ErbB receptor phosphosites with higher fidelity and sensitivity than was previously achieved with PMs. We used the FP assay to query the interaction of synthetic phosphopeptides corresponding to 89 ErbB receptor intracellular tyrosine sites against 93 human SH2 domains and 2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains. From 358,944 polarization measurements, the affinities for 1,405 unique biological interactions were determined, 83% of which are novel. In contrast to data from previous reports, our analyses suggested that ErbB2 was not more promiscuous than the other ErbB receptors. Our results showed that each receptor displays unique preferences in the affinity and location of recruited SH2 domains that may contribute to differences in downstream signaling potential. ErbB1 was enriched versus the other receptors for recruitment of domains from RAS GEFs whereas ErbB2 was enriched for recruitment of domains from tyrosine and phosphatidyl inositol phosphatases. ErbB3, the kinase inactive ErbB receptor family member, was predictably enriched for recruitment of domains from phosphatidyl inositol kinases and surprisingly, was enriched for recruitment of domains from tyrosine kinases, cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, and RHO GEFs but depleted for recruitment of domains from phosphatidyl inositol phosphatases. Many novel interactions were also observed with phosphopeptides corresponding to ErbB receptor tyrosines not previously reported to be phosphorylated by mass spectrometry, suggesting the existence of many biologically relevant RTK sites that may be phosphorylated but below the detection threshold of standard mass spectrometry procedures. This

  13. Free energetics of rigid body association of ubiquitin binding domains: a biochemical model for binding mediated by hydrophobic interaction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-07-01

    Weak intermolecular interactions, such as hydrophobic associations, underlie numerous biomolecular recognition processes. Ubiquitin is a small protein that represents a biochemical model for exploring thermodynamic signatures of hydrophobic association as it is widely held that a major component of ubiquitin's binding to numerous partners is mediated by hydrophobic regions on both partners. Here, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the Adaptive Biasing Force sampling method to compute potentials of mean force (the reversible work, or free energy, associated with the binding process) to investigate the thermodynamic signature of complexation in this well-studied biochemical model of hydrophobic association. We observe that much like in the case of a purely hydrophobic solute (i.e., graphene, carbon nanotubes), association is favored by entropic contributions from release of water from the interprotein regions. Moreover, association is disfavored by loss of enthalpic interactions, but unlike in the case of purely hydrophobic solutes, in this case protein-water interactions are lost and not compensated for by additional water-water interactions generated upon release of interprotein and moreso, hydration, water. We further find that relative orientations of the proteins that mutually present hydrophobic regions of each protein to its partner are favored over those that do not. In fact, the free energy minimum as predicted by a force field based method recapitulates the experimental NMR solution structure of the complex.

  14. U24 from Roseolovirus interacts strongly with Nedd4 WW Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yurou; Zhang, Rui; Scott, Walter R. P.; Creagh, A. Louise; Haynes, Charles A.; Straus, Suzana K.

    2017-01-01

    U24 is a protein found in both roseoloviruses Human Herpes Virus type 6 and 7 (HHV-6 and HHV-7), with an N-terminus that is rich in prolines (PY motif in both HHV-6A and 7; PxxP motif in HHV-6A). Previous work has shown that the interaction between U24 and WW domains is important for endocytic recycling of T-cell receptors, but a cognate ligand was never identified. In this contribution, data was obtained from pull-downs, ITC, NMR and molecular dynamics simulations to show that a specific interaction exists between U24 and Nedd4 WW domains. ITC experiments were also carried out for U24 from HHV-6A phosphorylated at Thr6 (pU24-6A) and a peptide containing the PY motif from Nogo-A, a protein implicated in both the initial inflammatory and the neurodegenerative phases of multiple sclerosis (MS). The results suggest that phosphorylation of U24 from HHV-6A may be crucial for its potential role in MS. PMID:28051106

  15. U24 from Roseolovirus interacts strongly with Nedd4 WW Domains.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yurou; Zhang, Rui; Scott, Walter R P; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Straus, Suzana K

    2017-01-04

    U24 is a protein found in both roseoloviruses Human Herpes Virus type 6 and 7 (HHV-6 and HHV-7), with an N-terminus that is rich in prolines (PY motif in both HHV-6A and 7; PxxP motif in HHV-6A). Previous work has shown that the interaction between U24 and WW domains is important for endocytic recycling of T-cell receptors, but a cognate ligand was never identified. In this contribution, data was obtained from pull-downs, ITC, NMR and molecular dynamics simulations to show that a specific interaction exists between U24 and Nedd4 WW domains. ITC experiments were also carried out for U24 from HHV-6A phosphorylated at Thr6 (pU24-6A) and a peptide containing the PY motif from Nogo-A, a protein implicated in both the initial inflammatory and the neurodegenerative phases of multiple sclerosis (MS). The results suggest that phosphorylation of U24 from HHV-6A may be crucial for its potential role in MS.

  16. Manipulation of domain propagation dynamics with the magnetostatic interaction in a pair of Fe-rich amorphous microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawroński, P.; Zhukova, V.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.

    2013-07-01

    We studied the domain wall dynamics in a system of two magnetostatically interacting Fe-rich glass coated amorphous microwires paying attention on the influence of the interaction and the external tensile stress on the velocity of the domain wall propagation. We measured and analyzed numerically the dependence of the shape of the hysteresis loops on the frequency of the applied field considering its origin related with the finite domain wall velocity. The critical condition for the disappearance of the plateau on the hysteresis loops separating two remagnetization events in a system of two microwires was investigated.

  17. The Shank3 Interaction Partner ProSAPiP1 Regulates Postsynaptic SPAR Levels and the Maturation of Dendritic Spines in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reim, Dominik; Weis, Tobias M.; Halbedl, Sonja; Delling, Jan Philipp; Grabrucker, Andreas M.; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Schmeisser, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The postsynaptic density or PSD is a submembranous compartment containing a wide array of proteins that contribute to both morphology and function of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. In this study, we have analyzed functional aspects of the Fezzin ProSAP-interacting protein 1 (ProSAPiP1), an interaction partner of the well-known PSD proteins Shank3 and SPAR. Using lentiviral-mediated overexpression and knockdown of ProSAPiP1, we found that this protein is dispensable for the formation of both pre- and postsynaptic specializations per se. We further show that ProSAPiP1 regulates SPAR levels at the PSD and the maturation of dendritic spines. In line with previous findings on the ProSAPiP1 homolog PSD-Zip70, we conclude that Fezzins essentially contribute to the maturation of excitatory spine synapses. PMID:27252646

  18. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models-the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex-and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs.

  19. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe; Gonzalez, Teresa; Gugenheim, Jean; Tran, Albert; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) initiates a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway involved in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. We recently identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein, as a partner of APS and showed that APS-Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organization in fibroblastic cells. Because actin rearrangement is important for insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (Glut 4) translocation, we studied the potential involvement of Enigma in insulin-induced glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Enigma mRNA was expressed in differentiated adipocytes and APS and Enigma were colocalized with cortical actin. Expression of an APS mutant unable to bind Enigma increased the insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation to the plasma membrane. By contrast, overexpression of Enigma inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin-induced actin rearrangements, whereas the expression of Enigma without its LIM domains was without effect. A physiological link between increased expression of Enigma and an alteration in insulin-induced glucose uptake was suggested by the increase in Enigma mRNA expression in adipose tissue of diabetic obese patients. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between APS and Enigma is involved in insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation by regulating cortical actin remodeling and raise the possibility that modification of APS/Enigma ratio could participate in the alteration of insulin-induced glucose uptake in adipose tissue.

  20. The EBNA-2 arginine-glycine domain is critical but not essential for B-lymphocyte growth transformation; the rest of region 3 lacks essential interactive domains.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, X; Yalamanchili, R; Harada, S; Kieff, E

    1994-01-01

    Since deletion of region 3 (amino acids [aa] 333 to 425) of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 2 (EBNA-2) results in EBV recombinants which cannot transform primary B lymphocytes (J. I. Cohen, F. Wang, and E. Kieff, J. Virol. 65:2545-2554, 1991), the role of domains of region 3 was investigated. Deletion of the Arg-Gly repeat domain, R-337GQSRGRGRGRGRGRGKG354, results in EBV recombinants that transform primary B lymphocytes with modestly decreased activity. The transformed cells grow slowly and are difficult to expand. EBNA-2 deleted for the Arg-Gly domain does not associate with the nuclear chromatin fraction. The Arg-Gly repeat has an intrinsic ability to bind to histone H1, to other proteins, including EBNA-1, and to nucleic acids, especially poly(G). Two independent deletions of each part of the rest of region 3 (aa 359 to 383 and 385 to 430) have little effect on transformation, while deletion of the rest of region 3 (aa 361 to 425) as a single segment substantially reduces transformation efficiency. EBNA-2 deleted for all of region 3 can still transactivate the LMP1 promoter in transient expression assays but is less active than EBNA-2 in transactivating the BamHI-C promoter. EBNA-2 deleted for the Arg-Gly domain is better than EBNA-2 at transactivating the LMP1 promoter and is as active as EBNA-2 in transactivating the BamHI-C promoter. These data are most compatible with a model in which the Arg-Gly domain of region 3 is a modulator of EBNA-2 interactions and activities, while the rest of region 3 is important in positioning the region 2 J kappa binding domain relative to the region 4 acidic transactivating domain. Despite the null phenotype of the region 3 deletion, region 3 is unlikely to mediate essential interactions with other proteins. Images PMID:8083959

  1. Characterization of the human sigma-1 receptor chaperone domain structure and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interactions.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R

    2013-07-19

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198-206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions.

  2. Characterization of the Human Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Domain Structure and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198–206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions. PMID:23760505

  3. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  4. Interactions between relay helix and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix drive the converter domain rotation during the recovery stroke of myosin II.

    PubMed

    Baumketner, Andrij

    2012-06-01

    Myosin motor protein exists in two alternative conformations, prerecovery state M* and postrecovery state M**, on adenosine triphosphate binding. The details of the M*-to-M** transition, known as the recovery stroke to reflect its role as the functional opposite of the force-generating power stroke, remain elusive. The defining feature of the postrecovery state is a kink in the relay helix, a key part of the protein involved in force generation. In this article, we determine the interactions that are responsible for the appearance of the kink. We design a series of computational models that contain three other segments, relay loop, converter domain, and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix, with which relay helix interacts and determine their structure in accurate replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. By conducting an exhaustive combinatorial search among different models, we find that: (1) the converter domain must be attached to the relay helix during the transition, so it does not interfere with other parts of the protein and (2) the structure of the relay helix is controlled by SH1 helix. The kink is strongly coupled to the position of SH1 helix. It arises as a result of direct interactions between SH1 and the relay helix and leads to a rotation of the C-terminal part of the relay helix, which is subsequently transmitted to the converter domain.

  5. A Fictitious Domain Method for Resolving the Interaction of Blood Flow with Clot Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Shadden, Shawn

    2016-11-01

    Thrombosis and thrombo-embolism cause a range of diseases including heart attack and stroke. Closer understanding of clot and blood flow mechanics provides valuable insights on the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of thrombotic diseases. Such mechanics are complicated, however, by the discrete and multi-scale phenomena underlying thrombosis, and the complex interactions of unsteady, pulsatile hemodynamics with a clot of arbitrary shape and microstructure. We have developed a computational technique, based on a fictitious domain based finite element method, to study these interactions. The method can resolve arbitrary clot geometries, and dynamically couple fluid flow with static or growing clot boundaries. Macroscopic thrombus-hemodynamics interactions were investigated within idealized vessel geometries representative of the common carotid artery, with realistic unsteady flow profiles as inputs. The method was also employed successfully to resolve micro-scale interactions using a model driven by in-vivo morphology data. The results provide insights into the flow structures and hemodynamic loading around an arbitrarily grown clot at arterial length-scales, as well as flow and transport within the interstices of platelet aggregates composing the clot. The work was supported by AHA Award No: 16POST27500023.

  6. Quantitation of interactions between two DNA loops demonstrates loop domain insulation in E. coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Priest, David G.; Kumar, Sandip; Yan, Yan; Dunlap, David D.; Dodd, Ian B.; Shearwin, Keith E.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene regulation involves complex patterns of long-range DNA-looping interactions between enhancers and promoters, but how these specific interactions are achieved is poorly understood. Models that posit other DNA loops—that aid or inhibit enhancer–promoter contact—are difficult to test or quantitate rigorously in eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the well-characterized DNA-looping proteins Lac repressor and phage λ CI to measure interactions between pairs of long DNA loops in E. coli cells in the three possible topological arrangements. We find that side-by-side loops do not affect each other. Nested loops assist each other’s formation consistent with their distance-shortening effect. In contrast, alternating loops, where one looping element is placed within the other DNA loop, inhibit each other’s formation, thus providing clear support for the loop domain model for insulation. Modeling shows that combining loop assistance and loop interference can provide strong specificity in long-range interactions. PMID:25288735

  7. Fluorescence assay of the interaction between hemoglobin and the cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte membrane band 3.

    PubMed

    Sega, Martiana F; Chu, Haiyan; Christian, John A; Low, Philip S

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen tension has emerged as a potent regulator of multiple erythrocyte properties, including glucose metabolism, cell volume, ATP release, and cytoskeletal organization. Because hemoglobin (Hb)(1) binds to the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) in an oxygen dependent manner, with deoxyHb exhibiting significantly greater affinity for cdb3 than oxyHb, the deoxyHb-cdb3 interaction has been hypothesized to constitute the molecular switch for all O2-controlled erythrocyte processes. In this study, we describe a rapid and accurate method for quantitating the interaction of deoxyHb binding to cdb3. For this purpose, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) is fused to the COOH-terminus of cdb3, and the binding of Hb to the NH2-terminus of cdb3-eGFP is quantitated by Hb-mediated quenching of cdb3-eGFP fluorescence. As expected, the intensity of cdb3-eGFP fluorescence decreases only slightly following addition of oxyHb. However, upon deoxygenation of the same Hb-cdb3 solution, the fluorescence decreases dramatically (i.e. confirming that deoxyHb exhibits much greater affinity for cdb3 than oxyHb). Using this fluorescence quenching method, we not only confirm previously established characteristics of the Hb-cdb3 interaction, but also establish an assay that can be exploited to screen for inhibitors of the sickle Hb-cdb3 interaction that accelerates sickle Hb polymerization.

  8. Mapping interactions between myosin relay and converter domains that power muscle function.

    PubMed

    Kronert, William A; Melkani, Girish C; Melkani, Anju; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2014-05-02

    Intramolecular communication within myosin is essential for its function as motor, but the specific amino acid residue interactions required are unexplored within muscle cells. Using Drosophila melanogaster skeletal muscle myosin, we performed a novel in vivo molecular suppression analysis to define the importance of three relay loop amino acid residues (Ile(508), Asn(509), and Asp(511)) in communicating with converter domain residue Arg(759). We found that the N509K relay mutation suppressed defects in myosin ATPase, in vitro motility, myofibril stability, and muscle function associated with the R759E converter mutation. Through molecular modeling, we define a mechanism for this interaction and suggest why the I508K and D511K relay mutations fail to suppress R759E. Interestingly, I508K disabled motor function and myofibril assembly, suggesting that productive relay-converter interaction is essential for both processes. We conclude that the putative relay-converter interaction mediated by myosin residues 509 and 759 is critical for the biochemical and biophysical function of skeletal muscle myosin and the normal ultrastructural and mechanical properties of muscle.

  9. The Brucella TIR-like protein TcpB interacts with the death domain of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anu; Ganguly, Kumkum; Cabantous, Stéphanie; Waldo, Geoffrey S; Micheva-Viteva, Sofiya N; Nag, Kamalika; Hlavacek, William S; Tung, Chang-Shung

    2012-01-06

    The pathogen Brucella melitensis secretes a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain containing protein that abrogates host innate immune responses. In this study, we have characterized the biochemical interactions of Brucella TIR-like protein TcpB with host innate immune adaptor proteins. Using protein-fragment complementation assays based on Gaussia luciferase and green fluorescent protein, we find that TcpB interacts directly with MyD88 and that this interaction is significantly stronger than the interaction of TcpB with TIRAP, the only other adaptor protein that detectably interacts with TcpB. Surprisingly, the TcpB-MyD88 interaction depends on the death domain (DD) of MyD88, and TcpB does not interact with the isolated TIR domain of MyD88. TcpB disrupts MyD88(DD)-MyD88(DD), MyD88(DD)-MyD88(TIR) and MyD88(DD)-MyD88 interactions but not MyD88-MyD88 or MyD88(TIR)-MyD88(TIR) interactions. Structural models consistent with these results suggest how TcpB might inhibit TLR signaling by targeting MyD88 via a DD-TIR domain interface.

  10. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  11. Solution structure and phospholipid interactions of the isolated voltage-sensor domain from KvAP.

    PubMed

    Butterwick, Joel A; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2010-11-05

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are specialized transmembrane segments that confer voltage sensitivity to many proteins such as ion channels and enzymes. The activities of these domains are highly dependent on both the chemical properties and the physical properties of the surrounding membrane environment. To learn about VSD-lipid interactions, we used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the structure and phospholipid interface of the VSD from the voltage-dependent K(+) channel KvAP (prokaryotic Kv from Aeropyrum pernix). The solution structure of the KvAP VSD solubilized within phospholipid micelles is similar to a previously determined crystal structure solubilized by a nonionic detergent and complexed with an antibody fragment. The differences observed include a previously unidentified short amphipathic α-helix that precedes the first transmembrane helix and a subtle rigid-body repositioning of the S3-S4 voltage-sensor paddle. Using (15)N relaxation experiments, we show that much of the VSD, including the pronounced kink in S3 and the S3-S4 paddle, is relatively rigid on the picosecond-to-nanosecond timescale. In contrast, the kink in S3 is mobile on the microsecond-to-millisecond timescale and may act as a hinge in the movement of the paddle during channel gating. We characterized the VSD-phospholipid micelle interactions using nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy and showed that the micelle uniformly coats the KvAP VSD and approximates the chemical environment of a phospholipid bilayer. Using paramagnetically labeled phospholipids, we show that bilayer-forming lipids interact with the S3 and S4 helices more strongly than with S1 and S2.

  12. Identification of Novel MAGE-G1-Interacting Partners in Retinoic Acid-Induced P19 Neuronal Differentiation Using SILAC-Based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Yujian; Lin, Shide; Yang, Shuguang; Liu, Shaojun

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-G1 is a protein plays role in the early process of neurogenesis. However, the fundamental roles MAGE-G1 played in neurogenesis have not yet been completely understood. Finding the partners MAGE-G1 interacting with will surely contribute to the function study of MAGE-G1. In this study, using Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-immunoprecipitation quantitative proteomics, we screened the interacting proteins of MAGE-G1 during retinoic acid -induced neuronal differentiation of P19 cells and firstly found that FSCN1 and VIME were potential novel MAGE-G1-interacting proteins. Then, the interaction between overexpressed MAGE-G1 and FSCN1 or VIME was validated by GST-pull down assay in bacteria and by co-immunoprecipitation assay in COS7 cells. Endogenous co-immunoprecipitation assay further confirmed that MAGE-G1 interacted with FSCN1 or VIME in P19 cells after a 6-day retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation. Those results provide a functional linkage between MAGE-G1 and FSCN1 or VIME and may facilitate a better understanding of the fundamental aspects of MAGE-G1 during neurogenesis. PMID:28374796

  13. Oxidative stress–induced assembly of PML nuclear bodies controls sumoylation of partner proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Umut; Ferhi, Omar; Jeanne, Marion; Benhenda, Shirine; Berthier, Caroline; Jollivet, Florence; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Faklaris, Orestis; Setterblad, Niclas; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein organizes PML nuclear bodies (NBs), which are stress-responsive domains where many partner proteins accumulate. Here, we clarify the basis for NB formation and identify stress-induced partner sumoylation as the primary NB function. NB nucleation does not rely primarily on intermolecular interactions between the PML SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) and SUMO, but instead results from oxidation-mediated PML multimerization. Oxidized PML spherical meshes recruit UBC9, which enhances PML sumoylation, allow partner recruitment through SIM interactions, and ultimately enhance partner sumoylation. Intermolecular SUMO–SIM interactions then enforce partner sequestration within the NB inner core. Accordingly, oxidative stress enhances NB formation and global sumoylation in vivo. Some NB-associated sumoylated partners also become polyubiquitinated by RNF4, precipitating their proteasomal degradation. As several partners are protein-modifying enzymes, NBs could act as sensors that facilitate and confer oxidative stress sensitivity not only to sumoylation but also to other post-translational modifications, thereby explaining alterations of stress response upon PML or NB loss. PMID:24637324

  14. LsbB Bacteriocin Interacts with the Third Transmembrane Domain of the YvjB Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovic, Marija; Uzelac, Gordana; Mirkovic, Nemanja; Devescovi, Giulia; Diep, Dzung B.; Venturi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    of LsbB is crucial for the bacteriocin activity, most probably through adequate interaction with the third transmembrane domain of the YvjB receptor. The conserved Tyr356 and Ala353 residues of YvjB are essential for the function of this Zn-dependent membrane-located protease as a bacteriocin receptor. PMID:27342562

  15. Analytical applications of partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems: Exploring protein structural changes and protein-partner interactions in vitro and in vivo by solvent interaction analysis method.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Boris Y; Uversky, Vladimir N; Chait, Arnon

    2016-05-01

    This review covers the fundamentals of protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Included is a review of advancements in the analytical application of solute partitioning in ATPS over the last two decades, with multiple examples of experimental data providing evidence that phase-forming polymers do not interact with solutes partitioned in ATPS. The partitioning of solutes is governed by the differences in solute interactions with aqueous media in the two phases. Solvent properties of the aqueous media in these two phases may be characterized and manipulated. The solvent interaction analysis (SIA) method, based on the solute partitioning in ATPS, may be used for characterization and analysis of individual proteins and their interactions with different partners. The current state of clinical proteomics regarding the discovery and monitoring of new protein biomarkers is discussed, and it is argued that the protein expression level in a biological fluid may be not the optimal focus of clinical proteomic research. Multiple examples of application of the SIA method for discovery of changes in protein structure and protein-partner interactions in biological fluids are described. The SIA method reveals new opportunities for discovery and monitoring structure-based protein biomarkers.

  16. Interaction Domains and Suicide: A Population-Based Panel Study of Suicides in Stockholm, 1991-1999

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedstrom, Peter; Liu, Ka-Yuet; Nordvik, Monica K.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how suicides influence suicide risks of others within two interaction domains: the family and the workplace. A distinction is made between dyad-based social-interaction effects and degree-based exposure effects. A unique database including all individuals who ever lived in Stockholm during the 1990s is analyzed. For about 5.6…

  17. Cyr61 and YB-1 are novel interacting partners of uPAR and elevate the malignancy of triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Michaela C.; Falkenberg, Natalie; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Priller, Markus; Braselmann, Herbert; Feuchtinger, Annette; Walch, Axel; Schmitt, Manfred; Aubele, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    The triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a very aggressive tumor type often occurring in young women and is associated with a bad prognosis for the patients. TNBC lacks established targets for breast cancer therapy, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Therefore, novel therapeutic targets and strategies are needed for an improved treatment of this breast cancer subtype. TNBC and respective cell lines often overexpress proteins of the urokinase plasminogen activator system (uPAS) including uPA, its receptor uPAR and inhibitor PAI-1, which together with co-factors contribute to the malignancy of TNBC. Here, two novel interacting partners of uPAR, the cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61) and the Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) were identified and their differential expression demonstrated in TNBC cells as well as in tumors. In the TNBC cohort, both interactors significantly correlated with expression levels of cathepsin B, c-Met and the tumor grade. In addition, expression levels of Cyr61 significantly correlated with cathepsin D (p=0.03), insulin receptor (p≤0.001), insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R, p=0.015) and also with YB-1 (p=0.0004) levels. The interactions of uPAR with Cyr61 significantly correlated with expression levels of tumor-promoting biomarkers including plasminogen (p=0.0014), cathepsin B (p=0.032), c-Met (p=0.0192) as well as with the tumor grade (p=0.02). In multivariate survival analysis, YB-1 showed independent prognostic value (p=0.01). As the novel interacting partners, also together with uPAR, contribute to tumor progression and metastasis, both may be potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:27286449

  18. Revealing the Effect of Protein Weak Adsorption to Nanoparticles on the Interaction between the Desorbed Protein and its Binding Partner by Surface-Enhanced Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zeng, Li; Wu, Lie; Jiang, Xiue

    2017-03-07

    In recent years, the properties of protein corona have attracted intense interest in the field of nanobio interface, but a long-ignored research issue is how the desorbed proteins suffering from conformational change upon weak association with nanoparticles affect their functional properties when further interacting with their downstream protein partners. In this Article, surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry were used to study the adsorption and redox properties of the soluble cytochrome c (cyt c) on 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) after weakly binding to and then desorbed from nano-TiO2. For the first time, our study reveals that the weak interaction between cyt c and nano-TiO2 induces the protein to undergo a heterogeneous conformational change. More importantly, the cyt c with a largely unfolded conformation exhibits a weaker interaction with its binding partner mimics than the native-like cyt c but a faster adsorption rate even at a concentration that is much lower than that of native-like cyt c. Correspondingly, the cyt c with a large unfolding shows a greatly positive-shifted formal potential (Ef) relative to the native-like protein possibly due to the disruption of the pocket structure of heme in the vicinity of Met80. These properties could enable the largely unfolded cyt c to undergo a favorable binding but an unavailable electron transfer to cytochrome c oxidase even in the presence of high-concentration native cyt c, probably causing the disruption of electron flow.

  19. Deciphering the role of the AT-rich interaction domain and the HMG-box domain of ARID-HMG proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Roy, Adrita; Dutta, Arkajyoti; Roy, Dipan; Ganguly, Payel; Ghosh, Ritesh; Kar, Rajiv K; Bhunia, Anirban; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta; Chaudhuri, Shubho

    2016-10-01

    ARID-HMG DNA-binding proteins represent a novel group of HMG-box containing protein family where the AT-rich interaction domain (ARID) is fused with the HMG-box domain in a single polypeptide chain. ARID-HMG proteins are highly plant specific with homologs found both in flowering plants as well as in moss such as Physcomitrella. The expression of these proteins is ubiquitous in plant tissues and primarily localises in the cell nucleus. HMGB proteins are involved in several nuclear processes, but the role of ARID-HMG proteins in plants remains poorly explored. Here, we performed DNA-protein interaction studies with Arabidopsis ARID-HMG protein HMGB11 (At1g55650) to understand the functionality of this protein and its individual domains. DNA binding assays revealed that AtHMGB11 can bind double-stranded DNA with a weaker affinity (Kd = 475 ± 17.9 nM) compared to Arabidopsis HMGB1 protein (Kd = 39.8 ± 2.68 nM). AtHMGB11 also prefers AT-rich DNA as a substrate and shows structural bias for supercoiled DNA. Molecular docking of the DNA-AtHMGB11 complex indicated that the protein interacts with the DNA major groove, mainly through its ARID domain and the junction region connecting the ARID and the HMG-box domain. Also, predicted by the docking model, mutation of Lys(85) from the ARID domain and Arg(199) & Lys(202) from the junction region affects the DNA binding affinity of AtHMGB11. In addition, AtHMGB11 and its truncated form containing the HMG-box domain can not only promote DNA mini-circle formation but are also capable of inducing negative supercoils into relaxed plasmid DNA suggesting the involvement of this protein in several nuclear events. Overall, the study signifies that both the ARID and the HMG-box domain contribute to the optimal functioning of ARID-HMG protein in vivo.

  20. Influence of domain interactions on conformational mobility of the progesterone receptor detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Devrishi; Callaway, Celetta; Pascal, Bruce D.; Kumar, Raj; Edwards, Dean P.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    Structural and functional details of the N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1) of most nuclear receptors are poorly understood due to the highly dynamic intrinsically disordered nature of this domain. A hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry based investigation of TATA box binding protein (TBP) interaction with various domains of progesterone receptor (PR) demonstrate that agonist bound PR interaction with TBP via AF1 impacts the mobility of the C-terminal AF2. Results from HDX and other biophysical studies involving agonist and antagonist bound full length PR and isolated PR domains reveals the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic transcriptional activation mediated by AF1 and AF2, dominance of PR-B isoform over PR-A, and the necessity of AF2 for full AF1-mediated transcriptional activity. These results provide a comprehensive picture elaborating the underlying mechanism of PR-TBP interactions as a model for studying NR-transcription factor functional interactions. PMID:24909783

  1. Measuring interactions of FERM domain-containing sorting Nexin proteins with endosomal lipids and cargo molecules.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Rajesh; Mobli, Mehdi; Collins, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    Endosomal recycling pathways regulate cellular homeostasis via the transport of internalized material back to the plasma membrane. Phox homology (PX) and band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin (FERM) domain-containing proteins are a recently identified subfamily of PX proteins that are critical for the recycling of numerous transmembrane cargo molecules. The PX-FERM subfamily includes three endosome-associated proteins called sorting nexin (SNX) 17, SNX27, and SNX31. These are modular peripheral membrane proteins that act as central scaffolds mediating protein-lipid interactions, cargo binding, and regulatory protein recruitment. This chapter outlines the methodology employed to classify the PX-FERM family using combined bioinformatics and structure prediction tools. It further details the application of isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to understand the mechanisms that underpin their endosomal membrane recruitment and subsequent recognition of NPxY/NxxY peptide sorting motifs, present in many cargo receptors and required for their trafficking. It is now increasingly recognized that the formation of a stable trafficking complex is dictated by a multitude of coordinated protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions, and the approaches highlighted here will be useful for future studies aimed at understanding these biomolecular interactions in greater detail.

  2. TIFAB inhibits TIFA, TRAF-interacting protein with a forkhead-associated domain.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Takayuki; Semba, Kentaro; Azuma, Sakura; Ikawa, Shuntaro; Gohda, Jin; Akiyama, Taishin; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2004-04-23

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) transduces signals that lead to activation of NFkappaB and AP-1, which is essential for cell differentiation and establishment of the immune and inflammatory systems. TRAF-interacting protein with a forkhead-associated domain (TIFA) was identified as a TRAF6-binding protein that could link IRAK-1 to TRAF6 and then activate TRAF6 upon stimulation. We report identification of a TIFA-related protein, TIFAB, that inhibits TIFA-mediated activation of NFkappaB. TIFAB does not associate with members of the TRAF family but does bind TIFA. We analyzed the effect of TIFAB expression on the TRAF6/TIFA interaction by immunoprecipitation of TRAF6 and found that TIFA coprecipitated with TRAF6 was not changed. However, when we analyzed this interaction by immunoprecipitation of TIFA, we found that TIFAB significantly increased the amount of TRAF6 coprecipitated with TIFA. These findings suggest that TIFAB inhibits the TIFA-mediated TRAF6 activation possibly by inducing a conformational change in TIFA.

  3. The Rab interacting lysosomal protein (RILP) homology domain functions as a novel effector domain for small GTPase Rab36: Rab36 regulates retrograde melanosome transport in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takahide; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-08-17

    Small GTPase Rab functions as a molecular switch that drives membrane trafficking through specific interaction with its effector molecule. Thus, identification of its specific effector domain is crucial to revealing the molecular mechanism that underlies Rab-mediated membrane trafficking. Because of the large numbers of Rab isoforms in higher eukaryotes, however, the effector domains of most of the vertebrate- or mammalian-specific Rabs have yet to be determined. In this study we screened for effector molecules of Rab36, a previously uncharacterized Rab isoform that is largely conserved in vertebrates, and we succeeded in identifying nine Rab36-binding proteins, including RILP (Rab interacting lysosomal protein) family members. Sequence comparison revealed that five of nine Rab36-binding proteins, i.e. RILP, RILP-L1, RILP-L2, and JIP3/4, contain a conserved coiled-coil domain. We identified the coiled-coil domain as a RILP homology domain (RHD) and characterized it as a common Rab36-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of the RHD of RILP revealed the different contributions by amino acids in the RHD to binding activity toward Rab7 and Rab36. Expression of RILP in melanocytes, but not expression of its Rab36 binding-deficient mutants, induced perinuclear aggregation of melanosomes, and this effect was clearly attenuated by knockdown of endogenous Rab36 protein. Moreover, knockdown of Rab36 in Rab27A-deficient melanocytes, which normally exhibit perinuclear melanosome aggregation because of increased retrograde melanosome transport activity, caused dispersion of melanosomes from the perinucleus to the cell periphery, but knockdown of Rab7 did not. Our findings indicated that Rab36 mediates retrograde melanosome transport in melanocytes through interaction with RILP.

  4. Cysteine-rich domains related to Frizzled receptors and Hedgehog-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Frizzled and Smoothened are homologous seven-transmembrane proteins functioning in the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, respectively. They harbor an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (FZ-CRD), a mobile evolutionary unit that has been found in a number of other metazoan proteins and Frizzled-like proteins in Dictyostelium. Domains distantly related to FZ-CRDs, in Hedgehog-interacting proteins (HHIPs), folate receptors and riboflavin-binding proteins (FRBPs), and Niemann-Pick Type C1 proteins (NPC1s), referred to as HFN-CRDs, exhibit similar structures and disulfide connectivity patterns compared with FZ-CRDs. We used computational analyses to expand the homologous set of FZ-CRDs and HFN-CRDs, providing a better understanding of their evolution and classification. First, FZ-CRD-containing proteins with various domain compositions were identified in several major eukaryotic lineages including plants and Chromalveolata, revealing a wider phylogenetic distribution of FZ-CRDs than previously recognized. Second, two new and distinct groups of highly divergent FZ-CRDs were found by sensitive similarity searches. One of them is present in the calcium channel component Mid1 in fungi and the uncharacterized FAM155 proteins in metazoans. Members of the other new FZ-CRD group occur in the metazoan-specific RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) proteins that are putative tumor suppressors acting as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. Finally, sequence and three-dimensional structural comparisons helped us uncover a divergent HFN-CRD in glypicans, which are important morphogen-binding heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Such a finding reinforces the evolutionary ties between the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways and underscores the importance of gene duplications in creating essential signaling components in metazoan evolution. PMID:22693159

  5. Measuring frequency domain granger causality for multiple blocks of interacting time series.

    PubMed

    Faes, Luca; Nollo, Giandomenico

    2013-04-01

    In the past years, several frequency-domain causality measures based on vector autoregressive time series modeling have been suggested to assess directional connectivity in neural systems. The most followed approaches are based on representing the considered set of multiple time series as a realization of two or three vector-valued processes, yielding the so-called Geweke linear feedback measures, or as a realization of multiple scalar-valued processes, yielding popular measures like the directed coherence (DC) and the partial DC (PDC). In the present study, these two approaches are unified and generalized by proposing novel frequency-domain causality measures which extend the existing measures to the analysis of multiple blocks of time series. Specifically, the block DC (bDC) and block PDC (bPDC) extend DC and PDC to vector-valued processes, while their logarithmic counterparts, denoted as multivariate total feedback [Formula: see text] and direct feedback [Formula: see text], represent into a full multivariate framework the Geweke's measures. Theoretical analysis of the proposed measures shows that they: (i) possess desirable properties of causality measures; (ii) are able to reflect either direct causality (bPDC, [Formula: see text] or total (direct + indirect) causality (bDC, [Formula: see text] between time series blocks; (iii) reduce to the DC and PDC measures for scalar-valued processes, and to the Geweke's measures for pairs of processes; (iv) are able to capture internal dependencies between the scalar constituents of the analyzed vector processes. Numerical analysis showed that the proposed measures can be efficiently estimated from short time series, allow to represent in an objective, compact way the information derived from the causal analysis of several pairs of time series, and may detect frequency domain causality more accurately than existing measures. The proposed measures find their natural application in the evaluation of directional

  6. Initiating protease with modular domains interacts with β-glucan recognition protein to trigger innate immune response in insects

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Garcia, Brandon L.; Kanost, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The autoactivation of an initiating serine protease upon binding of pattern recognition proteins to pathogen surfaces is a crucial step in eliciting insect immune responses such as the activation of Toll and prophenoloxidase pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for autoactivation of the initiating protease remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the autoactivation of hemolymph protease 14 (HP14), an initiating protease in hemolymph of Manduca sexta, upon the binding of β-1,3-glucan by its recognition protein, βGRP2. Biochemical analysis using HP14 zymogen (proHP14), βGRP2, and the recombinant proteins as truncated forms showed that the amino-terminal modular low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LA) domains within HP14 are required for proHP14 autoactivation that is stimulated by its interaction with βGRP2. Consistent with this result, recombinant LA domains inhibit the activation of proHP14 and prophenoloxidase, likely by competing with the interaction between βGRP2 and LA domains within proHP14. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrated that immobilized LA domains directly interact with βGRP2 in a calcium-dependent manner and that high-affinity interaction requires the C-terminal glucanase-like domain of βGRP2. Importantly, the affinity of LA domains for βGRP2 increases nearly 100-fold in the presence of β-1,3-glucan. Taken together, these results present the first experimental evidence to our knowledge that LA domains of an insect modular protease and glucanase-like domains of a βGRP mediate their interaction, and that this binding is essential for the protease autoactivation. Thus, our study provides important insight into the molecular basis underlying the initiation of protease cascade in insect immune responses. PMID:26504233

  7. Initiating protease with modular domains interacts with β-glucan recognition protein to trigger innate immune response in insects.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Garcia, Brandon L; Kanost, Michael R

    2015-11-10

    The autoactivation of an initiating serine protease upon binding of pattern recognition proteins to pathogen surfaces is a crucial step in eliciting insect immune responses such as the activation of Toll and prophenoloxidase pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for autoactivation of the initiating protease remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the autoactivation of hemolymph protease 14 (HP14), an initiating protease in hemolymph of Manduca sexta, upon the binding of β-1,3-glucan by its recognition protein, βGRP2. Biochemical analysis using HP14 zymogen (proHP14), βGRP2, and the recombinant proteins as truncated forms showed that the amino-terminal modular low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LA) domains within HP14 are required for proHP14 autoactivation that is stimulated by its interaction with βGRP2. Consistent with this result, recombinant LA domains inhibit the activation of proHP14 and prophenoloxidase, likely by competing with the interaction between βGRP2 and LA domains within proHP14. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrated that immobilized LA domains directly interact with βGRP2 in a calcium-dependent manner and that high-affinity interaction requires the C-terminal glucanase-like domain of βGRP2. Importantly, the affinity of LA domains for βGRP2 increases nearly 100-fold in the presence of β-1,3-glucan. Taken together, these results present the first experimental evidence to our knowledge that LA domains of an insect modular protease and glucanase-like domains of a βGRP mediate their interaction, and that this binding is essential for the protease autoactivation. Thus, our study provides important insight into the molecular basis underlying the initiation of protease cascade in insect immune responses.

  8. Conversation Therapy with People with Aphasia and Conversation Partners using Video Feedback: A Group and Case Series Investigation of Changes in Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Best, Wendy; Maxim, Jane; Heilemann, Claudia; Beckley, Firle; Johnson, Fiona; Edwards, Susan I.; Howard, David; Beeke, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Conversation therapies employing video for feedback and to facilitate outcome measurement are increasingly used with people with post-stroke aphasia and their conversation partners; however the evidence base for change in everyday interaction remains limited. We investigated the effect of Better Conversations with Aphasia (BCA), an intervention that is freely available online at https://extend.ucl.ac.uk/. Eight people with chronic agrammatic aphasia, and their regular conversation partners participated in the tailored 8 week program involving significant video feedback. We explored changes in: (i) conversation facilitators (such as multi-modal turns by people with aphasia); and (ii) conversation barriers (such as use of test questions by conversation partners). The outcome of intervention was evaluated directly by measuring change in video-recorded everyday conversations. The study employed a pre-post design with multiple 5 minute samples of conversation before and after intervention, scored by trained raters blind to the point of data collection. Group level analysis showed no significant increase in conversation facilitators. There was, however, a significant reduction in the number of conversation barriers. The case series data revealed variability in conversation behaviors across occasions for the same dyad and between different dyads. Specifically, post-intervention there was a significant increase in facilitator behaviors for two dyads, a decrease for one and no significant change for five dyads. There was a significant decrease in barrier behaviors for five dyads and no significant change for three dyads. The reduction in barrier behaviors was considerable; on average change from over eight to fewer than three barrier behaviors in 5 minutes of conversation. The pre-post design has the limitation of no comparison group. However, change occurs in targeted conversational behaviors and in people with chronic aphasia and their partners. The findings suggest

  9. What Is an Attractive Body? Using an Interactive 3D Program to Create the Ideal Body for You and Your Partner

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Kara L.; Cornelissen, Piers L.; Tovée, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    What is the ideal body size and shape that we want for ourselves and our partners? What are the important physical features in this ideal? And do both genders agree on what is an attractive body? To answer these questions we used a 3D interactive software system which allows our participants to produce a photorealistic, virtual male or female body. Forty female and forty male heterosexual Caucasian observers (females mean age 19.10 years, s.d. 1.01; 40 males mean age 19.84, s.d. 1.66) set their own ideal size and shape, and the size and shape of their ideal partner using the DAZ studio image manipulation programme. In this programme the shape and size of a 3D body can be altered along 94 independent dimensions, allowing each participant to create the exact size and shape of the body they want. The volume (and thus the weight assuming a standard density) and the circumference of the bust, waist and hips of these 3D models can then be measured. The ideal female body set by women (BMI = 18.9, WHR = 0.70, WCR = 0.67) was very similar to the ideal partner set by men, particularly in their BMI (BMI = 18.8, WHR = 0.73, WCR = 0.69). This was a lower BMI than the actual BMI of 39 of the 40 women. The ideal male body set by the men (BMI = 25.9, WHR = 0.87, WCR = 0.74) was very similar to the ideal partner set by the women (BMI = 24.5, WHR = 0.86, WCR = 0.77). This was a lower BMI than the actual BMI of roughly half of the men and a higher BMI than the other half. The results suggest a consistent preference for an ideal male and female body size and shape across both genders. The results also suggest that both BMI and torso shape are important components for the creation of the ideal body. PMID:23209791

  10. C2-Domain Abscisic Acid-Related Proteins Mediate the Interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR Abscisic Acid Receptors with the Plasma Membrane and Regulate Abscisic Acid Sensitivity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Lesia; Diaz, Maira; Rodrigues, Americo; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana C.; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Fernandez, Maria A.; Antoni, Regina; Fernandez, Daniel; Marquez, Jose A.; Mulet, Jose M.; Albert, Armando; Rodriguez, Pedro L.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-delimited abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction plays a critical role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms linking core signaling components to the plasma membrane are unclear. We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles. This interaction is relevant for PYR/PYL function and ABA signaling, since different car triple mutants affected in CAR1, CAR4, CAR5, and CAR9 genes showed reduced sensitivity to ABA in seedling establishment and root growth assays. In summary, we identified PYR/PYL-interacting partners that mediate a transient Ca2+-dependent interaction with phospholipid vesicles, which affects PYR/PYL subcellular localization and positively regulates ABA signaling. PMID:25465408

  11. C2-domain abscisic acid-related proteins mediate the interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR abscisic acid receptors with the plasma membrane and regulate abscisic acid sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Lesia; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Diaz, Maira; Rodrigues, Americo; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana C; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Fernandez, Maria A; Antoni, Regina; Fernandez, Daniel; Marquez, Jose A; Mulet, Jose M; Albert, Armando; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2014-12-01

    Membrane-delimited abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction plays a critical role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms linking core signaling components to the plasma membrane are unclear. We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles. This interaction is relevant for PYR/PYL function and ABA signaling, since different car triple mutants affected in CAR1, CAR4, CAR5, and CAR9 genes showed reduced sensitivity to ABA in seedling establishment and root growth assays. In summary, we identified PYR/PYL-interacting partners that mediate a transient Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with phospholipid vesicles, which affects PYR/PYL subcellular localization and positively regulates ABA signaling.

  12. Domain structure of ultrathin ferromagnetic elements in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

    PubMed

    Muratov, Cyrill B; Slastikov, Valeriy V

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in nanofabrication make it possible to produce multilayer nanostructures composed of ultrathin film materials with thickness down to a few monolayers of atoms and lateral extent of several tens of nanometers. At these scales, ferromagnetic materials begin to exhibit unusual properties, such as perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, also referred to as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), because of the increased importance of interfacial effects. The presence of surface DMI has been demonstrated to fundamentally alter the structure of domain walls. Here we use the micromagnetic modelling framework to analyse the existence and structure of chiral domain walls, viewed as minimizers of a suitable micromagnetic energy functional. We explicitly construct the minimizers in the one-dimensional setting, both for the interior and edge walls, for a broad range of parameters. We then use the methods of Γ-convergence to analyse the asymptotics of the two-dimensional magnetization patterns in samples of large spatial extent in the presence of weak applied magnetic fields.

  13. Domain structure of ultrathin ferromagnetic elements in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Cyrill B.; Slastikov, Valeriy V.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in nanofabrication make it possible to produce multilayer nanostructures composed of ultrathin film materials with thickness down to a few monolayers of atoms and lateral extent of several tens of nanometers. At these scales, ferromagnetic materials begin to exhibit unusual properties, such as perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, also referred to as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), because of the increased importance of interfacial effects. The presence of surface DMI has been demonstrated to fundamentally alter the structure of domain walls. Here we use the micromagnetic modelling framework to analyse the existence and structure of chiral domain walls, viewed as minimizers of a suitable micromagnetic energy functional. We explicitly construct the minimizers in the one-dimensional setting, both for the interior and edge walls, for a broad range of parameters. We then use the methods of Γ-convergence to analyse the asymptotics of the two-dimensional magnetization patterns in samples of large spatial extent in the presence of weak applied magnetic fields.

  14. Disruptions of Topological Chromatin Domains Cause Pathogenic Rewiring of Gene-Enhancer Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lupiáñez, Darío G.; Kraft, Katerina; Heinrich, Verena; Krawitz, Peter; Brancati, Francesco; Klopocki, Eva; Horn, Denise; Kayserili, Hülya; Opitz, John M.; Laxova, Renata; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Wittler, Lars; Borschiwer, Marina; Haas, Stefan A.; Osterwalder, Marco; Franke, Martin; Timmermann, Bernd; Hecht, Jochen; Spielmann, Malte; Visel, Axel; Mundlos, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian genomes are organized into megabase-scale topologically associated domains (TADs). We demonstrate that disruption of TADs can rewire long-range regulatory architecture and result in pathogenic phenotypes. We show that distinct human limb malformations are caused by deletions, inversions, or duplications altering the structure of the TAD-spanning WNT6/IHH/EPHA4/PAX3 locus. Using CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we generated mice with corresponding rearrangements. Both in mouse limb tissue and patient-derived fibroblasts, disease-relevant structural changes cause ectopic interactions between promoters and non-coding DNA, and a cluster of limb enhancers normally associated with Epha4 is misplaced relative to TAD boundaries and drives ectopic limb expression of another gene in the locus. This rewiring occurred only if the variant disrupted a CTCF-associated boundary domain. Our results demonstrate the functional importance of TADs for orchestrating gene expression via genome architecture and indicate criteria for predicting the pathogenicity of human structural variants, particularly in non-coding regions of the human genome. PMID:25959774

  15. Evolution of light domain walls interacting with dark matter, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of domain walls generated in the early Universe is discussed considering an interaction between the walls and a major gaseous component of the dark matter. The walls are supposed able to reflect the particles elastically and with a reflection coefficient of unity. A toy Lagrangian that could give rise to such a phenomenon is discussed. In the simple model studied, highly non-relativistic and slowly varying speeds are obtained for the domain walls (approximately 10 (exp -2)(1+z)(exp -1)) and negligible distortions of the microwave background. In addition, these topological defects may provide a mechanism of forming the large scale structure of the Universe, by creating fluctuations in the dark matter (delta rho/rho approximately O(1)) on a scale comparable with the distance the walls move from the formation (in the model d less than 20 h(exp -1) Mpc). The characteristic scale of the wall separation can be easily chosen to be of the order of 100 Mpc instead of being restricted to the horizon scale, as usually obtained.

  16. Domain structure of ultrathin ferromagnetic elements in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction

    PubMed Central

    Slastikov, Valeriy V.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in nanofabrication make it possible to produce multilayer nanostructures composed of ultrathin film materials with thickness down to a few monolayers of atoms and lateral extent of several tens of nanometers. At these scales, ferromagnetic materials begin to exhibit unusual properties, such as perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, also referred to as Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI), because of the increased importance of interfacial effects. The presence of surface DMI has been demonstrated to fundamentally alter the structure of domain walls. Here we use the micromagnetic modelling framework to analyse the existence and structure of chiral domain walls, viewed as minimizers of a suitable micromagnetic energy functional. We explicitly construct the minimizers in the one-dimensional setting, both for the interior and edge walls, for a broad range of parameters. We then use the methods of Γ-convergence to analyse the asymptotics of the two-dimensional magnetization patterns in samples of large spatial extent in the presence of weak applied magnetic fields. PMID:28265192

  17. Insight into interactions of the von-Willebrand-factor-A-like domain 2 with the FNIII-like domain 9 of collagen VII by NMR and SPR.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, Sarah; Schönig, Sarah; Seeger, Karsten

    2011-06-23

    Type VII collagen as component of anchoring fibrils plays an important role in skin architecture, however, no detailed structural information is available. Here, we describe the recombinant expression, isotope labeling, and (1)H, (15)N, (13)C chemical shift assignment of a subdomain of the murine type VII collagen - the von-Willebrand-factor-A-like domain 2 (mvWFA2). vWFA2 interacts with type I collagen and plays a central role in certain skin blistering diseases. Based on these assignments a secondary structure prediction was performed showing a properly folded protein. An interaction of mvWFA2 with its neighboring domain mFNIII-9 was characterized with NMR spectroscopy and SPR.

  18. Dielectric relaxation and hydrogen bonding interaction in xylitol-water mixtures using time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rander, D. N.; Joshi, Y. S.; Kanse, K. S.; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of complex dielectric permittivity of xylitol-water mixtures have been carried out in the frequency range of 10 MHz-30 GHz using a time domain reflectometry technique. Measurements have been done at six temperatures from 0 to 25 °C and at different weight fractions of xylitol (0 < W X ≤ 0.7) in water. There are different models to explain the dielectric relaxation behaviour of binary mixtures, such as Debye, Cole-Cole or Cole-Davidson model. We have observed that the dielectric relaxation behaviour of binary mixtures of xylitol-water can be well described by Cole-Davidson model having an asymmetric distribution of relaxation times. The dielectric parameters such as static dielectric constant and relaxation time for the mixtures have been evaluated. The molecular interaction between xylitol and water molecules is discussed using the Kirkwood correlation factor ( g eff ) and thermodynamic parameter.

  19. The UBAP1 Subunit of ESCRT-I Interacts with Ubiquitin via a SOUBA Domain

    PubMed Central

    Agromayor, Monica; Soler, Nicolas; Caballe, Anna; Kueck, Tonya; Freund, Stefan M.; Allen, Mark D.; Bycroft, Mark; Perisic, Olga; Ye, Yu; McDonald, Bethan; Scheel, Hartmut; Hofmann, Kay; Neil, Stuart J.D.; Martin-Serrano, Juan; Williams, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) facilitate endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated cargo, MVB biogenesis, late stages of cytokinesis, and retroviral budding. Here we show that ubiquitin associated protein 1 (UBAP1), a subunit of human ESCRT-I, coassembles in a stable 1:1:1:1 complex with Vps23/TSG101, VPS28, and VPS37. The X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal region of UBAP1 reveals a domain that we describe as a solenoid of overlapping UBAs (SOUBA). NMR analysis shows that each of the three rigidly arranged overlapping UBAs making up the SOUBA interact with ubiquitin. We demonstrate that UBAP1-containing ESCRT-I is essential for degradation of antiviral cell-surface proteins, such as tetherin (BST-2/CD317), by viral countermeasures, namely, the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ubiquitin ligase K5. PMID:22405001

  20. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion. PMID:27118064

  1. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z Z

    2016-04-27

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion.

  2. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-04-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion.

  3. Studies on the interactions of SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S) with its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-01-01

    SAP-1 is a 113 amino acid long single-chain protein which belongs to the type 2 cystatin gene family. In our previous study, we have purified SAP-1 from human seminal plasma and observed its cross-class inhibitory property. At this time, we report the interaction of SAP-1 with diverse proteases and its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the conformation of SAP-1 is changed after its complexation with proteases, and the alterations in protein secondary structure are quantitatively calculated with increase of α-helices and reduction of β-strand content. To get insight into the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases, we make an effort to model the three-dimensional structure of SAP-1 by molecular modeling and verify its stability and viability through molecular dynamics simulations and finally complexed with different proteases using ClusPro 2.0 Server. A high degree of shape complementarity is examined within the complexes, stabilized by a number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions. Using HB analyses in different protein complexes, we have identified a series of key residues that may be involved in the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases. These findings will assist to understand the mechanism of inhibition of SAP-1 for different proteases and provide intimation for further research.

  4. Molecular Interaction Between Smurfl WW2 Domain and PPXY Motifs of Smadl, Smad5, and Smad6-Modeling and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Rao Metpally, Raghu Prasad; B Reddy, Boojala Vijay

    2007-08-01

    Abstract The ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway is essential for various important biological processes including cell cycle progression, gene transcription, and signal transduction. One of the important regulatory mechanisms by which the bone-inducing activity of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is modulated involves ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. The BMP induced receptor signal is transmitted intracellularly by phosphorylation of Smad proteins by the activated receptor I. The phosphorylated Smads 1, 5, and 8 (R-Smads) oligomerize with the co-Smad (Smad4). The complex, thus, formed translocates to the nucleus and interacts with other cofactors to regulate the expression of downstream target genes. R-Smads contain PPXY motif in the linker region that interacts with Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that catalyzes ubiquitination of target proteins for proteasomal degradation. Smurf1 contains a HECT domain, a C2 domain, and 2 WW domains (WW1, WW2). The PPXY motif in target proteins and its interaction with Smurf1 may form the basis for regulation of steady-state levels of Smads in controlling BMP-responsiveness of cells. Here, we present a homology-based model of the Smurf1 WW2 domain and the target octa-peptides containing PPXY motif of Smurf1- interacting Smads. We carried out docking of Smurf1 WW2 domain with the PPXY motifs of Smadl, Smad5, and Smad6 and identified the key amino acid residues involved in interaction. Furthermore, we present experimental evidence that WW2 domain of Smurf1 does indeed interact with the Smad proteins and that the deletion of WW2 domain of Smurf1 results in loss of its binding to Smads using the purified recombinant proteins. Finally, we also present data confirming that the deletion of WW2 domain in Smurf1 abolishes its ubiquitination activity on Smad1 in an in vitro ubiquitination assay. It shows that the interaction between the WW domain and Smad PPXY motif is a

  5. Phase sensitive spectral domain interferometry for label free biomolecular interaction analysis and biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirvi, Sajal

    Biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) plays vital role in wide variety of fields, which include biomedical research, pharmaceutical industry, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology industry. Study and quantification of interactions between natural biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, DNA) and artificially synthesized molecules (drugs) is routinely done using various labeled and label-free BIA techniques. Labeled BIA (Chemiluminescence, Fluorescence, Radioactive) techniques suffer from steric hindrance of labels on interaction site, difficulty of attaching labels to molecules, higher cost and time of assay development. Label free techniques with real time detection capabilities have demonstrated advantages over traditional labeled techniques. The gold standard for label free BIA is surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) that detects and quantifies the changes in refractive index of the ligand-analyte complex molecule with high sensitivity. Although SPR is a highly sensitive BIA technique, it requires custom-made sensor chips and is not well suited for highly multiplexed BIA required in high throughput applications. Moreover implementation of SPR on various biosensing platforms is limited. In this research work spectral domain phase sensitive interferometry (SD-PSI) has been developed for label-free BIA and biosensing applications to address limitations of SPR and other label free techniques. One distinct advantage of SD-PSI compared to other label-free techniques is that it does not require use of custom fabricated biosensor substrates. Laboratory grade, off-the-shelf glass or plastic substrates of suitable thickness with proper surface functionalization are used as biosensor chips. SD-PSI is tested on four separate BIA and biosensing platforms, which include multi-well plate, flow cell, fiber probe with integrated optics and fiber tip biosensor. Sensitivity of 33 ng/ml for anti-IgG is achieved using multi-well platform. Principle of coherence multiplexing for multi

  6. Simulation of near-field plasmonic interactions with a local approximation order discontinuous Galerkin time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viquerat, Jonathan; Lanteri, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    During the last ten years, the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method has progressively emerged as a viable alternative to well established finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and finite-element time-domain (FETD) methods for the numerical simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation problems in the time-domain. The method is now actively studied in various application contexts including those requiring to model light/matter interactions on the nanoscale. Several recent works have demonstrated the viability of the DGDT method for nanophotonics. In this paper we further demonstrate the capabilities of the method for the simulation of near-field plasmonic interactions by considering more particularly the possibility of combining the use of a locally refined conforming tetrahedral mesh with a local adaptation of the approximation order.

  7. Evidence for general and domain-specific elements of teacher-child interactions: associations with preschool children's development.

    PubMed

    Hamre, Bridget; Hatfield, Bridget; Pianta, Robert; Jamil, Faiza

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates a model for considering domain-general and domain-specific associations between teacher-child interactions and children's development, using a bifactor analytic strategy. Among a sample of 325 early childhood classrooms there was evidence for both general elements of teacher-child interaction (responsive teaching) and domain-specific elements related to positive management and routines and cognitive facilitation. Among a diverse population of 4-year-old children (n = 1,407) responsive teaching was modestly associated with development across social and cognitive domains, whereas positive management and routines was modestly associated with increases in inhibitory control and cognitive facilitation was associated with gains in early language and literacy skills. The conceptual and methodological contributions and challenges of this approach are discussed.

  8. A distinct switch in interactions of the histone H4 tail domain upon salt-dependent folding of nucleosome arrays.

    PubMed

    Pepenella, Sharon; Murphy, Kevin J; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2014-09-26

    The core histone tail domains mediate inter-nucleosomal interactions that direct folding and condensation of nucleosome arrays into higher-order chromatin structures. The histone H4 tail domain facilitates inter-array interactions by contacting both the H2A/H2B acidic patch and DNA of neighboring nucleosomes. Likewise, H4 tail-H2A contacts stabilize array folding. However, whether the H4 tail domains stabilize array folding via inter-nucleosomal interactions with the DNA of neighboring nucleosomes remains unclear. We utilized defined oligonucleosome arrays containing a single specialized nucleosome with a photo-inducible cross-linker in the N terminus of the H4 tail to characterize these interactions. We observed that the H4 tail participates exclusively in intra-array interactions with DNA in unfolded arrays. These interactions are diminished during array folding, yet no inter-nucleosome, intra-array H4 tail-DNA contacts are observed in condensed chromatin. However, we document contacts between the N terminus of the H4 tail and H2A. Installation of acetylation mimics known to disrupt H4-H2A surface interactions did not increase observance of H4-DNA inter-nucleosomal interactions. These results suggest the multiple functions of the H4 tail require targeted distinct interactions within condensed chromatin.

  9. Structure and interactions of the C-terminal metal binding domain of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sorabh; Hong, Deli; Desai, Nirav K.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Argüello, José M.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    The Cu+-ATPase CopA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus belongs to the P1B family of the P-type ATPases. These integral membrane proteins couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to heavy metal ion translocation across membranes. A defining feature of P1B-1-type ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains at the N-terminus (N-MBDs). The N-MBDs exhibit a conserved ferredoxin-like fold, similar to that of soluble copper chaperones, and bind metal ions via a conserved CXXC motif. The N-MBDs enable Cu+ regulation of turnover rates apparently through Cu-sensitive interactions with catalytic domains. A. fulgidus CopA is unusual in that it contains both an N-terminal MBD and a C-terminal MBD (C-MBD). The functional role of the unique C-MBD has not been established. Here, we report the crystal structure of the apo, oxidized C-MBD to 2.0 Å resolution. In the structure, two C-MBD monomers form a domain-swapped dimer, which has not been observed previously for similar domains. In addition, the interaction of the C-MBD with the other cytoplasmic domains of CopA, the ATP binding domain (ATPBD) and actuator domain (A-domain) has been investigated. Interestingly, the C-MBD interacts specifically with both of these domains, independent of the presence of Cu+ or nucleotides. These data reinforce the uniqueness of the C-MBD and suggest a distinct structural role for the C-MBD in CopA transport. PMID:20602459

  10. LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL1) binds to the C-terminal domain of ATM-interacting protein (ATMIN/ASCIZ) and regulates its subcellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Rapali, Peter; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor; Martinez-Moreno, Monica; Tarnok, Krisztian; Schlett, Katalin; Albar, Juan Pablo; Bruix, Marta; Nyitray, Laszlo; Rodriguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have screened a human library with dynein light chain DYNLL1 (DLC8) as bait. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynein light chain DYNLL1 binds to ATM-kinase interacting protein (ATMIN). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATMIN has 17 SQ/TQ motifs, a motif frequently found in DYNLL1-binding partners. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two proteins interact in vitro, with ATMIN displaying at least five binding sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction of ATMIN and DYNNL1 in transfected cells can also be observed. -- Abstract: LC8 dynein light chain (now termed DYNLL1 and DYNLL2 in mammals), a dimeric 89 amino acid protein, is a component of the dynein multi-protein complex. However a substantial amount of DYNLL1 is not associated to microtubules and it can thus interact with dozens of cellular and viral proteins that display well-defined, short linear motifs. Using DYNLL1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart library we identified ATMIN, an ATM kinase-interacting protein, as a DYNLL1-binding partner. Interestingly, ATMIN displays at least 18 SQ/TQ motifs in its sequence and DYNLL1 is known to bind to proteins with KXTQT motifs. Using pepscan and yeast two-hybrid techniques we show that DYNLL1 binds to multiple SQ/TQ motifs present in the carboxy-terminal domain of ATMIN. Recombinant expression and purification of the DYNLL1-binding region of ATMIN allowed us to obtain a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass in gel filtration close to 400 kDa that could bind to DYNLL1 in vitro. The NMR data-driven modelled complexes of DYNLL1 with two selected ATMIN peptides revealed a similar mode of binding to that observed between DYNLL1 and other peptide targets. Remarkably, co-expression of mCherry-DYNLL1 and GFP-ATMIN mutually affected intracellular protein localization. In GFP-ATMIN expressing-cells DNA damage induced efficiently nuclear foci formation, which was partly impeded by the presence of mCherry-DYNLL1

  11. Stromal Response to Prostate Cancer: Nanotechnology-Based Detection of Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein Partners Distinguishes Prostate Cancer Associated Stroma from That of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S. Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  12. Stromal response to prostate cancer: nanotechnology-based detection of thioredoxin-interacting protein partners distinguishes prostate cancer associated stroma from that of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  13. [Anesthesiology: partner or competitor?].

    PubMed

    Körner, C M; Weigand, M A; Martin, E

    2012-04-01

    Surgery and anesthesiology have always been closely connected. Within the increasing complexity of therapies and technical capabilities both subjects overlap in certain areas. This article deals with the question whether anesthesiology is acting as a partner or competitor in the cooperation with the various operative specialties. In several studies it has been shown that the outcome of surgical patients can be improved by communication and interaction with anesthesiology and that forming multidisciplinary teams will be highly beneficial for patients in intensive care units.

  14. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  15. Structural plasticity in the topology of the membrane-interacting domain of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J; Wimley, William C; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2014-02-04

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662-683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning.

  16. Nicastrin functions to sterically hinder γ-secretase–substrate interactions driven by substrate transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, David M.; Montagna, Daniel R.; Gu, Yongli; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Wolfe, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is an intramembrane-cleaving protease that processes many type-I integral membrane proteins within the lipid bilayer, an event preceded by shedding of most of the substrate’s ectodomain by α- or β-secretases. The mechanism by which γ-secretase selectively recognizes and recruits ectodomain-shed substrates for catalysis remains unclear. In contrast to previous reports that substrate is actively recruited for catalysis when its remaining short ectodomain interacts with the nicastrin component of γ-secretase, we find that substrate ectodomain is entirely dispensable for cleavage. Instead, γ-secretase–substrate binding is driven by an apparent tight-binding interaction derived from substrate transmembrane domain, a mechanism in stark contrast to rhomboid—another family of intramembrane-cleaving proteases. Disruption of the nicastrin fold allows for more efficient cleavage of substrates retaining longer ectodomains, indicating that nicastrin actively excludes larger substrates through steric hindrance, thus serving as a molecular gatekeeper for substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:26699478

  17. Comparing finite difference time domain and Monte Carlo modeling of human skin interaction with terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Payne, Jason A.; Mixon, Dustin G.; Thomas, Robert J.; Roach, William P.

    2008-02-01

    Assessing the biological reaction to electromagnetic (EM) radiation of all frequencies and intensities is essential to the understanding of both the potential damage caused by the radiation and the inherent mechanisms within biology that respond, protect, or propagate damage to surrounding tissues. To understand this reaction, one may model the electromagnetic irradiation of tissue phantoms according to empirically measured or intelligently estimated dielectric properties. Of interest in this study is the terahertz region (0.2-2.0 THz), ranging from millimeter to infrared waves, which has been studied only recently due to lack of efficient sources. The specific interaction between this radiation and human tissue is greatly influenced by the significant EM absorption of water across this range, which induces a pronounced heating of the tissue surface. This study compares the Monte Carlo Multi-Layer (MCML) and Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) approaches for modeling the terahertz irradiation of human dermal tissue. Two congruent simulations were performed on a one-dimensional tissue model with unit power intensity profile. This works aims to verify the use of either technique for modeling terahertz-tissue interaction for minimally scattering tissues.

  18. Interaction between the cytoplasmic domains of HIV-1 Vpu and CD4: role of Vpu residues involved in CD4 interaction and in vitro CD4 degradation.

    PubMed

    Margottin, F; Benichou, S; Durand, H; Richard, V; Liu, L X; Gomas, E; Benarous, R

    1996-09-15

    The Vpu and CD4 cytoplasmic domains were found, by using a two-hybrid assay in yeast, to interact in the absence of their membrane anchor domains. Studies on several deletion and point mutants revealed that the overall structure of the Vpu cytoplasmic domain is required for this interaction. The Vpu amino acid residues involved in the interaction with CD4 were identified. Deletion of the C-terminal residues of Vpu, required for CD4 degradation, as well as the double mutation on the casein kinase II phosphorylation sites S52N-S56N, also involved in CD4 degradation, resulted in the loss of interaction with CD4 and in the inability to induce CD4 degradation. These results suggest that the ability of Vpu to mediate the degradation of CD4 is linked to its capacity to physically interact with CD4. However, additional mutagenesis on the S52 site revealed that the interaction between the cytoplasmic domains of Vpu and CD4 is not sufficient for in vitro Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation.

  19. Supply determines demand: influence of partner quality and quantity on the interactions between bats and pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Caroline R; Schöner, Michael G; Kerth, Gerald; Grafe, T Ulmar

    2013-09-01

    Interspecific relationships such as mutualism and parasitism are major drivers of biodiversity. Because such interactions often comprise more than two species, ecological studies increasingly focus on complex multispecies systems. However, the spatial heterogeneity of multi-species interactions is often poorly understood. Here, we investigate the unusual interaction of a bat (Kerivoula hardwickii hardwickii) and two pitcher plant species (Nepenthes hemsleyana and N. bicalcarata) whose pitchers serve as roost for bats. Nepenthes hemsleyana offers roosts of higher quality, indicated by a more stable microclimate compared to N. bicalcarata but occurs at lower abundance and is less common than the latter. Whereas N. hemsleyana benefits from the roosting bats by gaining nitrogen from their feces, the bats' interaction with N. bicalcarata seems to be commensal or even parasitic. Bats stayed longer in roosts of higher quality provided by N. hemsleyana and preferred them to pitchers of N. bicalcarata in a disturbance experiment. Moreover, bats roosting only in pitchers of N. hemsleyana had a higher body condition and were less infested with parasites compared to bats roosting in pitchers of N. bicalcarata. Our study shows how the local supply of roosts with different qualities affects the behavior and status of their inhabitants and-as a consequence-how the demand of the inhabitants can influence evolutionary adaptations of the roost providing species.

  20. When Training with a Partner Is Inferior to Training Alone: The Importance of Dyad Type and Interaction Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Amy E.; Beier, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Dyad training, where trainees learn in pairs but ultimately perform individually, has been shown to be an effective method for training some skills. The effectiveness of this approach, however, may be tied to the type of task to be trained and the quality of the interaction in the dyad. We report two studies on the effectiveness of dyad training…

  1. Disorganized Behavior in Adolescent-Parent Interaction: Relations to Attachment State of Mind, Partner Abuse, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obsuth, Ingrid; Hennighausen, Katherine; Brumariu, Laura E.; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2014-01-01

    Disoriented, punitive, and caregiving/role-confused attachment behaviors are associated with psychopathology in childhood, but have not been assessed in adolescence. A total of 120 low-income late adolescents (aged 18-23 years) and parents were assessed in a conflict-resolution paradigm. Their interactions were coded with the Goal-Corrected…

  2. RIP1 (ROP Interactive Partner 1)/ICR1 marks pollen germination sites and may act in the ROP1 pathway in the control of polarized pollen growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying; Yan, An; Lord, Elizabeth; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2008-11-01

    Rho family small GTPases are universal signaling switches in the control of cell polarity in eukaryotic cells. Their polar distribution to the cell cortex is critical for the execution of their functions, yet the mechanism for this distribution is poorly understood. Using a yeast two-hybrid method, we identified RIP1 (ROP interactive partner 1), which belongs to a family of five members of novel proteins that share a C-terminal region that interacts with ROP. When expressed in Arabidopsis pollen, green fluorescence protein GFP-tagged RIP1 was localized to the nucleus of mature pollen. When pollen grains were hydrated in germination medium, GFP-RIP1 switched from the nucleus to the cell cortex at the future pollen germination site and was maintained in the apical cortex of germinating pollen and growing pollen tubes. RIP1 was found to interact with ROP1 in pollen tubes, and the cortical RIP1 localization was influenced by the activity of ROP1. Overexpression of RIP1 induced growth depolarization in pollen tubes, a phenotype similar to that induced by ROP1 overexpression. Interestingly, RIP1 overexpression enhanced GFP-ROP1 recruitment to the plasma membrane (PM) of pollen tubes. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that RIP1 is involved in the positive feedback regulation of ROP1 localization to the PM, leading to the establishment of a polar site for pollen germination and pollen tube growth.

  3. VND-INTERACTING2, a NAC Domain Transcription Factor, Negatively Regulates Xylem Vessel Formation in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Ohtani, Misato; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Kubo, Minoru; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fukuda, Hiroo; Demura, Taku

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana NAC domain transcription factor VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7 (VND7) acts as a master regulator of xylem vessel differentiation. To understand the mechanism by which VND7 regulates xylem vessel differentiation, we used a yeast two-hybrid system to screen for proteins that interact with VND7 and identified cDNAs encoding two NAC domain proteins, VND-INTERACTING1 (VNI1) and VNI2. Binding assays demonstrated that VNI2 effectively interacts with VND7 and the VND family proteins, VND1-5, as well as with other NAC domain proteins at lower affinity. VNI2 is expressed in both xylem and phloem cells in roots and inflorescence stems. The expression of VNI2 overlaps with that of VND7 in elongating vessel precursors in roots. VNI2 contains a predicted PEST motif and a C-terminally truncated VNI2 protein, which lacks part of the PEST motif, is more stable than full-length VNI2. Transient reporter assays showed that VNI2 is a transcriptional repressor and can repress the expression of vessel-specific genes regulated by VND7. Expression of C-terminally truncated VNI2 under the control of the VND7 promoter inhibited the normal development of xylem vessels in roots and aerial organs. These data suggest that VNI2 regulates xylem cell specification as a transcriptional repressor that interacts with VND proteins and possibly also with other NAC domain proteins. PMID:20388856

  4. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W.; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  5. Functional and physical interaction between Bcl-XL and a BH3-like domain in Beclin-1

    PubMed Central

    Maiuri, M Chiara; Le Toumelin, Gaëtane; Criollo, Alfredo; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Gautier, Fabien; Juin, Philippe; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Pierron, Gérard; Troulinaki, Kostoula; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hickman, John A; Geneste, Olivier; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL bind and inhibit Beclin-1, an essential mediator of autophagy. Here, we demonstrate that this interaction involves a BH3 domain within Beclin-1 (residues 114–123). The physical interaction between Beclin-1 and Bcl-XL is lost when the BH3 domain of Beclin-1 or the BH3 receptor domain of Bcl-XL is mutated. Mutation of the BH3 domain of Beclin-1 or of the BH3 receptor domain of Bcl-XL abolishes the Bcl-XL-mediated inhibition of autophagy triggered by Beclin-1. The pharmacological BH3 mimetic ABT737 competitively inhibits the interaction between Beclin-1 and Bcl-2/Bcl-XL, antagonizes autophagy inhibition by Bcl-2/Bcl-XL and hence stimulates autophagy. Knockout or knockdown of the BH3-only protein Bad reduces starvation-induced autophagy, whereas Bad overexpression induces autophagy in human cells. Gain-of-function mutation of the sole BH3-only protein from Caenorhabditis elegans, EGL-1, induces autophagy, while deletion of EGL-1 compromises starvation-induced autophagy. These results reveal a novel autophagy-stimulatory function of BH3-only proteins beyond their established role as apoptosis inducers. BH3-only proteins and pharmacological BH3 mimetics induce autophagy by competitively disrupting the interaction between Beclin-1 and Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL. PMID:17446862

  6. Functional and physical interaction between Bcl-X(L) and a BH3-like domain in Beclin-1.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, M Chiara; Le Toumelin, Gaëtane; Criollo, Alfredo; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Gautier, Fabien; Juin, Philippe; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Pierron, Gérard; Troulinaki, Kostoula; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hickman, John A; Geneste, Olivier; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-05-16

    The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) bind and inhibit Beclin-1, an essential mediator of autophagy. Here, we demonstrate that this interaction involves a BH3 domain within Beclin-1 (residues 114-123). The physical interaction between Beclin-1 and Bcl-X(L) is lost when the BH3 domain of Beclin-1 or the BH3 receptor domain of Bcl-X(L) is mutated. Mutation of the BH3 domain of Beclin-1 or of the BH3 receptor domain of Bcl-X(L) abolishes the Bcl-X(L)-mediated inhibition of autophagy triggered by Beclin-1. The pharmacological BH3 mimetic ABT737 competitively inhibits the interaction between Beclin-1 and Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L), antagonizes autophagy inhibition by Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) and hence stimulates autophagy. Knockout or knockdown of the BH3-only protein Bad reduces starvation-induced autophagy, whereas Bad overexpression induces autophagy in human cells. Gain-of-function mutation of the sole BH3-only protein from Caenorhabditis elegans, EGL-1, induces autophagy, while deletion of EGL-1 compromises starvation-induced autophagy. These results reveal a novel autophagy-stimulatory function of BH3-only proteins beyond their established role as apoptosis inducers. BH3-only proteins and pharmacological BH3 mimetics induce autophagy by competitively disrupting the interaction between Beclin-1 and Bcl-2 or Bcl-X(L).

  7. Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) contains a multifunctional transcriptional activation domain important for inter- and intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X; Bieker, J J

    1996-01-01

    Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) is a red cell-restricted transcriptional activator that plays a dominant role in establishing high levels of beta-globin gene expression during erythroid ontogeny. Although its DNA binding domain belongs to the well-studied class of Krüppel-like zinc fingers, its proline-rich activation region has not been thoroughly examined. We have analyzed this region by monitoring the functional effects of its mutagenesis upon EKLF activity in vivo and in vitro. First, using co-transfection assays, we find that the transactivation region contains discrete stimulatory and inhibitory subdomains. Second, in vitro binding assays indicate that the inhibitory domain exerts its effect in cis by interfering with DNA binding. Third, in vivo competition assays demonstrate that EKLF interacts with a positive-acting cellular factor, and that the domain responsible for this trans interaction lies within a 40 amino acid sequence that is coincident with the EKLF minimal transactivation domain. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of this domain implies that conformation and/or phosphorylation status of its central core may be critical for such interactions. These results point towards post-translational steric and/or allosteric control of EKLF function that may be important not just for its DNA binding ability, but also for its potential to interact with other proteins that fully establish the correct stereospecific array leading to efficient switching of beta-globin transcription during development. Images PMID:8918466

  8. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E. O.; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J.; Andersen, Jens S.; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1’s defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made. PMID:22836166

  9. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  10. Novel domain interaction regulates secretion of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) protein.

    PubMed

    Du, Fen; Hui, Yvonne; Zhang, Michelle; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio; Fan, Daping

    2011-12-16

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) has emerged as a novel therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia due to its LDL receptor (LDLR)-reducing activity. Although its structure has been solved, the lack of a detailed understanding of the structure-function relation hinders efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors. In this study, we used mutagenesis and transfection approaches to investigate the roles of the prodomain (PD) and the C-terminal domain (CD) and its modules (CM1-3) in the secretion and function of PCSK9. Deletion of PD residues 31-40, 41-50, or 51-60 did not affect the self-cleavage, secretion, or LDLR-degrading activity of PCSK9, whereas deletion of residues 61-70 abolished all of these functions. Deletion of the entire CD protein did not impair PCSK9 self-cleavage or secretion but completely abolished LDLR-degrading activity. Deletion of any one or two of the CD modules did not affect self-cleavage but influenced secretion and LDLR-reducing activity. Furthermore, in cotransfection experiments, a secretion-defective PD deletion mutant (ΔPD) was efficiently secreted in the presence of CD deletion mutants. This was due to the transfer of PD from the cotransfected CD mutants to the ΔPD mutant. Finally, we found that a discrete CD protein fragment competed with full-length PCSK9 for binding to LDLR in vitro and attenuated PCSK9-mediated hypercholesterolemia in mice. These results show a previously unrecognized domain interaction as a critical determinant in PCSK9 secretion and function. This knowledge should fuel efforts to develop novel approaches to PCSK9 inhibition.

  11. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells. PMID:26826387

  12. Solution Structure of the Helicase-Interaction Domain of the Primase DnaG: A Model for Helicase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Syson, Karl; Thirlway, Jenny; Hounslow, Andrea M.; Soultanas, Panos; Waltho, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The helicase-primase interaction is a critical event in DNA replication and is mediated by a putative helicase-interaction domain within the primase. The solution structure of the helicase-interaction domain of DnaG reveals that it is made up of two independent subdomains: an N-terminal six-helix module and a C-terminal two-helix module that contains the residues of the primase previously identified as important in the interaction with the helicase. We show that the two-helix module alone is sufficient for strong binding between the primase and the helicase but fails to activate the helicase; both subdomains are required for helicase activation. The six-helix module of the primase has only one close structural homolog, the N-terminal domain of the corresponding helicase. This surprising structural relationship, coupled with the differences in surface properties of the two molecules, suggests how the helicase-interaction domain may perturb the structure of the helicase and lead to activation. PMID:15837199

  13. The Development and Application of a Quantitative Peptide Microarray Based Approach to Protein Interaction Domain Specificity Space*

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Brett W.; Kim, Yohan; Wang, Miaoyan; Peters, Bjoern; Rock, Ronald S.; Nash, Piers D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein interaction domain (PID) linear peptide motif interactions direct diverse cellular processes in a specific and coordinated fashion. PID specificity, or the interaction selectivity derived from affinity preferences between possible PID-peptide pairs is the basis of this ability. Here, we develop an integrated experimental and computational cellulose peptide conjugate microarray (CPCMA) based approach for the high throughput analysis of PID specificity that provides unprecedented quantitative resolution and reproducibility. As a test system, we quantify the specificity preferences of four Src Homology 2 domains and 124 physiological phosphopeptides to produce a novel quantitative interactome. The quantitative data set covers a broad affinity range, is highly precise, and agrees well with orthogonal biophysical validation, in vivo interactions, and peptide library trained algorithm predictions. In contrast to preceding approaches, the CPCMAs proved capable of confidently assigning interactions into affinity categories, resolving the subtle affinity contributions of residue correlations, and yielded predictive peptide motif affinity matrices. Unique CPCMA enabled modes of systems level analysis reveal a physiological interactome with expected node degree value decreasing as a function of affinity, resulting in minimal high affinity binding overlap between domains; uncover that Src Homology 2 domains bind ligands with a similar average affinity yet strikingly different levels of promiscuity and binding dynamic range; and parse with unprecedented quantitative resolution contextual factors directing specificity. The CPCMA platform promises broad application within the fields of PID specificity, synthetic biology, specificity focused drug design, and network biology. PMID:25135669

  14. A Novel Functional Domain of Tab2 Involved in the Interaction with Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reineri, Stefania; Agati, Silvia; Miano, Valentina; Sani, Monica; Berchialla, Paola; Ricci, Laura; Iannello, Andrea; Coscujuela Tarrero, Lucia; Cutrupi, Santina; De Bortoli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Tab2, originally described as a component of the inflammatory pathway, has been implicated in phenomena of gene de-repression in several contexts, due to its ability to interact with the NCoR corepressor. Tab2 interacts also with steroid receptors and dismisses NCoR from antagonist-bound Estrogen and Androgen Receptors on gene regulatory regions, thus modifying their transcriptional activity and leading to pharmacological resistance in breast and prostate cancer cells. We demonstrated previously that either Tab2 knock-down, or a peptide mimicking the Estrogen Receptor alpha domain interacting with Tab2, restore the antiproliferative response to Tamoxifen in Tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. In this work, we map the domain of Tab2 responsible of Estrogen Receptor alpha interaction. First, using both co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down with recombinant proteins, we found that the central part of Tab2 is primarily responsible for this interaction, and that this region also interacts with Androgen Receptor. Then, we narrowed down the essential interaction region by means of competition assays using recombinant protein pull-down. The interaction motif was finally identified as a small region adjacent to, but not overlapping, the Tab2 MEKK1 phosphorylation sites. A synthetic peptide mimicking this motif efficiently displaced Tab2 from interacting with recombinant Estrogen Receptor alpha in vitro, prompting us to test its efficacy using derivatives of the MCF7 breast carcinoma cell lines that are spontaneously resistant to Tamoxifen. Indeed, we observed that this mimic peptide, made cell-permeable by addition of the TAT minimal carrier domain, reduced the growth of Tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cells in the presence of Tamoxifen. These data indicate a novel functional domain of the Tab2 protein with potential application in drug design. PMID:27992601

  15. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  16. From the chromatin interaction network to the organization of the human genome into replication N/U-domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, Rasha E.; Julienne, Hanna; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Petryk, Nataliya; Kahli, Malik; dʼAubenton-Carafa, Yves; Goldar, Arach; Jensen, Pablo; Hyrien, Olivier; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain; Audit, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the mammalian nucleus is now being unraveled thanks to the recent development of chromatin conformation capture (3C) technologies. Here we report the results of a combined multiscale analysis of genome-wide mean replication timing and chromatin conformation data that reveal some intimate relationships between chromatin folding and human DNA replication. We previously described megabase replication N/U-domains as mammalian multiorigin replication units, and showed that their borders are ‘master’ replication initiation zones that likely initiate cascades of origin firing responsible for the stereotypic replication of these domains. Here, we demonstrate that replication N/U-domains correspond to the structural domains of self-interacting chromatin, and that their borders act as insulating regions both in high-throughput 3C (Hi-C) data and high-resolution 3C (4C) experiments. Further analyses of Hi-C data using a graph-theoretical approach reveal that N/U-domain borders are long-distance, interconnected hubs of the chromatin interaction network. Overall, these results and the observation that a well-defined ordering of chromatin states exists from N/U-domain borders to centers suggest that ‘master’ replication initiation zones are at the heart of a high-order, epigenetically controlled 3D organization of the human genome.

  17. Inhibitor of growth 4 suppresses cell spreading and cell migration by interacting with a novel binding partner, liprin alpha1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Unoki, Motoko; Ythier, Damien; Duperray, Alain; Varticovski, Lyuba; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Pedeux, Remy; Harris, Curtis C.

    2007-01-01

    ING4 is a candidate tumor suppressor that plays a major role in gene regulation, cell cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. ING4 expression is downregulated in glioblastoma cells, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Here, we identified liprin α1/PPFIA1, a cytoplasmic protein necessary for focal adhesion formation and axon guidance, as a novel interacting protein with ING4. ING4 and liprin α1 colocalized at lamellipodia in the vicinity of vinculin. Overexpressed ING4 suppressed cell spreading and cell migration. In contrast, overexpressed liprin α1 enhanced cell spreading and cell migration. Knockdown of endogenous ING4 with RNA interference induced cell motility, whereas knockdown of endogenous liprin α1 suppressed cell motility. ING4 also suppressed cell motility that was enhanced by liprin α1. However, ING4 did not further suppress cell motility when liprin α1 was suppressed with RNA interference, suggesting a functional and mechanistic interdependence between these proteins. In addition to its nuclear functions, cytoplasmic ING4 interacts with liprin α1 to regulate cell migration, and with its known anti-angiogenic function, may prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:17363573

  18. Mutual activation of Ets-1 and AML1 DNA binding by direct interaction of their autoinhibitory domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, W Y; Sieweke, M; Ogawa, E; Wee, H J; Englmeier, U; Graf, T; Ito, Y

    1999-01-01

    The transcription factors Ets-1 and AML1 (the alphaBl subunit of PEBP2/CBF) play critical roles in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, and cooperate in the transactivation of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta chain enhancer. The DNA binding capacity of both factors is blocked intramolecularly but can be activated by the removal of negative regulatory domains. These include the exon VII domain for Ets-1 and the negative regulatory domain for DNA binding (NRDB) for alphaB1. Here we report that the direct interaction between the two factors leads to a reciprocal stimulation of their DNA binding activity and activation of their transactivation function. Detailed mapping revealed two independent contact points involving the exon VII and NRDB regions as well as the two DNA binding domains. Using deletion variants and dominant interfering mutants, we demonstrate that the interaction between exon VII and NRDB is necessary and sufficient for cooperative DNA binding. The exon VII and NRDB motifs are highly conserved in evolution yet deleted in natural variants, suggesting that the mechanism described is of biological relevance. The mutual activation of DNA binding of Ets and AML1 through the intermolecular interaction of autoinhibitory domains may represent a novel principle for the regulation of transcription factor function. PMID:10075931

  19. Phospholemman regulates cardiac Na+/Ca2+ exchanger by interacting with the exchanger's proximal linker domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, Jufang; Carl, Lois L; Song, Jianliang; Ahlers, Belinda A; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2009-04-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) belongs to the FXYD family of small ion transport regulators. When phosphorylated at Ser(68), PLM inhibits cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1). We previously demonstrated that the cytoplasmic tail of PLM interacts with the proximal intracellular loop (residues 218-358), but not the transmembrane (residues 1-217 and 765-938) or Ca(2+)-binding (residues 371-508) domains, of NCX1. In this study, we used intact Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger with various deletions in the intracellular loop to map the interaction sites with PLM. We first demonstrated by Western blotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that wild-type (WT) NCX1 and its deletion mutants were expressed in transfected HEK-293 cells. Cotransfection with PLM and NCX1 (or its deletion mutants) in HEK-293 cells did not decrease expression of NCX1 (or its deletion mutants). Coexpression of PLM with WT NCX1 inhibited NCX1 current (I(NaCa)). Deletion of residues 240-679, 265-373, 250-300, or 300-373 from WT NCX1 resulted in loss of inhibition of I(NaCa) by PLM. Inhibition of I(NaCa) by PLM was preserved when residues 229-237, 270-300, 328-330, or 330-373 were deleted from the intracellular loop of NCX1. These results suggest that PLM mediated inhibition of I(NaCa) by interacting with two distinct regions (residues 238-270 and 300-328) of NCX1. Indeed, I(NaCa) measured in mutants lacking residues 238-270, 300-328, or 238-270 + 300-328 was not affected by PLM. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays confirmed that PLM bound to fragments corresponding to residues 218-371, 218-320, 218-270, 238-371, and 300-373, but not to fragments encompassing residues 250-300 and 371-508 of NCX1, indicating that residues 218-270 and 300-373 physically associated with PLM. Finally, acute regulation of I(NaCa) by PLM phosphorylation observed with WT NCX1 was absent in 250-300 deletion mutant but preserved in 229-237 deletion mutant. We conclude that PLM mediates its inhibition of NCX1 by interacting with

  20. Partner Ballroom Dance Robot -PBDR-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Takahiro; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Nomura, Minoru; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Koizumi, Mizuo; Oconogi, Tatsuya

    In this research, we have developed a dance partner robot, which has been developed as a platform for realizing the effective human-robot coordination with physical interaction. The robot could estimate the next dance step intended by a human and dance the step with the human. This paper introduce the robot referred to as PBDR (Partner Ballroom Dance Robot), which has performed graceful dancing with the human in EXPO 2005, Aichi, Japan.

  1. Study of Different Variants of Mo Enzyme crARC and the Interaction with Its Partners crCytb5-R and crCytb5-1.

    PubMed

    Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio; Llamas, Angel

    2017-03-21

    The mARC (mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component) proteins are recently discovered molybdenum (Mo) Cofactor containing enzymes. They are involved in the reduction of several N-hydroxylated compounds (NHC) and nitrite. Some NHC are prodrugs containing an amidoxime structure or mutagens such as 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP). We have studied this protein in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (crARC). Interestingly, all the ARC proteins need the reducing power supplied by other proteins. It is known that crARC requires a cytochrome b₅ (crCytb5-1) and a cytochrome b₅ reductase (crCytb5-R) that form an electron transport chain from NADH to the substrates. Here, we have investigated NHC reduction by crARC, the interaction with its partners and the function of important conserved amino acids. Interactions among crARC, crCytb5-1 and crCytb5-R have been studied by size-exclusion chromatography. A protein complex between crARC, crCytb5-1 and crCytb5-R was identified. Twelve conserved crARC amino acids have been substituted by alanine by in vitro mutagenesis. We have determined that the amino acids D182, F210 and R276 are essential for NHC reduction activity, R276 is important and F210 is critical for the Mo Cofactor chelation. Finally, the crARC C-termini were shown to be involved in protein aggregation or oligomerization.

  2. Study of Different Variants of Mo Enzyme crARC and the Interaction with Its Partners crCytb5-R and crCytb5-1

    PubMed Central

    Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio; Llamas, Angel

    2017-01-01

    The mARC (mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component) proteins are recently discovered molybdenum (Mo) Cofactor containing enzymes. They are involved in the reduction of several N-hydroxylated compounds (NHC) and nitrite. Some NHC are prodrugs containing an amidoxime structure or mutagens such as 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP). We have studied this protein in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (crARC). Interestingly, all the ARC proteins need the reducing power supplied by other proteins. It is known that crARC requires a cytochrome b5 (crCytb5-1) and a cytochrome b5 reductase (crCytb5-R) that form an electron transport chain from NADH to the substrates. Here, we have investigated NHC reduction by crARC, the interaction with its partners and the function of important conserved amino acids. Interactions among crARC, crCytb5-1 and crCytb5-R have been studied by size-exclusion chromatography. A protein complex between crARC, crCytb5-1 and crCytb5-R was identified. Twelve conserved crARC amino acids have been substituted by alanine by in vitro mutagenesis. We have determined that the amino acids D182, F210 and R276 are essential for NHC reduction activity, R276 is important and F210 is critical for the Mo Cofactor chelation. Finally, the crARC C-termini were shown to be involved in protein aggregation or oligomerization. PMID:28335548

  3. Proline localized to the interaction interface can mediate self-association of transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Sal-Man, Neta; Gerber, Doron; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-09-01

    Assembly of transmembrane domains (TMDs) is a critical step in the function of membrane proteins. In recent years, the role of specific amino acids in TMD-TMD interactions has been better characterized, with more emphasis on polar and aromatic residues. Despite the high abundance of proline residues in TMDs, contribution of proline to TMD-TMD association has not been intensively studied. Here, we evaluated statistically the frequency of appearance, and experimentally the contribution of proline, compared to other hydrophobic amino acids (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, and Met), with regard to TMD-TMD self-assembly. Our model system is the assembly motif ((22)QxxS(25)) found previously in TMDs of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor (Tar-1). Statistically, our data revealed that all different motifs, except PxxS (P/S), have frequencies similar to their theoretical random expectancy within a database of 41916 sequences of TMDs, while PxxS motif is underrepresented. Experimentally, using the ToxR assembly system, the SDS-gel running pattern of biotin-conjugated TMD peptides, and FRET experiments between fluorescence-labeled peptides, we found that only the P/S motif preserves the dimerization ability of wild-type Tar-1 TMD. Although proline is known as a helix breaker in solution, Circular Dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of the P/S and the wild-type peptides are similar. All together, these data suggest that proline can stabilize TM self-assembly when localized to the interaction interface of a transmembrane oligomer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova.

  4. Domain Interactions in the Yeast ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Ycf1p: Intragenic Suppressor Analysis of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Martínez-Burgos, Mónica; Molano, Jesús; Mazón, María J.; Eraso, Pilar

    2001-01-01

    The yeast cadmium factor (Ycf1p) is a vacuolar ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter required for heavy metal and drug detoxification. Cluster analysis shows that Ycf1p is strongly related to the human multidrug-associated protein (MRP1) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and therefore may serve as an excellent model for the study of eukaryotic ABC transporter structure and function. Identifying intramolecular interactions in these transporters may help to elucidate energy transfer mechanisms during transport. To identify regions in Ycf1p that may interact to couple ATPase activity to substrate binding and/or movement across the membrane, we sought intragenic suppressors of ycf1 mutations that affect highly conserved residues presumably involved in ATP binding and/or hydrolysis. Thirteen intragenic second-site suppressors were identified for the D777N mutation which affects the invariant Asp residue in the Walker B motif of the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1). Two of the suppressor mutations (V543I and F565L) are located in the first transmembrane domain (TMD1), nine (A1003V, A1021T, A1021V, N1027D, Q1107R, G1207D, G1207S, S1212L, and W1225C) are found within TMD2, one (S674L) is in NBD1, and another one (R1415G) is in NBD2, indicating either physical proximity or functional interactions between NBD1 and the other three domains. The original D777N mutant protein exhibits a strong defect in the apparent affinity for ATP and Vmax of transport. The phenotypic characterization of the suppressor mutants shows that suppression does not result from restoring these alterations but rather from a change in substrate specificity. We discuss the possible involvement of Asp777 in coupling ATPase activity to substrate binding and/or transport across the membrane. PMID:11466279

  5. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  6. Recognition of class I major histocompatibility complex molecules by Ly- 49: specificities and domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Ly-49 is a family type II transmembrane proteins encoded by a gene cluster on murine chromosome 6. One member of this family, Ly-49A, is expressed by a natural killer (NK) cell subset, binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, and blocks the killing of target cells bearing the appropriate H-2 antigens. Here we show that another member of this family which is expressed by an NK cell subset, Ly-49C, recognizes H-2b and H-2d structures which are distinct from and overlapping with those recognized by Ly-49A. Interactions between Ly- 49A and C and their class I ligands are entirely blocked by the antibodies 5E6, YE1/48, YE1/32, and A1, all of which were found to recognize epitopes contained within the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). However, cell-cell binding assays revealed that class I binding specificity is conferred by a combination of sequences within both the CRD and a 19-amino acid adjacent region. We also investigated the question of whether Ly-49A and C form dimers on cells which express both receptors. When coexpressed on COS cells, sequential immunoprecipitation demonstrated that these receptors pair exclusively as homodimers, with no evidence for heterodimeric structures. These observations provide insight into both the biochemical nature of the Ly- 49 family as well as the receptor functions of Ly-49C on NK cells. PMID:8666913

  7. The cytoplasmic domain of influenza M2 protein interacts with caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Wu, Fan; Lu, Lu; Huang, Jing-He; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2009-06-15

    The cytoplasmic domain of influenza M2 protein (M2c) consists of 54 amino acid (aa) residues from aa44 to aa97. In this paper, M2c and its deletion mutant M2c(delta47-55) were expressed using prokaryotic expression system. First, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assay showed that M2c had multimerization potential mediated by aa47-55. Then, M2c, instead of M2c(delta47-55), directed eGFP from the whole cell localization to a predominately perinuclear region in CHO cells, which indicated that aa47-55 of M2c mediated the localization. Moreover, M2c colocalized with caveolin-1 (Cav) when CHO cells were cotransfected with Cav. A caveolin-1 binding motif phixxxxphixxphi (phi represents aromatic amino acid residues) in aa47-55 of M2c was found by sequence alignment and analysis. Further overlay ELISA result showed that M2c, but not M2c(delta47-55), bound to prokaryotically expressed cholesterol-free Cav(2-101), which illustrated the interaction could be cholesterol-independent. That was the first report of cellular protein bound to M2c.

  8. Discrete domains of MARCH1 mediate its localization, functional interactions, and posttranscriptional control of expression.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Maurice; Campbell, Erin M; Fares, Hanna; Lybarger, Lonnie

    2009-11-15

    Within APCs, ubiquitination regulates the trafficking of immune modulators such as MHC class II and CD86 (B7.2) molecules. MARCH1 (membrane-associated RING-CH), a newly identified ubiquitin E3 ligase expressed in APCs, ubiquitinates MHC class II, thereby reducing its surface expression. Following LPS-induced maturation of dendritic cells, MARCH1 mRNA is down-regulated and MHC class II is redistributed to the cell surface from endosomal compartments. Here, we show that MARCH1 expression is also regulated at the posttranscriptional level. In primary dendritic cell and APC cell lines of murine origin, MARCH1 had a half-life of <30 min. MARCH1 degradation appears to occur partly in lysosomes, since inhibiting lysosomal activity stabilized MARCH1. Similar stabilization was observed when MARCH1-expressing cells were treated with cysteine protease inhibitors. Mutational analyses of MARCH1 defined discrete domains required for destabilization, proper localization, and functional interaction with substrates. Taken together, these data suggest that MARCH1 expression is regulated at a posttranscriptional level by trafficking within the endolysosomal pathway where MARCH1 is proteolyzed. The short half-life of MARCH1 permits very rapid changes in the levels of the protein in response to changes in the mRNA, resulting in efficient induction of Ag presentation once APCs receive maturational signals.

  9. WWOX: its genomics, partners, and functions.

    PubMed

    Del Mare, Sara; Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2009-11-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) spans one of the most active common fragile sites (CFSs) involved in cancer, FRA16D. WWOX encodes a 46-kDa protein that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) domain. Through its WW domain, Wwox interacts with its partners and modulates their functions. Our data indicate that Wwox suppresses the transactivation function of several transcription factors implied in neoplasia by sequestering them in the cytoplasm. Work from our laboratory and other research groups have demonstrated that Wwox participates in a number of cellular processes including growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and tumor suppression. Targeted deletion of the Wwox gene in mice causes increased spontaneous and chemically induced tumor incidence supporting bona fide tumor suppressor function of WWOX. Moreover, generation of the Wwox-deficient mice uncovers, at least in part, some of the physiological in vivo functions of the WWOX gene. This review focuses on recent progress that elucidates Wwox functions in biology and pathology.

  10. Spiroplasma eriocheiris Adhesin-Like Protein (ALP) Interacts with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Domain Proteins to Facilitate Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Libo; Liu, Yuhan; Gao, Qi; Xu, Xuechuan; Ning, Mingxiao; Bi, Jingxiu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Min; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Meng, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is a novel pathogen found in recent years, causing the tremor disease (TD) of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. Like Spiroplasma mirum, S. eriocheiris infects the newborn mouse (adult mice are not infected) and can cause cataract. Adhesion-related protein is an important protein involved in the interaction between pathogen and host. In this study, the Adhesin-like Protein (ALP) of S. eriocheiris was detected on its outer membrane by using immune electron microscopy, and was found to be involved in the bacterium's infection of mouse embryo fibroblasts (3T6-Swiss albino). Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that ALP interacts with a diverse group of mouse proteins. The interactions between recombinant partial fibulin7 (FBLN7; including two epidermal growth factor [EGF] domains) and ALP were confirmed by Far-western blotting and colocalization. We synthetized the domains of FBLN7 [EGF domain: amino acids 136–172 and complement control protein (CCP) domain: 81–134 amino acids], and demonstrated that only EGF domain of FBLN7 can interact with ALP. Because the EGF domain has high degree of similarity to EGF, it can activate the downstream EGFR signaling pathway, in key site amino acids. The EGFR pathway in 3T6 cells was restrained after rALP stimulation resulting from competitive binding of ALP to EGF. The unborn mouse, newborn mouse, and the adult mouse with cataract have a small amount of expressed FBLN7; however, none was detected in the brain and very little expression was seen in the eye of normal adult mice. In short, ALP as a S. eriocheiris surface protein, is critical for infection and further supports the role of ALP in S. eriocheiris infection by competitive effection of the EGF/EGFR axis of the target cells. PMID:28184355