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Sample records for dominant negative splicing

  1. A dominant negative mutation in the conserved RNA helicase motif 'SAT' causes splicing factor PRP2 to stall in spliceosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Plumpton, M; McGarvey, M; Beggs, J D

    1994-01-01

    To characterize sequences in the RNA helicase-like PRP2 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are essential for its function in pre-mRNA splicing, a pool of random PRP2 mutants was generated. A dominant negative allele was isolated which, when overexpressed in a wild-type yeast strain, inhibited cell growth by causing a defect in pre-mRNA splicing. This defect was partially alleviated by simultaneous co-overexpression of wild-type PRP2. The dominant negative PRP2 protein inhibited splicing in vitro and caused the accumulation of stalled splicing complexes. Immunoprecipitation with anti-PRP2 antibodies confirmed that dominant negative PRP2 protein competed with its wild-type counterpart for interaction with spliceosomes, with which the mutant protein remained associated. The PRP2-dn1 mutation led to a single amino acid change within the conserved SAT motif that in the prototype helicase eIF-4A is required for RNA unwinding. Purified dominant negative PRP2 protein had approximately 40% of the wild-type level of RNA-stimulated ATPase activity. As ATPase activity was reduced only slightly, but splicing activity was abolished, we propose that the dominant negative phenotype is due primarily to a defect in the putative RNA helicase activity of PRP2 protein. Images PMID:8112301

  2. Alternative Splice Variants Modulates Dominant-Negative Function of Helios in T-Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shaorong; Liu, Wei; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Pengjiang; Li, Shufang; Dou, Daolei; Wang, Yue; Yang, Rongcun; Xiang, Rong; Liu, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    The molecular defects which lead to multistep incidences of human T-cell leukemia have yet to be identified. The DNA-binding protein Helios (known as IKZF2), a member of the Ikaros family of Krüppel-like zinc-finger proteins, functions pivotally in T-cell differentiation and activation. In this study, we identify three novel short Helios splice variants which are T-cell leukemic specific, and demonstrate their dominant-negative function. We then test the cellular localization of distinct Helios isoforms, as well as their capability to form heterodimer with Ikaros, and the association with complexes comprising histone deacetylase (HDAC). In addition, the ectopic expression of T-cell leukemic Helios isoforms interferes with T-cell proliferation and apoptosis. The gene expression profiling and pathway analysis indicated the enrichment of signaling pathways essential for gene expression, translation, cell cycle checkpoint, and response to DNA damage stimulus. These data indicate the molecular function of Helios to be involved in the leukemogenesis and phenotype of T-cell leukemia, and also reveal Helios deregulation as a novel marker for T-cell leukemia. PMID:27681508

  3. A novel human aquaporin-4 splice variant exhibits a dominant-negative activity: a new mechanism to regulate water permeability.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Manuela; Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Basco, Davide; Catalano, Francesco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Two major isoforms of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) have been described in human tissue. Here we report the identification and functional analysis of an alternatively spliced transcript of human AQP4, AQP4-Δ4, that lacks exon 4. In transfected cells AQP4-Δ4 is mainly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and shows no water transport properties. When AQP4-Δ4 is transfected into cells stably expressing functional AQP4, the surface expression of the full-length protein is reduced. Furthermore, the water transport activity of the cotransfectants is diminished in comparison to transfectants expressing only AQP4. The observed down-regulation of both the expression and water channel activity of AQP4 is likely to originate from a dominant-negative effect caused by heterodimerization between AQP4 and AQP4-Δ4, which was detected in coimmunoprecipitation studies. In skeletal muscles, AQP4-Δ4 mRNA expression inversely correlates with the level of AQP4 protein and is physiologically associated with different types of skeletal muscles. The expression of AQP4-Δ4 may represent a new regulatory mechanism through which the cell-surface expression and therefore the activity of AQP4 can be physiologically modulated.

  4. A novel human aquaporin-4 splice variant exhibits a dominant-negative activity: a new mechanism to regulate water permeability

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Manuela; Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Basco, Davide; Catalano, Francesco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Two major isoforms of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) have been described in human tissue. Here we report the identification and functional analysis of an alternatively spliced transcript of human AQP4, AQP4-Δ4, that lacks exon 4. In transfected cells AQP4-Δ4 is mainly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and shows no water transport properties. When AQP4-Δ4 is transfected into cells stably expressing functional AQP4, the surface expression of the full-length protein is reduced. Furthermore, the water transport activity of the cotransfectants is diminished in comparison to transfectants expressing only AQP4. The observed down-regulation of both the expression and water channel activity of AQP4 is likely to originate from a dominant-negative effect caused by heterodimerization between AQP4 and AQP4-Δ4, which was detected in coimmunoprecipitation studies. In skeletal muscles, AQP4-Δ4 mRNA expression inversely correlates with the level of AQP4 protein and is physiologically associated with different types of skeletal muscles. The expression of AQP4-Δ4 may represent a new regulatory mechanism through which the cell-surface expression and therefore the activity of AQP4 can be physiologically modulated. PMID:24356448

  5. GPKOW is essential for pre-mRNA splicing in vitro and suppresses splicing defect caused by dominant-negative DHX16 mutation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Shengbing; Lin, Ting-Yu; Chen, Xinji; Gencheva, Marieta; Newo, Alain N. S.; Yang, Lixin; Rossi, Daniel; Hu, Jianda; Lin, Shwu-Bin; Huang, Aimin; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2014-01-01

    Human GPKOW [G-patch (glycine-rich) domain and KOW (Kyrpides, Ouzounis and Woese) domain] protein contains a G-patch domain and two KOW domains, and is a homologue of Arabidopsis MOS2 and Saccharomyces Spp2 protein. GPKOW is found in the human spliceosome, but its role in pre-mRNA splicing remains to be elucidated. In this report, we showed that GPKOW interacted directly with the DHX16/hPRP2 and with RNA. Immuno-depletion of GPKOW from HeLa nuclear extracts resulted in an inactive spliceosome that still bound DHX16. Adding back recombinant GPKOW restored splicing to the depleted extract. In vivo, overexpression of GPKOW partially suppressed the splicing defect observed in dominant-negative DHX16 mutant expressing cells. Mutations at the G-patch domain greatly diminished the GPKOW–DHX16 interaction; however, the mutant was active in splicing and was able to suppress splicing defect. Mutations at the KOW1 domain slightly altered the GPKOW–RNA interaction, but the mutant was less functional in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicated that GPKOW can functionally impact DHX16 but that interaction between the proteins is not required for this activity. PMID:25296192

  6. Involvement of dominant-negative spliced variants of the intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel, K(Ca)3.1, in immune function of lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Susumu; Niwa, Satomi; Yanagi, Ayano; Fukuyo, Yuka; Yamamura, Hisao; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2011-05-13

    The intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (IK(Ca) channel) encoded by K(Ca)3.1 is responsible for the control of proliferation and differentiation in various types of cells. We identified novel spliced variants of K(Ca)3.1 (human (h) K(Ca)3.1b) from the human thymus, which were lacking the N-terminal domains of the original hK(Ca)3.1a as a result of alternative splicing events. hK(Ca)3.1b was significantly expressed in human lymphoid tissues. Western blot analysis showed that hK(Ca)3.1a proteins were mainly expressed in the plasma membrane fraction, whereas hK(Ca)3.1b was in the cytoplasmic fraction. We also identified a similar N terminus lacking K(Ca)3.1 variants from mice and rat lymphoid tissues (mK(Ca)3.1b and rK(Ca)3.1b). In the HEK293 heterologous expression system, the cellular distribution of cyan fluorescent protein-tagged hK(Ca)3.1a and/or YFP-tagged hK(Ca)3.1b isoforms showed that hK(Ca)3.1b suppressed the localization of hK(Ca)3.1a to the plasma membrane. In the Xenopus oocyte translation system, co-expression of hK(Ca)3.1b with hK(Ca)3.1a suppressed IK(Ca) channel activity of hK(Ca)3.1a in a dominant-negative manner. In addition, this study indicated that up-regulation of mK(Ca)3.1b in mouse thymocytes differentiated CD4(+)CD8(+) phenotype thymocytes into CD4(-)CD8(-) ones and suppressed concanavalin-A-stimulated thymocyte growth by down-regulation of mIL-2 transcripts. Anti-proliferative effects and down-regulation of mIL-2 transcripts were also observed in mK(Ca)3.1b-overexpressing mouse thymocytes. These suggest that the N-terminal domain of K(Ca)3.1 is critical for channel trafficking to the plasma membrane and that the fine-tuning of IK(Ca) channel activity modulated through alternative splicing events may be related to the control in physiological and pathophysiological conditions in T-lymphocytes.

  7. Half pint/Puf68 is required for negative regulation of splicing by the SR splicing factor Transformer2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanzhi; Wagner, Eric J; Mattox, William

    2013-08-01

    The SR family of proteins plays important regulatory roles in the control of alternative splicing in a wide range of organisms. These factors affect splicing through both positive and negative controls of splice site recognition by pre-spliceosomal factors. Recent studies indicate that the Drosophila SR factor Transformer 2 (Tra2) activates and represses splicing through distinct and separable effector regions of the protein. While the interactions of its Arg-Ser-rich activator region have been well studied, cofactors involved in splicing repression have yet to be found. Here we use a luciferase-based splicing reporter assay to screen for novel proteins necessary for Tra2-dependent repression of splicing. This approach identified Half pint, also known as Puf68, as a co-repressor required for Tra2-mediated autoregulation of the M1 intron. In vivo, Half pint is required for Tra2-dependent repression of M1 splicing but is not necessary for Tra2-dependent activation of doublesex splicing. Further experiments indicate that the effect of Hfp is sequence-specific and that it associates with these target transcripts in cells. Importantly, known M1 splicing regulatory elements are sufficient to sensitize a heterologous intron to Hfp regulation. Two alternative proteins deriving from Hfp transcripts, Hfp68, and Hfp58, were found to be expressed in vivo but differed dramatically in their effect on M1 splicing. Comparison of the cellular localization of these forms in S2 cells revealed that Hfp68 is predominantly localized to the nucleus while Hfp58 is distributed across both the nucleus and cytoplasm. This accords with their observed effects on splicing and suggests that differential compartmentalization may contribute to the specificity of these isoforms. Together, these studies reveal a function for Half pint in splicing repression and demonstrate it to be specifically required for Tra2-dependent intron inclusion.

  8. PAP-1, the mutated gene underlying the RP9 form of dominant retinitis pigmentosa, is a splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Maita, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Keen, T Jeffrey; Inglehearn, Chris F; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2004-11-01

    PAP-1 is an in vitro phosphorylation target of the Pim-1 oncogene. Although PAP-1 binds to Pim-1, it is not a substrate for phosphorylation by Pim-1 in vivo. PAP-1 has recently been implicated as the defective gene in RP9, one type of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). However, RP9 is a rare disease and only two missense mutations have been described, so the report of a link between PAP-1 and RP9 was tentative. The precise cellular role of PAP-1 was also unknown at that time. We now report that PAP-1 localizes in nuclear speckles containing the splicing factor SC35 and interacts directly with another splicing factor, U2AF35. Furthermore, we used in vitro and in vivo splicing assays to show that PAP-1 has an activity, which alters the pattern of pre-mRNA splicing and that this activity is dependent on the phosphorylation state of PAP-1. We used the same splicing assay to examine the activities of two mutant forms of PAP-1 found in RP9 patients. The results showed that while one of the mutations, H137L, had no effect on splicing activity compared with that of wild-type PAP-1, the other, D170G, resulted in both a defect in splicing activity and a decreased proportion of phosphorylated PAP-1. The D170G mutation may therefore cause RP by altering splicing of retinal genes through a decrease in PAP-1 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that PAP-1 has a role in pre-mRNA splicing and, given that three other splicing factors have been implicated in adRP, this finding provides compelling further evidence that PAP-1 is indeed the RP9 gene.

  9. Expression of a Dominant Negative CELF Protein In Vivo Leads to Altered Muscle Organization, Fiber Size, and Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Dara S.; Moyer, Michelle; Kliment, Gregory M.; van Lunteren, Erik; Ladd, Andrea N.

    2011-01-01

    Background CUG-BP and ETR-3-like factor (CELF) proteins regulate tissue- and developmental stage-specific alternative splicing in striated muscle. We previously demonstrated that heart muscle-specific expression of a nuclear dominant negative CELF protein in transgenic mice (MHC-CELFΔ) effectively disrupts endogenous CELF activity in the heart in vivo, resulting in impaired cardiac function. In this study, transgenic mice that express the dominant negative protein under a skeletal muscle-specific promoter (Myo-CELFΔ) were generated to investigate the role of CELF-mediated alternative splicing programs in normal skeletal muscle. Methodology/Principal Findings Myo-CELFΔ mice exhibit modest changes in CELF-mediated alternative splicing in skeletal muscle, accompanied by a reduction of endomysial and perimysial spaces, an increase in fiber size variability, and an increase in slow twitch muscle fibers. Weight gain and mean body weight, total number of muscle fibers, and overall muscle strength were not affected. Conclusions/Significance Although these findings demonstrate that CELF activity contributes to the normal alternative splicing of a subset of muscle transcripts in vivo, the mildness of the effects in Myo-CELFΔ muscles compared to those in MHC-CELFΔ hearts suggests CELF activity may be less determinative for alternative splicing in skeletal muscle than in heart muscle. Nonetheless, even these small changes in CELF-mediated splicing regulation were sufficient to alter muscle organization and muscle fiber properties affected in myotonic dystrophy. This lends further evidence to the hypothesis that dysregulation of CELF-mediated alternative splicing programs may be responsible for the disruption of these properties during muscle pathogenesis. PMID:21541285

  10. Splicing defects caused by exonic mutations in PKD1 as a new mechanism of pathogenesis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Claverie-Martin, Felix; Gonzalez-Paredes, Francisco J; Ramos-Trujillo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The correct splicing of precursor-mRNA depends on the actual splice sites plus exonic and intronic regulatory elements recognized by the splicing machinery. Surprisingly, an increasing number of examples reveal that exonic mutations disrupt the binding of splicing factors to these sequences or generate new splice sites or regulatory elements, causing disease. This contradicts the general assumption that missense mutations disrupt protein function and that synonymous mutations are merely polymorphisms. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common inherited disorder caused mainly by mutations in the PKD1 gene. Recently, we analyzed a substantial number of PKD1 missense or synonymous mutations to further characterize their consequences on pre-mRNA splicing. Our results showed that one missense and 2 synonymous mutations induce significant defects in pre-mRNA splicing. Thus, it appears that aberrant splicing as a result of exonic mutations is a previously unrecognized cause of ADPKD.

  11. Arabidopsis PTB1 and PTB2 proteins negatively regulate splicing of a mini-exon splicing reporter and affect alternative splicing of endogenous genes differentially.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Lewandowska, Dominika; Liney, Michele; Davidson, Diane; Chapman, Sean; Fuller, John; McNicol, Jim; Shaw, Paul; Brown, John W S

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the function of Arabidopsis thaliana AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 as plant splicing factors. The effect on splicing of overexpression of AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 was analysed in an in vivo protoplast transient expression system with a novel mini-exon splicing reporter. A range of mutations in pyrimidine-rich sequences were compared with and without AtPTB and NpU2AF65 overexpression. Splicing analyses of constructs in protoplasts and RNA from overexpression lines used high-resolution reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 reduced inclusion/splicing of the potato invertase mini-exon splicing reporter, indicating that these proteins can repress plant intron splicing. Mutation of the polypyrimidine tract and closely associated Cytosine and Uracil-rich (CU-rich) sequences, upstream of the mini-exon, altered repression by AtPTB1 and AtPTB2. Coexpression of a plant orthologue of U2AF65 alleviated the splicing repression of AtPTB1. Mutation of a second CU-rich upstream of the mini-exon 3' splice site led to a decline in mini-exon splicing, indicating the presence of a splicing enhancer sequence. Finally, RT-PCR of AtPTB overexpression lines with c. 90 known alternative splicing (AS) events showed that AtPTBs significantly altered AS of over half the events. AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 are splicing factors that influence alternative splicing. This occurs in the potato invertase mini-exon via the polypyrimidine tract and associated pyrimidine-rich sequence.

  12. Half Pint/Puf68 is required for negative regulation of splicing by the SR factor Transformer2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanzhi; Wagner, Eric J; Mattox, William

    2013-01-01

    The SR family of proteins plays important regulatory roles in the control of alternative splicing in a wide range of organisms. These factors affect splicing through both positive and negative controls of splice site recognition by pre-spliceosomal factors. Recent studies indicate that the Drosophila SR factor Transformer 2 (Tra2) activates and represses splicing through distinct and separable effector regions of the protein. While the interactions of its Arg-Ser-rich activator region have been well studied, cofactors involved in splicing repression have yet to be found. Here we use a luciferase-based splicing reporter assay to screen for novel proteins necessary for Tra2-dependent repression of splicing. This approach identified Half pint, also known as Puf68, as a co-repressor required for Tra2-mediated autoregulation of the M1 intron. In vivo, Half pint is required for Tra2-dependent repression of M1 splicing but is not necessary for Tra2-dependent activation of doublesex splicing. Further experiments indicate that the effect of Hfp is sequence-specific and that it associates with these target transcripts in cells. Importantly, known M1 splicing regulatory elements are sufficient to sensitize a heterologous intron to Hfp regulation. Two alternative proteins deriving from Hfp transcripts, Hfp68, and Hfp58, were found to be expressed in vivo but differed dramatically in their effect on M1 splicing. Comparison of the cellular localization of these forms in S2 cells revealed that Hfp68 is predominantly localized to the nucleus while Hfp58 is distributed across both the nucleus and cytoplasm. This accords with their observed effects on splicing and suggests that differential compartmentalization may contribute to the specificity of these isoforms. Together, these studies reveal a function for Half pint in splicing repression and demonstrate it to be specifically required for Tra2-dependent intron inclusion. PMID:23880637

  13. Dominant negative myostatin produces hypertrophy without hyperplasia in muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Hadhazy, M; Wehling, M; Tidball, J G; McNally, E M

    2000-05-26

    Myostatin, a TGF-beta family member, is a negative regulator of muscle growth. Here, we generated transgenic mice that expressed myostatin mutated at its cleavage site under the control of a muscle specific promoter creating a dominant negative myostatin. These mice exhibited a significant (20-35%) increase in muscle mass that resulted from myofiber hypertrophy and not from myofiber hyperplasia. We also evaluated the role of myostatin in muscle degenerative states, such as muscular dystrophy, and found significant downregulation of myostatin. Thus, further inhibition of myostatin may permit increased muscle growth in muscle degenerative disorders.

  14. Disruption of C-Terminal Cytoplasmic Domain of βPS Integrin Subunit Has Dominant Negative Properties in Developing Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jannuzi, Alison L.; Bunch, Thomas A.; Brabant, Marc C.; Miller, Steven W.; Mukai, Leona; Zavortink, Michael; Brower, Danny L.

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed a set of new and existing strong mutations in the myospheroid gene, which encodes the βPS integrin subunit of Drosophila. In addition to missense and other null mutations, three mutants behave as antimorphic alleles, indicative of dominant negative properties. Unlike null alleles, the three antimorphic mutants are synthetically lethal in double heterozygotes with an inflated (αPS2) null allele, and they fail to complement very weak, otherwise viable alleles of myospheroid. Two of the antimorphs result from identical splice site lesions, which create a frameshift in the C-terminal half of the cytoplasmic domain of βPS. The third antimorphic mutation is caused by a stop codon just before the cytoplasmic splice site. These mutant βPS proteins can support cell spreading in culture, especially under conditions that appear to promote integrin activation. Analyses of developing animals indicate that the dominant negative properties are not a result of inefficient surface expression, or simple competition between functional and nonfunctional proteins. These data indicate that mutations disrupting the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of integrin β subunits can have dominant negative effects in situ, at normal levels of expression, and that this property does not necessarily depend on a specific new protein sequence or structure. The results are discussed with respect to similar vertebrate β subunit cytoplasmic mutations. PMID:11950944

  15. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes. PMID:28045043

  16. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes.

  17. β1-Integrin Cytoplasmic Subdomains Involved in Dominant Negative Function

    PubMed Central

    Retta, S. Francesco; Balzac, Fiorella; Ferraris, Piercarlo; Belkin, Alexey M.; Fässler, Reinhard; Humphries, Martin J.; De Leo, Giacomo; Silengo, Lorenzo; Tarone, Guido

    1998-01-01

    The β1-integrin cytoplasmic domain consists of a membrane proximal subdomain common to the four known isoforms (“common” region) and a distal subdomain specific for each isoform (“variable” region). To investigate in detail the role of these subdomains in integrin-dependent cellular functions, we used β1A and β1B isoforms as well as four mutants lacking the entire cytoplasmic domain (β1TR), the variable region (β1COM), or the common region (β1ΔCOM-B and β1ΔCOM-A). By expressing these constructs in Chinese hamster ovary and β1 integrin-deficient GD25 cells (Wennerberg et al., J Cell Biol 132, 227–238, 1996), we show that β1B, β1COM, β1ΔCOM-B, and β1ΔCOM-A molecules are unable to support efficient cell adhesion to matrix proteins. On exposure to Mn++ ions, however, β1B, but none of the mutants, can mediate cell adhesion, indicating specific functional properties of this isoform. Analysis of adhesive functions of transfected cells shows that β1B interferes in a dominant negative manner with β1A and β3/β5 integrins in cell spreading, focal adhesion formation, focal adhesion kinase tyrosine phosphorylation, and fibronectin matrix assembly. None of the β1 mutants tested shows this property, indicating that the dominant negative effect depends on the specific combination of common and B subdomains, rather than from the absence of the A subdomain in the β1B isoform. PMID:9529373

  18. beta1-integrin cytoplasmic subdomains involved in dominant negative function.

    PubMed

    Retta, S F; Balzac, F; Ferraris, P; Belkin, A M; Fässler, R; Humphries, M J; De Leo, G; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1998-04-01

    The beta1-integrin cytoplasmic domain consists of a membrane proximal subdomain common to the four known isoforms ("common" region) and a distal subdomain specific for each isoform ("variable" region). To investigate in detail the role of these subdomains in integrin-dependent cellular functions, we used beta1A and beta1B isoforms as well as four mutants lacking the entire cytoplasmic domain (beta1TR), the variable region (beta1COM), or the common region (beta1 deltaCOM-B and beta1 deltaCOM-A). By expressing these constructs in Chinese hamster ovary and beta1 integrin-deficient GD25 cells (Wennerberg et al., J Cell Biol 132, 227-238, 1996), we show that beta1B, beta1COM, beta1 deltaCOM-B, and beta1 deltaCOM-A molecules are unable to support efficient cell adhesion to matrix proteins. On exposure to Mn++ ions, however, beta1B, but none of the mutants, can mediate cell adhesion, indicating specific functional properties of this isoform. Analysis of adhesive functions of transfected cells shows that beta1B interferes in a dominant negative manner with beta1A and beta3/beta5 integrins in cell spreading, focal adhesion formation, focal adhesion kinase tyrosine phosphorylation, and fibronectin matrix assembly. None of the beta1 mutants tested shows this property, indicating that the dominant negative effect depends on the specific combination of common and B subdomains, rather than from the absence of the A subdomain in the beta1B isoform.

  19. Osmosensation in TRPV2 dominant negative expressing skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Zanou, Nadège; Mondin, Ludivine; Fuster, Clarisse; Seghers, François; Dufour, Inès; de Clippele, Marie; Schakman, Olivier; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Iwata, Yuko; Wakabayashi, Shigeo; Voets, Thomas; Allard, Bruno; Gailly, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased plasma osmolarity induces intracellular water depletion and cell shrinkage followed by activation of a regulatory volume increase (RVI). In skeletal muscle, this is accompanied by transverse tubule (TT) dilatation and by a membrane depolarization responsible for a release of Ca2+ from intracellular pools. We observed that both hyperosmotic shock-induced Ca2+ transients and RVI were inhibited by Gd3+, ruthenium red and GsMTx4 toxin, three inhibitors of mechanosensitive ion channels. The response was also completely absent in muscle fibres overexpressing a non-permeant, dominant negative (DN) mutant of the transient receptor potential, V2 isoform (TRPV2) ion channel, suggesting the involvement of TRPV2 or of a TRP isoform susceptible to heterotetramerization with TRPV2. The release of Ca2+ induced by hyperosmotic shock was increased by cannabidiol, an activator of TRPV2, and decreased by tranilast, an inhibitor of TRPV2, suggesting a role for the TRPV2 channel itself. Hyperosmotic shock-induced membrane depolarization was impaired in TRPV2-DN fibres, suggesting that TRPV2 activation triggers the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum by depolarizing TTs. RVI requires the sequential activation of STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and NKCC1, a Na+–K+–Cl− cotransporter, allowing ion entry and driving osmotic water flow. In fibres overexpressing TRPV2-DN as well as in fibres in which Ca2+ transients were abolished by the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA, the level of P-SPAKSer373 in response to hyperosmotic shock was reduced, suggesting a modulation of SPAK phosphorylation by intracellular Ca2+. We conclude that TRPV2 is involved in osmosensation in skeletal muscle fibres, acting in concert with P-SPAK-activated NKCC1. Key points Increased plasma osmolarity induces intracellular water depletion and cell shrinkage (CS) followed by activation of a regulatory volume increase (RVI). In skeletal muscle, the hyperosmotic shock

  20. Osmosensation in TRPV2 dominant negative expressing skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Mondin, Ludivine; Fuster, Clarisse; Seghers, François; Dufour, Inès; de Clippele, Marie; Schakman, Olivier; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Iwata, Yuko; Wakabayashi, Shigeo; Voets, Thomas; Allard, Bruno; Gailly, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Increased plasma osmolarity induces intracellular water depletion and cell shrinkage (CS) followed by activation of a regulatory volume increase (RVI). In skeletal muscle, the hyperosmotic shock-induced CS is accompanied by a small membrane depolarization responsible for a release of Ca(2+) from intracellular pools. Hyperosmotic shock also induces phosphorylation of STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK). TRPV2 dominant negative expressing fibres challenged with hyperosmotic shock present a slower membrane depolarization, a diminished Ca(2+) response, a smaller RVI response, a decrease in SPAK phosphorylation and defective muscle function. We suggest that hyperosmotic shock induces TRPV2 activation, which accelerates muscle cell depolarization and allows the subsequent Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, activation of the Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter by SPAK, and the RVI response. Increased plasma osmolarity induces intracellular water depletion and cell shrinkage followed by activation of a regulatory volume increase (RVI). In skeletal muscle, this is accompanied by transverse tubule (TT) dilatation and by a membrane depolarization responsible for a release of Ca(2+) from intracellular pools. We observed that both hyperosmotic shock-induced Ca(2+) transients and RVI were inhibited by Gd(3+) , ruthenium red and GsMTx4 toxin, three inhibitors of mechanosensitive ion channels. The response was also completely absent in muscle fibres overexpressing a non-permeant, dominant negative (DN) mutant of the transient receptor potential, V2 isoform (TRPV2) ion channel, suggesting the involvement of TRPV2 or of a TRP isoform susceptible to heterotetramerization with TRPV2. The release of Ca(2+) induced by hyperosmotic shock was increased by cannabidiol, an activator of TRPV2, and decreased by tranilast, an inhibitor of TRPV2, suggesting a role for the TRPV2 channel itself. Hyperosmotic shock-induced membrane depolarization was impaired in TRPV2

  1. The decline in fitness with inbreeding: evidence for negative dominance-by-dominance epistasis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sharp, N P; Agrawal, A F

    2016-04-01

    Genetic interactions can play an important role in the evolution of reproductive strategies. In particular, negative dominance-by-dominance epistasis for fitness can theoretically favour sex and recombination. This form of epistasis can be detected statistically because it generates nonlinearity in the relationship between fitness and inbreeding coefficient. Measures of fitness in progressively inbred lines tend to show limited evidence for epistasis. However, tests of this kind can be biased against detecting an accelerating decline due to line losses at higher inbreeding levels. We tested for dominance-by-dominance epistasis in Drosophila melanogaster by examining viability at five inbreeding levels that were generated simultaneously, avoiding the bias against detecting nonlinearity that has affected previous studies. We find an accelerating rate of fitness decline with inbreeding, indicating that dominance-by-dominance epistasis is negative on average, which should favour sex and recombination.

  2. Right Hemispheric Dominance in Processing of Unconscious Negative Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Aoki, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Right hemispheric dominance in unconscious emotional processing has been suggested, but remains controversial. This issue was investigated using the subliminal affective priming paradigm combined with unilateral visual presentation in 40 normal subjects. In either left or right visual fields, angry facial expressions, happy facial expressions, or…

  3. Alternatively spliced products lacking exon 12 dominate the expression of fragile X mental retardation 1 gene in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xianguo; Zheng, Dezhu; Liao, Juan; Li, Qingqin; Lin, Yuxiang; Zhang, Duo; Yan, Aizhen; Lan, Fenghua

    2015-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) expression is associated with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and exhibits several splicing products. However, the proportion of spliced isoforms that are expressed in different tissues remains unclear. In the present study, long-chain reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with a T cloning-sequencing method was conducted in order to analyze the entire coding region of the FMR1 gene in human tissues. In particular, FXS-associated tissues were analyzed, including the brain and testis. Twenty alternatively spliced isoforms were observed among 271 recombinants, including six novel ones. The isoform that consisted of the entire FMR1 coding region (ISO1) accounted for a small proportion of all isoforms. Isoforms lacking exon 12 were the most abundant. In particular, spliced isoforms ISO7 and ISO17 were the most abundant. However, their relative abundance varied between the peripheral blood cells, and the testis and brain tissues. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that exon 12 may be the sole exon undergoing positive selection. The results of the present study suggested that the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing (AS) of the FMR1 gene may be more complex. Furthermore, the functions of alternatively spliced products lacking exon 12 require further investigation. The results of the present study provide novel insights into the association between AS and the structure and function of the FMR1 gene.

  4. Mutations in Splicing Factor Genes Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in Belgian Families

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Frauke; Roels, Dimitri; De Jaegere, Sarah; Flipts, Helena; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Walraedt, Sophie; Claes, Charlotte; Fransen, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Depasse, Fanny; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is characterized by an extensive genetic heterogeneity, implicating 27 genes, which account for 50 to 70% of cases. Here 86 Belgian probands with possible adRP underwent genetic testing to unravel the molecular basis and to assess the contribution of the genes underlying their condition. Methods Mutation detection methods evolved over the past ten years, including mutation specific methods (APEX chip analysis), linkage analysis, gene panel analysis (Sanger sequencing, targeted next-generation sequencing or whole exome sequencing), high-resolution copy number screening (customized microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization). Identified variants were classified following American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations. Results Molecular genetic screening revealed mutations in 48/86 cases (56%). In total, 17 novel pathogenic mutations were identified: four missense mutations in RHO, five frameshift mutations in RP1, six mutations in genes encoding spliceosome components (SNRNP200, PRPF8, and PRPF31), one frameshift mutation in PRPH2, and one frameshift mutation in TOPORS. The proportion of RHO mutations in our cohort (14%) is higher than reported in a French adRP population (10.3%), but lower than reported elsewhere (16.5–30%). The prevalence of RP1 mutations (10.5%) is comparable to other populations (3.5%-10%). The mutation frequency in genes encoding splicing factors is unexpectedly high (altogether 19.8%), with PRPF31 the second most prevalent mutated gene (10.5%). PRPH2 mutations were found in 4.7% of the Belgian cohort. Two families (2.3%) have the recurrent NR2E3 mutation p.(Gly56Arg). The prevalence of the recurrent PROM1 mutation p.(Arg373Cys) was higher than anticipated (3.5%). Conclusions Overall, we identified mutations in 48 of 86 Belgian adRP cases (56%), with the highest prevalence in RHO (14%), RP1 (10.5%) and PRPF31 (10.5%). Finally, we expanded the molecular

  5. Expression of NKp46 Splice Variants in Nasal Lavage Following Respiratory Viral Infection: Domain 1-Negative Isoforms Predominate and Manifest Higher Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shemer-Avni, Yonat; Kundu, Kiran; Shemesh, Avishai; Brusilovsky, Michael; Yossef, Rami; Meshesha, Mesfin; Solomon-Alemayehu, Semaria; Levin, Shai; Gershoni-Yahalom, Orly; Campbell, Kerry S.; Porgador, Angel

    2017-01-01

    The natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor NKp46/NCR1 plays a critical role in elimination of virus-infected and tumor cells. The NCR1 gene can be transcribed into five different splice variants, but the functional importance and physiological distribution of NKp46 isoforms are not yet fully understood. Here, we shed light on differential expression of NKp46 splice variants in viral respiratory tract infections and their functional difference at the cellular level. NKp46 was the most predominantly expressed natural cytotoxicity receptor in the nasal lavage of patients infected with four respiratory viruses: respiratory syncytia virus, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus, or influenza A. Expression of NKp30 was far lower and NKp44 was absent in all patients. Domain 1-negative NKp46 splice variants (i.e., NKp46 isoform d) were the predominantly expressed isoform in nasal lavage following viral infections. Using our unique anti-NKp46 mAb, D2-9A5, which recognizes the D2 extracellular domain, and a commercial anti-NKp46 mAb, 9E2, which recognizes D1 domain, allowed us to identify a small subset of NKp46 D1-negative splice variant-expressing cells within cultured human primary NK cells. This NKp46 D1-negative subset also showed higher degranulation efficiency in term of CD107a surface expression. NK-92 cell lines expressing NKp46 D1-negative and NKp46 D1-positive splice variants also showed functional differences when interacting with targets. A NKp46 D1-negative isoform-expressing NK-92 cell line showed enhanced degranulation activity. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence showing the physiological distribution and functional importance of human NKp46 splice variants under pathological conditions. PMID:28261217

  6. Founder Effect of a c.828+3A>T Splice Site Mutation in Peripherin 2 (PRPH2) Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Birch, David G.; Ruiz, Richard S.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Screening for splice site mutation c.828+3A>T in the peripherin 2 (PRPH2) gene should be a high priority in families with highly variable retinal dystrophies. The correction of missplicing is a potential therapeutic target. Objective To determine the prevalence, genetic origin, and molecular mechanism of a donor c.828+3A>T mutation in the PRPH2 (peripherin 2, retinal degeneration slow) gene in individuals with retinal dystrophies. Design, Setting, and Participants Case-control study that took place at the University of Texas Health Science Center, the University of Iowa, and the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, from January 1, 1987, to August 1, 2014, including affected individuals from 200 families with a diagnosis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, 35 families with unspecified macular dystrophies, and 116 families with pattern dystrophy. Participants were screened for the c.828+3A>T mutation by restriction-enzyme digest, single-strand conformational polymorphism screening, or bidirectional sequencing. Haplotypes of polymorphic markers flanking the PRPH2 locus and sequence variants within the gene were determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis or automated capillary-based cycle sequencing. The effect of the splice site mutation on the PRPH2 transcript was analyzed using NetGene2, a splice prediction program and by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of illegitimate transcripts from peripheral white blood cells. Main Outcomes and Measures Results of testing for splice site mutation, haplotypes, and alternate transcripts. Results The PRPH2 mutation was found in 97 individuals of 19 independently ascertained families with a clinical diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, macular dystrophy, and/or pattern dystrophy. All affected individuals also shared a rare haplotype of approximately 644 kilobase pairs containing the c.828+3A>T mutation, which extends from the short tandem repeat polymorphism D6S282 to c.1013G>A (rs434102, a

  7. Modeling of surface-dominated plasmas: from electric thruster to negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Taccogna, F; Schneider, R; Longo, S; Capitelli, M

    2008-02-01

    This contribution shows two important applications of the particle-in-cell/monte Carlo technique on ion sources: modeling of the Hall thruster SPT-100 for space propulsion and of the rf negative ion source for ITER neutral beam injection. In the first case translational degrees of freedom are involved, while in the second case inner degrees of freedom (vibrational levels) are excited. Computational results show how in both cases, plasma-wall and gas-wall interactions play a dominant role. These are secondary electron emission from the lateral ceramic wall of SPT-100 and electron capture from caesiated surfaces by positive ions and atoms in the rf negative ion source.

  8. Identification of a novel human MD-2 splice variant that negatively regulates Lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gray, Pearl; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Sirois, Cherilyn M; Lowe, Emily; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Chen, Shuang; Brikos, Constantinos; Bulut, Yonca; Latz, Eicke; Underhill, David; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-06-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) is a secreted gp that assembles with TLR4 to form a functional signaling receptor for bacterial LPS. In this study, we have identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human MD-2, termed MD-2 short (MD-2s), which lacks the region encoded by exon 2 of the MD-2 gene. Similar to MD-2, MD-2s is glycosylated and secreted. MD-2s also interacted with LPS and TLR4, but failed to mediate LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 production. We show that MD-2s is upregulated upon IFN-gamma, IL-6, and TLR4 stimulation and negatively regulates LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. Furthermore, MD-2s competitively inhibited binding of MD-2 to TLR4. Our study pinpoints a mechanism that may be used to regulate TLR4 activation at the onset of signaling and identifies MD-2s as a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases characterized by an overly exuberant or chronic immune response to LPS.

  9. Molecular basis of the dominant negative effect of a glycine transporter 2 mutation associated with hyperekplexia.

    PubMed

    Arribas-González, Esther; de Juan-Sanz, Jaime; Aragón, Carmen; López-Corcuera, Beatriz

    2015-01-23

    Hyperekplexia or startle disease is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by an exaggerated startle in response to trivial tactile or acoustic stimuli. This neurological disorder can have serious consequences in neonates, provoking brain damage and/or sudden death due to apnea episodes and cardiorespiratory failure. Hyperekplexia is caused by defective inhibitory glycinergic neurotransmission. Mutations in the human SLC6A5 gene encoding the neuronal GlyT2 glycine transporter are responsible for the presynaptic form of the disease. GlyT2 mediates synaptic glycine recycling, which constitutes the main source of releasable transmitter at glycinergic synapses. Although the majority of GlyT2 mutations detected so far are recessive, a dominant negative mutant that affects GlyT2 trafficking does exist. In this study, we explore the properties and structural alterations of the S512R mutation in GlyT2. We analyze its dominant negative effect that retains wild-type GlyT2 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), preventing surface expression. We show that the presence of an arginine rather than serine 512 provoked transporter misfolding, enhanced association to the ER-chaperone calnexin, altered association with the coat-protein complex II component Sec24D, and thereby impeded ER exit. The S512R mutant formed oligomers with wild-type GlyT2 causing its retention in the ER. Overexpression of calnexin rescued wild-type GlyT2 from the dominant negative effect of the mutant, increasing the amount of transporter that reached the plasma membrane and dampening the interaction between the wild-type and mutant GlyT2. The ability of chemical chaperones to overcome the dominant negative effect of the disease mutation on the wild-type transporter was demonstrated in heterologous cells and primary neurons.

  10. The Alternative Splicing of Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding Protein 2 Drives Anoikis Resistance and the Metastasis of Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan M; Vu, Ngoc T; Griffin, Brian P; Gentry, Amanda E; Archer, Kellie J; Chalfant, Charles E; Park, Margaret A

    2015-10-16

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents an anomalous subset of breast cancer with a greatly reduced (30%) 5-year survival rate. The enhanced mortality and morbidity of TNBC arises from the high metastatic rate, which requires the acquisition of AnR, a process whereby anchorage-dependent cells become resistant to cell death induced by detachment. In this study TNBC cell lines were selected for AnR, and these cell lines demonstrated dramatic enhancement in the formation of lung metastases as compared with parental cells. Genetic analysis of the AnR subclones versus parental cells via next generation sequencing and analysis of global alternative RNA splicing identified that the mRNA splicing of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding 2 (CPEB2), a translational regulator, was altered in AnR TNBC cells. Specifically, increased inclusion of exon 4 into the mature mRNA to produce the CPEB2B isoform was observed in AnR cell lines. Molecular manipulations of CPEB2 splice variants demonstrated a key role for this RNA splicing event in the resistance of cells to anoikis. Specifically, down-regulation of the CPEB2B isoform using siRNA re-sensitized the AnR cell lines to detachment-induced cell death. The ectopic expression of CPEB2B in parental TNBC cell lines induced AnR and dramatically increased metastatic potential. Importantly, alterations in the alternative splicing of CPEB2 were also observed in human TNBC and additional subtypes of human breast cancer tumors linked to a high metastatic rate. Our findings demonstrate that the regulation of CPEB2 mRNA splicing is a key mechanism in AnR and a driving force in TNBC metastasis.

  11. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Lei; Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition.

  12. A dominant negative mutation suppresses the function of normal epidermal growth factor receptors by heterodimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Kashles, O; Yarden, Y; Fischer, R; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that defective receptors can function as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the action of wild-type receptors. This causes various diminished responses in cell culture and developmental disorders in murine embryogenesis. Here, we describe a model system and a potential mechanism underlying the dominant suppressing response caused by defective epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors. We used cultured 3T3 cells coexpressing human wild-type receptors and an inactive deletion mutant lacking most of the cytoplasmic domain. When expressed alone, EGF was able to stimulate the dimerization of either wild-type or mutant receptors in living cells as revealed by chemical covalent cross-linking experiments. In response to EGF, heterodimers and homodimers of wild-type and mutant receptors were observed in cells coexpressing both receptor species. However, only homodimers of wild-type EGF receptors underwent EGF-induced tyrosine autophosphorylation in living cells. These results indicate that the integrity of both receptor moieties within receptor dimers is essential for kinase activation and autophosphorylation. Moreover, the presence of mutant receptors in cells expressing wild-type receptors diminished the number of high-affinity binding sites for EGF, reduced the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, and diminished biological signalling via EGF receptors. We propose that heterodimerization with defective EGF receptors functions as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the activation and response of normal receptors by formation of unproductive heterodimers. Images PMID:1705006

  13. Negative-dominance phenomenon with genetic variants of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, many pathological genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac (monomeric) sodium channel Na(v)1.5, have been described. Negative dominance is a classical genetic concept involving a "poison" mutant peptide that negatively interferes with the co-expressed wild-type protein, thus reducing its cellular function. This phenomenon has been described for genetic variants of multimeric K(+) channels, which mechanisms are well understood. Unexpectedly, several pathologic SCN5A variants that are linked to Brugada syndrome also demonstrate such a dominant-negative (DN) effect. The molecular determinants of these observations, however, are not yet elucidated. This review article summarizes recent findings that describe the mechanisms underlying the DN phenomenon of genetic variants of K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-) and Na(+) channels, and in particular Brugada syndrome variants of Na(v)1.5. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies Caused by a Founder Splice Site Mutation, c.828+3A>T, in PRPH2 and Protein Haplotypes in trans as Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Birch, David G.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the phenotypic variation, disease progression, and potential modifiers of autosomal dominant retinal dystrophies caused by a splice site founder mutation, c.828+3A>T, in the PRPH2 gene. Methods A total of 62 individuals (19 families) harboring the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation, had phenotype analysis by fundus appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. The PRPH2 haplotypes in trans were sequenced for potential modifying variants and generalized estimating equations (GEE) used for statistical analysis. Results Several distinct phenotypes caused by the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation were observed and fell into two clinical categories: Group I (N = 44) with mild pattern dystrophies (PD) and Group II (N = 18) with more severe cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and central areolar chorioretinal dystrophy (CACD). The PRPH2 Gln304-Lys310-Asp338 protein haplotype in trans was found in Group I only (29.6% vs. 0%), whereas the Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype was predominant in Group II (94.4% vs. 70.4%). Generalized estimating equations analysis for PD versus the CRD/CACD/RP phenotypes in individuals over 43 years alone with the PRPH2 haplotypes in trans and age as predictors, adjusted for correlation within families, confirmed a significant effect of haplotype on severity (P = 0.03) with an estimated odds ratio of 7.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.8, 18.4]). Conclusions The PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation results in multiple distinct phenotypes likely modified by protein haplotypes in trans; the odds of having the CACD/RP-like phenotype (versus the PD phenotype) are 7.16 times greater with a Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype in trans. Further functional studies of the modifying haplotypes in trans and PRPH2 splice variants may offer therapeutic targets. PMID:26842753

  15. Cardioselective Dominant-negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor (Δ337T) Modulates Myocardial Metabolism and Contractile Dfficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Olson, Aaron; Ge, Ming; Ning, Xue-Han; Buroker, Norman E.; Chung, Youngran; Jue, Thomas; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-06-03

    Dominant- negative thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) show elevated expression relative to ligand-binding TRs during cardiac hypertrophy. We tested the hypothesis that overexpression of a dominant-negative TR alters cardiac metabolism and contractile efficiency (CE). We used mice expressing the cardioselective dominant-negative TRβ1 mutation Δ337T. Isolated working Δ337T hearts and nontransgenic control (Con) hearts were perfused with 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate (ACAC), lactate, and glucose at physiological concentrations for 30 min. 13C NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer analyses were used to determine substrate flux and fractional contributions (Fc) of acetyl-CoA to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Δ337T hearts exhibited rate depression but higher developed pressure and CE, defined as work per oxygen consumption (MV˙ O2). Unlabeled substrate Fc from endogenous sources was higher in Δ337T, but ACAC Fc was lower. Fluxes through CAC, lactate, ACAC, and FFA were reduced in Δ337T. CE and Fc differences were reversed by pacing Δ337T to Con rates, accompanied by an increase in FFA Fc. Δ337T hearts lacked the ability to increase MV˙ O2. Decreases in protein expression for glucose transporter-4 and hexokinase-2 and increases in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 and -4 suggest that these hearts are unable to increase carbohydrate oxidation in response to stress. These data show that Δ337T alters the metabolic phenotype in murine heart by reducing substrate flux for multiple pathways. Some of these changes are heart rate dependent, indicating that the substrate shift may represent an accommodation to altered contractile protein kinetics, which can be disrupted by pacing stress.

  16. Dominant-Negative Proteins in Herpesviruses – From Assigning Gene Function to Intracellular Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Mühlbach, Hermine; Mohr, Christian A.; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2009-01-01

    Investigating and assigning gene functions of herpesviruses is a process, which profits from consistent technical innovation. Cloning of bacterial artificial chromosomes encoding herpesvirus genomes permits nearly unlimited possibilities in the construction of genetically modified viruses. Targeted or randomized screening approaches allow rapid identification of essential viral proteins. Nevertheless, mapping of essential genes reveals only limited insight into function. The usage of dominant-negative (DN) proteins has been the tool of choice to dissect functions of proteins during the viral life cycle. DN proteins also facilitate the analysis of host-virus interactions. Finally, DNs serve as starting-point for design of new antiviral strategies. PMID:21994555

  17. Inactivation of TNF Signaling by Rationally Designed Dominant-Negative TNF Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steed, Paul M.; Tansey, Malú G.; Zalevsky, Jonathan; Zhukovsky, Eugene A.; Desjarlais, John R.; Szymkowski, David E.; Abbott, Christina; Carmichael, David; Chan, Cheryl; Cherry, Lisa; Cheung, Peter; Chirino, Arthur J.; Chung, Hyo H.; Doberstein, Stephen K.; Eivazi, Araz; Filikov, Anton V.; Gao, Sarah X.; Hubert, René S.; Hwang, Marian; Hyun, Linus; Kashi, Sandhya; Kim, Alice; Kim, Esther; Kung, James; Martinez, Sabrina P.; Muchhal, Umesh S.; Nguyen, Duc-Hanh T.; O'Brien, Christopher; O'Keefe, Donald; Singer, Karen; Vafa, Omid; Vielmetter, Jost; Yoder, Sean C.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.

    2003-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a key regulator of inflammatory responses and has been implicated in many pathological conditions. We used structure-based design to engineer variant TNF proteins that rapidly form heterotrimers with native TNF to give complexes that neither bind to nor stimulate signaling through TNF receptors. Thus, TNF is inactivated by sequestration. Dominant-negative TNFs represent a possible approach to anti-inflammatory biotherapeutics, and experiments in animal models show that the strategy can attenuate TNF-mediated pathology. Similar rational design could be used to engineer inhibitors of additional TNF superfamily cytokines as well as other multimeric ligands.

  18. Targeted Disruption of Chlamydia trachomatis Invasion by in Trans Expression of Dominant Negative Tarp Effectors.

    PubMed

    Parrett, Christopher J; Lenoci, Robert V; Nguyen, Brenda; Russell, Lauren; Jewett, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis invasion of eukaryotic host cells is facilitated, in part, by the type III secreted effector protein, Tarp. The role of Tarp in chlamydiae entry of host cells is supported by molecular approaches that examined recombinant Tarp or Tarp effectors expressed within heterologous systems. A major limitation in the ability to study the contribution of Tarp to chlamydial invasion of host cells was the prior absence of genetic tools for chlamydiae. Based on our knowledge of Tarp domain structure and function along with the introduction of genetic approaches in C. trachomatis, we hypothesized that Tarp function could be disrupted in vivo by the introduction of dominant negative mutant alleles. We provide evidence that transformed C. trachomatis produced epitope tagged Tarp, which was secreted into the host cell during invasion. We examined the effects of domain specific Tarp mutations on chlamydial invasion and growth and demonstrate that C. trachomatis clones harboring engineered Tarp mutants lacking either the actin binding domain or the phosphorylation domain had reduced levels of invasion into host cells. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for the critical role of Tarp in C. trachomatis pathogenesis and indicate that chlamydial invasion of host cells can be attenuated via the introduction of engineered dominant negative type three effectors.

  19. CRISPR-mediated targeting of HER2 inhibits cell proliferation through a dominant negative mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huajing; Sun, William

    2017-01-28

    With the discovery of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, genome editing could be performed in a rapid, precise and effective manner. Its potential applications in functional interrogation of cancer-causing genes and cancer therapy have been extensively explored. In this study, we demonstrated the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to directly target the oncogene HER2. Directing Cas9 to exons of the HER2 gene inhibited cell growth in breast cancer cell lines that harbor amplification of the HER2 locus. The inhibitory effect was potentiated with the addition of PARP inhibitors. Unexpectedly, CRISPR-induced mutations did not significantly affect the level of HER2 protein expression. Instead, CRISPR targeting appeared to exert its effect through a dominant negative mutation. This HER2 mutant interfered with the MAPK/ERK axis of HER2 downstream signaling. Our work provides a novel mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effects of HER2-targeting by CRISPR/Cas9, which is distinct from the clinical drug Herceptin. In addition, it opens up the possibility that incomplete CRISPR targeting of certain oncogenes could still have therapeutic value by generation of dominant negative mutants.

  20. The positive and negative framing of affirmative action: a group dominance perspective.

    PubMed

    Haley, Hillary; Sidanius, Jim

    2006-05-01

    Using a sample of 328 White, Latino, and Black Los Angeles County adults, the authors examined the tendency to employ various affirmative action "frames" (e.g., affirmative action as a "tie-breaking" device or as a quota-based policy). All three groups agreed about which frames cast affirmative action in a positive light and which cast it in a negative light. Although minorities had a tendency to frame affirmative action in terms that most people find morally acceptable, Whites had a tendency to frame affirmative action in terms most people find unacceptable. In addition, compared to minorities, Whites were less supportive of affirmative action regardless of how it was framed. LISREL modeling also was employed to test two competing models regarding predictors of the tendency to use frames that one personally finds to be relatively negative versus positive. Consistent with the expectations of social dominance theory and a motivated cognition perspective, the authors found that social dominance orientation (SDO) had significant net direct and indirect effects on one's framing of affirmative action.

  1. Targeted Disruption of Chlamydia trachomatis Invasion by in Trans Expression of Dominant Negative Tarp Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Parrett, Christopher J.; Lenoci, Robert V.; Nguyen, Brenda; Russell, Lauren; Jewett, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis invasion of eukaryotic host cells is facilitated, in part, by the type III secreted effector protein, Tarp. The role of Tarp in chlamydiae entry of host cells is supported by molecular approaches that examined recombinant Tarp or Tarp effectors expressed within heterologous systems. A major limitation in the ability to study the contribution of Tarp to chlamydial invasion of host cells was the prior absence of genetic tools for chlamydiae. Based on our knowledge of Tarp domain structure and function along with the introduction of genetic approaches in C. trachomatis, we hypothesized that Tarp function could be disrupted in vivo by the introduction of dominant negative mutant alleles. We provide evidence that transformed C. trachomatis produced epitope tagged Tarp, which was secreted into the host cell during invasion. We examined the effects of domain specific Tarp mutations on chlamydial invasion and growth and demonstrate that C. trachomatis clones harboring engineered Tarp mutants lacking either the actin binding domain or the phosphorylation domain had reduced levels of invasion into host cells. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for the critical role of Tarp in C. trachomatis pathogenesis and indicate that chlamydial invasion of host cells can be attenuated via the introduction of engineered dominant negative type three effectors. PMID:27602332

  2. Cloning and characterization of a dominant-negative vps1 allele of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Finken-Eigen, M; Müller, S; Köhrer, K

    1997-10-01

    The gene product of the yeast VPS1 gene is a member of a family of high-molecular-weight GTP-binding proteins that are involved in diverse cellular processes. The Vps1 protein (Vps1p) was shown to perform an essential function in the yeast secretory pathway. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a mutant allele of the VPS1 gene, causing a dominant-negative vacuolar protein sorting (vps) defect, as demonstrated by the mislocalization of the vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y (CPY). DNA sequence analysis of the mutant vps1 allele (vps1d-293) revealed a single point mutation, resulting in an amino acid exchange at position 293 from Ala to Asp. The mutation is located downstream of the tripartite GTP-binding motif found in the amino-terminal half of the protein. The observation that expression of wild-type Vps1p partially suppressed the dominant-negative CPY sorting phenotype indicates competition of a non-functional mutant Vps1 protein and a functional wild-type VPS1p for a Vps1p-binding site of an as yet unknown vacuolar protein sorting factor.

  3. A Dominant Negative Zebrafish Ahr2 Partially Protects Developing Zebrafish from Dioxin Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Kevin A.; Prasch, Amy L.; Weina, Kasia M.; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity by 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is thought to be caused by activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). However, our understanding of how AHR activation by TCDD leads to toxic effects is poor. Ideally we would like to manipulate AHR activity in specific tissues and at specific times. One route to this is expressing dominant negative AHRs (dnAHRs). This work describes the construction and characterization of dominant negative forms of the zebrafish Ahr2 in which the C-terminal transactivation domain was either removed, or replaced with the inhibitory domain from the Drosophila engrailed repressor protein. One of these dnAhr2s was selected for expression from the ubiquitously active e2fα promoter in transgenic zebrafish. We found that these transgenic zebrafish expressing dnAhr2 had reduced TCDD induction of the Ahr2 target gene cyp1a, as measured by 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity. Furthermore, the cardiotoxicity produced by TCDD, pericardial edema, heart malformation, and reduced blood flow, were all mitigated in the zebrafish expressing the dnAhr2. These results provide in vivo proof-of-principle results demonstrating the effectiveness of dnAHRs in manipulating AHR activity in vivo, and demonstrating that this approach can be a means for blocking TCDD toxicity. PMID:22194803

  4. Dental enamel structure is altered by expression of dominant negative RhoA in ameloblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Pugach, Megan K; Kuehl, Melissa A; Peng, Li; Bouchard, Jessica; Hwang, Soon Y; Gibson, Carolyn W

    2011-01-01

    Using in vitrotooth germ cultures and analysis by confocal microscopy, ameloblasts treated with sodium fluoride were found to have elevated amounts of filamentous actin. Because this response is reduced by inhibitors of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway, we generated mice that express dominant negative RhoA (RhoA(DN)) in ameloblasts for in vivo analysis. Expression of the EGFP-RhoA(DN) fusion protein was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and teeth were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The 3 strains expressed at either low (TgEGFP-RhoA(DN)-8), intermediate (TgEGFP-RhoA(DN)-2), or high (TgEGFP-RhoA(DN)-13) levels, and the molar teeth from the 3 strains had enamel hypoplasia and surface defects. We conclude that RhoA(DN) expressed in ameloblasts interferes with normal enamel development through the pathway that is induced by sodium fluoride.

  5. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect.

    PubMed

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-04-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1-EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects.

  6. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-01-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1–EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects. PMID:25026904

  7. Reduced striatal dopamine DA D2 receptor function in dominant-negative GSK-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sintes, Raquel; Bortolozzi, Analia; Artigas, Francesc; Lucas, José J

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase with constitutive activity involved in cellular architecture, gene expression, cell proliferation, fate decision and apoptosis, among others. GSK-3 expression is particularly high in brain where it may be involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer׳s disease, bipolar disorder and major depression. A link with schizophrenia is suggested by the antipsychotic drug-induced GSK-3 regulation and by the involvement of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Taking advantage of the previous development of dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice (Tg) showing a selective reduction of GSK-3 activity in forebrain neurons but not in dopaminergic neurons, we explored the relationship between GSK-3 and dopaminergic neurotransmission in vivo. In microdialysis experiments, local quinpirole (DA D2-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced dopamine (DA) release significantly less in Tg mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. However, local SKF-81297 (selective DA D1-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced DA release equally in both control and Tg mice indicating a comparable function of DA D1-R in the direct striato-nigral pathway. Likewise, systemic quinpirole administration - acting preferentially on presynaptic DA D2- autoreceptors to modulate DA release-reduced striatal DA release similarly in both control and Tg mice. Quinpirole reduced locomotor activity and induced c-fos expression in globus pallidus (both striatal DA D2-R-mediated effects) significantly more in WT than in Tg mice. Taking together, the present results show that dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice show reduced DA D2-R-mediated function in striatum and further support a link between dopaminergic neurotransmission and GSK-3 activity.

  8. Use of Dominant-Negative/Substrate Trapping PTP Mutations to Search for PTP Interactors/Substrates.

    PubMed

    Radha, Vegesna

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues is the consequence of coordinated action of tyrosine kinases (TKs), and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Together, they regulate intermolecular interactions, subcellular localization, and activity of a variety of proteins. The level of total protein-associated tyrosine phosphorylation in eukaryotic cells is only a small fraction of the total phosphorylation. PTPs, which have high specific activity compared to tyrosine kinases, play an important role in maintaining the tyrosine phosphorylation state of proteins and regulate signal transduction pathways and cellular responses. PTPs depend on specific invariant residues that enable binding to substrates phosphorylated at tyrosine and aid catalytic activity. Identification of PTP substrates has helped understand their role in distinct intracellular signaling pathways. Because of their high specific activity, the interaction between tyrosine phosphatases and their substrates is often very transient in the cellular context, and therefore identification of physiological substrates has been difficult. Single-site mutations in the enzymes stabilize interaction between the enzyme and its targets and have been used extensively to identify substrates. The mutations are either of the catalytic cysteine (Cys) residue or other invariant residues and have been classified as substrate-trapping mutants (STMs). These mutants often serve as dominant negatives that can inactivate effector functions of a specific PTP within cells. Considering their association with human disorders, inhibiting specific PTPs is important therapeutically. Since the catalytic domains are largely conserved, developing small-molecule inhibitors to a particular enzyme has proven difficult and therefore alternate strategies to block functions of individual enzymes are seriously being investigated. We provide a description of methods that will be useful to design strategies of using dominant-negative and

  9. Transgenic Mice Expressing Dominant Negative Bright Exhibit Defects in B1 B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Jamee C.; Ferrell, Scott; Miner, Cathrine; Oldham, Athenia L.; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Webb, Carol F.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor Bright up-regulates immunoglobulin heavy chain production from select variable region promoters and requires Bright dimerization, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) and the Btk substrate, TFII-I for this activity. Defects in Btk cause X-linked immunodeficiency disease in mice and man. Btk-deficient mice exhibit decreased serum IgM production, B cell developmental blocks, absence of peritoneal B1 cells, and subnormal immune responses against antigens, including phosphorylcholine, which confer protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative (DN) Bright share similarities with Btk-deficient mice, including decreased serum IgM, poor anti-phosphorylcholine responses, and slightly reduced numbers of mature B cells. Although DN Bright mice developed B1 B cells, these were functionally deficient in immunoglobulin secretion. These data suggest a mechanistic explanation for the abnormal responses to phosphorylcholine observed in Btk-deficient mice, and indicate that Bright functions in a subset of Btk-dependent pathways in vivo, particularly those responses dominated by B1 B cells. PMID:18981111

  10. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Repaske, D.R.; Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  11. Cooperative binding of dominant-negative prion protein to kringle domains.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Chongsuk; Prusiner, Stanley B; Legname, Giuseppe

    2003-05-30

    Conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to the pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a major biochemical alteration in the progression of prion disease. This conversion process is thought to require interaction between PrP(C) and an as yet unidentified auxiliary factor, provisionally designated protein X. In searching for protein X, we screened a phage display cDNA expression library constructed from prion-infected neuroblastoma (ScN2a) cells and identified a kringle protein domain using full-length recombinant mouse PrP (recMoPrP(23-231), hereafter recMoPrP) expressing a dominant-negative mutation at codon 218 (recMoPrP(Q218K)). In vitro binding analysis using ELISA verified specific interaction of recMoPrP to kringle domains (K(1+2+3)) with higher binding by recMoPrP(Q218K) than by full-length recMoPrP without the mutation. This interaction was confirmed by competitive binding analysis, in which the addition of either a specific anti-kringle antibody or L-lysine abolished the interaction. Biochemical studies of the interactions between K(1+2+3) and various concentrations of both recMoPrP molecules demonstrated binding in a dose-dependent manner. A Hill plot analysis of the data indicates positive cooperative binding of both recMoPrP(Q218K) and recMoPrP to K(1+2+3) with stronger binding by recMoPrP(Q218K). Using full-length and an N-terminally truncated MoPrP(89-231), we demonstrate that N-terminal sequences enable PrP to bind strongly to K(1+2+3). Further characterization with truncated MoPrP(89-231) refolded in different conformations revealed that both alpha-helical and beta-sheet conformations bind to K(1+2+3). Our data demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of a dominant-negative PrP as well as binding of other PrPs to K(1+2+3). The relevance of such interactions during prion pathogenesis remains to be established.

  12. Dominant-negative effect on adhesion by myelin Po protein truncated in its cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The myelin Po protein is believed to hold myelin together via interactions of both its extracellular and cytoplasmic domains. We have already shown that the extracellular domains of Po can interact in a homophilic manner (Filbin, M.T., F.S. Walsh, B.D. Trapp, J.A. Pizzey, and G.I. Tennekoon. 1990. Nature (Lond.). 344:871-872). In addition, we have shown that for this homophilic adhesion to take place, the cytoplasmic domain of Po must be intact and most likely interacting with the cytoskeleton; Po proteins truncated in their cytoplasmic domains are not adhesive (Wong, M.H., and M.T. Filbin, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:1089-1097). To determine if the presence of these truncated forms of Po could have an effect on the functioning of the full-length Po, we coexpressed both molecules in CHO cells. The adhesiveness of CHO cells expressing both full-length Po and truncated Po was then compared to cells expressing only full-length Po. In these coexpressors, both the full-length and the truncated Po proteins were glycosylated. They reached the surface of the cell in approximately equal amounts as shown by an ELISA and surface labeling, followed by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, the amount of full-length Po at the cell surface was equivalent to other cell lines expressing only full-length Po that we had already shown to be adhesive. Therefore, there should be sufficient levels of full-length Po at the surface of these coexpressors to measure adhesion of Po. However, as assessed by an aggregation assay, the coexpressors were not adhesive. By 60 min they had not formed large aggregates and were indistinguishable from the control transfected cells not expressing Po. In contrast, in the same time, the cells expressing only the full-length Po had formed large aggregates. This indicates that the truncated forms of Po have a dominant-negative effect on the adhesiveness of the full-length Po. Furthermore, from cross-linking studies, full-length Po, when expressed alone but not when

  13. Identification of new dominant-negative mutants of anthrax protective antigen using directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaobing; Feng, Chunfang; Cao, Sha; Guo, Aizhen; Liu, Ziduo

    2012-11-01

    The anthrax toxin is composed of three proteins: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema toxin (EF). The PA moiety carries EF and LF into the cytosol of mammalian cells via a mechanism that depends on the oligomerization of PA and transmembrane pore formation by the PA oligomer. Certain mutants of PA, termed dominant-negative (DN) mutants, can co-oligomerize with wild-type PA and disrupt the translocation ability of the pore. Here, we constructed a PA mutant library by introducing random mutations into domain II of PA and screened three new DN mutants of PA: V377E, T380S, and I432C. All the mutants inhibited the anthrax toxin action against sensitive cells. V377E had the strongest inhibitory effect and was further confirmed to be able to protect mice against a challenge with anthrax lethal toxin. Furthermore, we functionally characterized these mutants. The result showed that these mutations did not impair proteolytic activation or oligomer formation of PA, but impeded the prepore-pore conversion of the oligomer. These DN mutants of PA identified in our study may provide valuable information for elucidating the structure-function relationship of PA and for designing therapeutics for anthrax treatment.

  14. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation.

  15. A novel Fanconi anaemia subtype associated with a dominant-negative mutation in RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Ameziane, Najim; May, Patrick; Haitjema, Anneke; van de Vrugt, Henri J.; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Ristic, Dejan; Williams, Gareth J.; Balk, Jesper; Rockx, Davy; Li, Hong; Rooimans, Martin A.; Oostra, Anneke B.; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Bleijerveld, Onno B.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Joenje, Hans; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David; Wyman, Claire; Balling, Rudi; den Dunnen, Johan; de Winter, Johan P.; Kanaar, Roland; Gelinas, Richard; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disease featuring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linker-induced chromosomal instability in association with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure and a strong predisposition to cancer. A total of 17 FA disease genes have been reported, all of which act in a recessive mode of inheritance. Here we report on a de novo g.41022153G>A; p.Ala293Thr (NM_002875) missense mutation in one allele of the homologous recombination DNA repair gene RAD51 in an FA-like patient. This heterozygous mutation causes a novel FA subtype, ‘FA-R', which appears to be the first subtype of FA caused by a dominant-negative mutation. The patient, who features microcephaly and mental retardation, has reached adulthood without the typical bone marrow failure and paediatric cancers. Together with the recent reports on RAD51-associated congenital mirror movement disorders, our results point to an important role for RAD51-mediated homologous recombination in neurodevelopment, in addition to DNA repair and cancer susceptibility. PMID:26681308

  16. Inhibition of elastase-pulmonary emphysema in dominant-negative MafB transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Aida, Yasuko; Shibata, Yoko; Abe, Shuichi; Inoue, Sumito; Kimura, Tomomi; Igarashi, Akira; Yamauchi, Keiko; Nunomiya, Keiko; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Takako; Sato, Masamichi; Sato-Nishiwaki, Michiko; Nakano, Hiroshi; Sato, Kento; Kubota, Isao

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We previously demonstrated upregulation of the transcription factor MafB in AMs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. The aim of this study was to elucidate the roles of MafB in the development of pulmonary emphysema. Porcine pancreatic elastase was administered to wild-type (WT) and dominant-negative (DN)-MafB transgenic (Tg) mice in which MafB activity was suppressed only in macrophages. We measured the mean linear intercept and conducted cell differential analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, surface marker analysis using flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical staining using antibodies to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-12. Airspace enlargement of the lungs was suppressed significantly in elastase-treated DN-MafB Tg mice compared with treated WT mice. AMs with projected pseudopods were decreased in DN-MafB Tg mice. The number of cells intermediately positive for F4/80 and weakly or intermediately positive for CD11b, which are considered cell subsets of matured AMs, decreased in the BAL of DN-MafB Tg mice. Furthermore, MMP-9 and -12 were significantly downregulated in BAL cells of DN-MafB Tg mice. Because MMPs exacerbate emphysema, MafB may be involved in pulmonary emphysema development through altered maturation of macrophages and MMP expression.

  17. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26260012

  18. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Fibroblasts Over-Expressing Dominant Negative Ku70

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu Huang Yunhong; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response of cells over-expressing dominant negative (DN) Ku70 to single and multiple small radiation doses. Methods and Materials: Clones of fibroblasts over-expressing DNKu70, DNKu70-7, DNKu70-11, and parental Rat-1 cells were irradiated under oxic or hypoxic conditions with single or multiple doses. Cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after irradiation to determine surviving fraction (SF). Results: Oxic DNKu70-7 or -11 cells trypsinized 6 h after irradiation were 1.52 or 1.25 and 1.28 or 1.15 times more sensitive than oxic Rat-1 at SF of 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. Hypoxic DNKu70-7 or -11 cells trypsinized 6 h after irradiation were 1.44 or 1.70 and 1.33 or 1.51 times more sensitive than hypoxic Rat-1 at SF of 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. To the multiple doses, oxic and hypoxic DNKu70-7 or -11 cells were 1.35 or 1.37 and 2.23 or 4.61 times more sensitive than oxic and hypoxic Rat-1, respectively, resulting in very small oxygen enhancement ratios. Namely, enhancement caused by DNKu70 under hypoxia after multiple doses was greater than that under oxic conditions and greater than that after single dose. Conclusions: Over-expression of DNKu70 enhances cells' response to radiation given as a single dose and as multiple small doses. The enhancement after multiple doses was stronger under hypoxic than under oxic conditions. These results encourage the use of DNKu70 fragment in a gene-radiotherapy.

  19. Characterization of a novel, dominant negative KCNJ2 mutation associated with Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marrus, Scott B; Cuculich, Phillip S; Wang, Wei; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2011-01-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome is characterized by periodic paralysis, ventricular ectopy, and dysmorphic features. Approximately 60% of patients exhibit loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ2, which encodes the inwardly rectifying K(+) channel pore forming subunit Kir2.1. Here, we report the identification of a novel KCNJ2 mutation (G211T), resulting in the amino acid substitution D71Y, in a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of Andersen-Tawil syndrome. The functional properties of the mutant subunit were characterized using voltage-clamp experiments on transiently transfected HEK-293 cells and neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes. Whole-cell current recordings of transfected HEK-293 cells demonstrated that the mutant protein Kir2.1-D71Y fails to form functional ion channels when expressed alone, but co-assembles with wild-type Kir2.1 subunits and suppresses wild-type subunit function. Further analysis revealed that current suppression requires at least two mutant subunits per channel. The D71Y mutation does not measurably affect the membrane trafficking of either the mutant or the wild-type subunit or alter the kinetic properties of the currents. Additional experiments revealed that expression of the mutant subunit suppresses native I(K1) in neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes. Simulations predict that the D71Y mutation in human ventricular myocytes will result in a mild prolongation of the action potential and potentially increase cell excitability. These experiments indicate that the Kir2.1-D71Y mutant protein functions as a dominant negative subunit resulting in reduced inwardly rectifying K(+) current amplitudes and altered cellular excitability in patients with Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

  20. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R

    2015-11-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. Expression of a dominant negative PKA mutation in the kidney elicits a diabetes insipidus phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Merle L; Yang, Linghai; Su, Thomas; McKnight, G Stanley

    2015-03-15

    PKA plays a critical role in water excretion through regulation of the production and action of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The AVP prohormone is produced in the hypothalamus, where its transcription is regulated by cAMP. Once released into the circulation, AVP stimulates antidiuresis through activation of vasopressin 2 receptors in renal principal cells. Vasopressin 2 receptor activation increases cAMP and activates PKA, which, in turn, phosphorylates aquaporin (AQP)2, triggering apical membrane accumulation, increased collecting duct permeability, and water reabsorption. We used single-minded homolog 1 (Sim1)-Cre recombinase-mediated expression of a dominant negative PKA regulatory subunit (RIαB) to disrupt kinase activity in vivo and assess the role of PKA in fluid homeostasis. RIαB expression gave rise to marked polydipsia and polyuria; however, neither hypothalamic Avp mRNA expression nor urinary AVP levels were attenuated, indicating a primary physiological effect on the kidney. RIαB mice displayed a marked deficit in urinary concentrating ability and greatly reduced levels of AQP2 and phospho-AQP2. Dehydration induced Aqp2 mRNA in the kidney of both control and RIαB-expressing mice, but AQP2 protein levels were still reduced in RIαB-expressing mutants, and mice were unable to fully concentrate their urine and conserve water. We conclude that partial PKA inhibition in the kidney leads to posttranslational effects that reduce AQP2 protein levels and interfere with apical membrane localization. These findings demonstrate a distinct physiological role for PKA signaling in both short- and long-term regulation of AQP2 and characterize a novel mouse model of diabetes insipidus.

  2. Rapamycin protects against dominant negative-HNF1A-induced apoptosis in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Angela M; Kilbride, Seán M; Bonner, Caroline; Prehn, Jochen H M; Byrne, Maria M

    2011-11-01

    HNF1A-maturity onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) is caused by mutations in Hnf1a gene encoding the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1A). An increased rate of apoptosis has been associated with the decrease in beta-cell mass that is a hallmark of HNF1A-MODY and other forms of diabetes. In a cellular model of HNF1A-MODY, we have recently shown that signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is decreased by the overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of HNF1A (DN-HNF1A). mTOR is a protein kinase which has important roles in cell metabolism and growth, but also in cell survival, where it has been shown to be both protective and detrimental. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity with rapamycin protected INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Rapamycin also prevented DN-HNF1A-induced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular energy sensor which we have previously shown to mediate DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Conversely, activation of mTOR with leucine potentiated DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Gene silencing of raptor (regulatory associated protein of mTOR), a subunit of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), also conferred protection on INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis, confirming that mTORC1 mediates the protective effect. The potential relevance of this effect with regards to the clinical use of rapamycin as an immunosuppressant in diabetics post-transplantation is discussed.

  3. Molecular cloning of ID4, a novel dominant negative helix-loop-helix human gene on chromosome 6p21.3-p22

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliuca, A.; Bartoli, P.C.; Saccone, S.

    1995-05-01

    Transcription factors containing a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif regulate the expression of tissue-specific genes in a number of mammalian and insect systems. DNA-binding activity of the bHLH proteins is dependent upon formation of homo- and/or heterodimers. Dominant negative HLH proteins (Id-related genes) also contain the HLH-dimerization domain but lack the DNA-binding basic domain. Consequently, Id proteins inhibit binding to DNA and transcriptional transactivation by heterodimerization with bHLH proteins. The authors report here the cDNA sequence of a novel human HLH gene (HGMW-approved symbol ID4) that lacks the basic domain. ID4 is differentially expressed in adult organs in four mRNA molecules, which are presumably a result of differential splicing and/or alternative usage of the polyadenylation sites. Transfection experiments indicated that enforced expression of Id-4H protein inhibits the trans-activation of the muscle creatine kinase E-box enhancer by MyoD. Finally, the authors localized the ID4 gene to the chromosome 6p21-p22 region. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Negative Feedback Control of Jasmonate Signaling by an Alternative Splice Variant of JAZ101[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Javier E.; Shyu, Christine; Campos, Marcelo L.; Patel, Lalita C.; Chung, Hoo Sun; Yao, Jian; He, Sheng Yang; Howe, Gregg A.

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) activates gene expression by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressor proteins. A key feature of all JAZ proteins is the highly conserved Jas motif, which mediates both JAZ degradation and JAZ binding to the transcription factor MYC2. Rapid expression of JAZ genes in response to JA is thought to attenuate JA responses, but little is known about the mechanisms by which newly synthesized JAZ proteins exert repression in the presence of the hormone. Here, we show in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that desensitization to JA is mediated by an alternative splice variant (JAZ10.4) of JAZ10 that lacks the Jas motif. Unbiased protein-protein interaction screens identified three related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4) and the corepressor NINJA as JAZ10.4-binding partners. We show that the amino-terminal region of JAZ10.4 contains a cryptic MYC2-binding site that resembles the Jas motif and that the ZIM motif of JAZ10.4 functions as a transferable repressor domain whose activity is associated with the recruitment of NINJA. Functional studies showed that the expression of JAZ10.4 from the native JAZ10 promoter complemented the JA-hypersensitive phenotype of a jaz10 mutant. Moreover, treatment of these complemented lines with JA resulted in the rapid accumulation of JAZ10.4 protein. Our results provide an explanation for how the unique domain architecture of JAZ10.4 links transcription factors to a corepressor complex and suggest how JA-induced transcription and alternative splicing of JAZ10 premessenger RNA creates a regulatory circuit to attenuate JA responses. PMID:23632853

  5. A heterozygous dominant-negative mutation in the coiled-coil domain of STAT1 is the cause of autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masafumi; Ito, Kenta; Tozawa, Yusuke; Morino, Saeko; Horikoshi, Yuho; Takada, Hidetoshi; Abdrabou, Shimaa Said Mohamed Ali; Takezaki, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Ariga, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous dominant-negative mutations of STAT1 are responsible for autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (AD-MSMD). So far, only 7 mutations have been previously described and are localized to 3 domains: the DNA-binding domain, the SH2 domain, and the tail segment. In this study, we demonstrated the first coiled-coil domain (CCD) mutation of c.749G>C, p.G250A (G250A) in STAT1 as a genetic cause of AD-MSMD in a patient with mycobacterial multiple osteomyelitis. This de novo heterozygous mutation was shown to have a dominant-negative effect on the gamma-activated sequence (GAS) transcriptional activity following IFN-γ stimulation, which could be attributable to the abolished phosphorylation of STAT1 from the wild-type (WT) allele. The three-dimensional structure of STAT1 revealed the G250 residue was located distant from a cluster of residues affected by gain-of-function mutations responsible for chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

  6. Effects of eye dominance (left vs. right) and cannabis use on intermanual coordination and negative symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Gorynia, Inge; Schwaiger, Markus; Heinz, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Based on the previous findings, it has been assumed that in schizophrenia patients, eye dominance and cannabis use will affect negative symptoms and intermanual coordination (IMC), an index of interhemispheric communication. But eye dominance, specifically the clinical findings for it, has been neglected in schizophrenia research. We therefore investigated its effects in 52 right-handed (36 right-eyed and 16 left-eyed) and 51 left-handed (35 left-eyed and 16 right-eyed) schizophrenia in-patients without and with drug use. Eye dominance affected IMC in all schizophrenia patients. When comparing right- and left-handers, we found that this result was only significant in the right-handed patients and in the smaller subgroup without drug use. In the right-handers, left eye dominance-like left-handedness-was associated with higher values in IMC and less pronounced manifestation of negative symptoms, right eye dominance was not. Thus, left-eyed right-handers may be more closely related to left-handers than to right-handers. In accordance with the results from the literature, we suggest that these findings are due to better interhemispheric connections and less impairment of white matter structures, especially in right-hemispheric regions. Moreover, cannabis use was related to higher scores in IMC and less pronounced negative symptoms, but only in the right-eyed and not in the left-eyed right-handers or in the left-handers. Hence, differences in eye dominance and handedness may be partially responsible for different results in interhemispheric connections among cannabis users. In conclusion, both eye dominance and use of cannabis should be taken into account when assessing clinical symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

  7. Prognostic impact of alternative splicing-derived hMENA isoforms in resected, node-negative, non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sperduti, Isabella; Iapicca, Pierluigi; Visca, Paolo; Alessandrini, Gabriele; Antoniani, Barbara; Pilotto, Sara; Ludovini, Vienna; Vannucci, Jacopo; Bellezza, Guido; Sidoni, Angelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Radisky, Derek C.; Crinò, Lucio; Cognetti, Francesco; Facciolo, Francesco; Mottolese, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    Risk assessment and treatment choice remain a challenge in early non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Alternative splicing is an emerging source for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools. Here, we investigated the prognostic value of the actin cytoskeleton regulator hMENA and its isoforms, hMENA11a and hMENAΔv6, in early NSCLC. The epithelial hMENA11a isoform was expressed in NSCLC lines expressing E-CADHERIN and was alternatively expressed with hMENAΔv6. Enforced expression of hMENAΔv6 or hMENA11a increased or decreased the invasive ability of A549 cells, respectively. hMENA isoform expression was evaluated in 248 node-negative NSCLC. High pan-hMENA and low hMENA11a were the only independent predictors of shorter disease-free and cancer-specific survival, and low hMENA11a was an independent predictor of shorter overall survival, at multivariate analysis. Patients with low pan-hMENA/high hMENA11a expression fared significantly better (P≤0.0015) than any other subgroup. Such hybrid variable was incorporated with T-size and number of resected lymph nodes into a 3-class-risk stratification model, which strikingly discriminated between different risks of relapse, cancer-related death, and death. The model was externally validated in an independent dataset of 133 patients. Relative expression of hMENA splice isoforms is a powerful prognostic factor in early NSCLC, complementing clinical parameters to accurately predict individual patient risk. PMID:25373410

  8. Differential molecular and behavioural alterations in mouse models of GABRG2 haploinsufficiency versus dominant negative mutations associated with human epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Shen, Wangzhen; Huang, Xuan; Liu, Zhong; Macdonald, Robert L; Kang, Jing-Qiong

    2016-08-01

    Genetic epilepsy is a common disorder with phenotypic variation, but the basis for the variation is unknown. Comparing the molecular pathophysiology of mutations in the same epilepsy gene may provide mechanistic insights into the phenotypic heterogeneity. GABRG2 is an established epilepsy gene, and mutations in it produce epilepsy syndromes with varying severities. The disease phenotype in some cases may be caused by simple loss of subunit function (functional haploinsufficiency), while others may be caused by loss-of-function plus dominant negative suppression and other cellular toxicity. Detailed molecular defects and the corresponding seizures and related comorbidities resulting from haploinsufficiency and dominant negative mutations, however, have not been compared. Here we compared two mouse models of GABRG2 loss-of-function mutations associated with epilepsy with different severities, Gabrg2(+/Q390X) knockin (KI) and Gabrg2(+/-) knockout (KO) mice. Heterozygous Gabrg2(+/Q390X) KI mice are associated with a severe epileptic encephalopathy due to a dominant negative effect of the mutation, while heterozygous Gabrg2(+/-) KO mice are associated with mild absence epilepsy due to simple haploinsufficiency. Unchanged at the transcriptional level, KI mice with severe epilepsy had neuronal accumulation of mutant γ2 subunits, reduced remaining functional wild-type subunits in dendrites and synapses, while KO mice with mild epilepsy had no intracellular accumulation of the mutant subunits and unaffected biogenesis of the remaining wild-type subunits. Consequently, KI mice with dominant negative mutations had much less wild-type receptor expression, more severe seizures and behavioural comorbidities than KO mice. This work provides insights into the pathophysiology of epilepsy syndrome heterogeneity and designing mechanism-based therapies.

  9. High thermal stability of core-shell structures dominated by negative interface energy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Fu; Zhao, Ning; Jin, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Jiang, Qing

    2017-03-29

    Nanoscale core/shell structures are of interest in catalysis due to their superior catalytic properties. Here we investigated the thermal stability of the coherent core-shell structures in a thermodynamic way by considering the impact from the core with the bulk melting point Tm(∞) lower or higher than the shell. When a low-Tm(∞) core is adopted, core-shell melting induced by the melting depression of the core does not occur upon heating because of the superheating, although the melting depression of the core can be triggered ultimately by the preferential melting of the high-Tm(∞) shell for small cores. The superheating of the core is contributed by the negative solid-solid interface energy, while the depression is originated from the positive solid-liquid interface energy. Owing to the presence of the negative interface energy, moreover, the low-Tm(∞)-core structure possesses a low difference in thermal expansion between the core and the shell, high activation energy of outward atomic diffusion from the core to shell, and low heat capacity. This result is beneficial for the core-shell structure design for its application in catalysis.

  10. [Social representation of pregnancy in adolescence: appraisal of dominant attitudes and others of negative impact].

    PubMed

    Dufort, Francine; Boucher, Kathleen; Guilbert, Edith; Saint-Laurent, Louise; Fortin-Pellerin, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to gather information on the social representations of teenage pregnancy among adolescents, aged between 15 and 17. Eighteen focus groups were conducted among 150 boys and girls. The data were subjected to a qualitative content analysis. Results show that youths did not form homogeneous groups. The points of view expressed gave rise to 4 dimensions (emotive, reflexive, psychobiological, economic-social) and 4 positions (negative, positive, ambivalent and dynamic). From these dimensions and positions, 4 representations of teenage pregnancy were identified: pregnancy as a problem, pregnancy as a project, pregnancy as a source of tension, and pregnancy as a source of power. This study illustrates the importance of educative strategies such as going beyond alarmist preventive messages, opening dialogue with and between youngsters, and promoting social support and mutual aid.

  11. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Marie; Visser, Allerdien; Buabeng, Kwadwo M L; Poutsma, Ankie; van der Schors, Roel C; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively affect this trophoblast differentiation either by inducing proliferation rate or by causing cell cycle exit as shown by a decrease in both proliferation and invasion. As LincRNAs predominantly function through interactions with proteins, we identified the directly interacting proteins using chromatin isolation by RNA purification followed by protein mass spectrometry. We found 22 proteins predominantly clustering in two functional networks, i.e. RNA splicing and the ribosome. YBX1, PCBP1, PCBP2, RPS6 and RPL7 were validated, and binding to these proteins was influenced by the HELLP mutations carried. Finally, we show that the LINC-HELLP transcript levels are significantly upregulated in plasma of women in their first trimester of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women, whereas this upregulation seems absent in a pilot set of patients later developing pregnancy complications, indicative of its functional significance in vivo.

  12. Identification of positive and negative splicing regulatory elements within the terminal tat-rev exon of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Staffa, A; Cochrane, A

    1995-01-01

    The requirement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to generate numerous proteins from a single primary transcript is met largely by the use of suboptimal splicing to generate over 30 mRNAs. To ensure that appropriate quantities of each protein are produced, there must be a signal(s) that controls the efficiency with which any particular splice site in the RNA is used. To identify this control element(s) and to understand how it operates to generate the splicing pattern observed, we have initially focused on the control of splicing of the tat-rev intron, which spans the majority of the env open reading frame. Previous analysis indicated that a suboptimal branchpoint and polypyridimine tract in this intron contribute to its suboptimal splicing (A. Staffa and A. Cochrane, J. Virol. 68:3071-3079, 1994). In this report, we identify two additional elements within the 3'-terminal exon, an exon-splicing enhancer (ESE) and an exon splicing silencer (ESS), that modulate the overall efficiency with which the 3' tat-rev splice site is utilized. Both elements are capable of functioning independently of one another. Furthermore, while both the ESE and ESS can function in a heterologous context, the function of the ESS is extremely sensitive to the sequence context into which it is placed. In conclusion, it would appear that the presence of a suboptimal branchpoint and a polypyrimidine tract as well as the ESE and ESS operate together to yield the balanced splicing of the tat-rev intron observed in vivo. PMID:7623851

  13. RBFOX1 Cooperates with MBNL1 to Control Splicing in Muscle, Including Events Altered in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Klinck, Roscoe; Fourrier, Angélique; Thibault, Philippe; Toutant, Johanne; Durand, Mathieu; Lapointe, Elvy; Caillet-Boudin, Marie-Laure; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève; Meola, Giovanni; Furling, Denis; Puymirat, Jack; Chabot, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of identifying splicing alterations in myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) tissues that may yield insights into targets or mechanisms, we have surveyed mis-splicing events in three systems using a RT-PCR screening and validation platform. First, a transgenic mouse model expressing CUG-repeats identified splicing alterations shared with other mouse models of DM1. Second, using cell cultures from human embryonic muscle, we noted that DM1-associated splicing alterations were significantly enriched in cytoskeleton (e.g. SORBS1, TACC2, TTN, ACTN1 and DMD) and channel (e.g. KCND3 and TRPM4) genes. Third, of the splicing alterations occurring in adult DM1 tissues, one produced a dominant negative variant of the splicing regulator RBFOX1. Notably, half of the splicing events controlled by MBNL1 were co-regulated by RBFOX1, and several events in this category were mis-spliced in DM1 tissues. Our results suggest that reduced RBFOX1 activity in DM1 tissues may amplify several of the splicing alterations caused by the deficiency in MBNL1. PMID:25211016

  14. An ABCA1 truncation shows no dominant negative effect in a familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia pedigree with three ABCA1 mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrenson, Brie; Suetani, Rachel J.; Bickley, Vivienne M.; George, Peter M.; Williams, Michael J.A.; Scott, Russell S.; McCormick, Sally P.A.

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Characterisation of an ABCA1 truncation mutant, C978fsX988, in a pedigree with three ABCA1 mutations. {yields} Functional analysis of C978fsX988 in patient fibroblasts and HEK 293 cells shows no cholesterol efflux function. {yields} Allele-specific quantification shows C978fsX988 not expressed at mRNA level in fibroblasts. {yields} Unlike other ABCA1 truncations, C978fsX988 mutant shows no dominant negative effect at mRNA or protein level. -- Abstract: The ATP binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) A1 is a key determinant of circulating high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Mutations in ABCA1 are a major genetic contributor to low HDL-C levels within the general population. Following the finding of three different ABCA1 mutations, p.C978fsX988, p.T1512M and p.N1800H in a subject with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, we aimed to establish whether the p.C978fsX988 truncation exerted a dominant negative effect on the full-length ABCA1 alleles within family members as has been reported for other ABCA1 truncations. Characterisation of the p.C978fsX988 mutant in transfected HEK 293 cells showed it to be expressed as a GFP fusion protein but lacking in cholesterol efflux function. This was in keeping with results from cholesterol efflux assays in the fibroblasts of p.C978fsX988 carriers which also showed impaired efflux. Allele- specific quantification of p.C978fsX988 mRNA and analysis of ABCA1 protein levels in the fibroblasts of p.C978fsX988 heterozygotes showed negligible levels of mRNA and protein expression. There was no evidence of a dominant negative effect on wildtype or p.N1800H protein levels. We conclude that in the case of the p.C978fsX988 truncated mutant a lack of expression precludes it from having a dominant negative effect.

  15. Expanding the prion concept to cancer biology: dominant-negative effect of aggregates of mutant p53 tumour suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jerson L.; Rangel, Luciana P.; Costa, Danielly C. F.; Cordeiro, Yraima; De Moura Gallo, Claudia V.

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a key protein that participates in cell-cycle control, and its malfunction can lead to cancer. This tumour suppressor protein has three main domains; the N-terminal transactivation domain, the CTD (C-terminal domain) and the core domain (p53C) that constitutes the sequence-specific DBD (DNA-binding region). Most p53 mutations related to cancer development are found in the DBD. Aggregation of p53 into amyloid oligomers and fibrils has been shown. Moreover, amyloid aggregates of both the mutant and WT (wild-type) forms of p53 were detected in tumour tissues. We propose that if p53 aggregation occurred, it would be a crucial aspect of cancer development, as p53 would lose its WT functions in an aggregated state. Mutant p53 can also exert a dominant-negative regulatory effect on WT p53. Herein, we discuss the dominant-negative effect in light of p53 aggregation and the fact that amyloid-like mutant p53 can convert WT p53 into more aggregated species, leading into gain of function in addition to the loss of tumour suppressor function. In summary, the results obtained in the last decade indicate that cancer may have characteristics in common with amyloidogenic and prion diseases. PMID:24003888

  16. Non dominant-negative KCNJ2 gene mutations leading to Andersen-Tawil syndrome with an isolated cardiac phenotype.

    PubMed

    Limberg, Maren M; Zumhagen, Sven; Netter, Michael F; Coffey, Alison J; Grace, Andrew; Rogers, Jane; Böckelmann, Doris; Rinné, Susanne; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Decher, Niels; Schulze-Bahr, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by dysmorphic features, periodic paralyses and abnormal ventricular repolarization. After genotyping a large set of patients with congenital long-QT syndrome, we identified two novel, heterozygous KCNJ2 mutations (p.N318S, p.W322C) located in the C-terminus of the Kir2.1 subunit. These mutations have a different localization than classical ATS mutations which are mostly located at a potential interaction face with the slide helix or at the interface between the C-termini. Mutation carriers were without the key features of ATS, causing an isolated cardiac phenotype. While the N318S mutants regularly reached the plasma membrane, W322C mutants primarily resided in late endosomes. Co-expression of N318S or W322C with wild-type Kir2.1 reduced current amplitudes only by 20-25 %. This mild loss-of-function for the heteromeric channels resulted from defective channel trafficking (W322C) or gating (N318S). Strikingly, and in contrast to the majority of ATS mutations, neither mutant caused a dominant-negative suppression of wild-type Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 currents. Thus, a mild reduction of native Kir2.x currents by non dominant-negative mutants may cause ATS with an isolated cardiac phenotype.

  17. Dominant-negative mutants of a yeast G-protein beta subunit identify two functional regions involved in pheromone signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Hougan, L; Thomas, D Y; Whiteway, M

    1992-01-01

    The STE4 gene, which encodes the beta subunit of the mating response G-protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was subjected to a saturation mutagenesis using 'doped' oligodeoxynucleotides. We employed a genetic screen to select dominant-negative STE4 mutants, which when overexpressed from the GAL1 promoter, interfered with the signalling function of the wild type protein. The identified inhibitory amino acid alterations define two small regions that are crucially involved in transmitting the mating signal from G beta to downstream components of the signalling pathway. These results underline the positive signalling role of yeast G beta and assign for the first time the positive signalling function of a G-protein beta subunit to specific structural features. Images PMID:1464310

  18. Targeted point mutations of p53 lead to dominant-negative inhibition of wild-type p53 function.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annemieke; Flores, Elsa R; Miranda, Barbara; Hsieh, Harn-Mei; van Oostrom, Conny Th M; Sage, Julien; Jacks, Tyler

    2002-03-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers, and germ-line p53 mutations cause a familial predisposition for cancer. Germ-line or sporadic p53 mutations are usually missense and typically affect the central DNA-binding domain of the protein. Because p53 functions as a tetrameric transcription factor, mutant p53 is thought to inhibit the function of wild-type p53 protein. Here, we studied the possible dominant-negative inhibition of wild-type p53 protein by two different, frequently occurring point mutations. The R270H and P275S mutations were targeted into the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells to allow the analysis of the effects of the mutant proteins expressed in normal cells at single-copy levels. In embryonic stem cells, the presence of a heterozygous point-mutated allele resulted in delayed transcriptional activation of several p53 downstream target genes on exposure to gamma irradiation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was severely affected in the mutant embryonic stem cells compared with wild-type cells. Heterozygous mutant thymocytes had a severe defect in p53-dependent apoptotic pathways after treatment with gamma irradiation or doxorubicin, whereas p53-independent apoptotic pathways were intact. Together these data demonstrate that physiological expression of point-mutated p53 can strongly limit overall cellular p53 function, supporting the dominant-negative action of such mutants. Also, cells heterozygous for such mutations may be compromised in terms of tumor suppression and response to chemotherapeutic agents.

  19. A Restricted Repertoire of De Novo Mutations in ITPR1 Cause Gillespie Syndrome with Evidence for Dominant-Negative Effect

    PubMed Central

    McEntagart, Meriel; Williamson, Kathleen A.; Rainger, Jacqueline K.; Wheeler, Ann; Seawright, Anne; De Baere, Elfride; Verdin, Hannah; Bergendahl, L. Therese; Quigley, Alan; Rainger, Joe; Dixit, Abhijit; Sarkar, Ajoy; López Laso, Eduardo; Sanchez-Carpintero, Rocio; Barrio, Jesus; Bitoun, Pierre; Prescott, Trine; Riise, Ruth; McKee, Shane; Cook, Jackie; McKie, Lisa; Ceulemans, Berten; Meire, Françoise; Temple, I. Karen; Prieur, Fabienne; Williams, Jonathan; Clouston, Penny; Németh, Andrea H.; Banka, Siddharth; Bengani, Hemant; Handley, Mark; Freyer, Elisabeth; Ross, Allyson; van Heyningen, Veronica; Marsh, Joseph A.; Elmslie, Frances; FitzPatrick, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Gillespie syndrome (GS) is characterized by bilateral iris hypoplasia, congenital hypotonia, non-progressive ataxia, and progressive cerebellar atrophy. Trio-based exome sequencing identified de novo mutations in ITPR1 in three unrelated individuals with GS recruited to the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study. Whole-exome or targeted sequence analysis identified plausible disease-causing ITPR1 mutations in 10/10 additional GS-affected individuals. These ultra-rare protein-altering variants affected only three residues in ITPR1: Glu2094 missense (one de novo, one co-segregating), Gly2539 missense (five de novo, one inheritance uncertain), and Lys2596 in-frame deletion (four de novo). No clinical or radiological differences were evident between individuals with different mutations. ITPR1 encodes an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-responsive calcium channel. The homo-tetrameric structure has been solved by cryoelectron microscopy. Using estimations of the degree of structural change induced by known recessive- and dominant-negative mutations in other disease-associated multimeric channels, we developed a generalizable computational approach to indicate the likely mutational mechanism. This analysis supports a dominant-negative mechanism for GS variants in ITPR1. In GS-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), the proportion of ITPR1-positive cells using immunofluorescence was significantly higher in mutant than control LCLs, consistent with an abnormality of nuclear calcium signaling feedback control. Super-resolution imaging supports the existence of an ITPR1-lined nucleoplasmic reticulum. Mice with Itpr1 heterozygous null mutations showed no major iris defects. Purkinje cells of the cerebellum appear to be the most sensitive to impaired ITPR1 function in humans. Iris hypoplasia is likely to result from either complete loss of ITPR1 activity or structure-specific disruption of multimeric interactions. PMID:27108798

  20. Expression of a mutant form of cellulose synthase AtCesA7 causes dominant negative effect on cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Morrison, W Herbert; Freshour, Glenn D; Hahn, Michael G; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2003-06-01

    Cellulose synthase catalytic subunits (CesAs) have been implicated in catalyzing the biosynthesis of cellulose, the major component of plant cell walls. Interactions between CesA subunits are thought to be required for normal cellulose synthesis, which suggests that incorporation of defective CesA subunits into cellulose synthase complex could potentially cause a dominant effect on cellulose synthesis. However, all CesA mutants so far reported have been shown to be recessive in terms of cellulose synthesis. In the course of studying the molecular mechanisms regulating secondary wall formation in fibers, we have found that a mutant allele of AtCesA7 gene in the fra5 (fragile fiber 5) mutant causes a semidominant phenotype in the reduction of fiber cell wall thickness and cellulose content. The fra5 missense mutation occurred in a conserved amino acid located in the second cytoplasmic domain of AtCesA7. Overexpression of the fra5 mutant cDNA in wild-type plants not only reduced secondary wall thickness and cellulose content but also decreased primary wall thickness and cell elongation. In contrast, overexpression of the fra6 mutant form of AtCesA8 did not cause any reduction in cell wall thickness and cellulose content. These results suggest that the fra5 mutant protein may interfere with the function of endogenous wild-type CesA proteins, thus resulting in a dominant negative effect on cellulose biosynthesis.

  1. Dilated cardiomyopathy mutations in δ-sarcoglycan exert a dominant-negative effect on cardiac myocyte mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew D; Witcher, Marc; Gopal, Anoop; Michele, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    Delta-sarcoglycan is a component of the sarcoglycan subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex located at the plasma membrane of muscle cells. While recessive mutations in δ-sarcoglycan cause limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F, dominant mutations in δ-sarcoglycan have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The purpose of this study was to investigate functional cellular defects present in adult cardiac myocytes expressing mutant δ-sarcoglycans harboring the dominant inherited DCM mutations R71T or R97Q. This study demonstrates that DCM mutant δ-sarcoglycans can be stably expressed in adult rat cardiac myocytes and traffic similarly to wild-type δ-sarcoglycan to the plasma membrane, without perturbing assembly of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. However, expression of DCM mutant δ-sarcoglycan in adult rat cardiac myocytes is sufficient to alter cardiac myocyte plasma membrane stability in the presence of mechanical strain. Upon cyclical cell stretching, cardiac myocytes expressing mutant δ-sarcoglycan R97Q or R71T have increased cell-impermeant dye uptake and undergo contractures at greater frequencies than myocytes expressing normal δ-sarcoglycan. Additionally, the R71T mutation creates an ectopic N-linked glycosylation site that results in aberrant glycosylation of the extracellular domain of δ-sarcoglycan. Therefore, appropriate glycosylation of δ-sarcoglycan may also be necessary for proper δ-sarcoglycan function and overall dystrophin-glycoprotein complex function. These studies demonstrate that DCM mutations in δ-sarcoglycan can exert a dominant negative effect on dystrophin-glycoprotein complex function leading to myocardial mechanical instability that may underlie the pathogenesis of δ-sarcoglycan-associated DCM.

  2. Isolation and characterization of alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene, Sigmar1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ling; Pasternak, David A.; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Lu, Zhigang; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2017-01-01

    The sigma1 receptor acts as a chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum, associates with multiple proteins in various cellular systems, and involves in a number of diseases, such as addiction, pain, cancer and psychiatric disorders. The sigma1 receptor is encoded by the single copy SIGMAR1 gene. The current study identifies five alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene using a polymerase chain reaction cloning approach. All the splice variants are generated by exon skipping or alternative 3’ or 5’ splicing, producing the truncated sigma1 receptor. Similar alternative splicing has been observed in the human SIGMAR1 gene based on the molecular cloning or genome sequence prediction, suggesting conservation of alternative splicing of SIGMAR1 gene. Using quantitative polymerase chain reactions, we demonstrate differential expression of several splice variants in mouse tissues and brain regions. When expressed in HEK293 cells, all the splice variants fail to bind sigma ligands, implicating that each truncated region in these splice variants is important for ligand binding. However, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) study in HEK293 cells co-transfected with tagged constructs reveals that all the splice variants maintain their ability to physically associate with a mu opioid receptor (mMOR-1), providing useful information to correlate the motifs/sequences necessary for their physical association. Furthermore, a competition Co-IP study showed that all the variants can disrupt in a dose-dependent manner the dimerization of the original sigma1 receptor with mMOR-1, suggesting a potential dominant negative function and providing significant insights into their function. PMID:28350844

  3. Cord blood natural killer cells expressing a dominant negative TGF-β receptor: Implications for adoptive immunotherapy for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yvon, Eric S; Burga, Rachel; Powell, Allison; Cruz, Conrad R; Fernandes, Rohan; Barese, Cecilia; Nguyen, Tuongvan; Abdel-Baki, Mohamed S; Bollard, Catherine M

    2017-03-01

    Cord blood (CB) natural killer (NK) cells are promising effector cells for tumor immunotherapy but are currently limited by immune-suppressive cytokines in the tumor microenvironment, such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β). We observed that TGF-β inhibits expression of activating receptors such as NKG2D and DNAM1 and decreases killing activity against glioblastoma tumor cells through inhibition of perforin secretion. To overcome the detrimental effects of TGF-β, we engrafted a dominant negative TGF-β receptor II (DNRII) on CB-derived NK cells by retroviral transduction and evaluated their ability to kill glioblastoma cells in the presence of TGF-β. After manufacture using Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant methodologies and transduction with DNRII, CB-derived DNRII-transduced NK cells expanded to clinically relevant numbers and retained both their killing ability and their secretion of interferon-γ upon activation. More important, these cells maintained both perforin expression and NKG2D/DNMA1 expression in the presence of TGF-β allowing for recognition and killing of glioblastoma tumor cells. Hence, NK cells expressing a DNRII should have a functional advantage over unmodified NK cells in the presence of TGF-β-secreting tumors and may be an important therapeutic approach for patients with cancer.

  4. A novel de novo dominant negative mutation in DNM1L impairs mitochondrial fission and presents as childhood epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Fahrner, Jill A; Liu, Raymond; Perry, Michael Scott; Klein, Jessica; Chan, David C

    2016-08-01

    DNM1L encodes dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1/DLP1), a key component of the mitochondrial fission machinery that is essential for proper functioning of the mammalian brain. Previously reported probands with de novo missense mutations in DNM1L presented in the first year of life with severe encephalopathy and refractory epilepsy, with several dying within the first several weeks after birth. In contrast, we report identical novel missense mutations in DNM1L in two unrelated probands who experienced normal development for several years before presenting with refractory focal status epilepticus and subsequent rapid neurological decline. We expand the phenotype of DNM1L-related mitochondrial fission defects, reveal common unique clinical characteristics and imaging findings, and compare the cellular impact of this novel mutation to the previously reported A395D lethal variant. We demonstrate that our R403C mutation, which resides in the assembly region of DRP1, acts by a dominant-negative mechanism and reduces oligomerization, mitochondrial fission activity, and mitochondrial recruitment of DRP1, but to a lesser extent compared to the A395D mutation. In contrast to the initial report of neonatal lethality resulting from DNM1L mutation and DRP1 dysfunction, our results show that milder DRP1 impairment is compatible with normal early development and subsequently results in a distinct set of neurological findings. In addition, we identify a common pathogenic mechanism whereby DNM1L mutations impair mitochondrial fission. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Regression/Eradication of gliomas in mice by a systemically-deliverable ATF5 dominant-negative peptide

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Charles C.; Arias, Angelo D.; Wong, Lynn S. Nakayama; Lamé, Michael W.; Sidorov, Maxim; Cayanan, Geraldine; Rowland, Douglas J.; Fung, Jennifer; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Siegelin, Markus D.; Greene, Lloyd A.; Angelastro, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas have poor prognosis and urgently require new therapies. Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) is highly expressed in gliomas, and interference with its expression/function precipitates targeted glioma cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. We designed a novel deliverable truncated-dominant-negative (d/n) form of ATF5 fused to a cell-penetrating domain (Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP) that can be intraperitoneally/subcutaneously administered to mice harboring malignant gliomas generated; (1) by PDGF-B/sh-p53 retroviral transformation of endogenous neural progenitor cells; and (2) by human U87-MG xenografts. In vitro Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP entered into glioma cells and triggered massive apoptosis. In vivo, subcutaneously-administered Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP passed the blood brain barrier, entered normal brain and tumor cells, and then caused rapid selective tumor cell death. MRI verified elimination of retrovirus-induced gliomas within 8-21 days. Histopathology revealed growth-suppression of intracerebral human U87-MG cells xenografts. For endogenous PDGF-B gliomas, there was no recurrence or mortality at 6-12 months versus 66% mortality in controls at 6 months. Necropsy and liver-kidney blood enzyme analysis revealed no adverse effects on brain or other tissues. Our findings thus identify Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP as a potential therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:26863637

  6. Heterozygous PINK1 p.G411S increases risk of Parkinson's disease via a dominant-negative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Andreas; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Caulfield, Thomas R; Hudec, Roman; Ando, Maya; Truban, Dominika; Hou, Xu; Ogaki, Kotaro; Heckman, Michael G; James, Elle D; Swanberg, Maria; Jimenez-Ferrer, Itzia; Hansson, Oskar; Opala, Grzegorz; Siuda, Joanna; Boczarska-Jedynak, Magdalena; Friedman, Andrzej; Koziorowski, Dariusz; Aasly, Jan O; Lynch, Timothy; Mellick, George D; Mohan, Megha; Silburn, Peter A; Sanotsky, Yanosh; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Farrer, Matthew J; Chen, Li; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2017-01-01

    by a partial dominant-negative function phenotype.

  7. Identification of dominant negative human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vif mutants that interfere with the functional inactivation of APOBEC3G by virus-encoded Vif.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert C; Khan, Mohammad A; Kao, Sandra; Goila-Gaur, Ritu; Miyagi, Eri; Strebel, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a host cytidine deaminase that serves as a potent intrinsic inhibitor of retroviral replication. A3G is packaged into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions and deaminates deoxycytidine to deoxyuridine on nascent minus-strand retroviral cDNA, leading to hyper-deoxyguanine-to-deoxyadenine mutations on positive-strand cDNA and inhibition of viral replication. The antiviral activity of A3G is suppressed by Vif, a lentiviral accessory protein that prevents encapsidation of A3G. In this study, we identified dominant negative mutants of Vif that interfered with the ability of wild-type Vif to inhibit the encapsidation and antiviral activity of A3G. These mutants were nonfunctional due to mutations in the highly conserved HCCH and/or SOCS box motifs, which are required for assembly of a functional Cul5-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Similarly, mutation or deletion of a PPLP motif, which was previously reported to be important for Vif dimerization, induced a dominant negative phenotype. Expression of dominant negative Vif counteracted the Vif-induced reduction of intracellular A3G levels, presumably by preventing Vif-induced A3G degradation. Consequently, dominant negative Vif interfered with wild-type Vif's ability to exclude A3G from viral particles and reduced viral infectivity despite the presence of wild-type Vif. The identification of dominant negative mutants of Vif presents exciting possibilities for the design of novel antiviral strategies.

  8. An Engineered TGF-β Monomer that Functions as a Dominant Negative to Block TGF-β Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Barron, Lindsey; Hinck, Cynthia S; Petrunak, Elyse M; Cano, Kristin E; Thangirala, Avinash; Iskra, Brian; Brothers, Molly; Vonberg, Machell; Leal, Belinda; Richter, Blair; Kodali, Ravindra; Taylor, Alex B; Du, Shoucheng; Barnes, Christopher O; Sulea, Traian; Calero, Guillermo; Hart, P John; Hart, Matthew J; Demeler, Borries; Hinck, Andrew P

    2017-02-22

    The transforming growth factor beta isoforms, TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3 are small secreted homodimeric signaling proteins with essential roles in regulating the adaptive immune system and maintaining the extracellular matrix. However, dysregulation of the TGF-β pathway is responsible for promoting the progression of several human diseases, including cancer and fibrosis. In spite of the known importance of TGF-βs in promoting disease progression, no inhibitors have been approved for use in humans. Herein, we describe an engineered TGF-β monomer, lacking the heel helix, a structural motif essential for binding the TGF-β type I receptor, TβRI, but dispensible for binding the other receptor required for TGF-β signaling, the TGF-β type II receptor, TβRII, as an alternative therapeutic modality for blocking TGF-β signaling in humans. As shown through binding studies and crystallography, the engineered monomer retained the same overall structure of native TGF-β monomers and bound TβRII in an identical manner. Cell-based luciferase assays showed that the engineered monomer functioned as a dominant negative to inhibit TGF-β signaling with a Ki of 20 - 70 nM. Investigation of the mechanism showed that the high affinity of the engineered monomer for TβRII, coupled with its reduced ability to non-covalently dimerize and its inability to bind and recruit TβRI, enabled it to bind endogenous TβRII, but prevented it from binding and recruiting TβRI to form a signaling complex. Such engineered monomers provide a new avenue to probe and manipulate TGF-β signaling, and may inform similar modifications of other TGF-β family members.

  9. A Trafficking-Deficient Mutant of KCC3 Reveals Dominant-Negative Effects on K–Cl Cotransport Function

    PubMed Central

    Delpire, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The K–Cl cotransporter (KCC) functions in maintaining chloride and volume homeostasis in a variety of cells. In the process of cloning the mouse KCC3 cDNA, we came across a cloning mutation (E289G) that rendered the cotransporter inactive in functional assays in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Through biochemical studies, we demonstrate that the mutant E289G cotransporter is glycosylation-deficient, does not move beyond the endoplasmic reticulum or the early Golgi, and thus fails to reach the plasma membrane. We establish through co-immunoprecipitation experiments that both wild-type and mutant KCC3 with KCC2 results in the formation of hetero-dimers. We further demonstrate that formation of these hetero-dimers prevents the proper trafficking of the cotransporter to the plasma membrane, resulting in a significant decrease in cotransporter function. This effect is due to interaction between the K–Cl cotransporter isoforms, as this was not observed when KCC3-E289G was co-expressed with NKCC1. Our studies also reveal that the glutamic acid residue is essential to K–Cl cotransporter function, as the corresponding mutation in KCC2 also leads to an absence of function. Interestingly, mutation of this conserved glutamic acid residue in the Na+-dependent cation-chloride cotransporters had no effect on NKCC1 function in isosmotic conditions, but diminished cotransporter activity under hypertonicity. Together, our data show that the glutamic acid residue (E289) is essential for proper trafficking and function of KCCs and that expression of a non-functional but full-length K–Cl cotransporter might results in dominant-negative effects on other K–Cl cotransporters. PMID:23593405

  10. Effect of selective expression of dominant-negative PPARγ in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons on the control of energy balance.

    PubMed

    Stump, Madeliene; Guo, Deng-Fu; Lu, Ko-Ting; Mukohda, Masashi; Liu, Xuebo; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipogenesis, was recently shown to affect energy homeostasis through its actions in the brain. Deletion of PPARγ in mouse brain, and specifically in the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, results in resistance to diet-induced obesity. To study the mechanisms by which PPARγ in POMC neurons controls energy balance, we constructed a Cre-recombinase-dependent conditionally activatable transgene expressing either wild-type (WT) or dominant-negative (P467L) PPARγ and the tdTomato reporter. Inducible expression of both forms of PPARγ was validated in cells in culture, in liver of mice infected with an adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase (AdCre), and in the brain of mice expressing Cre-recombinase either in all neurons (NES(Cre)/PPARγ-P467L) or selectively in POMC neurons (POMC(Cre)/PPARγ-P467L). Whereas POMC(Cre)/PPARγ-P467L mice exhibited a normal pattern of weight gain when fed 60% high-fat diet, they exhibited increased weight gain and fat mass accumulation in response to a 10% fat isocaloric-matched control diet. POMC(Cre)/PPARγ-P467L mice were leptin sensitive on control diet but became leptin resistant when fed 60% high-fat diet. There was no difference in body weight between POMC(Cre)/PPARγ-WT mice and controls in response to 60% high-fat diet. However, POMC(Cre)/PPARγ-WT, but not POMC(Cre)/PPARγ-P467L, mice increased body weight in response to rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist. These observations support the concept that alterations in PPARγ-driven mechanisms in POMC neurons can play a role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis under certain dietary conditions.

  11. Dominant negative mutation in cell surface beta 1,4- galactosyltransferase inhibits cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In addition to its traditional location within the Golgi complex, beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) is also present on the cell surface, where it is thought to function as a cell adhesion molecule by binding to extracellular oligosaccharide ligands. Recent studies suggest that cells contain two forms of GalTase with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The longer form of GalTase contains a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic extension and is preferentially targeted to the plasma membrane, relative to the shorter GalTase protein that is confined primarily to the Golgi compartment. In this study, we created a dominant negative mutation that interferes with the function of cell surface GalTase by transfecting into cells cDNAs encoding truncated versions of the long form of GalTase containing the complete cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains, but devoid of the catalytic domain. In both F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, overexpressing the truncated long GalTase (TLGT) protein displaced the endogenous cell surface GalTase from its association with the cytoskeleton, resulting in a loss of intercellular adhesion and cell spreading specifically on matrices that use GalTase as a cell surface receptor. In contrast, overexpressing the analogous truncated short GalTase (TSGT) protein did not affect cell morphology or GalTase activity. In control assays, inducing the TLGT protein had no effect on cell interactions with fibronectin (which is independent of GalTase), or on the cytoskeleton attachment of another matrix receptor (beta 1 integrin), or on overall glycoprotein synthesis, thus eliminating nonspecific effects of the TLGT protein on cellular adhesion and metabolism. These results represent the first molecular manipulation of cell surface GalTase expression and confirm its function as a cell adhesion molecule. These studies further suggest that the cytoskeleton contains a defined, saturable number of binding sites for GalTase, which enables it to function as

  12. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Christopher R; Emmett, Warren; Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-05-21

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from precursor messenger RNA transcripts. However, some long Drosophila melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, known as a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis have not been examined. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of an 'RS-exon' that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform owing to competition with a reconstituted 5' splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic promoters or exons that fail to reconstitute an efficient 5' splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion can decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling cryptic elements with inclusion of RS-exons.

  13. Use of dominant-negative HrpA mutants to dissect Hrp pilus assembly and type III secretion in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Hoon; Kolade, Olatomirin O; Nomura, Kinya; Arvidson, Dennis N; He, Sheng Yang

    2005-06-03

    The Hrp pilus plays an essential role in the long-distance type III translocation of effector proteins from bacteria into plant cells. HrpA is the structural subunit of the Hrp pilus in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Little is known about the molecular features in the HrpA protein for pilus assembly or for transporting effector proteins. From previous collections of nonfunctional HrpA derivatives that carry random pentapeptide insertions or single amino acid mutations, we identified several dominant-negative mutants that blocked the ability of wild-type Pst DC3000 to elicit host responses. The dominant-negative phenotype was correlated with the disappearance of the Hrp pilus in culture and inhibition of wild-type HrpA protein self-assembly in vitro. Dominant-negative HrpA mutants can be grouped into two functional classes: one class exerted a strong dominant-negative effect on the secretion of effector proteins AvrPto and HopPtoM in culture, and the other did not. The two classes of mutant HrpA proteins carry pentapeptide insertions in discrete regions, which are interrupted by insertions without a dominant-negative effect. These results enable prediction of possible subunit-subunit interaction sites in the assembly of the Hrp pilus and suggest the usefulness of dominant-negative mutants in dissection of the role of the wild-type HrpA protein in various stages of type III translocation: protein exit across the bacterial cell wall, the assembly and/or stabilization of the Hrp pilus in the extracellular space, and Hrp pilus-mediated long-distance transport beyond the bacterial cell wall.

  14. Understanding splicing regulation through RNA splicing maps.

    PubMed

    Witten, Joshua T; Ule, Jernej

    2011-03-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process that greatly increases the proteome diversity and plays an important role in cellular differentiation and disease. Interactions between RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and pre-mRNA are the principle regulator of splicing decisions. Findings from recent genome-wide studies of protein-RNA interactions have been combined with assays of the global effects of RBPs on splicing to create RNA splicing maps. These maps integrate information from all pre-mRNAs regulated by single RBPs to identify the global positioning principles guiding splicing regulation. Recent studies using this approach have identified a set of positional principles that are shared between diverse RBPs. Here, we discuss how insights from RNA splicing maps of different RBPs inform the mechanistic models of splicing regulation.

  15. A dominantly negative mutation in cardiac troponin I at the interface with troponin T causes early remodeling in ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongguang; Jin, J-P

    2014-08-15

    We previously reported a point mutation substituting Cys for Arg(111) in the highly conserved troponin T (TnT)-contacting helix of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in wild turkey hearts (Biesiadecki et al. J Biol Chem 279: 13825-13832, 2004). This dominantly negative TnI-TnT interface mutation decreases the binding affinity of cTnI for TnT, impairs diastolic function, and blunts the β-adrenergic response of cardiac muscle (Wei et al. J Biol Chem 285: 27806-27816, 2010). Here we further investigate cellular phenotypes of transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes expressing the equivalent mutation cTnI-K118C. Functional studies were performed on single adult cardiomyocytes after recovery in short-term culture from isolation stress. The amplitude of contraction and the velocities of shortening and relengthening were lower in cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes than wild-type controls. The intracellular Ca(2+) transient was slower in cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes than wild-type cells. cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes also showed a weaker β-adrenergic response. The resting length of cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes was significantly greater than that of age-matched wild-type cells, with no difference in cell width. The resting sarcomere was not longer, but slightly shorter, in cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes than wild-type cells, indicating longitudinal addition of sarcomeres. More tri- and quadrinuclei cardiomyocytes were found in TnI-K118C than wild-type hearts, suggesting increased nuclear divisions. Whole-genome mRNA array and Western blots detected an increased expression of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-β in the hearts of 2-mo-old cTnI-K118C mice, suggesting a signaling pathway responsible for the potent effect of cTnI-K118C mutation on early remodeling in cardiomyocytes.

  16. A dominantly negative mutation in cardiac troponin I at the interface with troponin T causes early remodeling in ventricular cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hongguang

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported a point mutation substituting Cys for Arg111 in the highly conserved troponin T (TnT)-contacting helix of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in wild turkey hearts (Biesiadecki et al. J Biol Chem 279: 13825–13832, 2004). This dominantly negative TnI-TnT interface mutation decreases the binding affinity of cTnI for TnT, impairs diastolic function, and blunts the β-adrenergic response of cardiac muscle (Wei et al. J Biol Chem 285: 27806–27816, 2010). Here we further investigate cellular phenotypes of transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes expressing the equivalent mutation cTnI-K118C. Functional studies were performed on single adult cardiomyocytes after recovery in short-term culture from isolation stress. The amplitude of contraction and the velocities of shortening and relengthening were lower in cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes than wild-type controls. The intracellular Ca2+ transient was slower in cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes than wild-type cells. cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes also showed a weaker β-adrenergic response. The resting length of cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes was significantly greater than that of age-matched wild-type cells, with no difference in cell width. The resting sarcomere was not longer, but slightly shorter, in cTnI-K118C cardiomyocytes than wild-type cells, indicating longitudinal addition of sarcomeres. More tri- and quadrinuclei cardiomyocytes were found in TnI-K118C than wild-type hearts, suggesting increased nuclear divisions. Whole-genome mRNA array and Western blots detected an increased expression of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-β in the hearts of 2-mo-old cTnI-K118C mice, suggesting a signaling pathway responsible for the potent effect of cTnI-K118C mutation on early remodeling in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24898585

  17. Genome-Wide Survey of Cold Stress Regulated Alternative Splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression. PMID:23776682

  18. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  19. In pursuit of negative Fukui functions: examples where the highest occupied molecular orbital fails to dominate the chemical reactivity.

    PubMed

    Echegaray, Eleonora; Cárdenas, Carlos; Rabi, Sandra; Rabi, Nataly; Lee, Sungmin; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Toro-Labbe, Alejandro; Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W

    2013-07-01

    In our quest to explore molecules with chemically significant regions where the Fukui function is negative, we explored reactions where the frontier orbital that indicates the sites for electrophilic attack is not the highest occupied molecular orbital. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) controls the location of the regions where the Fukui function is negative, supporting the postulate that negative values of the Fukui function are associated with orbital relaxation effects and nodal surfaces of the frontier orbitals. Significant negative values for the condensed Fukui function, however, were not observed.

  20. Dominant-negative but not gain-of-function effects of a p53.R270H mutation in mouse epithelium tissue after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Speksnijder, Ewoud N; Liu, Xiaoling; Zwart, Edwin; vanOostrom, Conny Th M; Beems, Rudolf B; Hoogervorst, Esther M; Schaap, Mirjam M; Attardi, Laura D; Jacks, Tyler; van Steeg, Harry; Jonkers, Jos; de Vries, Annemieke

    2007-05-15

    p53 alterations in human tumors often involve missense mutations that may confer dominant-negative or gain-of-function properties. Dominant-negative effects result in inactivation of wild-type p53 protein in heterozygous mutant cells and as such in a p53 null phenotype. Gain-of-function effects can directly promote tumor development or metastasis through antiapoptotic mechanisms or transcriptional activation of (onco)genes. Here, we show, using conditional mouse technology, that epithelium-specific heterozygous expression of mutant p53 (i.e., the p53.R270H mutation that is equivalent to the human hotspot R273H) results in an increased incidence of spontaneous and UVB-induced skin tumors. Expression of p53.R270H exerted dominant-negative effects on latency, multiplicity, and progression status of UVB-induced but not spontaneous tumors. Surprisingly, gain-of-function properties of p53.R270H were not detected in skin epithelium. Apparently, dominant-negative and gain-of-function effects of mutant p53 are highly tissue specific and become most manifest upon stabilization of p53 after DNA damage.

  1. Alternatively spliced T-cell receptor transcripts are up-regulated in response to disruption of either splicing elements or reading frame.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Fu; Chan, Wai-Kin; Imam, J Saadi; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2007-10-12

    Nonsense mutations create premature termination codons (PTCs), leading to the generation of truncated proteins, some of which have deleterious gain-of-function or dominant-negative activity. Protecting cells from such aberrant proteins is non-sense-mediated decay (NMD), an RNA surveillance pathway that degrades transcripts harboring PTCs. A second response to nonsense mutations is the up-regulation of alternatively spliced transcripts that skip the PTC. This nonsense-associated altered splicing (NAS) response has the potential to rescue protein function, but the mechanism by which it is triggered has been controversial. Some studies suggest that, like NMD, NAS is triggered as a result of nonsense mutations disrupting reading frame, whereas other studies suggest that NAS is triggered when nonsense mutations disrupt exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs). Using T-cell receptor-beta (TCRbeta), which naturally acquires PTCs at high frequency, we provide evidence that both mechanisms act on a single type of mRNA. Mutations that disrupt consensus ESE sites up-regulated an alternatively spliced TCRbeta transcript that skipped the mutations independently of reading frame disruption and the NMD factor UPF1. In contrast, reading frame-disrupting mutations that did not disrupt consensus ESE sites elicited UPF1-dependent up-regulation of the alternatively spliced TCRbeta transcript. Restoration of reading frame prevented this up-regulation. Our results suggest that the response of an mRNA to a nonsense mutation depends on its context.

  2. Dominant-negative mutation in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome subunit genes affect alternative cell fate decisions in the Drosophila sense organ lineage.

    PubMed

    Schweisguth, F

    1999-09-28

    In Drosophila, dominant-negative mutations in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome catalytic subunit genes have been identified as dominant temperature-sensitive (DTS) mutations. At restrictive temperature, beta2 and beta6 DTS mutations confer lethality at the pupal stage. I investigate here the role of proteasome activity in regulating cell fate decisions in the sense organ lineage at the early pupal stage. Temperature-shift experiments in beta2 and beta6 DTS mutant pupae occasionally resulted in external sense organs with two sockets and no shaft. This double-socket phenotype was strongly enhanced in conditions in which Notch signaling was up-regulated. Furthermore, conditional overexpression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to shaft-to-socket and to neuron-to-sheath cell fate transformations, which are both usually associated with increased Notch signaling activity. Finally, expression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to the stabilization of an ectopically expressed nuclear form of Notch in imaginal wing discs. This study demonstrates that mutations affecting two distinct proteasome catalytic subunits affect two alternative cell fate decisions and enhance Notch signaling activity in the sense organ lineage. These findings raise the possibility that the proteasome targets an active form of the Notch receptor for degradation in Drosophila.

  3. Hair penalties: the negative influence of Afrocentric hair on ratings of Black women’s dominance and professionalism

    PubMed Central

    Opie, Tina R.; Phillips, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Women are penalized if they do not behave in a stereotype-congruent manner (Heilman, 1983, 2001; Eagly and Carli, 2007). For example, because women are not expected to be agentic they incur an “agency penalty” for expressing anger, dominance or assertiveness (Rudman, 1998; Rudman and Glick, 1999, 2001; Eagly and Karau, 2002; Rudman and Fairchild, 2004; Brescoll and Uhlmann, 2008; Livingston et al., 2012). Yet, all women are not equally penalized (Livingston et al., 2012). We make a novel contribution by examining how both White and Black evaluators respond to displays of Black women’s dominance, in this case, whether Black women choose to wear Afrocentric or Eurocentric hairstyles. Design/methodology/approach: We conducted three experimental studies to examine the influence of target hairstyle and participant race on ratings of the target’s professionalism (Studies 1, 2, and 3) and dominance (Study 2). Study 1 was an online experimental study with 200 participants (112 females, 87 males, 1 missing gender; 160 Whites, 19 Blacks, 11 Latinos, 7 Asian Americans and 3 who identify as “other”; Mage = 35.5, SD = 11.4). Study 2 was an online experimental study with 510 participants (276 women, 234 males; 256 Blacks, 254 Whites; Mage = 41.25 years, SD = 12.21). Study 3 was an online experimental study with 291 participants (141 Blacks, 150 Whites, Mage = 47.5 years, SD = 11.66). Findings: Black, as compared to White, evaluators gave higher agency penalties to Black employment candidates when they donned Afrocentric versus Eurocentric hair, rating them as more dominant and less professional. Implications: The present research illustrates the significance of considering both target and evaluator race when examining the influence of agency, and specifically dominance, on ratings of professionalism. PMID:26379612

  4. Fearless Dominance and reduced feedback-related negativity amplitudes in a time-estimation task – Further neuroscientific evidence for dual-process models of psychopathy☆

    PubMed Central

    Schulreich, Stefan; Pfabigan, Daniela M.; Derntl, Birgit; Sailer, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Dual-process models of psychopathy postulate two etiologically relevant processes. Their involvement in feedback processing and its neural correlates has not been investigated so far. Multi-channel EEG was collected while healthy female volunteers performed a time-estimation task and received negative or positive feedback in form of signs or emotional faces. The affective-interpersonal factor Fearless Dominance, but not Self-Centered Impulsivity, was associated with reduced feedback-related negativity (FRN) amplitudes. This neural dissociation extends previous findings on the impact of psychopathy on feedback processing and further highlights the importance of distinguishing psychopathic traits and extending previous (neuroscientific) models of psychopathy. PMID:23607997

  5. Multiple splicing defects in an intronic false exon.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Chasin, L A

    2000-09-01

    Splice site consensus sequences alone are insufficient to dictate the recognition of real constitutive splice sites within the typically large transcripts of higher eukaryotes, and large numbers of pseudoexons flanked by pseudosplice sites with good matches to the consensus sequences can be easily designated. In an attempt to identify elements that prevent pseudoexon splicing, we have systematically altered known splicing signals, as well as immediately adjacent flanking sequences, of an arbitrarily chosen pseudoexon from intron 1 of the human hprt gene. The substitution of a 5' splice site that perfectly matches the 5' consensus combined with mutation to match the CAG/G sequence of the 3' consensus failed to get this model pseudoexon included as the central exon in a dhfr minigene context. Provision of a real 3' splice site and a consensus 5' splice site and removal of an upstream inhibitory sequence were necessary and sufficient to confer splicing on the pseudoexon. This activated context also supported the splicing of a second pseudoexon sequence containing no apparent enhancer. Thus, both the 5' splice site sequence and the polypyrimidine tract of the pseudoexon are defective despite their good agreement with the consensus. On the other hand, the pseudoexon body did not exert a negative influence on splicing. The introduction into the pseudoexon of a sequence selected for binding to ASF/SF2 or its replacement with beta-globin exon 2 only partially reversed the effect of the upstream negative element and the defective polypyrimidine tract. These results support the idea that exon-bridging enhancers are not a prerequisite for constitutive exon definition and suggest that intrinsically defective splice sites and negative elements play important roles in distinguishing the real splicing signal from the vast number of false splicing signals.

  6. Dominant negative and loss of function mutations of the c-kit (mast/stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Giebel, L.B.; Holmes, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development and is characterized by congenital white parches of skin and hair from which melanocytes are completely absent. A similar disorder of the mouse, 'dominant white spotting' (W), results from mutations of the c-kit proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular tyrosine kinases receptor for the mast/stem cell growth factor. The authors have identified c-kit gene mutations in three patients with piebaldism. A missense substitution (Phe[r arrow]Leu) at codon 584, within the tyrosine kinases domain, is associated with a severe piebald phenotype, whereas two different frameshifts, within codons 561 and 642, are both associated with a variable and relatively mild piebald phenotype. This is consistent with a possible 'dominant negative' effect of missense c-kit polypeptides on the function of the dimeric receptor.

  7. Simulated leakage of high pCO2 water negatively impacts bivalve dominated infaunal communities from the Western Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, Hanna; Mevenkamp, Lisa; Guilini, Katja; Meyer, Stefanie; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Abele, Doris; Vanreusel, Ann; Melzner, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Carbon capture and storage is promoted as a mitigation method counteracting the increase of atmospheric CO2 levels. However, at this stage, environmental consequences of potential CO2 leakage from sub-seabed storage sites are still largely unknown. In a 3-month-long mesocosm experiment, this study assessed the impact of elevated pCO2 levels (1,500 to 24,400 μatm) on Cerastoderma edule dominated benthic communities from the Baltic Sea. Mortality of C. edule was significantly increased in the highest treatment (24,400 μatm) and exceeded 50%. Furthermore, mortality of small size classes (0–1 cm) was significantly increased in treatment levels ≥6,600 μatm. First signs of external shell dissolution became visible at ≥1,500 μatm, holes were observed at >6,600 μatm. C. edule body condition decreased significantly at all treatment levels (1,500–24,400 μatm). Dominant meiofauna taxa remained unaffected in abundance. Densities of calcifying meiofauna taxa (i.e. Gastropoda and Ostracoda) decreased in high CO2 treatments (>6,600 μatm), while the non - calcifying Gastrotricha significantly increased in abundance at 24,400 μatm. In addition, microbial community composition was altered at the highest pCO2 level. We conclude that strong CO2 leakage can alter benthic infauna community composition at multiple trophic levels, likely due to high mortality of the dominant macrofauna species C. edule.

  8. Simulated leakage of high pCO2 water negatively impacts bivalve dominated infaunal communities from the Western Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Schade, Hanna; Mevenkamp, Lisa; Guilini, Katja; Meyer, Stefanie; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Abele, Doris; Vanreusel, Ann; Melzner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is promoted as a mitigation method counteracting the increase of atmospheric CO2 levels. However, at this stage, environmental consequences of potential CO2 leakage from sub-seabed storage sites are still largely unknown. In a 3-month-long mesocosm experiment, this study assessed the impact of elevated pCO2 levels (1,500 to 24,400 μatm) on Cerastoderma edule dominated benthic communities from the Baltic Sea. Mortality of C. edule was significantly increased in the highest treatment (24,400 μatm) and exceeded 50%. Furthermore, mortality of small size classes (0–1 cm) was significantly increased in treatment levels ≥6,600 μatm. First signs of external shell dissolution became visible at ≥1,500 μatm, holes were observed at >6,600 μatm. C. edule body condition decreased significantly at all treatment levels (1,500–24,400 μatm). Dominant meiofauna taxa remained unaffected in abundance. Densities of calcifying meiofauna taxa (i.e. Gastropoda and Ostracoda) decreased in high CO2 treatments (>6,600 μatm), while the non - calcifying Gastrotricha significantly increased in abundance at 24,400 μatm. In addition, microbial community composition was altered at the highest pCO2 level. We conclude that strong CO2 leakage can alter benthic infauna community composition at multiple trophic levels, likely due to high mortality of the dominant macrofauna species C. edule. PMID:27538361

  9. Simulated leakage of high pCO2 water negatively impacts bivalve dominated infaunal communities from the Western Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Schade, Hanna; Mevenkamp, Lisa; Guilini, Katja; Meyer, Stefanie; Gorb, Stanislav N; Abele, Doris; Vanreusel, Ann; Melzner, Frank

    2016-08-19

    Carbon capture and storage is promoted as a mitigation method counteracting the increase of atmospheric CO2 levels. However, at this stage, environmental consequences of potential CO2 leakage from sub-seabed storage sites are still largely unknown. In a 3-month-long mesocosm experiment, this study assessed the impact of elevated pCO2 levels (1,500 to 24,400 μatm) on Cerastoderma edule dominated benthic communities from the Baltic Sea. Mortality of C. edule was significantly increased in the highest treatment (24,400 μatm) and exceeded 50%. Furthermore, mortality of small size classes (0-1 cm) was significantly increased in treatment levels ≥6,600 μatm. First signs of external shell dissolution became visible at ≥1,500 μatm, holes were observed at >6,600 μatm. C. edule body condition decreased significantly at all treatment levels (1,500-24,400 μatm). Dominant meiofauna taxa remained unaffected in abundance. Densities of calcifying meiofauna taxa (i.e. Gastropoda and Ostracoda) decreased in high CO2 treatments (>6,600 μatm), while the non - calcifying Gastrotricha significantly increased in abundance at 24,400 μatm. In addition, microbial community composition was altered at the highest pCO2 level. We conclude that strong CO2 leakage can alter benthic infauna community composition at multiple trophic levels, likely due to high mortality of the dominant macrofauna species C. edule.

  10. Negative phototropism is seen in Arabidopsis inflorescences when auxin signaling is reduced to a minimal level by an Aux/IAA dominant mutation, axr2.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuko; Sasaki, Shu; Matsuzaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Kotaro T

    2015-01-01

    Inflorescences of a dominant mutant of Arabidopsis Aux/IAA7, axr2, showed negative phototropism with a similar fluence response curve to the positive phototropism of wild-type stems. Application of a synthetic auxin, NAA, and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport, NPA, increased and decreased respectively the magnitude of the phototropic response in the wild type, while in axr2 application of NAA reduced the negative phototropic response and NPA had no effect. Decapitation of the apex induced a small negative phototropism in wild-type stems, and had no effect in axr2 plants. Inflorescences of the double mutants of auxin transporters, pgp1 pgp19, showed no phototropic response, while decapitation resulted in a negative phototropic response. These results suggest that negative phototropism can occur when the level of auxin or of auxin signaling is reduced to a minimal level, and that in plant axial organs the default phototropic response to unilateral blue light may be negative. Expression of axr2 protein by an endodermis-specific promoter resulted in agravitropism of inflorescences in a similar way to that of axr2, but phototropism was normal, confirming that the endodermis does not play a critical role in phototropism.

  11. Negative emotions and quality of life six months after cardiac surgery: the dominant role of depression not anxiety symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tully, Phillip J; Baker, Robert A; Turnbull, Deborah A; Winefield, Helen R; Knight, John L

    2009-12-01

    The specific syndromal aspects of depression and anxiety have not been explored in relation to changes in health related quality of life (HRQOL) after cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of general stress, depression and anxiety on HRQOL after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Utilizing a tripartite conceptual model of depression and anxiety, it was hypothesized that general stress symptoms, rather than unique depressive or anxiogenic symptoms, would be associated with lower HRQOL 6 months after CABG surgery. Elective CABG patients (n=226) completed baseline and postoperative self-report measures of negative emotions and HRQOL, and 193 patients completed these measures at 6-month follow-up. Multiple linear regression analyses and logit link analyses were performed to test the hypothesis. Elevated depression symptoms before and after surgery showed an association with lower and worse HRQOL for vitality and social role functioning and physical and general health. This study adds to previous research by outlining discrete associations between specific HRQOL domains, and is perhaps the first to test a theoretical model of depression and anxiety in relation to cardiac CABG patients' perceptions of HRQOL. These findings encourage further research on negative emotions and HRQOL in cardiac surgery patients and the practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  13. A wave-dominated heat transport mechanism for negative differential thermal resistance in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue-Kun; Liu, Jun; Peng, Zhi-Hua; Du, Dan; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinear thermal transport in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructure is investigated by the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. It is found that negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR) will appear as the applied temperature difference increases. Detailed phonon spectra analysis reveals that the excited out-of-plane acoustic wave plays an important role in the heat transport across such interface. That is, the mechanical wave results in a significant mismatch between the lattice vibrations of graphene and h-BN domains and hinders interfacial thermal transport. In addition, NDTR can be tuned through the temperature parameter. Interestingly, the regime of NDTR becomes smaller and eventually vanishes with increasing the heterostructure length. However, NDTR is insensitive to the variation of system width. The work may be useful for nanoscale thermal managements utilizing the graphene/h-BN heterostructure.

  14. Functional studies of a novel germline p53 splicing mutation identified in a patient with Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piao, Jinhua; Sakurai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Nishioka, Junji; Nakatani, Kaname; Komada, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi

    2013-10-01

    Most p53 mutations identified in Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) are missense mutations; splicing mutations have rarely been reported. A novel splicing p53 mutation was identified in a patient with Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (LFL). Usually, p53 missense mutants identified in LFS and cancer cells function as dominant negative mutations interfering with wild-type p53 function. However, the mechanism by which p53 haploinsufficiency causes carcinogenesis is not well characterized. In this study, we describe a novel splicing mutation that results in the loss-of-function of p53. These findings suggest a linkage between the loss-of-function type p53 mutation and a LFL phenotype.

  15. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected With Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Our ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 multiplicity of infection), and irradiated with a single dose or zero to five doses of 3 Gy each at 6-h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing with 100% nitrogen gas. The cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after the final irradiation, and cell survival was determined by colony formation. The survival data were fitted to linear-quadratic model or exponential line. Results: Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of the HCT8 and HT29 cells. The virus enhancement ratio for single-dose irradiation at a surviving fraction of 0.1 was {approx}1.3 for oxic and hypoxic HCT8 and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. A similar virus enhancement ratio of 1.2-1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses; however, these values were smaller than the values found for dominant-negative Ku70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference has been discussed. The oxygen enhancement ratio for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses was 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus infection altered them slightly. Conclusion: Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple radiation doses.

  16. Regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity thresholds and changes in exploratory and learning behavior in dominant negative NPR-B mutant rats

    PubMed Central

    Barmashenko, Gleb; Buttgereit, Jens; Herring, Neil; Bader, Michael; Özcelik, Cemil; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Braunewell, Karl H.

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic GMP affects synaptic transmission and modulates synaptic plasticity and certain types of learning and memory processes. The impact of the natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) and its ligand C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), one of several cGMP producing signaling systems, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning is, however, less well understood. We have previously shown that the NPR-B ligand CNP increases the magnitude of long-term depression (LTD) in hippocampal area CA1, while reducing the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). We have extended this line of research to show that bidirectional plasticity is affected in the opposite way in rats expressing a dominant-negative mutant of NPR-B (NSE-NPR-BΔKC) lacking the intracellular guanylyl cyclase domain under control of a promoter for neuron-specific enolase. The brain cells of these transgenic rats express functional dimers of the NPR-B receptor containing the dominant-negative NPR-BΔKC mutant, and therefore show decreased CNP-stimulated cGMP-production in brain membranes. The NPR-B transgenic rats display enhanced LTP but reduced LTD in hippocampal slices. When the frequency-dependence of synaptic modification to afferent stimulation in the range of 1–100 Hz was assessed in transgenic rats, the threshold for both, LTP and LTD induction, was shifted to lower frequencies. In parallel, NPR-BΔKC rats exhibited an enhancement in exploratory and learning behavior. These results indicate that bidirectional plasticity and learning and memory mechanism are affected in transgenic rats expressing a dominant-negative mutant of NPR-B. Our data substantiate the hypothesis that NPR-B-dependent cGMP signaling has a modulatory role for synaptic information storage and learning. PMID:25520616

  17. Aberrant alternative splicing of thyroid hormone receptor in a TSH-secreting pituitary tumor is a mechanism for hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Sarlis, N J; Krishnan, J; Feng, X; Refetoff, S; Zhang, M Q; Oldfield, E H; Yen, P M

    2001-09-01

    Patients with TSH-secreting pituitary tumors (TSHomas) have high serum TSH levels despite elevated thyroid hormone levels. The mechanism for this defect in the negative regulation of TSH secretion is not known. We performed RT-PCR to detect mutations in TRbeta from a surgically resected TSHoma. Analyses of the RT-PCR products revealed a 135-bp deletion within the sixth exon that encodes the ligand-binding domain of TRbeta2. This deletion was caused by alternative splicing of TRbeta2 mRNA, as near-consensus splice sequences were found at the junction site and no deletion or mutations were detected in the tumoral genomic DNA. This TRbeta variant (TRbeta2spl) lacked thyroid hormone binding and had impaired T3-dependent negative regulation of both TSHbeta and glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit genes in cotransfection studies. Furthermore, TRbeta2spl showed dominant negative activity against the wild-type TRbeta2. These findings strongly suggest that aberrant alternative splicing of TRbeta2 mRNA generated an abnormal TR protein that accounted for the defective negative regulation of TSH in the TSHoma. This is the first example of aberrant alternative splicing of a nuclear hormone receptor causing hormonal dysregulation. This novel posttranscriptional mechanism for generating abnormal receptors may occur in other hormone-resistant states or tumors in which no receptor mutation is detected in genomic DNA.

  18. The dominant-negative inhibition of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR increases the efficacy of Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lihoradova, Olga; Kalveram, Birte; Indran, Sabarish V; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Juelich, Terry L; Hill, Terence E; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Gong, Bin; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Morikawa, Shigeru; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), belonging to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and causes a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. MP-12 is the only RVFV strain excluded from the select-agent rule and handled at a biosafety level 2 (BSL2) laboratory. MP-12 encodes a functional major virulence factor, the NSs protein, which contributes to its residual virulence in pregnant ewes. We found that 100% of mice subcutaneously vaccinated with recombinant MP-12 (rMP12)-murine PKRN167 (mPKRN167), which encodes a dominant-negative form of mouse double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in place of NSs, were protected from wild-type (wt) RVFV challenge, while 72% of mice vaccinated with MP-12 were protected after challenge. rMP12-mPKRN167 induced alpha interferon (IFN-α) in sera, accumulated RVFV antigens in dendritic cells at the local draining lymph nodes, and developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies, while parental MP-12 induced neither IFN-α nor viral-antigen accumulation at the draining lymph node yet induced a high level of neutralizing antibodies. The present study suggests that the expression of a dominant-negative PKR increases the immunogenicity and efficacy of live-attenuated RVFV vaccine, which will lead to rational design of safe and highly immunogenic RVFV vaccines for livestock and humans.

  19. The Dominant-Negative Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR Increases the Efficacy of Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lihoradova, Olga; Kalveram, Birte; Indran, Sabarish V.; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Juelich, Terry L.; Hill, Terence E.; Tseng, Chien-Te K.; Gong, Bin; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Morikawa, Shigeru; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), belonging to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and causes a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. MP-12 is the only RVFV strain excluded from the select-agent rule and handled at a biosafety level 2 (BSL2) laboratory. MP-12 encodes a functional major virulence factor, the NSs protein, which contributes to its residual virulence in pregnant ewes. We found that 100% of mice subcutaneously vaccinated with recombinant MP-12 (rMP12)-murine PKRN167 (mPKRN167), which encodes a dominant-negative form of mouse double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in place of NSs, were protected from wild-type (wt) RVFV challenge, while 72% of mice vaccinated with MP-12 were protected after challenge. rMP12-mPKRN167 induced alpha interferon (IFN-α) in sera, accumulated RVFV antigens in dendritic cells at the local draining lymph nodes, and developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies, while parental MP-12 induced neither IFN-α nor viral-antigen accumulation at the draining lymph node yet induced a high level of neutralizing antibodies. The present study suggests that the expression of a dominant-negative PKR increases the immunogenicity and efficacy of live-attenuated RVFV vaccine, which will lead to rational design of safe and highly immunogenic RVFV vaccines for livestock and humans. PMID:22573861

  20. Missense Mutations in Pyruvate Kinase M2 Promote Cancer Metabolism, Oxidative Endurance, Anchorage Independence, and Tumor Growth in a Dominant Negative Manner

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mohd Askandar; Siddiqui, Farid Ahmad; Chaman, Noor; Gupta, Vibhor; Kumar, Bhupender; Gopinath, Prakasam; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the functional relevance of two heterozygous mutations (H391Y and K422R), observed earlier by us in the Bloom syndrome condition. Cells stably expressing exogenous wild-type or mutant PKM2 (K422R or H391Y) or co-expressing both wild type and mutant (PKM2-K422R or PKM2-H391Y) were assessed for cancer metabolism and tumorigenic potential. Interestingly, cells co-expressing PKM2 and mutant (K422R or H391Y) showed significantly aggressive cancer metabolism as compared with cells expressing either wild-type or mutant PKM2 independently. A similar trend was observed for oxidative endurance, tumorigenic potential, cellular proliferation, and tumor growth. These observations signify the dominant negative nature of mutations. Remarkably, PKM2-H391Y co-expressed cells showed a maximal effect on all the studied parameters. Such a dominant negative impaired function of PKM2 in tumor development is not known; this study demonstrates for the first time the possible predisposition of Bloom syndrome patients with impaired PKM2 activity to cancer and the importance of studying genetic variations in PKM2 in the future to understand their relevance in cancer in general. PMID:24492614

  1. Missense mutations in pyruvate kinase M2 promote cancer metabolism, oxidative endurance, anchorage independence, and tumor growth in a dominant negative manner.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohd Askandar; Siddiqui, Farid Ahmad; Chaman, Noor; Gupta, Vibhor; Kumar, Bhupender; Gopinath, Prakasam; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2014-03-21

    The present study was designed to examine the functional relevance of two heterozygous mutations (H391Y and K422R), observed earlier by us in the Bloom syndrome condition. Cells stably expressing exogenous wild-type or mutant PKM2 (K422R or H391Y) or co-expressing both wild type and mutant (PKM2-K422R or PKM2-H391Y) were assessed for cancer metabolism and tumorigenic potential. Interestingly, cells co-expressing PKM2 and mutant (K422R or H391Y) showed significantly aggressive cancer metabolism as compared with cells expressing either wild-type or mutant PKM2 independently. A similar trend was observed for oxidative endurance, tumorigenic potential, cellular proliferation, and tumor growth. These observations signify the dominant negative nature of mutations. Remarkably, PKM2-H391Y co-expressed cells showed a maximal effect on all the studied parameters. Such a dominant negative impaired function of PKM2 in tumor development is not known; this study demonstrates for the first time the possible predisposition of Bloom syndrome patients with impaired PKM2 activity to cancer and the importance of studying genetic variations in PKM2 in the future to understand their relevance in cancer in general.

  2. The correlation between subordinate fish eye colour and received attacks: a negative social feedback mechanism for the reduction of aggression during the formation of dominance hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Miyai, Caio A; Carretero Sanches, Fábio H; Costa, Tânia M; Colpo, Karine Delevati; Volpato, Gilson L; Barreto, Rodrigo E

    2011-12-01

    Eye darkening has been linked to social status in fish. The subordinate's eyes darken, while the eyes of the dominant fish become pale. Although this phenomenon has been described in salmonid fishes and in the African cichlid Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, it is unclear whether eye darkening correlates with a reduction in aggressive behaviour. Thus, we evaluated the link between social status and eye darkening. We evaluated whether the eye colours of subordinate fish correlate with the frequency of received attacks in a neotropical fish, the pearl cichlid Geophagus brasiliensis. We paired pearl cichlids and quantified both the aggressive behaviour and the eye darkening of each fish. As has been described for Nile tilapia and Atlantic salmon, a clear-cut hierarchical relationship formed, where dominance and subordination were associated with pale and dark eye colours, respectively. Initially, eye colour darkening was positively correlated with the frequency of received attacks; however, a negative association occurred following eye darkening, in which the intensity of aggressive interactions decreased. Thus, fish that initially received a high number of attacks signalled subordination more rapidly and intensely (rapid and dramatic eye darkening), thereby inducing a negative social feedback mechanism that led to reduced aggression.

  3. Dominant negative mutants of human T-cell leukemia virus type I Rex and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev fail to multimerize in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, H; Greene, W C

    1993-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Rex and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev are essential gene products required for the replication of these two pathogenic human retroviruses. Both Rex and Rev act at a posttranscriptional level by binding to highly structured RNA-response elements, the Rex-response element in HTLV-I and the Rev-response element in HIV-1. Using a sensitive in vivo assay of protein-protein interaction, we now demonstrate that the HTLV-I Rex and HIV-1 Rev proteins readily form homomultimeric complexes in the absence of their cognate RNA-response elements yet fail to form heteromultimeric complexes with each other. Dominant negative mutations have been identified in both the rex and rev genes which presumably specify a critical activation or effector domain in each of these viral transactivators. Surprisingly, these dominant negative mutants of Rex and Rev fail to interact in vivo. These findings raise the possibility that the binding of nonfunctional monomers rather than functional multimers underlies the transdominant phenotype of these Rex and Rev mutants. Further, it seems likely that the assembly of functional and stable multimers of Rex and Rev in vivo may depend not only on the intrinsic multimerization domains of these proteins but also on the binding of a bridging cellular cofactor to the related activation domains present in each viral transactivator. Images PMID:8474155

  4. A transgenic mouse model demonstrates a dominant negative effect of a point mutation in the RPS19 gene associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Emily E; Dacosta, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Elliott, Gene; Bodine, David M

    2010-10-14

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited erythroblastopenia associated with mutations in at least 8 different ribosomal protein genes. Mutations in the gene encoding ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) have been identified in approximately 25% of DBA families. Most of these mutations disrupt either the translation or stability of the RPS19 protein and are predicted to cause DBA by haploinsufficiency. However, approximately 30% of RPS19 mutations are missense mutations that do not alter the stability of the RPS19 protein and are hypothesized to act by a dominant negative mechanism. To formally test this hypothesis, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing an RPS19 mutation in which an arginine residue is replaced with a tryptophan residue at codon 62 (RPS19R62W). Constitutive expression of RPS19R62W in developing mice was lethal. Conditional expression of RPS19R62W resulted in growth retardation, a mild anemia with reduced numbers of erythroid progenitors, and significant inhibition of terminal erythroid maturation, similar to DBA. RNA profiling demonstrated more than 700 dysregulated genes belonging to the same pathways that are disrupted in RNA profiles of DBA patient cells. We conclude that RPS19R62W is a dominant negative DBA mutation.

  5. A Dominant Negative Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter, ZnT-2 (SLC30A2), Results in Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lasry, Inbal; Seo, Young Ah; Ityel, Hadas; Shalva, Nechama; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Glaser, Fabian; Berman, Bluma; Berezovsky, Igor; Goncearenco, Alexander; Klar, Aharon; Levy, Jacob; Anikster, Yair; Kelleher, Shannon L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to zinc deficiency as they require large amounts of zinc for their normal growth and development. We have recently described the first loss-of-function mutation (H54R) in the zinc transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) in mothers with infants harboring transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD). Here we identified and characterized a novel heterozygous G87R ZnT-2 mutation in two unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish mothers with infants displaying TNZD. Transient transfection of G87R ZnT-2 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi retention, whereas the WT transporter properly localized to intracellular secretory vesicles in HC11 and MCF-7 cells. Consequently, G87R ZnT-2 showed decreased stability compared with WT ZnT-2 as revealed by Western blot analysis. Three-dimensional homology modeling based on the crystal structure of YiiP, a close zinc transporter homologue from Escherichia coli, revealed that the basic arginine residue of the mutant G87R points toward the membrane lipid core, suggesting misfolding and possible loss-of-function. Indeed, functional assays including vesicular zinc accumulation, zinc secretion, and cytoplasmic zinc pool assessment revealed markedly impaired zinc transport in G87R ZnT-2 transfectants. Moreover, co-transfection experiments with both mutant and WT transporters revealed a dominant negative effect of G87R ZnT-2 over the WT ZnT-2; this was associated with mislocalization, decreased stability, and loss of zinc transport activity of the WT ZnT-2 due to homodimerization observed upon immunoprecipitation experiments. These findings establish that inactivating ZnT-2 mutations are an underlying basis of TNZD and provide the first evidence for the dominant inheritance of heterozygous ZnT-2 mutations via negative dominance due to homodimer formation. PMID:22733820

  6. Enhancement of NK Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Long-Term Living in Negatively Charged-Particle Dominant Indoor Air-Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Mase, Akinori; Kotani, Muneo; Ami, Kazuhisa; Maeda, Megumi; Shirahama, Takashi; Lee, Suni; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yoshitome, Kei; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of house conditions that promote health revealed that negatively charged-particle dominant indoor air-conditions (NCPDIAC) induced immune stimulation. Negatively charged air-conditions were established using a fine charcoal powder on walls and ceilings and utilizing forced negatively charged particles (approximate diameter: 20 nm) dominant in indoor air-conditions created by applying an electric voltage (72 V) between the backside of the walls and the ground. We reported previously that these conditions induced a slight and significant increase of interleukin-2 during a 2.5-h stay and an increase of NK cell cytotoxicity when examining human subjects after a two-week night stay under these conditions. In the present study, seven healthy volunteers had a device installed to create NCPDIAC in the living or sleeping rooms of their own homes. Every three months the volunteers then turned the NCPDIAC device on or off. A total of 16 ON and 13 OFF trials were conducted and their biological effects were analyzed. NK activity increased during ON trials and decreased during OFF trials, although no other adverse effects were found. In addition, there were slight increases of epidermal growth factor (EGF) during ON trials. Furthermore, a comparison of the cytokine status between ON and OFF trials showed that basic immune status was stimulated slightly during ON trials under NCPIADC. Our overall findings indicate that the NCPDIAC device caused activation of NK activity and stimulated immune status, particularly only on NK activity, and therefore could be set in the home or office buildings. PMID:26173062

  7. Effectiveness and clinical predictors of response to combined ECT and antipsychotic therapy in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and dominant negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Kołodziej-Kowalska, Emilia; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2014-12-15

    The effectiveness and predictors of response to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) combined with antipsychotics (AP) in treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients with the dominance of negative symptoms (TRS-NS) have not been studied systematically so far. 29 patients aged 21-55 years diagnosed with TRS-NS underwent ECT combined with antipsychotics (ECT+AP). Prior to the ECT, the symptom profile and severity were evaluated using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Demographic and medical data was collected; ECT parameters and pharmacotherapy results were evaluated. After the combined ECT+AP therapy a significant decrease in symptom severity was found. A response to treatment was achieved by 60% of patients. The greatest reductions were obtained in general and positive PANSS subscale (median change: 11 and 7 pts.) and the smallest, but still significant, ones in negative symptoms subscale (median: 3.5 pts.). Patients who responded to ECT+AP demonstrated a significantly shorter duration of the current episode in comparison with patients who did not experience at least a 25% reduction in symptom severity (median: 4 vs. 8 months). A combination of ECT and antipsychotic therapy can provide a useful treatment option for patients with TRS-NS. The only significant predictor of response to treatment was a shorter duration of the current episode.

  8. The doublesex splicing enhancer components Tra2 and Rbp1 also repress splicing through an intronic silencer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junlin; Su, Shihuang; Mattox, William

    2007-01-01

    The activation of sex-specific alternative splice sites in the Drosophila melanogaster doublesex and fruitless pre-mRNAs has been well studied and depends on the serine-arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors Tra, Tra2, and Rbp1. Little is known, however, about how SR factors negatively regulate splice sites in other RNAs. Here we examine how Tra2 blocks splicing of the M1 intron from its own transcript. We identify an intronic splicing silencer (ISS) adjacent to the M1 branch point that is sufficient to confer Tra2-dependent repression on another RNA. The ISS was found to function independently of its position within the intron, arguing against the idea that bound repressors function by simply interfering with branch point accessibility to general splicing factors. Conserved subelements of the silencer include five short repeated sequences that are required for Tra2 binding but differ from repeated binding sites found in Tra2-dependent splicing enhancers. The ISS also contains a consensus binding site for Rbp1, and this protein was found to facilitate repression of M1 splicing both in vitro and in Drosophila larvae. In contrast to the cooperative binding of SR proteins observed on the doublesex splicing enhancer, we found that Rbp1 and Tra2 bind to the ISS independently through distinct sequences. Our results suggest that functionally synergistic interactions of these SR factors can cause either splicing activation or repression.

  9. Ultraconserved elements are associated with homeostatic control of splicing regulators by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Julie Z.; Grate, Leslie; Donohue, John Paul; Preston, Christine; Nobida, Naomi; O’Brien, Georgeann; Shiue, Lily; Clark, Tyson A.; Blume, John E.; Ares, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Many alternative splicing events create RNAs with premature stop codons, suggesting that alternative splicing coupled with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD) may regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We tested this idea in mice by blocking NMD and measuring changes in isoform representation using splicing-sensitive microarrays. We found a striking class of highly conserved stop codon-containing exons whose inclusion renders the transcript sensitive to NMD. A genomic search for additional examples identified >50 such exons in genes with a variety of functions. These exons are unusually frequent in genes that encode splicing activators and are unexpectedly enriched in the so-called “ultraconserved” elements in the mammalian lineage. Further analysis show that NMD of mRNAs for splicing activators such as SR proteins is triggered by splicing activation events, whereas NMD of the mRNAs for negatively acting hnRNP proteins is triggered by splicing repression, a polarity consistent with widespread homeostatic control of splicing regulator gene expression. We suggest that the extreme genomic conservation surrounding these regulatory splicing events within splicing factor genes demonstrates the evolutionary importance of maintaining tightly tuned homeostasis of RNA-binding protein levels in the vertebrate cell. PMID:17369403

  10. Splicing plastic optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Susan D.; Salazar, Roberto A.

    1991-12-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plastic optical fiber (500 micrometers diameter, fluoropolymer cladding) has been spliced using a fused silica sleeve and a variety of solvent/PMMA solutions as adhesives. Mechanical splicing using index matching fluid has also been investigated. To ensure good bonding and minimize scattering, fiber ends are polished prior to application of adhesive. Using an LED ((lambda) max approximately 640 nm), losses are routinely less than 1.0 dB/splice, and some adhesive formulations have exhibited losses as low as 0.2 dB/splice. Five-meter fibers with as many as ten splices/fiber have been monitored over a period of several months. No fiber has exhibited an increase in optical loss with time.

  11. The splicing factor PRP2, a putative RNA helicase, interacts directly with pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teigelkamp, S; McGarvey, M; Plumpton, M; Beggs, J D

    1994-01-01

    The RNA helicase-like splicing factor PRP2 interacts only transiently with spliceosomes. To facilitate analysis of interactions of PRP2 with spliceosomal components, PRP2 protein was stalled in splicing complexes by two different methods. A dominant negative mutant form of PRP2 protein, which associates stably with spliceosomes, was found to interact directly with pre-mRNAs, as demonstrated by UV-crosslinking experiments. The use of various mutant and truncated pre-mRNAs revealed that this interaction requires a spliceable pre-mRNA and an assembled spliceosome; a 3' splice site is not required. To extend these observations to the wild-type PRP2 protein, spliceosomes were depleted of ATP; PRP2 protein interacts with pre-mRNA in these spliceosomes in an ATP-independent fashion. Comparison of RNA binding by PRP2 protein in the presence of ATP or gamma S-ATP showed that ATP hydrolysis rather than mere ATP binding is required to release PRP2 protein from pre-mRNA. As PRP2 is an RNA-stimulated ATPase, these experiments strongly suggest that the pre-mRNA is the native co-factor stimulating ATP hydrolysis by PRP2 protein in spliceosomes. Since PRP2 is a putative RNA helicase, we propose that the pre-mRNA is the target of RNA displacement activity of PRP2 protein, promoting the first step of splicing. Images PMID:8112302

  12. The new and recurrent FLT3 juxtamembrane deletion mutation shows a dominant negative effect on the wild-type FLT3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sandhöfer, Nadine; Bauer, Julia; Reiter, Katrin; Dufour, Annika; Rothenberg, Maja; Konstandin, Nikola P.; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Tizazu, Belay; Greif, Philipp A.; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is one of the most frequently mutated genes. Recently, a new and recurrent juxtamembrane deletion mutation (p.Q569Vfs*2) resulting in a truncated receptor was identified. The mutated receptor is expressed on the cell surface and still binds its ligand but loses the ability to activate ERK signaling. FLT3 p.Q569fs-expressing Ba/F3 cells show no proliferation after ligand stimulation. Furthermore, coexpressed with the FLT3 wild-type (WT) receptor, the truncated receptor suppresses stimulation and activation of the WT receptor. Thus, FLT3 p.Q569Vfs*2, to our knowledge, is the first FLT3 mutation with a dominant negative effect on the WT receptor. PMID:27346558

  13. Caveolin-1 mutants P132L and Y14F are dominant negative regulators of invasion, migration and aggregation in H1299 lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shatz, Maria; Lustig, Gila; Reich, Reuven; Liscovitch, Mordechai

    2010-06-10

    Caveolin-1 is an essential protein constituent of caveolae. Accumulating evidence indicates that caveolin-1 may act as a positive regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the function of caveolin-1 in human lung cancer cells. Caveolin-1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and reduced focal adhesion kinase (Fak) phosphorylation. Matrix invasion and cell migration as well as expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases were attenuated following caveolin-1 RNAi-mediated knockdown or overexpression of Y14F and P132L mutants, demonstrating dominant-negative activity of these mutants. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy revealed that caveolin-1 and its mutants P132L and Y14F are localized to the trailing edge of migrating cells during both random and directed cell movement, implying an active role of caveolin-1 in the migration process. Suppression of caveolin-1 function greatly elevated the percentage of H1299 cells exhibiting focal adhesions. In addition, cell aggregation was increased by wild type caveolin-1 and attenuated by both P132L and Y14F mutants. Overexpression of wild type caveolin-1 increased caveolae density, however, P132L and Y14F mutants did not affect caveolae formation, suggesting that in this respect that the mutants do not act in a dominant negative manner, and that effects of caveolin-1 on caveolae and cell invasion, migration, focal adhesion and aggregation, are separable. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of caveolin-1 in cell motility, invasiveness and aggregation, therefore, expanding our understanding of the tumor-promoting activities of caveolin-1 in advanced-stage cancer.

  14. Demonstration of differential quantitative requirements for NSF among multiple vesicle fusion pathways of GLUT4 using a dominant-negative ATPase-deficient NSF

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaoli; Matsumoto, Hideko; Hinck, Cynthia S.; Al-Hasani, Hadi; St-Denis, Jean-Francois; Whiteheart, Sidney W.; Cushman, Samuel W. . E-mail: sam_cushman@nih.gov

    2005-07-22

    In this study, we investigated the relative participation of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) in vivo in a complex multistep vesicle trafficking system, the translocation response of GLUT4 to insulin in rat adipose cells. Transfections of rat adipose cells demonstrate that over-expression of wild-type NSF has no effect on total, or basal and insulin-stimulated cell-surface expression of HA-tagged GLUT4. In contrast, a dominant-negative NSF (NSF-D1EQ) can be expressed at a low enough level that it has little effect on total HA-GLUT4, but does reduce both basal and insulin-stimulated cell-surface HA-GLUT4 by {approx}50% without affecting the GLUT4 fold-translocation response to insulin. However, high expression levels of NSF-D1EQ decrease total HA-GLUT4. The inhibitory effect of NSF-D1EQ on cell-surface HA-GLUT4 is reversed when endocytosis is inhibited by co-expression of a dominant-negative dynamin (dynamin-K44A). Moreover, NSF-D1EQ does not affect cell-surface levels of constitutively recycling GLUT1 and TfR, suggesting a predominant effect of low-level NSF-D1EQ on the trafficking of GLUT4 from the endocytic recycling compared to the intracellular GLUT4-specific compartment. Thus, our data demonstrate that the multiple fusion steps in GLUT4 trafficking have differential quantitative requirements for NSF activity. This indicates that the rates of plasma and intracellular membrane fusion reactions vary, leading to differential needs for the turnover of the SNARE proteins.

  15. Cochlear outer hair cells in a dominant-negative connexin26 mutant mouse preserve non-linear capacitance in spite of impaired distortion product otoacoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Minekawa, A; Abe, T; Inoshita, A; Iizuka, T; Kakehata, S; Narui, Y; Koike, T; Kamiya, K; Okamura, H-O; Shinkawa, H; Ikeda, K

    2009-12-15

    Mutations in the connexin26 gene (GJB2) are the most common genetic cause of congenital bilateral non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Transgenic mice were established carrying human Cx26 with the R75W mutation that was identified in a deaf family with autosomal dominant negative inheritance [Kudo T et al. (2003) Hum Mol Genet 12:995-1004]. A dominant-negative Gjb2 R75W transgenic mouse model shows incomplete development of the cochlear supporting cells, resulting in profound deafness from birth [Inoshita A et al. (2008) Neuroscience 156:1039-1047]. The Cx26 defect in the Gjb2 R75W transgenic mouse is restricted to the supporting cells; it is unclear why the auditory response is severely disturbed in spite of the presence of outer hair cells (OHCs). The present study was designed to evaluate developmental changes in the in vivo and in vitro function of the OHC, and the fine structure of the OHC and adjacent supporting cells in the R75W transgenic mouse. No detectable distortion product otoacoustic emissions were observed at any frequencies in R75W transgenic mice throughout development. A characteristic phenotype observed in these mice was the absence of the tunnel of Corti, Nuel's space, and spaces surrounding the OHC; the OHC were compressed and squeezed by the surrounding supporting cells. On the other hand, the OHC developed normally. Structural features of the lateral wall, such as the membrane-bound subsurface cisterna beneath the plasma membrane, were intact. Prestin, the voltage-dependent motor protein, was observed by immunohistochemistry in the OHC basolateral membranes of both transgenic and non-transgenic mice. No significant differences in electromotility of isolated OHCs during development was observed between transgenic and control mice. The present study indicates that normal development of the supporting cells is indispensable for proper cellular function of the OHC.

  16. Caveolin-1 mutants P132L and Y14F are dominant negative regulators of invasion, migration and aggregation in H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Maria; Lustig, Gila; Reich, Reuven; Liscovitch, Mordechai

    2010-06-10

    Caveolin-1 is an essential protein constituent of caveolae. Accumulating evidence indicates that caveolin-1 may act as a positive regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the function of caveolin-1 in human lung cancer cells. Caveolin-1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and reduced focal adhesion kinase (Fak) phosphorylation. Matrix invasion and cell migration as well as expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases were attenuated following caveolin-1 RNAi-mediated knockdown or overexpression of Y14F and P132L mutants, demonstrating dominant-negative activity of these mutants. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy revealed that caveolin-1 and its mutants P132L and Y14F are localized to the trailing edge of migrating cells during both random and directed cell movement, implying an active role of caveolin-1 in the migration process. Suppression of caveolin-1 function greatly elevated the percentage of H1299 cells exhibiting focal adhesions. In addition, cell aggregation was increased by wild type caveolin-1 and attenuated by both P132L and Y14F mutants. Overexpression of wild type caveolin-1 increased caveolae density, however, P132L and Y14F mutants did not affect caveolae formation, suggesting that in this respect that the mutants do not act in a dominant negative manner, and that effects of caveolin-1 on caveolae and cell invasion, migration, focal adhesion and aggregation, are separable. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of caveolin-1 in cell motility, invasiveness and aggregation, therefore, expanding our understanding of the tumor-promoting activities of caveolin-1 in advanced-stage cancer.

  17. Coupling transcription and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing regulation not only depends on the interaction of splicing factors with splicing enhancers and silencers in the pre-mRNA, but also on the coupling between transcription and splicing. This coupling is possible because splicing is often cotranscriptional and promoter identity and occupation may affect alternative splicing. We discuss here the different mechanisms by which transcription regulates alternative splicing. These include the recruitment of splicing factors to the transcribing polymerase and "kinetic coupling", which involves changes in the rate of transcriptional elongation that in turn affect the timing in which splice sites are presented to the splicing machinery. The recruitment mechanism may depend on the particular features of the carboxyl terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, whereas kinetic coupling seems to be linked to how changes in chromatin structure and other factors affect transcription elongation.

  18. A Novel, Non-canonical Splice Variant of the Ikaros Gene Is Aberrantly Expressed in B-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mancarelli, Maria Michela; Verzella, Daniela; Fischietti, Mariafausta; Di Tommaso, Ambra; Maccarone, Rita; Plebani, Sara; Di Ianni, Mauro; Gulino, Alberto; Alesse, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    The Ikaros gene encodes a Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor involved in hematopoiesis regulation. Ikaros has been established as one of the most clinically relevant tumor suppressors in several hematological malignancies. In fact, expression of dominant negative Ikaros isoforms is associated with adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia and adult and juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we report the isolation of a novel, non-canonical Ikaros splice variant, called Ikaros 11 (Ik11). Ik11 is structurally related to known dominant negative Ikaros isoforms, due to the lack of a functional DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, Ik11 is the first Ikaros splice variant missing the transcriptional activation domain. Indeed, we demonstrated that Ik11 works as a dominant negative protein, being able to dimerize with Ikaros DNA-binding isoforms and inhibit their functions, at least in part by retaining them in the cytoplasm. Notably, we demonstrated that Ik11 is the first dominant negative Ikaros isoform to be aberrantly expressed in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Aberrant expression of Ik11 interferes with both proliferation and apoptotic pathways, providing a mechanism for Ik11 involvement in tumor pathogenesis. Thus, Ik11 could represent a novel marker for B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:23874502

  19. RNA helicases in splicing.

    PubMed

    Cordin, Olivier; Beggs, Jean D

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, introns are spliced from pre-mRNAs by the spliceosome. Both the composition and the structure of the spliceosome are highly dynamic, and eight DExD/H RNA helicases play essential roles in controlling conformational rearrangements. There is evidence that the various helicases are functionally and physically connected with each other and with many other factors in the spliceosome. Understanding the dynamics of those interactions is essential to comprehend the mechanism and regulation of normal as well as of pathological splicing. This review focuses on recent advances in the characterization of the splicing helicases and their interactions, and highlights the deep integration of splicing helicases in global mRNP biogenesis pathways.

  20. Detecting Image Splicing Using Merged Features in Chroma Space

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjie; Dai, Yuewei

    2014-01-01

    Image splicing is an image editing method to copy a part of an image and paste it onto another image, and it is commonly followed by postprocessing such as local/global blurring, compression, and resizing. To detect this kind of forgery, the image rich models, a feature set successfully used in the steganalysis is evaluated on the splicing image dataset at first, and the dominant submodel is selected as the first kind of feature. The selected feature and the DCT Markov features are used together to detect splicing forgery in the chroma channel, which is convinced effective in splicing detection. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can detect splicing forgeries with lower error rate compared to the previous literature. PMID:24574877

  1. Detecting image splicing using merged features in chroma space.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Liu, Guangjie; Dai, Yuewei

    2014-01-01

    Image splicing is an image editing method to copy a part of an image and paste it onto another image, and it is commonly followed by postprocessing such as local/global blurring, compression, and resizing. To detect this kind of forgery, the image rich models, a feature set successfully used in the steganalysis is evaluated on the splicing image dataset at first, and the dominant submodel is selected as the first kind of feature. The selected feature and the DCT Markov features are used together to detect splicing forgery in the chroma channel, which is convinced effective in splicing detection. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can detect splicing forgeries with lower error rate compared to the previous literature.

  2. Targeting MDM4 Splicing in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2017-01-01

    MDM4, an essential negative regulator of the P53 tumor suppressor, is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells that harbor a wild-type P53. By a mechanism based on alternative splicing, the MDM4 gene generates two mutually exclusive isoforms: MDM4-FL, which encodes the full-length MDM4 protein, and a shorter splice variant called MDM4-S. Previous results suggested that the MDM4-S isoform could be an important driver of tumor development. In this short review, we discuss a recent set of data indicating that MDM4-S is more likely a passenger isoform during tumorigenesis and that targeting MDM4 splicing to prevent MDM4-FL protein expression appears as a promising strategy to reactivate p53 in cancer cells. The benefits and risks associated with this strategy are also discussed. PMID:28230750

  3. Adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit mutations causing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3) demonstrate genotype–phenotype correlations, codon bias and dominant-negative effects

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Fadil M.; Howles, Sarah A.; Rogers, Angela; Cranston, Treena; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Babinsky, Valerie N.; Reed, Anita A.; Thakker, Clare E.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Brown, Rosalind S.; Connell, John M.; Cook, Jacqueline; Darzy, Ken; Ehtisham, Sarah; Graham, Una; Hulse, Tony; Hunter, Steven J.; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Dhavendra; McKenna, Malachi J.; McKnight, John A.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Mughal, M. Zulf; O'Halloran, Domhnall; Pearce, Simon H.; Porteous, Mary E.; Rahman, Mushtaqur; Richardson, Tristan; Robinson, Robert; Scheers, Isabelle; Siddique, Haroon; van't Hoff, William G.; Wang, Timothy; Whyte, Michael P.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2015-01-01

    The adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit (AP2σ2) is pivotal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of plasma membrane constituents such as the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Mutations of the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue result in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3), a disorder of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) homeostasis. To elucidate the role of AP2σ2 in Ca2+o regulation, we investigated 65 FHH probands, without other FHH-associated mutations, for AP2σ2 mutations, characterized their functional consequences and investigated the genetic mechanisms leading to FHH3. AP2σ2 mutations were identified in 17 probands, comprising 5 Arg15Cys, 4 Arg15His and 8 Arg15Leu mutations. A genotype–phenotype correlation was observed with the Arg15Leu mutation leading to marked hypercalcaemia. FHH3 probands harboured additional phenotypes such as cognitive dysfunction. All three FHH3-causing AP2σ2 mutations impaired CaSR signal transduction in a dominant-negative manner. Mutational bias was observed at the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue as other predicted missense substitutions (Arg15Gly, Arg15Pro and Arg15Ser), which also caused CaSR loss-of-function, were not detected in FHH probands, and these mutations were found to reduce the numbers of CaSR-expressing cells. FHH3 probands had significantly greater serum calcium (sCa) and magnesium (sMg) concentrations with reduced urinary calcium to creatinine clearance ratios (CCCR) in comparison with FHH1 probands with CaSR mutations, and a calculated index of sCa × sMg/100 × CCCR, which was ≥ 5.0, had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 83 and 86%, respectively, for FHH3. Thus, our studies demonstrate AP2σ2 mutations to result in a more severe FHH phenotype with genotype–phenotype correlations, and a dominant-negative mechanism of action with mutational bias at the Arg15 residue. PMID:26082470

  4. Functional dominant-negative mutation of sodium channel subunit gene SCN3B associated with atrial fibrillation in a Chinese GeneID population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengyun; Yang, Qinbo; Wu, Xiaofen; Yang, Yanzong; Shi, Lisong; Wang, Chuchu; Wu, Gang; Xia, Yunlong; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Rongfeng; Xu, Chengqi; Cheng, Xiang; Li, Sisi; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Fu, Fenfen; Liao, Yuhua; Fang, Fang; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Wang, Qing K.

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the clinic, and accounts for more than 15% of strokes. Mutations in cardiac sodium channel α, β1 and β2 subunit genes (SCN5A, SCN1B, and SCN2B) have been identified in AF patients. We hypothesize that mutations in the sodium channel β3 subunit gene SCN3B are also associated with AF. To test this hypothesis, we carried out a large scale sequencing analysis of all coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of SCN3B in 477 AF patients (28.5% lone AF) from the GeneID Chinese Han population. A novel A130V mutation was identified in a 46 year-old patient with lone AF, and the mutation was absent in 500 controls. Mutation A130V dramatically decreased the cardiac sodium current density when expressed in HEK293/Nav1.5 stable cell line, but did not have significant effect on kinetics of activation, inactivation, and channel recovery from inactivation. When co-expressed with wild type SCN3B, the A130V mutant SCN3B negated the function of wild type SCN3B, suggesting that A130V acts by a dominant negative mechanism. Western blot analysis with biotinylated plasma membrane protein extracts revealed that A130V did not affect cell surface expression of Nav1.5 or SCN3B, suggesting that mutant A130V SCN3B may not inhibit sodium channel trafficking, instead may affect conduction of sodium ions due to its malfunction as an integral component of the channel complex. This study identifies the first AF-associated mutation in SCN3B, and suggests that mutations in SCN3B may be a new pathogenic cause of AF. PMID:20558140

  5. A divalent ion is crucial in the structure and dominant-negative function of ID proteins, a class of helix-loop-helix transcription regulators.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marie Vivian; Jiang, Sizun; Palasingam, Paaventhan; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of DNA binding and differentiation (ID) proteins, a dominant-negative group of helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription regulators, are well-characterized key players in cellular fate determination during development in mammals as well as Drosophila. Although not oncogenes themselves, their upregulation by various oncogenic proteins (such as Ras, Myc) and their inhibitory effects on cell cycle proteins (such as pRb) hint at their possible roles in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, their potency as inhibitors of cellular differentiation, through their heterodimerization with subsequent inactivation of the ubiquitous E proteins, suggest possible novel roles in engineering induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We present the high-resolution 2.1Å crystal structure of ID2 (HLH domain), coupled with novel biochemical insights in the presence of a divalent ion, possibly calcium (Ca2+), in the loop of ID proteins, which appear to be crucial for the structure and activity of ID proteins. These new insights will pave the way for new rational drug designs, in addition to current synthetic peptide options, against this potent player in tumorigenesis as well as more efficient ways for stem cells reprogramming.

  6. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  7. Dominant-negative cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein E2-C/UbcH10 blocks cells in metaphase

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Fiona M.; Aristarkhov, Alexander; Beck, Sharon; Hershko, Avram; Ruderman, Joan V.

    1997-01-01

    Destruction of mitotic cyclins by ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is required for cells to complete mitosis and enter interphase of the next cell cycle. In clam eggs, this process is catalyzed by a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein, E2-C, and the cyclosome/anaphase promoting complex (APC), a 20S particle containing cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity. Here we report cloning a human homolog of E2-C, UbcH10, which shares 61% amino acid identity with clam E2-C and can substitute for clam E2-C in vitro. Dominant-negative clam E2-C and human UbcH10 proteins, created by altering the catalytic cysteine to serine, inhibit the in vitro ubiquitination and destruction of cyclin B in clam oocyte extracts. When transfected into mammalian cells, mutant UbcH10 inhibits the destruction of both cyclin A and B, arrests cells in M phase, and inhibits the onset of anaphase, presumably by blocking the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of proteins responsible for sister chromatid separation. Thus, E2-C/UbcH10-mediated ubiquitination is involved in both cdc2 inactivation and sister chromatid separation, processes that are normally coordinated during exit from mitosis. PMID:9122200

  8. Expression of beta 1B integrin isoform in CHO cells results in a dominant negative effect on cell adhesion and motility

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The integrin subunit beta 1B, a beta 1 isoform with a unique sequence at the cytoplasmic domain, forms heterodimers with integrin alpha chains and binds fibronectin, but it does not localize to focal adhesion sites (Balzac, F., A. Belkin, V. Koteliansky, Y. Balabanow, F. Altruda, L. Silengo, and G. Tarone. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 121:171-178). Here we analyze the functional properties of human beta 1B by expressing it in hamster CHO cells. When stimulated by specific antibodies, beta 1B does not trigger tyrosine phosphorylation of a 125- kD cytosolic protein, an intracellular signalling pathway that is activated both by the endogenous hamster or the transfected human beta 1A. Moreover, expression of beta 1B results in reduced spreading on fibronectin and laminin, but not on vitronectin. Expression of beta 1B also results in severe reduction of cell motility in the Boyden chamber assay. Reduced cell spreading and motility could not be accounted for by preferential association of beta 1B with a given integrin alpha subunit. These data, together with our previous results, indicate that beta 1B interferes with beta 1A function when expressed in CHO cells resulting in a dominant negative effect on cell adhesion and migration. PMID:7523423

  9. An N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced dominant negative mutation in the JAK3 kinase protects against cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Bongfen, Silayuv E; Rodrigue-Gervais, Ian-Gael; Berghout, Joanne; Torre, Sabrina; Cingolani, Pablo; Wiltshire, Sean A; Leiva-Torres, Gabriel A; Letourneau, Louis; Sladek, Robert; Blanchette, Mathieu; Lathrop, Mark; Behr, Marcel A; Gruenheid, Samantha; Vidal, Silvia M; Saleh, Maya; Gros, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a lethal neurological complication of malaria. We implemented a genome-wide screen in mutagenized mice to identify host proteins involved in CM pathogenesis and whose inhibition may be of therapeutic value. One pedigree (P48) segregated a resistance trait whose CM-protective effect was fully penetrant, mapped to chromosome 8, and identified by genome sequencing as homozygosity for a mis-sense mutation (W81R) in the FERM domain of Janus-associated kinase 3 (Jak3). The causative effect of Jak3(W81R) was verified by complementation testing in Jak3(W81R/-) double heterozygotes that were fully protected against CM. Jak3(W81R) homozygotes showed defects in thymic development with depletion of CD8(+) T cell, B cell, and NK cell compartments, and defective T cell-dependent production of IFN-γ. Adoptive transfer of normal splenocytes abrogates CM resistance in Jak3(W81R) homozygotes, an effect attributed to the CD8(+) T cells. Jak3(W81R) behaves as a dominant negative variant, with significant CM resistance of Jak3(W81R/+) heterozygotes, compared to CM-susceptible Jak3(+/+) and Jak3(+/-) controls. CM resistance in Jak3(W81R/+) heterozygotes occurs in presence of normal T, B and NK cell numbers. These findings highlight the pathological role of CD8(+) T cells and Jak3-dependent IFN-γ-mediated Th1 responses in CM pathogenesis.

  10. Dominant negative RPW8.2 fusion proteins reveal the importance of haustorium-oriented protein trafficking for resistance against powdery mildew in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Berkey, Robert; Pan, Zhiyong; Wang, Wenming; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Xianfeng; King, Harlan; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew fungi form feeding structures called haustoria inside epidermal cells of host plants to extract photosynthates for their epiphytic growth and reproduction. The haustorium is encased by an interfacial membrane termed the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM). The atypical resistance protein RPW8.2 from Arabidopsis is specifically targeted to the EHM where RPW8.2 activates haustorium-targeted (thus broad-spectrum) resistance against powdery mildew fungi. EHM-specific localization of RPW8.2 suggests the existence of an EHM-oriented protein/membrane trafficking pathway during EHM biogenesis. However, the importance of this specific trafficking pathway for host defense has not been evaluated via a genetic approach without affecting other trafficking pathways. Here, we report that expression of EHM-oriented, nonfunctional RPW8.2 chimeric proteins exerts dominant negative effect over functional RPW8.2 and potentially over other EHM-localized defense proteins, thereby compromising both RPW8.2-mediated and basal resistance to powdery mildew. Thus, our results highlight the importance of the EHM-oriented protein/membrane trafficking pathway for host resistance against haustorium-forming pathogens such as powdery mildew fungi.

  11. A dominant-negative mutant of C/EBPalpha, associated with acute myeloid leukemias, inhibits differentiation of myeloid and erythroid progenitors of man but not mouse.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Maike; Löhler, Jürgen; Fischer, Meike; Herwig, Uwe; Tenen, Daniel G; Stocking, Carol

    2004-04-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) is an essential transcription factor for granulocytic differentiation. C/EBPalpha mutations are found in approximately 8% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Most of these mutations occur in the N-terminal coding region, resulting in a frame shift and the enhanced translation of a dominant-negative 30-kDa protein, which may be responsible for the differentiation block observed in AML. To test this hypothesis, we introduced a cDNA encoding an N-terminal mutated C/EBPalpha (mut10) into primary hematopoietic progenitors using a retroviral vector. Expression of mut10 in human CD34+ cord blood cells dramatically inhibited differentiation of both myeloid and erythroid lineages. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated coexpression of both myeloid and erythroid markers in the immature transformed cells. Surprisingly, mut10 did not block myelocytic differentiation in murine progenitors but did alter their differentiation kinetics and clonogenicity. Experiments were performed to confirm that the differential effect of mut10 on murine and human progenitors was not due to species-specific differences in C/EBPalpha protein sequences, expression levels, or inefficient targeting of relevant cells. Taken together, our results underline the intrinsic differences between hematopoietic controls in mouse and human and support the hypothesis that mutations in CEBPA are critical events in the disruption of myeloid differentiation in AMLs.

  12. Expression of beta 1B integrin isoform in CHO cells results in a dominant negative effect on cell adhesion and motility.

    PubMed

    Balzac, F; Retta, S F; Albini, A; Melchiorri, A; Koteliansky, V E; Geuna, M; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1994-10-01

    The integrin subunit beta 1B, a beta 1 isoform with a unique sequence at the cytoplasmic domain, forms heterodimers with integrin alpha chains and binds fibronectin, but it does not localize to focal adhesion sites (Balzac, F., A. Belkin, V. Koteliansky, Y. Balabanow, F. Altruda, L. Silengo, and G. Tarone. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 121:171-178). Here we analyze the functional properties of human beta 1B by expressing it in hamster CHO cells. When stimulated by specific antibodies, beta 1B does not trigger tyrosine phosphorylation of a 125-kD cytosolic protein, an intracellular signalling pathway that is activated both by the endogenous hamster or the transfected human beta 1A. Moreover, expression of beta 1B results in reduced spreading on fibronectin and laminin, but not on vitronectin. Expression of beta 1B also results in severe reduction of cell motility in the Boyden chamber assay. Reduced cell spreading and motility could not be accounted for by preferential association of beta 1B with a given integrin alpha subunit. These data, together with our previous results, indicate that beta 1B interferes with beta 1A function when expressed in CHO cells resulting in a dominant negative effect on cell adhesion and migration.

  13. Delayed dominant-negative TNF gene therapy halts progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Harms, Ashley S; Barnum, Christopher J; Ruhn, Kelly A; Varghese, Steve; Treviño, Isaac; Blesch, Armin; Tansey, Malú G

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder typified by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Recent evidence indicates that neuroinflammation may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of PD, particularly tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We have previously shown that soluble TNF (solTNF) is required to mediate robust degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or lipopolysaccharide. What remains unknown is whether TNF inhibition can attenuate the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration. To test this, rats were injected in the SNpc with lentivirus encoding dominant-negative TNF (lenti-DN-TNF) 2 weeks after receiving a 6-OHDA lesion. Remarkably, when examined 5 weeks after the initial 6-OHDA lesion, no further loss of nigral DA neurons was observed. Lenti-DN-TNF also attenuated microglial activation. Together, these data suggest that TNF is likely a critical mediator of nigral DA neuron death during the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration, and that microglia may be the principal cell type involved. These promising findings provide compelling reasons to perform DN-TNF gene transfer studies in nonhuman primates with the long-term goal of using it in the clinic to prevent the delayed and progressive degeneration of DA neurons that gives rise to motor symptoms in PD.

  14. Delayed Dominant-Negative TNF Gene Therapy Halts Progressive Loss of Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Ashley S; Barnum, Christopher J; Ruhn, Kelly A; Varghese, Steve; Treviño, Isaac; Blesch, Armin; Tansey, Malú G

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder typified by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Recent evidence indicates that neuroinflammation may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of PD, particularly tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We have previously shown that soluble TNF (solTNF) is required to mediate robust degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or lipopolysaccharide. What remains unknown is whether TNF inhibition can attenuate the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration. To test this, rats were injected in the SNpc with lentivirus encoding dominant-negative TNF (lenti-DN-TNF) 2 weeks after receiving a 6-OHDA lesion. Remarkably, when examined 5 weeks after the initial 6-OHDA lesion, no further loss of nigral DA neurons was observed. Lenti-DN-TNF also attenuated microglial activation. Together, these data suggest that TNF is likely a critical mediator of nigral DA neuron death during the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration, and that microglia may be the principal cell type involved. These promising findings provide compelling reasons to perform DN-TNF gene transfer studies in nonhuman primates with the long-term goal of using it in the clinic to prevent the delayed and progressive degeneration of DA neurons that gives rise to motor symptoms in PD. PMID:20959812

  15. Alternative splicing interference by xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Emanuela; Chipman, J Kevin; Soller, Matthias

    2012-06-14

    The protein coding sequence of most eukaryotic genes (exons) is interrupted by non-coding parts (introns), which are excised in a process termed splicing. To generate a mature messenger RNA (mRNA) hundreds of combinatorial protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions are required to splice out often very large introns with high fidelity and accuracy. Inherent to splicing is the use of alternative splice sites generating immense proteomic diversity from a limited number of genes. In humans, alternative splicing is a major mode of regulating gene expression, occurs in over 90% of genes and is particularly abundant in the brain. Only recently, it has been recognized that the complexity of the splicing process makes it susceptible to interference by various xenobiotics. These compounds include antineoplastic substances, commonly used drugs and food supplements and cause a spectrum of effects ranging from deleterious inhibition of general splicing to highly specific modifications of alternative splicing affecting only certain genes. Alterations in splicing have been implicated in numerous diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. Splicing regulation plays an important role in the execution of programmed cell death. The switch between anti- and pro-apoptotic isoforms by alternative splice site selection and misregulation of a number of splicing factors impacts on cell survival and disease. Here, our current knowledge is summarized on compounds interfering with general and alternative splicing and of the current methodology to study changes in these processes relevant to the field of toxicology and future risk assessments.

  16. Heterozygous PINK1 p.G411S increases risk of Parkinson’s disease via a dominant-negative mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Hudec, Roman; Ando, Maya; Truban, Dominika; Hou, Xu; Ogaki, Kotaro; Heckman, Michael G.; James, Elle D.; Swanberg, Maria; Jimenez-Ferrer, Itzia; Hansson, Oskar; Opala, Grzegorz; Siuda, Joanna; Boczarska-Jedynak, Magdalena; Friedman, Andrzej; Koziorowski, Dariusz; Rudzińska-Bar, Monika; Aasly, Jan O.; Lynch, Timothy; Mellick, George D.; Mohan, Megha; Silburn, Peter A.; Sanotsky, Yanosh; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Farrer, Matthew J.; Chen, Li; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.

    2017-01-01

    size conferred by a partial dominant-negative function phenotype. PMID:27807026

  17. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected with Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Muneyasu; He, Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DN(dominant-negative)Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Materials and Methods Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 MOI) and irradiated with single doses or 0-5 doses of 3 Gy with 6 h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing 100% N2. Cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after (final) irradiation, and cell survival determined by colony formation. Survival data were fitted to L-Q model or exponential line. Results Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of HCT8 and HT29 cells. Virus enhancement ratio (VER) for single dose irradiation at surviving fraction of 0.1 was ~1.3 for both oxic and hypoxic HCT8, and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. Similar VER of 1.2–1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses but these values were smaller than values found for DNKu70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference is discussed. The OERs for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses were 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus-infection slightly altered them. Conclusion Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DNKu70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple doses. PMID:20510198

  18. Attenuation of pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus strain through the chimeric S-segment encoding sandfly fever phlebovirus NSs or a dominant-negative PKR.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Slack, Olga A L; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E; Juelich, Terry L; Zhang, Lihong; Smith, Jennifer K; Perez, David; Gong, Bin; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-11-16

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease affecting ruminants and humans. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) causes abortions and fetal malformations in ruminants, and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or retinitis in humans. The live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the US. However, this vaccine lacks a marker for the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals (DIVA). NSs gene is dispensable for RVFV replication, and thus, rMP-12 strains lacking NSs gene is applicable to monitor vaccinated animals. However, the immunogenicity of MP-12 lacking NSs was not as high as parental MP-12. Thus, chimeric MP-12 strains encoding NSs from either Toscana virus (TOSV), sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) or Punta Toro virus Adames strain (PTA) were characterized previously. Although chimeric MP-12 strains are highly immunogenic, the attenuation through the S-segment remains unknown. Using pathogenic ZH501 strain, we aimed to demonstrate the attenuation of ZH501 strain through chimeric S-segment encoding either the NSs of TOSV, SFSV, PTA, or Punta Toro virus Balliet strain (PTB). In addition, we characterized rZH501 encoding a human dominant-negative PKR (PKRΔE7), which also enhances the immunogenicity of MP-12. Study done on mice revealed that attenuation of rZH501 occurred through the S-segment encoding either PKRΔE7 or SFSV NSs. However, rZH501 encoding either TOSV, PTA, or PTB NSs in the S-segment uniformly caused lethal encephalitis. Our results indicated that the S-segments encoding PKRΔE7 or SFSV NSs are attenuated and thus applicable toward next generation MP-12 vaccine candidates that encode a DIVA marker.

  19. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington’s disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions. PMID:26863614

  20. Expression of Dominant-Negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor Alpha1 in Leydig and Sertoli Cells Demonstrates No Additional Defect Compared with Expression in Sertoli Cells Only

    PubMed Central

    Fumel, Betty; Froment, Pascal; Holzenberger, Martin; Livera, Gabriel; Monget, Philippe; Fouchécourt, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Background In the testis, thyroid hormone (T3) regulates the number of gametes produced through its action on Sertoli cell proliferation. However, the role of T3 in the regulation of steroidogenesis is still controversial. Methods The TRαAMI knock-in allele allows the generation of transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative TRα1 (thyroid receptor α1) isoform restricted to specific target cells after Cre-loxP recombination. Here, we introduced this mutant allele in both Sertoli and Leydig cells using a novel aromatase-iCre (ARO-iCre) line that expresses Cre recombinase under control of the human Cyp19(IIa)/aromatase promoter. Findings We showed that loxP recombination induced by this ARO-iCre is restricted to male and female gonads, and is effective in Sertoli and Leydig cells, but not in germ cells. We compared this model with the previous introduction of TRαAMI specifically in Sertoli cells in order to investigate T3 regulation of steroidogenesis. We demonstrated that TRαAMI-ARO males exhibited increased testis weight, increased sperm reserve in adulthood correlated to an increased proliferative index at P3 in vivo, and a loss of T3-response in vitro. Nevertheless, TRαAMI-ARO males showed normal fertility. This phenotype is similar to TRαAMI-SC males. Importantly, plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels, as well as mRNA levels of steroidogenesis enzymes StAR, Cyp11a1 and Cyp17a1 were not affected in TRαAMI-ARO. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that the presence of a mutant TRαAMI allele in both Leydig and Sertoli cells does not accentuate the phenotype in comparison with its presence in Sertoli cells only. This suggests that direct T3 regulation of steroidogenesis through TRα1 is moderate in Leydig cells, and that Sertoli cells are the main target of T3 action in the testis. PMID:25793522

  1. Splice assembly tool and method of splicing

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1980-01-01

    A splice assembly tool for assembling component parts of an electrical conductor while producing a splice connection between electrical cables therewith, comprises a first structural member adaptable for supporting force applying means thereon, said force applying means enabling a rotary force applied manually thereto to be converted to a longitudinal force for subsequent application against a first component part of said electrical connection, a second structural member adaptable for engaging a second component part in a manner to assist said first structural member in assembling the component parts relative to one another and transmission means for conveying said longitudinal force between said first and said second structural members, said first and said second structural members being coupled to one another by said transmission means, wherein at least one of said component parts comprises a tubular elastomeric sleeve and said force applying means provides a relatively high mechanical advantage when said rotary force is applied thereto so as to facilitate assembly of said at least one tubular elastomeric sleeve about said other component part in an interference fit manner.

  2. Inflammation and Hyperglycemia Mediate Deaf1 Splicing in the Pancreatic Lymph Nodes via Distinct Pathways During Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fuhlbrigge, Rebecca; Taylor, Cariel; Creusot, Remi J.; Nishikawa-Matsumura, Teppei; Whiting, Chan C.; Schartner, Jill M.; Akter, Rahima; von Herrath, Matthias; Fathman, C. Garrison

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral tolerance is partially controlled by the expression of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs) in lymph node stromal cells (LNSCs). We previously identified a transcriptional regulator, deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor 1 (Deaf1), that can regulate PTA expression in LNSCs of the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs). During the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D), Deaf1 is spliced to form the dominant-negative isoform Deaf1-Var1. Here we show that Deaf1-Var1 expression correlates with the severity of disease in NOD mice and is reduced in the PLNs of mice that do not develop hyperglycemia. Inflammation and hyperglycemia independently drive Deaf1 splicing through activation of the splicing factors Srsf10 and Ptbp2, respectively. Inflammation induced by injection of activated splenocytes increased Deaf1-Var1 and Srsf10, but not Ptbp2, in the PLNs of NOD.SCID mice. Hyperglycemia induced by treatment with the insulin receptor agonist S961 increased Deaf1-Var1 and Ptbp2, but not Srsf10, in the PLNs of NOD.B10 and NOD mice. Overexpression of PTBP2 and/or SRSF10 also increased human DEAF1-VAR1 and reduced PTA expression in HEK293T cells. These data suggest that during the progression of T1D, inflammation and hyperglycemia mediate the splicing of DEAF1 and loss of PTA expression in LNSCs by regulating the expression of SRSF10 and PTBP2. PMID:25187368

  3. SpliceDisease database: linking RNA splicing and disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Kaibo; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing is an important aspect of gene regulation in many organisms. Splicing of RNA is regulated by complicated mechanisms involving numerous RNA-binding proteins and the intricate network of interactions among them. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or its regulatory proteins have been shown to be involved in human diseases. Defects in pre-mRNA splicing process have emerged as a common disease-causing mechanism. Therefore, a database integrating RNA splicing and disease associations would be helpful for understanding not only the RNA splicing but also its contribution to disease. In SpliceDisease database, we manually curated 2337 splicing mutation disease entries involving 303 genes and 370 diseases, which have been supported experimentally in 898 publications. The SpliceDisease database provides information including the change of the nucleotide in the sequence, the location of the mutation on the gene, the reference Pubmed ID and detailed description for the relationship among gene mutations, splicing defects and diseases. We standardized the names of the diseases and genes and provided links for these genes to NCBI and UCSC genome browser for further annotation and genomic sequences. For the location of the mutation, we give direct links of the entry to the respective position/region in the genome browser. The users can freely browse, search and download the data in SpliceDisease at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/sdisease.

  4. Mutually exclusive splicing regulates the Nav 1.6 sodium channel function through a combinatorial mechanism that involves three distinct splicing regulatory elements and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zubović, Lorena; Baralle, Marco; Baralle, Francisco E.

    2012-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is a form of alternative pre-mRNA processing that consists in the use of only one of a set of two or more exons. We have investigated the mechanisms involved in this process for exon 18 of the Nav 1.6 sodium channel transcript and its significance regarding gene-expression regulation. The 18N exon (neonatal form) has a stop codon in phase and although the mRNA can be detected by amplification methods, the truncated protein has not been observed. The switch from 18N to 18A (adult form) occurs only in a restricted set of neural tissues producing the functional channel while other tissues display the mRNA with the 18N exon also in adulthood. We demonstrate that the mRNA species carrying the stop codon is subjected to Nonsense-Mediated Decay, providing a control mechanism of channel expression. We also map a string of cis-elements within the mutually exclusive exons and in the flanking introns responsible for their strict tissue and temporal specificity. These elements bind a series of positive (RbFox-1, SRSF1, SRSF2) and negative (hnRNPA1, PTB, hnRNPA2/B1, hnRNPD-like JKTBP) splicing regulatory proteins. These splicing factors, with the exception of RbFox-1, are ubiquitous but their levels vary during development and differentiation, ensuing unique sets of tissue and temporal levels of splicing factors. The combinatorial nature of these elements is highlighted by the dominance of the elements that bind the ubiquitous factors over the tissue specific RbFox-1. PMID:22434879

  5. Attenuation of the slow component of delayed rectification, action potential prolongation, and triggered activity in mice expressing a dominant-negative Kv2 alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Barry, D M; Li, H; Brunet, S; Guo, W; Nerbonne, J M

    1999-10-01

    An in vivo experimental strategy, involving cardiac-specific expression of a mutant Kv 2.1 subunit that functions as a dominant negative, was exploited in studies focused on exploring the role of members of the Kv2 subfamily of pore-forming (alpha) subunits in the generation of functional voltage-gated K(+) channels in the mammalian heart. A mutant Kv2.1 alpha subunit (Kv2.1N216) was designed to produce a truncated protein containing the intracellular N terminus, the S1 membrane-spanning domain, and a portion of the S1/S2 loop. The truncated Kv2.1N216 was epitope tagged at the C terminus with the 8-amino acid FLAG peptide to generate Kv2. 1N216FLAG. No ionic currents are detected on expression of Kv2. 1N216FLAG in HEK-293 cells, although coexpression of this construct with wild-type Kv2.1 markedly reduced the amplitudes of Kv2. 1-induced currents. Using the alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter to direct cardiac specific expression of the transgene, 2 lines of Kv2. 1N216FLAG-expressing transgenic mice were generated. Electrophysiological recordings from ventricular myocytes isolated from these animals revealed that I(K, slow) is selectively reduced. The attenuation of I(K, slow) is accompanied by marked action potential prolongation, and, occasionally, spontaneous triggered activity (apparently induced by early afterdepolarizations) is observed. The time constant of inactivation of I(K, slow) in Kv2. 1N216FLAG-expressing cells (mean+/-SEM=830+/-103 ms; n=17) is accelerated compared with the time constant of I(K, slow) inactivation (mean+/-SEM=1147+/-57 ms; n=25) in nontransgenic cells. In addition, unlike I(K, slow) in wild-type cells, the component of I(K, slow) remaining in the Kv2.1N216FLAG-expressing cells is insensitive to 25 mmol/L tetraethylammonium. Taken together, these observations suggest that there are 2 distinct components of I(K, slow) in mouse ventricular myocytes and that Kv2 alpha subunits underlie the more slowly inactivating, tetraethylammonium

  6. Efficient internal exon recognition depends on near equal contributions from the 3' and 5' splice sites.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Peter J; Choi, Eun-A; Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J

    2011-11-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. In vertebrates, most splice sites are initially recognized by the spliceosome across the exon, because most exons are small and surrounded by large introns. This gene architecture predicts that efficient exon recognition depends largely on the strength of the flanking 3' and 5' splice sites. However, it is unknown if the 3' or the 5' splice site dominates the exon recognition process. Here, we test the 3' and 5' splice site contributions towards efficient exon recognition by systematically replacing the splice sites of an internal exon with sequences of different splice site strengths. We show that the presence of an optimal splice site does not guarantee exon inclusion and that the best predictor for exon recognition is the sum of both splice site scores. Using a genome-wide approach, we demonstrate that the combined 3' and 5' splice site strengths of internal exons provide a much more significant separator between constitutive and alternative exons than either the 3' or the 5' splice site strength alone.

  7. Regulation of FT splicing by an endogenous cue in temperate grasses.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhengrui; Wu, Jiajie; Geng, Shuaifeng; Feng, Nan; Chen, Fengjuan; Kong, Xingchen; Song, Gaoyuan; Chen, Kai; Li, Aili; Mao, Long; Wu, Liang

    2017-02-01

    Appropriate flowering timing is crucial for plant reproductive success. The florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), interacts with 14-3-3 proteins and the bZIP transcription factor FD, functioning at core nodes in multiple flowering pathways. There are two FT homologues, FT1 and FT2, in Brachypodium distachyon. Here we show that FT2 undergoes age-dependent alternative splicing (AS), resulting in two splice variants (FT2α and FT2β). The FT2β-encoded protein cannot interact with FD or 14-3-3s but is able to form heterodimers with FT2α and FT1, thereby interfering with the florigen-mediated assembly of the flowering initiation complex. Notably, transgenic plants overproducing FT2β exhibit delayed flowering, while transgenic plants in which FT2β is silenced by an artificial microRNA display accelerated flowering, demonstrating a dominant-negative role of FT2β in flowering induction. Furthermore, we show that the AS splicing of FT2 is conserved in important cereal crops, such as barley and wheat. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel posttranscriptional mode of FT regulation in temperate grasses.

  8. Regulation of FT splicing by an endogenous cue in temperate grasses

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhengrui; Wu, Jiajie; Geng, Shuaifeng; Feng, Nan; Chen, Fengjuan; Kong, Xingchen; Song, Gaoyuan; Chen, Kai; Li, Aili; Mao, Long; Wu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate flowering timing is crucial for plant reproductive success. The florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), interacts with 14-3-3 proteins and the bZIP transcription factor FD, functioning at core nodes in multiple flowering pathways. There are two FT homologues, FT1 and FT2, in Brachypodium distachyon. Here we show that FT2 undergoes age-dependent alternative splicing (AS), resulting in two splice variants (FT2α and FT2β). The FT2β-encoded protein cannot interact with FD or 14-3-3s but is able to form heterodimers with FT2α and FT1, thereby interfering with the florigen-mediated assembly of the flowering initiation complex. Notably, transgenic plants overproducing FT2β exhibit delayed flowering, while transgenic plants in which FT2β is silenced by an artificial microRNA display accelerated flowering, demonstrating a dominant-negative role of FT2β in flowering induction. Furthermore, we show that the AS splicing of FT2 is conserved in important cereal crops, such as barley and wheat. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel posttranscriptional mode of FT regulation in temperate grasses. PMID:28145403

  9. Genomic architecture and functional relationships of intronless, constitutively- and alternatively-spliced genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Kranthi K; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2015-01-01

    Splicing and alternative splicing (AS) are widespread co- and post-transcriptional regulatory processes in plants. Recently, we characterized genome-wide AS landscapes and virus-induced AS patterns in Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a C3 model grass. Brachypodium plants infected with Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) alone or in mixed infections with its satellite virus (SPMV) were used for high-throughput, paired-end RNA sequencing. Here, using gene attributes of ∼5,655 intronless genes, ∼13,302 constitutively spliced, and ∼7,564 alternatively spliced genes, we analyzed the influence of genomic features on splicing incidence and AS frequency. In Brachypodium, gene length, coding sequence length, and exon and intron number were positively correlated to splicing incidence and AS frequency. In contrast, exon length and the percentage composition of GC (%GC) content were inversely correlated with splicing incidence and AS frequency. Although gene expression status had little correlation with splicing occurrence per se, it negatively correlated to AS frequency: i.e., genes with ≥5 alternatively spliced transcripts were significantly less expressed compared to genes encoding <5 alternative transcripts. Further gene set enrichment analysis uncovered unique functional relationships among nonspliced, constitutively spliced and alternatively spliced genes. PMID:26156297

  10. Genomic architecture and functional relationships of intronless, constitutively- and alternatively-spliced genes in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Mandadi, Kranthi K; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2015-01-01

    Splicing and alternative splicing (AS) are widespread co- and post-transcriptional regulatory processes in plants. Recently, we characterized genome-wide AS landscapes and virus-induced AS patterns in Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a C3 model grass. Brachypodium plants infected with Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) alone or in mixed infections with its satellite virus (SPMV) were used for high-throughput, paired-end RNA sequencing. Here, using gene attributes of ∼5,655 intronless genes, ∼13,302 constitutively spliced, and ∼7,564 alternatively spliced genes, we analyzed the influence of genomic features on splicing incidence and AS frequency. In Brachypodium, gene length, coding sequence length, and exon and intron number were positively correlated to splicing incidence and AS frequency. In contrast, exon length and the percentage composition of GC (%GC) content were inversely correlated with splicing incidence and AS frequency. Although gene expression status had little correlation with splicing occurrence per se, it negatively correlated to AS frequency: i.e., genes with ≥5 alternatively spliced transcripts were significantly less expressed compared to genes encoding <5 alternative transcripts. Further gene set enrichment analysis uncovered unique functional relationships among nonspliced, constitutively spliced and alternatively spliced genes.

  11. Transcription and splicing: when the twain meet.

    PubMed

    Brody, Yehuda; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    Splicing can occur co-transcriptionally. What happens when the splicing reaction lags after the completed transcriptional process? We found that elongation rates are independent of ongoing splicing on the examined genes and suggest that when transcription has completed but splicing has not, the splicing machinery is retained at the site of transcription, independently of the polymerase.

  12. Increased Serine-Arginine (SR) Protein Phosphorylation Changes Pre-mRNA Splicing in Hypoxia*

    PubMed Central

    Jakubauskiene, Egle; Vilys, Laurynas; Makino, Yuichi; Poellinger, Lorenz; Kanopka, Arvydas

    2015-01-01

    The removal of introns from mRNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) is an essential step in eukaryotic gene expression. The splicing machinery heavily contributes to biological complexity and especially to the ability of cells to adapt to altered cellular conditions. Inhibitory PAS domain protein (IPAS), a dominant negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression, is generated from hypoxia inducible transcription factor-3α (HIF-3α) pre-mRNA by an alternative splicing mechanism. Inactivation of the IPAS transcript in mice leads to the neo-vascularization of the cornea, suggesting that IPAS is an important regulator of anti-angiogenesis in this tissue. For the first time we demonstrate that serine-arginine (SR) proteins are involved in oxygen tension-dependent changes in pre-mRNA splicing. SR proteins isolated from hypoxic cells differentially interact with RNA (compared with proteins isolated from cells cultured under normoxic conditions). They possess the differential ability to activate hypoxia-dependent splice sites, and they are more phosphorylated than those isolated from normoxic HeLa cells. We also show that expression of SR protein kinases (CLK1, SRPK1, SRPK2) in hypoxic cells is elevated at mRNA and protein levels. Increased expression of CLK1 kinase is regulated by HIFs. Reduction of CLK1 cellular expression levels reduces hypoxia-dependent full-length carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) mRNA and CAIX protein formation and changes hypoxia-dependent cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61) mRNA isoform formation profiles. PMID:26023237

  13. A conserved splicing mechanism of the LMNA gene controls premature aging.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; Vautrot, Valentin; De Toledo, Marion; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Navarro, Claire L; Osorio, Fernando G; Freije, José M P; Stévenin, James; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Lévy, Nicolas; Branlant, Christiane; Tazi, Jamal

    2011-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder phenotypically characterized by many features of premature aging. Most cases of HGPS are due to a heterozygous silent mutation (c.1824C>T; p.Gly608Gly) that enhances the use of an internal 5' splice site (5'SS) in exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA and leads to the production of a truncated protein (progerin) with a dominant negative effect. Here we show that HGPS mutation changes the accessibility of the 5'SS of LMNA exon 11 which is sequestered in a conserved RNA structure. Our results also reveal a regulatory role of a subset of serine-arginine (SR)-rich proteins, including serine-arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) and SRSF6, on utilization of the 5'SS leading to lamin A or progerin production and a modulation of this regulation in the presence of the c.1824C>T mutation is shown directly on HGPS patient cells. Mutant mice carrying the equivalent mutation in the LMNA gene (c.1827C>T) also accumulate progerin and phenocopy the main cellular alterations and clinical defects of HGPS patients. RNAi-induced depletion of SRSF1 in the HGPS-like mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) allowed progerin reduction and dysmorphic nuclei phenotype correction, whereas SRSF6 depletion aggravated the HGPS-like MEF's phenotype. We demonstrate that changes in the splicing ratio between lamin A and progerin are key factors for lifespan since heterozygous mice harboring the mutation lived longer than homozygous littermates but less than the wild-type. Genetic and biochemical data together favor the view that physiological progerin production is under tight control of a conserved splicing mechanism to avoid precocious aging.

  14. RNA splicing: disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Andrew G L; Wood, Matthew J A

    2011-05-01

    The majority of human genes that encode proteins undergo alternative pre-mRNA splicing and mutations that affect splicing are more prevalent than previously thought. The mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing is highly complex, requiring multiple interactions between pre-mRNA, small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and splicing factor proteins. Regulation of this process is even more complicated, relying on loosely defined cis-acting regulatory sequence elements, trans-acting protein factors and cellular responses to varying environmental conditions. Many different human diseases can be caused by errors in RNA splicing or its regulation. Targeting aberrant RNA provides an opportunity to correct faulty splicing and potentially treat numerous genetic disorders. Antisense oligonucleotide therapies show particular promise in this area and, if coupled with improved delivery strategies, could open the door to a multitude of novel personalized therapies.

  15. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  16. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Celine K.; Black, Douglas L.; Zheng, Sika

    2016-01-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that regulate splicing, both during development and in the adult brain. PMID:27094079

  17. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells.

  18. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  19. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Samuel E; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing "minigene" in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest.

  20. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  1. Autosomal dominant

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether the trait is dominant or recessive. A single abnormal gene on one of the first 22 nonsex ( autosomal ) chromosomes from either parent can cause an autosomal disorder. Dominant inheritance means ...

  2. Cellular stress and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Biamonti, Giuseppe; Caceres, Javier F

    2009-03-01

    In response to physical and chemical stresses that affect protein folding and, thus, the execution of normal metabolic processes, cells activate gene-expression strategies aimed at increasing their chance of survival. One target of several stressing agents is pre-mRNA splicing, which is inhibited upon heat shock. Recently, the molecular basis of this splicing inhibition has begun to emerge. Interestingly, different mechanisms seem to be in place to block constitutive pre-mRNA splicing and to affect alternative splicing regulation. This could be important to modulate gene expression during recovery from stress. Thus, pre-mRNA splicing emerges as a central mechanism to integrate cellular and metabolic stresses into gene-expression profiles.

  3. Splicing of aged fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotinen, Tarja T.; Yuce, Hakan H.; Bonanno, Nicholas; Frantz, Rolf A.; Duffy, Sean

    1993-11-01

    The deployment of fiber in the subscriber loop will require that an optical fiber network maintain the highest possible level of reliability over time, despite being subjected to extremes of temperature, humidity, and other environmental and mechanical stresses imposed on the outside plant. At the same time, both the initial cost and the ongoing maintenance expenses for loop equipment must be kept low. Fiber in the Loop (FITL) applications will entail increased fiber handling. Cable lengths will be shorter, and fiber counts higher, than has been the case so far in long-distance applications. There will also be more cable sheath openings per unit length of cable and/or fiber, as well as more splicing and connectorization. It may become a common practice that a customer is connected to a cable installed many years earlier. In subscriber loops, cables and fibers will be installed in harsher and more varying environments. Fibers will be exposed to higher humidity and temperature, particularly in splice boxes mounted on building walls, in pedestal cabinets, and in other similar enclosures. Corrosive gases and/or liquids may also be present at some locations and will adversely affect the fibers. The combination of increased handling, greater exposure, and more stressful environments may give rise to a need for new, more stringent requirements for fiber mechanical reliability. These can include increaSed fiber strength, increased aging resistance, and increased fatigue resistance.

  4. The BRCA1 alternative splicing variant Δ14-15 with an in-frame deletion of part of the regulatory serine-containing domain (SCD) impairs the DNA repair capacity in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sevcik, Jan; Falk, Martin; Kleiblova, Petra; Lhota, Filip; Stefancikova, Lenka; Janatova, Marketa; Weiterova, Lenka; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek

    2012-05-01

    The BRCA1 gene codes for a protein involved in the DNA double strand break (DDSB) repair. Alongside the dominant full-length splicing form of BRCA1, numerous endogenously expressed alternative splicing variants of unknown significance have been described in various tissues. Some of them retain the original BRCA1 reading frame but lack several critical BRCA1 structural domains, suggesting an altered function of the resulting protein in the BRCA1-regulated processes. To characterize the effect of the BRCA1Δ14-15 splicing variant (with an in-frame deletion affecting the regulatory serine-containing domain) on the DDSB repair, we constructed the MCF-7 clones stably expressing the analyzed variant with/without a shRNA-mediated downregulation of the endogenous full-length wild-type BRCA1 expression. Our results show that the expression of the BRCA1Δ14-15 variant delays the γ-radiation-induced DDSB repair, alters the kinetics of irradiation-induced foci formation/decomposition and reduces the non-homologous end-joining capacity in MCF-7 cells. Therefore, the BRCA1Δ14-15 is not able to functionally replace the full-length wt BRCA1 in the DDSB repair. Our findings indicate that the endogenously expressed BRCA1 alternative splicing variants may negatively influence genome stability and support the growing evidence of the pathological potential of the sequence variants generated by an altered or misregulated alternative splicing in the process of mammary malignant transformation.

  5. Alternative splicing of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta):effects on translation efficiency and trans-activation ability

    PubMed Central

    Lundell, Kerstin; Thulin, Petra; Hamsten, Anders; Ehrenborg, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Numerous studies have aimed at unravelling the physiological role of PPARδ as a transcriptional regulator whereas the regulation of PPARδ gene expression has been less studied. Results The principal transcription start site in the human PPARδ gene identified here is positioned upstream of exon 1, although four alternative 5'-ends related to downstream exons were identified. The demonstration of multiple 5'-UTR splice variants of PPARδ mRNA, with an impact on translation efficiency, suggests a translational regulation of human PPARδ expression. Five untranslated exons identified in this study contribute to the variability among the 5'-UTRs of human PPARδ mRNAs. Moreover, in vitro studies of a 3'-splice transcript encoding a truncated variant of PPARδ (designated PPARδ2) show that this isoform constitutes a potential dominant negative form of the receptor. Conclusion We propose that alternative splicing of human PPARδ constitutes an intrinsic role for the regulation of PPARδ expression and thus activity, and highlight the significance of alternative splicing of this nuclear receptor in physiology and disease. PMID:17705821

  6. Identification and characterization of NF1 splicing mutations in Korean patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Young-Eun; Kim, Sun Kyung; Lee, Myoung-Keun; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2016-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by NF1 mutations. Although mutations affecting mRNA splicing are the most common molecular defects in NF1, few studies have analyzed genomic DNA (gDNA)-mRNA correlations in Korean NF1 patients. In this study, we investigated 28 unrelated NF1 patients who showed splicing alterations in reverse transcription-PCR of NF1 mRNA and identified 24 different NF1 splicing mutations, 9 of which were novel. These mutations can be categorized into five groups: exon skipping resulting from mutations at authentic 5' and 3' splice sites (type I, 46%), cryptic exon inclusion caused by deep intronic mutations (type II, 8%), creation of new splice sites causing loss of exonic sequences (type III, 8%), activation of cryptic splice sites due to disruption of authentic splice sites (type IV, 25%) and exonic sequence alterations causing exon skipping (type V, 13%). In total, 42% of all splicing mutations did not involve the conserved AG/GT dinucleotides of the splice sites, making it difficult to identify the correct mutation sites at the gDNA level. These results add to the mutational spectrum of NF1 and further elucidate the gDNA-mRNA correlations of NF1 mutations.

  7. Splicing variants of ADAR2 and ADAR2-mediated RNA editing in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Zhao, Xingli; Li, Zhaohui; Wei, Jun; Tian, Yu

    2016-08-01

    The roles of alternative splicing and RNA editing in gene regulation and transcriptome diversity are well documented. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are responsible for adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing and exemplify the complex association between RNA editing and alternative splicing. The self-editing activity of ADAR2, which acts on its own pre-mRNA, leads to its alternative splicing. Alternative splicing occurs independently at nine splicing sites on ADAR2 pre-mRNA, generating numerous alternative splicing variants with various catalytic activities. A-to-I RNA editing is important in a range of physiological processes in humans and is associated with several diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, mood disorders, epilepsy and glioma. Reduced editing at the glutamine/arginine site of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in glioma, without any alteration in ADAR2 expression, is a notable phenomenon. Several studies have tried to explain this alteration in the catalytic activity of ADAR2; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present review summarizes the relevant literature and shares experimental results concerning ADAR2 alternative splicing. In particular, the present review demonstrates that shifts in the relative abundance of the active and inactive splicing variants of ADAR2 may reduce the ADAR2 editing activity in glioma. Dominant expression of ADAR2 splicing variant with low enzyme activity causes reduced RNA editing of GluA2 subunit at the glutamine/arginine site in glioma.

  8. Reprogramming the Dynamin 2 mRNA by Spliceosome-mediated RNA Trans-splicing

    PubMed Central

    Trochet, Delphine; Prudhon, Bernard; Jollet, Arnaud; Lorain, Stéphanie; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin 2 (DNM2) is a large GTPase, ubiquitously expressed, involved in membrane trafficking and regulation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. DNM2 mutations cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy which is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and histopathological features including nuclear centralization in absence of regeneration. No curative treatment is currently available for the DNM2-related autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy. In order to develop therapeutic strategy, we evaluated here the potential of Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing technology to reprogram the Dnm2-mRNA in vitro and in vivo in mice. We show that classical 3′-trans-splicing strategy cannot be considered as accurate therapeutic strategy regarding toxicity of the pre-trans-splicing molecules leading to low rate of trans-splicing in vivo. Thus, we tested alternative strategies devoted to prevent this toxicity and enhance frequency of trans-splicing events. We succeeded to overcome the toxicity through a 5′-trans-splicing strategy which also allows detection of trans-splicing events at mRNA and protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing strategy may be used to reprogram mutated Dnm2-mRNA but highlight the potential toxicity linked to the molecular tools which have to be carefully investigated during preclinical development. PMID:27623444

  9. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  10. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles.

  11. Adaptive Significance of ERα Splice Variants in Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) Resident in an Estrogenic Environment.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Kellie A; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Yeo, Alan T; Gilmore, Thomas D; Callard, Gloria V

    2016-06-01

    The possibility that chronic, multigenerational exposure to environmental estrogens selects for adaptive hormone-response phenotypes is a critical unanswered question. Embryos/larvae of killifish from an estrogenic-polluted environment (New Bedford Harbor, MA [NBH]) compared with those from a reference site overexpress estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) mRNA but are hyporesponsive to estradiol. Analysis of ERα mRNAs in the two populations revealed differences in splicing of the gene encoding ERα (esr1). Here we tested the transactivation functions of four differentially expressed ERα mRNAs and tracked their association with the hyporesponsive phenotype for three generations after transfer of NBH parents to a clean environment. Deletion variants ERαΔ6 and ERαΔ6-8 were specific to NBH killifish, had dominant negative functions in an in vitro reporter assay, and were heritable. Morpholino-mediated induction of ERαΔ6 mRNA in zebrafish embryos verified its role as a dominant negative ER on natural estrogen-responsive promoters. Alternate long (ERαL) and short (ERαS) 5'-variants were similar transcriptionally but differed in estrogen responsiveness (ERαS ≫ ERαL). ERαS accounted for high total ERα expression in first generation (F1) NBH embryos/larvae but this trait was abolished by transfer to clean water. By contrast, the hyporesponsive phenotype of F1 NBH embryos/larvae persisted after long-term laboratory holding but reverted to a normal or hyper-responsive phenotype after two or three generations, suggesting the acquisition of physiological or biochemical traits that compensate for ongoing expression of negative-acting ERαΔ6 and ERαΔ6-8 isoforms. We conclude that a heritable change in the pattern of alternative splicing of ERα pre-mRNA is part of a genetic adaptive response to estrogens in a polluted environment.

  12. Ott1 (Rbm15) regulates thrombopoietin response in hematopoietic stem cells through alternative splicing of c-Mpl

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Laha, Suparna; Das, Shankar P.; Morlock, Kayla; Jesneck, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (Thpo) signaling through the c-Mpl receptor promotes either quiescence or proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner; however, in vivo Thpo serum levels are responsive to platelet mass rather than HSC demands, suggesting additional regulation exists. Ott1 (Rbm15), a spliceosomal component originally identified as a fusion partner in t(1;22)-associated acute megakaryocytic leukemia, is also essential for maintaining HSC quiescence under stress. Ott1 controls the alternative splicing of a dominant negative isoform, Mpl-TR, capable of inhibiting HSC engraftment and attenuating Thpo signaling. Ott1, which associates with Hdac3 and the histone methyltransferase, Setd1b, binds to both c-Mpl RNA and chromatin and regulates H4 acetylation and H3K4me3 marks. Histone deacetylase or histone methyltransferase inhibition also increases Mpl-TR levels, suggesting that Ott1 uses an underlying epigenetic mechanism to control alternative splicing of c-Mpl. Manipulation of Ott1-dependent alternative splicing may therefore provide a novel pharmacologic avenue for regulating HSC quiescence and proliferation in response to Thpo. PMID:25468569

  13. Dominant-Negative Effect of a Missense Variant in the TASK-2 (KCNK5) K+ Channel Associated with Balkan Endemic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Wahab, Firdaus; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    TASK-2, a member of the Two-Pore Domain (K2P) subfamily of K+ channels, is encoded by the KCNK5 gene. The channel is expressed primarily in renal epithelial tissues and a potentially deleterious missense variant in KCNK5 has recently been shown to be prevalent amongst patients predisposed to the development of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (BEN), a chronic tubulointerstitial renal disease of unknown etiology. In this study we show that this variant (T108P) results in a complete loss of channel function and is associated with a major reduction in TASK-2 channel subunits at the cell surface. Furthermore, these mutant subunits have a suppressive or ‘dominant-negative’ effect on channel function when coexpressed with wild-type subunits. This missense variant is located at the extracellular surface of the M2 transmembrane helix and by using a combination of structural modelling and further functional analysis we also show that this highly-conserved threonine residue is critical for the correct function of other K2P channels. These results therefore provide further structural and functional insights into the possible pathophysiological effects of this missense variant in TASK-2. PMID:27228168

  14. Heteromeric p97/p97R155C complexes induce dominant negative changes in wild-type and autophagy 9-deficient Dictyostelium strains.

    PubMed

    Arhzaouy, Khalid; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Tung, Sze Man; Tangavelou, Karthikeyan; Stumpf, Maria; Faix, Jan; Schröder, Rolf; Clemen, Christoph S; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the human VCP (p97) gene cause autosomal-dominant IBMPFD (inclusion body myopathy with early onset Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia), ALS14 (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with or without frontotemporal dementia) and HSP (hereditary spastic paraplegia). Most prevalent is the R155C point mutation. We studied the function of p97 in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and have generated strains that ectopically express wild-type (p97) or mutant p97 (p97(R155C)) fused to RFP in AX2 wild-type and autophagy 9 knock-out (ATG9(KO)) cells. Native gel electrophoresis showed that both p97 and p97(R155C) assemble into hexamers. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that endogenous p97 and p97(R155C)-RFP form heteromers. The mutant strains displayed changes in cell growth, phototaxis, development, proteasomal activity, ubiquitinylated proteins, and ATG8(LC3) indicating mis-regulation of multiple essential cellular processes. Additionally, immunofluorescence analysis revealed an increase of protein aggregates in ATG9(KO)/p97(R155C)-RFP and ATG9(KO) cells. They were positive for ubiquitin in both strains, however, solely immunoreactive for p97 in the ATG9(KO) mutant. A major finding is that the expression of p97(R155C)-RFP in the ATG9(KO) strain partially or fully rescued the pleiotropic phenotype. We also observed dose-dependent effects of p97 on several cellular processes. Based on findings in the single versus the double mutants we propose a novel mode of p97 interaction with the core autophagy protein ATG9 which is based on mutual inhibition.

  15. Next-generation sequencing detection and characterization of a heterozygous novel splice junction mutation in the 2B domain of KRT1 in a family with diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Santasree; Ren, Yunqing; Wei, Tianying; Zhou, Zhongwei; Yu, Ping; Guan, Fenghui; Wei, Xiaonming; Ye, Sheng; Yan, Shaofeng; Zheng, Min; Raff, Michael L; Qi, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma (DPPK) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by restricted, uniform hyperkeratosis on the palm and sole epidermis. DPPK is normally associated with dominant-negative mutations in the keratin-encoding gene, KRT1. We report a heterozygous novel point mutation in the exon 6 splice donor site of KRT1 (c.1254G>C) by next-generation sequencing, resulting in the formation of two alternative transcripts, which segregates with DPPK in a four-generation Chinese family. This results in both the complete loss of exon 6 and the simultaneous utilization of a novel in-frame splice site 54 bases downstream of the mutation with the subsequent deletion of 42 amino acids and the insertion of 18 amino acids into the protein's 2B domain. This is the first report of a novel splice donor site mutation with aberrant splicing and the formation of two alternative transcripts causing DPPK. This study also demonstrates the value of next-generation sequencing in the identification of novel disease-causing mutations.

  16. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3–RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing. PMID:25234929

  17. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3-RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing.

  18. Information Dominance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    Information dominance may be defined as superiority in the generation, manipulation, and use of information sufficient to afford its possessors... information dominance at the strategic level: knowing oneself and one’s enemy; and, at best, inducing them to see things as one does.

  19. Too Many Is Too Bad: Long-Term Net Negative Effects of High Density Ungulate Populations on a Dominant Mediterranean Shrub.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Xavier; Fedriani, José M; Caldeira, Maria C; Clemente, Adelaide S; Olmi, Alessandro; Bugalho, Miguel N

    2016-01-01

    Plant-animal interactions imply costs and benefits with net balance depending on interacting species and ecological context. Ungulates, in particular, confer costs (e.g., plant leaf consumption, flower bud predation) and benefits (e.g., plant overcompensation, seed dispersal) to plants. Magnitude of costs and benefits may be altered by habitat management or ecological conditions favoring high density ungulate populations. Little is known however on whether plant costs or benefits predominate over the years, or the long-term outcomes of plant-animal interactions in habitat types sustaining high density ungulate populations. We investigated how high density ungulate populations alter plant costs and benefits by quantifying ungulate long-term effects on the shrub Cistus ladanifer (Cistaceae) individual size, seed weight and number, seed bank, and population density, through a 12-year ungulate exclusion experiment in a Mediterranean scrubland. We monitored plant size and flower buds in plants exposed or protected from ungulates and number of developed capsules and seeds consumed (potential seed dispersal) by ungulates during three reproductive seasons. We found that ungulates negatively affected shrub size and led to a dramatically decline of shrub reproductive structures and seed production, affecting the plant reproductive cycle. Number of buds was 27 times higher and number of developed seed 5 times higher in ungulate-excluded as compared to ungulate-exposed plots. After 9 years of ungulate exclusion, the C. ladanifer seed bank was 2.6 times higher in ungulate-excluded plots. The population density of C. ladanifer was 4 times higher in ungulate-excluded plots. Our long-term experiment showed that high density ungulate populations can alter plant-animal interactions by reducing plant benefits and increasing plant costs.

  20. Too Many Is Too Bad: Long-Term Net Negative Effects of High Density Ungulate Populations on a Dominant Mediterranean Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Xavier; Fedriani, José M.; Caldeira, Maria C.; Clemente, Adelaide S.; Olmi, Alessandro; Bugalho, Miguel N.

    2016-01-01

    Plant–animal interactions imply costs and benefits with net balance depending on interacting species and ecological context. Ungulates, in particular, confer costs (e.g., plant leaf consumption, flower bud predation) and benefits (e.g., plant overcompensation, seed dispersal) to plants. Magnitude of costs and benefits may be altered by habitat management or ecological conditions favoring high density ungulate populations. Little is known however on whether plant costs or benefits predominate over the years, or the long-term outcomes of plant-animal interactions in habitat types sustaining high density ungulate populations. We investigated how high density ungulate populations alter plant costs and benefits by quantifying ungulate long-term effects on the shrub Cistus ladanifer (Cistaceae) individual size, seed weight and number, seed bank, and population density, through a 12-year ungulate exclusion experiment in a Mediterranean scrubland. We monitored plant size and flower buds in plants exposed or protected from ungulates and number of developed capsules and seeds consumed (potential seed dispersal) by ungulates during three reproductive seasons. We found that ungulates negatively affected shrub size and led to a dramatically decline of shrub reproductive structures and seed production, affecting the plant reproductive cycle. Number of buds was 27 times higher and number of developed seed 5 times higher in ungulate-excluded as compared to ungulate-exposed plots. After 9 years of ungulate exclusion, the C. ladanifer seed bank was 2.6 times higher in ungulate-excluded plots. The population density of C. ladanifer was 4 times higher in ungulate-excluded plots. Our long-term experiment showed that high density ungulate populations can alter plant-animal interactions by reducing plant benefits and increasing plant costs. PMID:27387134

  1. MALT1 cleaves the E3 ubiquitin ligase HOIL-1 in activated T cells, generating a dominant negative inhibitor of LUBAC-induced NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Elton, Lynn; Carpentier, Isabelle; Staal, Jens; Driege, Yasmine; Haegman, Mira; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-02-01

    Human paracaspase 1 (PCASP1), better known as mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation 1 (MALT1), plays a key role in immunity and inflammation by regulating gene expression in lymphocytes and other immune cell types. Deregulated MALT1 activity has been implicated in autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and certain types of lymphoma. As a scaffold MALT1 assembles downstream signaling proteins for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, while its proteolytic activity further enhances NF-κB activation by cleaving NF-κB inhibitory proteins. MALT1 also processes and inactivates a number of mRNA destabilizing proteins, which further fine-tunes gene expression. MALT1 protease inhibitors are currently developed for therapeutic targeting. Here we show that T cell activation, as well as overexpression of the oncogenic fusion protein API2-MALT1, induces the MALT1-mediated cleavage of haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1 (HOIL-1). In addition, to acting as a K48-polyubiquitin specific E3 ubiquitin ligase for different substrates, HOIL-1 co-operates in a catalytic-independent manner with the E3 ubiquitin ligase HOIL-1L interacting protein (HOIP) as part of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC). Intriguingly, cleavage of HOIL-1 does not directly abolish its ability to support HOIP-induced NF-κB signaling, which is still mediated by the N-terminal cleavage fragment, but generates a C-terminal fragment with LUBAC inhibitory properties. We propose that MALT1-mediated HOIL-1 cleavage provides a gain-of-function mechanism that is involved in the negative feedback regulation of NF-κB signaling.

  2. Multilayered Control of Alternative Splicing Regulatory Networks by Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Han, Hong; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas; Weatheritt, Robert J; Hirsch, Calley L; Ha, Kevin C H; Radovani, Ernest; Nabeel-Shah, Syed; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; Wang, Juli; O'Hanlon, Dave; Pan, Qun; Ray, Debashish; Zheng, Hong; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Datti, Alessandro; Magomedova, Lilia; Cummins, Carolyn L; Hughes, Timothy R; Greenblatt, Jack F; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Moffat, Jason; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2017-02-02

    Networks of coordinated alternative splicing (AS) events play critical roles in development and disease. However, a comprehensive knowledge of the factors that regulate these networks is lacking. We describe a high-throughput system for systematically linking trans-acting factors to endogenous RNA regulatory events. Using this system, we identify hundreds of factors associated with diverse regulatory layers that positively or negatively control AS events linked to cell fate. Remarkably, more than one-third of the regulators are transcription factors. Further analyses of the zinc finger protein Zfp871 and BTB/POZ domain transcription factor Nacc1, which regulate neural and stem cell AS programs, respectively, reveal roles in controlling the expression of specific splicing regulators. Surprisingly, these proteins also appear to regulate target AS programs via binding RNA. Our results thus uncover a large "missing cache" of splicing regulators among annotated transcription factors, some of which dually regulate AS through direct and indirect mechanisms.

  3. RNA splicing and splicing regulator changes in prostate cancer pathology.

    PubMed

    Munkley, Jennifer; Livermore, Karen; Rajan, Prabhakar; Elliott, David J

    2017-04-05

    Changes in mRNA splice patterns have been associated with key pathological mechanisms in prostate cancer progression. The androgen receptor (abbreviated AR) transcription factor is a major driver of prostate cancer pathology and activated by androgen steroid hormones. Selection of alternative promoters by the activated AR can critically alter gene function by switching mRNA isoform production, including creating a pro-oncogenic isoform of the normally tumour suppressor gene TSC2. A number of androgen-regulated genes generate alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms, including a prostate-specific splice isoform of ST6GALNAC1 mRNA. ST6GALNAC1 encodes a sialyltransferase that catalyses the synthesis of the cancer-associated sTn antigen important for cell mobility. Genetic rearrangements occurring early in prostate cancer development place ERG oncogene expression under the control of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 promoter to hijack cell behaviour. This TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene shows different patterns of alternative splicing in invasive versus localised prostate cancer. Alternative AR mRNA isoforms play a key role in the generation of prostate cancer drug resistance, by providing a mechanism through which prostate cancer cells can grow in limited serum androgen concentrations. A number of splicing regulator proteins change expression patterns in prostate cancer and may help drive key stages of disease progression. Up-regulation of SRRM4 establishes neuronal splicing patterns in neuroendocrine prostate cancer. The splicing regulators Sam68 and Tra2β increase expression in prostate cancer. The SR protein kinase SRPK1 that modulates the activity of SR proteins is up-regulated in prostate cancer and has already given encouraging results as a potential therapeutic target in mouse models.

  4. Coexpression of neuronatin splice forms promotes medulloblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Siu, I-Mei; Bai, Renyuan; Gallia, Gary L; Edwards, Jennifer B; Tyler, Betty M; Eberhart, Charles G; Riggins, Gregory J

    2008-10-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common pediatric brain cancer. Several important developmental pathways have been implicated in MB formation, but fewer therapeutic targets have been identified. To locate frequently overexpressed genes, we performed a comprehensive gene expression survey of MB. Our comparison of 20 primary tumors to normal cerebellum identified neuronatin (NNAT) as the most frequently overexpressed gene in our analysis. NNAT is a neural-specific developmental gene with alpha and beta splice forms. Functional evaluation revealed that RNA interference knockdown of NNAT causes a significant decrease in proliferation. Conversely, coexpression of both splice forms in NNAT-negative MB cell lines increased proliferation, caused a significant shift from G(1) to G(2)/M, and increased soft agar colony formation and size. When expressed individually, each NNAT splice form had much less effect on these in vitro oncogenic predictors. In an in vivo model, the coexpression of both splice forms conferred the ability of xenograft formation to human MB cells that do not normally form xenografts, whereas a control gene had no effect. Our findings suggest that the frequently observed overexpression of both NNAT splice forms in MB enhances growth in this cancer.

  5. Targeting RNA Splicing for Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Mallory A.; Duelli, Dominik M.

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicing is a logical approach to therapy. Splicing is a favorable intervention point for disease therapeutics, because it is an early step in gene expression and does not alter the genome. Significant advances have been made in the development of approaches to manipulate splicing for therapy. Splicing can be manipulated with a number of tools including antisense oligonucleotides, modified small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), trans-splicing, and small molecule compounds, all of which have been used to increase specific alternatively spliced isoforms or to correct aberrant gene expression resulting from gene mutations that alter splicing. Here we describe clinically relevant splicing defects in disease states, the current tools used to target and alter splicing, specific mutations and diseases that are being targeted using splice-modulating approaches, and emerging therapeutics. PMID:23512601

  6. Targeting RNA splicing for disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Havens, Mallory A; Duelli, Dominik M; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for the expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicing is a logical approach to therapy. Splicing is a favorable intervention point for disease therapeutics, because it is an early step in gene expression and does not alter the genome. Significant advances have been made in the development of approaches to manipulate splicing for therapy. Splicing can be manipulated with a number of tools including antisense oligonucleotides, modified small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), trans-splicing, and small molecule compounds, all of which have been used to increase specific alternatively spliced isoforms or to correct aberrant gene expression resulting from gene mutations that alter splicing. Here we describe clinically relevant splicing defects in disease states, the current tools used to target and alter splicing, specific mutations and diseases that are being targeted using splice-modulating approaches, and emerging therapeutics.

  7. Hepatitis B virus spliced variants are associated with an impaired response to interferon therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieliang; Wu, Min; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Jiming; Liu, Yinghui; Liu, Yi; Feng, Yanling; Zheng, Ye; Hu, Yunwen; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    During hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, spliced HBV genomes and splice-generated proteins have been widely described, however, their biological and clinical significance remains to be defined. Here, an elevation of the proportion of HBV spliced variants in the sera of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is shown to correlate with an impaired respond to interferon-α (IFN-α) therapy. Transfection of the constructs encoding the three most dominant species of spliced variants into cells or ectopic expression of the two major spliced protein including HBSP and N-terminal-truncated viral polymerase protein result in strong suppression of IFN-α signaling transduction, while mutation of the major splicing-related sites of HBV attenuates the viral anti-IFN activities in both cell and mouse models. These results have associated the productions of HBV spliced variants with the failure response to IFN therapy and illuminate a novel mechanism where spliced viral products are employed to resist IFN-mediated host defense. PMID:26585041

  8. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing.

  9. Detecting tissue-specific alternative splicing and disease-associated aberrant splicing of the PTCH gene with exon junction microarrays.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kazuaki; Togawa, Naoyuki; Fujii, Katsunori; Uchikawa, Hideki; Kohno, Yoichi; Yamada, Masao; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-15

    Mutations in the human ortholog of Drosophila patched (PTCH) have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), characterized by minor developmental anomalies and an increased incidence of cancers such as medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. We identified many isoforms of PTCH mRNA involving exons 1-5, exon 10 and a novel exon, 12b, generated by alternative splicing (AS), most of which have not been deposited in GenBank nor discussed earlier. To monitor splicing events of the PTCH gene, we designed oligonucleotide arrays on which exon probes and exon-exon junction probes as well as a couple of intron probes for the PTCH gene were placed in duplicate. Probe intensities were normalized on the basis of the total expression of PTCH and probe sensitivity. Tissue-specific regulation of AS identified with the microarrays closely correlated with the results obtained by RT-PCR. Of note, the novel exon, exon 12b, was specifically expressed in the brain and heart, especially in the cerebellum. Additionally, using these microarrays, we were able to detect disease-associated aberrant splicings of the PTCH gene in two patients with NBCCS. In both cases, cryptic splice donor sites located either in an exon or in an intron were activated because of the partial disruption of the consensus sequence for the authentic splice donor sites due to point mutations. Taken together, oligonucleotide microarrays containing exon junction probes are demonstrated to be a powerful tool to investigate tissue-specific regulation of AS and aberrant splicing taking place in genetic disorders.

  10. Aberrant Splice Variants of HAS1 (Hyaluronan Synthase 1) Multimerize with and Modulate Normally Spliced HAS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anirban; Kuppusamy, Hemalatha; Pilarski, Linda M.

    2009-01-01

    Most human genes undergo alternative splicing, but aberrant splice forms are hallmarks of many cancers, usually resulting from mutations initiating abnormal exon skipping, intron retention, or the introduction of a new splice sites. We have identified a family of aberrant splice variants of HAS1 (the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene) in some B lineage cancers, characterized by exon skipping and/or partial intron retention events that occur either together or independently in different variants, apparently due to accumulation of inherited and acquired mutations. Cellular, biochemical, and oncogenic properties of full-length HAS1 (HAS1-FL) and HAS1 splice variants Va, Vb, and Vc (HAS1-Vs) are compared and characterized. When co-expressed, the properties of HAS1-Vs are dominant over those of HAS1-FL. HAS1-FL appears to be diffusely expressed in the cell, but HAS1-Vs are concentrated in the cytoplasm and/or Golgi apparatus. HAS1-Vs synthesize detectable de novo HA intracellularly. Each of the HAS1-Vs is able to relocalize HAS1-FL protein from diffuse cytoskeleton-anchored locations to deeper cytoplasmic spaces. This HAS1-Vs-mediated relocalization occurs through strong molecular interactions, which also serve to protect HAS1-FL from its otherwise high turnover kinetics. In co-transfected cells, HAS1-FL and HAS1-Vs interact with themselves and with each other to form heteromeric multiprotein assemblies. HAS1-Vc was found to be transforming in vitro and tumorigenic in vivo when introduced as a single oncogene to untransformed cells. The altered distribution and half-life of HAS1-FL, coupled with the characteristics of the HAS1-Vs suggest possible mechanisms whereby the aberrant splicing observed in human cancer may contribute to oncogenesis and disease progression. PMID:19451652

  11. Promoter usage and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2005-06-01

    Recent findings justify a renewed interest in alternative splicing (AS): the process is more a rule than an exception as it affects the expression of 60% of human genes; it explains how a vast mammalian proteomic complexity is achieved with a limited number of genes; and mutations in AS regulatory sequences are a widespread source of human disease. AS regulation not only depends on the interaction of splicing factors with their target sequences in the pre-mRNA but is coupled to transcription. A clearer picture is emerging of the mechanisms by which transcription affects AS through promoter identity and occupation. These mechanisms involve the recruitment of factors with dual functions in transcription and splicing (i.e. that contain both functional domains and hence link the two processes) and the control of RNA polymerase II elongation.

  12. Biological Applications of Protein Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Muir, Tom W.

    2010-01-01

    Protein splicing is a naturally-occurring process in which a protein editor, called an intein, performs a molecular disappearing act by cutting itself out of a host protein in a traceless manner. In the two decades since its discovery, protein splicing has been harnessed for the development of several protein-engineering methods. Collectively, these technologies help bridge the fields of chemistry and biology, allowing hitherto impossible manipulations of protein covalent structure. These tools and their application are the subject of this Primer. PMID:20946979

  13. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable: molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Demirkol, Mübeccel; Blau, Nenad; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2012-08-01

    In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11 as a vulnerable exon and used patient derived lymphoblast cell lines and PAH minigenes to study the molecular defect that impacted pre-mRNA processing. We showed that the c.1144T>C and c.1066-3C>T mutations cause exon 11 skipping, while the c.1139C>T mutation is neutral or slightly beneficial. The c.1144T>C mutation resides in a putative splicing enhancer motif and binding by splicing factors SF2/ASF, SRp20 and SRp40 is disturbed. Additional mutations in potential splicing factor binding sites contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis of mutations in PAH exon 11. We suggest that PAH exon 11 is vulnerable due to a weak 3' splice site and that this makes exon 11 inclusion dependent on an ESE spanning position c.1144. Importantly, this implies that other mutations in exon 11 may affect splicing, since splicing is often determined by a fine balance between several positive and negative splicing regulatory elements distributed throughout the exon. Finally, we identified a pseudoexon in intron 11, which would have pathogenic consequences if activated by mutations or improved splicing conditions. Exonic mutations that disrupt splicing are unlikely to facilitate response to BH(4) and may lead to inconsistent genotype-phenotype correlations. Therefore, recognizing such mutations enhances our ability to predict the BH(4)-response.

  14. Intronic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 that affect RNA splicing can be reliably selected by splice-site prediction programs.

    PubMed

    Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Kraan, Jaennelle N; van der Klift, Heleen M; Vink, Geraldine R; Cornelisse, Cees J; Wijnen, Juul T; Bakker, Egbert; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A large number of sequence variants identified in BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot be distinguished as either disease-causing mutations or neutral variants. These so-called unclassified variants (UVs) include variants that are located in the intronic sequences of BRCA1 and BRCA2. The purpose of this study was to assess the use of splice-site prediction programs (SSPPs) to select intronic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 that are likely to affect RNA splicing. We performed in vitro molecular characterization of RNA of six intronic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2. In four cases (BRCA1, c.81-6T>A and c.4986+5G>T; BRCA2, c.7617+2T>G and c.8754+5G>A) a deleterious effect on RNA splicing was seen, whereas the c.135-15_-12del variant in BRCA1 showed no effect on RNA splicing. In the case of the BRCA2 c.68-7T>A variant, RNA analysis was not sufficient to establish the clinical significance. Six SSPPs were used to predict whether an effect on RNA splicing was expected for these six variants as well as for 23 intronic variants in BRCA1 for which the effect on RNA splicing has been published. Out of a total of 174 predictions, 161 (93%) were informative (i.e., the wild-type splice-site was recognized). No false-negative predictions were observed; an effect on RNA splicing was always predicted by these programs. In four cases (2.5%) a false-positive prediction was observed. For DNA diagnostic laboratories, these programs are therefore very useful to select intronic variants that are likely to affect RNA splicing for further analysis.

  15. Alternative Splicing Generates a Novel Truncated Cav1.2 Channel in Neonatal Rat Heart*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ping; Yu, Dejie; Hu, Zhenyu; Liang, Mui Cheng; Wang, Jue Jin; Yu, Chye Yun; Ng, Gandi; Yong, Tan Fong; Soon, Jia Lin; Chua, Yeow Leng; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2015-01-01

    L-type Cav1.2 Ca2+ channel undergoes extensive alternative splicing, generating functionally different channels. Alternatively spliced Cav1.2 Ca2+ channels have been found to be expressed in a tissue-specific manner or under pathological conditions. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of alternative splicing in Cav1.2 channel, we systematically investigated the splicing patterns in the neonatal and adult rat hearts. The neonatal heart expresses a novel 104-bp exon 33L at the IVS3-4 linker that is generated by the use of an alternative acceptor site. Inclusion of exon 33L causes frameshift and C-terminal truncation. Whole-cell electrophysiological recordings of Cav1.233L channels expressed in HEK 293 cells did not detect any current. However, when co-expressed with wild type Cav1.2 channels, Cav1.233L channels reduced the current density and altered the electrophysiological properties of the wild type Cav1.2 channels. Interestingly, the truncated 3.5-domain Cav1.233L channels also yielded a dominant negative effect on Cav1.3 channels, but not on Cav3.2 channels, suggesting that Cavβ subunits is required for Cav1.233L regulation. A biochemical study provided evidence that Cav1.233L channels enhanced protein degradation of wild type channels via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Although the physiological significance of the Cav1.233L channels in neonatal heart is still unknown, our report demonstrates the ability of this novel truncated channel to modulate the activity of the functional Cav1.2 channels. Moreover, the human Cav1.2 channel also contains exon 33L that is developmentally regulated in heart. Unexpectedly, human exon 33L has a one-nucleotide insertion that allowed in-frame translation of a full Cav1.2 channel. An electrophysiological study showed that human Cav1.233L channel is a functional channel but conducts Ca2+ ions at a much lower level. PMID:25694430

  16. Chromatin, DNA structure and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Giono, Luciana E; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2015-11-14

    Coupling of transcription and alternative splicing via regulation of the transcriptional elongation rate is a well-studied phenomenon. Template features that act as roadblocks for the progression of RNA polymerase II comprise histone modifications and variants, DNA-interacting proteins and chromatin compaction. These may affect alternative splicing decisions by inducing pauses or decreasing elongation rate that change the time-window for splicing regulatory sequences to be recognized. Herein we discuss the evidence supporting the influence of template structural modifications on transcription and splicing, and provide insights about possible roles of non-B DNA conformations on the regulation of alternative splicing.

  17. Evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, S.; Gao, Z.; Liu, R.-Z.; Godbout, R.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing represents a source of great diversity for regulating protein expression and function. It has been estimated that one-third to two-thirds of mammalian genes are alternatively spliced. With the sequencing of the chicken genome and analysis of transcripts expressed in chicken tissues, we are now in a position to address evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing events in chicken and mammals. Here, we compare chicken and mammalian transcript sequences of 41 alternatively-spliced genes and 50 frequently accessed genes. Our results support a high frequency of splicing events in chicken, similar to that observed in mammals. PMID:17675855

  18. Alcoholism and alternative splicing of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Toshikazu; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2010-04-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  19. Computational Methods and Correlation of Exon-skipping Events with Splicing, Transcription, and Epigenetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbo; Ye, Zhenqing; Huang, Tim H.; Shi, Huidong; Jin, Victor X.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is widely recognized for playing roles in regulating genes and creating gene diversity. Consequently the identification and quantification of differentially spliced transcripts are pivotal for transcriptome analysis. However, how these diversified isoforms are spliced during genomic transcription and protein expression and what biological factors might influence the regulation of this are still required for further exploration. The advances in next-generation sequencing of messenger RNA (RNA-seq) have enabled us to survey gene expression and splicing more accurately. We have introduced a novel computational method, graph-based exon-skipping scanner (GESS), for de novo detection of skipping event sites from raw RNA-seq reads without prior knowledge of gene annotations, as well as for determining the dominant isoform generated from such sites. We have applied our method to publicly available RNA-seq data in GM12878 and K562 cells from the ENCODE consortium, and integrated other sequencing-based genomic data to investigate the impact of splicing activities, transcription factors (TFs) and epigenetic histone modifications on splicing outcomes. In a separate study, we also apply this algorithm in prostate cancer in The Cancer Genomics Atlas (TCGA) for de novo skipping event discovery to the understanding of abnormal splicing in each patient and to identify potential markers for prediction and progression of diseases. PMID:27807836

  20. Exploitation of a thermosensitive splicing event to study pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cizdziel, P.E.; De Mars, M.; Murphy, E.C. Jr.

    1988-04-01

    The spliced form of MuSVts110 viral RNA is approximately 20-fold more abundant at growth temperatures of 33/sup 0/C or lower than at 37 to 41/sup 0/C. This difference is due to changes in the efficiency of MuSVts110 RNA splicing rather than selective thermolability of the spliced species at 37 to 41/sup 0/C or general thermosensitivity of RNA splicing in MuSVts110-infected cells. Moreover, RNA transcribed from MuSVts110 DNA introduced into a variety of cell lines is spliced in a temperature-sensitive fashion, suggesting that the structure of the viral RNA controls the efficiency of the event. The authors exploited this novel splicing event to study the cleavage and ligation events during splicing in vivo. No spliced viral mRNA or splicing intermediates were observed in MuSVts110-infected cells (6m2 cells) at 39/sup 0/C. However, after a short (about 30-min) lag following a shift to 33/sup 0/C, viral pre-mRNA cleaved at the 5' splice site began to accumulate. Ligated exons were not detected until about 60 min following the initial detection of cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting that these two splicing reactions did not occur concurrently. Splicing of viral RNA in the MuSVts110 revertant 54-5A4, which lacks the sequence -AG/TGT- at the usual 3' splice site, was studied. Cleavage at the 5' splice site in the revertant viral RNA proceeded in a temperature-sensitive fashion. No novel cryptic 3' splice sites were activated; however, splicing at an alternate upstream 3' splice site used at low efficiency in normal MuSVts110 RNA was increased to a level close to that of 5'-splice-site cleavage in the revertant viral RNA.

  1. Conserved RNA secondary structures promote alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Peter J; Hertel, Klemens J

    2008-08-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. Alternative splicing in higher eukaryotes results in the generation of multiple protein isoforms from gene transcripts. The extensive alternative splicing observed implies a flexibility of the spliceosome to identify exons within a given pre-mRNA. To reach this flexibility, splice-site selection in higher eukaryotes has evolved to depend on multiple parameters such as splice-site strength, splicing regulators, the exon/intron architecture, and the process of pre-mRNA synthesis itself. RNA secondary structures have also been proposed to influence alternative splicing as stable RNA secondary structures that mask splice sites are expected to interfere with splice-site recognition. Using structural and functional conservation, we identified RNA structure elements within the human genome that associate with alternative splice-site selection. Their frequent involvement with alternative splicing demonstrates that RNA structure formation is an important mechanism regulating gene expression and disease.

  2. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  3. Random Splicing of Several Exons Caused by a Single Base Change in the Target Exon of CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Gene Knockout

    PubMed Central

    Kapahnke, Marcel; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated sequence 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system is widely used for genome editing purposes as it facilitates an efficient knockout of a specific gene in, e.g. cultured cells. Targeted double-strand breaks are introduced to the target sequence of the guide RNAs, which activates the cellular DNA repair mechanism for non-homologous-end-joining, resulting in unprecise repair and introduction of small deletions or insertions. Due to this, sequence alterations in the coding region of the target gene frequently cause frame-shift mutations, facilitating degradation of the mRNA. We here show that such CRISPR/Cas9-mediated alterations in the target exon may also result in altered splicing of the respective pre-mRNA, most likely due to mutations of splice-regulatory sequences. Using the human FLOT-1 gene as an example, we demonstrate that such altered splicing products also give rise to aberrant protein products. These may potentially function as dominant-negative proteins and thus interfere with the interpretation of the data generated with these cell lines. Since most researchers only control the consequences of CRISPR knockout at genomic and protein level, our data should encourage to also check the alterations at the mRNA level. PMID:27983621

  4. Aberrant Alternative Splicing Is Another Hallmark of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ladomery, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of human genes are alternatively spliced. Not surprisingly, aberrant alternative splicing is increasingly linked to cancer. Splice isoforms often encode proteins that have distinct and even antagonistic properties. The abnormal expression of splice factors and splice factor kinases in cancer changes the alternative splicing of critically important pre-mRNAs. Aberrant alternative splicing should be added to the growing list of cancer hallmarks. PMID:24101931

  5. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3′-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  6. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  7. A herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D-expressing nonreplicating dominant-negative HSV-2 virus vaccine is superior to a gD2 subunit vaccine against HSV-2 genital infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengwei; Xie, Lining; Balliet, John W; Casimiro, Danilo R; Yao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    We recently constructed a novel non-replicating dominant-negative HSV-2 recombinant viral vaccine (CJ2-gD2) capable of expressing various HSV-2 antigens that are dominant targets of HSV-2-specific CD8 T-cell response. Importantly, CJ2-gD2 expresses gD2, the HSV-2 major antigen glycoprotein D, as efficiently as wild-type HSV-2 infection and can lead to a nearly 500-fold reduction in wild-type HSV-2 viral replication in cells co-infected with CJ2-gD2 and wild-type HSV-2. In this report, we show that CJ2-gD2 elicits a strong antibody response to various HSV-2 antigens and is highly effective in the prevention of primary and recurrent HSV-2 genital infection and disease in the immunized guinea pigs. The direct comparison study between CJ2-gD2 and a gD2 subunit vaccine (gD2-alum/MPL) with a formulation akin to a vaccine tested in phase III clinical trials shows that CJ2-gD2 is 8 times more effective than the gD2-alum/MPL subunit vaccine in eliciting an anti-HSV-2 specific neutralizing antibody response and offers significantly superior protection against primary and recurrent HSV-2 genital infections. Importantly, no challenge wild-type HSV-2 viral DNA was detectable in dorsal root ganglia DNA isolated from CJ2-gD2-immunized guinea pigs on day 60 post-challenge. CJ2-gD2 should be an excellent HSV-2 vaccine candidate for protection against HSV-2 genital infection and disease in humans.

  8. Manipulation of cellular GSH biosynthetic capacity via TAT-mediated protein transduction of wild-type or a dominant-negative mutant of glutamate cysteine ligase alters cell sensitivity to oxidant-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Backos, Donald S.; Brocker, Chad N.; Franklin, Christopher C.

    2010-02-15

    The glutathione (GSH) antioxidant defense system plays a central role in protecting mammalian cells against oxidative injury. Glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) is the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis and is a heterodimeric holoenzyme composed of catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunits. As a means of assessing the cytoprotective effects of enhanced GSH biosynthetic capacity, we have developed a protein transduction approach whereby recombinant GCL protein can be rapidly and directly transferred into cells when coupled to the HIV TAT protein transduction domain. Bacterial expression vectors encoding TAT fusion proteins of both GCL subunits were generated and recombinant fusion proteins were synthesized and purified to near homogeneity. The TAT-GCL fusion proteins were capable of heterodimerization and formation of functional GCL holoenzyme in vitro. Exposure of Hepa-1c1c7 cells to the TAT-GCL fusion proteins resulted in the time- and dose-dependent transduction of both GCL subunits and increased cellular GCL activity and GSH levels. A heterodimerization-competent, enzymatically deficient GCLC-TAT mutant was also generated in an attempt to create a dominant-negative suppressor of GCL. Transduction of cells with a catalytically inactive GCLC(E103A)-TAT mutant decreased cellular GCL activity in a dose-dependent manner. TAT-mediated manipulation of cellular GCL activity was also functionally relevant as transduction with wild-type GCLC(WT)-TAT or mutant GCLC(E103A)-TAT conferred protection or enhanced sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death, respectively. These findings demonstrate that TAT-mediated transduction of wild-type or dominant-inhibitory mutants of the GCL subunits is a viable means of manipulating cellular GCL activity to assess the effects of altered GSH biosynthetic capacity.

  9. Hallmarks of alternative splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oltean, S; Bates, D O

    2014-11-13

    The immense majority of genes are alternatively spliced and there are many isoforms specifically associated with cancer progression and metastasis. The splicing pattern of specific isoforms of numerous genes is altered as cells move through the oncogenic process of gaining proliferative capacity, acquiring angiogenic, invasive, antiapoptotic and survival properties, becoming free from growth factor dependence and growth suppression, altering their metabolism to cope with hypoxia, enabling them to acquire mechanisms of immune escape, and as they move through the epithelial-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions and metastasis. Each of the 'hallmarks of cancer' is associated with a switch in splicing, towards a more aggressive invasive cancer phenotype. The choice of isoforms is regulated by several factors (signaling molecules, kinases, splicing factors) currently being identified systematically by a number of high-throughput, independent and unbiased methodologies. Splicing factors are de-regulated in cancer, and in some cases are themselves oncogenes or pseudo-oncogenes and can contribute to positive feedback loops driving cancer progression. Tumour progression may therefore be associated with a coordinated splicing control, meaning that there is the potential for a relatively small number of splice factors or their regulators to drive multiple oncogenic processes. The understanding of how splicing contributes to the various phenotypic traits acquired by tumours as they progress and metastasise, and in particular how alternative splicing is coordinated, can and is leading to the development of a new class of anticancer therapeutics-the alternative-splicing inhibitors.

  10. Splicing-related genes are alternatively spliced upon changes in ambient temperatures in plants

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Johan; Lammers, Michiel; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Bonnema, Guusje; Rodenburg, Nicole; Proveniers, Marcel C. G.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Plants adjust their development and architecture to small variations in ambient temperature. In a time in which temperatures are rising world-wide, the mechanism by which plants are able to sense temperature fluctuations and adapt to it, is becoming of special interest. By performing RNA-sequencing on two Arabidopsis accession and one Brassica species exposed to temperature alterations, we showed that alternative splicing is an important mechanism in ambient temperature sensing and adaptation. We found that amongst the differentially alternatively spliced genes, splicing related genes are enriched, suggesting that the splicing machinery itself is targeted for alternative splicing when temperature changes. Moreover, we showed that many different components of the splicing machinery are targeted for ambient temperature regulated alternative splicing. Mutant analysis of a splicing related gene that was differentially spliced in two of the genotypes showed an altered flowering time response to different temperatures. We propose a two-step mechanism where temperature directly influences alternative splicing of the splicing machinery genes, followed by a second step where the altered splicing machinery affects splicing of downstream genes involved in the adaptation to altered temperatures. PMID:28257507

  11. Unexpectedly high allelic diversity at the KIT locus causing dominant white color in the domestic pig.

    PubMed Central

    Pielberg, G; Olsson, C; Syvänen, A C; Andersson, L

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in KIT encoding the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (MGF) are responsible for coat color variation in domestic pigs. The dominant white phenotype is caused by two mutations, a gene duplication and a splice mutation in one of the copies leading to skipping of exon 17. Here we applied minisequencing and pyrosequencing for quantitative analysis of the number of copies with the splice form. An unexpectedly high genetic diversity was revealed in white pigs. We found four different KIT alleles in a small sample of eight Large White females used as founder animals in a wild boar intercross. A similar number of KIT alleles was found in commercial populations of white Landrace and Large White pigs. We provide evidence for at least two new KIT alleles in pigs, both with a triplication of the gene. The results imply that KIT alleles with the duplication are genetically unstable and new alleles are most likely generated by unequal crossing over. This study provides an improved method for genotyping the complicated Dominant white/KIT locus in pigs. The results also suggest that some alleles may be associated with negative pleiotropic effects on other traits. PMID:11805065

  12. Safely splicing glass optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korbelak, K.

    1980-01-01

    Field-repair technique fuses glass fibers in flammable environment. Apparatus consists of v-groove vacuum chucks on manipulators, high-voltage dc power supply and tungsten electrodes, microscope to observe joint alignment and fusion, means of test transmission through joint. Apparatus is enclosed in gas tight bos filled with inert gas during fusion. About 2 feet of fiber end are necessary for splicing.

  13. Ikaros dominant negative isoform (Ik6) induces IL-3-independent survival of murine pro-B lymphocytes by activating JAK-STAT and up-regulating Bcl-xl levels.

    PubMed

    Kano, Gen; Morimoto, Akira; Takanashi, Mami; Hibi, Shigeyoshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Inaba, Tohru; Yagi, Tomohito; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2008-05-01

    Ikaros is an essential regulator of lymphocyte differentiation. Mice transgenic for the Ikaros dominant negative (DN) mutation rapidly develop lymphoid malignancies. Various human leukemias have also been reported to express Ikaros DN isoforms, but its role in leukemogenesis is yet to be defined. We demonstrate that overexpressed Ikaros DN (Ik6) prolonged the survival of two different murine pro-B cell lines in cytokine deprived condition, and this was associated with increased expression of Bcl-xl. A survey of the upstream controller(s) of Bcl-xl expression revealed Ik6 overexpression enhanced the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5. Interestingly, the Ik6 expressing cell lines showed reduced expression of B-cell differentiation surface marker CD45R (B220), which is also known as a JAK2 inhibitor. Although further evaluation with human clinical materials are required, these results propose a putative role of Ik6 in the development of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia, by activating the JAK2-STAT5 pathway and thus stimulating the production of Bcl-xl.

  14. Alternative Splicing of Rice WRKY62 and WRKY76 Transcription Factor Genes in Pathogen Defense1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xujun; Zhou, Xiangui; Yang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family of transcription factors (TFs) functions as transcriptional activators or repressors in various signaling pathways. In this study, we discovered that OsWRKY62 and OsWRKY76, two genes of the WRKY IIa subfamily, undergo constitutive and inducible alternative splicing. The full-length OsWRKY62.1 and OsWRKY76.1 proteins formed homocomplexes and heterocomplexes, and the heterocomplex dominates in the nuclei when analyzed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Transgenic overexpression of OsWRKY62.1 and OsWRKY76.1 in rice (Oryza sativa) enhanced plant susceptibility to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and the leaf blight bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae, whereas RNA interference and loss-of-function knockout plants exhibited elevated resistance. The dsOW62/76 and knockout lines of OsWRKY62 and OsWRKY76 also showed greatly increased expression of defense-related genes and the accumulation of phytoalexins. The ratio of full-length versus truncated transcripts changed in dsOW62/76 plants as well as in response to pathogen infection. The short alternative OsWRKY62.2 and OsWRKY76.2 isoforms could interact with each other and with full-length proteins. OsWRKY62.2 showed a reduced repressor activity in planta, and two sequence determinants required for the repressor activity were identified in the amino terminus of OsWRKY62.1. The amino termini of OsWRKY62 and OsWRKY76 splice variants also showed reduced binding to the canonical W box motif. These results not only enhance our understanding of the DNA-binding property, the repressor sequence motifs, and the negative feedback regulation of the IIa subfamily of WRKYs but also provide evidence for alternative splicing of WRKY TFs during the plant defense response. PMID:27208272

  15. Cryptic splice sites and split genes.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Yuri; Chan, Elcie; Sarkar, Rupa; Wong, Frederick; Vorechovsky, Igor; Winston, Robert M; Tatusova, Tatiana; Dibb, Nick J

    2011-08-01

    We describe a new program called cryptic splice finder (CSF) that can reliably identify cryptic splice sites (css), so providing a useful tool to help investigate splicing mutations in genetic disease. We report that many css are not entirely dormant and are often already active at low levels in normal genes prior to their enhancement in genetic disease. We also report a fascinating correlation between the positions of css and introns, whereby css within the exons of one species frequently match the exact position of introns in equivalent genes from another species. These results strongly indicate that many introns were inserted into css during evolution and they also imply that the splicing information that lies outside some introns can be independently recognized by the splicing machinery and was in place prior to intron insertion. This indicates that non-intronic splicing information had a key role in shaping the split structure of eukaryote genes.

  16. Cryptic splice sites and split genes

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Yuri; Chan, Elcie; Sarkar, Rupa; Wong, Frederick; Vorechovsky, Igor; Winston, Robert M.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Dibb, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new program called cryptic splice finder (CSF) that can reliably identify cryptic splice sites (css), so providing a useful tool to help investigate splicing mutations in genetic disease. We report that many css are not entirely dormant and are often already active at low levels in normal genes prior to their enhancement in genetic disease. We also report a fascinating correlation between the positions of css and introns, whereby css within the exons of one species frequently match the exact position of introns in equivalent genes from another species. These results strongly indicate that many introns were inserted into css during evolution and they also imply that the splicing information that lies outside some introns can be independently recognized by the splicing machinery and was in place prior to intron insertion. This indicates that non-intronic splicing information had a key role in shaping the split structure of eukaryote genes. PMID:21470962

  17. Pharmacology of Modulators of Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jonathan C.; Oltean, Sebastian; Donaldson, Lucy F.

    2017-01-01

    More than 95% of genes in the human genome are alternatively spliced to form multiple transcripts, often encoding proteins with differing or opposing function. The control of alternative splicing is now being elucidated, and with this comes the opportunity to develop modulators of alternative splicing that can control cellular function. A number of approaches have been taken to develop compounds that can experimentally, and sometimes clinically, affect splicing control, resulting in potential novel therapeutics. Here we develop the concepts that targeting alternative splicing can result in relatively specific pathway inhibitors/activators that result in dampening down of physiologic or pathologic processes, from changes in muscle physiology to altering angiogenesis or pain. The targets and pharmacology of some of the current inhibitors/activators of alternative splicing are demonstrated and future directions discussed. PMID:28034912

  18. Underwater splice for submarine coaxial cable

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, A.T.; Roe, T. Jr.; Tausing, W.R.; Wilson, J.V.

    1984-10-30

    The invention is a device for splicing submarine coaxial cable underwater on the seafloor with a simple push-on operation to restore and maintain electrical and mechanical strength integrity; the splice device is mateable directly with the severed ends of a coaxial cable to be repaired. Splicing assemblies comprise a dielectric pressure compensating fluid filled guide cavity, a gelled castor oil cap and wiping seals for exclusion of seawater, electrical contacts, a cable strength restoration mechanism, and a pressure compensation system for controlled extrusion of and depletion loss prevention of dielectric seal fluid during cable splicing. A splice is made underwater by directly inserting prepared ends of coaxial cable, having no connector attachments, into splicing assemblies.

  19. Investigating alternative RNA splicing in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Mereau, Agnès; Hardy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing, the process by which distinct mature mRNAs can be produced from a single primary transcript, is a key mechanism to increase the organism complexity. The generation of alternative splicing pattern is a means to expand the proteome diversity and also to control gene expression through the regulation of mRNA abundance. Alternative splicing is therefore particularly prevalent during development and accordingly numerous splicing events are regulated in a tissue or temporal manner. To study the roles of alternative splicing during developmental processes and decipher the molecular mechanisms that underlie temporal and spatial regulation, it is important to develop in vivo whole animal studies. In this chapter, we present the advantages of using the amphibian Xenopus as a fully in vivo model to study alternative splicing and we describe the experimental procedures that can be used with Xenopus laevis embryos and oocytes to define the cis-regulatory elements and identify the associated trans-acting factors.

  20. Characterization of a novel five-transmembrane domain cholecystokinin-2 receptor splice variant identified in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Claire; Escrieut, Chantal; Clerc, Pascal; Gigoux, Véronique; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Fourmy, Daniel

    2012-02-26

    The cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R), is expressed in cancers where it contributes to tumor progression. The CCK2R is over-expressed in a sub-set of tumors, allowing its use in tumor targeting with a radiolabel ligand. Since discrepancies between mRNA levels and CCK2R binding sites were noticed, we searched for abnormally spliced variants in tumors from various origins having been previously reported to frequently express cholecystokinin receptors, such as medullary thyroid carcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, and gastroenteropancreatic tumors. A variant of the CCK2R coding for a putative five-transmembrane domains receptor has been cloned. This variant represented as much as 6% of CCK2R levels. Ectopic expression in COS-7 cells revealed that this variant lacks biological activity due to its sequestration in endoplasmic reticulum. When co-expressed with the CCK2R, this variant diminished membrane density of the CCK2R and CCK2R-mediated activity (phospholipase-C and ERK activation). In conclusion, a novel splice variant acting as a dominant negative on membrane density of the CCK2R may be of importance for the pathophysiology of certain tumors and for their in vivo CCK2R-targeting.

  1. The low information content of Neurospora splicing signals: implications for RNA splicing and intron origin.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard A; Stajich, Jason E; Field, Deborah J; Olive, Joan E; DeAbreu, Diane M

    2015-05-01

    When we expressed a small (0.9 kb) nonprotein-coding transcript derived from the mitochondrial VS plasmid in the nucleus of Neurospora we found that it was efficiently spliced at one or more of eight 5' splice sites and ten 3' splice sites, which are present apparently by chance in the sequence. Further experimental and bioinformatic analyses of other mitochondrial plasmids, random sequences, and natural nuclear genes in Neurospora and other fungi indicate that fungal spliceosomes recognize a wide range of 5' splice site and branchpoint sequences and predict introns to be present at high frequency in random sequence. In contrast, analysis of intronless fungal nuclear genes indicates that branchpoint, 5' splice site and 3' splice site consensus sequences are underrepresented compared with random sequences. This underrepresentation of splicing signals is sufficient to deplete the nuclear genome of splice sites at locations that do not comprise biologically relevant introns. Thus, the splicing machinery can recognize a wide range of splicing signal sequences, but splicing still occurs with great accuracy, not because the splicing machinery distinguishes correct from incorrect introns, but because incorrect introns are substantially depleted from the genome.

  2. [Deregulation of pre-messenger RNA splicing and rare diseases].

    PubMed

    de la Grange, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Most of protein-coding human genes are subjected to alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This mechanism is highly regulated to precisely modulate detection of specific splice sites. This regulation is under control of the spliceosome and several splicing factors are also required to modulate the alternative usage of splice sites. Splicing factors and spliceosome components recognize splicing signals and regulatory sequences of the pre-mRNAs. These splicing sequences make splicing susceptible to polymorphisms and mutations. Examples of associations between human rare diseases and defects in pre-messenger RNA splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing sequence (i.e., cis acting mutations), recent studies described the disruptive impact of mutations within spliceosome components or splicing factors (i.e., trans acting mutations). Following growing of knowledge regarding splicing regulation, several approaches have been developed to compensate for the effect of deleterious mutations and to restore sufficient amounts of functional protein.

  3. Targeting GH-1 splicing as a novel pharmacological strategy for growth hormone deficiency type II.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2017-01-15

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD II) is a rare genetic splicing disorder characterized by reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion and short stature. It is mainly caused by autosomal dominant-negative mutations within the growth hormone gene (GH-1) which results in missplicing at the mRNA level and the subsequent loss of exon 3, producing the 17.5-kDa GH isoform: a mutant and inactive GH protein that reduces the stability and the secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform, the main biologically active GH form. At present, patients suffering from IGHD II are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent the toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa mutant on the pituitary gland, which may eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. As the severity of the disease inversely correlates with the 17.5-kDa/22-kDa ratio, increasing the inclusion of exon 3 is expected to ameliorate disease symptoms. This review focuses on the recent advances in experimental and therapeutic strategies applicable to treat IGHD II in clinical and preclinical contexts. Several avenues for alternative IGHD II therapy will be discussed including the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically target the exon 3-deleted transcripts as well as the application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to enhance full-length GH-1 transcription, correct GH-1 exon 3 splicing and manipulate GH pathway.

  4. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html.

  5. A dominant-negative F-box deleted mutant of E3 ubiquitin ligase, β-TrCP1/FWD1, markedly reduces myeloma cell growth and survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anjana; McCluskey, Brandon; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Muñoz, Steve; Oyajobi, Babatunde O.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma with bortezomib can result in severe adverse effects, necessitating the development of targeted inhibitors of the proteasome. We show that stable expression of a dominant-negative F-box deleted (ΔF) mutant of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, SCFβ-TrCP/FWD1, in murine 5TGM1 myeloma cells dramatically attenuated their skeletal engraftment and survival when inoculated into immunocompetent C57BL/KaLwRij mice. Similar results were obtained in immunodeficient bg-nu-xid mice, suggesting that the observed effects were independent of host recipient immune status. Bone marrow stroma offered no protection for 5TGM1-ΔF cells in cocultures treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), indicating a cell-autonomous anti-myeloma effect. Levels of p100, IκBα, Mcl-1, ATF4, total and cleaved caspase-3, and phospho-β-catenin were elevated in 5TGM1-ΔF cells whereas cIAP was down-regulated. TNF also activated caspase-3 and downregulated Bcl-2, correlating with the enhanced susceptibility of 5TGM1-ΔF cells to apoptosis. Treatment of 5TGM1 tumor-bearing mice with a β-TrCP1/FWD1 inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), significantly reduced tumor burden in bone. PDTC also increased levels of cleaved Mcl-1 and caspase-3 in U266 human myeloma cells, correlating with our murine data and validating the development of specific β-TrCP inhibitors as an alternative therapy to nonspecific proteasome inhibitors for myeloma patients. PMID:26009993

  6. Sequestration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Facilitation by G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK2) and attenuation by a dominant-negative mutant of GRK2.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Kurose, H; Nagao, T

    1994-12-23

    Sequestration of m2 receptors (muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes), which was assessed as loss of N-[3H]methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) binding activity from the cell surface, was examined in COS 7 and BHK-21 cells that had been transfected with expression vectors encoding the m2 receptor and, independently, vectors encoding a G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK2) (beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1) or a GRK2 dominant-negative mutant (DN-GRK2). The sequestration of m2 receptors became apparent when the cells were treated with 10(-5) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine. In this case, approximately 40% or 20-25% of the [3H]NMS binding sites on COS 7 or BHK-21 cells, respectively, were sequestered with a half-life of 15-25 min. In cells in which GRK2 was also expressed, the sequestration became apparent in the presence of 10(-7) M carbamylcholine. Approximately 40% of the [3H]NMS binding sites on both COS 7 and BHK-21 cells were sequestered in the presence of 10(-6) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine. When DN-GRK2 was expressed in COS 7 cells, the proportion of [3H]NMS binding sites sequestered in the presence of 10(-5) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine was reduced to 20-30%. These results indicate that the phosphorylation of m2 receptors by GRK2 facilitates their sequestration. These results are in contrast with the absence of a correlation between sequestration and the phosphorylation of beta-adrenergic receptors by the GRK2 and suggests that the consequences of phosphorylation by GRK2 are different for different receptors.

  7. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  8. Irf6 directly regulates Klf17 in zebrafish periderm and Klf4 in murine oral epithelium, and dominant-negative KLF4 variants are present in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Jia, Zhonglin; Smith, Tiffany; Eshete, Mekonen; Butali, Azeez; Dunnwald, Martine; Murray, Jeffrey; Cornell, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic (NS) cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common disorder with a strong genetic underpinning. Genome-wide association studies have detected common variants associated with this disorder, but a large portion of the genetic risk for NSCL/P is conferred by unidentified rare sequence variants. Mutations in IRF6 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 6) and GRHL3 (Grainyhead-like 3) cause Van der Woude syndrome, which includes CL/P. Both genes encode members of a regulatory network governing periderm differentiation in model organisms. Here, we report that Krüppel-like factor 17 (Klf17), like Grhl3, acts downstream of Irf6 in this network in zebrafish periderm. Although Klf17 expression is absent from mammalian oral epithelium, a close homologue, Klf4, is expressed in this tissue and is required for the differentiation of epidermis. Chromosome configuration capture and reporter assays indicated that IRF6 directly regulates an oral-epithelium enhancer of KLF4. To test whether rare missense variants of KLF4 contribute risk for NSCL/P, we sequenced KLF4 in approximately 1000 NSCL/P cases and 300 controls. By one statistical test, missense variants of KLF4 as a group were enriched in cases versus controls. Moreover, two patient-derived KLF4 variants disrupted periderm differentiation upon forced expression in zebrafish embryos, suggesting that they have dominant-negative effect. These results indicate that rare NSCL/P risk variants can be found in members of the gene regulatory network governing periderm differentiation. PMID:26692521

  9. A novel mutation in LRSAM1 causes axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with dominant inheritance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) refers to a heterogeneous group of genetic motor and sensory neuropathies. According to the primary site of damage, a distinction is made between demyelinating and axonal forms (CMT1 and 2, respectively, when inherited as an autosomal dominant trait). Leucine-rich repeat and sterile alpha motif-containing protein 1 (LRSAM1) is a ubiquitin-protein ligase with a role in sorting internalised cell-surface receptor proteins. So far, mutations in the LRSAM1 gene have been shown to cause axonal CMT in three different families and can confer either dominant or recessive transmission of the disease. Case presentation We have identified a novel mutation in LRSAM1 in a small family with dominant axonal CMT. Electrophysiological studies show evidence of a sensory axonal neuropathy and are interesting in so far as giant motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) are present on needle electromyography (EMG), while motor nerve conduction studies including compound motor action potential (CMAP) amplitudes are completely normal. The underlying mutation c.2046+1G >T results in the loss of a splice donor site and the inclusion of 63 additional base pairs of intronic DNA into the aberrantly spliced transcript. This disrupts the catalytically active RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain of LRSAM1. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, beyond the typical length-dependent degeneration of motor axons, damage of cell bodies in the anterior horn might play a role in LRSAM1-associated neuropathies. Moreover, in conjunction with other data in the literature, our results support a model, by which disruption of the C-terminal RING domain confers dominant negative properties to LRSAM1. PMID:24894446

  10. Specific interactions between proteins implicated in splice site selection and regulated alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Y; Maniatis, T

    1993-12-17

    Specific recognition and pairing of the 5' and 3' splice sites are critical steps in pre-mRNA splicing. We report that the splicing factors SC35 and SF2/ASF specifically interact with both the integral U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP U1-70K) and with the 35 kd subunit of the splicing factor U2AF (U2AF35). Previous studies indicated that the U1 snRNP binds specifically to the 5' splice site, while U2AF35-U2AF65 heterodimer binds to the 3' splice site. Together, these observations suggest that SC35 and other members of the SR family of splicing factors may function in splice site selection by acting as a bridge between components bound to the 5' and 3' splice sites. Interestingly, SC35, SF2/ASF, and U2AF35 also interact with the Drosophila splicing regulators Transformer (Tra) and Transformer-2 (Tra2), suggesting that protein-protein interactions mediated by SR proteins may also play an important role in regulating alternative splicing.

  11. The incredible complexity of RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Robert, Christelle; Watson, Mick

    2016-12-30

    Alternative splice isoforms are common and important and have been shown to impact many human diseases. A new study by Nellore et al. offers a comprehensive study of splice junctions in humans by re-analyzing over 21,500 public human RNA sequencing datasets.

  12. Multiple links between transcription and splicing.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R; de la Mata, Manuel; Fededa, Juan Pablo; Munoz, Manuel J; Nogues, Guadalupe

    2004-10-01

    Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are extremely complex multimolecular processes that involve protein-DNA, protein-RNA, and protein-protein interactions. Splicing occurs in the close vicinity of genes and is frequently cotranscriptional. This is consistent with evidence that both processes are coordinated and, in some cases, functionally coupled. This review focuses on the roles of cis- and trans-acting factors that regulate transcription, on constitutive and alternative splicing. We also discuss possible functions in splicing of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II (pol II) largest subunit, whose participation in other key pre-mRNA processing reactions (capping and cleavage/polyadenylation) is well documented. Recent evidence indicates that transcriptional elongation and splicing can be influenced reciprocally: Elongation rates control alternative splicing and splicing factors can, in turn, modulate pol II elongation. The presence of transcription factors in the spliceosome and the existence of proteins, such as the coactivator PGC-1, with dual activities in splicing and transcription can explain the links between both processes and add a new level of complexity to the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes.

  13. Cell types differ in global coordination of splicing and proportion of highly expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Trakhtenberg, Ephraim F.; Pho, Nam; Holton, Kristina M.; Chittenden, Thomas W.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Dong, Lingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Balance in the transcriptome is regulated by coordinated synthesis and degradation of RNA molecules. Here we investigated whether mammalian cell types intrinsically differ in global coordination of gene splicing and expression levels. We analyzed RNA-seq transcriptome profiles of 8 different purified mouse cell types. We found that different cell types vary in proportion of highly expressed genes and the number of alternatively spliced transcripts expressed per gene, and that the cell types that express more variants of alternatively spliced transcripts per gene are those that have higher proportion of highly expressed genes. Cell types segregated into two clusters based on high or low proportion of highly expressed genes. Biological functions involved in negative regulation of gene expression were enriched in the group of cell types with low proportion of highly expressed genes, and biological functions involved in regulation of transcription and RNA splicing were enriched in the group of cell types with high proportion of highly expressed genes. Our findings show that cell types differ in proportion of highly expressed genes and the number of alternatively spliced transcripts expressed per gene, which represent distinct properties of the transcriptome and may reflect intrinsic differences in global coordination of synthesis, splicing, and degradation of RNA molecules. PMID:27577089

  14. Evolutionary Character of Alternative Splicing in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengjun; Yang, Hong; Yang, Huizhao

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the most important ways to enhance the functional diversity of genes. Huge amounts of data have been produced by microarray, expressed sequence tag, and RNA-seq, and plenty of methods have been developed specifically for this task. The most frequently asked questions in previous research were as follows. What is the content rate of AS genes among the whole gene set? How many AS types are presented in the genome, and which type is dominant? How about the conservation ability of AS among different species? Which kinds of isoforms from some genes have the environmental response to help individual adaptation? Based on this background, we collected analysis results from 17 species to try to map out the landscape of AS studies in plants. We have noted the shortages of previous results, and we appeal to all scientists working in the AS field to make a standard protocol so that analyses between different projects are comparable. PMID:26819552

  15. Expression Microarray Analysis Reveals Alternative Splicing of LAMA3 and DST Genes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ryan; Ochs, Michael F.; Ahn, Sun Mi; Hennessey, Patrick; Tan, Marietta; Soudry, Ethan; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Uemura, Mamoru; Brait, Mariana; Shao, Chunbo; Westra, William; Bishop, Justin; Fertig, Elana J.; Califano, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prior studies have demonstrated tumor-specific alternative splicing events in various solid tumor types. The role of alternative splicing in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is unclear. Our study queried exon-level expression to implicate splice variants in HNSCC tumors. Experimental Design We performed a comparative genome-wide analysis of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) tissue samples at an exon expression level. In our comparison we ranked genes based upon a novel score—the Maximum-Minimum Exon Score (MMES) – designed to predict the likelihood of an alternative splicing event occurring. We validated predicted alternative splicing events using quantitative RT-PCR on an independent cohort. Results After MMES scoring of 17,422 genes, the top 900 genes with the highest scores underwent additional manual inspection of expression patterns in a graphical analysis. The genes LAMA3, DST, VEGFC, SDHA, RASIP1, and TP63 were selected for further validation studies because of a high frequency of alternative splicing suggested in our graphical analysis, and literature review showing their biological relevance and known splicing patterns. We confirmed TP63 as having dominant expression of the short DeltaNp63 isoform in HNSCC tumor samples, consistent with prior reports. Two of the six genes (LAMA3 and DST) validated by quantitative RT-PCR for tumor-specific alternative splicing events (Student's t test, P<0.001). Conclusion Alternative splicing events of oncologically relevant proteins occur in HNSCC. The number of genes expressing tumor-specific splice variants needs further elucidation, as does the functional significance of selective isoform expression. PMID:24675808

  16. The Characterizations of Different Splicing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Fariba; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan

    The concept of splicing system was first introduced by Head in 1987 to model the biological process of DNA recombination mathematically. This model was made on the basis of formal language theory which is a branch of applied discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. In fact, splicing system treats DNA molecule and the recombinant behavior by restriction enzymes and ligases in the form of words and splicing rules respectively. The notion of splicing systems was taken into account from different points of view by many mathematicians. Several modified definitions have been introduced by many researchers. In this paper, some properties of different kinds of splicing systems are presented and their relationships are investigated. Furthermore, these results are illustrated by some examples.

  17. Tumor microenvironment-associated modifications of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Jean-Philippe; Lucier, Jean-François; Nwilati, Hanad; Thibault, Philippe; Garneau, Daniel; Gendron, Daniel; Durand, Mathieu; Couture, Sonia; Lapointe, Elvy; Prinos, Panagiotis; Klinck, Roscoe; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Chabot, Benoit; Abou-Elela, Sherif

    2014-02-01

    Pre-mRNA alternative splicing is modified in cancer, but the origin and specificity of these changes remain unclear. Here, we probed ovarian tumors to identify cancer-associated splicing isoforms and define the mechanism by which splicing is modified in cancer cells. Using high-throughput quantitative PCR, we monitored the expression of splice variants in laser-dissected tissues from ovarian tumors. Surprisingly, changes in alternative splicing were not limited to the tumor tissues but were also found in the tumor microenvironment. Changes in the tumor-associated splicing events were found to be regulated by splicing factors that are differentially expressed in cancer tissues. Overall, ∼20% of the alternative splicing events affected by the down-regulation of the splicing factors QKI and RBFOX2 were altered in the microenvironment of ovarian tumors. Together, our results indicate that the tumor microenvironment undergoes specific changes in alternative splicing orchestrated by a limited number of splicing factors.

  18. Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum (rER) Trafficking Errors by Different Classes of Mutant DSPP Cause the Dominant Negative Effects in both Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Dentin Dysplasia by Entrapping Normal DSPP

    PubMed Central

    von Marschall, Zofia; Mok, Seeun; Phillips, Matthew D.; McKnight, Dianalee A.; Fisher, Larry W.

    2012-01-01

    Families with nonsyndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and the milder, dentin dysplasia (DD), have mutations in one allele of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene. Because loss of a single Dspp allele in mice (and likely, humans) causes no dental phenotype, the mechanism(s) underling the dominant-negative effects were investigated. DSPP mutations occur in three classes. (The first class, the mid-leader missense mutation, Y6D, was not investigated in this report.) All other 5' mutations of DSPP result in changes/loss in the first three amino acids (IPV) of mature DSPP or, for A15V, some retention of the hydrophobic leader sequence. All of this second class of mutations caused mutant DSPP to be retained in the rER of transfected HEK293 cells. Trafficking out of the rER by co-expressed normal DSPP was reduced in a dose-responsive manner, probably due to formation of Ca2+-dependent complexes with the retained mutant DSPP. IPV-like sequences begin many secreted Ca2+-binding proteins, and changing the third amino acid to the charged aspartate (D) in three other acidic proteins also caused increased rER accumulation. Both the leader-retaining A15V and the long string of hydrophobic amino acids resulting from all known frameshift mutations within the 3'-encoded Ca2+-binding repeat domain (third class of mutations) caused retention by association of the mutant proteins with rER membranes. More 5' frameshift mutations result in longer mutant hydrophobic domains but the milder phenotype, DD, probably due to lower effectiveness of the remaining, shorter Ca2+-binding domain in capturing normal DSPP protein within the rER. This study presents evidence of a shared underlying mechanism of capturing of normal DSPP by two different classes of DSPP mutations and offers an explanation for the mild (DD-II) versus severe (DGI-II & III) nonsyndromic dentin phenotypes. Evidence is also presented that many acidic, Ca2+-binding proteins may use the same IPV-like receptor

  19. An interspecific plant hybrid shows novel changes in parental splice forms of genes for splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Scascitelli, Moira; Cognet, Marie; Adams, Keith L

    2010-04-01

    Interspecific hybridization plays an important role in plant adaptive evolution and speciation, and the process often results in phenotypic novelty. Hybrids can show changes in genome structure and gene expression compared with their parents including chromosomal rearrangments, changes in cytosine methylation, up- and downregulation of gene expression, and gene silencing. Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental aspect of the expression of many genes. However alternative splicing patterns have not been examined in multiple genes in an interspecific plant hybrid compared with its parents. Here we studied alternative splicing patterns in an interspecific Populus hybrid and its parents by assaying 40 genes using reverse transcription PCR. Most of the genes showed identical alternative splicing patterns between the parents and the hybrid. We found new alternative splicing variants present in the hybrid in two SR genes involved in the regulation of splicing and alternative splicing. The novel alternative splicing patterns included changes in donor and acceptor sites to create a new exon in one allele of PtRSZ22 in the hybrid and retention of an intron in both alleles of PtSR34a.1 in the hybrid, with effects on the function of the corresponding truncated proteins, if present. Our results suggest that novel alternative splicing patterns are present in a small percentage of genes in hybrids, but they could make a considerable impact on the expression of some genes. Changes in alternative splicing are likely to be an important component of the genetic changes that occur upon interspecific hybridization.

  20. Aberrant Splicing in Cancer: Mediators of Malignant Progression through an Imperfect Splice Program Shift.

    PubMed

    Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Moraes, Alberto Silva; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Although the efforts to understand the genetic basis of cancer allowed advances in diagnosis and therapy, little is known about other molecular bases. Splicing is a key event in gene expression, controlling the excision of introns decoded inside genes and being responsible for 80% of the proteome amplification through events of alternative splicing. Growing data from the last decade point to deregulation of splicing events as crucial in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Several alterations in splicing events were observed in cancer, caused by either missexpression of or detrimental mutations in some splicing factors, and appear to be critical in carcinogenesis and key events during tumor progression. Notwithstanding, it is difficult to determine whether it is a cause or consequence of cancer and/or tumorigenesis. Most reviews focus on the generated isoforms of deregulated splicing pattern, while others mainly summarize deregulated splicing factors observed in cancer. In this review, events associated with carcinogenesis and tumor progression mainly, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, which is also implicated in alternative splicing regulation, will be progressively discussed in the light of a new perspective, suggesting that splicing deregulation mediates cell reprogramming in tumor progression by an imperfect shift of the splice program.

  1. Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans does not require an AG at the 3' splice acceptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Aroian, R V; Levy, A D; Koga, M; Ohshima, Y; Kramer, J M; Sternberg, P W

    1993-01-01

    The dinucleotide AG, found at the 3' end of virtually all eukaryotic pre-mRNA introns, is thought to be essential for splicing. Reduction-of-function mutations in two Caenorhabditis elegans genes, the receptor tyrosine kinase gene let-23 and the collagen gene dpy-10, both alter the AG at the end of a short (ca. 50-nucleotide) intron to AA. The in vivo effects of these mutations were studied by sequencing polymerase chain reaction-amplified reverse-transcribed RNA isolated from the two mutants. As expected, we find transcripts that splice to a cryptic AG, skip an exon, and retain an unspliced intron. However, we also find significant levels of splicing at the mutated 3' splice site (AA) and at nearby non-AG dinucleotides. Our results indicate that for short C. elegans introns an AG is not required for splicing at either the correct 3' splice site or incorrect sites. Analysis of a splice site mutant involving a longer, 316-nucleotide C. elegans intron indicates that an AG is also not required there for splicing. We hypothesize that elements besides the invariant AG, e.g., an A-U-rich region, a UUUC motif, and/or a potential branch point sequence, are directing the selection of the 3' splice site and that in wild-type genes these elements cooperate so that proper splicing occurs. Images PMID:8417357

  2. MAASE: An alternative splicing database designed for supporting splicing microarray applications

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, CHRISTINA L.; KWON, YOUNG-SOO; LI, HAI-RI; ZHANG, KUI; COUTINHO-MANSFIELD, GABRIELA; YANG, CANZHU; NAIR, T. MURLIDHARAN; GRIBSKOV, MICHAEL; FU, XIANG-DONG

    2005-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a prominent feature of higher eukaryotes. Understanding of the function of mRNA isoforms and the regulation of alternative splicing is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. The development of mRNA isoform sensitive microarrays, which requires precise splice-junction sequence information, is a promising approach. Despite the availability of a large number of mRNAs and ESTs in various databases and the efforts made to align transcript sequences to genomic sequences, existing alternative splicing databases do not offer adequate information in an appropriate format to aid in splicing array design. Here we describe our effort in constructing the Manually Annotated Alternatively Spliced Events (MAASE) database system, which is specifically designed to support splicing microarray applications. MAASE comprises two components: (1) a manual/computational annotation tool for the efficient extraction of critical sequence and functional information for alternative splicing events and (2) a user-friendly database of annotated events that allows convenient export of information to aid in microarray design and data analysis. We provide a detailed introduction and a step-by-step user guide to the MAASE database system to facilitate future large-scale annotation efforts, integration with other alternative splicing databases, and splicing array fabrication. PMID:16251387

  3. SAW: A Method to Identify Splicing Events from RNA-Seq Data Based on Splicing Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Kang; Fermin, Damian

    2010-01-01

    Splicing event identification is one of the most important issues in the comprehensive analysis of transcription profile. Recent development of next-generation sequencing technology has generated an extensive profile of alternative splicing. However, while many of these splicing events are between exons that are relatively close on genome sequences, reads generated by RNA-Seq are not limited to alternative splicing between close exons but occur in virtually all splicing events. In this work, a novel method, SAW, was proposed for the identification of all splicing events based on short reads from RNA-Seq. It was observed that short reads not in known gene models are actually absent words from known gene sequences. An efficient method to filter and cluster these short reads by fingerprint fragments of splicing events without aligning short reads to genome sequences was developed. Additionally, the possible splicing sites were also determined without alignment against genome sequences. A consensus sequence was then generated for each short read cluster, which was then aligned to the genome sequences. Results demonstrated that this method could identify more than 90% of the known splicing events with a very low false discovery rate, as well as accurately identify, a number of novel splicing events between distant exons. PMID:20706591

  4. Control of alternative splicing by signal-dependent degradation of splicing-regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Marengo, Matthew S; Wassarman, David A

    2009-04-17

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major gene expression regulatory mechanism in metazoan organisms. Proteins that bind pre-mRNA elements and control assembly of splicing complexes regulate utilization of pre-mRNA alternative splice sites. To understand how signaling pathways impact this mechanism, an RNA interference screen in Drosophila S2 cells was used to identify proteins that regulate TAF1 (TBP-associated factor 1) alternative splicing in response to activation of the ATR (ATM-RAD3-related) signaling pathway by the chemotherapeutic drug camptothecin (CPT). The screen identified 15 proteins that, when knocked down, caused the same change in TAF1 alternative splicing as CPT treatment. However, combined RNA interference and CPT treatment experiments indicated that only a subset of the identified proteins are targets of the CPT-induced signal, suggesting that multiple independent pathways regulate TAF1 alternative splicing. To understand how signals modulate the function of splicing factors, we characterized one of the CPT targets, Tra2 (Transformer-2). CPT was found to down-regulate Tra2 protein levels. CPT-induced Tra2 down-regulation was ATR-dependent and temporally paralleled the change in TAF1 alternative splicing, supporting the conclusion that Tra2 directly regulates TAF1 alternative splicing. Additionally, CPT-induced Tra2 down-regulation occurred independently of new protein synthesis, suggesting a post-translational mechanism. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 reduced CPT-induced Tra2 degradation and TAF1 alternative splicing, and mutation of evolutionarily conserved Tra2 lysine 81, a potential ubiquitin conjugation site, to arginine inhibited CPT-induced Tra2 degradation, supporting a proteasome-dependent alternative splicing mechanism. We conclude that CPT-induced TAF1 alternative splicing occurs through ATR-signaled degradation of a subset of splicing-regulatory proteins.

  5. Alternative splicing in cancer: implications for biology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Weiss, W A

    2015-01-02

    Alternative splicing has critical roles in normal development and can promote growth and survival in cancer. Aberrant splicing, the production of noncanonical and cancer-specific mRNA transcripts, can lead to loss-of-function in tumor suppressors or activation of oncogenes and cancer pathways. Emerging data suggest that aberrant splicing products and loss of canonically spliced variants correlate with stage and progression in malignancy. Here, we review the splicing landscape of TP53, BARD1 and AR to illuminate roles for alternative splicing in cancer. We also examine the intersection between alternative splicing pathways and novel therapeutic approaches.

  6. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Alger M.; Cygan, Kamil J.; Brown, Brian A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25985083

  7. A novel mouse PKC{delta} splice variant, PKC{delta}IX, inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung D.; Seo, Kwang W.; Lee, Eun A.; Quang, Nguyen N.; Cho, Hong R.; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} A novel PKC{delta} isoform, named PKC{delta}IX, that lacks the C1 domain and the ATP-binding site is ubiquitously expressed. {yields} PKC{delta}IX inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis. {yields} PKC{delta}IX may function as an endogenous dominant negative isoform for PKC{delta}. -- Abstract: Protein kinase C (PKC) {delta} plays an important role in cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The catalytic fragment of PKC{delta} generated by caspase-dependent cleavage is essential for the initiation of etoposide-induced apoptosis. In this study, we identified a novel mouse PKC{delta} isoform named PKC{delta}IX (Genebank Accession No. (HQ840432)). PKC{delta}IX is generated by alternative splicing and is ubiquitously expressed, as seen in its full-length PKC{delta}. PKC{delta}IX lacks the C1 domain, the caspase 3 cleavage site, and the ATP binding site but preserves an almost intact c-terminal catalytic domain and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The structural characteristics of PKC{delta}IX provided a possibility that this PKC{delta} isozyme functions as a novel dominant-negative form for PKC{delta} due to its lack of the ATP-binding domain that is required for the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. Indeed, overexpression of PKC{delta}IX significantly inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, an in vitro kinase assay showed that recombinant PKC{delta}IX protein could competitively inhibit the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. We conclude that PKC{delta}IX can function as a natural dominant-negative inhibitor of PKC{delta}in vivo.

  8. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  9. Lessons from non-canonical splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ule, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements in experimental and computational techniques used to study the transcriptome have enabled an unprecedented view of RNA processing, revealing many previously unknown non-canonical splicing events. This includes cryptic events located far from the currently annotated exons, and unconventional splicing mechanisms that have important roles in regulating gene expression. These non-canonical splicing events are a major source of newly emerging transcripts during evolution, especially when they involve sequences derived from transposable elements. They are therefore under precise regulation and quality control, which minimises their potential to disrupt gene expression. While non-canonical splicing can lead to aberrant transcripts that cause many diseases, we also explain how it can be exploited for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27240813

  10. RNA-splicing endonuclease structure and function.

    PubMed

    Calvin, K; Li, H

    2008-04-01

    The RNA-splicing endonuclease is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme responsible for the excision of introns from nuclear transfer RNA (tRNA) and all archaeal RNAs. Since its first identification from yeast in the late 1970s, significant progress has been made toward understanding the biochemical mechanisms of this enzyme. Four families of the splicing endonucleases possessing the same active sites and overall architecture but with different subunit compositions have been identified. Two related consensus structures of the precursor RNA splice sites and the critical elements required for intron excision have been established. More recently, a glimpse was obtained of the structural mechanism by which the endonuclease recognizes the consensus RNA structures and cleaves at the splice sites. This review summarizes these findings and discusses their implications in the evolution of intron removal processes.

  11. HOLLYWOOD: a comparative relational database of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Holste, Dirk; Huo, George; Tung, Vivian; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    RNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression, and is often variable, giving rise to multiple alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoforms from a single gene locus. The design of effective databases to support experimental and computational investigations of alternative splicing (AS) is a significant challenge. In an effort to integrate accurate exon and splice site annotation with current knowledge about splicing regulatory elements and predicted AS events, and to link information about the splicing of orthologous genes in different species, we have developed the Hollywood system. This database was built upon genomic annotation of splicing patterns of known genes derived from spliced alignment of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) and expressed sequence tags, and links features such as splice site sequence and strength, exonic splicing enhancers and silencers, conserved and non-conserved patterns of splicing, and cDNA library information for inferred alternative exons. Hollywood was implemented as a relational database and currently contains comprehensive information for human and mouse. It is accompanied by a web query tool that allows searches for sets of exons with specific splicing characteristics or splicing regulatory element composition, or gives a graphical or sequence-level summary of splicing patterns for a specific gene. A streamlined graphical representation of gene splicing patterns is provided, and these patterns can alternatively be layered onto existing information in the UCSC Genome Browser. The database is accessible at http://hollywood.mit.edu.

  12. Decreased expression of Fyn protein and disbalanced alternative splicing patterns in platelets from patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Kotaro; Fukuzako, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Tomo; Hamada, Shun; Murata, Yoji; Isosaka, Tomoko; Yuasa, Shigeki; Yagi, Takeshi

    2009-07-30

    Fyn, a Src-family kinase, is highly expressed in brain tissue and blood cells. In the mouse brain, Fyn participates in brain development, synaptic transmission through the phosphorylation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits, and the regulation of emotional behavior. Recently, we found that Fyn is required for the signal transduction in striatal neurons that is initiated by haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug. To determine whether Fyn abnormalities are present in patients with schizophrenia, we analyzed Fyn expression in platelet samples from 110 patients with schizophrenia, 75 of the patients' first-degree relatives, and 130 control subjects. A Western blot analysis revealed significantly lower levels of Fyn protein among the patients with schizophrenia and their relatives, compared with the level in the control group. At the mRNA level, the splicing patterns of fyn were altered in the patients and their relatives; specifically, the ratio of fynDelta7, in which exon 7 is absent, was elevated. An expression study in HEK293T cells revealed that FynDelta7 had a dominant-negative effect on the phosphorylation of Fyn's substrate. These results suggest novel deficits in Fyn function, manifested as the downregulation of Fyn protein or the altered transcription of the fyn gene, in patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Tumor Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    2001. Multiple interactions between SRm160 and SR family proteins in enhancer-dependent splicing and development of Caenorhabditis elegans . 11... Caenorhabditis 36 Lorson, C.L. et al. (1999) A single nucleotide in the Biol. 77, 277-291 elegans . Nature 402, 835-838 SMN gene regulates splicing and is...terminate (Birse et al., 1998; Proudfoot, 2000), mutation of the poly(A) signal resulted in the accumulation to high levels in the nuclear fraction of

  14. Targeting RNA-splicing for SMA treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhua; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2012-03-01

    The central dogma of DNA-RNA-protein was established more than 40 years ago. However, important biological processes have been identified since the central dogma was developed. For example, methylation is important in the regulation of transcription. In contrast, proteins, are more complex due to modifications such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, or cleavage. RNA is the mediator between DNA and protein, but it can also be modulated at several levels. Among the most profound discoveries of RNA regulation is RNA splicing. It has been estimated that 80% of pre-mRNA undergo alternative splicing, which exponentially increases biological information flow in cellular processes. However, an increased number of regulated steps inevitably accompanies an increased number of errors. Abnormal splicing is often found in cells, resulting in protein dysfunction that causes disease. Splicing of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene has been extensively studied during the last two decades. Accumulating knowledge on SMN splicing has led to speculation and search for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) treatment by stimulating the inclusion of exon 7 into SMN mRNA. This mini-review summaries the latest progress on SMN splicing research as a potential treatment for SMA disease.

  15. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)—short nucleotide sequences flanking introns—are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints. PMID:26642327

  16. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)--short nucleotide sequences flanking introns--are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints.

  17. The C-Terminal Domain of Nrf1 Negatively Regulates the Full-Length CNC-bZIP Factor and Its Shorter Isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; Both Are Also Inhibited by the Small Dominant-Negative Nrf1γ/δ Isoforms that Down-Regulate ARE-Battery Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiguo; Qiu, Lu; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Chen, Jiayu; Ren, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686–741) of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1) shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L) CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein) and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa). Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2). Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ. PMID:25290918

  18. The C-terminal domain of Nrf1 negatively regulates the full-length CNC-bZIP factor and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; both are also inhibited by the small dominant-negative Nrf1γ/δ isoforms that down-regulate ARE-battery gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiguo; Qiu, Lu; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Chen, Jiayu; Ren, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686-741) of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1) shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L) CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein) and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa). Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2). Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ.

  19. The Intronic GABRG2 Mutation, IVS6+2T→G, Associated with CAE Altered Subunit mRNA Intron Splicing, Activated Nonsense-Mediated Decay and Produced a Stable Truncated γ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mengnan; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The intronic GABRG2 mutation, IVS6+2T→G, was identified in an Australian family with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and febrile seizures (Kananura et al., 2002). The GABRG2 intron 6 splice donor site was found to be mutated from GT to GG. We generated wildtype and mutant γ2S subunit bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) driven by a CMV promoter and expressed them in HEK293T cells and expressed wildtype and mutant γ2S subunit BACs containing the endogenous hGABRG2 promoter in transgenic mice. Wildtype and mutant GABRG2 mRNA splicing patterns were determined in both BAC transfected HEK293T cells and transgenic mouse brain, and in both, the mutation abolished intron 6 splicing at the donor site, activated a cryptic splice site, generated partial intron 6 retention and produced a frame shift in exon 7 that created a premature translation-termination codon (PTC). The resultant mutant mRNA was either degraded partially by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) or translated to a stable, truncated subunit (the γ2-PTC subunit) containing the first 6 GABRG2 exons and a novel frame-shifted 29 aa C terminal tail. The γ2-PTC subunit was homologous to the mollusk acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) but was not secreted from cells. It was retained in the ER and not expressed on the surface membrane, but it did oligomerize with α1 and β2 subunits. These results suggested that the GABRG2 mutation, IVS6+2T→G, reduced surface αβγ2 receptor levels, thus reducing GABAergic inhibition, by reducing GABRG2 transcript level and producing a stable, nonfunctional truncated subunit that had a dominant negative effect on αβγ2 receptor assembly. PMID:22539854

  20. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation.

  1. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  2. Splicing in action: assessing disease causing sequence changes

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, D; Baralle, M

    2005-01-01

    Variations in new splicing regulatory elements are difficult to identify exclusively by sequence inspection and may result in deleterious effects on precursor (pre) mRNA splicing. These mutations can result in either complete skipping of the exon, retention of the intron, or the introduction of a new splice site within an exon or intron. Sometimes mutations that do not disrupt or create a splice site activate pre-existing pseudo splice sites, consistent with the proposal that introns contain splicing inhibitory sequences. These variants can also affect the fine balance of isoforms produced by alternatively spliced exons and in consequence cause disease. Available genomic pathology data reveal that we are still partly ignorant of the basic mechanisms that underlie the pre-mRNA splicing process. The fact that human pathology can provide pointers to new modulatory elements of splicing should be exploited. PMID:16199547

  3. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  4. An Alu-derived intronic splicing enhancer facilitates intronic processing and modulates aberrant splicing in ATM.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Tibor; Talotti, Gabriele; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2009-11-01

    We have previously reported a natural GTAA deletion within an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene that disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates the excision of the upstream portion of the intron. The resulting pre-mRNA splicing intermediate is then processed to a cryptic exon, whose aberrant inclusion in the final mRNA is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia. We show here that the last 40 bases of a downstream intronic antisense Alu repeat are required for the activation of the cryptic exon by the ISPE deletion. Evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediate by a hybrid minigene assay indicates that the identified intronic splicing enhancer represents a novel class of enhancers that facilitates processing of splicing intermediates possibly by recruiting U1 snRNP to defective donor sites. In the absence of this element, the splicing intermediate accumulates and is not further processed to generate the cryptic exon. Our results indicate that Alu-derived sequences can provide intronic splicing regulatory elements that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and potentially affect the severity of disease-causing splicing mutations.

  5. Development of a positive genetic selection system for inhibition of protein splicing using mycobacterial inteins in Escherichia coli DNA gyrase subunit A.

    PubMed

    Adam, Eric; Perler, Francine B

    2002-09-01

    An intein-based positive genetic selection system was developed to study protein splicing and to provide a selection system with the potential for finding splicing inhibitors. Inteins can be novel antimicrobial targets when present in essential proteins since blocking splicing would kill the organism. For example, pathogenic mycobacteria encode inteins that interrupt DNA gyrase. The gyrase selection system exploits (1) splicing of inteins out of Gyrase A and (2) the dominant lethal effect of quinolone poisoning of DNA gyrase, which in turn blocks replication. The system was adapted for whole-cell high-throughput screening using green fluorescent protein as an automatable readout of viability. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system, mutations that blocked splicing of the Mycobacterium xenopi Gyrase A intein were isolated. Splicing was then assayed at a second temperature to identify inteins with a temperature-sensitive splicing phenotype. Mutations were mapped onto a structure-based sequence alignment, which led to the rational prediction of a temperature-sensitive splicing mutation. GyrA intein subdomain relationships also provided insight into intein evolution.

  6. A multi-split mapping algorithm for circular RNA, splicing, trans-splicing and fusion detection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Steve; Otto, Christian; Doose, Gero; Tanzer, Andrea; Langenberger, David; Christ, Sabina; Kunz, Manfred; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel; Hackermüller, Jörg; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-02-10

    Numerous high-throughput sequencing studies have focused on detecting conventionally spliced mRNAs in RNA-seq data. However, non-standard RNAs arising through gene fusion, circularization or trans-splicing are often neglected. We introduce a novel, unbiased algorithm to detect splice junctions from single-end cDNA sequences. In contrast to other methods, our approach accommodates multi-junction structures. Our method compares favorably with competing tools for conventionally spliced mRNAs and, with a gain of up to 40% of recall, systematically outperforms them on reads with multiple splits, trans-splicing and circular products. The algorithm is integrated into our mapping tool segemehl (http://www.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de/Software/segemehl/).

  7. RNA splicing. The human splicing code reveals new insights into the genetic determinants of disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui Y; Alipanahi, Babak; Lee, Leo J; Bretschneider, Hannes; Merico, Daniele; Yuen, Ryan K C; Hua, Yimin; Gueroussov, Serge; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Hughes, Timothy R; Morris, Quaid; Barash, Yoseph; Krainer, Adrian R; Jojic, Nebojsa; Scherer, Stephen W; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J

    2015-01-09

    To facilitate precision medicine and whole-genome annotation, we developed a machine-learning technique that scores how strongly genetic variants affect RNA splicing, whose alteration contributes to many diseases. Analysis of more than 650,000 intronic and exonic variants revealed widespread patterns of mutation-driven aberrant splicing. Intronic disease mutations that are more than 30 nucleotides from any splice site alter splicing nine times as often as common variants, and missense exonic disease mutations that have the least impact on protein function are five times as likely as others to alter splicing. We detected tens of thousands of disease-causing mutations, including those involved in cancers and spinal muscular atrophy. Examination of intronic and exonic variants found using whole-genome sequencing of individuals with autism revealed misspliced genes with neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Our approach provides evidence for causal variants and should enable new discoveries in precision medicine.

  8. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  9. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  10. Purification of RNA-Protein Splicing Complexes Using a Tagged Protein from In Vitro Splicing Reaction Mixture.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step for gene expression. Splicing reactions have been well investigated by using in vitro splicing reactions with extracts prepared from cultured cells. Here, we describe protocols for the preparation of splicing-competent extracts from cells expressing a tagged spliceosomal protein. The whole-cell extracts are able to splice exogenously added pre-mRNA and the RNA-protein complex formed in the in vitro splicing reaction can be purified by immunoprecipitation using antibodies against the peptide tag on the splicing protein. The method described here to prepare splicing-active extracts from whole cells is particularly useful when studying pre-mRNA splicing in various cell types, and the expression of a tagged spliceosomal protein allows one to purify and analyze the RNA-protein complexes by simple immunoprecipitation.

  11. The behavior of bonded doubler splices for composite sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, T. A.; Weisahaar, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the behavior of adhesively bonded doubler splices of two composite material sandwich panels are presented. The splices are studied from three approaches: analytical; numerical (finite elements); and experimental. Several parameters that characterize the splice are developed to determine their influence upon joint strength. These parameters are: doubler overlap length; core stiffness; laminate bending stiffness; the size of the gap between the spliced sandwich panels; and room and elevated temperatures. Similarities and contrasts between these splices and the physically similar single and double lap joints are discussed. The results of this investigation suggest several possible approaches to improving the strength of the sandwich splices.

  12. Rescue of Isolated GH Deficiency Type II (IGHD II) via Pharmacologic Modulation of GH-1 Splicing.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2016-10-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) type II, the autosomal dominant form of GHD, is mainly caused by mutations that affect splicing of GH-1. When misspliced RNA is translated, it produces a toxic 17.5-kDa GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild-type-human GH (wt-hGH). Usually, isolated GHD type II patients are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH in order to maintain normal growth. However, this type of replacement therapy does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa GH isoform on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Here, we tested the possibility to restore the constitutive splicing pattern of GH-1 by using butyrate, a drug that mainly acts as histone deacetylase inhibitor. To this aim, wt-hGH and/or different hGH-splice site mutants (GH-IVS3+2, GH-IVS3+6, and GH-ISE+28) were transfected in rat pituitary cells expressing human GHRH receptor (GHRHR) (GC-GHRHR). Upon butyrate treatment, GC-GHRHR cells coexpressing wt-hGH and each of the mutants displayed increased GH transcript level, intracellular GH content, and GH secretion when compared with the corresponding untreated condition. The effect of butyrate was most likely mediated by the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2. Overexpression of alternative ASF/SF2 in the same experimental setting, indeed, promoted the amount of full-length transcripts thus increasing synthesis and secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that modulation of GH-1 splicing pattern to increase the 22-kDa GH isoform levels can be clinically beneficial and hence a crucial challenge in GHD research.

  13. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  14. Gene and alternative splicing annotation with AIR

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Liliana; Di Francesco, Valentina; Miller, Jason; Turner, Russell; Yao, Alison; Harris, Michael; Walenz, Brian; Mobarry, Clark; Merkulov, Gennady V.; Charlab, Rosane; Dew, Ian; Deng, Zuoming; Istrail, Sorin; Li, Peter; Sutton, Granger

    2005-01-01

    Designing effective and accurate tools for identifying the functional and structural elements in a genome remains at the frontier of genome annotation owing to incompleteness and inaccuracy of the data, limitations in the computational models, and shifting paradigms in genomics, such as alternative splicing. We present a methodology for the automated annotation of genes and their alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts based on existing cDNA and protein sequence evidence from the same species or projected from a related species using syntenic mapping information. At the core of the method is the splice graph, a compact representation of a gene, its exons, introns, and alternatively spliced isoforms. The putative transcripts are enumerated from the graph and assigned confidence scores based on the strength of sequence evidence, and a subset of the high-scoring candidates are selected and promoted into the annotation. The method is highly selective, eliminating the unlikely candidates while retaining 98% of the high-quality mRNA evidence in well-formed transcripts, and produces annotation that is measurably more accurate than some evidence-based gene sets. The process is fast, accurate, and fully automated, and combines the traditionally distinct gene annotation and alternative splicing detection processes in a comprehensive and systematic way, thus considerably aiding in the ensuing manual curation efforts. PMID:15632090

  15. Alternative splicing modulates stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ru-Huei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Ou, Chen-Wei; Yu, Hsiu-Hui; Li, Kuo-Wei; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the surprising potential to develop into many different cell types. Therefore, major research efforts have focused on transplantation of stem cells and/or derived progenitors for restoring depleted diseased cells in degenerative disorders. Understanding the molecular controls, including alternative splicing, that arise during lineage differentiation of stem cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapeutic approaches in regeneration medicine. Alternative splicing to allow a single gene to encode multiple transcripts with different protein coding sequences and RNA regulatory elements increases genomic complexities. Utilizing differences in alternative splicing as a molecular marker may be more sensitive than simply gene expression in various degrees of stem cell differentiation. Moreover, alternative splicing maybe provide a new concept to acquire induced pluripotent stem cells or promote cell-cell transdifferentiation for restorative therapies and basic medicine researches. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of alternative splicing regulation in stem cells and their progenitors. It will hopefully provide much needed knowledge into realizing stem cell biology and related applications.

  16. Phosphoregulation of Ire1 RNase splicing activity

    PubMed Central

    Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R.; Carrara, Marta; Ali, Maruf M. U.

    2014-01-01

    Ire1 is activated in response to accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is a unique enzyme, possessing both kinase and RNase activity that is required for specific splicing of Xbp1 mRNA leading to UPR activation. How phosphorylation impacts on the Ire1 splicing activity is unclear. In this study, we isolate distinct phosphorylated species of Ire1 and assess their effects on RNase splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We find that phosphorylation within the kinase activation loop significantly increases RNase splicing in vitro. Correspondingly, mutants of Ire1 that cannot be phosphorylated on the activation loop show decreased specific Xbp1 and promiscuous RNase splicing activity relative to wild-type Ire1 in cells. These data couple the kinase phosphorylation reaction to the activation state of the RNase, suggesting that phosphorylation of the activation loop is an important step in Ire1-mediated UPR activation. PMID:24704861

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the human pituitary gland: expression and splicing pattern in adenomas versus normal pituitary.

    PubMed

    Occhi, G; Albiger, N; Berlucchi, S; Gardiman, M; Scanarini, M; Scienza, R; Fassina, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2007-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas are slow-growing tumours arising within the pituitary gland. If secreting, they give rise to well-known syndromes such as Cushing's disease or acromegaly; when hormonally inactive, they come to clinical attention often with local mass effects or pituitary deficiency. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor with a key role in fat and glucose metabolism, but also involved in several neoplasia, has recently been detected in pituitary adenomas. In the present study, we evaluated the occurrence and splicing profile of PPARgamma in 43 cases of pituitary adenoma of different subtypes and compared it to 12 normal pituitary glands. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, PPARgamma was expressed as much in adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and ACTH-silent adenomas as in controls, with a moderate underexpression in somatotrophinomas and prolactinomas and overexpression in 54% of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). There was no apparent qualitative change in the splicing profile of pathological pituitary glands, nor was the presence of specific isoforms with dominant negative effects against PPARgamma detected. Western blotting revealed similar expression levels in the different subgroups of pituitary adenomas and normal glands. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PPARgamma expression in approximately one-half of analysed samples. The intra- and intergroup differences observed in pituitary adenomas may represent new elements in the process of understanding the different clinical responses of Cushing's and Nelson patients to PPARgamma-ligand treatment. Moreover, the higher level of PPARgamma expression detected in the NFPA subgroup may suggest its possible role as a molecular target in these pituitary adenomas, paving the way for investigations on the effectiveness of treatment with thiazolidinediones in such patients.

  18. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, F.; Textoris-Taube, K.; Keller, C.; Golnik, R.; Vigneron, N.; Van den Eynde, B. J.; Schuler-Thurner, B.; Schadendorf, D.; Lorenz, F. K. M.; Uckert, W.; Urban, S.; Lehmann, A.; Albrecht-Koepke, N.; Janek, K.; Henklein, P.; Niewienda, A.; Kloetzel, P. M.; Mishto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100mel47–52/40–42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100mel47–52/40–42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8+ T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  19. The 20S Proteasome Splicing Activity Discovered by SpliceMet

    PubMed Central

    Textoris-Taube, Kathrin; Janek, Katharina; Keller, Christin; Henklein, Petra; Kloetzel, Peter Michael; Zaikin, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    The identification of proteasome-generated spliced peptides (PSP) revealed a new unpredicted activity of the major cellular protease. However, so far characterization of PSP was entirely dependent on the availability of patient-derived cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL) thus preventing a systematic investigation of proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing (PCPS). For an unrestricted PSP identification we here developed SpliceMet, combining the computer-based algorithm ProteaJ with in vitro proteasomal degradation assays and mass spectrometry. By applying SpliceMet for the analysis of proteasomal processing products of four different substrate polypeptides, derived from human tumor as well as viral antigens, we identified fifteen new spliced peptides generated by PCPS either by cis or from two separate substrate molecules, i.e., by trans splicing. Our data suggest that 20S proteasomes represent a molecular machine that, due to its catalytic and structural properties, facilitates the generation of spliced peptides, thereby providing a pool of qualitatively new peptides from which functionally relevant products may be selected. PMID:20613855

  20. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    PubMed

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  1. Analysis of differential splicing suggests different modes of short-term splicing regulation

    PubMed Central

    Topa, Hande; Honkela, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Alternative splicing is an important mechanism in which the regions of pre-mRNAs are differentially joined in order to form different transcript isoforms. Alternative splicing is involved in the regulation of normal physiological functions but also linked to the development of diseases such as cancer. We analyse differential expression and splicing using RNA-sequencing time series in three different settings: overall gene expression levels, absolute transcript expression levels and relative transcript expression levels. Results: Using estrogen receptor α signaling response as a model system, our Gaussian process-based test identifies genes with differential splicing and/or differentially expressed transcripts. We discover genes with consistent changes in alternative splicing independent of changes in absolute expression and genes where some transcripts change whereas others stay constant in absolute level. The results suggest classes of genes with different modes of alternative splicing regulation during the experiment. Availability and Implementation: R and Matlab codes implementing the method are available at https://github.com/PROBIC/diffsplicing. An interactive browser for viewing all model fits is available at http://users.ics.aalto.fi/hande/splicingGP/ Contact: hande.topa@helsinki.fi or antti.honkela@helsinki.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307611

  2. Protein splicing: selfish genes invade cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Neff, N F

    1993-12-01

    Protein splicing is a series of enzymatic events involving intramolecular protein breakage, rejoining and intron homing, in which introns are able to promote the recombinative transposition of their own coding sequences. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic spliced proteins have conserved similar gene structure, but little amino acid identity. The genes coding for these spliced proteins contain internal in-frame introns that encode polypeptides that apparently self-excise from the resulting host protein sequences. Excision of the 'protein intron' is coupled with joining of the two flanking protein regions encoded by exons of the host gene. Some introns of this type encode DNA endonucleases, related to Group I RNA intron gene products, that stimulate gene conversion and self-transmission.

  3. Systematic identification and analysis of exonic splicing silencers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zefeng; Rolish, Michael E; Yeo, Gene; Tung, Vivian; Mawson, Matthew; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-12-17

    Exonic splicing silencers (ESSs) are cis-regulatory elements that inhibit the use of adjacent splice sites, often contributing to alternative splicing (AS). To systematically identify ESSs, an in vivo splicing reporter system was developed to screen a library of random decanucleotides. The screen yielded 141 ESS decamers, 133 of which were unique. The silencer activity of over a dozen of these sequences was also confirmed in a heterologous exon/intron context and in a second cell type. Of the unique ESS decamers, most could be clustered into groups to yield seven putative ESS motifs, some resembling known motifs bound by hnRNPs H and A1. Potential roles of ESSs in constitutive splicing were explored using an algorithm, ExonScan, which simulates splicing based on known or putative splicing-related motifs. ExonScan and related bioinformatic analyses suggest that these ESS motifs play important roles in suppression of pseudoexons, in splice site definition, and in AS.

  4. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. ); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. ); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. ); Te Velde, K. ); Nordmann, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  5. Alternative splicing: a novel mechanism of regulation identified in the chorismate mutase gene of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun-Wen; Tian, Duanhua; Borchardt-Wier, Harmony B; Wang, Xiaohong

    2008-11-01

    Chorismate mutase (CM) secreted from the stylet of plant-parasitic nematodes plays an important role in plant parasitism. We isolated and characterized a new nematode CM gene (Gr-cm-1) from the potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis. The Gr-cm-1 gene was found to exist in the nematode genome as a single-copy gene that has two different alleles, Gr-cm-1A and Gr-cm-1B, both of which could give rise to two different mRNA transcripts of Gr-cm-1 and Gr-cm-1-IRII. In situ mRNA hybridization showed that the Gr-cm-1 gene was exclusively expressed within the subventral oesophageal gland cells of the nematode. Gr-cm-1 was demonstrated to encode a functional CM (GR-CM-1) potentially having a dimeric structure as the secreted bacterial *AroQ CMs. Gr-cm-1-IRII, generated by retention of intron 2 of the Gr-cm-1 pre-mRNA through alternative splicing (AS), would encode a truncated protein (GR-CM-1t) lacking the CM domain with no CM activity. The quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed that splicing of the Gr-cm-1 gene was developmentally regulated; Gr-cm-1 was up-regulated whereas Gr-cm-1-IRII was down-regulated in early nematode parasitic stages compared to the preparasitic juvenile stage. Low-temperature SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that GR-CM-1 could form homodimers when expressed in Escherichia coli and the dimerization domain was retained in the truncated GR-CM-1t protein. The specific interaction between the two proteins was demonstrated in yeast. Our data suggested that the novel splice variant might function as a dominant negative isoform through heterodimerization with the full-length GR-CM-1 protein and that AS may represent an important mechanism for regulating CM activity during nematode parasitism.

  6. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K.; Ali, Abdullah M.; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S.; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein–protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting. PMID:26261309

  7. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K; Ali, Abdullah M; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L

    2015-08-25

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein-protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting.

  8. Experimental study of lap splice bolted connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dehui; Tian, Lishan; Jiang, Wenqiang; An, Liqiang; Zhang, Ziyang

    2017-01-01

    The bolted connection is prone to slip under external load in the lattice transmission tower, which will affect the internal forces and deformation of tower. In order to better simulate the effect of bolt connection slippage on transmission tower, the load deformation relationship should be established. In this paper, the single lap splice bolt connection under tension load is tested and the load displacement curve is obtained. Furthermore, the existing model of single lap splice bolted connection is modified, which will plays an important role in the influence of the bolt slippage of the transmission lines towers more accurately and reasonably.

  9. Hepatitis B virus DNA splicing in Lebanese blood donors and genotype A to E strains: implications for hepatitis B virus DNA quantification and infectivity.

    PubMed

    El Chaar, Mira; El Jisr, Tamima; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major viruses transmissible by blood that causes chronic infection in immunocompromised individuals. The study of 61 HBV carrier blood donors from Lebanon revealed multiple patterns of spliced HBV DNA. HBV DNA splicing was examined and quantified in samples of five genotypes and in seroconversion panels. The Lebanese sample median viral load was 1.5 ×10(2) IU/ml. All strains were genotype D, serotype ayw; 35 clustered as subgenotype D1 and 7 clustered as subgenotype D2. Three splice variants (SP1, SP1A, and Pol/S) were observed in 12 high-viral-load samples. Twenty samples of each genotype, A to E, were tested for the presence of HBV spliced DNA and SP1-specific splice variant. An unspliced HBV genome was dominant, but 100% of strains with a viral load of ≥10(5) copies/ml contained various proportions of spliced DNA. SP1 was detected in 56/100 (56%) samples in levels that correlated with the overall viral load. HBV DNA quantification with S (unspliced) and X (total DNA) regions provided different levels of viral load, with the difference corresponding to spliced DNA. During the highly infectious window period, the SP1 variant became detectable shortly after the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), suggesting a correlation between the initiation of splicing and the production of detectable levels of HBsAg. The quantification of HBV DNA with primers located outside and inside the spliced region might provide different estimations of viral load and differentiate between infectious and defective viral genomes. The role of splicing neoproteins in HBV replication and interaction with the host remains to be determined.

  10. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion-proof splice boxes. 18.43 Section 18... Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held and adequately insulated. Strain clamps shall be provided for all cables entering a splice box....

  11. 46 CFR 111.60-19 - Cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable splices. 111.60-19 Section 111.60-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-19 Cable splices. (a) A cable must not be spliced in...

  12. 30 CFR 77.504 - Electrical connections or splices; suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electrical connections or splices; suitability... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.504 Electrical connections or splices; suitability. Electrical connections or splices in electric conductors shall be mechanically and electrically...

  13. 30 CFR 75.514 - Electrical connections or splices; suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electrical connections or splices; suitability... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.514 Electrical connections or splices; suitability. All electrical connections or splices...

  14. 30 CFR 77.504 - Electrical connections or splices; suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical connections or splices; suitability... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.504 Electrical connections or splices; suitability. Electrical connections or splices in electric conductors shall be mechanically and electrically...

  15. Schizophyllum commune has an extensive and functional alternative splicing repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Gehrmann, Thies; Pelkmans, Jordi F.; Lugones, Luis G.; Wösten, Han A. B.; Abeel, Thomas; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide studies have demonstrated that fungi possess the machinery to alternatively splice pre-mRNA. However, there has not been a systematic categorization of the functional impact of alternative splicing in a fungus. We investigate alternative splicing and its functional consequences in the model mushroom forming fungus Schizophyllum commune. Alternative splicing was demonstrated for 2,285 out of 12,988 expressed genes, resulting in 20% additional transcripts. Intron retentions were the most common alternative splicing events, accounting for 33% of all splicing events, and 43% of the events in coding regions. On the other hand, exon skipping events were rare in coding regions (1%) but enriched in UTRs where they accounted for 57% of the events. Specific functional groups, including transcription factors, contained alternatively spliced genes. Alternatively spliced transcripts were regulated differently throughout development in 19% of the 2,285 alternatively spliced genes. Notably, 69% of alternatively spliced genes have predicted alternative functionality by loss or gain of functional domains, or by acquiring alternative subcellular locations. S. commune exhibits more alternative splicing than any other studied fungus. Taken together, alternative splicing increases the complexity of the S. commune proteome considerably and provides it with a rich repertoire of alternative functionality that is exploited dynamically. PMID:27659065

  16. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S.; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  17. A synonymous CHRNE mutation responsible for an aberrant splicing leading to congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Richard, Pascale; Gaudon, Karen; Fournier, Emmanuel; Jackson, Christopher; Bauché, Stéphanie; Haddad, Hafedh; Koenig, Jeanine; Echenne, Bernard; Hantaï, Daniel; Eymard, Bruno

    2007-05-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are rare hereditary disorders transmitted in a recessive or dominant pattern, and are caused by mutations in the genes encoding proteins of the neuromuscular junction. They are classified in three groups depending on the origin of the molecular defect. Postsynaptic defects are the most frequent and have been reported to be partly due to abnormalities of the acetylcholine receptor, and particularly to mutations in CHRNE, the gene encoding the acetylcholine receptor epsilon-subunit. In a Portuguese patient with a mild form of recessive CMS, CHRNE sequencing identified an unknown homozygous transition. This variation affects the third nucleotide of the glycine 285 condon, and leads to a synonymous variant. Analysis of transcripts demonstrated that this single change creates a new splice donor site located 4 nucleotides upstream of the normal site, leading to a deletion and generating a frameshift in exon 9 followed by a premature termination codon. This paper relates the identification of a synonymous mutation in CHRNE that creates a new splice donor site leading to an aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and so to their instability. This is the first synonymous mutation in CHRNE known to generate a cryptic splice site, and mRNA quantification strongly suggests that it is the disease-causing mutation.

  18. α1 Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase (sGC) Splice Forms as Potential Regulators of Human sGC Activity*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Jelen, Filip; Bogatenkova, Elena P.; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key protein in the NO/cGMP signaling pathway, is an obligatory heterodimeric protein composed of one α- and one β-subunit. The α1/β1 sGC heterodimer is the predominant form expressed in various tissues and is regarded as the major isoform mediating NO-dependent effects such as vasodilation. We have identified three new α1 sGC protein variants generated by alternative splicing. The 363 residue N1-α1 sGC splice variant contains the regulatory domain, but lacks the catalytic domain. The shorter N2-α1 sGC maintains 126 N-terminal residues and gains an additional 17 unique residues. The C-α1 sGC variant lacks 240 N-terminal amino acids, but maintains a part of the regulatory domain and the entire catalytic domain. Q-PCR of N1-α1, N2-α1 sGC mRNA levels together with RT-PCR analysis for C-α1 sGC demonstrated that the expression of the α1 sGC splice forms vary in different human tissues indicative of tissue-specific regulation. Functional analysis of the N1-α1 sGC demonstrated that this protein has a dominant-negative effect on the activity of sGC when coexpressed with the α1/β1 heterodimer. The C-α1 sGC variant heterodimerizes with the β1 subunit and produces a fully functional NO- and BAY41-2272-sensitive enzyme. We also found that despite identical susceptibility to inhibition by ODQ, intracellular levels of the 54-kDa C-α1 band did not change in response to ODQ treatments, while the level of 83 kDa α1 band was significantly affected by ODQ. These studies suggest that modulation of the level and diversity of splice forms may represent novel mechanisms modulating the function of sGC in different human tissues. PMID:18381288

  19. Inhibition of Splicing but not Cleavage at the 5' Splice Site by Truncating Human β -globin Pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furdon, Paul J.; Kole, Ryszard

    1986-02-01

    Human β -globin mRNAs truncated in the second exon or in the first intron have been processed in vitro in a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Transcripts containing a fragment of the second exon as short as 53 nucleotides are efficiently spliced, whereas transcripts truncated 24 or 14 nucleotides downstream from the 3' splice site are spliced inefficiently, if at all. All of these transcripts, however, are efficiently and accurately cleaved at the 5' splice site. In contrast, RNA truncated in the first intron, 54 nucleotides upstream from the 3' splice site, is not processed at all. These findings suggest that cleavage at the 5' splice site and subsequent splicing steps--i.e., cleavage at the 3' splice site and exon ligation--need not be coupled. Anti-Sm serum inhibits the complete splicing reaction and cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting involvement of certain ribonucleoprotein particles in the cleavage reaction. ATP and Mg2+ are required for cleavage at the 5' splice site at concentrations similar to those for the complete splicing reaction.

  20. Methylxanthines Increase Expression of the Splicing Factor SRSF2 by Regulating Multiple Post-transcriptional Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia; Pabon, Kirk; Scotto, Kathleen W.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that the methylxanthine caffeine increases expression of the splicing factor SRSF2, the levels of which are normally controlled by a negative autoregulatory loop. In the present study we have investigated the mechanisms by which methylxanthines induce this aberrant overexpression. RT-PCR analyses suggested little impact of caffeine on SRSF2 total mRNA levels. Instead, caffeine induced changes in the levels of SRSF2 3′ UTR splice variants. Although some of these variants were substrates for nonsense-medicated decay (NMD), and could potentially have been stabilized by caffeine-mediated inhibition of NMD, down-regulation of NMD by a genetic approach was not sufficient to reproduce the phenotype. Furthermore, cell-based assays demonstrated that some of the caffeine-induced variants were intrinsically more efficiently translated than others; the addition of caffeine increased the translational efficiency of most SRSF2 transcripts. MicroRNA array analyses revealed a significant caffeine-mediated decrease in the expression of two SRSF2-targeting miRs, both of which were shown to repress translation of specific SRSF2 splice variants. These data support a complex model whereby caffeine down-regulates SRSF2-targeting microRNAs, leading to an increase in SRSF2 translation, which in turn induces SRSF2 splicing. SRSF2 splice variants are then stabilized by caffeine-mediated NMD inhibition, breaking the normal negative feedback loop and allowing the aberrant increase in SRSF2 protein levels. These findings highlight the complexity of SRSF2 gene regulation, and suggest ways in which SRSF2 expression may be dysregulated in disease. PMID:25818199

  1. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Tumor Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    erythematosus and sarcoidosis . Arthritis Rheum. 41: 1505-15 10. Eldridge A.G., Y. Li, P.A. Sharp, and B.J. Blencowe. 1999. The SRml60/300 splicing coactivator...J. Hum. Genet. 59:279-286. erythematosus and sarcoidosis . Arthritis Rheum. 41:1505-1510. Matsumoto, K., K.M. Wassarman, and A.P. Wolffe. 1998. Nuclear

  2. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  3. Emerging roles of BRCA1 alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Orban, T I; Olah, E

    2003-08-01

    Germline mutations of the BRCA1 gene predispose individuals mainly to the development of breast and/or ovarian cancer. However, the exact function of the gene is still unclear, although the encoded proteins are involved in various cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation and DNA repair pathways. Several BRCA1 splice variants are found in different tissues, but in spite of intense investigations, their regulation and possible functions are poorly understood at the moment. This review summarises current knowledge on the roles of these splice variants and the mechanisms responsible for their formation. Because alternative splicing is now widely accepted as an important source of genetic diversity, elucidating the functions of the BRCA1 splice variants would help in the understanding of the exact role(s) of this tumour suppressor. This should help to resolve the current paradox that, despite its seemingly vital cellular functions, mutations of this gene are associated with tissue specific tumour formation predominantly in the breast and the ovary.

  4. Alternative splicing: a pivotal step between eukaryotic transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Schor, Ignacio E; Alló, Mariano; Dujardin, Gwendal; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Muñoz, Manuel J

    2013-03-01

    Alternative splicing was discovered simultaneously with splicing over three decades ago. Since then, an enormous body of evidence has demonstrated the prevalence of alternative splicing in multicellular eukaryotes, its key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific differentiation patterns, the multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control it, and its causal role in hereditary disease and cancer. The emerging evidence places alternative splicing in a central position in the flow of eukaryotic genetic information, between transcription and translation, in that it can respond not only to various signalling pathways that target the splicing machinery but also to transcription factors and chromatin structure.

  5. Second order limit language in variants of splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan; Yusof, Yuhani

    2014-07-01

    The cutting and pasting processes that occur in DNA molecules have led to the formulation of splicing system. Since then, there are few models used to model the splicing system. The splicing language, which is the product of splicing system, can be categorized into two, namely the adult and limit language. In this research, limit language is extended to the second order limit language. Few problems are approached which lead to the formation of second order limit language which is then analyzed using various types of splicing system.

  6. Cotranscriptional coupling of splicing factor recruitment and precursor messenger RNA splicing in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Listerman, Imke; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2006-09-01

    Coupling between transcription and RNA processing is a key gene regulatory mechanism. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation to detect transcription-dependent accumulation of the precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing factors hnRNP A1, U2AF65 and U1 and U5 snRNPs on the intron-containing human FOS gene. These factors were poorly detected on intronless heat-shock and histone genes, a result that opposes direct recruitment by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) or the cap-binding complex in vivo. However, an observed RNA-dependent interaction between U2AF65 and active forms of Pol II may stabilize U2AF65 binding to intron-containing nascent RNA. We establish chromatin-RNA immunoprecipitation and show that FOS pre-mRNA is cotranscriptionally spliced. Notably, the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin, which stalls elongating Pol II, increased cotranscriptional splicing factor accumulation and splicing in parallel. This provides direct evidence for a kinetic link between transcription, splicing factor recruitment and splicing catalysis.

  7. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, A. M.; Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Amano, S.; Ebschner, U.; Burgeson, R. E.; Uitto, J.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC-->G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly healing erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8644730

  8. SplicePie: a novel analytical approach for the detection of alternative, non-sequential and recursive splicing.

    PubMed

    Pulyakhina, Irina; Gazzoli, Isabella; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Verwey, Nisha; den Dunnen, Johan T; den Dunnen, Johan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Laros, Jeroen F J

    2015-07-13

    Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism present in eukaryotic cells to obtain a wide range of transcripts and protein isoforms from a relatively small number of genes. The mechanisms regulating (alternative) splicing and the paradigm of consecutive splicing have recently been challenged, especially for genes with a large number of introns. RNA-Seq, a powerful technology using deep sequencing in order to determine transcript structure and expression levels, is usually performed on mature mRNA, therefore not allowing detailed analysis of splicing progression. Sequencing pre-mRNA at different stages of splicing potentially provides insight into mRNA maturation. Although the number of tools that analyze total and cytoplasmic RNA in order to elucidate the transcriptome composition is rapidly growing, there are no tools specifically designed for the analysis of nuclear RNA (which contains mixtures of pre- and mature mRNA). We developed dedicated algorithms to investigate the splicing process. In this paper, we present a new classification of RNA-Seq reads based on three major stages of splicing: pre-, intermediate- and post-splicing. Applying this novel classification we demonstrate the possibility to analyze the order of splicing. Furthermore, we uncover the potential to investigate the multi-step nature of splicing, assessing various types of recursive splicing events. We provide the data that gives biological insight into the order of splicing, show that non-sequential splicing of certain introns is reproducible and coinciding in multiple cell lines. We validated our observations with independent experimental technologies and showed the reliability of our method. The pipeline, named SplicePie, is freely available at: https://github.com/pulyakhina/splicing_analysis_pipeline. The example data can be found at: https://barmsijs.lumc.nl/HG/irina/example_data.tar.gz.

  9. Development of a Blocking ELISA Using a Monoclonal Antibody to a Dominant Epitope in Non-Structural Protein 3A of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus, as a Matching Test for a Negative-Marker Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yuanfang; Li, Pinghua; Cao, Yimei; Wang, Na; Sun, Pu; Shi, Qian; Ji, Xincheng; Bao, Huifang; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Bai, Xingwen; Ma, Xueqing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Zengjun; Liu, Zaixin

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a devastating animal disease. Strategies for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) remain very important for controlling disease. Development of an epitope-deleted marker vaccine and accompanying diagnostic method will improve the efficiency of DIVA. Here, a monoclonal antibody (Mab) was found to recognize a conserved “AEKNPLE” epitope spanning amino acids 109–115 of non-structural protein (NSP) 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV; O/Tibet/CHA/99 strain), which could be deleted by a reverse-genetic procedure. In addition, a blocking ELISA was developed based on this Mab against NSP 3A, which could serve as a matching test for a negative-marker vaccine. The criterion of this blocking ELISA was determined by detecting panels of sera from different origins. The serum samples with a percentage inhibition (PI) equal or greater than 50% were considered to be from infected animals, and those with <50% PI were considered to be from non-infected animals. This test showed similar performance when compared with other 2 blocking ELISAs based on an anti-NSP 3B Mab. This is the first report of the DIVA test for an NSP antibody based on an Mab against the conserved and predominant “AEKNPLE” epitope in NSP 3A of FMDV. PMID:28107470

  10. Functional association between promoter structure and transcript alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Cramer, P; Pesce, C G; Baralle, F E; Kornblihtt, A R

    1997-10-14

    It has been assumed that constitutive and regulated splicing of RNA polymerase II transcripts depends exclusively on signals present in the RNA molecule. Here we show that changes in promoter structure strongly affect splice site selection. We investigated the splicing of the ED I exon, which encodes a facultative type III repeat of fibronectin, whose inclusion is regulated during development and in proliferative processes. We used an alternative splicing assay combined with promoter swapping to demonstrate that the extent of ED I splicing is dependent on the promoter structure from which the transcript originated and that this regulation is independent of the promoter strength. Thus, these results provide the first evidence for coupling between alternative splicing and promoter-specific transcription, which agrees with recent cytological and biochemical evidence of coordination between splicing and transcription.

  11. Functional characterization of Ih-channel splice variants from Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Gisselmann, Günter; Wetzel, Christian H; Warnstedt, Maike; Hatt, Hanns

    2004-09-24

    We isolated splice variants of the AMIH cDNA by means of polymerase chain reaction and homology screening. Splicing at one site generates at least four different channel transcripts (AMIH, AMIHL, AMIHM and AMIHT), which code for ion-channel proteins that vary in the interloop regions between the membrane-spanning domains S4 and S5. HEK293 cells in which the AMIHL splice variants were functionally expressed generated currents that were activated by hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Compared to AMIH, AMIHL cells showed pronounced differences in the voltage dependency of activation: the incorporation of 32 extra amino acids between S4 and S5 shifts the activation curve by +25 mV. Intracellular cAMP made the current-activation potential still less negative and accelerated the activation more effectively than it does in AMIH cells. In vertebrates, functional diversity of Ih-channels is generated by four different genes. In Apis mellifera, splice variants coded by the single gene AMIH could generate a similar diversity.

  12. Structure of a tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase splicing factor bound to a group I intron RNA.

    PubMed

    Paukstelis, Paul J; Chen, Jui-Hui; Chase, Elaine; Lambowitz, Alan M; Golden, Barbara L

    2008-01-03

    The 'RNA world' hypothesis holds that during evolution the structural and enzymatic functions initially served by RNA were assumed by proteins, leading to the latter's domination of biological catalysis. This progression can still be seen in modern biology, where ribozymes, such as the ribosome and RNase P, have evolved into protein-dependent RNA catalysts ('RNPzymes'). Similarly, group I introns use RNA-catalysed splicing reactions, but many function as RNPzymes bound to proteins that stabilize their catalytically active RNA structure. One such protein, the Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS; CYT-18), is bifunctional and both aminoacylates mitochondrial tRNA(Tyr) and promotes the splicing of mitochondrial group I introns. Here we determine a 4.5-A co-crystal structure of the Twort orf142-I2 group I intron ribozyme bound to splicing-active, carboxy-terminally truncated CYT-18. The structure shows that the group I intron binds across the two subunits of the homodimeric protein with a newly evolved RNA-binding surface distinct from that which binds tRNA(Tyr). This RNA binding surface provides an extended scaffold for the phosphodiester backbone of the conserved catalytic core of the intron RNA, allowing the protein to promote the splicing of a wide variety of group I introns. The group I intron-binding surface includes three small insertions and additional structural adaptations relative to non-splicing bacterial TyrRSs, indicating a multistep adaptation for splicing function. The co-crystal structure provides insight into how CYT-18 promotes group I intron splicing, how it evolved to have this function, and how proteins could have incrementally replaced RNA structures during the transition from an RNA world to an RNP world.

  13. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  14. Messenger RNA processing is altered in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Gasparini, Laura; Giacomini, Caterina; Corrado, Patrizia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Giorgio, Elisa; Magini, Pamela; Seri, Marco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Parchi, Piero; Brusco, Alfredo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterized by autonomic dysfunction, followed by cerebellar and pyramidal features. ADLD is caused by duplication of the lamin B1 gene (LMNB1), which leads to its increased expression. The molecular pathways involved in the disease are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed global gene expression in fibroblasts and whole blood of LMNB1 duplication carriers and used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis to explore their gene signatures. We found that LMNB1 duplication is associated with dysregulation of genes involved in the immune system, neuronal and skeletal development. Genes with an altered transcriptional profile clustered in specific genomic regions. Among the dysregulated genes, we further studied the role of RAVER2, which we found to be overexpressed at mRNA and protein level. RAVER2 encodes a putative trans regulator of the splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) and is likely implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Functional studies demonstrated an abnormal splicing pattern of several PTB-target genes and of the myelin protein gene PLP1, previously demonstrated to be involved in ADLD. Mutant mice with different lamin B1 expression levels confirmed that Raver2 expression is dependent on lamin B1 in neural tissue and determines an altered splicing pattern of PTB-target genes and Plp1. Overall our results demonstrate that deregulation of lamin B1 expression induces modified splicing of several genes, likely driven by raver-2 overexpression, and suggest that an alteration of mRNA processing could be a pathogenic mechanism in ADLD. PMID:25637521

  15. Multiple Distinct Splicing Enhancers in the Protein-Coding Sequences of a Constitutively Spliced Pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Thomas D.; Maniatis, Tom

    1999-01-01

    We have identified multiple distinct splicing enhancer elements within protein-coding sequences of the constitutively spliced human β-globin pre-mRNA. Each of these highly conserved sequences is sufficient to activate the splicing of a heterologous enhancer-dependent pre-mRNA. One of these enhancers is activated by and binds to the SR protein SC35, whereas at least two others are activated by the SR protein SF2/ASF. A single base mutation within another enhancer element inactivates the enhancer but does not change the encoded amino acid. Thus, overlapping protein coding and RNA recognition elements may be coselected during evolution. These studies provide the first direct evidence that SR protein-specific splicing enhancers are located within the coding regions of constitutively spliced pre-mRNAs. We propose that these enhancers function as multisite splicing enhancers to specify 3′ splice-site selection. PMID:9858550

  16. The Human Splicing Factor ASF/SF2 can Specifically Recognize Pre-mRNA 5' Splice Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Ping; Manley, James L.

    1994-04-01

    ASF/SF2 is a human protein previously shown to function in in vitro pre-mRNA splicing as an essential factor necessary for all splices and also as an alternative splicing factor, capable of switching selection of 5' splice sites. To begin to study the protein's mechanism of action, we have investigated the RNA binding properties of purified recombinant ASF/SF2. Using UV crosslinking and gel shift assays, we demonstrate that the RNA binding region of ASF/SF2 can interact with RNA in a sequence-specific manner, recognizing the 5' splice site in each of two different pre-mRNAs. Point mutations in the 5' splice site consensus can reduce binding by as much as a factor of 100, with the largest effects observed in competition assays. These findings support a model in which ASF/SF2 aids in the recognition of pre-mRNA 5' splice sites.

  17. Cloning and Characterization of Spliced Variants of the Porcine G Protein Coupled Receptor 120

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tongxing; Peng, Jie; Ren, Jiao; Wei, Hong-kui; Peng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) receptor GPR120 exerts a significant impact on systemic nutrient homeostasis in human and rodents. However, the porcine GPR120 (pGPR120) has not been well characterized. In the current study, we found that pGPR120 had 3 spliced variants. Transcript 1 encoded 362-amino acids (aa) wild type pGPR120-WT, which shared 88% homology with human short form GPR120. Transcript 1 was the mainly expressed transcript of pGPR120. It was expressed predominantly in ileum, jejunum, duodenum, spleen, and adipose. Transcript 3 (coding 320-aa isoform) was detected in spleen, while the transcript 2 (coding 310-aa isoform) was only slightly expressed in spleen. A selective agonist for human GPR120 (TUG-891) and PUFAs activated SRE-luc and NFAT-luc reporter in HEK293T cells transfected with construct for pGPR120-WT but not pGPR120-V2. However, 320-aa isoform was not a dominant negative isoform. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation levels in cells transfected with construct for pGPR120-WT were well activated by PUFAs, especially n-3 PUFA. These results showed that although pGPR120 had 3 transcripts, transcript 1 which encoded pGPR120-WT was the mainly expressed transcript. TUG-891 and PUFAs, especially n-3 PUFA, well activated pGPR120-WT. The current study contributed to dissecting the molecular regulation mechanisms of n-3 PUFA in pigs. PMID:26075265

  18. Evolution of Nova-Dependent Splicing Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Živin, Marko; Darnell, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    A large number of alternative exons are spliced with tissue-specific patterns, but little is known about how such patterns have evolved. Here, we study the conservation of the neuron-specific splicing factors Nova1 and Nova2 and of the alternatively spliced exons they regulate in mouse brain. Whereas Nova RNA binding domains are 94% identical across vertebrate species, Nova-dependent splicing silencer and enhancer elements (YCAY clusters) show much greater divergence, as less than 50% of mouse YCAY clusters are conserved at orthologous positions in the zebrafish genome. To study the relation between the evolution of tissue-specific splicing and YCAY clusters, we compared the brain-specific splicing of Nova-regulated exons in zebrafish, chicken, and mouse. The presence of YCAY clusters in lower vertebrates invariably predicted conservation of brain-specific splicing across species, whereas their absence in lower vertebrates correlated with a loss of alternative splicing. We hypothesize that evolution of Nova-regulated splicing in higher vertebrates proceeds mainly through changes in cis-acting elements, that tissue-specific splicing might in some cases evolve in a single step corresponding to evolution of a YCAY cluster, and that the conservation level of YCAY clusters relates to the functions encoded by the regulated RNAs. PMID:17937501

  19. Heritability of alternative splicing in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Tony; Benovoy, David; Dias, Christel; Gurd, Scott; Serre, David; Zuzan, Harry; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Staples, Michelle K.; Wang, Hui; Blume, John E.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sladek, Rob; Majewski, Jacek

    2007-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing increases proteomic diversity and provides a potential mechanism underlying both phenotypic diversity and susceptibility to genetic disorders in human populations. To investigate the variation in splicing among humans on a genome-wide scale, we use a comprehensive exon-targeted microarray to examine alternative splicing in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from the CEPH HapMap population. We show the identification of transcripts containing sequence verified exon skipping, intron retention, and cryptic splice site usage that are specific between individuals. A number of novel alternative splicing events with no previous annotations in either the RefSeq and EST databases were identified, indicating that we are able to discover de novo splicing events. Using family-based linkage analysis, we demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and segregation of specific splice isoforms with regulatory haplotypes for three genes: OAS1, CAST, and CRTAP. Allelic association was further used to identify individual SNPs or regulatory haplotype blocks linked to the alternative splicing event, taking advantage of the high-resolution genotype information from the CEPH HapMap population. In one candidate, we identified a regulatory polymorphism that disrupts a 5′ splice site of an exon in the CAST gene, resulting in its exclusion in the mutant allele. This report illustrates that our approach can detect both annotated and novel alternatively spliced variants, and that such variation among individuals is heritable and genetically controlled. PMID:17671095

  20. The influence of Argonaute proteins on alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Batsché, Eric; Ameyar-Zazoua, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor RNAs is an important process in multicellular species because it impacts several aspects of gene expression: from the increase of protein repertoire to the level of expression. A large body of evidences demonstrates that factors regulating chromatin and transcription impact the outcomes of alternative splicing. Argonaute (AGO) proteins were known to play key roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. More recently, their role in the nucleus of human somatic cells has emerged. Here, we will discuss some of the nuclear functions of AGO, with special emphasis on alternative splicing. The AGO-mediated modulation of alternative splicing is based on several properties of these proteins: their binding to transcripts on chromatin and their interactions with many proteins, especially histone tail-modifying enzymes, HP1γ and splicing factors. AGO proteins may favor a decrease in the RNA-polymerase II kinetics at actively transcribed genes leading to the modulation of alternative splicing decisions. They could also influence alternative splicing through their interaction with core components of the splicing machinery and several splicing factors. We will discuss the modes of AGO recruitment on chromatin at active genes. We suggest that long intragenic antisense transcripts (lincRNA) might be an important feature of genes containing splicing events regulated by AGO.

  1. Cellular RNA binding proteins NS1-BP and hnRNP K regulate influenza A virus RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Ling; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Kuss, Sharon; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lynch, Kristen W; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen with a genome comprised of eight single-strand, negative-sense, RNA segments. Two viral RNA segments, NS1 and M, undergo alternative splicing and yield several proteins including NS1, NS2, M1 and M2 proteins. However, the mechanisms or players involved in splicing of these viral RNA segments have not been fully studied. Here, by investigating the interacting partners and function of the cellular protein NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP), we revealed novel players in the splicing of the M1 segment. Using a proteomics approach, we identified a complex of RNA binding proteins containing NS1-BP and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), among which are hnRNPs involved in host pre-mRNA splicing. We found that low levels of NS1-BP specifically impaired proper alternative splicing of the viral M1 mRNA segment to yield the M2 mRNA without affecting splicing of mRNA3, M4, or the NS mRNA segments. Further biochemical analysis by formaldehyde and UV cross-linking demonstrated that NS1-BP did not interact directly with viral M1 mRNA but its interacting partners, hnRNPs A1, K, L, and M, directly bound M1 mRNA. Among these hnRNPs, we identified hnRNP K as a major mediator of M1 mRNA splicing. The M1 mRNA segment generates the matrix protein M1 and the M2 ion channel, which are essential proteins involved in viral trafficking, release into the cytoplasm, and budding. Thus, reduction of NS1-BP and/or hnRNP K levels altered M2/M1 mRNA and protein ratios, decreasing M2 levels and inhibiting virus replication. Thus, NS1-BP-hnRNPK complex is a key mediator of influenza A virus gene expression.

  2. Gaining Cyber Dominance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    2014 Carnegie Mellon University Gaining Cyber Dominance Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University NETCOM G3/5/7 TREX January 2015...JAN 2015 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gaining Cyber Dominance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...2014) 4 GCD Overview January 2015 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University FY15 Initiatives Gaining Cyber Dominance Program • Army topology development

  3. Entropic contributions to the splicing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Caselle, Michele

    2009-12-01

    It has been recently argued that depletion attraction may play an important role in different aspects of cellular organization, ranging from the organization of transcriptional activity in transcription factories to the formation of nuclear bodies. In this paper, we suggest a new application of these ideas in the context of the splicing process, a crucial step of messenger RNA maturation in eukaryotes. We shall show that entropy effects and the resulting depletion attraction may explain the relevance of the aspecific intron length variable in the choice of splice-site recognition modality. On top of that, some qualitative features of the genome architecture of higher eukaryotes can find evolutionary realistic motivation in the light of our model.

  4. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10-15%) creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO) allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2'-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy.

  5. Ecotype dependent expression and alternative splicing of epithiospecifier protein (ESP) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kissen, R; Hyldbakk, E; Wang, C-W V; Sørmo, C G; Rossiter, J T; Bones, A M

    2012-03-01

    Epithiospecifier protein (ESP) is responsible for diverting glucosinolate hydrolysis from the generation of isothiocyanates to that of epithionitriles or nitriles, and thereby negatively affects the ability of the plant to defend itself against certain insects. Despite this important role of ESP, little is known about its expression in plant tissues and the regulation thereof. We therefore investigated ESP expression by qPCR and Western blot in different organs during the growth cycle of the two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Mt-0. Besides the fact that ESP transcript and protein levels were revealed to be much higher in Mt-0 than in Col-0 in all cases, our qPCR results also indicated that ESP expression is regulated differently in the two A. thaliana ecotypes. No ESP protein was detected by Western blot in any organ or developmental stage for Col-0. During the assays an alternative splice variant of ESP was identified in Col-0, but not Mt-0, leading to a mis-spliced transcript which could explain the low expression levels of ESP in the former ecotype. Analysis of genomic sequences containing the ESP splice sites, of ESP protein level and ESP activity from seven A. thaliana ecotypes showed a positive correlation between the presence of a non-canonical 5' splice site for ESP and the absence of detectable ESP protein levels and ESP activity. When analysing the expression of both transcript variants in Col-0 after treatment with methyl jasmonate, a condition known to "induce ESP", it was indeed the alternative splice variant that was preferentially induced.

  6. [EDAS, databases of alternatively spliced human genes].

    PubMed

    Nurtdinov, R N; Neverov, A D; Mal'ko, D B; Kosmodem'ianskiĭ, I A; Ermakova, E O; Ramenskiĭ, V E; Mironov, A A; Gel'fand, M S

    2006-01-01

    EDAS, a database of alternatively spliced human genes, contains data on the alignment of proteins, mRNAs, and EST. It contains information on all exons and introns observed, as well as elementary alternatives formed from them. The database makes it possible to filter the output data by changing the cut-off threshold by the significance level. The database is accessible at http://www.gene-bee.msu.ru/edas/.

  7. Vials: Visualizing Alternative Splicing of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Alsallakh, Bilal; Botros, Joseph; Peterson, Brant; Borowsky, Mark; Pfister, Hanspeter; Lex, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a process by which the same DNA sequence is used to assemble different proteins, called protein isoforms. Alternative splicing works by selectively omitting some of the coding regions (exons) typically associated with a gene. Detection of alternative splicing is difficult and uses a combination of advanced data acquisition methods and statistical inference. Knowledge about the abundance of isoforms is important for understanding both normal processes and diseases and to eventually improve treatment through targeted therapies. The data, however, is complex and current visualizations for isoforms are neither perceptually efficient nor scalable. To remedy this, we developed Vials, a novel visual analysis tool that enables analysts to explore the various datasets that scientists use to make judgments about isoforms: the abundance of reads associated with the coding regions of the gene, evidence for junctions, i.e., edges connecting the coding regions, and predictions of isoform frequencies. Vials is scalable as it allows for the simultaneous analysis of many samples in multiple groups. Our tool thus enables experts to (a) identify patterns of isoform abundance in groups of samples and (b) evaluate the quality of the data. We demonstrate the value of our tool in case studies using publicly available datasets. PMID:26529712

  8. Integrating alternative splicing detection into gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Sylvain; Schiex, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is now considered as a major actor in transcriptome/proteome diversity and it cannot be neglected in the annotation process of a new genome. Despite considerable progresses in term of accuracy in computational gene prediction, the ability to reliably predict AS variants when there is local experimental evidence of it remains an open challenge for gene finders. Results We have used a new integrative approach that allows to incorporate AS detection into ab initio gene prediction. This method relies on the analysis of genomically aligned transcript sequences (ESTs and/or cDNAs), and has been implemented in the dynamic programming algorithm of the graph-based gene finder EuGÈNE. Given a genomic sequence and a set of aligned transcripts, this new version identifies the set of transcripts carrying evidence of alternative splicing events, and provides, in addition to the classical optimal gene prediction, alternative optimal predictions (among those which are consistent with the AS events detected). This allows for multiple annotations of a single gene in a way such that each predicted variant is supported by a transcript evidence (but not necessarily with a full-length coverage). Conclusions This automatic combination of experimental data analysis and ab initio gene finding offers an ideal integration of alternatively spliced gene prediction inside a single annotation pipeline. PMID:15705189

  9. Defective MHC class II expression in an MHC class II deficiency patient is caused by a novel deletion of a splice donor site in the MHC class II transactivator gene.

    PubMed

    Peijnenburg, A; Van den Berg, R; Van Eggermond, M J; Sanal, O; Vossen, J M; Lennon, A M; Alcaïde-Loridan, C; Van den Elsen, P J

    2000-01-01

    MHC class II deficiency patients are mutated for transcription factors that regulate the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes. Four complementation groups (A-D) are defined and the gene defective in group A has been shown to encode the MHC class II transactivator (CIITA). Here, we report the molecular characterization of a new MHC class II deficiency patient, ATU. Cell fusion experiments indicated that ATU belongs to complementation group A. Subsequent mutation analysis revealed that the CIITA mRNA lacked 84 nucleotides. This deletion was the result of the absence of a splice donor site in the CIITA gene of ATU. As a result of this novel homozygous genomic deletion, ATU CIITA failed to transactivate MHC class II genes. Furthermore, this truncated CIITA of ATU did not display a dominant negative effect on CIITA-mediated transactivation of various isotypic MHC class II promoters.

  10. ASF/SF2-like maize pre-mRNA splicing factors affect splice site utilization and their transcripts are alternatively spliced.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huirong; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Lyznik, L Alexander

    2004-09-15

    Three ASF/SF2-like alternative splicing genes from maize were identified, cloned, and analyzed. Each of these genes (zmSRp30, zmSRp31, and zmSRp32) contains two RNA binding domains, a signature sequence SWQDLKD, and a characteristic serine/ariginine-rich domain. There is a strong structural similarity to the human ASF/SF2 splicing factor and to the Arabidopsis atSRp34/p30 proteins. Similar to ASF/SF2-like genes in other organisms, the maize pre-mRNA messages are alternatively spliced. They are differentially expressed in maize tissues with relatively uniform levels of zmSRp30 and zmSRp31 messages being observed throughout the plant, while zmSRp32 messages preferentially accumulated in the meristematic regions. Overexpression of zmSRp32 in maize cells leads to the enhanced selection of weak 5' intron splice sites during the processing of pre-mRNA molecules. Overexpression of the zmSRp31 or zmSRp32 gene affects regulation of wheat dwarf virus rep gene pre-mRNA splicing, presumably by interacting with the weak 5' splice site, CCGU. Our results suggest that the described genes are functional homologues of the human ASF/SF2 alternative splicing factor and they indicate a diversity of the ASF/SF2-like alternative splicing factors in monocot plant cells.

  11. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  12. Global control of aberrant splice-site activation by auxiliary splicing sequences: evidence for a gradient in exon and intron definition.

    PubMed

    Královicová, Jana; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Auxiliary splicing signals play a major role in the regulation of constitutive and alternative pre-mRNA splicing, but their relative importance in selection of mutation-induced cryptic or de novo splice sites is poorly understood. Here, we show that exonic sequences between authentic and aberrant splice sites that were activated by splice-site mutations in human disease genes have lower frequencies of splicing enhancers and higher frequencies of splicing silencers than average exons. Conversely, sequences between authentic and intronic aberrant splice sites have more enhancers and less silencers than average introns. Exons that were skipped as a result of splice-site mutations were smaller, had lower SF2/ASF motif scores, a decreased availability of decoy splice sites and a higher density of silencers than exons in which splice-site mutation activated cryptic splice sites. These four variables were the strongest predictors of the two aberrant splicing events in a logistic regression model. Elimination or weakening of predicted silencers in two reporters consistently promoted use of intron-proximal splice sites if these elements were maintained at their original positions, with their modular combinations producing expected modification of splicing. Together, these results show the existence of a gradient in exon and intron definition at the level of pre-mRNA splicing and provide a basis for the development of computational tools that predict aberrant splicing outcomes.

  13. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  14. A multi-agent system simulating human splice site recognition.

    PubMed

    Vignal, L; Lisacek, F; Quinqueton, J; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Y; Thermes, C

    1999-06-15

    The present paper describes a method detecting splice sites automatically on the basis of sequence data and models of site/signal recognition supported by experimental evidences. The method is designed to simulate splicing and while doing so, track prediction failures, missing information and possibly test correcting hypotheses. Correlations between nucleotides in the splice site regions and the various elements of the acceptor region are evaluated and combined to assess compensating interactions between elements of the splicing machinery. A scanning model of the acceptor region and a model of interaction between the splicing complexes (exon definition model) are also incorporated in the detection process. Subsets of sites presenting deficiencies of several splice site elements could be identified. Further examination of these sites helps to determine lacking elements and refine models.

  15. Splicing of many human genes involves sites embedded within introns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Steven; Georgomanolis, Theodore; Zirkel, Anne; Diermeier, Sarah; O'Reilly, Dawn; Murphy, Shona; Längst, Gernot; Cook, Peter R.; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    The conventional model for splicing involves excision of each intron in one piece; we demonstrate this inaccurately describes splicing in many human genes. First, after switching on transcription of SAMD4A, a gene with a 134 kb-long first intron, splicing joins the 3′ end of exon 1 to successive points within intron 1 well before the acceptor site at exon 2 is made. Second, genome-wide analysis shows that >60% of active genes yield products generated by such intermediate intron splicing. These products are present at ∼15% the levels of primary transcripts, are encoded by conserved sequences similar to those found at canonical acceptors, and marked by distinctive structural and epigenetic features. Finally, using targeted genome editing, we demonstrate that inhibiting the formation of these splicing intermediates affects efficient exon–exon splicing. These findings greatly expand the functional and regulatory complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:25897131

  16. Targeting Splicing in the Treatment of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suñé-Pou, Marc; Prieto-Sánchez, Silvia; Boyero-Corral, Sofía; Moreno-Castro, Cristina; El Yousfi, Younes; Suñé-Negre, Josep Mª; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The tightly regulated process of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) alternative splicing (AS) is a key mechanism in the regulation of gene expression. Defects in this regulatory process affect cellular functions and are the cause of many human diseases. Recent advances in our understanding of splicing regulation have led to the development of new tools for manipulating splicing for therapeutic purposes. Several tools, including antisense oligonucleotides and trans-splicing, have been developed to target and alter splicing to correct misregulated gene expression or to modulate transcript isoform levels. At present, deregulated AS is recognized as an important area for therapeutic intervention. Here, we summarize the major hallmarks of the splicing process, the clinical implications that arise from alterations in this process, and the current tools that can be used to deliver, target, and correct deficiencies of this key pre-mRNA processing event. PMID:28245575

  17. Test and Analysis of Spliced DI-BSCCO HTS Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetisov, S. S.; Sotnikov, D. V.; Radchenko, I. P.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Osabe, G.; Kinoshita, K.; Fujikami, J.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamazaki, K.

    For some applications, short unit lengths of HTS wires should be spliced if longer lengths are necessary and short unit lengths of HTS wires should be utilize by applying the splice technology to reduce the total wire cost in the application. The splice technology has been developed for DI-BSCCO Type HT-CA tapes by Sumitomo Electric and spliced tapes were tested in Russian Cable Institute. The test program included: measurements of splice's resistance, critical current anisotropy, thermo cycling tolerance, mechanical properties, overload tests and magnetization measurements. In the paper the results of tests are presented and discussed. The test results demonstrated that splices can be used for cable production if twisting and bending limitations are taken into account.

  18. HEXEvent: a database of Human EXon splicing Events.

    PubMed

    Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J

    2013-01-01

    HEXEvent (http://hexevent.mmg.uci.edu) is a new database that permits the user to compile genome-wide exon data sets of human internal exons showing selected splicing events. User queries can be customized based on the type and the frequency of alternative splicing events. For each splicing version of an exon, an ESTs count is given, specifying the frequency of the event. A user-specific definition of constitutive exons can be entered to designate an exon exclusion level still acceptable for an exon to be considered as constitutive. Similarly, the user has the option to define a maximum inclusion level for an exon to be called an alternatively spliced exon. Unlike other existing splicing databases, HEXEvent permits the user to easily extract alternative splicing information for individual, multiple or genome-wide human internal exons. Importantly, the generated data sets are downloadable for further analysis.

  19. Visualizing group II intron catalysis through the stages of splicing

    PubMed Central

    Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that share a reaction mechanism and a common ancestor with the eukaryotic spliceosome, thereby providing a model system for understanding the chemistry of pre-mRNA splicing. Here we report fourteen crystal structures of a group II intron at different stages of catalysis. We provide a detailed mechanism for the first step of splicing, we describe a reversible conformational change between the first and the second steps of splicing, and we present the ligand-free intron structure after splicing, in an active state that corresponds to the retrotransposable form of the intron. During each reaction, the reactants are aligned and activated by a heteronuclear four-metal-ion center that contains a metal cluster and obligate monovalent cations, adopting a structural arrangement similar to that of protein endonucleases. Based on our data, we propose a model for the splicing cycle and show that it is applicable to the eukaryotic spliceosome. PMID:23101623

  20. Identification of common genetic variation that modulates alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Hull, Jeremy; Campino, Susana; Rowlands, Kate; Chan, Man-Suen; Copley, Richard R; Taylor, Martin S; Rockett, Kirk; Elvidge, Gareth; Keating, Brendan; Knight, Julian; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2007-06-01

    Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by naturally occurring DNA sequence variation and in particular by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In this study, we surveyed the splicing patterns of 250 exons in 22 individuals who had been previously genotyped by the International HapMap Project. We identified 70 simple cassette exon alternative splicing events in our experimental system; for six of these, we detected consistent differences in splicing pattern between individuals, with a highly significant association between splice phenotype and neighbouring SNPs. Remarkably, for five out of six of these events, the strongest correlation was found with the SNP closest to the intron-exon boundary, although the distance between these SNPs and the intron-exon boundary ranged from 2 bp to greater than 1,000 bp. Two of these SNPs were further investigated using a minigene splicing system, and in each case the SNPs were found to exert cis-acting effects on exon splicing efficiency in vitro. The functional consequences of these SNPs could not be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms. Our findings suggest that phenotypic variation in splicing patterns is determined by the presence of SNPs within flanking introns or exons. Effects on splicing may represent an important mechanism by which SNPs influence gene function.

  1. Superconducting cable-in-conduit low resistance splice

    DOEpatents

    Artman, Thomas A.

    2003-06-24

    A low resistance splice connects two cable-in-conduit superconductors to each other. Dividing collars for arranging sub-cable units from each conduit are provided, along with clamping collars for mating each sub-cable wire assembly to form mated assemblies. The mated assemblies ideally can be accomplished by way of splicing collar. The mated assemblies are cooled by way of a flow of coolant, preferably helium. A method for implementing such a splicing is also described.

  2. Thai Negation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Samsul

    A study analyzed the structure of negative sentences in the Thai language, based on data gathered from two native speakers. It is shown that the Thai negative marker generally occurs between the noun phrase (subject) and the verb phrase in simple active sentences and in passive sentences. Negation of noun phrases is also allowed in Thai, with a…

  3. Mis-Spliced Lr34 Transcript Events in Winter Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Tilin; Carver, Brett F.; Hunger, Robert M.; Yan, Liuling

    2017-01-01

    Lr34 in wheat is a non-race-specific gene that confers resistance against multiple fungal pathogens. The resistant allele Lr34 and the susceptible allele Lr34s can be distinguished by three polymorphisms that cause alternation of deduced amino acid sequences of Lr34 at the protein level. In seedlings of a cultivar carrying the resistant Lr34r allele, only a portion (35%) of its transcripts was correctly spliced and the majority (65%) of its transcripts were incorrectly spliced due to multiple mis-splicing events. Lr34 mis-splicing events were also observed at adult plant age when this gene exerts its function. All of the mis-spliced Lr34r cDNA transcripts observed in this study resulted in a premature stop codon due to a shift of the open reading frame; hence, the mis-spliced Lr34r cDNAs were deduced to encode incomplete proteins. Even if a cultivar has a functional Lr34 gene, its transcripts might not completely splice in a correct pattern. These findings suggested that the partial resistance conferred by a quantitative gene might be due to mis-splicing events in its transcripts; hence, the resistance of the gene could be increased by eliminating or mutating regulators that cause mis-splicing events in wheat. PMID:28135317

  4. Evolutionary Insights into RNA trans-Splicing in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Quan; Li, Cong; Zuo, Zhixiang; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-01-01

    Pre-RNA splicing is an essential step in generating mature mRNA. RNA trans-splicing combines two separate pre-mRNA molecules to form a chimeric non-co-linear RNA, which may exert a function distinct from its original molecules. Trans-spliced RNAs may encode novel proteins or serve as noncoding or regulatory RNAs. These novel RNAs not only increase the complexity of the proteome but also provide new regulatory mechanisms for gene expression. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that trans-splicing occurs frequently in both physiological and pathological processes. In addition, mRNA reprogramming based on trans-splicing has been successfully applied in RNA-based therapies for human genetic diseases. Nevertheless, clarifying the extent and evolution of trans-splicing in vertebrates and developing detection methods for trans-splicing remain challenging. In this review, we summarize previous research, highlight recent advances in trans-splicing, and discuss possible splicing mechanisms and functions from an evolutionary viewpoint. PMID:26966239

  5. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipulate protein production from a gene. Splicing modulation is particularly valuable in cases of disease caused by mutations that lead to disruption of normal splicing or when interfering with the normal splicing process of a gene transcript may be therapeutic. SSOs offer an effective and specific way to target and alter splicing in a therapeutic manner. Here, we discuss the different approaches used to target and alter pre-mRNA splicing with SSOs. We detail the modifications to the nucleic acids that make them promising therapeutics and discuss the challenges to creating effective SSO drugs. We highlight the development of SSOs designed to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy, which are currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:27288447

  6. Evolutionary Insights into RNA trans-Splicing in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lei, Quan; Li, Cong; Zuo, Zhixiang; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-03-10

    Pre-RNA splicing is an essential step in generating mature mRNA. RNA trans-splicing combines two separate pre-mRNA molecules to form a chimeric non-co-linear RNA, which may exert a function distinct from its original molecules. Trans-spliced RNAs may encode novel proteins or serve as noncoding or regulatory RNAs. These novel RNAs not only increase the complexity of the proteome but also provide new regulatory mechanisms for gene expression. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that trans-splicing occurs frequently in both physiological and pathological processes. In addition, mRNA reprogramming based on trans-splicing has been successfully applied in RNA-based therapies for human genetic diseases. Nevertheless, clarifying the extent and evolution of trans-splicing in vertebrates and developing detection methods for trans-splicing remain challenging. In this review, we summarize previous research, highlight recent advances in trans-splicing, and discuss possible splicing mechanisms and functions from an evolutionary viewpoint.

  7. Impacts of Alternative Splicing Events on the Differentiation of Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing was found to be a common phenomenon after the advent of whole transcriptome analyses or next generation sequencing. Over 90% of human genes were demonstrated to undergo at least one alternative splicing event. Alternative splicing is an effective mechanism to spatiotemporally expand protein diversity, which influences the cell fate and tissue development. The first focus of this review is to highlight recent studies, which demonstrated effects of alternative splicing on the differentiation of adipocytes. Moreover, use of evolving high-throughput approaches, such as transcriptome analyses (RNA sequencing), to profile adipogenic transcriptomes, is also addressed. PMID:26389882

  8. Some characteristics of probabilistic one-sided splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model for DNA computing using the recombination behavior of DNA molecules known as asplicing system has been introduced in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings at the specific places and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string yielding the new strings. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions for splicing systems have been considered to increase the computational power of the languages generated. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic one-sided splicing systems, which are special types of probabilistic splicing systems, are investigated. We prove that probabilistic one-sided splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the languages generated.

  9. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M G; Pinto, Yigal M; Creemers, Esther E

    2016-02-05

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new functional protein (function) is likely to be retained, and this way, the genome has gradually evolved to encode for genes with multiple isoforms, thereby creating an enormously diverse transcriptome. Advances in technologies to characterize RNA populations have led to a better understanding of RNA processing in health and disease. In the heart, alternative splicing is increasingly being recognized as an important layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Moreover, the recent identification of several cardiac splice factors, such as RNA-binding motif protein 20 and SF3B1, not only provided important insight into the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing but also revealed how these splicing factors impact functional properties of the heart. Here, we review our current knowledge of alternative splicing in the heart, with a particular focus on the major and minor spliceosome, the factors controlling RNA splicing, and the role of alternative splicing in cardiac development and disease.

  10. A hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-3α splicing variant, HIF-3α4 impairs angiogenesis in hypervascular malignant meningiomas with epigenetically silenced HIF-3α4

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Hitoshi; Natsume, Atsushi; Iwami, Kenichiro; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Ito, Kengo; Saito, Kiyoshi; Sugita, Sachi; Hoshino, Tsuneyoshi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► HIF-3α4 is silenced by DNA methylation in meningiomas. ► Induction of HIF-3α4 impaired angiogenesis in meningiomas. ► Induction of HIF-3α4 impaired proliferation and oxygen-dependent metabolism. -- Abstract: Hypoxia inducible factor is a dominant regulator of adaptive cellular responses to hypoxia and controls the expression of a large number of genes regulating angiogenesis as well as metabolism, cell survival, apoptosis, and other cellular functions in an oxygen level-dependent manner. When a neoplasm is able to induce angiogenesis, tumor progression occurs more rapidly because of the nutrients provided by the neovasculature. Meningioma is one of the most hypervascular brain tumors, making anti-angiogenic therapy an attractive novel therapy for these tumors. HIF-3α has been conventionally regarded as a dominant-negative regulator of HIF-1α, and although alternative HIF-3α splicing variants are extensively reported, their specific functions have not yet been determined. In this study, we found that the transcription of HIF-3α4 was silenced by the promoter DNA methylation in meningiomas, and inducible HIF-3α4 impaired angiogenesis, proliferation, and metabolism/oxidation in hypervascular meningiomas. Thus, HIF-3α4 could be a potential molecular target in meningiomas.

  11. Functional and splicing defect analysis of 23 ACVRL1 mutations in a cohort of patients affected by Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Alaa el Din, Ferdos; Patri, Sylvie; Thoreau, Vincent; Rodriguez-Ballesteros, Montserrat; Hamade, Eva; Bailly, Sabine; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Abou Merhi, Raghida; Kitzis, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia syndrome (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Two most common forms of HHT, HHT1 and HHT2, have been linked to mutations in the endoglin (ENG) and activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1or ALK1) genes respectively. This work was designed to examine the pathogenicity of 23 nucleotide variations in ACVRL1 gene detected in more than 400 patients. Among them, 14 missense mutations and one intronic variant were novels, and 8 missense mutations were previously identified with questionable implication in HHT2. The functionality of missense mutations was analyzed in response to BMP9 (specific ligand of ALK1), the maturation of the protein products and their localization were analyzed by western blot and fluorescence microscopy. The splicing impairment of the intronic and of two missense mutations was examined by minigene assay. Functional analysis showed that 18 out of 22 missense mutations were defective. Splicing analysis revealed that one missense mutation (c.733A>G, p.Ile245Val) affects the splicing of the harboring exon 6. Similarly, the intronic mutation outside the consensus splicing sites (c.1048+5G>A in intron 7) was seen pathogenic by splicing study. Both mutations induce a frame shift creating a premature stop codon likely resulting in mRNA degradation by NMD surveillance mechanism. Our results confirm the haploinsufficiency model proposed for HHT2. The affected allele of ACVRL1 induces mRNA degradation or the synthesis of a protein lacking the receptor activity. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that functional and splicing analyses together, represent two robust diagnostic tools to be used by geneticists confronted with novel or conflicted ACVRL1 mutations. PMID:26176610

  12. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katja; Koester, Tino; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance. PMID:26213982

  13. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Katja; Koester, Tino; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-07-24

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance.

  14. Identification of cis-acting elements and splicing factors involved in the regulation of BIM Pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Juan, Wen Chun; Roca, Xavier; Ong, S Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant changes in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, BCL-2-like 11 (BIM), can result in either impaired or excessive apoptosis, which can contribute to tumorigenesis and degenerative disorders, respectively. Altering BIM pre-mRNA splicing is an attractive approach to modulate apoptosis because BIM activity is partly determined by the alternative splicing of exons 3 or 4, whereby exon 3-containing transcripts are not apoptotic. Here we identified several cis-acting elements and splicing factors involved in BIM alternative splicing, as a step to better understand the regulation of BIM expression. We analyzed a recently discovered 2,903-bp deletion polymorphism within BIM intron 2 that biased splicing towards exon 3, and which also impaired BIM-dependent apoptosis. We found that this region harbors multiple redundant cis-acting elements that repress exon 3 inclusion. Furthermore, we have isolated a 23-nt intronic splicing silencer at the 3' end of the deletion that is important for excluding exon 3. We also show that PTBP1 and hnRNP C repress exon 3 inclusion, and that downregulation of PTBP1 inhibited BIM-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, these findings start building our understanding of the cis-acting elements and splicing factors that regulate BIM alternative splicing, and also suggest potential approaches to alter BIM splicing for therapeutic purposes.

  15. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules.

    PubMed

    Berkers, Celia R; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib

    2015-11-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I-restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags.

  16. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

    SciTech Connect

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-10-10

    Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 1–89 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127–588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127–588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNP•Mg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to the adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNP•Mg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28•AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila Vasa•AMPPNP•Mg2+•RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.

  17. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

    DOE PAGES

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; ...

    2014-10-10

    Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 1–89 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127–588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127–588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNP•Mg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to themore » adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNP•Mg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28•AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila Vasa•AMPPNP•Mg2+•RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.« less

  18. Biomedical Impact of Splicing Mutations Revealed through Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Taneri, Bahar; Asilmaz, Esra; Gaasterland, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Splicing is a cellular mechanism, which dictates eukaryotic gene expression by removing the noncoding introns and ligating the coding exons in the form of a messenger RNA molecule. Alternative splicing (AS) adds a major level of complexity to this mechanism and thus to the regulation of gene expression. This widespread cellular phenomenon generates multiple messenger RNA isoforms from a single gene, by utilizing alternative splice sites and promoting different exon–intron inclusions and exclusions. AS greatly increases the coding potential of eukaryotic genomes and hence contributes to the diversity of eukaryotic proteomes. Mutations that lead to disruptions of either constitutive splicing or AS cause several diseases, among which are myotonic dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Aberrant splicing is also well established in cancer states. Identification of rare novel mutations associated with splice-site recognition, and splicing regulation in general, could provide further insight into genetic mechanisms of rare diseases. Here, disease relevance of aberrant splicing is reviewed, and the new methodological approach of starting from disease phenotype, employing exome sequencing and identifying rare mutations affecting splicing regulation is described. Exome sequencing has emerged as a reliable method for finding sequence variations associated with various disease states. To date, genetic studies using exome sequencing to find disease-causing mutations have focused on the discovery of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms that alter amino acids or introduce early stop codons, or on the use of exome sequencing as a means to genotype known single nucleotide polymorphisms. The involvement of splicing mutations in inherited diseases has received little attention and thus likely occurs more frequently than currently estimated. Studies of exome sequencing followed by molecular and bioinformatic analyses have great potential to reveal the high impact of splicing

  19. Cotranscriptional splicing efficiency differs dramatically between Drosophila and mouse.

    PubMed

    Khodor, Yevgenia L; Menet, Jerome S; Tolan, Michael; Rosbash, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Spliceosome assembly and/or splicing of a nascent transcript may be crucial for proper isoform expression and gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. We recently showed that cotranscriptional splicing occurs efficiently in Drosophila, but there are not comparable genome-wide nascent splicing data from mammals. To provide this comparison, we analyze a recently generated, high-throughput sequencing data set of mouse liver nascent RNA, originally studied for circadian transcriptional regulation. Cotranscriptional splicing is approximately twofold less efficient in mouse liver than in Drosophila, i.e., nascent intron levels relative to exon levels are ∼0.55 in mouse versus 0.25 in the fly. An additional difference between species is that only mouse cotranscriptional splicing is optimal when 5'-exon length is between 50 and 500 bp, and intron length does not correlate with splicing efficiency, consistent with exon definition. A similar analysis of intron and exon length dependence in the fly is more consistent with intron definition. Contrasted with these differences are many similarities between the two systems: Alternatively annotated introns are less efficiently spliced cotranscriptionally than constitutive introns, and introns of single-intron genes are less efficiently spliced than introns from multi-intron genes. The most striking common feature is intron position: Cotranscriptional splicing is much more efficient when introns are far from the 3' ends of their genes. Additionally, absolute gene length correlates positively with cotranscriptional splicing efficiency independently of intron location and position, in flies as well as in mice. The gene length and distance effects indicate that more "nascent time" gives rise to greater cotranscriptional splicing efficiency in both systems.

  20. Modulation of RNA splicing as a potential treatment for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauman, John A; Kole, Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    Close to 90% of human genes are transcribed into pre-mRNA that undergoes alternative splicing, producing multiple mRNAs and proteins from single genes. This process is largely responsible for human proteome diversity, and about half of genetic disease-causing mutations affect splicing. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) comprise an emerging class of antisense therapeutics that modify gene expression by directing pre-mRNA splice site usage. Bauman et al. investigated an SSO that up-regulated the expression of an anti-cancer splice variant while simultaneously eliminating an over-expressed cancer-causing splice variant.  This was accomplished by targeting pre-mRNA of the apoptotic regulator Bcl-x, which is alternatively spliced to express anti- and pro-apoptotic splice variants Bcl-xL and Bcl-xS, respectively. High expression of Bcl-xL is a hallmark of many cancers and is considered a general mechanism used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis. Redirection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing from Bcl-xL to -xS by SSO induced apoptotic and chemosensitizing effects in various cancer cell lines. Importantly, the paper shows that delivery of Bcl-x SSO using a lipid nanoparticle redirected Bcl-x splicing and reduced tumor burden in melanoma lung metastases. This was the first demonstration of SSO efficacy in tumors in vivo. SSOs are not limited to be solely potential anti-cancer drugs. SSOs were first applied to repair aberrant splicing in thalassemia, a genetic disease, they have been used to create novel proteins (e.g., ∆7TNFR1), and they have recently progressed to clinical trials for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 

  1. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome.

  2. Potential control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 asp expression by alternative splicing in the upstream untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Michael S; Birch, Katherine E; Deacon, Nicholas J; Mosse, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    The negative-sense asp open reading frame (ORF) positioned opposite to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env gene encodes the 189 amino acid, membrane-associated ASP protein. Negative-sense transcription, regulated by long terminal repeat sequences, has been observed early in HIV-1 infection in vitro. All subtypes of HIV-1 were scanned to detect the negative-sense asp ORF and to identify potential regulatory sequences. A series of highly conserved upstream short open reading frames (sORFs) was identified. This potential control region from HIV-1(NL4-3), containing six sORFs, was cloned upstream of the reporter gene EGFP. Expression by transfection of HEK293 cells indicated that the introduction of this sORF region inhibits EGFP reporter expression; analysis of transcripts revealed no significant changes in levels of EGFP mRNA. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (RT-PCR) further demonstrated that the upstream sORF region undergoes alternative splicing in vitro. The most abundant product is spliced to remove sORFs I to V, leaving only the in-frame sORF VI upstream of asp. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of typical splice donor- and acceptor-site motifs. Mutation of the highly conserved splice donor and acceptor sites modulates, but does not fully relieve, inhibition of EGFP production. The strong conservation of asp and its sORFs across all HIV-1 subtypes suggests that the asp gene product may have a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. Alternative splicing of the upstream sORF region provides a potential mechanism for controlling expression of the asp gene.

  3. NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS AND NEGATIVE SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Gopinath, P.S.; Mathai, P. John; Michael, Albert

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY This study determines the frequency distribution of prominent negative symptoms in a group of chronic, hospitalised schizophrenics. Thirty chronic Schizophrenic (D.S.M. III) patients were rated on the scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and the prominent negative symptoms were correlated with age, sex and certain illness variables. Majority (80%) of patients had some or the other negative symptom, except thought blocking which was found in none. The subjective awareness of the symptoms was poor. Most negative symptoms were present to a severe degree in about 40% of cases. However, no significant correlation was found between severe negative symptoms and age or sex. Similarly, duration of illness, duration of hospitalisation or current medications did not influence negative symptoms to any appreciable degree. The implications are discussed. PMID:21965985

  4. Splice connector with internal heat transfer jacket

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.; Mayer, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    A heat transfer jacket is placed over the terminal portions of the conductors of a pair of high voltage cables which are connected in a splice connection wherein a housing surrounds the connected conductor portions, the heat transfer jacket extending longitudinally between the confronting ends of a pair of adaptor sleeves placed upon the insulation of the cables to engage and locate the adaptor sleeves relative to one another, and laterally between the conductors and the housing to provide a path of relatively high thermal conductivity between the connected conductor portions and the housing.

  5. Functional analysis reveals splicing mutations of the CASQ2 gene in patients with CPVT: implication for genetic counselling and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Rendu, John; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Goldenberg, Alice; David, Nadine; Faivre, Laurence; Barthez, Olivier; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Marty, Isabelle; Lunardi, Joel; Fauré, Julien

    2011-09-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a rare and severe arrhythmogenic disorder. Although usually transmitted in a recessive form, few cases of dominant mutations have been reported. Thirteen mutations in the CASQ2 gene have been reported so far in association with CPVT. We performed molecular analysis of the CASQ2 gene in 43 probands with CPVT and identified eight mutations in five patients. Six mutations were novel: one was a single nucleotide deletion, three affected consensus splice sites, and two had unknown consequences: the c.939 + 5G>C and the synonymous c.381C>T variations. We demonstrated that these two variations affected CASQ2 splicing using a splicing minigene assay. These data increased significantly the number of CASQ2 mutations described in association with CPVT, revealed the high prevalence of splicing and truncating mutations in this gene and brought new insight regarding the dominant inheritance of the disease. Moreover, our report of the first splicing abnormalities in CASQ2 caused by intronic mutation or synonymous change underlines the absolute necessity to perform extensive molecular analysis for genetic diagnosis and counseling of CPVT.

  6. An abnormal mRNA produced by a novel PMP22 splice site mutation associated with HNPP.

    PubMed

    Bellone, E; Balestra, P; Ribizzi, G; Schenone, A; Zocchi, G; Di Maria, E; Ajmar, F; Mandich, P

    2006-04-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant, demyelinating neuropathy. Point mutations in the PMP22 gene are a rare cause of HNPP. A novel PMP22 splice site mutation (c.179+1 G-->C) is reported in an HNPP family. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction experiments, this mutation was shown to cause the synthesis of an abnormal mRNA in which a premature stop codon probably produces a truncated non-functional protein.

  7. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay. PMID:27081549

  8. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay.

  9. Alternative Splicing of the LIM-Homeodomain Transcription Factor Isl1 in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Irene E.; Kautzman, Amanda G.; Reese, Benjamin E.

    2015-01-01

    Islet-1 (Isl1) is a LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) transcription factor that functions in a combinatorial manner with other LIM-HD proteins to direct the differentiation of distinct cell types within the central nervous system and many other tissues. A study of pancreatic cell lines showed that Isl1 is alternatively spliced generating a second isoform, Isl1β, which is missing 23 amino acids within the C-terminal region. This study examines the expression of the canonical and alternative Isl1 transcripts across other tissues, in particular, within the retina, where Isl1 is required for the differentiation of multiple neuronal cell types. The alternative splicing of Isl1 is shown to occur in multiple tissues, but the relative abundance of Isl1α and Isl1 β expression varies greatly across them. In most tissues, Isl1α is the more abundant transcript, but in others the transcripts are expressed equally, or the alternative splice variant is dominant. Within the retina, differential expression of the two Isl1 transcripts increases as a function of development, with dynamic changes in expression peaking at E16.5 and again at P10. At the cellular level, individual retinal ganglion cells vary in their expression, with a subset of small-to-medium sized cells expressing only the alternative isoform. The functional significance of the difference in protein sequence between the two Isl1 isoforms was also assessed using a luciferase assay, demonstrating that the alternative isoform forms a less effective transcriptional complex for activating gene expression. These results demonstrate the differential presence of the canonical and alternative isoforms of Isl1 amongst retinal ganglion cell classes. As Isl1 participates in the differentiation of multiple cell types within the CNS, the present results support a role for alternative splicing in the establishment of cellular diversity in the developing nervous system. PMID:25752730

  10. Arabidopsis orthologs of maize chloroplast splicing factors promote splicing of orthologous and species-specific group II introns.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2006-12-01

    Chloroplast genomes in plants and green algae contain numerous group II introns, large ribozymes that splice via the same chemical steps as spliceosome-mediated splicing in the nucleus. Most chloroplast group II introns are degenerate, requiring interaction with nucleus-encoded proteins to splice in vivo. Genetic approaches in maize (Zea mays) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have elucidated distinct sets of proteins that assemble with chloroplast group II introns and facilitate splicing. Little information is available, however, concerning these processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To determine whether the paucity of data concerning chloroplast splicing factors in Arabidopsis reflects a fundamental difference between protein-facilitated group II splicing in monocot and dicot plants, we examined the mutant phenotypes associated with T-DNA insertions in Arabidopsis genes encoding orthologs of the maize chloroplast splicing factors CRS1, CAF1, and CAF2 (AtCRS1, AtCAF1, and AtCAF2). We show that the splicing functions and intron specificities of these proteins are largely conserved between maize and Arabidopsis, indicating that these proteins were recruited to promote the splicing of plastid group II introns prior to the divergence of monocot and dicot plants. We show further that AtCAF1 promotes the splicing of two group II introns, rpoC1 and clpP-intron 1, that are found in Arabidopsis but not in maize; AtCAF1 is the first splicing factor described for these introns. Finally, we show that a strong AtCAF2 allele conditions an embryo-lethal phenotype, adding to the body of data suggesting that cell viability is more sensitive to the loss of plastid translation in Arabidopsis than in maize.

  11. Splicing enhancement in the yeast rp51b intron.

    PubMed Central

    Libri, D; Lescure, A; Rosbash, M

    2000-01-01

    Splicing enhancement in higher eukaryotes has been linked to SR proteins, to U1 snRNP, and to communication between splice sites across introns or exons mediated by protein-protein interactions. It has been previously shown that, in yeast, communication mediated by RNA-RNA interactions between the two ends of introns is a basis for splicing enhancement. We designed experiments of randomization-selection to isolate splicing enhancers that would work independently from RNA secondary structures. Surprisingly, one of the two families of sequences selected was essentially composed of 5' splice site variants. We show that this sequence enhances splicing independently of secondary structure, is exportable to heterologous contexts, and works in multiple copies with additive effects. The data argue in favor of an early role for splicing enhancement, possibly coincident with commitment complex formation. Genetic compensation experiments with U1 snRNA mutants suggest that U1 snRNP binding to noncanonical locations is required for splicing enhancement. PMID:10744020

  12. A Broad Set of Chromatin Factors Influences Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Eric; Myers, Michael P.; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Krainer, Adrian R.; Muchardt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Several studies propose an influence of chromatin on pre-mRNA splicing, but it is still unclear how widespread and how direct this phenomenon is. We find here that when assembled in vivo, the U2 snRNP co-purifies with a subset of chromatin-proteins, including histones and remodeling complexes like SWI/SNF. Yet, an unbiased RNAi screen revealed that the outcome of splicing is influenced by a much larger variety of chromatin factors not all associating with the spliceosome. The availability of this broad range of chromatin factors impacting splicing further unveiled their very context specific effect, resulting in either inclusion or skipping, depending on the exon under scrutiny. Finally, a direct assessment of the impact of chromatin on splicing using an in vitro co-transcriptional splicing assay with pre-mRNAs transcribed from a nucleosomal template, demonstrated that chromatin impacts nascent pre-mRNP in their competence for splicing. Altogether, our data show that numerous chromatin factors associated or not with the spliceosome can affect the outcome of splicing, possibly as a function of the local chromatin environment that by default interferes with the efficiency of splicing. PMID:27662573

  13. RNA splicing in human disease and in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Baralle, Diana; Buratti, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    Defects at the level of the pre-mRNA splicing process represent a major cause of human disease. Approximately 15-50% of all human disease mutations have been shown to alter functioning of basic and auxiliary splicing elements. These elements are required to ensure proper processing of pre-mRNA splicing molecules, with their disruption leading to misprocessing of the pre-mRNA molecule and disease. The splicing process is a complex process, with much still to be uncovered before we are able to accurately predict whether a reported genomic sequence variant (GV) represents a splicing-associated disease mutation or a harmless polymorphism. Furthermore, even when a mutation is correctly identified as affecting the splicing process, there still remains the difficulty of providing an exact evaluation of the potential impact on disease onset, severity and duration. In this review, we provide a brief overview of splicing diagnostic methodologies, from in silico bioinformatics approaches to wet lab in vitro and in vivo systems to evaluate splicing efficiencies. In particular, we provide an overview of how the latest developments in high-throughput sequencing can be applied to the clinic, and are already changing clinical approaches.

  14. Scattering of acoustic duct modes by axial liner splices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Ju, Hongbin; Chien, Eugene W.

    2008-03-01

    Recent engine test data and results of computational analysis show that the engine inlet acoustic liner splices have a significant impact on aircraft flight noise certification and cabin noise levels. The phenomenon of scattering of acoustic duct modes by axial liner splices is investigated. Previous studies, invariably, follow the frequency-domain approach. The present study, however, uses the time-domain approach. It is demonstrated that time-domain computation yields results that are in close agreement with frequency-domain results. The scattering phenomenon under consideration is very complex. This study concentrates on the effects of four parameters. They are the width of the splices, the frequency of the incident duct mode, the number of splices and the length of splices. Based on the computed results, the conditions under which scattered wave modes would significantly increase the intensity of transmitted waves are identified. It is also found that surface scattering by liner splices has the tendency to distribute energy equally to all the cut-on scattered azimuthal modes. On the other hand, for each scattered azimuthal mode, the high-order cut-on radial mode, generally, has the highest intensity. Moreover, scattering by liner splices is a local phenomenon. It is confined primarily to an area of the duct adjacent to the junction between the hard wall near the fan face and the spliced liner.

  15. Connecting the dots: chromatin and alternative splicing in EMT

    PubMed Central

    Warns, Jessica A.; Davie, James R.; Dhasarathy, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Nature has devised sophisticated cellular machinery to process mRNA transcripts produced by RNA Polymerase II, removing intronic regions and connecting exons together, to produce mature RNAs. This process, known as splicing, is very closely linked to transcription. Alternative splicing, or the ability to produce different combinations of exons that are spliced together from the same genomic template, is a fundamental means of regulating protein complexity. Similar to transcription, both constitutive and alternative splicing can be regulated by chromatin and its associated factors in response to various signal transduction pathways activated by external stimuli. This regulation can vary between different cell types, and interference with these pathways can lead to changes in splicing, often resulting in aberrant cellular states and disease. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which leads to cancer metastasis, is influenced by alternative splicing events of chromatin remodelers and epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of epigenetic factors including chromatin, chromatin remodelers, DNA methyltransferases and microRNAs in the context of alternative splicing, and discuss their potential involvement in alternative splicing during the EMT process. PMID:26291837

  16. Connecting the dots: chromatin and alternative splicing in EMT.

    PubMed

    Warns, Jessica A; Davie, James R; Dhasarathy, Archana

    2016-02-01

    Nature has devised sophisticated cellular machinery to process mRNA transcripts produced by RNA Polymerase II, removing intronic regions and connecting exons together, to produce mature RNAs. This process, known as splicing, is very closely linked to transcription. Alternative splicing, or the ability to produce different combinations of exons that are spliced together from the same genomic template, is a fundamental means of regulating protein complexity. Similar to transcription, both constitutive and alternative splicing can be regulated by chromatin and its associated factors in response to various signal transduction pathways activated by external stimuli. This regulation can vary between different cell types, and interference with these pathways can lead to changes in splicing, often resulting in aberrant cellular states and disease. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which leads to cancer metastasis, is influenced by alternative splicing events of chromatin remodelers and epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of epigenetic factors including chromatin, chromatin remodelers, DNA methyltransferases, and microRNAs in the context of alternative splicing, and discuss their potential involvement in alternative splicing during the EMT process.

  17. Alternative Splicing of STAT3 Is Affected by RNA Editing.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Lior; Abutbul-Amitai, Mor; Paret, Gideon; Nevo-Caspi, Yael

    2017-03-09

    A-to-I RNA editing, carried out by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, is an epigenetic phenomenon of posttranscriptional modifications on pre-mRNA. RNA editing in intronic sequences may influence alternative splicing of flanking exons. We have previously shown that conditions that induce editing result in elevated expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), preferentially the alternatively-spliced STAT3β isoform. Mechanisms regulating alternative splicing of STAT3 have not been elucidated. STAT3 undergoes A-to-I RNA editing in an intron residing in proximity to the alternatively spliced exon. We hypothesized that RNA editing plays a role in regulating alternative splicing toward STAT3β. In this study we extend our observation connecting RNA editing to the preferential induction of STAT3β expression. We study the involvement of ADAR1 in STAT3 editing and reveal the connection between editing and alternative splicing of STAT3. Deferoaxamine treatment caused the induction in STAT3 RNA editing and STAT3β expression. Silencing ADAR1 caused a decrease in STAT3 editing and expression with a preferential decrease in STAT3β. Cells transfected with a mutated minigene showed preferential splicing toward the STAT3β transcript. Editing in the STAT3 intron is performed by ADAR1 and affects STAT3 alternative splicing. These results suggest that RNA editing is one of the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of STAT3β.

  18. Recruitment of RED-SMU1 complex by Influenza A Virus RNA polymerase to control Viral mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Guillaume; Chiang, Chiayn; Munier, Sandie; Tomoiu, Andru; Demeret, Caroline; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Jacob, Yves; Naffakh, Nadia

    2014-06-01

    Influenza A viruses are major pathogens in humans and in animals, whose genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA segments of negative polarity. Viral mRNAs are synthesized by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in the nucleus of infected cells, in close association with the cellular transcriptional machinery. Two proteins essential for viral multiplication, the exportin NS2/NEP and the ion channel protein M2, are produced by splicing of the NS1 and M1 mRNAs, respectively. Here we identify two human spliceosomal factors, RED and SMU1, that control the expression of NS2/NEP and are required for efficient viral multiplication. We provide several lines of evidence that in infected cells, the hetero-trimeric viral polymerase recruits a complex formed by RED and SMU1 through interaction with its PB2 and PB1 subunits. We demonstrate that the splicing of the NS1 viral mRNA is specifically affected in cells depleted of RED or SMU1, leading to a decreased production of the spliced mRNA species NS2, and to a reduced NS2/NS1 protein ratio. In agreement with the exportin function of NS2, these defects impair the transport of newly synthesized viral ribonucleoproteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and strongly reduce the production of infectious influenza virions. Overall, our results unravel a new mechanism of viral subversion of the cellular splicing machinery, by establishing that the human splicing factors RED and SMU1 act jointly as key regulators of influenza virus gene expression. In addition, our data point to a central role of the viral RNA polymerase in coupling transcription and alternative splicing of the viral mRNAs.

  19. Intronic splicing mutations in PTCH1 cause Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bholah, Zaynab; Smith, Miriam J; Byers, Helen J; Miles, Emma K; Evans, D Gareth; Newman, William G

    2014-09-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the tumour suppressor PTCH1. Routine clinical genetic testing, by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, identifies a mutation in 60-90 % of cases. We undertook RNA analysis on lymphocytes from ten individuals diagnosed with Gorlin syndrome, but without known PTCH1 mutations by exonic sequencing or MLPA. Two altered PTCH1 transcripts were identified. Genomic DNA sequence analysis identified an intron 7 mutation c.1068-10T>A, which created a strong cryptic splice acceptor site, leading to an intronic insertion of eight bases; this is predicted to create a frameshift p.(His358Alafs*12). Secondly, a deep intronic mutation c.2561-2057A>G caused an inframe insertion of 78 intronic bases in the cDNA transcript, leading to a premature stop codon p.(Gly854fs*3). The mutations are predicted to cause loss of function of PTCH1, consistent with its tumour suppressor function. The findings indicate the importance of RNA analysis to detect intronic mutations in PTCH1 not identified by routine screening techniques.

  20. Ancient nature of alternative splicing and functions of introns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Kemin; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Aerts, Andrea; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-21

    Using four genomes: Chamydomonas reinhardtii, Agaricus bisporus, Aspergillus carbonarius, and Sporotricum thermophile with EST coverage of 2.9x, 8.9x, 29.5x, and 46.3x respectively, we identified 11 alternative splicing (AS) types that were dominated by intron retention (RI; biased toward short introns) and found 15, 35, 52, and 63percent AS of multiexon genes respectively. Genes with AS were more ancient, and number of AS correlated with number of exons, expression level, and maximum intron length of the gene. Introns with tendency to be retained had either stop codons or length of 3n+1 or 3n+2 presumably triggering nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), but introns retained in major isoforms (0.2-6percent of all introns) were biased toward 3n length and stop codon free. Stopless introns were biased toward phase 0, but 3n introns favored phase 1 that introduced more flexible and hydrophilic amino acids on both ends of introns which would be less disruptive to protein structure. We proposed a model in which minor RI intron could evolve into major RI that could facilitate intron loss through exonization.

  1. Functional impact of splice isoform diversity in individual cells

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an effective means for expanding coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes. Recent studies suggest that co-expression of different splice isoforms may increase diversity of RNAs and proteins at a single-cell level. A pertinent question in the field is whether such co-expression is biologically meaningful or, rather, represents insufficiently stringent splicing regulation. Here we argue that isoform co-expression may produce functional outcomes that are difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve using other regulation strategies. Far from being a ‘splicing noise’, co-expression is often established through co-ordinated activity of specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Further work in this area may uncover new biological functions of alternative splicing (AS) and generate important insights into mechanisms allowing different cell types to attain their unique molecular identities. PMID:27528755

  2. [Alternative splicing regulation: implications in cancer diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montiel, Nancy; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca

    2015-04-08

    The accurate expression of the genetic information is regulated by processes like mRNA splicing, proposed after the discoveries of Phil Sharp and Richard Roberts, who demonstrated the existence of intronic sequences, present in almost every structural eukaryotic gene, which should be precisely removed. This intron removal is called "splicing", which generates different proteins from a single mRNA, with different or even antagonistic functions. We currently know that alternative splicing is the most important source of protein diversity, given that 70% of the human genes undergo splicing and that mutations causing defects in this process could originate up to 50% of genetic diseases, including cancer. When these defects occur in genes involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and cell cycle regulation, there is an impact on cancer progression, rising the opportunity to diagnose and treat some types of cancer according to a particular splicing profile.

  3. Differential Impacts of Alternative Splicing Networks on Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun; Tsao, Mei-Fen; Lin, Ying-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis functions as a common mechanism to eliminate unnecessary or damaged cells during cell renewal and tissue development in multicellular organisms. More than 200 proteins constitute complex networks involved in apoptotic regulation. Imbalanced expressions of apoptosis-related factors frequently lead to malignant diseases. The biological functions of several apoptotic factors are manipulated through alternative splicing mechanisms which expand gene diversity by generating discrete variants from one messenger RNA precursor. It is widely observed that alternatively-spliced variants encoded from apoptosis-related genes exhibit differential effects on apoptotic regulation. Alternative splicing events are meticulously regulated by the interplay between trans-splicing factors and cis-responsive elements surrounding the regulated exons. The major focus of this review is to highlight recent studies that illustrate the influences of alternative splicing networks on apoptotic regulation which participates in diverse cellular processes and diseases. PMID:27983653

  4. RNA splicing factors as oncoproteins and tumor suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Dvinge, Heidi; Kim, Eunhee; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Bradley, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Preface The recent genomic characterization of cancers has revealed recurrent somatic point mutations and copy number changes affecting genes encoding RNA splicing factors. Initial studies of these ‘spliceosomal mutations’ suggest that the proteins bearing these mutations exhibit altered splice site and/or exon recognition preferences relative to their wild-type counterparts, resulting in cancer-specific mis-splicing. Such changes in the splicing machinery may create novel vulnerabilities in cancer cells that can be therapeutically exploited using compounds that can influence the splicing process. Further studies to dissect the biochemical, genomic, and biological effects of spliceosomal mutations are critical for the development of cancer therapies targeted to these mutations. PMID:27282250

  5. Functional impact of splice isoform diversity in individual cells.

    PubMed

    Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V

    2016-08-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an effective means for expanding coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes. Recent studies suggest that co-expression of different splice isoforms may increase diversity of RNAs and proteins at a single-cell level. A pertinent question in the field is whether such co-expression is biologically meaningful or, rather, represents insufficiently stringent splicing regulation. Here we argue that isoform co-expression may produce functional outcomes that are difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve using other regulation strategies. Far from being a 'splicing noise', co-expression is often established through co-ordinated activity of specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Further work in this area may uncover new biological functions of alternative splicing (AS) and generate important insights into mechanisms allowing different cell types to attain their unique molecular identities.

  6. Positive control of pre-mRNA splicing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tian, M; Maniatis, T

    1992-04-10

    Positive control of the sex-specific alternative splicing of doublesex (dsx) precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) in Drosophila melanogaster involves the activation of a female-specific 3' splice site by the products of the transformer (tra) and transformer-2 (tra-2) genes. The mechanisms of this process were investigated in an in vitro system in which the female-specific 3' splice site could be activated by recombinant Tra or Tra-2 (or both). An exon sequence essential for regulation in vivo was shown to be both necessary and sufficient for activation in vitro. Nuclear proteins in addition to Tra and Tra-2 were found to bind specifically to this exon sequence. Therefore, Tra and Tra-2 may act by promoting the assembly of a multiprotein complex on the exon sequence. This complex may facilitate recognition of the adjacent 3' splice site by the splicing machinery.

  7. Temporal regulation of adenovirus major late alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Akusjarvi, Goran

    2008-05-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced mRNAs during replication. The accumulation of viral mRNAs is subjected to a temporal regulation, a mechanism that ensures that proteins that are needed at certain stages of the virus life cycle are produced in a timely fashion. The complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery has been studied in detail during the last decade. These studies have resulted in the characterization of two viral proteins, E4-ORF4 and L4-33K, that adenovirus uses to remodel the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here I will review the current knowledge of how mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit is controlled with a particular emphasis on how cis-acting sequence element, trans-acting factors and mechanisms regulating adenovirus major late L1 alternative RNA splicing is controlled.

  8. Structural analysis of Aircraft fuselage splice joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaya Prakash, R.; Kumar, G. Raj; Vijayanandh, R.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Ramganesh, T.

    2016-09-01

    In Aviation sector, composite materials and its application to each component are one of the prime factors of consideration due to the high strength to weight ratio, design flexibility and non-corrosive so that the composite materials are widely used in the low weight constructions and also it can be treated as a suitable alternative to metals. The objective of this paper is to estimate and compare the suitability of a composite skin joint in an aircraft fuselage with different joints by simulating the displacement, normal stress, vonmises stress and shear stress with the help of numerical solution methods. The reference Z-stringer component of this paper is modeled by CATIA and numerical simulation is carried out by ANSYS has been used for splice joint presents in the aircraft fuselage with three combinations of joints such as riveted joint, bonded joint and hybrid joint. Nowadays the stringers are using to avoid buckling of fuselage skin, it has joined together by rivets and they are connected end to end by splice joint. Design and static analysis of three-dimensional models of joints such as bonded, riveted and hybrid are carried out and results are compared.

  9. Death, dying, and domination.

    PubMed

    Spindelman, Marc

    2008-06-01

    This Article critiques conventional liberal arguments for the right to die on liberal grounds. It contends that these arguments do not go far enough to recognize and address private, and in particular structural, forms of domination. It presents an alternative that does, which is thus more respectful of true freedom in the context of death and dying, and also more consistent with liberalism. After discussing obstacles to the achievement of a right to die that encompasses freedom from both public and private domination, the Article closes with a significant reform project within bioethics that might help bring it about.

  10. Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N P; Goldberg, M F; Fishman, G A; Salzano, T

    1984-01-01

    We report the second family recognised to have autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy. The clinical features were (1) autosomal dominant inheritance; (2) peripheral, coarse pigmentary degeneration of the fundus for 360 degrees, with a relatively discrete posterior border in the equatorial region (this finding may be pathognomonic); (3) superficial punctate yellowish-white opacities in the retina; (4) various vascular abnormalities; (5) breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier; (6) retinal neovascularisation; (7) vitreous abnormalities; and (8) choroidal atrophy. Visual reduction was mainly due to macular oedema or vitreous haemorrhage. Images PMID:6689931

  11. Altered splicing leads to reduced activation of CPEB3 in high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Skubal, Magdalena; Gielen, Gerrit H.; Waha, Anke; Gessi, Marco; Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Seifert, Gerald; Freihoff, Dorothee; Freihoff, Johannes; Pietsch, Torsten; Simon, Matthias; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian; Waha, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding proteins (CPEBs) are auxiliary translational factors that associate with consensus sequences present in 3′UTRs of mRNAs, thereby activating or repressing their translation. Knowing that CPEBs are players in cell cycle regulation and cellular senescence prompted us to investigate their contribution to the molecular pathology of gliomas–most frequent of intracranial tumors found in humans. To this end, we performed methylation analyses in the promoter regions of CPEB1-4 and identified the CPEB1 gene to be hypermethylated in tumor samples. Decreased expression of CPEB1 protein in gliomas correlated with the rising grade of tumor malignancy. Abundant expression of CPEBs2-4 was observed in several glioma specimens. Interestingly, expression of CPEB3 positively correlated with tumor progression and malignancy but negatively correlated with protein phosphorylation in the alternatively spliced region. Our data suggest that loss of CPEB3 activity in high-grade gliomas is caused by expression of alternatively spliced variants lacking the B-region that overlaps with the kinase recognition site. We conclude that deregulation of CPEB proteins may be a frequent phenomenon in gliomas and occurs on the level of transcription involving epigenetic mechanism as well as on the level of mRNA splicing, which generates isoforms with compromised biological properties. PMID:27256982

  12. Identification and analysis of alternative splicing events conserved in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene W.; Van Nostrand, Eric; Holste, Dirk; Poggio, Tomaso; Burge, Christopher B.

    2005-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing affects a majority of human genes and plays important roles in development and disease. Alternative splicing (AS) events conserved since the divergence of human and mouse are likely of primary biological importance, but relatively few of such events are known. Here we describe sequence features that distinguish exons subject to evolutionarily conserved AS, which we call alternative conserved exons (ACEs), from other orthologous human/mouse exons and integrate these features into an exon classification algorithm, acescan. Genome-wide analysis of annotated orthologous human–mouse exon pairs identified ≈2,000 predicted ACEs. Alternative splicing was verified in both human and mouse tissues by using an RT-PCR-sequencing protocol for 21 of 30 (70%) predicted ACEs tested, supporting the validity of a majority of acescan predictions. By contrast, AS was observed in mouse tissues for only 2 of 15 (13%) tested exons that had EST or cDNA evidence of AS in human but were not predicted ACEs, and AS was never observed for 11 negative control exons in human or mouse tissues. Predicted ACEs were much more likely to preserve the reading frame and less likely to disrupt protein domains than other AS events and were enriched in genes expressed in the brain and in genes involved in transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, and development. Our results also imply that the vast majority of AS events represented in the human EST database are not conserved in mouse. PMID:15708978

  13. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  14. Influence of weather conditions on splicing process and parameters of splicing single-mode telecommunication fibers of different types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratuszek, Marek; Zakrzewski, Zbigniew; Majewski, Jacek; Strozecki, Stefan; Zalewski, Jozef; Konefal, Tadeusz; Kula, Witold

    1999-05-01

    Results of research on the influence of weather conditions (t equals 10 divided by 27 degree(s)C; H equals 30 divided by 90%) on the process of splicing of standard single mode fibers SM (G.652) and fibers with dispersion shifted DS (G.653) have been presented as well as the results of optimization of splicing SM and DS fibers.

  15. Real-time imaging of cotranscriptional splicing reveals a kinetic model that reduces noise: implications for alternative splicing regulation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ute; Robert, Marie-Cécile; Yoshida, Minoru; Villemin, Jean-Philippe; Auboeuf, Didier; Aitken, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Splicing is a key process that expands the coding capacity of genomes. Its kinetics remain poorly characterized, and the distribution of splicing time caused by the stochasticity of single splicing events is expected to affect regulation efficiency. We conducted a small-scale survey on 40 introns in human cells and observed that most were spliced cotranscriptionally. Consequently, we constructed a reporter system that splices cotranscriptionally and can be monitored in live cells and in real time through the use of MS2–GFP. All small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) are loaded on nascent pre-mRNAs, and spliceostatin A inhibits splicing but not snRNP recruitment. Intron removal occurs in minutes and is best described by a model where several successive steps are rate limiting. Each pre-mRNA molecule is predicted to require a similar time to splice, reducing kinetic noise and improving the regulation of alternative splicing. This model is relevant to other kinetically controlled processes acting on few molecules. PMID:21624952

  16. Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in humans with CTLA4 mutations.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Desirée; Bode, Claudia; Kenefeck, Rupert; Hou, Tie Zheng; Wing, James B; Kennedy, Alan; Bulashevska, Alla; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Grüning, Björn A; Unger, Susanne; Frede, Natalie; Baumann, Ulrich; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Dueckers, Gregor; Niehues, Tim; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Kanariou, Maria; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Warnatz, Klaus; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Thimme, Robert; Hasselblatt, Peter; Emmerich, Florian; Cathomen, Toni; Backofen, Rolf; Fisch, Paul; Seidl, Maximilian; May, Annette; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Ikemizu, Shinji; Salzer, Ulrich; Franke, Andre; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Walker, Lucy S K; Sansom, David M; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2014-12-01

    The protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of immune responses, and its loss causes fatal autoimmunity in mice. We studied a large family in which five individuals presented with a complex, autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and multiple autoimmune clinical features. We identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 1 of CTLA4. Screening of 71 unrelated patients with comparable clinical phenotypes identified five additional families (nine individuals) with previously undescribed splice site and missense mutations in CTLA4. Clinical penetrance was incomplete (eight adults of a total of 19 genetically proven CTLA4 mutation carriers were considered unaffected). However, CTLA-4 protein expression was decreased in regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in both patients and carriers with CTLA4 mutations. Whereas Treg cells were generally present at elevated numbers in these individuals, their suppressive function, CTLA-4 ligand binding and transendocytosis of CD80 were impaired. Mutations in CTLA4 were also associated with decreased circulating B cell numbers. Taken together, mutations in CTLA4 resulting in CTLA-4 haploinsufficiency or impaired ligand binding result in disrupted T and B cell homeostasis and a complex immune dysregulation syndrome.

  17. Autosomal dominant genes (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. One of the parents will have the disease (since it is dominant) in this mode of inheritance and that person is called the CARRIER. Only one parent must be a carrier in order for the child to inherit the disease.

  18. Iron dominated magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  19. WT1 interacts with the splicing protein RBM4 and regulates its ability to modulate alternative splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, M. Andrea; Heinrich, Bettina; Raitskin, Oleg; Adams, David J.; Mangs, Helena; Goy, Christine; Ladomery, Michael; Sperling, Ruth; Stamm, Stefan; Morris, Brian J. . E-mail: brianm@medsci.usyd.edu.au

    2006-10-15

    Wilm's tumor protein 1 (WT1), a protein implicated in various cancers and developmental disorders, consists of two major isoforms: WT1(-KTS), a transcription factor, and WT1(+KTS), a post-transcriptional regulator that binds to RNA and can interact with splicing components. Here we show that WT1 interacts with the novel splicing regulator RBM4. Each protein was found to colocalize in nuclear speckles and to cosediment with supraspliceosomes in glycerol gradients. RBM4 conferred dose-dependent and cell-specific regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs transcribed from several reporter genes. We found that overexpressed WT1(+KTS) abrogated this effect of RBM4 on splice-site selection, whereas WT1(-KTS) did not. We conclude that the (+KTS) form of WT1 is able to inhibit the effect of RBM4 on alternative splicing.

  20. PPS, a large multidomain protein, functions with sex-lethal to regulate alternative splicing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew L; Nagengast, Alexis A; Salz, Helen K

    2010-03-05

    Alternative splicing controls the expression of many genes, including the Drosophila sex determination gene Sex-lethal (Sxl). Sxl expression is controlled via a negative regulatory mechanism where inclusion of the translation-terminating male exon is blocked in females. Previous studies have shown that the mechanism leading to exon skipping is autoregulatory and requires the SXL protein to antagonize exon inclusion by interacting with core spliceosomal proteins, including the U1 snRNP protein Sans-fille (SNF). In studies begun by screening for proteins that interact with SNF, we identified PPS, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a novel component of the machinery required for Sxl male exon skipping. PPS encodes a large protein with four signature motifs, PHD, BRK, TFS2M, and SPOC, typically found in proteins involved in transcription. We demonstrate that PPS has a direct role in Sxl male exon skipping by showing first that loss of function mutations have phenotypes indicative of Sxl misregulation and second that the PPS protein forms a complex with SXL and the unspliced Sxl RNA. In addition, we mapped the recruitment of PPS, SXL, and SNF along the Sxl gene using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), which revealed that, like many other splicing factors, these proteins bind their RNA targets while in close proximity to the DNA. Interestingly, while SNF and SXL are specifically recruited to their predicted binding sites, PPS has a distinct pattern of accumulation along the Sxl gene, associating with a region that includes, but is not limited to, the SxlPm promoter. Together, these data indicate that PPS is different from other splicing factors involved in male-exon skipping and suggest, for the first time, a functional link between transcription and SXL-mediated alternative splicing. Loss of zygotic PPS function, however, is lethal to both sexes, indicating that its role may be of broad significance.

  1. The High Level of Aberrant Splicing of ISCU in Slow-Twitch Muscle May Involve the Splicing Factor SRSF3

    PubMed Central

    Österman, Lennart; Lindsten, Hans; Holmberg, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis (HML) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by an intronic one-base mutation in the iron-sulfur cluster assembly (ISCU) gene, resulting in aberrant splicing. The incorrectly spliced transcripts contain a 100 or 86 bp intron sequence encoding a non-functional ISCU protein, which leads to defects in several Fe-S containing proteins in the respiratory chain and the TCA cycle. The symptoms in HML are restricted to skeletal muscle, and it has been proposed that this effect is due to higher levels of incorrectly spliced ISCU in skeletal muscle compared with other energy-demanding tissues. In this study, we confirm that skeletal muscle contains the highest levels of incorrect ISCU splice variants compared with heart, brain, liver and kidney using a transgenic mouse model expressing human HML mutated ISCU. We also show that incorrect splicing occurs to a significantly higher extent in the slow-twitch soleus muscle compared with the gastrocnemius and quadriceps. The splicing factor serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3) was identified as a potential candidate for the slow fiber specific regulation of ISCU splicing since this factor was expressed at higher levels in the soleus compared to the gastrocnemius and quadriceps. We identified an interaction between SRSF3 and the ISCU transcript, and by overexpressing SRSF3 in human myoblasts we observed increased levels of incorrectly spliced ISCU, while knockdown of SRSF3 resulted in decreased levels. We therefore suggest that SRSF3 may participate in the regulation of the incorrect splicing of mutant ISCU and may, at least partially, explain the muscle-specific symptoms of HML. PMID:27783661

  2. Identification of a Bidirectional Splicing Enhancer: Differential Involvement of SR Proteins in 5′ or 3′ Splice Site Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Popielarz, Michel; Hildwein, Georges; Stevenin, James

    1999-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing whose modulation occurs during infection, through the use of three different 5′ splice sites and of one major or one minor 3′ splice site. Although this pre-mRNA has been extensively used as a model to compare the transactivation properties of SR proteins, no cis-acting element has been identified in the transcript sequence. Here we describe the identification and the characterization of a purine-rich splicing enhancer, located just upstream of the 12S 5′ splice site, which is formed from two contiguous 9-nucleotide (nt) purine motifs (Pu1 and Pu2). We demonstrate that this sequence is a bidirectional splicing enhancer (BSE) in vivo and in vitro, because it activates both the downstream 12S 5′ splice site through the Pu1 motif and the upstream 216-nt intervening sequence (IVS) 3′ splice site through both motifs. UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the BSE interacts with several SR proteins specifically, among them 9G8 and ASF/SF2, which bind preferentially to the Pu1 and Pu2 motifs, respectively. Interestingly, we show by in vitro complementation assays that SR proteins have distinct transactivatory properties. In particular, 9G8, but not ASF/SF2 or SC35, is able to strongly activate the recognition of the 12S 5′ splice site in a BSE-dependent manner in wild-type E1A or in a heterologous context, whereas ASF/SF2 or SC35, but not 9G8, activates the upstream 216-nt IVS splicing. Thus, our results identify a novel exonic BSE and the SR proteins which are involved in its differential activity. PMID:10523623

  3. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  4. Aberrant and alternative splicing in skeletal system disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin; Tang, Liling

    2013-10-01

    The main function of skeletal system is to support the body and help movement. A variety of factors can lead to skeletal system disease, including age, exercise, and of course genetic makeup and expression. Pre-mRNA splicing plays a crucial role in gene expression, by creating multiple protein variants with different biological functions. The recent studies show that several skeletal system diseases are related to pre-mRNA splicing. This review focuses on the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease. On the one hand, splice site mutation that leads to aberrant splicing often causes genetic skeletal system disease, like COL1A1, SEDL and LRP5. On the other hand, alternative splicing without genomic mutation may generate some marker protein isoforms, for example, FN, VEGF and CD44. Therefore, understanding the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease will aid in uncovering the mechanism of disease and contribute to the future development of gene therapy.

  5. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413] PMID:27222125

  6. Peptidic tools applied to redirect alternative splicing events.

    PubMed

    Nancy, Martínez-Montiel; Nora, Rosas-Murrieta; Rebeca, Martínez-Contreras

    2015-05-01

    Peptides are versatile and attractive biomolecules that can be applied to modulate genetic mechanisms like alternative splicing. In this process, a single transcript yields different mature RNAs leading to the production of protein isoforms with diverse or even antagonistic functions. During splicing events, errors can be caused either by mutations present in the genome or by defects or imbalances in regulatory protein factors. In any case, defects in alternative splicing have been related to several genetic diseases including muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer's disease and cancer from almost every origin. One of the most effective approaches to redirect alternative splicing events has been to attach cell-penetrating peptides to oligonucleotides that can modulate a single splicing event and restore correct gene expression. Here, we summarize how natural existing and bioengineered peptides have been applied over the last few years to regulate alternative splicing and genetic expression. Under different genetic and cellular backgrounds, peptides have been shown to function as potent vehicles for splice correction, and their therapeutic benefits have reached clinical trials and patenting stages, emphasizing the use of regulatory peptides as an exciting therapeutic tool for the treatment of different genetic diseases.

  7. Alternative splicing regulation of APP exon 7 by RBFox proteins.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shafiul; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    RBFox proteins are well-known alternative splicing regulators. We have shown previously that during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid and cell aggregation, RBFox1 shows markedly increased temporal expression. To find its key splicing regulation, we examined the effect of RBFox1 on 33 previously reported and validated neuronal splicing events of P19 cells. We observed that alternative splicing of three genes, specifically, amyloid precursor protein (APP), disks large homolog 3 (DLG3), and G protein, alpha activating activity polypeptide O (GNAO1), was altered by transient RBFox1 expression in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, an RBFox1 mutant (RBFox1FA) that was unable to bind the target RNA sequence ((U)GCAUG) did not induce these splicing events. APP generates amyloid beta peptides that are involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, and therefore we examined APP alternative splicing regulation by RBFox1 and other splicing regulators. Our results indicated that RBFox proteins promote the skipping of APP exon 7, but not the inclusion of exon 8. We made APP6789 minigenes and observed that two (U)GCAUG sequences, located upstream of exon 7 and in exon 7, functioned to induce skipping of exon 7 by RBFox proteins. Overall, RBFox proteins may shift APP from exon 7 containing isoforms, APP770 and APP751, toward the exon 7 lacking isoform, APP695, which is predominant in neural tissues.

  8. An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vernia, Santiago; Edwards, Yvonne JK; Han, Myoung Sook; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17672.001 PMID:27635635

  9. In silico prediction of splice-affecting nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Houdayer, Claude

    2011-01-01

    It appears that all types of genomic nucleotide variations can be deleterious by affecting normal pre-mRNA splicing via disruption/creation of splice site consensus sequences. As it is neither pertinent nor realistic to perform functional testing for all of these variants, it is important to identify those that could lead to a splice defect in order to restrict experimental transcript analyses to the most appropriate cases. In silico tools designed to provide this type of prediction are available. In this chapter, we present in silico splice tools integrated in the Alamut (Interactive Biosoftware) application and detail their use in routine diagnostic applications. At this time, in silico predictions are useful for variants that decrease the strength of wild-type splice sites or create a cryptic splice site. Importantly, in silico predictions are not sufficient to classify variants as neutral or deleterious: they should be used as part of the decision-making process to detect potential candidates for splicing anomalies, prompting molecular geneticists to carry out transcript analyses in a limited and pertinent number of cases which could be managed in routine settings.

  10. Fusion splice between tapered inhibited coupling hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber and SMF.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ximeng; Debord, Benoît; Vincetti, Luca; Beaudou, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah

    2016-06-27

    We report for the first time on tapering inhibited coupling (IC) hypocycloid-core shape Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers whilst maintaining their delicate core-contour negative curvature with a down-ratio as large as 2.4. The transmission loss of down-tapered sections reaches a figure as low as 0.07 dB at 1550 nm. The tapered IC fibers are also spliced to standard SMF with a total insertion loss of 0.48 dB. These results show that all-fiber photonic microcells with the ultra-low loss hypocycloid core-contour Kagome fibers is now possible.

  11. PSM/SH2B1 splice variants: critical role in src catalytic activation and the resulting STAT3s-mediated mitogenic response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manchao; Deng, Youping; Riedel, Heimo

    2008-05-01

    A role of PSM/SH2B1 had been shown in mitogenesis and extending to phenotypic cell transformation, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remained to be established. Here, four alternative PSM splice variants and individual functional protein domains were compared for their role in the regulation of Src activity. We found that elevated cellular levels of PSM variants resulted in phenotypic cell transformation and potentiated cell proliferation and survival in response to serum withdrawal. PSM variant activity presented a consistent signature pattern for any tested response of highest activity observed for gamma, followed by delta, alpha, and beta with decreasing activity. PSM-potentiated cell proliferation was sensitive to Src inhibitor herbimycin and PSM and Src were found in the same immune complex. PSM variants were substrates of the Src Tyr kinase and potentiated Src catalytic activity by increasing the V(max) and decreasing the K(m) for ATP with the signature pattern of variant activity. Dominant-negative PSM peptide mimetics including the SH2 or PH domains inhibited Src catalytic activity as well as Src-mediated phenotypic cell transformation. Activation of major Src substrate STAT3 was similarly potentiated by the PSM variants in a Src-dependent fashion or inhibited by PSM domain-specific peptide mimetics. Expression of a dominant-negative STAT3 mutant blocked PSM variant-mediated phenotypic cell transformation. Our results implicate an essential role of the PSM variants in the activation of the Src kinase and the resulting mitogenic response--extending to phenotypic cell transformation and involving the established Src substrate STAT3.

  12. [Dominant Thalamus and Aphasia].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Akiko; Shimomura, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that lesions of the dominant thalamus precipitate language disorders in a similar manner to transcortical aphasias, in a phenomenon known as "thalamic aphasia." In some cases, however, aphasia may not occur or may appear transiently following thalamic lesions. Furthermore, dominant thalamic lesions can produce changes in character, as observed in patients with amnesic disorder. Previous work has explored the utility of thalamic aphasia as a discriminative feature for classification of aphasia. Although the thalamus may be involved in the function of the brainstem reticular activating system and play a role in attentional network and in memory of Papez circuit or Yakovlev circuit, the mechanism by which thalamic lesion leads to the emergence of aphasic disorders is unclear. In this review, we we survey historical and recent literature on thalamic aphasia in an attempt to understand the neural processes affected by thalamic lesions.

  13. Splicing life, with scalpel and scythe.

    PubMed

    Boone, C K

    1983-04-01

    Two recent reports on the social and moral implications of recombinant DNA research and "genetic engineering" are compared: Splicing Life: A Report on the Social and Ethical Issues of Genetic Engineering with Human Beings, by the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Issues in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research, and a shorter Study Paper of Bioethical Concerns, by the Panel on Bioethical Concerns of the National Council of Churches of Christ (NCC). The President's Commission report is seen as more sophisticated, better organized, carefully reasoned, and clearly focused on imminent clinical uses of genetic research. The NCC report is described as more diffuse, concerned with remote and dramatic applications, and heavily exhortatory.

  14. Validation and Interrogation of Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in African-American Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    RNA and annotated. In addition, we have developed SSOs to manipulate PIK3CD alternative splicing, to correct aberrant splicing leading to production...molecular mechanisms, differential gene expression, alternative RNA splicing, epigenetic alterations, clinical tumor aggressiveness 16. SECURITY...words): Prostate cancer, health disparities among racial groups, molecular mechanisms, differential gene expression, alternative RNA splicing

  15. Influence of ageing and essential amino acids on quantitative patterns of troponin T alternative splicing in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Arthur; Drummond, Micah J.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Kimball, Scot R.

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss of skeletal muscle performance, a condition referred to as sarcopenia. In part, the age-related reduction in performance is due to a selective loss in muscle fiber mass, but mass-independent effects have also been demonstrated. An important mass-independent determinant of muscle performance is the pattern of expression of isoforms of proteins that participate in muscle contraction, e.g. the troponins. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that ageing impairs alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding fast troponin T (Tnnt3) in human vastus lateralis muscle. Furthermore, we hypothesized that resistance exercise alone or in combination with consumption of essential amino acids will attenuate age-associated effects on Tnnt3 alternative splicing. Our results indicate that ageing negatively affects the pattern of Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing in a manner that correlates quantitatively with age-associated reductions in muscle performance. Interestingly, whereas vastus lateralis Tnnt3 alternative splicing was unaffected by a bout of resistance exercise 24 hour prior to muscle biopsy, ingestion of a mixture of essential amino acids after resistance exercise resulted in a significant shift in the pattern of Tnnt3 spliceform expression in both age groups to one predicted to promote greater muscle performance. We conclude that essential amino acid supplementation after resistance exercise may provide a means to reduce impairments in skeletal muscle quality during ageing in humans. PMID:26201856

  16. SQSTM1 splice site mutation in distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Bucelli, Robert C.; Arhzaouy, Khalid; Pestronk, Alan; Pittman, Sara K.; Rojas, Luisa; Sue, Carolyn M.; Evilä, Anni; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne; Harms, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic etiology and characterize the clinicopathologic features of a novel distal myopathy. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing on a family with an autosomal dominant distal myopathy and targeted exome sequencing in 1 patient with sporadic distal myopathy, both with rimmed vacuolar pathology. We also evaluated the pathogenicity of identified mutations using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and expression studies. Results: Sequencing identified a likely pathogenic c.1165+1 G>A splice donor variant in SQSTM1 in the affected members of 1 family and in an unrelated patient with sporadic distal myopathy. Affected patients had late-onset distal lower extremity weakness, myopathic features on EMG, and muscle pathology demonstrating rimmed vacuoles with both TAR DNA-binding protein 43 and SQSTM1 inclusions. The c.1165+1 G>A SQSTM1 variant results in the expression of 2 alternatively spliced SQSTM1 proteins: 1 lacking the C-terminal PEST2 domain and another lacking the C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, both of which have distinct patterns of cellular and skeletal muscle localization. Conclusions: SQSTM1 is an autophagic adaptor that shuttles aggregated and ubiquitinated proteins to the autophagosome for degradation via its C-terminal UBA domain. Similar to mutations in VCP, dominantly inherited mutations in SQSTM1 are now associated with rimmed vacuolar myopathy, Paget disease of bone, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and frontotemporal dementia. Our data further suggest a pathogenic connection between the disparate phenotypes. PMID:26208961

  17. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  18. The Resistance and Strength of Soft Solder Splices between Conductors in MICE Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Pan, Heng; Green, Michael A; Dietderich, Dan; Gartner, T. E.; Higley, Hugh C; Mentink, M.; Xu, FengYu; Trillaud, F.; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Zheng, S. X.; Tam, D.G.

    2010-08-03

    Two of the three types of MICE magnets will have splices within their coils. The MICE coupling coils may have as many as fifteen one-meter long splices within them. Each of the MICE focusing coils may have a couple of 0.25-meter long conductor splices. Equations for the calculation of resistance of soldered lap splices of various types are presented. This paper presents resistance measurements of soldered lap splices of various lengths. Measured splice resistance is shown for one-meter long splices as a function of the fabrication method. Another important consideration is the strength of the splices. The measured breaking stress of splices of various lengths is presented in this paper. Tin-lead solders and tin-silver solders were used for the splices that were tested. From the data given in this report, the authors recommend that the use of lead free solders be avoided for low temperature coils.

  19. Splicing changes in SMA mouse motoneurons and SMN-depleted neuroblastoma cells: Evidence for involvement of splicing regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Qing; Kayikci, Melis; Odermatt, Philipp; Meyer, Kathrin; Michels, Olivia; Saxena, Smita; Ule, Jernej; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletions or mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The second gene copy, SMN2, produces some, but not enough, functional SMN protein. SMN is essential to assemble small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that form the spliceosome. However, it is not clear whether SMA is caused by defects in this function that could lead to splicing changes in all tissues, or by the impairment of an additional, less well characterized, but motoneuron-specific SMN function. We addressed the first possibility by exon junction microarray analysis of motoneurons (MNs) isolated by laser capture microdissection from a severe SMA mouse model. This revealed changes in multiple U2-dependent splicing events. Moreover, splicing appeared to be more strongly affected in MNs than in other cells. By testing mutiple genes in a model of progressive SMN depletion in NB2a neuroblastoma cells, we obtained evidence that U2-dependent splicing changes occur earlier than U12-dependent ones. As several of these changes affect genes coding for splicing regulators, this may acerbate the splicing response induced by low SMN levels and induce secondary waves of splicing alterations. PMID:25692239

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide Alters Splicing of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Selectively Modulates Expression of Splicing Regulators in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Gilbert J.; Zhu, Wen; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid; Sharina, Iraida G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) plays a central role in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signal transduction in the cardiovascular, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Alternative RNA splicing has emerged as a potential mechanism to modulate sGC expression and activity. C-α1 sGC is an alternative splice form that is resistant to oxidation-induced protein degradation and demonstrates preferential subcellular distribution to the oxidized environment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that splicing of C-α1 sGC can be modulated by H2O2 treatment in BE2 neuroblastoma and MDA-MD-468 adenocarcinoma human cells. In addition, we show that the H2O2 treatment of MDA-MD-468 cells selectively decreases protein levels of PTBP1 and hnRNP A2/B1 splice factors identified as potential α1 gene splicing regulators by in silico analysis. We further demonstrate that down-regulation of PTBP1 by H2O2 occurs at the protein level with variable regulation observed in different breast cancer cells. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that H2O2 regulates RNA splicing to induce expression of the oxidation-resistant C-α1 sGC subunit. We also report that H2O2 treatment selectively alters the expression of key splicing regulators. This process might play an important role in regulation of cellular adaptation to conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:22911749

  1. TIA-1 and TIAR activate splicing of alternative exons with weak 5' splice sites followed by a U-rich stretch on their own pre-mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Le Guiner, C; Lejeune, F; Galiana, D; Kister, L; Breathnach, R; Stévenin, J; Del Gatto-Konczak, F

    2001-11-02

    TIA-1 has recently been shown to activate splicing of specific pre-mRNAs transcribed from transiently transfected minigenes, and of some 5' splice sites in vitro, but has not been shown to activate splicing of any endogenous pre-mRNA. We show here that overexpression of TIA-1 or the related protein TIAR has little effect on splicing of several endogenous pre-mRNAs containing alternative exons, but markedly activates splicing of some normally rarely used alternative exons on the TIA-1 and TIAR pre-mRNAs. These exons have weak 5' splice sites followed by U-rich stretches. When the U-rich stretch following the 5' splice site of a TIA-1 alternative exon was deleted, TIAR overexpression induced use of a cryptic 5' splice site also followed by a U-rich stretch in place of the original splice site. Using in vitro splicing assays, we have shown that TIA-1 is directly involved in activating the 5' splice sites of the TIAR alternative exons. Activation requires a downstream U-rich stretch of at least 10 residues. Our results confirm that TIA-1 activates 5' splice sites followed by U-rich sequences and show that TIAR exerts a similar activity. They suggest that both proteins may autoregulate their expression at the level of splicing.

  2. Defective control of pre–messenger RNA splicing in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-01

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre–messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies. PMID:26728853

  3. Defective control of pre-messenger RNA splicing in human disease.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Benoit; Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-04

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre-messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies.

  4. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney].

    PubMed

    Jorge Adad, S; Estevão Barbosa, M; Fácio Luíz, J M; Furlan Rodrigues, M C; Iwamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    A 48-year-old male had autosomic dominant polycystic kidneys with dimensions, to the best of our knowledge, never previously reported; the right kidney weighed 15,100 g and measured 53 x 33 x 9cm and the left one 10.200 g and 46 x 21 x 7cm, with cysts measuring up to 14cm in diameter. Nephrectomy was done to control persistent hematuria and to relief disconfort caused by the large kidneys. The renal function is stable four years after transplantation.

  5. Negative Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariso, José María

    2017-01-01

    The definitions of "negative knowledge" and the studies in this regard published to date have not considered the categorial distinction Wittgenstein established between knowledge and certainty. Hence, the important role that certainty, despite its omission, should have in these definitions and studies has not yet been shown. In this…

  6. Negative Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Mary J.

    1974-01-01

    Examination of models for representing integers demonstrates that formal operational thought is required for establishing the operations on integers. Advocated is the use of many models for introducing negative numbers but, apart from addition, it is recommended that operations on integers be delayed until the formal operations stage. (JP)

  7. Genome-wide identification, splicing, and expression analysis of the myosin gene family in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Wang, Guifeng; Zhong, Mingyu; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Jushan; Tang, Yuanping; Wang, Gang; Song, Rentao

    2014-03-01

    The actin-based myosin system is essential for the organization and dynamics of the endomembrane system and transport network in plant cells. Plants harbour two unique myosin groups, class VIII and class XI, and the latter is structurally and functionally analogous to the animal and fungal class V myosin. Little is known about myosins in grass, even though grass includes several agronomically important cereal crops. Here, we identified 14 myosin genes from the genome of maize (Zea mays). The relatively larger sizes of maize myosin genes are due to their much longer introns, which are abundant in transposable elements. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that maize myosin genes could be classified into class VIII and class XI, with three and 11 members, respectively. Apart from subgroup XI-F, the remaining subgroups were duplicated at least in one analysed lineage, and the duplication events occurred more extensively in Arabidopsis than in maize. Only two pairs of maize myosins were generated from segmental duplication. Expression analysis revealed that most maize myosin genes were expressed universally, whereas a few members (XI-1, -6, and -11) showed an anther-specific pattern, and many underwent extensive alternative splicing. We also found a short transcript at the O1 locus, which conceptually encoded a headless myosin that most likely functions at the transcriptional level rather than via a dominant-negative mechanism at the translational level. Together, these data provide significant insights into the evolutionary and functional characterization of maize myosin genes that could transfer to the identification and application of homologous myosins of other grasses.

  8. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks.

  9. 30 CFR 75.603 - Temporary splice of trailing cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 25 feet of the machine, except cable reel equipment. Temporary splices in trailing cables shall be... used. As used in this section, the term “splice” means the mechanical joining of one or more...

  10. 30 CFR 75.603 - Temporary splice of trailing cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 25 feet of the machine, except cable reel equipment. Temporary splices in trailing cables shall be... used. As used in this section, the term “splice” means the mechanical joining of one or more...

  11. Cutaway Isometric, Upper Chord (Compression Joint), Lower Chord (Tension Splice) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cutaway Isometric, Upper Chord (Compression Joint), Lower Chord (Tension Splice) - McConnell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Slippery Rock Creek at McConnell's Mill Road (Township Route 415), Ellwood City, Lawrence County, PA

  12. A long noncoding way to alternative splicing in plant development.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-07-28

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Bardou et al. (2014) elucidate how long, highly structured noncoding RNAs control alternative splicing regulators that specifically mediate the action of the hormone auxin in the promotion of lateral root growth in Arabidopsis.

  13. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  14. 3. Detail of beam splice and column capital on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Detail of beam splice and column capital on the second floor of the Cloth Room Building/Old Bleach House, Monadnock Mills. Beam and column edges are chamfered. - Monadnock Mills, 15 Water Street, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  15. Biochemistry and regulation of pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Adams, M D; Rudner, D Z; Rio, D C

    1996-06-01

    During the past year, significant advances have been made in the field of pre-mRNA splicing. It is now clear that members of the serine-arginine-rich protein family are key players in exon definition and function at multiple steps in the spliceosome cycle. Novel findings have been made concerning the role of exon sequences, which function as both constitutive and regulated enhancers of splicing, in trans-splicing and as targets for tissue-specific control of splicing patterns. By combining biochemical approaches in human and yeast extracts with genetic analysis, much has been learned about the RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions that are necessary to assemble the various complexes that are found along the pathway to the catalytically active spliceosome.

  16. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  17. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held...

  18. The peculiarities of large intron splicing in animals.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Samuel; McCreary, Mark; Fedorov, Alexei

    2009-11-16

    In mammals a considerable 92% of genes contain introns, with hundreds and hundreds of these introns reaching the incredible size of over 50,000 nucleotides. These "large introns" must be spliced out of the pre-mRNA in a timely fashion, which involves bringing together distant 5' and 3' acceptor and donor splice sites. In invertebrates, especially Drosophila, it has been shown that larger introns can be spliced efficiently through a process known as recursive splicing-a consecutive splicing from the 5'-end at a series of combined donor-acceptor splice sites called RP-sites. Using a computational analysis of the genomic sequences, we show that vertebrates lack the proper enrichment of RP-sites in their large introns, and, therefore, require some other method to aid splicing. We analyzed over 15,000 non-redundant, large introns from six mammals, 1,600 from chicken and zebrafish, and 560 non-redundant large introns from five invertebrates. Our bioinformatic investigation demonstrates that, unlike the studied invertebrates, the studied vertebrate genomes contain consistently abundant amounts of direct and complementary strand interspersed repetitive elements (mainly SINEs and LINEs) that may form stems with each other in large introns. This examination showed that predicted stems are indeed abundant and stable in the large introns of mammals. We hypothesize that such stems with long loops within large introns allow intron splice sites to find each other more quickly by folding the intronic RNA upon itself at smaller intervals and, thus, reducing the distance between donor and acceptor sites.

  19. Alternative splicing acting as a bridge in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Aerts, Andrea L.; Kong, Xiangyang; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) regulates diverse cellular and developmental functions through alternative protein structures of different isoforms. Alternative exons dominate AS in vertebrates; however, very little is known about the extent and function of AS in lower eukaryotes. To understand the role of introns in gene evolution, we examined AS from a green algal and five fungal genomes using a novel EST-based gene-modeling algorithm (COMBEST). Methods AS from each genome was classified with COMBEST that maps EST sequences to genomes to build gene models. Various aspects of AS were analyzed through statistical methods. The interplay of intron 3n length, phase, coding property, and intron retention (RI) were examined with Chi-square testing. Results With 3 to 834 times EST coverage, we identified up to 73% of AS in intron-containing genes and found preponderance of RI among 11 types of AS. The number of exons, expression level, and maximum intron length correlated with number of AS per gene (NAG), and intron-rich genes suppressed AS. Genes with AS were more ancient, and AS was conserved among fungal genomes. Among stopless introns, non-retained introns (NRI) avoided, but major RI preferred 3n length. In contrast, stop-containing introns showed uniform distribution among 3n, 3n+1, and 3n+2 lengths. We found a clue to the intron phase enigma: it was the coding function of introns involved in AS that dictates the intron phase bias. Conclusions Majority of AS is non-functional, and the extent of AS is suppressed for intron-rich genes. RI through 3n length, stop codon, and phase bias bridges the transition from functionless to functional alternative isoforms. PMID:27358887

  20. Modulators of alternative splicing as novel therapeutics in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Sebastian

    2015-10-10

    Alternative splicing (AS), the process of removing introns from pre-mRNA and re-arrangement of exons to give several types of mature transcripts, has been described more than 40 years ago. However, until recently, it has not been clear how extensive it is. Genome-wide studies have now conclusively shown that more than 90% of genes are alternatively spliced in humans. This makes AS one of the main drivers of proteomic diversity and, consequently, determinant of cellular function repertoire. Unsurprisingly, given its extent, numerous splice isoforms have been described to be associated with several diseases including cancer. Many of them have antagonistic functions, e.g., pro- and anti-angiogenic or pro- and anti-apoptotic. Additionally several splice factors have been recently described to have oncogene or tumour suppressors activities, like SF3B1 which is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndromes. Beside the implications for cancer pathogenesis, de-regulated AS is recognized as one of the novel areas of cell biology where therapeutic manipulations may be designed. This editorial discusses the possibilities of manipulation of AS for therapeutic benefit in cancer. Approaches involving the use of oligonucleotides as well as small molecule splicing modulators are presented as well as thoughts on how specificity might be accomplished in splicing therapeutics.

  1. Alternative Splicing of Type II Procollagen: IIB or not IIB?

    PubMed Central

    McAlinden, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Over two decades ago, two isoforms of the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) were discovered. These isoforms, named IIA and IIB, are generated in a developmentally-regulated manner by alternative splicing of exon 2. Chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA isoforms (containing exon 2) while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB transcripts (devoid of exon 2). Importantly, this IIA-to-IIB alternative splicing switch occurs only during chondrogenesis. More recently, two other isoforms have been reported (IIC and IID) that also involve splicing of exon 2; these findings highlight the complexities involving regulation of COL2A1 expression. The biological significance of why different isoforms of COL2A1 exist within the context of skeletal development and maintenance is still not completely understood. This review will provide current knowledge on COL2A1 isoform expression during chondrocyte differentiation and what is known about some of the mechanisms that control exon 2 alternative splicing. Utilization of mouse models to address the biological significance of Col2a1 alternative splicing in vivo will also be discussed. From the knowledge acquired to date, some new questions and concepts are now being proposed on the importance of Col2a1 alternative splicing in regulating extracellular matrix assembly and how this may subsequently affect cartilage and endochondral bone quality and function. PMID:24669942

  2. Reflections on protein splicing: structures, functions and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Anraku, Yasuhiro; Satow, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    Twenty years ago, evidence that one gene produces two enzymes via protein splicing emerged from structural and expression studies of the VMA1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. VMA1 consists of a single open reading frame and contains two independent genetic information for Vma1p (a catalytic 70-kDa subunit of the vacuolar H+-ATPase) and VDE (a 50-kDa DNA endonuclease) as an in-frame spliced insert in the gene. Protein splicing is a posttranslational cellular process, in which an intervening polypeptide termed as the VMA1 intein is self-catalytically excised out from a nascent 120-kDa VMA1 precursor and two flanking polypeptides of the N- and C-exteins are ligated to produce the mature Vma1p. Subsequent studies have demonstrated that protein splicing is not unique to the VMA1 precursor and there are many operons in nature, which implement genetic information editing at protein level. To elucidate its structure-directed chemical mechanisms, a series of biochemical and crystal structural studies has been carried out with the use of various VMA1 recombinants. This article summarizes a VDE-mediated self-catalytic mechanism for protein splicing that is triggered and terminated solely via thiazolidine intermediates with tetrahedral configurations formed within the splicing sites where proton ingress and egress are driven by balanced protonation and deprotonation. PMID:19907126

  3. Functional studies on the ATM intronic splicing processing element.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Marzena A; Stuani, Cristiana; Parvizpur, Alireza; Baralle, Francisco E; Pagani, Franco

    2005-01-01

    In disease-associated genes, the understanding of the functional significance of deep intronic nucleotide variants may represent a difficult challenge. We have previously reported a new disease-causing mechanism that involves an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) in ATM, composed of adjacent consensus 5' and 3' splice sites. A GTAA deletion within ISPE maintains potential adjacent splice sites, disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates an aberrant exon. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of U1 snRNA through complementarity within a approximately 40 nt window downstream of the ISPE prevents aberrant splicing. By selective mutagenesis at the adjacent consensus ISPE splice sites, we show that this effect is not due to a resplicing process occurring at the ISPE. Functional comparison of the ATM mouse counterpart and evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediates derived from affected cell lines and hybrid minigene assays indicate that U1 snRNP binding at the ISPE interferes with the cryptic acceptor site. Activation of this site results in a stringent 5'-3' order of intron sequence removal around the cryptic exon. Artificial U1 snRNA loading by complementarity to heterologous exonic sequences represents a potential therapeutic method to prevent the usage of an aberrant CFTR cryptic exon. Our results suggest that ISPE-like intronic elements binding U1 snRNPs may regulate correct intron processing.

  4. Different roles played by periostin splice variants in retinal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Takahito; Yoshida, Shigeo; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Katsuragi, Naruto; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Morishita, Ryuichi; Taniyama, Yoshiaki

    2016-12-01

    Retinal neovascularization (NV) due to retinal ischemia is one of the major causes of vision reduction in patients with different types of retinal diseases although anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy can partially reduce the size of the retinal NV. We recently reported that periostin plays an important role in the development of NV and the formation of preretinal fibrovascular membranes, but the role of the splice variants of periostin on retinal NV has not been determined. We examined the expressions of periostin splice variants in the ischemic retinas of a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinal NV. We also studied the function of periostin splice variants on retinal NV using periostin knock out mice, and the effects of anti-periostin antibodies on retinal NV. Our results showed that the expressions of the periostin splice variants were increased in ischemic retinas. The degree of increase of periostin lacking exon 17 was the highest among the periostin splice variants examined. Both genetic ablation of periostin exons 17 and 21 and antibodies for periostin exons 17 and 21 affected preretinal pathological NV. Inhibition of exon 17 of periostin had the greatest effect in reducing preretinal pathological NV. These findings suggest a causal link between periostin splice variants and retinal NV, and an intravitreal injection of antibody for exon 17 and exon 21 of periostin should be considered to inhibit preretinal pathological NV.

  5. Functional studies on the ATM intronic splicing processing element

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Stuani, Cristiana; Parvizpur, Alireza; Baralle, Francisco E.; Pagani, Franco

    2005-01-01

    In disease-associated genes, the understanding of the functional significance of deep intronic nucleotide variants may represent a difficult challenge. We have previously reported a new disease-causing mechanism that involves an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) in ATM, composed of adjacent consensus 5′ and 3′ splice sites. A GTAA deletion within ISPE maintains potential adjacent splice sites, disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates an aberrant exon. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of U1 snRNA through complementarity within a ∼40 nt window downstream of the ISPE prevents aberrant splicing. By selective mutagenesis at the adjacent consensus ISPE splice sites, we show that this effect is not due to a resplicing process occurring at the ISPE. Functional comparison of the ATM mouse counterpart and evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediates derived from affected cell lines and hybrid minigene assays indicate that U1 snRNP binding at the ISPE interferes with the cryptic acceptor site. Activation of this site results in a stringent 5′–3′ order of intron sequence removal around the cryptic exon. Artificial U1 snRNA loading by complementarity to heterologous exonic sequences represents a potential therapeutic method to prevent the usage of an aberrant CFTR cryptic exon. Our results suggest that ISPE-like intronic elements binding U1 snRNPs may regulate correct intron processing. PMID:16030351

  6. Regulation of chemoresistance via alternative messenger RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Eblen, Scott T

    2012-04-15

    The acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy is a significant problem in the treatment of cancer, greatly increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Tumors are often sensitive to chemotherapy upon initial treatment, but repeated treatments can select for those cells that were able to survive initial therapy and have acquired cellular mechanisms to enhance their resistance to subsequent chemotherapy treatment. Many cellular mechanisms of drug resistance have been identified, most of which result from changes in gene and protein expression. While changes at the transcriptional level have been duly noted, it is primarily the post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA into mature mRNA that regulates the composition of the proteome and it is the proteome that actually regulates the cell's response to chemotherapeutic insult, inducing cell survival or death. During pre-mRNA processing, intronic non-protein-coding sequences are removed and protein-coding exons are spliced to form a continuous template for protein translation. Alternative splicing involves the differential inclusion or exclusion of exonic sequences into the mature transcript, generating different mRNA templates for protein production. This regulatory mechanism enables the potential to produce many different protein isoforms from the same gene. In this review I will explain the mechanism of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and look at some specific examples of how splicing factors, splicing factor kinases and alternative splicing of specific pre-mRNAs from genes have been shown to contribute to acquisition of the drug resistant phenotype.

  7. Counterspace Operations for Information Dominance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    INTERNET DOCUMENT INFORMATION FORM A. Report Title: Counterspace perations for Information Dominance B. DATE Report Downloaded From the Internet 3/10...Representative for resolution. Counterspace perations for Information Dominance by James G. Lee INTRODUCTION The Problem The launch of the Soviet...information gap between friendly and enemy forces. This positive information gap has been referred to as information dominance . Information Dominance The

  8. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  9. Dominant modal decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombovari, Zoltan

    2017-03-01

    The paper deals with the automatic decomposition of experimental frequency response functions (FRF's) of mechanical structures. The decomposition of FRF's is based on the Green function representation of free vibratory systems. After the determination of the impulse dynamic subspace, the system matrix is formulated and the poles are calculated directly. By means of the corresponding eigenvectors, the contribution of each element of the impulse dynamic subspace is determined and the sufficient decomposition of the corresponding FRF is carried out. With the presented dominant modal decomposition (DMD) method, the mode shapes, the modal participation vectors and the modal scaling factors are identified using the decomposed FRF's. Analytical example is presented along with experimental case studies taken from machine tool industry.

  10. Coupled transcription-splicing regulation of mutually exclusive splicing events at the 5′ exons of protein 4.1R gene

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Aeri; Norton, Stephanie; Liu, Eva S.; Park, Jennie; Zhou, Anyu; Munagala, Indira D.; Ou, Alexander C.; Yang, Guang; Wickrema, Amittha; Tang, Tang K.; Benz, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    The tightly regulated production of distinct erythrocyte protein 4.1R isoforms involves differential splicing of 3 mutually exclusive first exons (1A, 1B, 1C) to the alternative 3′ splice sites (ss) of exon 2′/2. Here, we demonstrate that exon 1 and 2′/2 splicing diversity is regulated by a transcription-coupled splicing mechanism. We also implicate distinctive regulatory elements that promote the splicing of exon 1A to the distal 3′ ss and exon 1B to the proximal 3′ ss in murine erythroleukemia cells. A hybrid minigene driven by cytomegalovirus promoter mimicked 1B-promoter–driven splicing patterns but differed from 1A-promoter–driven splicing patterns, suggesting that promoter identity affects exon 2′/2 splicing. Furthermore, splicing factor SF2/ASF ultraviolet (UV) cross-linked to the exon 2′/2 junction CAGAGAA, a sequence that overlaps the distal U2AF35-binding 3′ ss. Consequently, depletion of SF2/ASF allowed exon 1B to splice to the distal 3′ ss but had no effect on exon 1A splicing. These findings identify for the first time that an SF2/ASF binding site also can serve as a 3′ ss in a transcript-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that 4.1R gene expression involves transcriptional regulation coupled with a complex splicing regulatory network. PMID:19729518

  11. Characterization of U4 and U6 interactions with the 5' splice site using a S. cerevisiae in vitro trans-splicing system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T L; Abelson, J

    2001-08-01

    Spliceosome assembly has been characterized as the ordered association of the snRNP particles U1, U2, and U4/U6.U5 onto pre-mRNA. We have used an in vitro trans-splicing/cross-linking system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear extracts to examine the first step of this process, 5' splice site recognition. This trans-splicing reaction has ATP, Mg(2+), and splice-site sequence requirements similar to those of cis-splicing reactions. Using this system, we identified and characterized a novel U4-5' splice site interaction that is ATP-dependent, but does not require the branch point, the 3' splice site, or the 5' end of the U1 snRNA. Additionally, we identified several ATP-dependent U6 cross-links at the 5' splice site, indicating that different regions of U6 sample it before a U6-5' splice site interaction is stabilized that persists through the first step of splicing. This work provides evidence for ATP-dependent U4/U6 association with the 5' splice site independent of ATP-mediated U2 association with the branch point. Furthermore, it defines specific nucleotides in U4 and U6 that interact with the 5' splice site at this early stage, even in the absence of base-pairing with the U1 snRNA.

  12. Identification of a splicing enhancer in MLH1 using COMPARE, a new assay for determination of relative RNA splicing efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Qing; Mattox, William

    2006-01-15

    Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) are sequences that facilitate recognition of splice sites and prevent exon-skipping. Because ESEs are often embedded within protein-coding sequences, alterations in them can also often be interpreted as nonsense, missense or silent mutations. To correctly interpret exonic mutations and their roles in diseases, it is important to develop strategies that identify ESE mutations. Potential ESEs can be found computationally in many exons but it has proven difficult to predict whether a given mutation will have effects on splicing based on sequence alone. Here, we describe a flexible in vitro method that can be used to functionally compare the effects of multiple sequence variants on ESE activity in a single in vitro splicing reaction. We have applied this method in parallel with conventional splicing assays to test for a splicing enhancer in exon 17 of the human MLH1 gene. Point mutations associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have previously been found to correlate with exon-skipping in both lymphocytes and tumors from patients. We show that sequences from this exon can replace an ESE from the mouse IgM gene to support RNA splicing in HeLa nuclear extracts. ESE activity was reduced by HNPCC point mutations in codon 659, indicating that their primary effect is on splicing. Surprisingly, the strongest enhancer function mapped to a different region of the exon upstream of this codon. Together, our results indicate that HNPCC point mutations in codon 659 affect an auxillary element that augments the enhancer function to ensure exon inclusion.

  13. The Involvement of Splicing Factor hnRNP A1 in UVB-Induced Alternative Splicing of hdm2.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianguo; Li, Li; Tong, Lingying; Tang, Liling; Wu, Shiyong

    2016-01-12

    Human homolog double minute 2 (hdm2), an oncoprotein, which binds to tumor suppressor p53 to facilitate its degradation, has been known to contribute to tumorigenesis. Its splicing variants are reported to be highly expressed in many cancers and can be induced by ultraviolet B light (UVB). However, the mechanisms of how UVB radiation induces hdm2 alternative splicing still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the roles of two common splicing factors, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) A1 and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1), in regulating UVB-induced hdm2 splicing. Our study indicated that while the expression of both hnRNP A1 and SRSF1 are induced, only hnRNP A1 is involved in hdm2 alternative splicing upon UVB irradiation. Overexpression of hnRNP A1 resulted in decrease of full-length hdm2 (hdm2-FL) and increase of hdm2B, one of hdm2 alternate-splicing forms; while down-regulated hnRNP A1 expression led to the decrease of the hdm2-FL and hdm2B in HaCaT cells. Protein-mRNA binding assay confirmed that UVB irradiation could increase the binding of hnRNP A1 to hdm2 pre-mRNA. In conclusion, we elucidated that UVB induces alternative splicing of hdm2 via increasing the expression and the binding of hnRNP A1 to hdm2 full-length mRNA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  15. Biochemical identification of new proteins involved in splicing repression at the Drosophila P-element exonic splicing silencer

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Lucas; Yasuhara, Jiro C.; Kohlstaedt, Lori A.; Rio, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Splicing of the Drosophila P-element third intron (IVS3) is repressed in somatic tissues due to the function of an exonic splicing silencer (ESS) complex present on the 5′ exon RNA. To comprehensively characterize the mechanisms of this alternative splicing regulation, we used biochemical fractionation and affinity purification to isolate the silencer complex assembled in vitro and identify the constituent proteins by mass spectrometry. Functional assays using splicing reporter minigenes identified the proteins hrp36 and hrp38 and the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein PABPC1 as novel functional components of the splicing silencer. hrp48, PSI, and PABPC1 have high-affinity RNA-binding sites on the P-element IVS3 5′ exon, whereas hrp36 and hrp38 proteins bind with low affinity to the P-element silencer RNA. RNA pull-down and immobilized protein assays showed that hrp48 protein binding to the silencer RNA can recruit hrp36 and hrp38. These studies identified additional components that function at the P-element ESS and indicated that proteins with low-affinity RNA-binding sites can be recruited in a functional manner through interactions with a protein bound to RNA at a high-affinity binding site. These studies have implications for the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) in the control of alternative splicing at cis-acting regulatory sites. PMID:26545814

  16. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  17. The alternative splicing program of differentiated smooth muscle cells involves concerted non-productive splicing of post-transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Llorian, Miriam; Gooding, Clare; Bellora, Nicolas; Hallegger, Martina; Buckroyd, Adrian; Wang, Xiao; Rajgor, Dipen; Kayikci, Melis; Feltham, Jack; Ule, Jernej; Eyras, Eduardo; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a key component of gene expression programs that drive cellular differentiation. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are important in the function of a number of physiological systems; however, investigation of SMC AS has been restricted to a handful of events. We profiled transcriptome changes in mouse de-differentiating SMCs and observed changes in hundreds of AS events. Exons included in differentiated cells were characterized by particularly weak splice sites and by upstream binding sites for Polypyrimidine Tract Binding protein (PTBP1). Consistent with this, knockdown experiments showed that that PTBP1 represses many smooth muscle specific exons. We also observed coordinated splicing changes predicted to downregulate the expression of core components of U1 and U2 snRNPs, splicing regulators and other post-transcriptional factors in differentiated cells. The levels of cognate proteins were lower or similar in differentiated compared to undifferentiated cells. However, levels of snRNAs did not follow the expression of splicing proteins, and in the case of U1 snRNP we saw reciprocal changes in the levels of U1 snRNA and U1 snRNP proteins. Our results suggest that the AS program in differentiated SMCs is orchestrated by the combined influence of auxiliary RNA binding proteins, such as PTBP1, along with altered activity and stoichiometry of the core splicing machinery. PMID:27317697

  18. Cytoplasmic Drosha activity generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lisheng; Chen, Kevin; Youngren, Brenda; Kulina, Julia; Yang, Acong; Guo, Zhengyu; Li, Jin; Yu, Peng; Gu, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    RNase III enzyme Drosha interacts with DGCR8 to form the Microprocessor, initiating canonical microRNA (miRNA) maturation in the nucleus. Here, we re-evaluated where Drosha functions in cells using Drosha and/or DGCR8 knock out (KO) cells and cleavage reporters. Interestingly, a truncated Drosha mutant located exclusively in the cytoplasm cleaved pri-miRNA effectively in a DGCR8-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that in vitro generated pri-miRNAs when transfected into cells could be processed to mature miRNAs in the cytoplasm. These results indicate the existence of cytoplasmic Drosha (c-Drosha) activity. Although a subset of endogenous pri-miRNAs become enriched in the cytoplasm of Drosha KO cells, it remains unclear whether pri-miRNA processing is the main function of c-Drosha. We identified two novel in-frame Drosha isoforms generated by alternative splicing in both HEK293T and HeLa cells. One isoform loses the putative nuclear localization signal, generating c-Drosha. Further analysis indicated that the c-Drosha isoform is abundant in multiple cell lines, dramatically variable among different human tissues and upregulated in multiple tumors, suggesting that c-Drosha plays a unique role in gene regulation. Our results reveal a new layer of regulation on the miRNA pathway and provide novel insights into the ever-evolving functions of Drosha. PMID:27471035

  19. Discover hidden splicing variations by mapping personal transcriptomes to personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Shayna; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Park, Juw Won; Xing, Yi

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq has become a popular technology for studying genetic variation of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Commonly used RNA-seq aligners rely on the consensus splice site dinucleotide motifs to map reads across splice junctions. Consequently, genomic variants that create novel splice site dinucleotides may produce splice junction RNA-seq reads that cannot be mapped to the reference genome. We developed and evaluated an approach to identify ‘hidden’ splicing variations in personal transcriptomes, by mapping personal RNA-seq data to personal genomes. Computational analysis and experimental validation indicate that this approach identifies personal specific splice junctions at a low false positive rate. Applying this approach to an RNA-seq data set of 75 individuals, we identified 506 personal specific splice junctions, among which 437 were novel splice junctions not documented in current human transcript annotations. 94 splice junctions had splice site SNPs associated with GWAS signals of human traits and diseases. These involve genes whose splicing variations have been implicated in diseases (such as OAS1), as well as novel associations between alternative splicing and diseases (such as ICA1). Collectively, our work demonstrates that the personal genome approach to RNA-seq read alignment enables the discovery of a large but previously unknown catalog of splicing variations in human populations. PMID:26578562

  20. Alu-Derived Alternative Splicing Events Specific to Macaca Lineages in CTSF Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Cho, Hyeon-Mu; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Lee, Youngjeon; Jin, Yeung Bae; Kang, Philyong; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin F, which is encoded by CTSF, is a cysteine proteinase ubiquitously expressed in several tissues. In a previous study, novel transcripts of the CTSF gene were identified in the crab-eating monkey deriving from the integration of an Alu element–AluYRa1. The occurrence of AluYRa1-derived alternative transcripts and the mechanism of exonization events in the CTSF gene of human, rhesus monkey, and crab-eating monkey were investigated using PCR and reverse transcription PCR on the genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from several tissues. Results demonstrated that AluYRa1 was only integrated into the genome of Macaca species and this lineage-specific integration led to exonization events by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Six transcript variants (V1–V6) were generated by alternative splicing (AS) events, including intron retention and alternative 5′ splice sites in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions of CTSF_AluYRa1. Among them, V3–V5 transcripts were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues of rhesus monkey and crab-eating monkey, whereas AluYRa1-exonized V1 was dominantly expressed in the testis of the crab-eating monkey, and V2 was only expressed in the testis of the two monkeys. These five transcript variants also had different amino acid sequences in the C-terminal region of CTSF, as compared to reference sequences. Thus, species-specific Alu-derived exonization by lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and AS events seems to have played an important role during primate evolution by producing transcript variants and gene diversification. PMID:28196413

  1. ALS-associated mutation FUS-R521C causes DNA damage and RNA splicing defects

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Haiyan; Lee, Sebum; Shang, Yulei; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Au, Kin Fai; Kamiya, Sherry; Barmada, Sami J.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Lui, Hansen; Carlton, Caitlin E.; Tang, Amy A.; Oldham, Michael C.; Wang, Hejia; Shorter, James; Filiano, Anthony J.; Roberson, Erik D.; Tourtellotte, Warren G.; Chen, Bin; Tsai, Li-Huei; Huang, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations of the RNA/DNA binding protein FUS are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS); however, it is not clear how FUS mutations cause neurodegeneration. Using transgenic mice expressing a common FALS-associated FUS mutation (FUS-R521C mice), we found that mutant FUS proteins formed a stable complex with WT FUS proteins and interfered with the normal interactions between FUS and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Consequently, FUS-R521C mice exhibited evidence of DNA damage as well as profound dendritic and synaptic phenotypes in brain and spinal cord. To provide insights into these defects, we screened neural genes for nucleotide oxidation and identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) as a target of FUS-R521C–associated DNA damage and RNA splicing defects in mice. Compared with WT FUS, mutant FUS-R521C proteins formed a more stable complex with Bdnf RNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Stabilization of the FUS/Bdnf RNA complex contributed to Bdnf splicing defects and impaired BDNF signaling through receptor TrkB. Exogenous BDNF only partially restored dendrite phenotype in FUS-R521C neurons, suggesting that BDNF-independent mechanisms may contribute to the defects in these neurons. Indeed, RNA-seq analyses of FUS-R521C spinal cords revealed additional transcription and splicing defects in genes that regulate dendritic growth and synaptic functions. Together, our results provide insight into how gain-of-function FUS mutations affect critical neuronal functions. PMID:24509083

  2. ALS-associated mutation FUS-R521C causes DNA damage and RNA splicing defects.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Haiyan; Lee, Sebum; Shang, Yulei; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Au, Kin Fai; Kamiya, Sherry; Barmada, Sami J; Finkbeiner, Steven; Lui, Hansen; Carlton, Caitlin E; Tang, Amy A; Oldham, Michael C; Wang, Hejia; Shorter, James; Filiano, Anthony J; Roberson, Erik D; Tourtellotte, Warren G; Chen, Bin; Tsai, Li-Huei; Huang, Eric J

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations of the RNA/DNA binding protein FUS are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS); however, it is not clear how FUS mutations cause neurodegeneration. Using transgenic mice expressing a common FALS-associated FUS mutation (FUS-R521C mice), we found that mutant FUS proteins formed a stable complex with WT FUS proteins and interfered with the normal interactions between FUS and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Consequently, FUS-R521C mice exhibited evidence of DNA damage as well as profound dendritic and synaptic phenotypes in brain and spinal cord. To provide insights into these defects, we screened neural genes for nucleotide oxidation and identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) as a target of FUS-R521C-associated DNA damage and RNA splicing defects in mice. Compared with WT FUS, mutant FUS-R521C proteins formed a more stable complex with Bdnf RNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Stabilization of the FUS/Bdnf RNA complex contributed to Bdnf splicing defects and impaired BDNF signaling through receptor TrkB. Exogenous BDNF only partially restored dendrite phenotype in FUS-R521C neurons, suggesting that BDNF-independent mechanisms may contribute to the defects in these neurons. Indeed, RNA-seq analyses of FUS-R521C spinal cords revealed additional transcription and splicing defects in genes that regulate dendritic growth and synaptic functions. Together, our results provide insight into how gain-of-function FUS mutations affect critical neuronal functions.

  3. Mutations in DSTYK and Dominant Urinary Tract Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Nees, Shannon N.; Perry, Brittany J.; Choi, Murim; Bodria, Monica; Liu, Yan; Weng, Patricia L.; Lozanovski, Vladimir J.; Verbitsky, Miguel; Lugani, Francesca; Sterken, Roel; Paragas, Neal; Caridi, Gianluca; Carrea, Alba; Dagnino, Monica; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Santamaria, Giuseppe; Murtas, Corrado; Ristoska-Bojkovska, Nadica; Izzi, Claudia; Kacak, Nilgun; Bianco, Beatrice; Giberti, Stefania; Gigante, Maddalena; Piaggio, Giorgio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Vukic, Durdica Kosuljandic; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Saraga, Marijan; Gucev, Zoran; Allegri, Landino; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Casu, Domenica; State, Matthew; Scolari, Francesco; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Al-Awqati, Qais; D'Agati, Vivette D.; Drummond, Iain A.; Tasic, Velibor; Lifton, Richard P.; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and the urinary tract are the most common cause of pediatric kidney failure. These disorders are highly heterogeneous, and the etiologic factors are poorly understood. METHODS We performed genomewide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in a family with an autosomal dominant form of congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract (seven affected family members). We also performed a sequence analysis in 311 unrelated patients, as well as histologic and functional studies. RESULTS Linkage analysis identified five regions of the genome that were shared among all affected family members. Exome sequencing identified a single, rare, deleterious variant within these linkage intervals, a heterozygous splice-site mutation in the dual serine–threonine and tyrosine protein kinase gene (DSTYK). This variant, which resulted in aberrant splicing of messenger RNA, was present in all affected family members. Additional, independent DSTYK mutations, including nonsense and splice-site mutations, were detected in 7 of 311 unrelated patients. DSTYK is highly expressed in the maturing epithelia of all major organs, localizing to cell membranes. Knockdown in zebrafish resulted in developmental defects in multiple organs, which suggested loss of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Consistent with this finding is the observation that DSTYK colocalizes with FGF receptors in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. DSTYK knockdown in human embryonic kidney cells inhibited FGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the principal signal downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. CONCLUSIONS We detected independent DSTYK mutations in 2